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B S C I Volume 27

Spring 2017

the newsletter of the m c whorter school of building science in the college of architecture, design and construction at auburn university

The distinguished and valiant life of

WWII VET AND BUILDING SCIENCE ALUM MALCOLM "BUCK" MARSH, JR.


BUILD YOUR FUTURE

at au b u r n u n i v e r s i t y

auburn.edu/cmcertificate

Pursue Graduate Executive Certificates in Construction Management CERTIFICATES OFFERED 1. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT: Estimating, Scheduling, Contracts & Law 2. TECHNICAL ISSUES: BIM, Electrical, Mechanical & Plumbing 3. INTEGRATED PROCESSES: Pre-construction, Project Management, Leadership

Two Courses x Two Semesters* = One Certificate

*One week residency per semester

McWHORTER SCHOOL OF BUILDING SCIENCE IN THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

Contact us at cadc.communications@auburn.edu or 1-334-844-4518. Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.


WE WANT YOUR FEEDBACK What do you think of the Quoin?

table of contents

P L E A S E TAK E A S H O RT S U R VEY AT: http://conta.cc/2kKc6MT

MESSAGE FROM SCHOOL HEAD

CADC

by the numbers

NOLAN STROM

NEW INNOVATIVE WAYS TO LOOK AT SOUTHERN CULTURE

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE OF CONSTRUCTION

SERVICE LEARNING AT MCWHORTER SCHOOL OF BUILDING SCIENCE

THE DISTINGUISHED AND VALIANT LIFE OF MALCOLM "BUCK" MARSH, JR., WWII VET AND BUILDING SCIENCE ALUM

BUILDING SCIENCE STUDENTS WIN INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

BUILDING SCIENCE

quoin

RANDY HALL JOINS THE CADC EXECUTIVE BOARD

ALAN BUGG, LES CARTER JEFFREY KIM, AND APRIL SIMONS

CAREER EXPO HOSTS RECORD NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS

SLC GOLF OUTING

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

editor ’s note

DONOR LISTS


me ssa g e f r o m

the school head

photography: Stephen DeVries

dr. richard burt S c h o o l H e a d & M cw h o r t e r E n d o w e d C h a i r

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elcome to the latest edition of Quoin. The fall Semester was another busy start to the academic year. For consecutive years we had new faculty start their academic careers at Auburn. In August we welcomed three new tenure-track faculty, Alan Bugg, Jeff Kim and April Simons, together with a senior lecturer, Les Carter. You will read about them in this issue of the Quoin. Earlier in the semester we learned of the passing of former department head, Paul Brandt, at the age of 93. Paul served as department head from 1968 until 1993. The program grew significantly under his leadership, and he leaves a meaningful legacy to construction education. For the third straight year we have seen our Fall undergraduate enrollment grow. We now have 539 undergraduate students in the program, and are fast approaching the levels of enrollment we had before the recession. This is good news for our con-

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struction industry recruiters who showed up in force for our Career Expo in October. A total of 85 companies came to recruit our students for either full time, internship, or co-op positions. Results from our student exit surveys show the graduates are getting jobs, and many are receiving mutiple written job offers. The Expo has always been a special event for me as I get to meet with former students and find out about how their lives and careers are progressing. I am also glad that you will have the chance to learn more about one of our earliest building construction graduates, Buck Marsh. I first learned about Buck through his daughter, Susan Marsh, who works for Auburn University. After learning that Buck was a WWII veteran and one of our early graduates, I scheduled a meeting and spent time with him learning about the early days of construction education and his experiences during the war. I am sure you will enjoy his story as much as I did.

Since coming to Auburn over eight years ago, I have endeavored to promote and support our participation in the various construction competitions both in the United States and abroad. Through the assistance of the College’s development team, we increased the interaction between our industry supporters and our teams in the run up to the regional competition. I recently attended the Associated Schools of Construction regional competitions held in Peachtree City. I was immensely proud of our teams and coaches, and for the first time ever, we won three of the four competitions. War Eagle!

Richard


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N E W G R A DUATE S TA RTS H IS OWN COM PA NY

Alumni Profile: Nolan Strom

“ The program boasts a wealth of industry experts. The professors are the streng th of the program. They helped shape me professionally, and the extent to which they made themselves available to me as a student spoke volumes about how passionate they were about their professions.”

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ewly-minted graduate (Spring 2016) Nolan Strom has worked in construction most of his life. As a youngster, he helped his dad, a carpenter, with projects in the house, build furniture, or go on jobs with him on weekends. When he was looking into programs at Auburn, Strom chose building science as a major “because it was a great fit.” The most exciting part of the building science program for him was the opportunity to use construction technology. “In construction information technology and advanced construction information technology, we used industry-standard software such as Revit, Navisworks, Primavera P6, Synchro, 3DS Max and many others. Throughout our course of study, we had several opportunities to practice using technology and present them before groups,” Strom added. According to Strom, there were many extracurricular activities offered by the program. “While I joined two honor societies, Phi Kappa Phi and Sigma Lambda Chi (SLC), SLC was my favorite,” says Strom. He served as vice president of SLC, led two volunteer projects, and ran the tutoring program for a semester. Strom was a member on two team competitions, the concrete team in October 2014, and an international team (that traveled to Dublin, Ireland) in November 2015. “The competition teams provided a special opportunity to learn directly from industry experts and to work on a project in a pressure-packed environment.”

Strom credits his internships with Applied Software (Atlanta) and Dilworth Development (Auburn) for providing him with valuable experience that ultimately helped him star t his own business after graduation. He is the owner of Whole Construction Solutions, a limited liability technology-focused company that provides customized solutions to each client based on their needs. “In a nutshell, my business is about connecting small and mid-size construction-related businesses with technology services or consulting that will help them deliver better projects.”

THE BIGGEST TRENDS IN BUILDING TODAY?

PHILOSOPHY THAT GUIDES HIS PROFESSIONAL LIFE? Work hard and treat people fairly and with respect.

WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT AUBURN AND THE UNIVERSITY? My classmates and professors made the experience something I will never forget!

“The biggest trend in b u il d in g i s te c h n o l o g y. D r o n e s a r e s t a r ti n g to make a huge impact in the way jobs are documented, inspected, and marketed...” — Nolan Strong

“The biggest trend in building is technology. Drones are star ting to make a huge impact in the way jobs are documented, inspected, and marketed; BIM is becoming an industry standard, and Virtual Reality and Lean Construction are making a huge difference in the industry. Many companies are bringing several kinds of expertise under one roof.”

ple a se send us your news

The McWhorter School of Building Science alumni are achieving great things professionally and personally. Please email cadc.communications@auburn. edu with your news. Send us news and photos of your professional successes (promotions, awards, etc.) and personal news (marriage, births, personal accomplishments, etc.), and we will include it in the next issue of the Quion.


N E W IN NOVATIV E WAYS TO LOOK AT SOUTH ERN CU LTU RE

Center for Construction, Innovation and Collaboration

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sociate Professor Junshan Liu (BSCI) and Assistant Professor Danielle Willkens (APLA) presented their project, Research, Representation, & Recovery: New Uses of 3D Scanning in the Built Environment, at Auburn University’s annual faculty symposium, This is Research, to promote connections among researchers and creative scholars. The scanning project is funded by a SEED grant from the College of Architecture, Design and Construction, and grants from the Center for Construction, Innovation and Collaboration (CCIC). CCIC’s mision is based on the need to encourage cuttingedge research that enriches the programs and support the best practices of the evolving industry. The current venture by Liu and Willkens enumerates several research projects under way that use 3-D scanning to capture details of large buildings, intricate façade details, treasured sites and landscapes, recording for posterity. Three Dimensional LiDAR scanning and photogrammetry result in a composite picture derived from several millions, or even hundreds of millions of data points that are captured or generated to provide a precise 3-Dimensional point cloud. These point clouds can be used directly for measurement and visualization in the architectural and construction world. In 2011, Professors Liu and Charlene LeBlue (APLA) began a research and survey project at Fort Gaines and Mobile Bay. The Civil War Battle site found itself in an unfortunate position on the National Trust for Historic site’s list of America’s Most Endangered Historical Places. 3-D LiDAR scanning was seen as the perfect way to capture the deteriorating fort. In 2015, when anthropologists from the University of North Carolina 6

in Greensboro were looking for a non-invasive way to study possible excavation sites in the Great Divide Basin of Wyoming’s Red Desert, Liu suggested 3-D LiDAR scanning. By far the largest project has been the capture of sites connected to Rural Studio in its new home in Newbern, Alabama. Rural studio, which serves Alabama’s rural population, originally operated in Greensboro. For more than 23 years, with more than 150 built projects and 600 associated alumni, it has brought thoughtful, integrated design practices to remote rural areas of Alabama. According to Liu and Wilkens, the distant and sometimes isolated works of the Rural Studio means that many people interested in exploring the projects and learn from them can only do so remotely. “In order to add to the documenting records and potential analyses of Rural Studio’s 21st century approach to the vernacular, particularly their work in Hale County, the capturing cloud project is underway to record a phased 3-D point clouds as well as aerial and panoramic photographs,” says Willkens. “Together, these forms of digital documentation will be used to map a concentration of Rural Studio’s projects and adjacent sites in Newbern.” During the course of several site visits between fall 2015 and summer 2016, 57 scan stations were captured using a Leica ScanStation C10 HD scanner. This scanner captured point cloud data and raw photographs to record the site’s geographical and colored data. Nearly 4,000 drone footage and high resolution DSLR photos were also used to bolster the detail of documentation. With


such a large scanning region, approximately of a mile long and 500 feet wide in some areas, a Leica GS14 GPS unit was also used to accurately geo-register the point clouds. The total amount of point cloud data of this project ended up with about 28GB. Some of the data has been published online and can been through this link: http://www.profliu.com/#!rural-studio-project Despite the growing number of 3-D scanning projects underway internationally, the primary commonality between the vast majority of this digital documentation, design for renovation and dissemination projects is that they record recognized and often protected objects and sites. “Our project is interested in documenting sites, disseminating and sharing the works of Rural Studio with the larger audience, but also with documenting examples of the American vernacular,” says Willkens. According to Liu and Willkens, the ongoing project leverages several unique aspects of AU’s academic profile. Building upon the documentary style that photojournalist Walker Evans used in his visits to Hale County in 1936 and 1973, the capturing cloud project focuses on recording work outside the established canon of architectural record, and thereby affords architects, builders and historians several new, measured as-built drawings that are complete with color and material data. “The working methods, original research and resulting graphics of the ongoing capturing cloud project not only present ways of using sophisticated technology, for recording aspects of Rural South’s historic and contemporary architectural fabric, but the project also aspires to facilitate new post occupancy studies,” adds Willkens.

Associate Professor Junshan Liu (BSCI) and Assistant Professor Danielle Willkens (APLA) presented their project, Research, Representation, & Recovery: New Uses of 3D Scanning in the Built Environment, at Auburn University’s annual faculty symposium.

“Our project is interested in documenting sites, disseminating and sharing the works of Rural Studio with the larger audience, but also with documenting examples of the American vernacular.” Danielle Willkens

“This project, which was supported by the CCIC, is part of an important collective effort in research involving high definition LiDAR scanning,” said Paul Holley, CCIC director and Wilborn Endowed Professor for Senior Faculty. “The technology is becoming more and more commonplace in the industry, and our College has a proven track record of investigating new ways to employ it in relevant industry applications. The CCIC continues to underwrite research efforts in HD scanning, photogrammetry, unmanned aerial systems, and related technologies in an effort to provide meaningful findings for industry and to inform future investigations.” This is Research symposium was sponsored by the Vice President for Research & Economic Development. It is a program that invites faculty to create an environment that promotes innovation and builds knowledge, contributing in important and tangible ways to economic development and advancement of society.

“ Together, these forms of digital documentation will be used to map a concentration of Rural Studio’s projects and adjacent sites in Newbern.” Danielle Willkens 7


IN V ES TING IN TH E FUTU RE OF CONS TRUC TION Office of Development

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he McWhorter School of Building Science students have been successful in competitions for more than 10 years. Students and faculty coaches spend weeks preparing for competitions. “Our success in these competitions is a testament to the students’ commitment, competitiveness, and preparation through the BSCI curriculum,” says Professor Paul Holley. Participating in team competitions can be expensive, and the McWhorter School is very thankful to have supporters who see the value of this endeavor. “We are very thankful for our sponsors. Their generosity helps to cover travel costs, equipment expenses and other needs associated with the competition teams,” shares Evan Thomas, CADC Development Associate. “The competition team sponsors are investing in the future of the construction workforce and supporting experiences that will build a well-rounded professional. It is a win-win for all.” “EMJ is honored to sponsor Auburn’s ASC team, as we believe these students are the next generation of construction thought leaders and innovators,” said Burt Odom, CEO & President of EMJ Corporation, and an Auburn alum. “This investment is returned tenfold as these students enter the workforce with fresh ideas and initiative to allow our industry to continue to grow and improve.”

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IN 2016 OUR STUDENTS PLACED FIRST OR SECOND IN FIVE OF THE SEVEN COMPETITIONS ENTERED: ASC REGION 2/ CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION – FIRST PLACE ASC REGION 2/ HEAVY CIVIL CONSTRUCTION – FIRST PLACE ASC REGION 2/ COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION – FIRST PLACE ASC REGION 2/ DESIGN BUILD (WITH TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY) ASC REGION 8: AU/BIRMINGHAM CITY UNIVERSITY – FIRST PLACE ASC REGION 8: AU/LIVERPOOL JOHN MOORES UNIVERSITY – SECOND PLACE ABC STUDENT CHAPTER CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COMPETITION

WE LOOK FORWARD TO GREAT COMPETITIONS IN SPRING 2017: • ROOFING INDUSTRY ALLIANCE'S CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT STUDENT COMPETITION • ASC REGION 6/7 COMPETITION


2016-2017 SPONSORS SIGNATURE ($10,000) EMJ CONSTRUCTION

PLATINUM ($5,000) ROBINS AND MORTON

GOLD ($2,500) HOAR CONSTRUCTION HOLDER CONSTRUCTION JE DUNN CONSTRUCTION EVERGREEN CONSTRUCTION DAVE KNECHT HOMES LLC BATSON-COOK BRASFIELD & GORRIE GENERAL CONTRACTORS

SILVER ($1,000) DPR CONSTRUCTION GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION WHITE-SPUNNER CONSTRUCTION

BRONZE ($500) CHOATE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

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SERV ICE LE A RN I NG Student News

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ervice Learning at the McWhorter School of Building Science is an instructional strategy that has had a positive impact on the community. An educational approach designed to enhance academic and social learning, service learning takes classroom research and curriculum and introduces those theories into real life services that directly connect to community needs. A project is usually in a group setting, where the outcome is the personal growth and interpersonal skills of the participants. Building Science students have undertaken several projects ranging in scope from big studies to full-scale design build. Clients have included non-profit agencies such as rural churches ministries, state agencies and the AU Alumni Center. THE SANI FREEZE PROJECT

One venture completed at the start of the 2016 football season was the Sani Freeze project. The Auburn Alumni Association, in partnership with the McWhorter School of Building Science, recreated the Sani-Freeze, an Auburn landmark, on the front patio of the Auburn Alumni Center on College Street. The Sani-Freeze was a well-known local walk-up eatery that closed in 1993. “The Flush” as it was popularly known (the Doll House before that), was famous for ice cream treats. The purpose of this assignment was to build a historically accurate representation of the ice cream shop for display at the Alumni Center. During the 2016 football season, the Alumni Hospitality Tailgate, in partnership with O-Town Ice Cream, served sweet treats to alumni and fans starting three hours before kickoff.

Tanner Case THE ALABAMA RURAL MINISTRY

THE ALABAMA RURAL MINISTRY

The community service project for spring 2016 helped the Alabama Rural Ministry. An 18-foot wide trench outside the church made it inconvenient for workers and considered dangerous to maneuver heavy equipment. The team constructed a bridge to overcome this obstruction. Prior class exercises helped with calculating deflection, and allowable stress to apply the right supports and sizes to the bridge. Students involved in the project were, Shawn Blakely, Patrick Collins, Frank Daniel, Sam Edwards, Joe Jorgensen, John McCleskey, Gray “Gary” Rochester, Hunter Whitten and Pat Williamson. “It was an opportunity to contribute to the Opelika community in a positive way,” said McClesky. “The project helped me grow not only as a future project manager, but also as a leader,” said Whitten. “I gained invaluable experience dealing with suppliers and owners.”

The class of 2018, whose members included Daniel Graveman, Peter Sullivan, Conner Wilson, Brady Ray, Matthew Barnett, Robert Byrne, Scott Andrews, Trew Lowery and Will Caldwell, built structures for My Jerusalem, a Way 2 Serve service ministry located in Opelika, Alabama. My Jerusalem is a group of people who provide outreach and home repair in the form of charity construction projects for people who cannot afford it themselves and are in need. The students built ramps, decks and other essential building components for individuals.

Students Clayton Carter, Sam Davis, Turner Easterbrook, Travis Eubanks, Drew Herndon, Sam Hoza, Joseph Humber, Jordan Lake, Coleman Lay, and Jackson Schnell built a Utility shed for the Alabama Rural Ministry. The structure, built on-site, on top of a pre-existing slab in the courtyard of Tuskegee’s First United Methodist Church, was to house the Ministry’s equipment in a locked space, out of the elements, and easily accessible for staff and volunteers to use when needed. “The project helped me harness my skills in 3D modeling.”

The Sani Freeze project under Professor Mike Hosey’s direction included students Jamie Andrews, Drew Bolton, Colby Brasher, Eric Lynn (Foreman), Tanner Mayfield (Foreman), Jason McCay, Andrew McCrory, Hannah Redifer, and John Shreve. “Many of us had no prior experience with building a structure,” said Hannah Redifer. “The whole process was a huge learning experience. Teamwork allowed the project to run smoothly despite many issues. In the end, seeing the public's reaction to the project was extremely rewarding. It is so great to be able to help re-create a piece Auburn's history.”

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“This community service project taught me more than I anticipated. We learned cost of material, estimating, design, and most importantly, how to work together.”


THE TUSKEGEE NATIONAL FOREST

The Tuskegee National Forest includes several hiking trails for visitors. Many of these paths have kiosks at the trail heads to display park rules, ranger contact information, warnings, and maps. The Park Service rangers contacted the school to replace (missing or damaged) kiosks. Participating in this exercise were Mitchell Beers, Tanner Case, McKelvy Douthit, Alex Funck, Neil Jesse, Richard King, Reeves Moore, Zach Schroeder, George Wolfe, Mac Warren, and Allen Wood. “This community service project taught me more than I anticipated. We learned cost of material, estimating, design, and most importantly, how to work together,” said Tanner Case. Another project for Tuskegee National Forest included replacing trail parking bumpers and restoring benches for the Bartram Trail, ensuring a long life span for the restored bumpers and benches. Team members rebuilding benches included, Paxton DeLamar, John Stephens, Erin Allee, Sarah Hoffman, Mitchell Davis, Jackson Harmening, Tad Kederick, Sam Hausler, Skylar Sexton, and Tyler Bush. While one team rebuilt benches, a second team of students was responsible for installing new parking bumpers at the Tuskegee National Forest. Taylor Drake, John Duncan, Trey Finlen, Camden Fuller, Greg Giraud, Drew Holmes, Daniel Meadows and Max White replaced damaged parking bumpers near the ranger station. They also replaced existing bumpers with new bumper stoppers. “This project showed me how important scheduling and estimating were for project efficiency and delivering on time,” said Max White. BOY SCOUTS

Several students built decks for the Boy Scouts at the Auburn United Methodist Church. Students on the project included Andrew Durbin, Charlie Goodfellow, Matthew Gean, Chase Merrill, Patrick Morton, Joseph Passantino, Taylor Stubbs, Jake Thompson, Hayden Tilley, and Austin Turner.

“The project helped me grow not only as a future project manager, but also as a leader.” Hunter Whitten

“This project showed me how important scheduling and estimating were for project efficiency and delivering on time.” Max White


The distinguished and valiant life of

WWII VET AND BUILDING SCIENCE ALUMNUS MALCOLM “BUCK” MARSH, JR. Alumni Profile

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ovies, documentaries, and history books recount the saga of World War II, giving us a glimpse of a soldier’s life in the trenches. One of the decisive battles fought in the European theater during World War II was the Battle of the Bulge, which prompted British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to say that it was the greatest American battle of the war and would be regarded as an ever-famous American victory. It was in this harrowing battle that Sergeant Malcolm “Buck” Marsh, Jr. would fight on the American side, and return triumphantly to U.S. and begin the next phase of his illustrious life. A native of Florence, Ala., Marsh began his education in 1940 in electrical engineering at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute (TPI, now Tennessee Tech. University). In 1942, he enrolled in a new program at TPI—the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP)—which included infantry basic training for four months and then study at an engineering school in preparation for becom-

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ing a lieutenant in Army Engineers. But America’s entry into World War II interrupted these plans. Deployment orders for Marsh’s contingent came while they were in school at St. John’s University in New York after basic training. He was sent to join Company A of the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment, and on December 29, 1944, he officially entered the “bloodiest U.S. battle of World War II.” Marsh was forced to defer his college plans until after the war. “When I returned after the war, my wounded knee entitled me to enter an educational program,” said Marsh. After being tested and counseled for three days on his return in February 1946, the army recommended that he study architecture. “TPI did not have a school of architecture, so I had to look elsewhere,” he added. Marsh decided to follow his uncle who had graduated from Alabama Polytechnic Institute (API) with a degree in Architecture in 1928. He joined seven of his friends to start architecture studies at API. After a brief term at the University of Northern Alabama, studying


For his heroic efforts during the war, Marsh was awarded the Purple Heart, and battle stars for the Battle of the Bulge, Rhineland and Central Germany.

chemistry and physics, Marsh started school in API in 1946. “After my first quarter in architecture, Dean Turpin Bannister recommended that my bountiful energy would be best suited for another curriculum, a new program, Building Construction.” “Classes were held at Dudley Hall location, which in those days consisted of several wooden buildings with black tar paper siding. Some classes were also held in Biggin Hall. Since I was allowed to transfer credits from TPI, I graduated in two and a half years. We had wonderful teachers in the program. Frank Orr, who taught us structures, design and strength of materials, had become dean when I graduated.” On graduating, Marsh worked for a small contractor in Florence, Ala. After a few years, he started his own company custom building houses designed by his architect friends. In 1970, Marsh moved to Auburn to work for Burns, Kirkley, and Williams. “In 1972, CRS (Caudill Rowlett Scott), an architecture

company in Austin, Texas, contacted us to build Opelika High School. CRS, at that time, was a front runner in construction management (CM) and created CRSCM.” As an on-site manager for the project, Marsh was offered the first Construction Management job in the Southeast.

“We had wonderful teachers in the program. Frank Orr, who taught us structures, design and strength of materials, had become dean when I graduated.” Malcolm Marsh, Jr. 13


Marsh launched his own construction management company in 1978, and built the Helen Keller Hospital in Tuscumbia. In 1990, Marsh met Charles White, of White Construction Company, who had offices in Austin, Texas, and Jackson, Miss. “They wanted a presence in Alabama and bought my company,” added Marsh. “White was a leader in design-build project delivery. I went to work for them initially for five years and retired seventeen years later! We had a wonderful opportunity for design-build, utilizing it to build many projects from 1990 until 2008 when I retired.”

team, consisting of contractors for mechanical, electrical, precast concrete, equipment and security electronics. My philosophy in building was, first and foremost, to impress on all contractors that we were a team, depending on each other to perform quality workmanship whereby all crafts could interface in a quality manner creating a smooth and timely construction process. This usually resulted in a profitable project for all concerned. We undertook projects in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas.”

“Design-Build was fairly new and we had to have a trustworthy

“When we started building Opelika school, we introduced the expression fast-track. We did schedules, called critical path. We had to have a good handle on the budget without exceeding the estimate. Modern day building construction has evolved since then. Communications and electronic devices have expedited tasks in the industry.” Marsh was inducted to the IOTA Chapter of Sigma Lambda Chi on November 24, 1975. He continued his contact with Auburn as an adjunct professor of construction management from 1978 to 1980. “I enjoyed teaching ‘building science’ seniors on Tuesday and Thursday nights, but the rigors of my business and projects prevented me from continuing the assignment beyond three years.”

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No narrative about Malcolm “Buck” Marsh Jr., is complete without mention of his early years in the army. He saw his first combat action at the Battle of the Bulge, the largest and bloodiest battle fought by the United States in World War II. during combat and eventually rose to the rank of 1st sergeant. For his heroic efforts during the war, Marsh was awarded the Purple Heart, and battle stars for the Battle of the Bulge, Rhineland and Central Germany. After the war, he stayed in Europe as part of the army of occupation and returned home in January 1946. Marsh was named honorary command sergeant major of the 36th Army Infantry Regiment in 1999. He and his wife Wanda traveled to Germany to receive the award and visit some of the battle sites in Belgium. “There was one time when I couldn’t walk up a hill when memories came rushing back. Emotions welled up and it was difficult for me to continue.” Marsh said that talking about his war experience to his Auburn University Phi Delta Theta brothers as well as to his biological ones helped him cope with the traumatic experiences he had during the war. “It kept me from internalizing my experience,” he added. “I always told my students to strongly consider the firm where they would be working, because it was important to enjoy going to work every day. I asked them to try to develop a rapport with fellow employees and to not become loners if they wanted to advance to supervisory positions; to become familiar with architecture/ engineering documents to the extent they were knowledgeable of the interfacing of each phase as it related to a quality finished project,” Marsh added. Marsh has served on Phi Delta Theta’s House Corporation Board since 1973, including being the Board’s President from 1975–1989. He was named the chapter’s Alum of the Year in 2008 at the 2nd Annual Alumni Reunion Weekend in November 2008. No narrative about Malcolm “Buck” Marsh Jr., is complete without mention of his early years in the army. He saw his first combat action at the Battle of the Bulge, the largest and bloodiest battle fought by the United States in World War II. But the war did not end for Marsh after the Bulge. Together with his company, he had to cross the Rhine, aid in the capture of Cologne, and free a prison camp in Nordhausen, Germany. It is recounted in detail in his memoir (published in 2011), Reflections of a World War II Infantryman, a historic account of his preparation and participation in the war. Entering “A” Company as a PFC, Marsh became a squad leader

Marsh was one of the veterans featured in the documentary: WWII: Alabama Remembers presented by the Alabama Public Television

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STUDENTS WIN INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

Undergraduate Programs

“I would attribute the win to the hard work put in by the students to fully understand the project at hand, the development of a winning strategy, and the opportunity we had to visit with contractors in the UK prior From left to right:

Collins, Chaplow, Roberts, Tyson, Spencer, and Kilby.

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he annual highlight of the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) Region 8, is the International Student Competition, which was held on November 17-18, 2016, at the University of Reading (UR), England. Of the nine student teams from the United States and Europe that participated, two groups of senior students from the McWhorter School of Building Science finished first and second in the competition. A joint team coached by Professor Wes Collins included AU’s Nick Chaplow and Reed Spencer along with Matt Roberts and Jack Tyson from Birmingham City University which won first place in the competition. Professor Angela Kilby from BCU was co-coach.

to the competition.” Wes Collins this understanding was a big help. Auburn has been successful in this competition, with a first place finish two years ago, a second place finish last year, and first and second place finishes this year,” he added. The ASC is the professional association for the development and advancement of construction education, where the sharing of ideas and knowledge inspires, guides and promotes excellence in curricula, teaching, research and service.

The second joint team coached by Professor Eric Wetzel involved Brody Keel and Randy Morris from Auburn and James Cairns and Chris Bennett from Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU). Professor Fiona Borthwick was the co-coach from LJMU. The competition was based on one of University of Reading’s recent infrastructure investments and focused primarily on scheduling and cost control. This year’s real-life project was from Multiplex, a global contracting and development company. The project used for the competition was a student housing project on the UR campus called the “Bridges Hall Redevelopment”. “I would attribute the win to the hard work put in by the students to fully understand the project at hand, the development of a winning strategy, and the opportunity we had to visit with contractors in the UK prior to the competition,” said Collins. “Although Construction work is similar between the U.S. and UK, there are some distinct differences that are important to understand when participating in an international competition. Gaining 16

Brody Keel, Randy Morris, James Cairns and Chris Bennett


IAC HIGHLIGHT

Randy Hall joins CADC Executive Board

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Millbrook native, Auburn alumnus Randy Hall entered the construction industry after completing a degree in Civil Engineering in 1986. Growing up, Hall had a passion for working outdoors and for math. He resolved that civil engineering would be a good fit for him and decided to check into the program in Auburn. “I had loved Auburn throughout my childhood, and I knew AU had an exceptional engineering program, and it also offered a cooperative program that would enable me to put myself through school.” Hall credits AU’s co-op program with presenting him the opportunity to alternate between taking school one term and working at a large commercial construction company the next. “It was my co-op experience that created in me a love for construction, and I decided to make it my career. As a co-op student, I was assigned to a variety of projects, including the Tennessee Valley Authority and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base where I worked both in the office and the field. This invaluable hands-on experience also helped me earn money for tuition and other expenses.” Upon graduation, Hall accepted a job as an office engineer with J.A. Jones in Atlanta, where his first assignment was an 8-floor vertical expansion of the then 8-story Atlanta Apparel Mart. In 1997, he joined Batson-Cook as a project manager. He served as senior vice-president/general manager of both the West Point and Atlanta offices before becoming president in 2012, and added the responsibilities of CEO a year later. According to Hall, the greatest change he has seen in the construction industry is the introduction of technology to both office and field operations. “The software and programs now available enables us to manage projects more effectively and estimate more efficiently. We can build the project virtually before we turn the first shovel of dirt, which yields savings in time and costs. The trend toward more diversity in the construction workforce and to prefabrication and modularization are the other notable trends right now, and each will benefit industry productivity tremendously and help alleviate our current labor shortage,” he added. “For the generation now entering the construction industry, technology is second nature. They are well equipped and are poised to lead the way in the prefabrication and modularization of building components into robotic application. The techniques, already advancing at a rapid pace, will improve overall productivity in construction by having a positive impact on safety, schedules, costs, quality and waste reduction. “When I began my career in the 1980s, everything was a hard bid. The low bid won, and everyone basically fought their way through the construction process. Today, the collaboration among project stakeholders—owners, designers, contractors and trade partners—as we work together through the design process is extremely efficient. We are able to manage costs and establish the price as we move forward.

In June 2016, Hall began his one-year term as president of the Associated General Contractors of Georgia (AGC). AGC which represents 525 companies, offers a full menu of member services—advocacy, workforce development, safety, education, youth leadership, among others. As president, he will represent Georgia’s construction industry, which includes general contractors, residential/light commercial builders, construction managers, design-build firms, municipal utility contractors, heavy and highway contractors, specialty contractors, and industry service providers and suppliers. Hall is the newest member on the CADC Executive Board, whose term began in October 2016. The Board, which was established in 2000, meets twice a year and is made up of leaders in the field. Its mission is to maintain and enhance the college’s reputation and strengths, and to represent the disciplines of architecture, design and construction as initiatives for CADC in particular, and Auburn as a whole. “CADC is consistently ranked among the Top 10 in the country,” Hall said. “I look forward to keeping the CADC at Auburn at least as strong, if not stronger than it is now. The program feeds new talent into our industry, so seeing to its advancement will be of utmost importance and quite rewarding. I have been a die-hard Auburn fan for most of my life, and I am honored to play a role in shaping and securing its future.”

“I had loved Auburn throughout my childhood, and I knew AU had an exceptional engineering program, and it also offered a cooperative program that would enable me to put myself through school.” Randy Hall 17


FAC U LT Y N E W S

Alan Bugg, Les Carter. Jeffrey Kim, and April Simons WHEN STUDENTS IN THE MCWHORTER SCHOOL OF BUILDING SCIENCE RETURNED TO CLASSES IN THE FALL SEMESTER THEY WERE INTRODUCED TO NEW FACULTY:

Alan Bugg Wadley native, Alan Bugg, is a new assistant professor who taught Construction Safety and Structures III (concrete) this fall. The Auburn alumnus graduated with three degrees from Auburn University: a bachelor’s in agricultural engineering in 1982, an MBA in 2003, and a master of building construction in 2011. His first job was with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in a construction office working on the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. “Almost immediately, I knew I would make construction management my career. After working for 33 years for USACE in construction management, I wanted to share my experiences with the next generation of construction professionals,” said Bugg. “I enjoy overcoming the unique challenges each project presents,” said Bugg. “As I progressed in my career, I made it my mission to share my passion for the construction industry by mentoring and developing young construction professionals.

Les Carter Les Carter joined the BSCI program as Senior Lecturer in fall. With a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Auburn, the Florida native went to work for Exxon after graduation in 1980. He retired this summer with over 35 years with the company, finalizing his career with an assignment in Abu Dhabi, UAE. “As retirement was imminent, I wanted to be able to give back to the Auburn family,” says Carter. “I love Auburn and the Auburn family has meant the world to me. I had the opportunity to teach in the ExxonMobil system in my mid-career years and enjoyed it. Since most of my career with ExxonMobil was in construction and project management, teaching in the building science program was a natural fit. The Building Science program considered my application to teach.” Carter is teaching Introduction to Construction, Structures I and Advanced Construction Communication. PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING

PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING “I endeavor to inspire my students to pursue lifelong learning, a philosophy that was instilled in me at an early age by my parents and grandparents. Just as importantly, I strive to develop the leadership, critical thinking, and relationship skills required to be truly successful in their chosen career and in life. My passion for the industry and desire to give back to the profession are the basis of my teaching philosophy. “I want to give our students the tools to be successful construction managers. There is currently a shortage of skilled construction managers in the industry. I believe that it is important for faculty members to have a good mix of academic training and practical work experience. This allows them to demonstrate how the application of classroom principles can be used to solve real-world problems.”

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“I love interacting with the students and would say my approach is an ‘active teach/active learn’ philosophy. I would love for the students to have a passion for life-long learning. As the students enter their future careers, learning is going to be the key to their future success.”


Jeffrey Kim Assistant Professor Jeff Kim graduated from Auburn with an undergraduate degree in Building Science in 1994, and went on to receive his master’s from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Building Construction and Facility Management in 2016. A veteran in the commercial construction industry, Kim is not new to teaching. “In the industry, I was often called upon to teach fellow associates, partners and clients about construction and through these experiences I found a passion for teaching,” says Kim. “I cultivated some of this enthusiasm by involving myself in volunteer organizations such as ACE Mentor Program of America, Inc. (Architecture, Construction, Engineering program for high school students), CEFGA (Construction Education Foundation of Georgia) and SkillsUSA-Career Skills Education Program.” He currently teaches Project Controls II and Construction Information Technology, and will teach Contracting Business in spring. “I incorporate technology in the classroom because I want my students to expand their technology literacy. I want to guide the next generation of construction management professionals to be practical problem solvers, effective decision makers, good communicators and most of all, I want them to have fun learning more about what interests them most,” says Kim. PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING “My objective is to prepare young professionals with a comprehension of the business while imparting a readiness in them to improve it. In order for the industry to change, I believe that students need to be encouraged to become independent thinkers, willing to break from the norm and explore new ways of approaching reoccurring problems. “I’m encouraged by the enthusiasm that students bring to the classroom, and I’d like to match their enthusiasm with mine about the industry. I hope to be a small part of their success as they become the next great builders of the future.”

April Simons Flomaton, Alabama, native April Simons graduated with both a bachelor’s (2009) and a master’s (2013) degree in Civil Engineering from Auburn University. Simons’ father owned and operated a construction company that erected new buildings and renovated old ones. “I was able to see every aspect of the business from an early age. Being exposed to client meetings, plan reviews, bids, scheduling, and construction was exciting for me so I knew my future career would be construction-based. I chose to major in civil engineering to give myself the versatility to switch between design and field functions within the industry.” “Although my experience and passion lies in construction management,” says Simons, “teaching has been a long-term goal of mine. I spent more than five years working as a project engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Fort Benning, in Georgia. I was responsible for structural and architectural design review, estimating and negotiating new projects and change orders, reviewing and approving project schedules, and overall project management for a variety of construction projects. “The Building Science Program offers a great foundation for graduates and equips them with skills they need for successful careers,” says Simons. She taught Structures for Builders III: Soils and Concrete, and Structures III for Architects in the fall, and will teach Structures for Builders II: Wood and Steel in the spring. PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING “The construction industry is constantly evolving and a commitment to lifelong learning is essential to be truly effective. I strive to recognize the various industry experience among students and relate this into class discussion as much as possible. “I want my students to not only learn and understand the established learning principles set forth in my classes, but also to relate these principles to practical applications. The inclusion of a weekly field lab exercise, in Structures II and III, helps relate hands-on exercises to class discussions. I hope that students gain the confidence and knowledge they need to tackle the structural problems they face during their careers.” 19


C A R EER E X P O

Career Expo Hosts Record Number of Employers

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strong market brought 85 employers to the McWhorter School Fall 2016 Career Fair on Wednesday, October 5. Our students enjoyed from 100 percent job placement at the time of graduation since Spring 2016.

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AU Facilities A West Enterprise, LLC Ajax Building Corporation Alabama Rural Ministry Amec Foster Wheeler America's Home Place Anning-Johnson Co. Austin Commercial Balfour Beatty Construction Barton Malow Company Batson-Cook Construction BL Harbert Intern, LLC Brasfield & Gorrie, LLC Broadmoor, LLC Caddell Construction

Carroll Daniel Construction Co. CBG Building Company Century Construction & Realty Charles Perry Partners, Inc. Choate Construction Co. Clark Construction Co. ClayCo Construction Clifton Construction Construction Enterprises, Inc. D.R.Horton Davis Development, Inc. DeAngelis Diamond Construction Doster Construction DPR Construction Edward Andrews Homes

EMJ Construction Evergreen Construction FinFrock Flintco Gilbane Building Co. Golden Construction, LLC Haskell Hensel Phelps Construction Co. Hill & Wilkinson GC HITT Hoar Construction Hodges & Hicks GC, LLC Hogan Construction Group, LLC Holder Construction Hunt Construction Group


TO PARTICIPATE IN THE NEXT CAREER FAIR

C O N TA C T

Inglett &Stubbs, LLC Integra Construction JE Dunn Construction JES Holdings Juneau Construction Co. Kevin Price Construction Kiewit Linbeck Group, LLC M.J. Harris Construction Services, LLC Mill Creek Construction McCarthy Building Companies McShane Construction Co., AU McKenneys, Inc. MetroPower, Inc. Nabholz Construction Services

Nucor Building Group/ American Bldgs. Co. New South Construction Co., Inc PCL Construction Services, Inc Performance Contracting Group Pulte Group RA-LIN & Associates, Inc. Robins & Morton Rogers-O’Brien Construction Ruppert Landscape Samet Corporation Signal Energy Constructors Superior Construction Steel Fab, Inc. T.W. Frierson Contractor, Inc.

The Conlan Company The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. Thyssenkrupp Elevator Trio Electric LLC Turner Construction Co. TIC-The Industrial Co. United Rentals, Inc. White-Spunner Construction, INC Winter Construction WSE Builders LLC Yates

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E V EN T S

SLC Golf Outing 2016

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he IOTA Chapter of Sigma Lambda Chi (SLX) hosted their annual Golf Outing on October 4, 2016, at the Auburn University Club. The event supports the Building Science Program, and the

proceeds provide opportunities to award scholarships, personal protection equipment for students and SLX activities throughout the year. “This is a special year for the IOTA chapter as it completes 50 years since the first induction in 1966,” said Keith Rahn, assistant professor in charge of the event.

The golf outing was held in conjunction with the 2016 Fall BSCI Career Expo. More than 130 participated in the event last year,” Rahn added.

“The event is a great time to meet students, connect with faculty and reconnect with fellow alums and industry leaders.” Keith Rahn

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WO M EN I N CO N S T R U C TI O N

A Welcoming and Networking Luncheon

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uburn University and Tuskeegee University female construction students, as well as Auburn Building Science alumnae were invited to enjoy networking and a panel presentation at a luncheon sponsored by Skanska in October.

We envision this as the first of our activities designed to connect with more than 200 alumnae to network, share ideas, an increase recruitment and retention of women in construction.

THIS EVENT WAS SPONSORED BY

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According to the National Association of Women in Construction, construction related jobs account for approximately 66 percent of all jobs in the United States. As of 2006, the construction work force consisted of 90.4 percent men and 9.6 percent women. With women projected to account for 51 percent of the increase in total labor force growth from 2008-2018, women in the construction industry need to work together to increase the number of women entering the industry and to support the women already in it.

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MCWHORTER SCHOOL DONORS

Office of Development

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lumni, friends, and corporate partners have committed nearly $6 million to benefit students, faculty, and programs of the McWhorter School of Building Science as part of Because This is Auburn — A Campaign for Auburn University, a $1 billion fundraising effort. As a result of their giving so far, 20 new endowed scholarships have been established in Building Science and we received programmatic support for areas of greatest opportunity. Four new professorship endowments have been created and more than $723,000 committed to establish endowed funds for excellence. Private support from alumni, friends, and corporate partners empowers the McWhorter School of Building Science to transcend the limitations of state funding and ensures our programs are at the forefront of construction education, outreach, and research. We are grateful to the following donors whose outright, pledged and/or estate gifts of $1,000 and greater from April 1, 2008 to Dec. 31, 2016, are creating a strong future for Building Science. Because This is Auburn concludes Dec. 31, 2017.

$2,000,000 - $500,000 •

M. James '84 and Alison Mobley Gorrie '84 • William Earl Kessler '82 • Wade Jeffress ‘83 and Ann D. White

$499,999 - $100,000 Atlanta Auburn Building Science Alumni Committee • Comer Foundation • Fulcrum Construction • M. Miller '57 and Frances Gorrie Hoar Construction Inc • Huff Homes, Inc and Brandon '90 and Heather Huff • William A. '55 and Ann Hunt • James Cleve ‘81 and Jane Loman • William Reed McMahon, Jr. '88 • •

$99,999 - $50,000 Alabama Associated General Contractors • Brasfield & Gorrie LLC • The Clement Group LLC Daniel Foundation of Alabama • Cliff ’87 and Amy ’89 Darloy • B L Harbert International LLC • The Stone Family Foundation • Bill Wayne Young ‘62 • •

$49,999 - $25,000 Benning Construction Company • James Robert Dugan Jr. ‘79 • Harold E. ‘72 and Patricia S. Hebson • J. Michael ‘78 and Dara Hosey ‘86 William Jackson ‘85 and Laura Horton Fite ‘86 • Lucien Moore ‘75 and Ginger Kimball • Knaack, LLC • Marshall McLeod PLS, LLC • Robert W. McMillan III ‘51 • Robins & Morton • C. Ben ‘77 and Barbara Benton Nevins ‘78 • Michael K. Runyan ‘71 • William C. Smith • F. Allen & Louise K. Turner Charitable Trust • Michael Robert ‘83 and Caroline Kendall Wichman • Steven Ashley ‘86 and Melissa Willard • Western Forge • You Might Be For Auburn Foundation • •

$24,999 - $10,000 Batson-Cook Construction • Julian B. Bell, Jr. • Susan Bilbo Blackledge • DPR Southeast • William Berridge Dunn Jr. ‘87 Gerdau • M. Gregory Hicks • George Gregory Hicks ‘86 • Holder Construction Foundation • David Jeffrey Knecht ‘85 • KPS Group, Inc. • Leica Geosystems, Inc. • Linbeck Group, LLC • M.J. Harris Construction Services, LLC • Manhattan Construction • Fred’55 and Mary Cobey Martin • Thomas W. and Betty S. Mitchell • National Electrical Contractors Association Incorporated • Jeannie H. Petitjean • John H. Powers, Sr. ‘72 • Robin W. ‘82 and Virginia B. Savage ‘81 • Albert James ‘47 and Jule Collins Smith ‘99 • Southern Company • Steelfab, Inc. • Jeffrey Ira ‘79 and Linda Johnson Stone ‘79 •

• EMJ Construction •

Bold: Deceased Italics: Estate Gift

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$9,999 - $5,000 •

Salman Azhar and Amna Salman ‘13 • Brian Douglas Barr • Theodore R. Benning III ‘76 • Theodore R. Benning Jr. ‘42

• Elfrieda

L. Brandt • BRAWCO Inc • Julia B. Caddell • Montgomery Chapter CSI • Richard Gabe Danner ‘77

• Evergreen Construction • Timothy Eugene ‘85 and Jennifer Smith Farley ‘85 Fluor Enterprises, Inc. • William Godwin ‘83 • Golden

Construction • Gray Construction • Hosey-Lancour Construction, Inc. • Kiewit Infrastructure South Co.

• Roger Garvin Law ‘80 • National Roofing Foundation • Pinkerton & Laws • Roy Anderson Corporation • Sigma

Lambda Chi • Turner/Universal Construction Co, Inc. • Andrew Cain ‘87 and Pamela Bell Yantis ‘91

$4,999 - $2,500

Building Corporation • Alabama Concrete Industries Association • James F. Anthony ‘57 • Maria Benning Kent R. Bilbo • Birmingham Construction Industry Authority • Clark Construction Group, Inc. • The Conlan Company • Doster Construction Co., Inc. • JE Dunn Construction • Gilbane Building Company • Harmon, Inc. • Oliver R. ‘66 and Mary Head • G E Johnson Construction Company • Juneau Construction Company • Royce London Lehman Jr. ‘79 • McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. • William B. ‘87 and Leila Morton • National Association of Women in Construction • PCL Construction Enterprises, Inc. • John Christopher Petitjean ‘11 • Ronald J. Pounds ‘75 • Retail Contractors Association • Skanska USA, Inc. • Harry Lee Spear Jr. ‘73 • John Bowen Stone III, ‘57 • Turner Construction Company • Richard D. Williams III ‘51 • Gary C. Wyatt General Contractors

• AJAX •

$2,499 - $1,000 R. W. Allen & Associates, Inc. • Edward Andrews Homes • Archer Western Contractors, LTD • Austin Commercial, LP Barton Malow Company • Batten & Shaw, Inc. • Robert Benjamin Barfield Jr. ‘95 • James William ‘57 and Janice Johnson Bealle, ‘57 • Michael Paul Berry ‘85 • Paul C. Brandt • Cara Mia Braswell ‘77 • Jerry Dean Bryant ‘87 • Buford Burchfield Jr. ‘63 • Robert George Burton ‘51 • C-Sharpe Co, LLC • Caddell Construction Co, Inc. • Catamount Constructors, Inc. • Choate Construction Company • Cherokee Erecting Company, LLC • Cheryl L. Cheske • Charles N. ‘71 and Susan Perdue Codding ‘70 • Thomas Franklin ’66 and Frances Clement • Thomas Orville Cole II ‘00 • Clifton Terry Collier ‘81 • Robert Earl Conry ‘51 • Construction Enterprises, Inc. • Cooper Steel • CORE Construction Services of FL, LLC • Cupertino Electric, Inc. • Deangelis Diamond Healthcare Group • Paula M. DeSimone ‘84 • Hubbard Honoree Donald ‘62 • Allen Doyle Family • Jennifer M. Dorsey,’98 • Harold Lewis ‘52 and Margaret Draper Eskew ‘52 • Lauren Evans • Fairway Construction Co, Inc. • John D. Fetz ‘78 • Kanda Hale Floyd ‘03 • R. Mack ‘65 and Jamie Hardin Freeman ‘65 • Michael Robert Gary ‘93 • Franklin Eugene Golson ‘76 • Wayne J. Griffin Electric, Inc. • Steven Larry Hale ‘73 • Billy L. Harbert, Jr. ‘88 • Keith M. Hartsfield Jr. ‘62 • Joseph T. ‘77 and Debbie Hatch • James Loyd Heard ‘76 • Hensel Phelps Construction Co. • Frank C. Hopson III, ‘65 • Obie Carlton Holley, ‘62 • D R Horton • James L. Howard ‘51 • Edward Harlan Hudgins, ‘71 • Hunt Construction Group, Inc. • Integra Construction • Anning Johnson Company • William Ralph Johnson ‘58 • Keith Marcel Jurado ‘85 • Layton Construction Company, Inc. • Robert L. Maxwell ‘55 • McCorkle Construction Company • J. Neal ‘78 and Cathy McCullohs • John Michael McGwier ‘78 • McKenney’s Inc. Mechanical Contractors & Engineers • Metro Power Electrical Contractors • David William Miller ‘84 • Nabholz Construction • NCI Building Systems • New South Construction • Paul Ray, ‘63 and Frances Orton • Terri J. Perry ‘83 • Kevin Price General Contractor, Inc. • Harold Tobler, ‘57 and Dannie Propst • R.T.D. Construction, Inc. • Keith A. and Dawn R. Rahn • Adonis Reynolds ‘88 • Richard Roman II ‘11 • Ben Marett Rooke III ‘92 • Bruce W. Smith • Mark S. Sowell ‘58 • Signal Energy, LLC • David Wesley Stanton ‘91 • Travis E. Staub ‘55 • Selma Stone • William Leary Stone ‘75 • Strictly Mechanical • James M. Taylor ‘72 • Michael Kelly Thompson ‘82 • Dean Scott Thomson ‘77 • Thompson Tractor Company • TIC/The Industrial Company • Trawick Construction Company, Inc. • U.S. Fiduciary Services, Inc. • Charles Anthony Vick, ‘89 • Stephen Ray Wash • Western Construction Group • White-Spunner Construction, Inc. • Whiting-Turner Contracting Company • Kevin Lamar Wilks ‘83 • Mary V. Samford Williams • Bill Winkle • Winter Construction Company • John E. Witherington Jr. ‘94 •

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Quoin Newsletter of the McWhorter School of Building Science 1161 W. Samford Ave., Bldg. 8 Auburn, AL 36849-0001 Address Ser vice Requested Auburn University is an equal oppor tunity educational institution/employer.

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Quoin March 2017  

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