__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

RACING ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

CERTAINTY RACINGCERTAINTY 2019

THE 2018 AIRO AWARDS

Celebrating the best in Irish racing

MAGAZINE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

ALPHA CENTRE STAGE

THE NIARCHOS FAMILY TALK BREEDING AND DYNASTIES

000 AIRO 2019_Cover.indd 1

FROM GOOD LUCK TO TWISTS OF FATE

Rita Shah and Joanne Lavery on the ups and downs of ownership MEET THE FAMILY

The O’Ryans offer something for everyone’s taste and pocket

14/02/2019 14:58


THE WINNING FORMULA

“Race 13, the choice of world leading trainers” “High Energy, Highly Palatable Sweet Mix”

RACE 13

® In conjunction with

Fuelling Triple Crown Winners American Pharoah and Justify www.bluegrasshorsefeed.com T: +44 (0)28 3754 8276 E: info@bluegrasshorsefeed.com Follow us on:

Advert template.indd 246998_1C_A N Irwin 1 Feeds_JM_AIRO 19.indd 1

14/02/2019 17/01/2019 13:36 11:16


| WELCOME |

The Association of Irish Racehorse Owners (AIRO)

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Brian Polly Chairman

I

wish to warmly welcome our members to the 2019 edition of our annual publication – Racing Certainty. 2018 was another great year for Irish owners with many of their horses successfully competing abroad. At home we had the inaugural Dublin Racing Festival in February at Leopardstown which featured the BHP Insurance Irish Champion Hurdle and the Unibet Irish Gold Cup. The total prize money for the two days was €1.5million. Many of the Irish trained winners at Cheltenham had run at the Dublin Racing Festival. The Association of Irish Racehorse Owners has a membership of over 2200 and we continue to work with the various industry bodies and Government to ensure that appropriate recognition is given to all racehorse owners for their contribution to the industry. For 2019 we have secured 115 free entry days to racecourses for all owners who have a racehorse returned in training. The 2019 budget saw the VAT rate on the purchase of racehorses increase to 13.5% and we have been lobbying Horse Racing Ireland to have a VAT reclaimable scheme introduced so that there is no additional cost to the owner/purchaser. Horse Racing Ireland advise us that it is pursuing this issue with Government and hopefully there will be a positive outcome. Our marquee facilities at Punchestown and Galway Festivals continue to be appreciated by our members and we look forward to meeting you again in 2019. The 2018 AIRO/The Irish Field Awards Event took place in the Killashee hotel in Naas in October last and was a great success with very popular winners over a range of categories. Multiple racehorse owner, Rich Ricci, proved to be a very popular guest speaker on the night. This event in 2019 moves to a new date and venue – November 9th in Keadeen Hotel, Newbridge. On behalf of our Association I would like to thank all our sponsors, whose continued support of our Awards is very much appreciated. The Council and I look forward to welcoming our members to the various events throughout the year and I thank you for your continued support of our Association. I wish you all a very successful 2019.

Brian Polly Chairman

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 1 |

001 AIRO 2019_Welcome.indd 1

14/02/2019 17:08


Owners Magazine.pdf

1

07/02/2019

11:31

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

2019 Membership Benefits Specifically designed Stud Farm Insurance exclusive to ITBA Members FREE Racecourse Admission FREE Handbook & Diary FREE Breeding & Racing Publications FREE Initial Legal, Taxation, HR, Accountancy & Veterinary Consultancy Comprehensive Educational Programme ITBA Tours

Subscription Fee €100 per annum €50 (add family member/ stud staff) €20 ITBA Next Generation

Advert template.indd 1 241245_1C_ITBA_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

ITBA

WORKING FOR IRISH BREEDERS Irish Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association ITBA_Official ITBA Breeders App

Greenhills, Kill, Co. Kildare Tel: +353 (0)45 877543 Fax: +353 (0)45 877429 Email: rbyrne@itba.ie www.itba.ie

14/02/2019 08/02/2019 13:37 10:13


| NEWS |

PRIZE MONEY

DATE FOR THE DIARY

OWNERSHIP

Regular prize money

The new National Hunt EBF/Connolly’s Red Mills Auction Hurdle Series which is confined to horses purchased for €45000 or less will conclude with a final in Punchestown in April 2019 worth €75000 in prizemoney.

There was a

will increase by €2.9 million in 2019 to a total of

nett increase of 130 (3.5%) in racehorse

€66.1 million and a further €500.000

Dundalk Stadium will open a new Owners & Trainers facility in 2019.

ownership in 2018 bringing the

will be allocated to

total to 3817 and

Grade 2 and Grade

a nett increase

3 Racecourses to

in the number of

be used to increase

horses in training

the value of their

of 200 (2.4%)

races and provide

bringing the total

opportunities for a

to 8688

horses and owners.

RACEDAYS AIRO has secured agreement with the Racecourses for

115 free admission days in 2019 for all owners who have a horse registered in training. Details of the dates are on

page 50

APPOINTMENTS Down Royal Racecourse commenced a new era with its first race day under the change of management on Tuesday 29th January 2019. Emma Meehan, who left her role in Dundalk Stadium has taken over as Chief Executive at the racecourse. Some other notable appointments in the industry in 2018 were: Nicky Hartery, Chairperson Horse Racing Ireland; Jennifer Pugh, Senior Medical Officer, Irish Horseracing Regulatory Board; Conor O’Neill, Chief Executive, Punchestown Racecourse and Chairman Association of Irish Racecourses; David Burns, European Representative, Irish Thoroughbred Marketing; Alex Cairns, Marketing Executive, Irish Thoroughbred marketing; Andrew (Sandy) Shaw, Chief NH Handicapper; Tracey O’Meara, Clerk of the Course- Down Royal, Downpatrick, Kilbeggan and Sligo; Michael O’Rourke and Mark Kershaw, Directors, Down Royal Racecourse; Joe Collins and Gareth Graham, Advisors Down Royal Racecourse.

Bites

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

greater spread of

INJURED JOCKEYS

NEWS

AIRO raised €2735 in a raffle for the Irish Injured Jockeys at its Awards Dinner in October and a cheque for this amount was presented to Ruby Walsh and Davy Russell, representatives of the Irish Injured Jockeys, at Down Royal on 3rd November. We express sincere thanks to all who supported the raffle on the evening.

There is a new date and venue for the AIRO/ The Irish Field Awards Dinner in 2019. The event is scheduled to take place in the Keadeen Hotel on Saturday 9th November.

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 5 |

005 AIRO 2019_News_2.indd 5

14/02/2019 09:30


| NEWS |

February Festival Fun at Leopardstown

Grand Expo in Goffs The Irish Thoroughbred Breeders Association, the representative body for 6,777 breeders hosted an EXPO in partnership with Connolly’s RED MILLS for the thoroughbred industry in Goffs Sales Complex. Stands featured all elements of the bloodstock industry from stud farms to veterinary products to nutrition companies.

22

DAYS OF RACING LOST THROUGH SNOW

8

trainers’ s

sh

I ri

WINNERS

va l

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

January

17 e

he Festi

Irish horses made Cheltenham their own once again.

on

at t

Cheltenham

ighest tall y dh

r ve

March

ec

Ireland’s newest race meeting, the Dublin Racing Festival, at Leopardstown saw the renowned race-course play host to seven Grade 1 races - including the Unibet Irish Gold Cup - and a prize fund of €1.5 million

2018

THE YEAR THAT WAS

April Willie Mullins trains 18 winners for 13 owners and wins 10 of the 12 group races at Punchestown to secure trainer’s title for 2018

Willie Mullins became the winning-most trainer at the Festival

61 WINNERS

WINNERS

saw Gordon Elliott retain his leading trainer’s title

Davy Russell took the leading rider’s crown for the first time with four Cheltenham festival winners including a spectacular day three treble.

HALF OF THE RACES (14) AT THIS YEAR’S CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL WERE WON BY IRISH-BRED HORSES. “What has happened on the track this week merely underlines the current strength and quality of racing in Ireland; we had two memorable days at the Dublin Racing Festival at Leopardstown in early February and I’d expect that the upcoming festivals at Fairyhouse and Punchestown will continue to showcase Irish National Hunt racing at its very best.” Brian Kavanagh, CEO of Horse Racing Ireland

Tiger roll Tiger Roll wins Grand National at Aintree for Gigginstown Tiger Roll and Davy Russell held on to claim victory in the Grand National at Aintree, a first win in the race for the Irish jockey. (Trained by Gordon Elliott and owned by Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary)

| 6 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

006 AIRO 2019_Highlights.indd 6

14/02/2019 09:33


| NEWS |

MAY

Nicky Hartery appointed chairman of Horse Racing Ireland

Forever Together wins English Oaks for Mrs John Magnier, Michael Tabor and Derrick Smith. Aidan O’Brien landed a magnificent seventh victory in The fillies’ Classic at Epsom, ridden by son, Donnacha O’Brien.

July Magnier Family and Aidan O’Brien received 2018 Longines and IFHA International Award of Merit Saint-Imier (Switzerland), 24 July 2018 – The Magnier family and trainer Aidan O’Brien, the driving forces behind Coolmore and the Ballydoyle Racing Stable, recieved the 2018 Longines and IFHA International Award of Merit, which recognizes distinguished horsemen and horsewomen for lifelong contributions to Thoroughbred racing.

June

Willie Mullins records his 3,000th career win as trainer. The Closutton handler reached the personal milestone after Timi Roli romped to glory in the World Cup Betting On The Brand New, Faster Than Ever BoyleSports App Hurdle. Mullins said, “I’d hoped I would get a few winners on the board and get established and I’m very pleased to have come this far.”

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Sons beat father in the Irish Derby as Joseph O’Brien’s Latrobe wins for owner Lloyd J. Williams under Donnacha. Aidan O’Brien’s sons, Joseph and Donnacha, conspired to dramatically trump their father at the Curragh when Latrobe landed a historic €1.5 million Dubai Duty Free Irish Derby success.

August Don Cossack wins Racehorse to Riding horse, Dublin Horse Show, owned by Paulette Cooper & Louise Lyons and ridden by Louise Lyons

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 7 |

006 AIRO 2019_Highlights.indd 7

14/02/2019 09:33


| NEWS |

September

October

Longines Irish Champions Weekend was a spectacular two-day event, featuring Ten Group races including Six Group 1 races run at two legendary Irish racecourses; Leopardstown and The Curragh. Showcasing the World’s best horses, trainers and jockeys, prize money at this event exceeded €4.6 million making it one of the richest and most glamorous meetings on the international racing calendar

Winners for leading owners Mrs John Magnier, Michael Tabor and Derrick Smith

All ladies ‘Its all about the girls

The Sideways Syndicate win US National with Jury Duty ridden by Robbie Power. Gordon Elliott and Robbie Power teamed up to land the Grand National Hurdle Stakes at Far Hills in New Jersey on a raid across the Atlantic giving Elliott his third National of the year.

syndicate’ win with Sparkle’n’joy trained by Jessica Harington

November

NH Trainer Willie Mullins and Mrs S Ricci win with Limini | MAGAZINE 2019 |

Madhmoon trained by one of Irelands senior trainers Kevin Prendergast for his long term owner Hamdan Al Maktoum

The Niccolia Schuster Racing Clubs Ellie Mac, trained by Henry De Bromhead, back to winning ways at Fairy House after her shock win last Christmas. The Henry de Bromheadtrained mare followed up her success in a similar contest over half a mile further at Tipperary last time when leading on the run-in for a hard fought success.

The most excited owners of the weekend, The Stable Friends Syndicate, owners of Hamley, trained by Peter Fahey

THE MOTHER AND SON SONIA AND ANTHONY ROGERS OWNER BREEDERS OF SKITTER SCATTER TRAINED BY THIRD GENERATION OF CURRAGH TRAINERS PATRICK PRENDERGAST

December THE 2018 LAYTOWN RACE FESTIVAL MARKED 150 YEARS OF RACING ON LAYTOWN STRAND. TE OCCASION WAS MARKED WITH THE LAUNCH OF A COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “LAYTOWN STRAND RACES, CELEBRATING 150 YEARS.”

New Team announced for Racing UK Gary O’Brien, Kevin O’Ryan,Kate Harrington and Don Mcclean join Ruby Walsh on the channel relaunched in January as Racing TV.

| 8 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

006 AIRO 2019_Highlights.indd 8

14/02/2019 09:33


Advert template.indd 1 247248_1C_Appleby_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

14/02/2019 12/02/2019 13:38 11:27


| RUNNING A RACEDAY |

TRACK

STARS

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

RUNNING A RACEDAY AT FAIRYHOUSE IT MAY TAKE A MONTH BEHIND THE SCENES, BUT IT’S ALL IN A DAY’S WORK FOR THE FAIRYHOUSE TEAM

Peter Roe, Manager Raceday for Peter is an opportunity to meet with clients in person and deal with raceday issues now rather than later. “Effectively I have nothing to do,” he says, the preparation already done. “It’s a team game. We have 20 people on track working, and 40-50 others around elsewhere. I prefer to deal with things while they are fresh, rather than later on. If not, it might be dwelt on and then it festers.” The smaller fixtures are no less important for the 70 runners and seven winners on the day and behind the scenes is as important as front of house. “Our facilities are still presented as they would be for the Grand National. The perceived media rights keep going back into the racecourse, such as €250,000 back into the racecourse stabling that the general public will never see.” Peter’s biggest frustration is the weather. “We water for every summer meeting. Our watering bill is through roof, and if it spills rain on the day our gate is halved. I detest watering more than anything else, we’re playing God to a certain amount and giving cause for complaint. But we have to ensure safe ground for horse and rider.”

| 10 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

008 AIRO 2019_Raceday.indd 10

13/02/2019 16:21


David Betts

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| RUNNING A RACEDAY |

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 11 |

008 AIRO 2019_Raceday.indd 11

13/02/2019 16:22


| RUNNING A RACEDAY |

Noel Fanning, Track Manager “The grass is cut and fertilised. We move rails for different ground each day. We have 11 fences and seven hurdles, requiring dressing, wings and rails. We’re on to Accuweather and Met Eiréann daily and we actually measure the rainfall for Met Eiréann. If it’s too wet or dries up too quickly we can’t do remedial work. In the winter we have to work around the short days and we’ll have seven racemeetings when there’s no growth at all, which is difficult. Winter is tough and we might not have the weather to get out to do things. We deal with on the spot changes as they happen and we’re lucky to have a big wide track on 66 acres which we can alternate.”

Brendan Sheridan, Clerk of the Course “People think we just arrive from the last day, but it’s full-time care. On a typical raceday we have to move fences and hurdles, there will be different starts, and we have two miles of rail to be moved at every meeting. The fences are repaired and re-birched, the ground filled and put back. Weather would be the main concern. The most important thing is to have the ground safe for rider and horse. This year we’ve struggled to get good grass, the weather we’ve had was unheard of. One night’s frost we can cope with, we’d be very unlucky to pull a meeting, but we can do very little against several severe frosts in a row. Fog is a problem, you wait and wait and there’s no sign of it leaving, but after you’ve pulled the plug on racing, 20 minutes later there’s no fog! But you have to make the call. If a meeting has to be cancelled on the day, everyone is involved, we consult with the jockeys and trainers, but only the stewards are in the position to make the call. I go to them with my concerns, but they make the final call.”

| MAGAZINE 2019 | Niccolai Schuster Racing Club members greet their novice chase winner Ellie Mac, jockey Rachael Blackmore and trainer Henry de Bromhead

Thom Malone, Paddock Announcer “A day before the declarations come out, I look at the entries. I’m never off my phone, studying form and results! It’s difficult if I take a week off, it’s easy to fall behind. A little and often, that’s how I keep abreast, I get to know the horses well.”

Tara Martin, Office “Even on a raceday there’ll be many phone queries from sponsors and people looking to book tickets for the Festival, they all still have to be dealt with. I’ll be manning the ticket desk, escorting guests to the office, manning phones once more, back to tickets. I love racedays and although I’m super busy that extra buzz is great.”

Gillian Carey, Operations Manager Gillian has worked in many roles at Fairyhouse for 12 years, but for the past eight years she has been Operations Manager. She is responsible for the raceday contractors, casual staff, catering, car parking, security, turnstiles, veterinary surgeons, doctors, Order of Malta, stewards, trophies, overseas runners, racecards, outdoor facilities and children’s entertainment. Despite such an exhaustive list ensuring the smooth running of one of the country’s largest racetracks, Gillian is part of a surprisingly small team. Peter Roe is Fairyhouse Manager, Kate O’Sullivan is Marketing Manager, Orla Aaron and Tara Martin are in the office and Noel Fanning is the Track Manager. On a day such as Easter Monday there will be over 16,000 racegoers, and they all have the team to thank for the enjoyment of a day’s racing. There are 21 fixtures a year at Fairyhouse and Gillian ensures that all the contractors for each are in place and that all catering facilities are set up. She rosters contactors up to eight weeks in advance. “Everyone must be in place before the gates open,” she tells us. “One of my favourite jobs is taking care of the trophies, many of which have a great history. The perpetual trophies have to be returned each year and I start to chase up their return five weeks before the required race. The racecards have to be ready the day before. The race and form information comes from HRI, but I do the remaining content along with Peter and we proof it before it goes to the printer. I gather information and advertising and include special notes such as welcoming sponsors or guests, birthdays etc. Both days’ cards are done on the Friday for the Winter Festival, but usually it’s 10am the morning before a raceday. The hardest is during the Easter Festival because we take delivery of the racecards in the middle of the night!”

| 12 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

008 AIRO 2019_Raceday.indd 12

14/02/2019 09:36


J2710 Racing Certainty_297x210Wmm+5mmBleed_PRINT.indd 1 Advert template.indd 1 246785_1C_Horse Racing Ireland_JM_AIRO 19.indd 1

06/12/2018 16:59 14/02/2019 12/12/2018 13:40 10:15


| COVER STORY |

ALPHA CENTAURI

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

OF THE DONN McCLEAN LOOKS INTO A REGAL DYNASTY

T

he defining moment of Alpha Centauri’s racing career? Difficult to choose. It could be the Tattersalls Falmouth Stakes, when the Niarchos family’s filly took on the older fillies for the first time and beat them. Or the Prix du Haras de Fresnay-le-Buffard Jacques le Marois, when she took on the colts and beat them too. It could be the Tattersalls Irish 1000 Guineas, when she first announced herself as a top class three-year-old filly. That win had added significance too, because it was trainer Jessica Harrington’s first Irish Guineas, her first Classic. Or it could even be the filly’s racecourse debut at Naas in May 2017, when she was forward enough to win her maiden easily. That was the win that sent her on her way. But the defining moment? The standout performance? It’s difficult to look beyond Royal Ascot in June, the Coronation Stakes, when her devastating turn of foot broke her rivals and broke the track record.

Get Electra Niarchos and Alan Cooper, the Niarchos Family’s racing manager, sitting at a table in Goffs, however, and push them for an answer, and they are both circumspect. There have been so many days, they tell you. So many performances. Alpha Centauri has achieved so much. It’s difficult to choose one over all the others. This filly has deep Niarchos roots too. Her great grandam is the brilliant Niarchos filly Miesque, dual Guineas winner, dual Breeders’ Cup Turf winner, Champion Miler in 1987, Champion Female Turf horse in America in 1987 and 1988. Alpha Centauri’s grandam is East Of The Moon, French Guineas winner, French Oaks winner, Prix Jacques le Marois winner. Her dam, Alpha Lupi, never raced, but there was never any doubt that the talent was all there in her genes. “Alpha Lupi’s first foal was Tenth Star, by Dansili, who won a listed race,” says Alan Cooper. “So we thought, why not go back to the Danzig line? Mastercraftsman suited, his physique fitted very well with Alpha Lupi. That was the reasoning behind it. And then, along comes this wonderful filly.”

It was always likely that Alpha Centauri would be joining Jessica Harrington. “Maria (Niarchos) has always worked on the basis that we try to give each trainer one of their most preferred yearlings. And Jessie loved this filly from the start.” The story of the filly’s arrival at Commonstown Stables in Moone in County Kildare is well told. Jessie always weighs the yearlings when they first arrive, but when Alpha Centauri’s weight came back, her trainer didn’t believe it. Yearling fillies simply don’t weigh 530 kilos. So she was sent to be weighed again. And again. Each time she came back: 530 kilos.

| 14 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

012 AIRO 2018_Niarchos.indd 14

14/02/2019 09:37


| COVER STORY |

David Betts

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

I REMEMBER WE WATCHED THE RACE FROM THERE ON OUR PHONES, AND WE COULDN’T BELIEVE HOW EASILY SHE WON.”

Alpha Centauri and Colm O’Donoghue win the Irish 1000 Guineas

“She was always a well-developed filly all right.” You wouldn’t have been surprised if she had not raced as a two-year-old, but her trainer got her going, and was amazed at how easily she was able to do everything. She learned quickly, and her ability came to the fore. She stood out among her contemporaries at Commonstown. So much so that Jessie thought that she could run her in a maiden at Naas on May Day. “We were at Saint-Cloud that day,” says Electra. “I remember, we watched the race from there on our phones, and we couldn’t believe how easily she won. She was one of the earliest two-yearolds we had in a while. It is rare that we would

have a Royal Ascot two-year-old. She’s tall, and she’s herself. She is unique in her physique.” The Niarchos family’s relationship with Jessica Harrington goes back to 2010, when the trainer won the Group 1 National Stakes at The Curragh with Pathfork. The Niarchos Family bred Pathfork, and Maria Niarchos was keen to meet the trainer who had landed her first Group 1 race on the flat with the Distorted Humor colt. They met up at the Keeneland September Sale that year, and so began a relationship of mutual respect and admiration that has thrived. Bocca Baciata came along in 2014. Jessica Harrington trained the Niarchos filly to win her

maiden that year, and to win the Group 3 Dance Design Stakes the following year. Then in 2016, she won the Listed Victor McCalmont Stakes at Gowran Park and the Group 2 Kilboy Estate Stakes at the Curragh, and she finished second behind Minding in the Group 1 Pretty Polly Stakes. “Jessie is a remarkable trainer,” says Alan. “Both disciplines are as easy for her as they are difficult for others. There are not many trainers who can train Group or Grade 1 winners over hurdles and over fences and on the flat.” Alpha Centauri went back to Naas three weeks after she had made her racecourse debut there, and won a listed race. She was even more impressive

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 15 |

012 AIRO 2018_Niarchos.indd 15

14/02/2019 09:37


| COVER STORY |

THE WAY SHE WORKED THAT DAY. SHE WANTED TO GO FASTER THAN COLM WOULD ALLOW HER. SHE LEFT EVERYTHING STANDING. I THINK WE CAN SAY, THAT DAY, THAT PIECE OF WORK, THAT WAS THE MOMENT THAT WE THOUGHT SHE COULD HAVE A VERY GOOD YEAR THIS YEAR”

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

in winning that listed race than she had been in winning her maiden. After that, unusually for a Niarchos filly, you had to allow her to take her chance in the Albany Stakes at Royal Ascot. “We were delighted that she ran so well in the Albany, but of course we were a little disappointed that, having run so well, she didn’t win. We started hearing about this French filly, Different League, a few days before the race. She got the run of the race, and she beat us on the day. Even so, we were very happy. We knew that we had a very good filly.” Alpha Centauri didn’t run well in the Moyglare Stakes the following September. Her abject run was probably down to a combination of factors. The ground was soft and she had been off the track for nearly three months. Also, she was probably just filling her frame then. So that was it for the season. Give her the winter off, allow her to fill her frame, strengthen up, re-group, come back in 2018 as a three-year-old and target the top races. The Mastercraftsman filly was well beaten on her first run as a three-year-old too, in the Guineas Trial at Leopardstown in April. Again,

the ground was heavy. Rider Colm O’Donoghue kept her wide, on the best of the ground, tried to mitigate the disadvantage of the soft conditions. In the end, she could only finish 10th, but her owners were not disheartened. She had travelled well to the top of the home straight before she tired on the ground. A month later she went back to Leopardstown to do a piece of work and, on better ground, she zinged. “It was Derby Trial day at Leopardstown,” says Electra. “Maria and I had just arrived, and Alan called us and said, Alpha is working after racing. The way she worked that day. She wanted to go faster than Colm would allow her. She left everything standing. I think we can say, that day, that piece of work, that was the moment that we thought she could have a very good year this year.” There was never any thought in the owners’ minds that their filly would not train on. She had the size and scope to be a three-year-old, and they had the reassurance of her trainer’s absolute faith in her. But that day at Leopardstown, that was the day that they saw for themselves. She was a relative outsider in the Irish

David Betts

Colm O’Donoghue salutes Alpha Centauri

1000 Guineas 10 days later but, when Colm O’Donoghue asked her to pick up, and she moved into second place behind Could It Be Love just inside the two-furlong marker, it always looked likely that she would get there. “That was a great day,” says Electra. “To win an Irish 1000 Guineas. And for Jessie to win it with a filly of ours, her first Classic. That made it very special.” “For Colm as well,” says Alan. “We have known Colm for years, through the horses that we have had in training at Ballydoyle, but we have obviously got to know him better recently. He’s a top rider. He rode Bocca Baciata too as a four-year-old. There’s a wonderful photo here (at Goffs) of him and Bocca.” There are also published photos of Colm O’Donoghue and Alpha Centauri. Lots of them. Like the Coronation Stakes at Royal Ascot, the photos are of horse and rider bounding clear. There aren’t many photos of the preamble, when they assembled in the parade ring, the prerace nerves, and dared to hope. Or of the early stages of the race, when Alpha Centauri travelled easily in Colm O’Donoghue’s hands, towards the outside, hunting up Veracious and Aim Of Artemis. Or of the home turn, when she loomed up on the outside of the leaders and effortlessly joined the front rank. Or of the next few yards, when O’Donoghue sat still, waited, allowed his filly a few strides to fill her lungs. The photos are of the finish of the race, Alpha Centauri coming clear, leaving her rivals toiling. “I was so nervous before the Coronation Stakes,” says Alan. “I decided to watch the race on my own. I went to the tunnel where the horses go out, put my hat on the rail, and looked at the big screen in the paddock with my binoculars. And all I was saying to Colm in my mind was, don’t go too soon. What happens if she hits the front and pulls herself up? And I remember thinking afterwards, what on earth were you so nervous about?! It was one of those days. On those days, you know you are doing the right thing by having racehorses.” “We were all nervous,” says Electra. “I watched it in the seated area on the ground floor with Maria. The great thing about that race was that, when she went clear, we could enjoy the last furlong. We could almost relax. We just shouted, come on, come on, and then we hugged each other and enjoyed it all. “It goes by so quickly. The race itself. Royal Ascot. The adrenaline. The atmosphere and the energy that you get from the crowd. But looking

| 16 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

012 AIRO 2018_Niarchos.indd 16

14/02/2019 09:40


| COVER STORY |

back on it all, I found it amazing. With Maria, and back to my grandfather. The breeding side of it. The legacy. It goes back to Miesque and then Pasadoble. The whole story. Generations. To continue this new chapter of that story with Alpha Centauri. It’s incredible to think that, 30 years down the line, for her to do what she is doing, to add to the story. It’s great to have runners, but to breed them and have all that history behind us. That’s what really makes it so special.” That Coronation Stakes victory was a milestone in Alpha Centauri’s career. Not just because it was one of the marquee performances of the 2018 racing season on a global scale, but also because it was Jessica Harrington’s first Royal Ascot winner. More milestones were to follow. The Falmouth Stakes, taking on her elders for the first time. “In the paddock, before the Falmouth Stakes,” recalls Alan, “Colm said to me, I think we’re going to have to make the running here. I went white! She’d never done that before. Colm thought that there wasn’t going to be enough pace. He knew the filly. He didn’t want her to get into trouble. He has a wonderful expression: let’s keep it simple. And that’s what he did.” And the Prix Jacques le Marois, taking on

the colts. That was extra special, because of the family’s deep association with the race. “The Niarchos family have sponsored the race since 1984,” says Electra. “And it is a highlight of the summer racing. It does bring together most of the best milers from Britain, Ireland and France, over a straight mile. And it’s usually won by a very good horse. So it made sense that Alpha would go there as long as she was well.” Not only has the Jacques le Marois been sponsored by the Niarchos family for over 30 years, but the race has also been won by top class Niarchos horses. Hector Protector won it, Exit To Nowhere won it, Six Perfections won it. Alpha Centauri’s grandam East Of The Moon won it in 1994. Miesque won it twice, Spinning World won it twice. But the race had not been won by a Niarchos horse since Six Perfections won it in 2003. That was before this year. “In the Cyrano Café, close to Deauville racecourse,” says Alan, “every morning during the week leading up to the race, people I didn’t know would come up to me and ask, is she coming? People really appreciated her. The French racegoers are great like that. And when she won, the applause for her was fantastic. The appreciation that she had come from Ireland,

trained by Jessie, owned by the family. It was a very emotional day.” Matron Stakes day at Leopardstown was also an emotional day, when Alpha Centauri finished second to Laurens, and came home injured. “The way I look at it,” says Alan, “it could have been worse. She could have had a worse accident. We knew that something was wrong while watching the race, and we weren’t surprised when they found a chip on the x-ray immediately afterwards. And then on the Monday, in Fethard, the scan showed how close we were to catastrophe.” “It was a dark day all right,” says Electra, “and she wasn’t a happy filly immediately afterwards, but she has undergone great rehab in the Coolmore hospital, and she is doing very well now. She has built up a really good relationship with her pony, Godzilla. I went to see her two days ago, and she looked great.” Mating plans have yet to be finalised. “It’s too early to say,” says Alan. “It will all come to light when Maria and Electra have considered everything.” “There is a shortlist,” says Electra. “And she’ll stay in Ireland. It’s a very nice position to be in.” The Niarchos legacy goes on.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Healy Racing

The Coronation Stakes victory was a milestone in Alpha Centauri’s career.

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 17 |

012 AIRO 2018_Niarchos.indd 17

14/02/2019 09:40


| OWNER PROFILE |

Happy JOANNE LAVERY, AN ACCIDENTAL OWNER DREAMING OF CLASSIC GLORY TALKS TO LISSA OLIVER

A | MAGAZINE 2019 |

s an owner, Joanne Lavery, niece of trainer Sheila Lavery, has enjoyed great success on the track, first with the Group-placed Burgundy Boy in 2017 and now with Gr.1 Moyglare Stud Stakes runner-up Lady Kaya, who holds an entry in the Irish 1000 Guineas; not to mention her winner Danehill Quest, who she rides out most mornings. Not that Joanne ever had ambitions to be a winning owner. Having been bitten by the racing bug as a schoolgirl, she was realistic about the financial limitations of racehorse ownership and fed her interest instead by getting involved in the sales and pinhooking. “With my dad’s help, I bought three foals in 2015 to sell as yearlings,” Joanne tells us, “but it wasn’t the best of starts. One sadly died of colic and the other two failed to sell.” That definitely proved someone’s loss and Joanne’s gain, although she probably didn’t view it as such at the time. Brave enough to trust her own judgement, however, she put the two horses in training with her aunt and by the end of that season Burgundy Boy had won his maiden and run fourth in two Gr.3 races. He was sent to the Goffs Champion Sale and this time Joanne was far luckier. He sold to BBA Ireland for €260,000. It couldn’t have been a more apt combination – that year, following her Social Science degree at UCD, Joanne had been one of two

successful applicants for the ITBA Next Generation apprentice programme and had enjoyed placements with both Goffs and BBA Ireland, as well as at Ballyhane Stud, which stands Red Jazz, sire of Burgundy Boy. Danehill Quest, meanwhile, remained in training and won last year. He has been at home with Joanne for the winter, but she hopes to continue having some fun on the track with him this year. “I put him in the Goffs horses in training sale last year and half of me was hoping he didn’t sell,” she admits. It isn’t sentimentality that sees her hang on to horses, however, but a strong confidence in her own sense of value. “Keeping horses in training myself has been accidental, my aim is always to sell, but if you are lucky enough and can keep them, then I would encourage people to do that. I would rather that than let them go too cheaply,” she says. “I was gutted at the time, but thankfully it worked out well and I’m very lucky to be able to keep any I don’t sell, I have a Plan B.” Plan B sees Joanne as a very lucky owner, but as this has never been the actual goal she is forced to admit, “I’m not a great owner! I’ve been very unlucky, missing a couple of races and I’ve missed their wins!” On the other hand, she is a very hands-on owner, probably far more so than any other, and works in the Summerhill, County Meath yard of Sheila Lavery every morning. “I’m there every day and it’s good to see them and exciting to see them progress, as you don’t know what you have until they start to work.” It was through riding out for Sheila while still at school that Joanne decided to buy foals to pinhook, but her love of thoroughbreds from an early age went beyond the racecourse. Joanne is an accomplished polocrosse competitor and will be playing a match in the USA in February and competing in the polocrosse World Cup in Australia in April. “We use ex-racehorses for polocrosse so I had experience with them, but it’s a very different discipline. I only have one polocrosse horse, but I’m about to start training a young horse who has just finished racing.” The ITBA Next Generation apprenticeship also enabled Joanne to gain experience of other aspects of the racing industry. “My first placement was in Goffs and it was amazing, working with a really professional team and getting to meet people. Then I worked at BBA Ireland and throughout the apprenticeship I was given the opportunity to follow, watch, listen and learn. I finished up at Ballyhane Stud and had my first experience of foaling. I would like to have a couple of mares later on.” All of which puts Joanne in a perfect position of introducing ownership to others. “It’s difficult to own a horse without trading, so racing clubs are the way forward,” she says. “A club is a great way to get more people

Joanne with her mum, dad, aunt Shiela and boyfriend Chris Timmons

| 18 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

014 AIRO 2018_Joanne Lavery.indd 18

14/02/2019 14:54


| OWNER PROFILE |

David Betts

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Joanne leading in Burgundy Boy with Gary Carroll

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 19 |

014 AIRO 2018_Joanne Lavery.indd 19

14/02/2019 14:54


| OWNER PROFILE | Joanne riding for the Irish polocrosse team at international level

EVERYONE WANTS THE SAME HORSE AND THEY ARE REALLY EXPENSIVE TO BUY. THE PEDIGREE IS IMPORTANT TO AN EXTENT, BUT I ALWAYS TRY TO LOOK TO FIND A RACEHORSE AND BUY A HORSE THAT I WANT TO KEEP LOOKING AT.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

involved, even for those who can afford to buy a racehorse but want to see what it’s like first.” She is currently setting up a club and has Danehill Quest and a Red Jazz filly ready to go into training with Sheila. “Hopefully we can get a few members and have them visit the yard and go on days away to watch the filly work on the Curragh. As an owner, you have a wider choice when buying at the sales and you’re not constricted by the fashionable pedigree needed for reselling. You’ll still get a good price for the horse if it runs well. “Pinhooking is quite difficult and fashion is the big thing, everyone wants the same horse and they are really expensive to buy. The pedigree is important to an extent, but I always try to look to find a racehorse and buy a horse that I want to keep looking at.” Lady Kaya is just such a horse and has provided Joanne with her best day’s racing so far. “The Moyglare Stud Stakes day at the Curragh was definitely my best day as an owner,” she reveals. Skitter Scatter may have been two lengths clear of Lady Kaya in the Gr.1 prize but for Joanne and her family it was as thrilling as a win. “I was standing there so delighted and waiting for something more! The winner was getting all the attention and I know we were only second, but to be second in a Group One, we felt like winners!” It’s an ill wind, as they say, and yet another twisted piece of good fortune for Joanne. Her first three pinhooks hadn’t quite gone to plan but hadn’t put her off going back for more the following year. “Unfortunately, as a yearling Lady Kaya got a very bad cut and that kept her

in her box for six weeks, so she only had three weeks of sales prep and I knew I was in trouble, but that definitely worked out for the best! My dad has bought a share in her and we will keep racing her for this year. The whole family is excited.” The yearlings Joanne had last year and the two foals she purchased for this year’s sales, a Gutaifan colt and a Ruler Of The World filly, have been bought in partnership with her boyfriend Chris Timmons. “He’s a really good rider and he keeps everything organised for me, even though he’s really busy,” she reveals. “He’s working in a really good breeze-up yard, so

that’s another potential area we could look to in the future!” She is busy setting up her own yard in Meath and plans to continue pinhooking and possibly start pre-training at some point in the future. Her aunt Sheila has been inspirational in her chosen career path, giving her her first pony, and has provided amazing support and help, Joanne tells us. “She has such a good eye for a horse. She is always willing to help anyone and has never held back in sharing information. She always says that she never stops learning herself.” For the moment, though, Joanne is happy to be an accidental, but very lucky, owner.

Lady Kaya before the Moyglare Stud Stakes

| 20 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

014 AIRO 2018_Joanne Lavery.indd 20

14/02/2019 14:54


YOUR

PASSION

STARTS

HERE

www.racehorseownership.ie

#thisisourteam

Ownership Department, Horse Racing Ireland, Ballymany, The Curragh, Co. Kildare. T: +353 (0)45 455 455 E: owners@hri.ie 246754_2L_HRI_JM_AIRO 19.indd 1

17/01/2019 10:59

IRISH STALLION FARMS IRISH RACING’S LARGEST SPONSOR SUPPORTING IRISH R ACING SINCE 1983 €42 million in sponsorship since 1983 from Irish Stallion Farms Contributing €2.2 million towards Irish prize-money in 2019 Strong focus on Auction races for flat and NH Supporting over 400 Flat & National Hunt races in 2019

FOLLOW US @IrishEBF

#EBFGoodForRacing Irish European Breeders’ Fund Greenhills, Kill, Naas, Co. Kildare W91 FY62 For further details, contact Nessa Joyce: T: 00 353 45 910 999 M: 00 353 85 7590970 E: info@irishebf.ie www.ebfstallions.com

AIRO Mag 2019 Ad.indd 1 246691_2L_IEBF_JM_AIRO 19.indd 1

Advert template.indd 1

30/11/2018 12:54:49 05/12/2018 08:53

14/02/2019 13:41


| TAKE 6 |

Take 6

LISSA OLIVER LEARNS ABOUT A DAY IN THE LIFE OF OUR LEADING RIDERS

Davy Russell, champion NH jockey

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

“My daily routine changes, it can be different depending on whether there’s racing or how far away a meeting is. Usually I’ll leave home at 5am and I like to be at Gordon Elliott’s a bit before first lot goes out at 7.30am and get a good set of tack sorted out. If it’s a raceday I’ll ride out as many lots as I’m able and I’ll have a sweat to lose a bit of weight, either at Gordon’s or in a hotel, depending on how far away the meeting is. If there’s no racing, I’ll ride out four lots and then get back home to do any jobs at home for the afternoon. My advice to anyone hoping to be a jockey is to expect to work twice as hard as you were expecting to and earn half as much as you were expecting. You have to enjoy what you’re doing. No matter what happens and what the job brings, if you put in the work and the time something will happen. Hard work will eventually pay off. The way I see it, if 100 doors close on you, you only need just one to open, so keep trying. I haven’t really got a favourite track to ride, I’m comfortable at most places, but I do like the great atmosphere at Tramore, I enjoy riding at any track where there’s a great atmosphere. I’ve been lucky enough to ride some good horses, but if there’s one I could have got on it would have to be Istabraq.” Last five seasons: 331 wins, 1,974 rides, 17% strikerate

Donagh O’Connor, apprentice jockey “My day begins riding out every morning. In the summer we start at 7am and I usually finish at 11.30am and have a sweat bath if I need to lose a small bit of weight for a ride. If racing starts early or the meeting is a distance away I ride out as many lots as I can and head straight to the races. Racing can go on to 8.30pm so any spare time is limited enough, but it’s what we’re in the game for and I’m well able to make sacrifices to do what I love. Kevin O’Ryan is my agent and gets me a lot of rides, and being on the Curragh I meet plenty of trainers every day and talk to them, but my boss Johnny Levins gives me most of my rides. My favourite course is the Curragh, it’s the fairest track and nine out of ten times the best horse wins. You can’t beat the good racing there and the atmosphere, and it’s where I’m located. If I could ride any horse it would be Frankel, but any top-class miler really, the Guineas is the one race I’d love to win. My advice for anyone hoping to be a jockey is what you will always hear, to work as hard as you can and keep your ears open and your mouth closed. It’s a tough lifestyle and you need a belief in your ability, there are plenty of people willing to help you, but you’ll always get knocks along the way and you have to be prepared for the ups and downs.” Last five seasons: 64 wins, 772 rides, 7% strike-rate

| 22 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

020 AIRO 2019_Jockeys.indd 22

14/02/2019 15:25


| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| TAKE 6 |

Rachael Blackmore, professional NH jockey “My daily routine changes a lot from week to week, but usually I get up around 6am or 7am, depending on where I’m riding out. I like to have porridge and Nutella for my breakfast before heading out. Depending on where I’m riding out, you could have three lots in some places and six lots going out in other places. If there’s racing that day I’ll head off to the races, but if there’s no racing on I’ll go to the gym. My favourite track is Leopardstown, I love riding there and my best day in racing was when I was crowned Champion Conditional for 2016/17. For a young person wanting to be a jockey, this advice probably goes for all walks of life, surround yourself with the right people and also don’t get too disheartened if things are taking a long time, there’s only a handful of people who are an overnight success and for a lot of people it takes a very long time.” Last five seasons: 149 wins, 1,442 rides, 10% strike-rate

Mark O’Hare, amateur jockey “On a typical raceday I’d be into the yard early and see the horses rolled out to the races. I also keep a few horses of my own for point-to-points so I get them done first. I’m a farrier, so I shoe from 11am and if it’s an evening meeting I’ll head to the races after finishing the shoeing. If it’s a day time meeting, I get straight on the road after riding out. It’s three jobs in one day and hard work, but I never stop thinking how lucky I am to be riding and I’m really, really enjoying it, I don’t want to have to retire. I don’t have an agent, I check in and ring a few trainers that I’ve ridden for before and if I’ve no rides I’m not sitting about. I don’t set myself targets, I take it as it comes. My favourite course is any racecourse close to my home, because those are the rare days I get to spend more time with my wife and two young children. I especially like Downpatrick, with lovely fences that I enjoy jumping. If I have any equine hero it would have to be Florida Pearl and Danoli, great chasers and my favourite finish to watch is the 2000 Champion Chase between Norman Williamson on Direct Route and AP McCoy on Edredon Bleu. If I could offer advice to any rider it is to become part of a successful yard and learn from successful people.” Last five seasons: 27 wins, 184 rides, 15% strike-rate

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 23 |

020 AIRO 2019_Jockeys.indd 23

14/02/2019 16:52


| TAKE 6 |

Paying your jockey

Andrew Lynch, NH jockey | MAGAZINE 2019 |

“I have a few horses of my own at home, so I’ll be up early to feed them and get them done before I start work. I ride out for a few people and I leave in time to be at the races an hour before my first booked ride. During the winter my day starts at 5.30am and most of the weekend meetings will be fairly local, and tracks like Clonmel and Thurles I can get to in under two hours. On a non-raceday it’s the same, I’m up early and I’ll ride out and I’ll do some schooling for different people, then ride out my own horses in the afternoon. My favourite track is Navan, a grand big galloping track, the best horse wins there, and I like Fairyhouse, too. I don’t mind Tramore, I’m usually lucky there and you always seem to get a crowd. I would have loved to have ridden Istabraq, he was a star horse and a very quick jumper, but I got the chance to ride Sublimity and won on him and he would come close. My advice to young people starting out is to work hard and never let anyone down, you never know when you might need them.” Last five seasons: 184 wins, 2,458 rides, 7% strike-rate

Colin Keane, champion Flat jockey “On the darker mornings I’m usually in work for 7.30am and I’ll ride out until 12.30pm. If there’s no racing on I’ll go home and have lunch then go out to my father’s yard and give him a hand for the evening, maybe riding out or doing whatever needs to be done with the horses. I try to keep busy and keep my weight down. When there’s racing, I might not get the full morning and only ride out two or three lots, then depending on the race meeting I’d meet up with a few of the other lads and we usually share lifts racing. My luckiest track is Dundalk, but I like Leopardstown and the Curragh as the best horse usually wins there. I would have loved to have ridden Frankel if I was to choose any horse. This year I’m really looking forward to riding Who’s Steph, she’s wintered really well and she’s potentially a Group One filly. When I was starting out the advice I was told was to keep your ears open and your mouth shut, but I’d add on don’t be afraid to ask questions.” Last five seasons: 372 wins, 2,574 rides, 14% strike-rate

n Jockey fee per race is €163.89 Flat and €187.36 National Hunt n From that fee, €7.56 is deducted from a Flat jockey and €9.07 from a NH jockey to the Jockeys’ Accident Fund. A further 2% is deducted to the Irish Jockeys Pension Trust and 2% to the Irish Jockeys Association. n Should the jockey then earn prize money, certain deductions from the total prize money are made first, before the jockey’s percentage is calculated. Deductions to Stable Employees Bonus Scheme (3.00%), IHRB (1.70%), Stable Staff Association (0.10%) and Jockeys Emergency Fund (1.00%) are first removed from the prize money. n From the remaining prize money the jockey receives 10%, which actually equates to 9.09% of the total prize money. n From the jockey’s 9.09% is deducted: Irish Jockeys Association (career ending insurance) 2.0% Irish Jockeys Pension Trust 11.00% Irish Jockeys Trust 9.00% Valet 1.50% Agent 10.00% Agent VAT 23.00% n Typically, a jockey’s earnings from a €10,000 prize would be €615.62

| 24 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

020 AIRO 2019_Jockeys.indd 24

14/02/2019 15:23


INTRODUCING W.B. YEATS Designed and built to the highest standards. Four main engines delivering 33,600 KW of power. You should expect reliability.

Partnering with Ulysses on Dublin to Holyhead. An unrivalled experience for commercial drivers. You should expect stability.

From mid March 4 times per week from Dublin to Cherbourg. The dawning of a new era of market opportunities. You should expect versatility.

W.B.Yeats - a game changer has arrived. You should expect to dominate your competition.

I RISH F ERRIES F R E I G H T

...attitude is key

ÂŽ

www.irishferriesfreight.com

Advert template.indd 1 246816_1C_Irish Ferries_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

14/02/2019 23/01/2019 13:43 10:41


| RITA SHAH |

Rita Shah with jockeys Gavin Ryan, Andy Slattery and Conor Orr.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

RITA SHAH TALKS OF LUCK, JOY, SORROW AND ENTHUSIASM TO LISSA OLIVER

| 26 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

026 AIRO 2018_Rita Shah.indd 26

14/02/2019 09:44


| RITA SHAH |

I

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

t isn’t possible to sit and have a one-toone chat with Rita Shah. There is always a third person present, perhaps not in person but most definitely in spirit. If cherished memories keep those we have lost and loved alive in our hearts, the late Oliver Brady will never leave us. Rita knew her business partner and soulmate so well that he still contributes to our conversation, with all the enthusiasm and humour of old. The immense hole he has left in the lives of those who knew him will never fully heal, but thanks to Rita his legacy continues and he is never really very far away. “When I came to Ireland it was just for a few months,” she tells us, “and I’m still here! Oliver had a mare and foal and I loved being with them. I told him that I wanted a racehorse, but he warned me it takes a lot of time and a lot of money. I have never accepted no for an answer, if I have a goal I will work hard to make it possible, so I challenged him. I don’t want to accept no! “He saw Barr’s Hill was going to the factory as an unraced three-year-old and he bought her for me just to keep me quiet! When he rang me up to tell me, I was all excited and I wanted to know how much she had cost. 150 Irish punts! I said she must be a donkey! ‘Don’t worry, if you don’t want her I’ll keep her,’ Oliver said, so in the way you do when someone else wants something, I wanted her for myself. “We went over together to Dessie Devlin with the horsebox. Dessie wished me the best of luck with her and gave me a luck penny of IR£20.

Healy Racing

Oliver Brady in his Monaghan jersey

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 27 |

026 AIRO 2018_Rita Shah.indd 27

14/02/2019 09:44


| RITA SHAH |

I WANTED TO FORM A GOOD SYNDICATE WHERE PEOPLE CAN GET INVOLVED, SO WE HAVE THE UP MONAGHAN SYNDICATE AND THE BALLYBRAY SYNDICATE.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

It isn’t in my culture to accept money, so I was shy to take it, but Oliver nudged me and said it brings Irish luck, and she won over IR£190,000. Everything in my life is just a fairytale.” It was certainly a fairytale beginning. Oliver trained the grey mare to win her first three starts, at Navan in 1986 followed up by wins at the Curragh Guineas Festival and Galway Festival. The Irish luck has held up well since, with Gazalani winning the Jameson Gold Cup at Fairyhouse for the partnership in 1997 and Maralan, Ebediyan and Balapour all successful at Graded level. Luck hasn’t always been kind, as we know, but even in defeat has come some wonderful moments, not least at the 2007 Cheltenham Festival. It was Oliver’s dream to train a winner at the Festival and that remains Rita’s ambition in his honour, but when Baron De Feypo came in third in the Coral Cup the whole of Ireland celebrated with Oliver, such was his joy. “I thought we would be asked to leave when he removed his shirt to reveal his Monaghan jersey, with cries of ‘Up Monaghan’!” Rita laughs. “There were more people gathered around our horse than the winner!” It’s easy to see why the two business partners enjoyed such a close friendship. Rita is a lady with passion, for her work and for what she can do for others, and no one can deny that quality was possessed by Oliver in abundance. “Oliver was a very giving man,” Rita agrees, “and I really miss him so much. He always wanted to touch everyone, he wanted everyone to be part of the charity, everyone had to connect to a feel good factor. And he had so much talent for operational planning, he could plan a complete enterprise on a single piece of paper.”

In some ways this must have made it hard for Anthony McCann, who had mighty shoes to fill, as well as the sense of loss to overcome. “Anthony worked with us for nine years before Oliver passed. Oliver was only supposed to be in hospital for the one night for tests, but that afternoon he called Anthony and he told him, ‘I want you to go to the Turf Club and get your licence.’ That was at 4pm and he passed away at 11pm. Can you believe that?” Thanks to Anthony’s skill and experience it has been a seamless transition. “He’s doing a marvellous job. Racing is a difficult business, especially when you are not at the very top. He’s done very well given the opportunity. He’s got 35 horses and I’ve got 15 and he’s still trying to get more. You never make money from horses. Syndicates are the answer. “The Irish are so connected and would love to have a horse. I wanted to form a good syndicate where people can get involved, so we have the Up Monaghan Syndicate and the Ballybray Syndicate. It’s easier on people and more affordable and if they give their horse to a young trainer it keeps the succession alive and is giving the industry a chance of survival. “Anthony has been very, very good to me and he has learnt a lot. He was guided by Oliver all the time and when it comes to taking it on your shoulders, he has really come through. There can be such difficult times in racing. The highs are very high, but the lows are the lowest of the lows. Konig Hall finished sixth at Dundalk last week and after safely pulling up, broke a leg. He had been such a good horse for us and could have gone on to win many more. Anthony lost a horse and had a winner, but he couldn’t

celebrate. He took that blow very hard. “Tomorrow is always a new day. I’m forever trying to encourage. My heart goes out to the people who work so hard with horses and have ambitions for their horse. They always live in hope their horse will win and they get too attached. My heart goes out to all the staff in Shabra Stables who work so hard, and here at Shabra Plastics and Recycling where people have to handle waste, I have great respect for all the staff.” Shabra Recycling is the only company in Ireland reprocessing plastic waste and the

| 28 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

026 AIRO 2018_Rita Shah.indd 28

14/02/2019 09:44


| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| RITA SHAH |

Maralan and John Cullen winning The Flyingbolt Novice Steeplechase.

work Rita accomplishes through the Shabra Group recently earned her a Distinguished Fellowship from Athlone IT. “I am so lucky to be able to combine business and pleasure and promote charity. For a woman from Kenya to take this on, it is quite special,” Rita reflects. As a co-founder of Shabra Charity Foundation with Oliver, Rita has now fundraised over €850,000 for the World Class Gene Sequencing Equipment at the Mater Hospital, Dublin in his memory. “As an owner I’m on the small stage as I don’t have too much time to spare. I don’t like

criticising people, but those in charge of the industry should seriously look at it as a business. Promote young trainers and provide more races. I don’t know if the people involved in its running are interested in strategic planning. A lot of times we’ve had to run in the UK as our horse was ready but there was no suitable race here. Horses can lose interest, they need to run, but there’s the welfare aspect of a long trip and the cost. Far better if they can race here. “I think if you look at any business, you have to first ask, how does a small trainer or a young jockey survive? That’s the only question to ask.”

For Rita, the pleasure of racing is about winning and cherishing those moments. When making an entry for a horse, she always makes sure there’s a trophy, joking that Anthony can keep the money, as long as she gets to keep the trophy. “Even today I can look at the gold cup won by Gazalani and still remember leading him in and Oliver’s reaction! You can never buy the thrill of bringing a winner into the winner’s enclosure, you can’t put a value on it,” she enthuses. “I’ve got all the happiness of my horses, but Oliver will always be at front of it.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 29 |

026 AIRO 2018_Rita Shah.indd 29

14/02/2019 09:44


| WOMEN IN RACING |

Every day is GIRL POWER ROCKS TO THE TOP

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Kathryn Foley

Meta Osborne

Manager of Sligo Racecourse since 2015, Kathryn says she is really enjoying her role. “It can be very challenging at times and very rewarding. It’s a broad job with a lot of responsibility covering all aspects, from managing people, seeing the restaurants and bars operate smoothly, dealing with sponsorship, right through to keeping everything within the Health and Safety boundaries. I find the whole thing very interesting.” Kathryn has always had an interest in racing and has been an owner, her not-too-successful horse now retired and on the farm at home. “If someone is interested in this line of work, I recommend they gain broad experience outside of the industry.”

Meta has served on the Board of Horse Racing Ireland since 2013 and in 2015 she became the first female Senior Steward of the Turf Club in the Club’s 225-year history, serving a two-year term. In this, Meta follows in the footsteps of her late father, Michael Osborne, also a Senior Steward. “I was made aware that I was actually the first female to head a regulatory body of horseracing anywhere in the world, which brings an added pressure, because I just wanted to get on and do what needed to be done rather than be viewed as something special,” Meta reveals. As a practising vet, Meta is on the Veterinary Committee of the ITBA and the Irish Equine Centre Committee, yet still finds the time to help run Tinnakill House Stud in Co Laois, co-owned with her husband Dermot Cantillon, which has produced three Group 1 winners. “Although we have high profile lady trainers and jockeys, I’d like to see the women working behind the scenes, such as in administration, getting more recognition and in particular taking volunteering roles on committees where they can have an influence on decision making and planning.”

| 30 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

030 AIRO 2019_Ladies in Racing.indd 30

14/02/2019 09:51


| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| WOMEN IN RACING |

Healy Racing

Jennifer Pugh Jennifer replaced Dr Adrian McGoldrick from January this year as IHRB Senior Medical Officer having been involved in horseracing all her life. She joined the Turf Club in 2012 and has been Point-to-Point Medical Officer since 2003, as well as being a GP in Kildare. Her own experience in the saddle means she understands first-hand the perils riders face, as she rode from 1999-2012 and was Lady Point-to-Point Champion in the 2008/2009 season, representing Ireland at the Lady Amateur Championship in Hungary and Slovakia in 2009. “I’m very happy with how things are going so far and it’s been a good eye-opener for me,” Jennifer says. “I was familiar with raceday procedures and looking after jockeys, but to see the amount of work Adrian has been doing in the background has really impressed me. I’m finding it all so interesting and I’m benefiting hugely from Adrian’s work and research. We have three active research projects going on and I’m very lucky to be working with such an experienced team. We have the potential to really change things for jockeys. It’s a part-time role but my phone is on 24/7.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 31 |

030 AIRO 2019_Ladies in Racing.indd 31

14/02/2019 09:51


| WOMEN IN RACING |

Sneezy Foster

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Denise Foster is much better known as Sneezy, thanks to a childhood nickname that has never left her, and she successfully trains both Flat and NH horses at Possextown in Meath, taking on the licence in 1998 following the tragic death of her husband David and scoring almost immediately with point-to-pointer Twisted Logic. Since then her winners have included Lily’s Rainbow, Not For Burning, Tipped Up Harry and Miles To Memphis, among many others. “I’m probably the smallest of small trainers and I fell into it, really. I think women have a couple of advantages as trainers, we are generally more sensitive and in tune with the mind-set of animals and we’re also able to multitask so well. The drawbacks are that a lot of people don’t take women seriously and they are slow to give women a chance. But it’s becoming pretty even. When I walk into the weigh room I don’t feel any different to the men and I’m treated exactly the same. It doesn’t make any difference whether you’re a man or a woman, it’s a tough business and the small yards are getting even smaller.”

Jennifer Walsh

Lynn Hillyer

Jennifer is a jockey’s agent for brother Ruby, IHRB judge and also works in TV production, and whether it’s men or women working in racing she feels there’s no difference. “If you want to do the job you can just go out and do it. I’ve been Ruby’s agent since he turned professional just over 20 years ago and we’ve had great days and bad days, but it’s the great days that make you glad you’re doing it and I love that side of my career. I’m also a judge for IHRB and I’m really enjoying that, it’s a challenge and busy. They are two different sides of the industry and I love them both just as much.” There are so many different roles within the industry requiring different skills and Jennifer believes anyone with passion can create their own niche.

Lynn has been the IHRB Chief Veterinary Officer and Head of Anti-Doping since 2016, having previously worked with the regulator of British horseracing for 12 years, focusing on anti-doping and medication control. She has led the European regulatory veterinary group of the European Horserace Scientific Liaison Committee (EHSL) for the last eight years and is the European representative on the Executive for the International Group of Specialist Racing Veterinarians (IGSRV). Lynn’s network of European and international connections has proved invaluable to Irish racing and in turn she takes much of what is learned here back to the European table. Her raceday presence and that of her team is crucial in presenting a clean image to the general public and Lynn says, “I welcome the challenges, that’s what I took the job for. It is imperative we keep that social licence. We need to be consistent, accountable, reliable and trusted.”

| 32 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

030 AIRO 2019_Ladies in Racing.indd 32

14/02/2019 15:28


Become a Member of the RDS RDS Membership offers you an exclusive Dublin city base to use for business and pleasure. And of course, as an RDS Member you will also be supporting the Irish sport horse industry, as well as our other work in the areas of agriculture, the arts, enterprise and science.

RDS Membership will also give you access to: > Our elegant Members’ Club > Use of reciprocal clubs worldwide > Superb catering & free Wi-Fi > Warm and friendly service > Vibrant program of social & cultural events > Free parking in Ballsbridge for you and your guests > Complimentary five day entry to the Horse Show (7 to 11 August 2019) > Borrowing rights from the extensive Library

To find out more contact us now e: catherine@rds.ie

Advert template.indd 1 1C_RDS_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

t: 01-240 7296

w: rds.ie/membership

15/02/2019 11:15 09:31


| INTERVIEW |

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Template for the

| 34 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

032 AIRO 2018_ORyans_V2.indd 34

14/02/2019 10:49


| INTERVIEW | THE O’RYANS - BLOODSTOCK AGENTS, OWNERS, BREEDERS, JOCKEY’S AGENT, TV HOST, GOFFS AGENT AND PRETRAINERS – IT’S RACING’S ONE-STOP FAMILY SHOP!

Caroline Norris

Bobby O’Ryan with son Mouse (Aidan), and wife, Sheila to the left; son Kevin and daughter-in-law Angela to the right

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

M

eet Bobby O’Ryan, one of Ireland’s most successful bloodstock agents; his wife, Sheila, the gatherer of contacts and organiser extraordinaire; their son Mouse (Aidan), bloodstock agent and buyer for Richard Fahey and Gordon Elliott; son Kevin, former leading amateur rider, now jockeys’ agent and television presenter; and Kevin’s wife Angela (nee Crowley), a leading lady rider, now Kevin’s partner in a pretraining business. Before we get down to the business of an interview we first sit down to lunch, picnicstyle. Already, we’re part of the family and the conversation flows. The O’Ryans are straight in with the anecdotes and reminiscences that fill the room with laughter and are all unprintable. One thing is clear, if there is a single golden rule for a successful family business then it has to be a shared passion. Each does their own thing, but the strong base of a happy and supportive family ensures individual success. Success is the happy outcome, but it’s not about doing well, it’s about doing it well. The O’Ryans are not afraid to try. That certainly comes from Sheila and Bobby, whose life together has been a series of fresh adventures into the unknown, breaking new ground and trusting their own instinct. The boys remember that spirit, in the tough times as well as the good, even when they were too young to really understand the significance. From the earliest age they were always involved and never excluded.

COMING FROM A RACING FAMILY, THE CROWLEYS, IS JOINING THE O’RYAN FAMILY ANY DIFFERENT? ANGELA “Out of the frying pan, into the fire! I’d be well used to it. I worked for my sister Frances as assistant for several years. Working with Kevin is easy, I can be at home when I need

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 35 |

032 AIRO 2018_ORyans_V2.indd 35

14/02/2019 10:49


| INTERVIEW |

Caroline Norris

LEFT: Bobby (centre) with sons Aiden and Kevin. BELOW: Bobby O’Ryan perusing the catalogue; BELOW LEFT: Bobby chats with Des Leadon at the GOFFS sale.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

to be, the working day is flexible and I’m versatile. I get out into the yard between school runs, ride out, do all the office work wherever needed. As a young couple it all happened so quickly, we built the stables before the house, just to get up and running and get some money coming in. Our children Claire, Jessie and Robert are big into ponies and this summer we were on the road every weekend, competing in shows. Claire is eventing and we enjoy it. Claire was Under-12s Eventing winner and was second at the RDS.” KEVIN “We’re definitely enjoying the pony shows, very much so. The kids have made friends, we’ve made friends. You can see the next generation coming along, so many of their cousins are competing there as well. Between the GAA and ponies, it keeps them occupied.” ANGELA “And it keeps them passionate about something, before the teens kick in. It’s a social thing.” BOBBY “I hope next year to be able to get round and see them jumping.”

DOES THAT MEAN YOU’LL BE SLOWING DOWN A BIT OR EVEN RETIRING? BOBBY “Definitely not slowing down! That would be boring! The faster the better!” KEVIN AND MOUSE “He’ll never retire!”

HOW DID O’RYAN BLOODSTOCK FIRST COME ABOUT? BOBBY “Dad, Paddy, was a jockey, then became a trainer, he broke horses for The Queen Mother. My uncle Bobby won the 1946 Champion Hurdle on Distel. I’ve always enjoyed wheeling and dealing, the first thing I ever sold were sheepdog pups in Tipperary town. I met Sheila and after six years as headlad at Adrian Maxwell’s, with Sheila also working there as secretary, Adrian decided to move to the USA.” SHEILA “We had a nice holiday in Hialeah, but the two boys were young and it wasn’t a good place for kids.”

DAD, PADDY, WAS A JOCKEY, THEN BECAME A TRAINER, HE BROKE HORSES FOR THE QUEEN MOTHER. I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED WHEELING AND DEALING, THE FIRST THING I EVER SOLD WERE SHEEPDOG PUPS IN TIPPERARY TOWN.

| 36 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

032 AIRO 2018_ORyans_V2.indd 36

14/02/2019 10:49


| INTERVIEW |

Jane Matthews

BOBBY “I was headlad for Jim Bolger, and for Mick O’Toole for ten years. I’d always had a few horses for selling and a few breeze-up horses, so we began looking for a place to set up on our own. We found Kirriemuir in 1990 and the business started from there. It was very hard, but you have to take a gamble. I thought, Jesus what am I after doing! We had no money, but we survived.”

YOU’RE KNOWN FOR SELLING HORSES TO PLACES SUCH AS INNER MONGOLIA AND KOREA. HOW DO YOU FIND THESE NEW MARKETS?

SHEILA “It all started from talking to strangers! Everything with me starts from talking to strangers!” BOBBY “I’m always living on the edge. I’ve fell off a few times, but I like to be doing that. I came home one evening and said to Sheila, book flights for Hong Kong, and she did! Then we went on to Macau and got contracts. We got an order for 85 horses for Korea and the guy organising the transport disappeared and there we were with 85 horses, so we had to rent Tipperary and Thurles racecourse to keep them. And we had to rent a plane!” SHEILA “I became an expert in renting

planes, with help from Grainne Gibbons! We couldn’t use the living room that Christmas, I had 85 sets of documents spread out across the floor, some of them written in Korean. The vets there would refuse entry to a horse on minutia.” KEVIN “I remember that! I don’t think I really understood what was going on, but I knew there was something wrong.” MOUSE “I remember it all very well, realising this business isn’t all rosy. It was good to see the tougher side. At the airport they were all day and all night loading pallets of three horses at a time, I’ve never seen anything like it.” BOBBY “The boys would have been about 10 and 12, but they were a great help organising the horses. When that plane finally took off I was like the Pope, I kissed the ground!” SHEILA “Bobby said let’s get out of here and I said, no, I’m staying, I want to make sure they don’t come back! We lost a lot of money on that. They were sent to the Equine Centre built for the Seoul Olympics. It was incredible, they put horses up in a sling to shoe them!” BOBBY “They ended up winning over €2m in prize money there.”

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

LEFT: Shiela in the outer ring at GOFFS. RIGHT: Bobby bidding. BELOW: Bobby and Mouse discuss tactics

IT MUST HAVE BEEN A GOOD GROUNDING FOR YOUR FUTURE? KEVIN “I remember we had nothing at home, but we wanted for nothing. It was a great education, I really appreciate it. Dad has a great work ethic and he taught us to have that ethic. He always said, if you get up in the morning you’ll make a living.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 37 |

032 AIRO 2018_ORyans_V2.indd 37

14/02/2019 10:50


| INTERVIEW |

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

FROM TOP: Bobby and granddaughter, Claire; Shiela O’Ryan with daughter-in-law Angela

KEVIN:  Winning the Goffs Land Rover Bumper at Fairyhouse in 2002 on Hardy Eustace.  Any time I’ve got a Champion Jockey, I’ve had 14 Champion Jockey and seven Champion Apprentice.  Interviewing Lester Piggott for At The Races.  I love working for Goffs and I’m very lucky to be part of the team, Henry Beeby is a

ANGELA:  Riding 14 winners as an amateur, culminating in being Champion Lady Jockey 1997/1998. | MAGAZINE 2019 |

 Seeing the horses that we nurture going on to win races, especially at listed and graded level. BOBBY AND SHEILA:  Best day as an owner was Kevin’s first winner on Sarah Blue at Kilbeggan.  Best as an agent was Cockney Rebel winning the English and Irish 2000 Guineas.  Best as parents, too many to choose from, but two great boys and now three great grandchildren. Happy days! MOUSE’S HIGHLIGHTS:  The success of the twoyear-olds for Gordon Elliott, especially Beckford, as

MOUSE “We all do our separate things, but we come together a lot. I buy for Gordon Elliot and I’ve been buying for Richard Fahey for 15 years. That came about through my cousin Robin (O’Ryan), Richard’s assistant. I’ve always been close to Robin and started out helping him and Richard at the sales and it works well. I think Gordon is making me look good! I will always be grateful to Jim Gorman who gave me a start, he just let me off to do what I want, and thankfully I bought plenty of winners. I buy some for Kevin Prendergast and Joseph O’Brien and a few for Gigginstown. There’s no clash of interest between Richard and Gordon, we’re good friends and it all fits in perfectly. “Whatever sale is on, between myself, Dad and Robin we take a side each. Dad and I have clashed a few times bidding for a horse, but it’s all good.” BOBBY “I get a great thrill out of buying a cheap horse. I buy a lot for Keith Dalglish and for foreign clients. This year I bought 48 horses for Kishore Mirpuri, to race in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. I’ve bought 15 Group One winners, the dearest one was €80,000. Some of the good ones include Rajasinghe, Rumble Inthejungle, Cockney Rebel, Boston Bob and Wootton Bassett. I’ve

Caroline Norris

legend.

been very lucky, I bought three Royal Ascot winners and 122 winners so far this year.”

ANY PEARLS OF WISDOM? BOBBY “The markets are fine, but when it comes to the lesser horses, if you like it you’ll buy it, if not you won’t. If they stop all that gloom and doom, things are fine.” KEVIN “If you’re willing to work you will do fine.” MOUSE “Definitely. All our friends are the same, none of us is a genius but we all did well.” KEVIN “Mum made me stay in school and go to agricultural college and get the Green Cert. That was the best thing I could have done.”

I’m proud to be working with Gordon and to have suggested that idea.  Any of the four Group One wins of Ribchester.

I REMEMBER WE HAD NOTHING AT HOME, BUT WE WANTED FOR NOTHING. IT WAS A GREAT EDUCATION, I REALLY APPRECIATE IT. DAD HAS A GREAT WORK ETHIC AND HE TAUGHT US TO HAVE THAT ETHIC.”

| 38 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

032 AIRO 2018_ORyans_V2.indd 38

14/02/2019 10:50


DON’T JUST WIN,

Win

The Curragh launching April 2019, hosting 19 world class Racedays. Owners access to world leading facilities and a raceday experience like no other.

www.curragh.ie 246646_2L_Curragh Racecourse_JM_AIRO_V6.indd 1

15/02/2019 14:31

YOUR KINDA TOWN 30 APR I L – 4 MAY 2019 P U NCHE ST OW N R ACE C OU R SE OF T HE Y E A R 2 0 18 R E CO R D B R E A KI N G P R IZ E M O N E Y, D E LI C I O U S CO M P LI M E NTA RY LU N C H I N O U R

OW N E R S & TR AI N E R S LO U N G E & CO M P LI M E NTA RY

TI C KETS TO DAY O N E O F P U N C H E STOW N F E STIVA L 2 019 PUNCHESTOWN.COM

246690_2L_Punchestown_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

Advert template.indd 1

14/12/2018 14:15

15/02/2019 14:32


STATEROOM VOTED NO. I TRAVEL

+

-

ASHFORD CASTLE, IRELAND

H O T E L O F T H E Y E A R - V I R T U O S O A W A R D S 2015 L E I S U R E W O R L D ’ S B E S T B O U T I Q U E H O T E L D E C E M B E R , 2015

T H E BE S T

A collection of 17 award-winning luxury boutique hotels. Red Carnation proudly pampers guests with generous hospitality, gourmet and comfort cuisine, extravagantly artful surroundings and a professional staff passionate about quality and service. LONDON

| DORSET | GUERNSEY | IRELAND | GENEVA | PALM BEACH CAPE TOWN | DURBAN | WESTERN CAPE REDCARNATIONHOTELS.COM

Advert template.indd 1 1 RedCarnation2_1C_JM_AIRO.indd 1 RCH_2017_01_JM.indd

15/02/2019 11:13 04/08/2017 11:17 14:41


| REGULATIONS |

RULES AND REGULATIONS

Passports & Drug Testing Disqualifications due to positive drug tests have been largely down to mistakes and poor stable management, rather than malpractice, and incorrect entries and mistakes in passports have led to raceday withdrawals, too. Losing a race or arriving at the races to find your horse is a late withdrawal isn’t something any of us wish to endure, but each scenario also has a wider impact. As we already know to our cost, the media does not always present racing’s problems in a sympathetic light and is often more interested in attention-grabbing headlines. Presenting a clean image to the general public is vital to all of us, if we are to continue to enjoy the support of the Government and income from television rights. Thankfully, Dr Lynn Hillyer, Head of IHRB Anti-Doping, can offer us some valuable advice. She begins at once by reminding us of the simple key points to remember: n Only use medications that are necessary n Withdraw all medicines at the right time n Give absolutely nothing other than normal food and water on race day n Be very careful with supplements n Be aware of what comes into contact with your horses n Work closely with your vet n If in doubt, ask “My number is readily available, so seek advice whenever there is doubt,” Lynn stresses. “Neither I nor the IHRB believe there is a problem with racing’s integrity, but we must work together to

ensure those outside of the industry are also left in no doubt about the integrity of the sport.” Her role centres on maintaining a level playing field for all those professionally involved, but the use of race day drugs is prohibited not simply to prevent cheating, but to protect the welfare of horse and rider. “If you are patching up a lame horse so that it is sound enough to race, that horse should not be racing,” Lynn reminds us. “In the interests of horse welfare and jockey safety, the IHRB absolutely believes horses should not be racing on any medication.” There is an industry-wide policy on prohibited substances and doping control set out by the IFHA (International Federation of Horseracing Authorities) and Ireland is at the forefront of the international decision-making process, with Denis Egan on the executive panel and Lynn Hillyer on the advisory board. The IHRB controls the sampling and testing process and decides what to analyse and how it is to be done.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

HOW TO AVOID COSTLY MISTAKES

NEITHER I NOR THE IHRB BELIEVE THERE IS A PROBLEM WITH RACING’S INTEGRITY, BUT WE MUST WORK TOGETHER TO ENSURE THOSE OUTSIDE OF THE INDUSTRY ARE ALSO LEFT IN NO DOUBT ABOUT THE INTEGRITY OF THE SPORT.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 41 |

039 AIRO 2019_Rules & Regulations_V2.indd 41

14/02/2019 10:55


| REGULATIONS |

VETERINARY MEDICINES HAVE SCREENING LIMITS LINKED TO DETECTION TIMES AND THE MORE DRUG PRODUCTS GIVEN, THE GREATER THE RISK OF EXCEEDING THE SCREENING LIMITS.”

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

“The Rules pertaining to use of drugs are based on scientific evidence after decades of discussion and agreement within IFHA experts and there is a huge gap between the international threshold and what is normal for a horse,” Lynn explains, allaying any fear that something naturally found in a normal horse’s system could lead to a positive test. “When testing on stud farms, the IHRB are looking only for those substances prohibited at all times, such as anabolic steroids.” When a sample is taken it is split into two, as Sample A and Sample B. If the A-Sample tests positive, a request may be made within four days to have the B-Sample tested. Any later than this and the B-Sample will have deteriorated and will no longer be an accurate twin of the A-Sample at the time that was tested. “Retaining samples for future retrospective testing is different to testing the A and B samples. In future tests, the deterioration levels will be the same and results therefore comparable,” explains Lynn. Samples are screened against thousands of substances and if there is a match the IHRB is informed. When a positive case moves on to the Referral Committee, an investigation examines whether there is a prohibited substance and how it got there. The horse is disqualified and other sanctions may be made according to the circumstances and the substance. Contrary to rumour, the rise in positive samples is not linked to a change of laboratory, with 15% of samples going to other laboratories and returning similar results. “Veterinary medicines have screening limits linked to detection times and the more drug products given, the greater the risk of exceeding the screening limits,” Lynn points out. Particular care should be taken if multiple vets are visiting the yard, as a stacking effect from repeated ingredients within different medicines and supplements pose a serious risk. “Detection times are scientifically assessed, in a controlled environment with data. When converted to an estimated withdrawal time it is not in a controlled environment, so it is

important to add on days to the withdrawal time and ask the IHRB if you are unsure.” Using only reputable feed suppliers is also recommended, as they invest heavily to ensure the screening of their products. Ensure forage is well-sourced and have samples tested, as hay has been associated with naturally occurring prohibited substances such as morphine. “Always ask yourself if it is absolutely necessary to use supplements and remember they don’t always contain what they say on the tin,” warns Lynn. Claims by manufacturers to be Turf Club approved are not always true. “Always assume supplements or medications contain prohibited substances, unless you have specific advice otherwise from the IHRB. If you mix supplements together you may inadvertently give more than the legal threshold. “Use medicines only when needed and only for the condition being treated, always with input from your vet. You are in breach of the law if you do not use a vet in medicine procurement, so never buy products online. “Good management will minimise risks,” Lynn assures us. “Establish who is responsible for particular duties and how the information will flow. Keep all medications secure, keep all prescriptions, and ensure the Medicines Register book is properly maintained. “Educate staff on prohibited substances. Delegate an individual to be responsible for medicating horses, not the same person who is also feeding. Medicate horses last, after everything else has been done. It is wise to clear the box labels for horses that will be racing in the next 48-hour period, to avoid mistakes. Medicating the wrong horse is common, so ensure rigorous yard management.” Accidental exposure to prohibited substances can also occur from staff members, so adopt a strict policy of no drugs, no urination in the yard, and no high caffeine drinks in the yard. Seeded bread has also been linked to contamination, so provide somewhere for staff to eat lunch, away from the horses. Forty-eight hours before a race, check the Medicines Register book. “Question if the horse really needs anything additional to normal food and water and, if so, should it be racing?” Lynn asks. “Pay attention to what is given at evening stables and avoid herbal supplements. On the day of the race the horse must have nothing other than normal food and water.” In comparison, passports are far easier to control. Check the passport of every horse on arrival and ensure the markings and details are accurate. These may not have been checked and updated since they were originally entered as a foal. When entries are made, check that the correct date has been entered and properly signed. Check the passports of intended runners 48 hours prior to the race, so that any errors may be rectified.

PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT IS GIVEN AT EVENING STABLES AND AVOID HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS.”

| 42 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

039 AIRO 2019_Rules & Regulations_V2.indd 42

14/02/2019 10:55


Telephone: 087 2591718 Fax: 045 860804

Email: info@declanlandy.com Fax: 045 860804 Website: www.declanlandy.com

gallops, in All Weather Specialist in All Weather gallops, Specialist Land Drainage, Plant Hire and Paddocks and road lungeing rings Paddocks and lungeing rings internal making

Supply and erection of V Mesh wire fencing products

Land Drainage, Plant Hire and Competitive quotations for Post internal road making and Rail Fencing

Supply and erection of V Mesh Competitive quotations on request wire fencing products

Website: www.declanlandy.com

Competitive quotations for Post and Rail Fencing

Pluckerstown, Kilmeague, Naas, Co. Kildare

Competitive quotations on request

Telephone: 087 2591718 Fax: 045 860804

DECLAN LANDY FENCING Pluckerstown, Pluckerstown, Kilmeague,Kilmeague, Naas, Kildare Naas, KildareCo.gallops, AllCo.Weather in Land

Specialist Drainage, Plant Hire and Telephone: 087 2591718 Email: info@declanlandy.com Email: info@declanlandy.com PaddocksTelephone: and lungeing rings internal road making 087 2591718 Pluckerstown, Fax:Kilmeague, 045 860804 Fax: 045 860804 Naas, Co. Kildare

Website: www.declanlandy.com Website: www.declanlandy.com

Telephone: 087 2591718 Fax: 045 860804

Email: info@declanlandy.com Website: www.declanlandy.com

gallops, Weather in Allgallops, Specialist Land Plant Drainage, Plant HireCompetitive and Competitive Weather AllWeather Specialistinin Land Drainage, HirePlant and Hire Pluckerstown, Kilmeague, quotationsquotations for Post for Post Specialist All Gallops, Land Drainage, and Paddocks and lungeing rings internal road making and Rail Naas, Co. Kildare Paddocks and lungeing rings internal road making and Rail Fencing Fencing Paddocks and Lunging Rings Internal Road Making

Supply and erection of V Mesh

Competitive Telephone: 087 2591718 Email: info@declanlandy.com fencing products Specialist in All Weather gallops,wireLand Drainage, Plant Hire and Competitive quotations for Post Fax: 045 860804 Website: www.declanlandy.com Paddocks and lungeing rings internal road making and Rail Fencing

andoferection Supply andSupply erection V Meshof V Mesh wire fencing wire fencing products products Specialist in All Weather gallops, Drainage, Plant Hire and Supply andLand erection of V Mesh Competitive Quotations for Paddocks and lungeing rings wire fencing internal road products making Post and Rail Fencing

Competitive Competitive quotations quotations on request on request Competitive quotations for Post Supply and Erection of V Mesh Wire Competitive quotations on request and Rail Fencing Fencing Products

COMPETITIVE QUOTATIONS ON REQUEST Supply and erection of V Mesh Telephone: +353 (0)87 2591718 wire fencing products

Fax: +353 (0)45 860804

Competitive quotations on request

Email: info@declanlandy.com Website: www.declanlandy.com

Pluckerstown, Kilmeague, Naas, Co. Kildare

Trading in U.K. as V-Mesh Fencing Ltd.

Advert template.inddLandy_JM_AIRO19.indd 1 246687_1C_Declan 243118_1C_Declan Landy_JM_Goffs.indd 1 1

14/02/2019 08/02/2019 10:05 10/10/2017 13:46 10:23

quot


| INTERVIEW |

Meet Jonathan Mullins THE

| MAGAZINE 2019 | Jonathan Mullin, Head of Communications HRI

| 44 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

044 AIRO 2018_Jonathon Mullins.indd 44

14/02/2019 11:01


| INTERVIEW |

How closely do you work with DAFM and how important is our industry viewed as by the Minister? As a commercial semi-state body HRI, through its board, reports to the Minister for Agriculture Food and the Marine. This reporting line reflects the importance of Ireland’s thoroughbred racing and breeding industry to agricultural development and employment in every region of the country. Successive governments have seen the dividend that racing and breeding provides – especially in rural Ireland – and we are extremely grateful that this contribution is backed up by support through the Horse and Greyhound Fund. Relationships like this have been key in racing and breeding getting across to government the difficulties Brexit will pose for the industry. The HRI Ownership Department has seen a number of improvements and innovations, have you received positive feedback? The 2018 Ownership figures would suggest yes. Owner retention is over 70% which is the highest it has been since 2007. Owners certainly welcome the increases in prize money which in 2018 was €63.5million and in 2019 will again increase to €66.1million. The Foran Equine Irish EBF Auction Series and the Irish EBF Auction Hurdle Series have provided opportunities for less expensive horses bought at auction and are attractive for trainers and owners alike. On a more practical level, the improved owner facilities and offerings at many of the tracks, in

Total Recall Racing Club

addition to the increased ticketing allocation, makes for a better owner racecourse experience. New owners increased by 16% in 2018, and the growth areas are coming from syndicates which are up over 30% with a steady rise in sole owners. The “Experience It” innovation is providing a taste of ownership for potential owners, is HRI working to retain new and existing owners? As mentioned, increased prize money and the auction series make racing a more attractive proposition for owners. The Ownership division in HRI continue to work with stakeholders to tweak and improve these initiatives. In 2018 ownership launched a number of campaigns aimed at raising the profile of racehorse ownership. #thisisourteam and #investinyourpassion campaigns saw Ownership working with a series of ambassadors such as Sean O’Brien, Ed Chamberlin and a number of existing owners to promote ownership. Ownership also worked closely with the Irish

National Stud Racing to promote the club concept to a wider audience. In addition to numerous PR and marketing campaigns, they hosted a series of events in both Ireland and the UK. These ‘Racing to the Top’ events introduced new people to the world of racing and led directly to new owner registrations. Undoubtedly, the Ownership department recognise that many trainers face challenges when it comes to attracting new owners, and in addition to the marketing grant they also run a series of workshops and mentoring sessions for trainers, to help in the area of sales and promotion. This work will continue in 2019 because horses in training drive employment and secondary employment all over the country and it is the investment from owners that drives so much of this important activity. The Ownership department will continue to promote the concept of racehorse ownership both domestically and internationally and the focus will be on the ownership experience and the introduction of a number of initiatives to improve the experience for existing owners.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Could you tell us a little about your role and what it entails? As Director of Communications and Corporate Affairs at Horse Racing Ireland, I lead the Communications team responsible for the management and development of the communications function within HRI, comprising corporate affairs, internal and external corporate communications, press office and event management. The Communications and Corporate Affairs department is the direct point of contact in Horse Racing Ireland for the Minister of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, and other government departments and bodies.

INCREASED PRIZE MONEY AND THE AUCTION SERIES MAKE RACING A MORE ATTRACTIVE PROPOSITION FOR OWNERS. THE OWNERSHIP DIVISION IN HRI CONTINUE TO WORK WITH STAKEHOLDERS TO TWEAK AND IMPROVE THESE INITIATIVES.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 45 |

044 AIRO 2018_Jonathon Mullins.indd 45

14/02/2019 11:01


| RACECOURSES |

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

PUNCHESTOWN

WE TAKE A LOOK AT THE MODERN FACE OF IRISH RACECOURSES.

IN WITH THE

New HRI introduced the Racecourse Capital Development scheme to enable all 26 Irish racecourses to improve the raceday experience. It is also hoped that the scheme will have supported somewhere in the region of 1,300 direct and indirect jobs during its completion. 2018 saw the final allocations from the Capital Grant Programme, resulting in the commencement of the next phase of the Leopardstown redevelopment, the completion of major developments at the Curragh, Galway, Naas and Punchestown, and the new straight seven furlong track at Cork. More than €2.3m has also been initially approved under the Tracks Works Scheme.

The go-ahead team at Punchestown has made a conscientious effort to improve the raceday experience across the board, aided by a €6.2m redevelopment greatly enhancing facilities, including a new roof on the grandstand, refurbished public bar and café venues with increased seating and toilet facilities throughout the parade ring enclosure, introduction of the Bollinger Winners’ Room and the La Touche Restaurant. Throughout the entire process attention was paid to maximising the views of the action, whilst ensuring customer service expectations were not only met but exceeded. Unveiled at the 2018 Irish National Hunt Festival was the new €4m Hunt Stand, incorporating a dedicated Owners and Trainers Lounge, public bars and betting facilities. The Hunt Stand replaces the original open-air stand, but retains the character, heritage and personality of Punchestown. Its prime location overlooks the final furlong, where reserved enclosure patrons can enjoy some of the race starts and all of the finishing stages. The ground floor is entirely dedicated to the general public and is home to the stylish Festival Bar, the Fox Den Café and the elegant Bollinger Lounge. The first floor houses the 160-diner Corinthian Restaurant and the exclusive

| 46 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

044 AIRO 2019_Racecourse New facilities_V3.indd 46

14/02/2019 11:03


| RACECOURSES |

Goffs Owners and Trainers Lounge, both offering exceptional panoramic views of the racecourse. The private Vantage Room also offers stunning views of the entire racecourse. Conor O’Neill, Punchestown General Manager, tells us, “The team had a clear vision for the redevelopment, but a tight timeline and even tighter budget meant we had to take a very hands-on approach which paid off. It has been our aim for years to dedicate a special venue to owners so regardless of their horse’s performance they have a raceday experience befitting the home of Irish jump racing! Feedback so far suggests we have fulfilled that aim and we will continue to work hard in this area.”

One of our most actively upwardly-mobile racecourses, a culture of continuous improvement and development has been witnessed by racegoers at Naas for the past number of seasons. It seems the Naas management are on an unrelenting mission to provide modern top-class facilities and racing and they are keeping well ahead of the Joneses! Initial work was put in to improve the racetrack and racecourse facilities, with a state-of-the-art watering system installed in 2016 and upgrade of the parade ring and new administration office completed in 2017. Current developments have focused on the customer experience, with a €500,000 upgrade to the grandstand interior, which will include the introduction of a café and Members Area in 2019. Creche facilities have also been introduced, open on all racedays to fit in with their family focus. Most exciting of all, 2018 saw the unveiling of ‘The Circle’, part of the €3.2m HRI Capital Development Scheme. The innovative design, located between the parade ring and grandstand, provides enhanced viewing points for the general racing public and professionals alike. The ground floor of the building is home to The Circle Bar, a sports bar open to all racegoers, while upstairs on the first floor is the Goffs Owners and Trainers Lounge, providing 180-degree views of the track and making it one of the world’s finest vantage points to view racehorses, both on the track and in the parade ring. The original concept for the unique €1.7m Circle came from Turnberry Design Consultants, who specialise in racecourse design. It was developed further by architects Hamilton Young and built by Duggan Lynch builders. Tom Ryan, Manager of Naas Racecourse, explains, “Our aim was to erect a building which would help bring Naas Racecourse to the next level. We are delighted with the finished product and our customers can now enjoy a new Naas experience.”

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

NAAS

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 47 |

044 AIRO 2019_Racecourse New facilities_V3.indd 47

14/02/2019 11:04


| RACECOURSES |

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

THE CURRAGH As we have already seen during its racing season, the Curragh is creating world class facilities on a par with the best anywhere in the world. The new grandstand will open in 2019 and promises five-star corporate facilities, restaurants, bars and superb viewing facilities. There will be a designated Owners Lounge located on Level 1 of the new Grandstand, which will give owners a fantastic experience when they have a runner. The â‚Ź70m redevelopment was expertly planned not to interfere with the racing at the Curragh, so regular racegoers have had the opportunity to monitor its progress throughout. The promise hinted at during 2017 was brought astonishingly to life in 2018 and the feedback from racegoers and professionals alike was nothing but positive. The continuation of racing during the process enabled any teething problems, such as the size of the parade ring, to be identified and tweaked. When the gates re-open for 2019 on 13th April, racegoers will be greeted by a new arrivals and reception area. A new parade ring will provide better viewing for all and help to connect racegoers to the stars of the sport in an up close and personal setting. For the stars themselves, there is a new weigh room with vastly improved facilities for the jockeys and a completely refurbished stable yard, ensuring the equine stars now also enjoy first class facilities. Unchanged is the unique spirit of the Curragh and unrivalled atmosphere, but most importantly among the changes are brand new fixtures, with the introduction of a threeday Spring Racing Festival (24-26 May) and two-day Autumn Festival (28-29 September), the moving forward of the Irish Derby Festival to ThursdaySaturday (27-29 June) and a new series of Summer Sounds Friday evening meetings throughout August (9th, 16th, 23rd and 30th).

| 48 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

044 AIRO 2019_Racecourse New facilities_V3.indd 48

14/02/2019 11:04


IMAGE COURTESY ADAMS AUCTIONEERS

| BLACK AND ALL BLACK |

The Dual of the Curragh

O

n a recent trip to Boston, my son advised me to visit the Museum of Fine Arts. I had planned to stay merely a few hours but, despite my best-laid plans, I stayed the whole day! The museum has a fantastic collection of Fine Arts from all over the world. On my tour, I came across a selection of Dublin Silverware and, to my surprise, a beautiful racing trophy punch bowl which had Curragh Connections. The inscription on the trophy read, “The Great Match Run on Curragh of Kildare September 5th 1751 for a 1000 Guineas by Black And All Black, the property of Sr. Ralph Gore Bart ad Bajezet ye. Property of ye. Rt Honble – Earl of March won with ease by ye former.” What was all this about? Black And All Black, whose stud book name was Othello, became a celebrity of his time. He won several plates in England and was sold for 500 guineas, a considerable sum in its day, to Sir Ralph Gore, a self-made Irishman from Manor Gore in Donegal, who brought the horse back to Ireland. Black And All Black’s most famous race was against the Earl of March’s horse, Bajezet. The race took place on the Curragh in September 1751 for a prize of 1000 guineas over a distance of four miles. The excitement of the occasion was extraordinary, with large crowds in attendance to witness the Local Baronet versus the Lord of

the Realm. For those spectators, the significance of the event was not lost – it wasn’t just David versus Goliath, it was Ireland versus England! Lord March’s jockey weighed-in lighter than Sir Ralph’s and weights were added to his belt. Bajazet was odds-on favourite and led the way, until they came to the ‘Round Hill’ when Black And All Black received the advantage and won the race by about 10 yards. While a large and joyous crowd welcomed home Sir Ralph’s horse, a ‘side-show’ story of deceit and deception was unravelling. During the race, Lord March’s jockey managed to guilefully dispose of his weights which were picked up by a ‘careful observer’ and slipped back onto the jockey’s belt before he returned to the scales. Unfortunately for Lord March, little did the careful observer know that he too was being carefully observed and he was challenged by Sir Ralph and threatened with a ‘thrashing’ if he didn’t admit who he was were acting for. Lord March knew he was in trouble. In true “Trumpian” style, he dismissed the allegations but Sir Ralph was having none of it. In those days, gentlemen of high-standing used to settle their differences by drawing pistols at dawn, and so, Sir Ralph issued the following invitation. “My Lord – I shall be happy to meet you by five o’clock tomorrow morning at _________ and if your Lordship will have the goodness to bring

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

A MATCH FOR 1000 GUINEAS AND PISTOLS AT DAWN!

a friend, a surgeon and a case of pistols with you, I doubt not our little misunderstanding will be settled in less than five minutes. I have the honour to be _________ “ Lord March accepted the invitation and, along with his friend, Ruglen, a surgeon and a case of pistols, arrived on time to the secret location. Surprise gave way to terror when his Lordship saw before him a polished-oak coffin, upon which a plaque was engraved with his name, title and the day’s date! In a rather brave yet eccentric move, the Irishman welcomed him to the dual. “My dear fellow, you are of course aware that I never miss my man and I find myself in excellent form for sport this morning. I have not a shadow of a doubt upon my mind that this oaken box will shortly be better calculated for you than in your present dress.” Lord March did not waste any time in deciding what to do next. He made a full and complete apology, to which Sir Ralph graciously accepted. And so, the Dual of the Curragh was auspiciously avoided!

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 49 |

049 AIRO 2019_David Mongey_V2.indd 49

14/02/2019 15:42


| FIXTURES |

RACEDAY BENEFITS FOR AIRO MEMBERS One of the great benefits of being a member of AIRO is the access to our exclusive racecourse hospitality marquees at designated meetings. There is also a growing number of free race days, highlighted below, at courses around Ireland for owners with horses in training.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

AIRO has secured agreement with the Association of Irish Racecourses to have free entry to race meetings on selected dates for racehorse owners who currently have a horse in training but do not have a runner on the day. Free admission applies to a total of 115 meetings in 2019 and AIRO expresses its appreciation to the racecourses throughout the country for this gesture. Details of the meetings are highlighted on this calendar. RACECOURSE HOSPITALITY FOR MEMBERS The Association’s hospitality arrangements will be in place again in 2019 at Galway, Punchestown and the Curragh. Having these hospitality facilities was made possible with the support of Horse Racing Ireland, Punchestown, Galway and Curragh Racecourses. The Association also entered into a hospitality exchange arrangement with the UK and French Owners Associations and details of this can be found on page 78 of this magazine. The Association will provide hospitality for its members at the following race meetings in 2019:  PUNCHESTOWN RACING FESTIVAL APRIL 30TH TO MAY

3RD Marquee, where complimentary refreshments will be available. Marquee located in Reserved Enclosure.

 KEENLAND PHOENIX STAKES AUGUST 9TH Free admission to the Racecourse and complimentary refreshments.  GALWAY RACING FESTIVAL JULY 29TH TO JULY 31ST Marquee, where complimentary refreshments will be available. Marquee located close to Parade Ring.

MARCH

07.03.19 09.03.19 16.03.19 16.03.19 26.03.19 30.03.19

APRIL

05.04.19 06.04.19 12.04.19 15.04.19 18.04.19 20.04.19 26.04.19 27.04.19 28.04.19 29.04.19

MAY

05.05.19 06.05.19 07.05.19 10.05.19 10.05.19 13.05.19 13.05.19 15.05.19 21.05.19 22.05.19 23.05.19 27.05.19 28.05.19 31.05.19

Thurles Gowran Park Down Royal Limerick Clonmel Navan

Wexford Leopardstown Ballinrobe Tramore Clonmel Cork Kilbeggan Wexford Sligo Naas

Gowran Park Down Royal Ballinrobe Cork Downpatrick Killarney Roscommon Punchestown Sligo Wexford Tipperary Ballinrobe Ballinrobe Down Royal

| 50 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

050 AIRO 2019_Fixtures.indd 50

14/02/2019 15:44


| FIXTURES |

JULY

03.07.19 04.07.19 04.07.19 05.07.19 05.07.19 06.07.19 06.07.19 08.07.19 09.07.18 14.07.19 14.07.19 15.07.19 15.07.19 22.07.18 23.07.19 26.07.19 26.07.19

Listowel Curragh Navan Roscommon Roscommon Punchestown Gowran Park Sligo Wexford Down Royal Down Royal Ballinrobe

Bellewstown Bellewstown Tipperary Bellewstown Wexford Bellewstown Naas Roscommon Roscommon Fairyhouse Sligo Downpatrick Killarney Ballinrobe Ballinrobe Down Royal Wexford

AUGUST

05.08.19 06.08.19 07.08.19 08.08.19 12.08.19 17.08.19 15.08.19 19.08.19 20.08.19 21.08.19 27.08.19 28.08.19 29.08.19 29.08.19 30.08.19 31.08.19

Cork Roscommon Sligo Sligo Ballinrobe Cork Tramore Roscommon Sligo Killarney Ballinrobe Bellewstown Bellewstown Tipperary Down Royal Down Royal

OCTOBER

01.10.19 08.10.19 11.10.19 12.10.19 14.10.19 15.10.19 31.10.19

Cork Galway Downpatrick Limerick Gowran Park Punchestown Clonmel

NOVEMBER

07.11.19 17.11.19 23.11.19

Thurles Cork Gowran Park

DECEMBER

SEPTEMBER

02.09.19 05.09.19 06.09.19 07.09.19 09.09.19 11.09.19 16.09.19 17.09.19 18.09.19 20.09.19 21.09.19 25.09.18 27.09.19 28.09.19 30.09.19

Roscommon Clonmel Kilbeggan Wexford Listowel Laytown Galway Galway Naas Ballinrobe Gowran Park Sligo Downpatrick Navan Roscommon

05.12.19 14.12.19 16.12.19 29.12.19

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

JUNE

02.06.19 07.06.19 08.06.19 10.06.19 11.06.19 12.06.19 16.06.19 18.06.19 19.06.19 21.06.19 22.06.19 24.06.18

Clonmel Fairyhouse Naas Limerick

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 51 |

048 AIRO 2019_Fixtures.indd 51

14/02/2019 11:09


| SYNDICATES |

Caring is SYNDICATES AND SHARED OWNERSHIP, AN ACCESSIBLE ENTRY POINT TO THE THRILLING WORLD OF RACING

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

O

Owning a racehorse is not just for the elite few, the thrill of having a runner at the racetrack can be enjoyed by those on a more limited budget as well and more than 60% of racehorses are owned in some form of joint ownership, syndicate or partnership, with the number of new syndicates increasing by 33% in 2018. Before getting involved in a syndicate for the first time, remember that it isn’t only about having a runner on raceday. The average horse has only five races a year, so other aspects of ownership such as regular updates and photos, and visits to the yard to see your horse, are important. Ensure also that the syndicate manager is clear and transparent about all costs. Ask how often you will be welcome to visit the stables, whether the horse is insured and how often updates will be received on its progress. It is also important to find out what happens if a syndicate member falls behind on the monthly training fees. Racing enthusiasts who cannot afford syndicate shares may also consider joining a racing club. Members pay an annual membership without owning a share in a horse. Prize money is shared between members, but the club keeps any profit from selling horses.

Templeburn Racing Syndicate The Templeburn Racing Syndicate has horses in training with Crossgar, Downpatrick, based Colin McBratney and is run by Colin’s daughter, ensuring on-the-spot news and updates for the 40 members. “They’re all local people,” Colin tells us, “so they try to call in here as often as they can and they are always welcome. We invite them along whenever we’re going away from home to gallop the horses and they have a close involvement with the horses. It helps them to know it’s not all easy work and we try to educate them and help them have a better understanding of the game. Some owners will tell you where they want their horse to run, but with experience they realise it’s never as easy as that and we hope to offer the syndicate members that knowledge and experience, so they can get more out of it and have a bit of fun. I send out WhatsApp messages to all the members on a regular basis and when the five day entries are made I’ll let everyone know and update them on how the horses have worked. A few members like to keep in touch themselves and will give me a ring to ask after the horses. Running a smaller yard, it’s nice that I can keep in touch with the members on a one-to-one basis which maybe you wouldn’t get in a bigger yard. I feel it’s important owners are kept well informed. Syndicates are the way forward and ideal for people who don’t want the sole commitment, and sharing the costs allows owners to have more horses, so they can be more competitive. If one horse is being rested or is unsuited by ground conditions, it’s great to have one or two others that can give you a run.” Templeburn Racing Syndicate has been lucky so far, with two winners and several placed runners, including Caerleon Kate and Shipwreck, and being a part of a group adds to the social interest and fun. camcbratneyracing.com

| 52 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

052 AIRO 2018_Syndicates.indd 52

14/02/2019 11:11


| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| SYNDICATES |

It’s All About The Girls It’s All About The Girls is an all-women international racing syndicate horses are trained by Gai Waterhouse in Australia, syndicate founded in 2013 by Anna Seitz Ciannello, the Client Nicolas Clement in France, Jessica Harrington in Ireland, Relations and Public Relations Manager for Fasig-Tipton. and by three US trainers, Ron Moquett, Michael Stidham While working with trainer Todd Pletcher, Anna witnessed and Horacio DePaz. Already their best horses include the first-hand the excitement of ownership and noticed the two Gr.1 winners I’m Already Sexy and Global Glamour, NSW fun was mostly being had and shared by men. She started 3yo of the Year 2017, and the 2017 VA-bred Champion 2yo IAATG to provide an opportunity for women to share the Filly Yes To The Dress, Our Majesty and the two Irish-trained camaraderie of horse ownership with other fun-loving, likefillies Chicas Amigas and Sparkle’n’joy. Chicas Amigas was minded women. Elaine “Legs” Lawlor, Ireland and Australia subsequently sold to Qatar Racing and holds an entry in the Manager, and French-based Bloodstock agent Tina Rau Irish 1,000 Guineas for her new owners. Each IAATG member complete the team. “Putting together the syndicate of It’s receives a ticket to the races, including a seat when possible, All About The Girls in Ireland has been amazing,” Elaine and paddock entry, including the winner’s enclosure if Lawlor reveals. “For so long women have watched their successful and a photo from the track photographer. They husbands, who were involved in the business, but weren’t may also attend morning workouts and are encouraged involved themselves. Those times are changing. Syndication to visit their horse during training hours. The mornings are gives people the opportunity to have access to a racehorse an excellent time to speak with trainers and jockeys and Bobby O’Ryan with son Mouse (Aidan), without costing the world, it opens the industry up and gets experience behind-the-scenes life, but IAATG also hosts and wife, Sheila to the left; son Kevin Angela to the left more people involved. When you put a groupand of daughter-in-law women numerous parties and gatherings throughout the year. together to invest in their own horse, the energy, style and Membership promises to be educational, social and fun. fun they bring to the racecourse is palpable!” The IAATG itsallaboutthegirlsracing.com THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 53 |

052 AIRO 2018_Syndicates.indd 53

14/02/2019 11:12


| SYNDICATES |

Irish National Stud Racing Club

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Jonathan Sweeney Racing Club Kevin Dunlea manages one of Ireland’s newest clubs and tells us, “We started the club in October of last year with the aim to keep it affordable and to provide enjoyment and experience for anyone who might be interested in getting a racehorse and would like to learn more. It’s €200 per year to join and then €100 per month. We have just the two horses at the moment, Battling Spirit who won twice last year and a five-year-old half-sister to Lighthouse Warrier who will start out in a point-to-point in a month or two, but we hope to add a dual-purpose horse to give us some fun during the summer as well. Our members include a group of local people who are fans of Jonathan Sweeney and followed the yard. They were impressed by Jonathan’s strike-rate and when they heard about the Club they wanted to get involved. We have a WhatsApp group set up for members and we send regular updates, photos and videos from the gallops, as well as via email and phone calls, as some members prefer not to use social media or phone apps. We’re also on Twitter and have a members only login area on our website, to share photos, videos and news. We try to organise an activity for members every month, such as a stable visit or going away to the gallops to watch the horses schooling, as well as providing the full raceday experience when we have a runner. If we haven’t had a runner for a while, we’ll have an outing to the races or to a point-to-point and we are trying to encourage an interest by including outside visits to other racing yards and stud farms. We chose Jonathan as our trainer because he has a great work ethic, the horse always comes first and his attention to detail is key. He has the patience to give a horse time and we all want to do right by our horses.” jonathansweeneyracingclub.ie

The I.N.S. Racing Club is the perfect entry-level opportunity to own and race top-class Flat and National Hunt horses for just €399 per year. Members receive free entry to racing whenever the I.N.S. Racing Club has a runner, as well as days out to leading training yards and stud farms, educational workshops, access to industry news and updates, and regular information and updates on all the I.N.S. Racing Club horses through the Club’s state-of-the-art platform. Any prize money earned is also shared between members. “The Irish National Stud exists to ensure everyone is given the opportunity to get closer to a thoroughbred,” Marketing manager Ellen Mitchell tells us. “Whilst racing clubs have been around for some time now, we wanted to create an ownership experience that would make horseracing accessible to the sports fan at a great value-for-money cost. The aim of I.N.S. Racing is to build the largest network of its type in Ireland and encourage people to attend race meetings on a regular basis, to fully experience and enjoy the thrill of horseracing. I.N.S. Racing officially launched in December 2018 and we already have well over 350 members. The club is made up of fans of horseracing that now have an opportunity to get fully immersed in this great sport. Many of the club travelled to see our first runner, the 2015 Irish Grand National winner, Thunder And Roses, run in a point-to-point in Boulta and we had a great day. I.N.S. Racing has some of the finest trainers based throughout Ireland, training some very exciting prospects including the Listed two-yearold winner, Lethal Promise. We have big dreams for 2019, including a Royal Ascot runner.” The Club horses racing in 2019 are made up of both Flat and National Hunt and are at various stages in their career, providing year-round interest. Three-year-old Lethal Promise, with Willie McCreery, is hopefully heading for Royal Ascot. Divine Approach is an improving four-year-old half-sister to Red Cadeaux, with Michael O’Callaghan. 2015 Irish Grand National winner Thunder And Roses is the star 11-year-old gelding in training with Ross O’Sullivan, who will hopefully take the Club to Cheltenham, Aintree and beyond. Joe Murphy trains the five-year-old filly Twenty Times, from the high-class family of Irish St Leger hero Flag Of Honour. All of those winning Club horses set the scene for the two 2019 newcomers, the unnamed three-year-old daughter of Ruler Of The World, a half-sister to two Gr.2 winners, with Dermot Weld, and a two-year-old Free Eagle half-brother to nine winners, six of which won at Black Type level, in training with Patrick Prendergast. irishnationalstud.ie

| 54 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

052 AIRO 2018_Syndicates.indd 54

14/02/2019 11:12


One of Ireland’s longest established Equine Veterinary Practices Specialist Medicine & Surgical Services Prepurchase examinations for all International Markets In attendance at all Major Thoroughbred Sales The Curragh, Co Kildare. Tel: 00353 45 521373 / Fax: 00353 45 521114 / www.aleh.ie / email: info@aleh.ie

246644_2L_AngleseyLodge_JM_AIRO.indd 1

07/01/2019 16:01

Your future winners deserve a winning service

Award Winning Service, Advice & Research  Extensive range of diagnostic tests  Nutritional analysis of feed & fodder  Expert veterinary advice  Water quality analysis  Bespoke equine probiotics  Yard biosecurity advice Irish Equine Centre Johnstown, Naas, Co. Kildare Tel: +353 (0)45 866266 Email: iec@irishequinecentre.ie / www.irishequinecentre.ie 246700_2L_Irish Equine_JM_AIRO19.indd 1

Advert template.indd 1

05/02/2019 09:21

14/02/2019 13:48


| POINT-TO-POINT |

Rain, hail & shine

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

RECORDS WERE BROKEN, CHAMPIONS WERE CROWNED AND THE WEATHER PROVED TO BE THE MAIN TALKING POINT - ALL IN A YEAR BETWEEN THE FLAGS. EOGHAIN WARD REPORTS

Wilcosdiana, champion mare.

P

oint-to-Pointing in this era of unpredictable weather is certainly proving to be the challenge for organisers, who found themselves in the rather unusual position of clearing snow from their tracks in March, and then watering tracks in late November to combat dry weather. Tales of volunteers working late into the night carrying out necessary remedial work to tracks in the run-up to fixtures was common place. The Trojan efforts of these volunteer committees and their supporters is what makes the sport so special. When racing was able to take place, it was the Wexford men that were the ones to beat. Barry O’Neill was crowned national champion for the second consecutive season, a campaign which also saw him pick-up further rider’s titles in both the eastern and northern regions. The Kiltealy man later went on to ride his 500th winner between the flags at Borris House in December, becoming only the fourth rider in the sport’s

history to do so and five days after he collected his second HRI Award. Not a bad week’s work. O’Neill’s boss Colin Bowe won a sixth handlers’ title, whilst Sean O’Keeffe was the season’s breakthrough rider. The Taghmonnative entered the season with just one winner to his name, however 11 winners in this breakthrough campaign saw him take a share of the Under-21 rider’s title, before he made the switch to the professional ranks. None other than Jessica Harrington was quick to snap him up as her stable conditional, a significant recommendation in itself. He had shared the Under-21 title with the Wexford-based Shane Fitzgerald, who is currently looking to become the first rider ever to win that title for the third straight year. Elsewhere, Derek O’Connor added to his vast collection of titles in the western and southern regions, Liz Lalor was once again the leading lady, Eugene O’Sullivan’s Wilcosdiana was the champion mare, whilst Pat Doyle sent out Sydney Paget to win seven races on

the bounce, and with that the champion pointer crown. On the track, a record-breaking 1,236 races were won by point-to-point graduates, including the blue ribbon Cheltenham Gold Cup with Native River and the Punchestown Stayers Hurdle with Faugheen, whilst Edwulf created one of the stories of the season with a back from the brink success in the Irish Gold Cup under Derek O’Connor. Pointto-Pointers once again proving to be the number one breeding ground of future stars. The future is also looking bright following years of notable decline in the participation rates. The number of horses is on the rise, a wave of promising young riders are making their presence felt, whilst the IHRB have introduced a number of new initiatives. A €5,000 race has been created for older horses to boost the winners division of older horses, whilst significant changes have been made to the hunter chase license for handlers that will hopefully make it easier for them to run their horses on the track. All in all, there is hope for the future.

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 59 |

059 AIRO 2018_Point to point.indd 59

14/02/2019 15:31


| RETIRED FACES |

Where Are They Now? LISSA OLIVER REMINDS US THOSE WHO RETIRED THIS YEAR AREN’T SO FAR AWAY

Vroum Vroum Mag

Punchestown General Manager

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Dr Adrian McGoldrick, IHRB Senior Medical Officer Adrian has pioneered medical research and services for professional riders, but his good work won’t end with his retirement. “It’s a sideways step,” he says and will continue with research projects, including monitoring bone density of jockeys to combat osteoporosis, researching the benefits of vitamin supplements, and working with Waterford IT on mental health issues. He also has a wish list and would love to see RACE developed into a full rehab centre, but says, “I envisage going racing just as frequently, as I’ve been asked to stay involved at Naas and the Curragh and hopefully I can do a few days at Punchestown and other places.”

Sixteen years ago Punchestown was on the brink of closure, but Dick stepped in and turned its fortunes around, extending the Punchestown Festival from four days to five, increasing attendance to record levels and bowing out with the legacy of the new Hunt Stand. In recognition of his contribution, Dick has remained as president of Blackhall Racing, Punchestown’s controlling company, and he continues to be involved in the day-to-day running of the business. The team at Punchestown reveal that retirement now allows him to be at the racecourse even more often than before, so life is now one long busman’s holiday for Dick!

David Betts

Dick O’Sullivan,

Top-class mare Vroum Vroum Mag was retired from racing just a week before looking to regain her OLBG Mares’ Hurdle crown at the 2018 Cheltenham Festival, not having raced since the 2017 Punchestown Festival. Trainer Willie Mullins remained upbeat about the prospect of her return, but sadly it wasn’t to be. Instead she retired in time to be covered by a choice of the leading NH sires and as a regally-bred champion mare we can now look forward to her raising an aspiring champion in 2019. If her youngster proves half as versatile and useful, her name will continue in racing’s record books for more years yet.

Saxon Warrior By the Japanese wonder sire Deep Impact out of the top two-year-old Maybe, Saxon lived up to his Warrior name and treated us to some fine performances in defeat. Unbeaten at two, he ran away with the 2000 Guineas and was placed in the Epsom and Irish Derby. He bounced back to be beaten just a neck by Roaring Lion in the Eclipse Stakes and it was another fight to the line to savour when the same distance separated the pair in the Irish Champion Stakes. That proved his last race, injury forcing his retirement to Coolmore Stud, and we’ll see the first of his offspring on the racecourse in 2022.

| 60 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

060 AIRO 2019_Where are they now.indd 60

14/02/2019 12:13


| RETIRED FACES |

Dessie Scahill,

Katie Walsh, jockey Katie announced her retirement after riding Antey to success at the Punchestown Festival. The leading amateur achieved the highest-placed finish by a lady rider in the Grand National when she came third on Seabass for her father Ted in 2012, and won the Irish Grand National on Thunder And Roses in 2015. She also rode a double at the 2010 Cheltenham Festival. “It’s been on my mind for the last while and I just said when I rode the next winner that would be it,” she revealed. For many years she has been a successful consignor of breeze-up horses and, far from retiring, will be kept busy pinhooking and breaking young horses.

Dessie first called the Irish Derby winner home in 1971 and his 48th Irish Derby in 2018 marked the end of an era. It was his final commentary and he was overwhelmed by the unexpected outpouring of good wishes from everyone. While he won’t miss the commentating, he’s wondering how he will fill his time and is looking forward to continuing as a racegoer, this time at a more relaxed pace between races. “I don’t like going racing when I’m not working, I’m not used to walking around at the races with nothing to do. But I will still go to places such as Leopardstown and the Curragh and see old friends.’’

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

David Betts

racecourse commentator

Mendelssohn Breeders’ Cup and UAE Derby winner Mendelssohn was retired from racing in December, following his final start in America. He showed real brilliance when wining the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf at Del Mar in 2017. The Aidan O’Brien-trained colt targeted the major North American races this season, beginning his threeyear-old career with a record-breaking wide-margin win in the UAE Derby at Meydan. Although he disappointed in the Kentucky Derby, being by Scat Daddy and a half-brother to champions, Into Mischief and Beholde, he is sure to be popular with breeders and begins his new stallion career at Coolmore’s American farm, Ashford Stud.

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 61 |

060 AIRO 2019_Where are they now.indd 61

14/02/2019 15:47


| RETIRED FACES |

Nina Carberry,

Healy Racing

jockey After nearly 17 years and over 400 winners, Nina bowed out on the winner Josies Orders at the Punchestown Festival, admitting, “I’ve been doing it all my life and if I can’t do it 110%, it was time to give up, so I just said this is the time now.” She rode her first Cheltenham Festival winner, Dabiroun, in 2005 and rode a further six Festival winners, as well as the Irish Grand National aboard Organisedconfusion in 2011. Married to Katie Walsh’s brother Ted, Nina gave birth to Rosie a year ago and will continue to ride work at Ballydoyle. She hopes to buy and sell a few horses, too.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Christy Roche, trainer

Christy had been one of our greatest jockeys before retiring from the saddle to take up training, the winners coming just as easy to him as a trainer. Now he has fully retired, handing over his Curragh stables to his son Padraig in January 2018. He has surprised himself by just how much of a backseat he’s taken and tells us he doesn’t miss training at all. “I can keep my own hours. I’ve been rearing foals for the sales for the past ten years and now I can concentrate on my mares and foals, plus still enjoy a casual game of golf in the summer.”

Djakadam Dual-Cheltenham Gold Cup runner-up Djakadam retired in June, following an injury sustained in the Grande Steeple-Chase de Paris. He won seven times, including back-to-back runnings of the John Durkan Memorial Chase at Punchestown. The nine-year-old has now returned to his native France to spend his retirement with his breeder Richard Corveller, at Richard’s farm in Mayenne near Château-Gontier. Richard is a veterinarian and says, “I devote myself to my job and breeding in parallel.” Djakadam is therefore assured the best of lifestyles and is likely to act as companion to Richard’s mares and foals, who will be hoping to grow up just like him.

Order Of St George Third and fourth respectively to Found and Enable in back-to-back Arcs, Order Of St George’s 13 wins have earnt him even greater bragging rights, as they include the Ascot Gold Cup and two Irish St Leger trophies. The imposing bay was one of our most popular racehorses and it’s a safe bet he’ll become an equally popular sire, standing under the Coolmore NH banner in 2019. He’ll be covering mares from February through to June, after which he’ll enjoy a summer of leisure turned out in his paddock, still eating up the Turf, but a little more literally this time!

| 62 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

060 AIRO 2019_Where are they now.indd 62

14/02/2019 16:14


| 2019 |

THE YEAR AHEAD FOR HRI AIDEN McGARRY OUTLINES PLANS FOR THE NEXT TWELVE MONTHS. HORSE RACING IRELAND’S OWNERNERSHIP DEPARTMENT HAVE SOME INTERESTING BENEFITS COMING DOWN THE LINE.

2018 has been another busy year for the team in Horse Racing Ireland’s Ownership Department. Amber Byrne (Owner Development Manager), Caroline Townend (Owner Executive) and I (Owner Relations Manager) are focused on the improvement of the ownership experience and in turn attracting new owners into the sport. Some of our projects and activities over the 18 months have included: RACECOURSE EXPERIENCE With assistance of the Horse Racing Ireland Racecourse Capital Development Grant, racecourses such as Punchestown and Naas opened new Owner’s Lounges to compliment other recent improvements. Looking to 2019, we will see additional facilities opened at Dundalk and of course the opening of the new Curragh. Along with the improvement in facilities, we have seen improvements in complimentary lunch and meal offerings at the racecourses and this is something we are keen to continue to improve. RACECOURSE ADMISSIONS Highlighted regularly as an issue, a new owner ticket allocation on racedays has been introduced. In conjunction with the Association of Irish Racecourses, Horse Racing Ireland introduced additional ticket allocations for racehorse owners with runners on the day. All sole owners, partnerships, clubs and companies can apply for an additional four tickets to complement their AIR card allocation through www. racehorseownership.ie/tickets. As well as this, all registered syndicate members are now guaranteed admission through the same process via the syndicate agent. This is an important step in ensuring a fair provision of admission tickets for those who are an integral part of the raceday.

ADDITIONAL BENEFITS Between Owner Racedays, processing complimentary tickets to racedays at Punchestown and the Curragh, events in Dublin and London, the Ownership Department has aimed to provide additional benefits to owners away from the racecourse. 2019 is going to see further exciting offerings with the introduction of a wider range of exclusive benefits to owners. Please ensure your email address is registered with Horse Racing Ireland to receive these offers as well to ensure your receive any winning race replay or picture.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

COSTS OF OWNERSHIP In terms of costs, Horse Racing Ireland has significantly reduced our charges in recent years, with reductions in registration fees as well as the cost of running in races worth €20,000 or less. Growth in syndicate and club participation is one of the strategic goals of Horse Racing Ireland as it offers a sustainable and affordable means for people to get involved in ownership.

HRI REGISTRATIONS & ACCOUNTS The rollout of the online RÁS system has given owners 24 hour access to their Horse Racing Ireland owner account allowing any number of tasks to be carried out at their convenience. This free service allows for the ability to make withdrawal requests, submitting an authority to act or viewing horses returned in training etc. Quick, easy and accessible through mobile, more and more applications will be added to the RÁS system over time. As well as the development of the RÁS system, the registration forms are in the process of being updated to allow for a much more user-friendly experience for first time and repeat owners. PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES In addition to improving the experience of current owners, a number of promotional activities at home and abroad have taken place. As mentioned earlier, the syndicate model has been to the fore of all promotions, encouraging new members to join existing syndicates or assisting in setting up new ventures. Much of these promotions can be seen on our website (www.racehorseownership.ie) and our social media channels, HRI Owners on Twitter & Instagram and HRI Ownership on Facebook. CONTACT THE TEAM Should you have any queries or issues that you would like highlighted, the Ownership Department of Horse Racing Ireland can be contacted on +353 (0)45 455455 or email owners@hri.ie

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 63 |

061 AIRO 2018_Aiden McGarry.indd 63

14/02/2019 12:15


| VETTING AT SALES |

Vetting at public auction ERNAN O’DONNELL EXPLAINS

W | MAGAZINE 2019 |

hile there is frequent discussion regarding the role of a vet in the purchase of a thoroughbred at public auction it remains a truth that thoroughbred horses are frequently bought without even the most cursory veterinary examination. While the “Conditions of Sale” do offer some reassurance to purchasers, there are many potential pitfalls that are not covered under these conditions. There are also some consumer protection laws applicable that vary from country to country. The old adage “Caveat Emptor” or “Buyer Beware” is useful advice when purchasing the most mundane of objects but gains even more importance when purchasing thoroughbred horses at public auction. It is important to add at this stage that most vendors presenting horses at auction have no intention of selling unsound or unsuitable horses and at any sale you are much more likely to buy a sound horse than not. The role of the vet is in the main to provide some reassurance that this will be the case. The prospective purchaser, in most sales, has the opportunity to ask that a vet of their choice examine the animal prior to the selling time and report back the findings. This hopefully would be requested giving a reasonable amount of time for this to be performed before the sale time and not performed in haste, similar to a “Pit Stop” in Formula 1. It is important for a vet to tailor the examination to be appropriate for the different types of sale. A vetting performed on a yearling is obviously different to an examination performed on a broodmare. The examination itself can be divided into three general stages. It is noteworthy that it is now considered routine for the vet to inform the vendor who has requested the veterinary examination of the horse.

Stage 1 CLINICAL EXAM: The clinical exam is the basis of all veterinary examinations and involves the following structures to be examine: n HEART: using a stethoscope the heart is auscultated on both sides listening for any significant altered rhythm (arrhythmia) or abnormal sound (murmur). n EYES: Using an ophthalmoscope, the surface and inner structures including retina are assessed. n MOUTH: Checking for any obvious abnormalities of the mouth e.g. parrot mouth or injury. n SKIN: Looking for any lumps or bumps that may be significant e.g. warts, scars or sarcoids. n JOINTS/LIMBS: Palpation and manipulation of the limbs and joints, looking for any signs of heat pain or inflammation and swelling. The initial examination of the horse is generally examined inside the stable and then outside of the box where it is examined at the walk, and in some cases, can also be trotted up. In the case of colts, the reproductive organs are examined also at this stage. Fillies intended for breeding would usually be presented at sale with a ‘Breeding soundness cert’ which is performed at its originating farm before arriving at the sales complex

Stage 2 RESPIRATORY APPARATUS An endoscopic examination or “Scope” is performed routinely for any horse intended for racing. A prerecorded video of the respiratory apparatus (larynx and pharynx) may be viewed to avoid multiple examinations. This part of the examination is probably the area that causes most concern for vendors and purchasers. It is a complicated area and while many of the conditions of the larynx are included in the “Conditions of Sale” many horses are requested by purchasers to be scoped pre-sale to obtain their vets’ opinion. While there are agreed grading systems specifically for laryngeal function which most vets use, the difficulty can be in the vet’s interpretation of his or her examinations. There is potential for differing opinions between vets especially around the borderline cases. Further complication is added by the potential for laryngeal function of an individual animal varying between examinations.

Stage 3 RADIOGRAPHIC OR ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION Often for higher value animals intended for racing there may be a series of radiographic images (usually 36) available for interpretation by the prospective purchasers’ nominated vet. Usually this would have been performed on the originating farm however it can be performed at the sales complex. Less routinely ultrasound imaging may be used to assess certain soft tissues i.e. tendons or ligaments.

| 64 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

064 AIRO 2018_Vet_V2.indd 64

14/02/2019 15:49


| VETTING AT SALES |

Traffic Light System

Some vets use a traffic light system when reporting on vettings performed at sales. Red and green are self-explanatory however the amber is where there is something noted and a discussion needs to take place. There are numerous factors that influence a final decision.

Pass/Fail

You will often hear at the sales whether a horse has passed or failed by the vet. There are cases where a horse could not be recommended for purchase under any circumstance and this will have “failed” the vet. In reality, this is rare and more commonly nowadays you may hear a vet say, “on the balance of probabilities” and use a grading system for the level of risk involved in purchase.

Client/agent tolerances or preferences

Prospective purchaser experience can be important as they will associate certain conditions with certain outcomes, sometimes regardless of the vet’s opinion. Some purchasers will be risk adverse and some will tolerate more risk. For a horse with a particular problem, a vet could suggest purchase with a recommendation for a surgery to remedy the issue. Some purchasers will accept this scenario, for others it will be anathema. Generally, purchasers will opt to accept the risk or not however some will lower their intended bid price to accommodate the assessed risk.

The vets themselves obviously have the weight of a veterinary and hopefully years of experience to add to their informed opinion. It does require the vet to keep up to date with research applicable to the conditions of the thoroughbred, and also be aware of changes in tolerance to certain conditions due to our expanding knowledge of veterinary in thoroughbreds. A vet may have had ‘bad experience’ with a particular issue but the opinion formed should bear in mind the current thoughts in the wider veterinary community.

Intended use for horse

Summary

Obviously, the intended use for a horse will affect the clarification of the risk. For example, a retained testicle in a thoroughbred National Hunt foal/yearling is less significant than a retained testicle in a well-bred Flat yearling with the dream of breeding potential still alive. Also, certain conditions, given time, carry a much-improved prognosis. For example, a yearling identified with low-grade sesamoiditis of the fetlocks may cause a vet to advise that the risk associated with training the horse as an early two-year-old would be too great. However, a vet may be more comfortable recommending the purchase if the horse is to be aimed for a late two-year-old or three-year-old career. Another factor to include in discussion is the intention to resell, many horses purchased will be offered for resale at some stage of their career. Some conditions identified on a vetting are likely to persist and are obviously open to interpretation by another vet at a later stage. Certain countries have different tolerance for risk so this would have to be discussed.

In any given year, the practice that I work in is presented with a handful of horses with a condition that would have been unlikely to satisfy an examining vet at the sales. There can be significant costs associated with time away from its intended purpose, veterinary bills and even larger cost where the issue is career limiting. Obviously, given the nature of buying a horse at public auction, the prospective purchaser may pay a vet to examine many horses in order to buy one within budget, and may even have a bill with no horse purchased. Such is the nature of the business. However most significant purchases in life involve some sort of ‘vetting’ process and it is ironic that the ‘vetting’ process is sometimes omitted in the very transaction the term originated in.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Vet’s own tolerance

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 65 |

064 AIRO 2018_Vet_V2.indd 65

14/02/2019 15:49


| SADDLE-MAKING |

TAKE CRAFTSMANSHIP AND HERITAGE COMBINE TO PRODUCE MODERN, WORLDCLASS SADDLES. SAFFRON O’SULLIVAN SPEAKS TO TOM BERNEY.

T | MAGAZINE 2019 |

he epic tale of the Berney Brothers family business began in 1880, in a workshop just a short distance from The Curragh. Strong bonds with family and community, have seen both the saddlery trade and the workshop passed down from generation to generation. Tom Berney, owner and head saddler, says,“there is a certain ethos when you’re working for a family business that you do what needs to be done, the work ethic is quite strict. I think it adds a lot to the business because the hearts of the craftsmen are truly invested in it.” Berney began working in the shop almost 32 years ago, a tradition that has continued to the present day with Tom’s own children learning the trade from an early age. “When I saw my kids coming in, they just had a gift in their hands. They made difficult tasks look quite easy, it just came naturally to them,” Berney says. However, it’s not just the proprietors that draw business to Berney Brothers, but the quality of their product. Expanding their range to 35 different models of saddle, the shop now caters for every discipline from racing and show jumping to ponies and dressage. Each requires 35 hours to create and are made from the finest leather. “When you buy a Berneys saddle there is a kind of assurance with it that you know that all the materials are of the highest quality, you’re going to buy a saddle that’s going to last a lifetime, if you mind it,” explains Berney. With such dedication to standards and quality control it’s no wonder that Team Ireland Equestrian have forged a partnership with Berney Brothers, a relationship which has been mutually beneficial. “Our saddle designs have improved with the benefit of the knowledge that these top riders are bringing to the game. I think our new saddles, The Grand Prix Range, are really world class.” Like any business the key to success is the customer, and yet again Berneys exceeds expectations by taking customer care to a new level. The workshop itself has become a source of intrigue due to its historic reputation dealing with families whose patronage has remained over the generations. “When people come and visit the shop and see the workshop and get professionally fitted for a saddle, they walk away with a memory that lasts.” They have formed their own community of customers throughout the years, creating a devoted demographic of repeat clients. Refreshingly, despite its fame and popularity, Berney Brothers remain humble, viewing themselves as “a small cog in a bigger wheel”. “I think that there’s a trust that has been built up over the generations. I always say that I’m working on the reputation that was built by my father and his father before him.”

| 66 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

066 AIRO 2019_Saddler.indd 66

14/02/2019 13:08


James Moore

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| SADDLE-MAKING |

WHEN I SAW MY KIDS COMING IN, THEY JUST HAD A GIFT IN THEIR HANDS. THEY MADE DIFFICULT TASKS LOOK QUITE EASY, IT JUST CAME NATURALLY TO THEM.”

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 67 |

066 AIRO 2019_Saddler.indd 67

14/02/2019 13:08


LEFT: Grey wool hat with bobble, €30.00, Principles

| FASHION |

BELOW: Clear blue sunglasses €10.00, Next

Blue Depths, wool jumper, €164.95, Samsøe & Samsøe, Avoca

Grey chunky rib Cashmere sweater, €285, Lucy Nagle

LEFT: Black Cashmere turtleneck, €125, Theo & George

ABOVE: Dolostone, navy, padded jacket from a selection at Barbour, Kildare Village

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

BELOW: Laurel belted shawl short padded coat, €135, Monsoon, Littlewoods

Bluebell and drizzle grey scarf, €195, Lucy Nagle

SPRING SALES STAY COSY IN STYLE WITH OUR FASHION EDITORS’ PICK OF THE BEST KNITS, JACKETS AND BOOTS FROM FAR LEFT: Tipperary boot in Walnut and Irish €380; Sligo in Black Brown and Irish, €375. both Dubarry

Blue down jacket, €120, Betty Barclay, Arnotts

BOOT IT THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 69 |

069 AIRO 2019_Fashion_V2b.indd 69

14/02/2019 15:52


| FASHION |

LADIES DAY

1

REWRITE THE BOOK! YOU CAN HAVE COMFORT AND STYLE WITH THIS FABULOUS IRISH-DESIGNER EDIT

2

3

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

TAKE THREE: HATS 1. Red velvet looped hat, €275, Deb Fanning Millinery. 2. Bespoke wire hairband, from a selection at Leonora Ferguson. 3. Felt beret with crystal embellishment, €300, Aoife Harrison

CAPE CRUSADER: Clifden Rust cape with Antique Green silk lining, from a selection at BallyBoy Design

2 1

ROSE COLOURED EVERYTHING

5

Whatever the weather, shades of red and pink will add a bloom. 1. Pink print Juko dress, €395, Niamh O’Neill. 2. Red high short sleeved top and skirt, Helen Hayes. 3. Pink, Zarina, assymetric hem dress, €399, Heidi Higgins. 4. Print silk Eabha scarf, €175, Hazel Greene. 5. Eadach Banshee dark rose print silk oversized scarf, from a selection at eadachbysaraoneill.com 6. Drama Pop Cherry earrings, €120, Helena Malone

6

4 3 | 70 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

069 AIRO 2019_Fashion_V2b.indd 70

14/02/2019 15:55


| FASHION | 18ct white gold diamond pendant, €2,785, Appleby

Red clutch, €60, Olga Berg, Arnotts

LEFT: Passport cufflinks, €50.00, West End by Simon Carter, Arnotts. BELOW: Silver horse cufflnks, €195, Appleby

LEFT: Black 100% wool tuxedo with satin lapels, €599, Louis Copeland

Black Dionne prom dress, Little Mistress, from a selection at Debenhams

Tuxedo jacket, €113, River Island

AWARDS NIGHT Rose gold sequined dress, from a selection at Debenhams

Tuxedo, €55, Burton, Asos

DRESS CODE: BLACK TIE

Gold metallic clutch, €66, Olga Berg, Arnotts

BELOW LEFT: Black Draconia sandals, €690, Gucci. BELOW RIGHT: Silver Soulier Mara heels, €535, Malone

9ct Gold earrings 9ct with pearls & chrysophrase €675, Helena Malone

Red evening dress, €3,500, Versace, Brown Thomas

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Royal blue Dani, dress, €155, Monsoon, Littlewoods

Bow ties, €10, River Island

Annual Calendar watch, POA, Patek Philippe, Weir & Sons

Black Leather Loafers, Burton, from a selection at Debenhams

Navy and gold shortsleeved Charlotte wrap dress, €70, Monsoon, Simply Be Platinum vintage style diamond ring, €7,995.

Black ‘Powermore’ lace up oxford shoes, Dune, from a selection at Debenhams

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 71 |

069 AIRO 2019_Fashion_V2b.indd 71

14/02/2019 15:55


Diamond, sapphire and platinum Pegasus ring, Price upon request, Boucheron

| JEWELLERY |

LEFT: horsehair bead, €20.00, The Stamping Block, www.etsy. com/ie/shop/ thestampingblock

RIGHT: Snaffle bit necklace, €28.95, theequinewarehouse.ie

RIGHT: Montana Wrap full Pavé, leather $6,995.00 vincentpeach.com

ABOVE: hanging crystal snaffle bit earrings, $49.00, Red Scarf Equestrian, www.redscarfequestrian.ca

BELOW: Gold Mare and Foal brooch, 9ct gold, €480. Also available in silver, €98; from George Bryan Jewellers, Dalkey

| MAGAZINE 2019 | RIGHT: Silver & horse hair bracelet, €195, Germosi, www.Germosi.com

CLASSIC AND TIMELESS, EQUESTRIAN JEWELLERY NEVER SEEMS TO GO OUT OF STYLE.

BELOW: Carus Ring, €485, Nanna Salmi, tailoredequestrian.com

ABOVE: Galop Hermes ring, €1,670, Hermes, www.hermes.com LEFT: Mini Pied-De-Biche cuff in gold and silver, from $80.00, Giles & Brother. RIGHT: 18ct rose gold with diamond encrusted in white gold bracelet (1.72ct total), €5950.00, Appleby | 72 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

072 AIRO 2019_Jewellery.indd 72

14/02/2019 15:57


| GADGETS |

RESILIANCE The Trinovid 32 HD maintains the brand’s reputation for reliability and durability in all weather conditions. Perfect for hunting, these binoculars have a wide field of view and are also compact, lightweight and surrounded by a rubber armour in order to improve resiliance and provide a superior optical standard. connscameras.ie

Inspector Gadget TRIED AND TESTED THE BEST EYE GEAR ON THE MARKET. SAFFRON O’SULLIVAN BRINGS THINGS INTO FOCUS.

FIELD OF VIEW | MAGAZINE 2019 |

At 426ft/142m wide 1000yds/1000m, the Bushnell Engage 8x42 Binoculars provide a very impressive field of view. Excellent for outdoor activities such as wildlife watching and hunting, these binoculars provide premium optical features as a result of their prime ED glass and oil resistant lenses. bushnell.com

COMPACT Foldable and compact, the Swarovski 8x25 CL Pocket binoculars fit nicely into a small bag or purse. They are perfect for the birdwatcher on the go or the wandering wildlife observer. In addition, the size of the product does not compromise the quality or comfort of the binoculars as they provide sizeable eyecups and quality optics, focusing as close as 8.5ft. connscameras.ie

WILDLIFE An excellent birding and wildlife binocular, the Hawke Sapphire ED are ergonomic and well-balanced with a wide range of view. They offer clear, sharp and detailed imaging due to their Extra low Dispersion (ED) glass and dielectric coated prisms, which rival other more expensive models on the market. whelancameras.ie

TRACKING Perfect for bird watching or animal tracking, the Nikon Monarch has a wide field of view and delivers optical performance. The compact, sleek design boasts a superior Field Flattener Lens System and extra-low dispersion glass ensuring a sharp, bright and clear picture. littlewoods.ie

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 73 |

074 AIRO 2018_Binoculars.indd 73

14/02/2019 15:58


TO ADVERTISE IN

RACING ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

CERTAINTY RACINGCERTAINTY 2019

THE 2018 AIRO AWARDS

Celebrating the best in Irish racing

MAGAZINE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

ALPHA CENTRE STAGE

THE NIARCHOS FAMILY TALK BREEDING AND DYNASTIES

000 AIRO 2019_Cover.indd 1

FROM GOOD LUCK TO TWISTS OF FATE

Rita Shah and Joanne Lavery on the ups and downs of ownership MEET THE FAMILY

The O’Ryans offer something for everyone’s taste and pocket

14/02/2019 14:58

To discuss further please contact Heidi Vambeck Sales Manager Ashville Media Group Tel: +353 (1) 432 2254 Email: heidivambeck@ashvillemediagroup.com

246906_4C_Crown Plaza_JM_AIRO 2019_V2.indd 1

08/02/2019AIRO_Advertise 12:04 with us_JM_Airo19_V2.indd 1

15/02/2019 09:23

BET ON THE BEST NIGHT OUT T: +353 (0) 42 933 4438 E: bookings@dundalkstadium.com

www.dundalkstadium.com

246655_2L_Dundalk_JM_AIRO 2019_V2.indd 1

Advert template.indd 1

25/01/2019 11:01

15/02/2019 09:40


A

IRO continues to campaign on behalf of owners with Horse Racing Ireland, government departments, and The Association of Irish Racecourses to ensure improvement in prize money, race day experience and a reduction in costs. Prize money will increase by €2.9 million in 2019 to a total figure of €66.1million. We express our sincere thanks to the government for its continued support of the industry and to Horse Racing Ireland for recognising the importance of improving the level of prize money. There will be a further €500,000 allocated to Grade 2 and Grade 3 racecourses to be used to enhance the value of their races and this initiative should provide opportunities for Aiden Burns Association a greater spread of horses and owners. Manager Following the success of the EBF auction series for The Association of Irish Racehorse Flat horses, a similar series has been introduced for Owners (AIRO) National Hunt horses with Connolly’s Red Mills as cosponsor of the Irish EBF NH Auction Hurdle Series. The series got underway in September last and will conclude with a final value €75,000 in April 2019. The total prize money for the series is €355,000. The series consists of 14 maiden and novice hurdle races each worth a minimum of €20,000 and a final in April worth €75,000. Conditions of the races specify that all participating horse must be by an EBF registered stallion and bought as an unraced three or four-year old at a recognised National Hunt Store sale for €45,000 or less and weight allowances will apply relative to purchase price. This initiative should provide owners of less expensive horses with an opportunity to compete for good value races. The race day experience for owners is improving at most racecourses and we express our thanks to those courses that have shown improvement and would encourage the few remaining courses to step up to the plate. We also thank the racecourses for the free entry scheme for owners who have a horse registered in training. There will be well in excess of 100 free entry days in 2019. Details of these dates are on page 50 of this magazine and will also be on our website. Our hospitality for AIRO members will again be in place in 2019 with our marquee at Punchestown and Galway Festivals. We will also have hospitality facilities at The Curragh (August 9th) and Listowel on September 10th. In addition to the AIRO marquees our members can get access to the ROA marquee at Cheltenham as part of our reciprocal arrangements. We have secured an arrangement with our Third-Party Policy Insurers whereby they will offer All Risk Mortality Insurance cover to our members at an exclusive discount rate. Members interested in this type of insurance should contact Howden UK, directly, at 0044 207 1331382. The Annual General Meeting of the Association will be held in late March in our offices in ITBA Building, Kill, and notice of this will be sent to all members in due course.

76 Benefits of Membership

77

Members Public Liability Insurance Scheme

78

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

VOICING OWNERS’ INTERESTS

Hospitality Exchange Programme

79

Guide to Horse Racing Ireland charges and deductions in relation to racehorse ownership - 2018

Aiden Burns Association Manager

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 75 |

075 AIRO 2019_AIRO Opener_24.1.19.indd 75

14/02/2019 16:01


| AIRO MEMBER BENEFITS |

BENEFITS OF MEMBERSHIP

In addition to being represented within the governing body of the industry, members also receive the following benefits

PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE All members are automatically covered in relation to sums they may become legally liable to pay (up to €6.5 million) as damages in respect of accidental bodily injury to any person or accidental loss of, or damage to property, arising out of ownership of any horse kept for the purposes of racing.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

OTHER INSURANCE

RACING POST PHOTOGRAPHS

RACECOURSE HOSPITALITY

The Association’s insurance brokers, Howden UK, who handle the members Third Party Scheme, can also offer other insurance products such as All Risk Mortality at an exclusive discounted rate directly to our members. Members interested in obtaining a quote should contact Howden UK at 0044/207 1331 382

Members can avail of a 20% discount on all photos purchased from Racing Post.

Access to Members Marquee and complimentary refreshments at Punchestown and Galway Racing Festivals.

CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL

OTHER UK RACE MEETINGS

Opportunity to purchase Marquee tickets at a discounted rate which will give access to the UK Owners Association facility at Cheltenham in March.

Opportunity to purchase tickets at a favourable rate for the UK Owners Association corporate hospitality at Royal Ascot and Aintree Grand National Meeting first day.

The Marquee is ideally located in the Club Enclosure. Food and refreshments are on sale inside.

Free admission to Curragh Racecourse and complimentary refreshments on “Keenland Phoenix Stakes Day” on Friday 9th August 2019.

FRENCH RACING Free admission and access to the Jardin des Proprietaires (a private outdoor marquee in a prime location) at Deauville race

meetings in August. Details available from the AIRO office.

| 76 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

076 AIRO 2019_Member Benefits.indd 76

14/02/2019 16:02


| AIRO MEMBER BENEFITS |

MEMBERS PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE SCHEME

An owner may ask why he/ she would be responsible for the actions of their horse when it is in training or in the care of a training professional. The answer is that unfortunately in the current litigious environment where compensatory court awards for bodily injury are at an all time high, an owner is now more likely than ever to be drawn into an action as well as the trainer should his/her horse cause an incident resulting in bodily injury or property damage to a third party. With Court Awards reported

to be increasing at around 15% per year it is more important than ever that owners are protected by their own public liability insurance policy should claims exceed the limits provided under another policy. The Association of Irish Racehorse Owners works closely with insurance brokers, Howden UK, to ensure the best possible coverage for the AIRO Members and their horses. Howden UK is a specialist insurance broker, specialising in equestrian associations around the world.

SOME KEY FACTS OF THE POLICY MASTER POLICY HOLDER

The Association of Irish Racehorse Owners

LIMIT OF INDEMNITY

€6.5 million

CLAIMS

If any claim is also covered by another insurance, the liability under this policy will be as excess of and not as contributory with the other policy

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Public liability insurance is one of the most important insurance policies that a racehorse owner should have and fortunately all AIRO Members have this automatically covered up to a limit of €6.5million. The AIRO public liability policy provides cover for third party property damage and bodily injury to any person for any horse kept for the purposes of racing (under the Rules of Racing or National Hunt rules) or point to pointing (if trained by a licensed trainer) should you as an owner be found legally liable.

Cover applies to any horse kept for the purposes of racing under the Rules of Racing and National Hunt Rules or Point to Pointing, providing the Point to Pointer is being trained by a licensed trainer only.

COVER

The horse can be (a) in training in a licensed trainer’s yard in Ireland or UK (b) being prepared to go in to training in a licensed trainer’s yard in Ireland or UK (c) out of training provided the horse is only out of training on a temporary basis and is within Ireland or UK (d) temporarily outside Ireland or Great Britain for the purposes of participating in a race only. Cover also applies to a yearling purchased at the sales provided it is the intention to begin preparation for training and to a horse being prepared for a breeze up from the time that process begins. Racehorse owners who are not currently members of the AIRO are encouraged to join as the benefit alone of having this insurance cover will give peace of mind.

Membership costs €80 annually and has many other benefits

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 77 |

076 AIRO 2019_Member Benefits.indd 77

14/02/2019 16:03


| AIRO MEMBER BENEFITS |

HOSPITALITY EXCHANGE PROGRAMME

The Association of Irish Racehorse Owners (AIRO), the Racehorse Owners Association, UK, (ROA) and France Galop’s Owners Department joined forces to provide a programme of hospitality exchanges between Ireland, Great Britain and France, for the exclusive benefit of our respective members. This has proven to be a very successful initiative with positive feedback from members of all three Associations who availed of the facilities.

AIRO, ROA and France Galop share a commitment to upgrading their services to members with a view to enhancing the recognition of owners’ invaluable contribution to the thoroughbred industry. Through this exchange programme, the three organisations look to build and expand the reciprocal hospitality and look forward to welcoming each other’s members to their facilities at a number of high profile race meetings during 2019.

Race meetings included in the programme are Punchestown Festival, Galway Festival, “Keenland Phoenix Strakes Day” (Evening Meeting) at the Curragh, Cheltenham Festival, Royal Ascot and Deauville Festival. In addition to providing facilities at race meetings in their own country, the programme offers the opportunity to members to enjoy similar hospitality in Europe’s two other major racing jurisdictions.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

DETAILS OF THE PROGRAMME Cheltenham Festival March 12th to 15th

• Badges can be purchased for the ROA Marquee at ROA Members rate Complimentary, Coffee/tea available • There is a cash bar and food can be purchased • Admission to racecourse is payable

Aintree Grand National Meeting April 4th (Thursday Only)

• ROA Hospitality package including racecourse admission, reserved seating and carvery buffet • Contact AIRO for details

Punchestown Festival April 30th to May 3rd

• Access to AIRO Marquee, located in Reserved enclosure • Complimentary refreshments. Members may bring up to 3 guests • Racecourse admission is payable

Royal Ascot June 18th to 22nd Galway Festival July 29th to July 31st

• ROA Hospitality package across all 5 days – Contact AIRO for details • Access to AIRO Marquee adjacent to Parade Ring. • Complimentary Refreshments. Members may bring up to 3 guests • Racecourse admission is payable • Facility available Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday

Curragh Keenland Phoenix Stakes August 9th (Evening Meeting)

• Complimentary refreshments - Details will be sent to Members.

Deauville August Race Meetings

• Free admission to racecourse and access to Jardin des Proprietaires • Owners lounge • Food can be purchased. • Contact AIRO for dates and details

NOTES: 1. AIRO Members wishing to avail of ROA or France Galop facilities should contact the AIRO office – Tel: 045/878173 or Email: info@irishracehorseowners.com for the relative details. 2. ROA and France Galop Members who wish to avail of AIRO facilities should (a) for Punchestown and Galway – present membership I D at AIRO Marquee and (b) for the Curragh – Tickets must be reserved in advance by contacting AIRO as per contact details in note 1.

| 78 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

076 AIRO 2019_Member Benefits.indd 78

14/02/2019 16:04


| AIRO MEMBER BENEFITS |

Guide to Horse Racing Ireland charges and deductions in relation to racehorse ownership - 2019

The following are the main charges and deductions applied. REGISTRATION FEES: Registration of Horse’s Name & Issue of Passport

€125

Annual Registration of Authority to Act on behalf of Owner

€40

Annual Registration of Colours

€40

Annual Registration of Partnerships

€40

Registration of Leases

€40

Bookage Charge for ordinary races – (group & listed cost more) (Bookage charges include €2.50 levy for Irish Equine Centre)

€10

Entry Fee

0.7% of Total Race Value (races worth €20,000 or less)

Declaration Fee

0.2% of Total Race Value

Jockey Riding Fee (Flat)

€163.89 (plus VAT if jockey registered)

Jockey Riding Fee (N/Hunt)

€187.36 (plus VAT if jockey registered)

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

RACING CHARGES

DEDUCTIONS FROM WINNERS PRIZE MONEY Trainers Share – 10% of owners winnings less Stable Lads’ and Jockeys’ Emergency Fund payments (Equivalent to approximately)

9.49% of winnings

Jockeys Share - Same as Trainers

9.49% of winnings

Stable Employee Bonus Scheme

3.00% of winnings

Stable Staff Association

0.10% of winnings

Jockeys’ Emergency Fund (Welfare fund for jockeys with permanent disability )

1.00% of winnings

Total deducted from Owners Prize Money including race entry

24%

HRI STATEMENT ABBREVIATIONS E+B ...... Entry Fee plus Bookage Fee Fft+Bkge .........................Forfeit Fee plus Bookage Fee Del ......................................Declaration Fee

RF .................................................... Riding Fee JO%........................Jockey’s Percentage TR%....................... Trainer’s Percentage JEF............Jockey’s Emergency Fund

SEBS ............................. Stable Employee Bonus Scheme ISA ........ Irish Stablestaff Association

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 79 |

076 AIRO 2019_Member Benefits.indd 79

14/02/2019 16:04


| AIRO COUNCIL |

AIRO COUNCIL

CHAIRMAN: Brian Polly, Co. Down

VICE CHAIRMAN: John Weld, Co. Kildare

ASSOCIATION MANAGER: Aiden Burns, Co. Meath

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

HON. TREASURER: Dr. Brendan Doyle, Co. Carlow

REPRESENTATIVE ON HRI BOARD: James Gough, Co. Meath

COUNCIL MEMBER: David Hyland, Co. Laois

COUNCIL MEMBER: Paddy Roche, Co. Carlow

COUNCIL MEMBER: Caren Walsh, Co. Kildare

COUNCIL MEMBER: William Bourke, Co. Meath

COUNCIL MEMBER: John Power, Co. Limerick

COUNCIL MEMBER: Sandra Fox, Co. Meath

COUNCIL MEMBER: Richard Pugh, Co. Kildare

COUNCIL MEMBER: Judy Maxwell, Co. Down

| 80 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

080 AIRO 2019_Committee Members.indd 80

14/02/2019 16:06


| ITBA |

Take a chance on me

OWNER/BREEDERS REAP THE REWARDS FROM THE WEATHERBYS ITBA NH FILLIES BONUS SCHEME

Owner/Breeders The figures speak for themselves but for the individual breeders the additional bonus can be vital to keeping the show on the road. Our first ever treble bonus winner Carrigmoorna Rock was very lucky for her Owner/Breeders Tom McCarthy and Michael Veale. This duo hail from Kilmacthomas in Co Waterford and under the racing name Old Fools Partnership have won €20,000 from the scheme. Carrigmoorna Wood is the newest kid on the block and has the potential to add further to the winnings for this very lucky duo. Michael boasts a newly fenced paddock from

the proceeds of his winnings. Robert Hennelly from Breaffy Co Mayo is another who has been rewarded for taking a punt on his fillies. Breaffy is better known for its GAA prowess rather than horseracing, but from a very small band of broodmares Robert is most definitely punching above his weight and collecting the dividends. Moyhenna and Moskovite, trained in Co. Offaly by Denis Hogan have each won two bonuses and are actively seeking out the third. The Gleeson Family are others who have taken advantage of the scheme. Gleeson’s are household names in the equine industry, Brian is a regular on RTE and Kieran, Damien & Liam run the very successful family business Ardmore Equine Nutrition. Pride of the Braid and Decision Time are two fillies who have given their connections an extra €20,000 without deduction on top of their prize money.

Glendine River

Carrigmoona Rock

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

When the ITBA NH Committee established their highly successful self-help scheme in 2013, one of their objectives was to encourage breeders to take a chance on their filly and put her into training. The ITBA scheme pays out a bonus of €5,000 to any eligible filly when they win their Mares only maiden bumper, maiden hurdle and beginners steeplechase. Therefore, each filly has the opportunity to win €15,000 without deduction on top of the prize money. In 2018, the scheme was extended to include a number of Mares only H’Cap Hurdles for fillies that did not win their maiden.Breeders who accepted the encouragement from the ITBA to put their filly into training have certainly reaped the rewards. The results are as follows: n €1,270,000 paid out to winning owners n 254 individual winners n 72 individual Owner/Breeder winners n 10% increase in the number of fillies returned in training with HRI

Small Trainers In an era when small trainers are finding the going particularly tough, the Weatherbys ITBA NH Fillies bonus scheme has been a godsend. While the powerhouses are present at every race meeting it is refreshing to see the small trainer getting a good share of the spoils. Patrick Cronin was one such trainer who won an extra €10,000 on top of his prize money when Give her Bach won her maiden hurdle and beginners chase, which he bred, trained and owned. There are many examples of these trainers who own their winners, John O’Brien (Cloudy Rock), Dermot O’Brien (Glendine River), Edmond Kent (Thanks for Tea), T J Nagle (Khalessi), W Austin (Blazing West), John Nicholson (The Brook Inn).

Pride of the Braid

Moskovite

Weatherbys is the title sponsor and the scheme is financial supported by HRI. The figures for fillies at store sales have never been better and with the enhanced racing programme, now is the time to buy a filly and get involved. Should you require any additional information on the scheme, contact Regina in the ITBA on 045 877543.

THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 81 |

000 AIRO 2019_ITBA.indd 81

14/02/2019 14:08


| MEMBERS DAYS 2018 |

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

M AIRO MEMBERS DAYS 2018

embers and friends enjoying one of the benefits of AIRO Membership in their exclusive hospitality marquee at Galway Race Week and at Punchestown 2018.

| 82 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS |

082 AIRO 2018_Galway Race Week.indd 82

14/02/2019 13:30


| MAGAZINE 2019 |

| MEMBERS DAYS 2018 |

| THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 83 |

082 AIRO 2018_Galway Race Week.indd 83

14/02/2019 13:30


| AIRO AWARDS 2018 | Brian Polly and Andrew Hogan 2018 Awards Winners

John Osborne and Des Scahill

AIRO & THE IRISH FIELD

AWARDS 2018

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

T

he fourth annual awards dinner was held in the Killashee Hotel on Saturday 20th October 2018 and had over 200 in attendance. Richard Pugh, AIRO Council member acted as MC on the night. AIRO Chairman Brian Polly and The Irish Field General Manager, Mark Costello, welcomed the guests and congratulated all the winners. Guests included Fine Gael Party Chairman and Kildare T.D. Martin Heydon, Ceann Comhairle, Sean O’Fearghail T.D. John Osborne HRI Representative, guest speaker on the night, multiple racehorse owner, Rich Ricci and representatives from many bodies within the industry. Martin Heydon T.D. addressed the attendance and on behalf of the Government acknowledged the importance of the horseracing industry to the economy of the country and the key role that racehorse owners played in this.

Shane O’Dwyer, Regina Byrne and Brian Polly

Attracta Mongey and Eddie O’Leary Christy Grassick with Niall Flynn

Fiona Flynn, Aisling Flynn, Ciara Flynn, Martin Holmes and Allen Flynn

| 84 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS |

084 AIRO 2018_AIRO Awards 2018_v2.indd 84

14/02/2019 13:38


| AIRO AWARDS 2018 |

Rich Ricci

Jamie Moriarty (Coolmore) and Sharon O’Regan

Special guest speaker, Rich Ricci, who flew in from racing at Ascot to be there on the night, praised the racecourses that had improved facilities for owners and encouraged the remaining few to step up to the plate. He also addressed a number of issues in Irish racing and with regard to improving ownership numbers he suggested that Syndicates similar to the model used by “It’s All About The Girls“ group should be developed. There were fourteen awards in all and the Association very much appreciate the generous sponsorship received from Coolmore Stud, Darley, Derrinstown Stud, Diamonds & Pearls Boutique, Goffs Bloodstock Sales, Hanged Man’s Restaurant, Horse Racing Ireland, Howden Insurance Brokers, Irish Thoroughbred Breeders Association, Irish Thoroughbred Marketing, Killashee Hotel, Tattersalls, The Irish Field, Weatherbys Ireland, Journalists, Mark Costello from The Irish Field and Alan Sweetman from The Racing Post assisted in selecting the winners of a number of awards and their help was much appreciated. The categories of awards ranged from racecourse facilities for owners, champion performances, services to racing and the realisation of a racing dream. Details of the winners appear on following pages.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Kerry Ryan and Regina Byrne

Niall Flynn, Tommy Kiely, Claire Flynn and Anita Kiely

Matt Mitchell and Robert Reynolds

Jarlath Fahey (second from right), Eoghan Fitzpatrick, Kevin O’Shea, Geraldine O’Shea, Nicole Harper, Sinead Fahy, Ciara Callaghan, Susan Fahy, Kathleen Wheelan, Jamie Wheelan and Aoife Fahy

| THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 85 |

084 AIRO 2018_AIRO Awards 2018_v2.indd 85

14/02/2019 13:38


| AIRO AWARDS 2018 |

Members of the familywinners AllFlynn the award Ross O’Sullivan, Katie Walsh and Ted Walsh

AIRO & THE IRISH FIELD

WINNERS 2018 RACECOURSE MERIT AWARD

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

Sponsored by AIRO

Cork Racecourse Mark Costello Olivia Hamilton Brian Polly and Brendan McArdle

RACECOURSE MERIT AWARD

Sponsored by The Irish Field

Fairyhouse Racecourse SERVICES TO RACING

Sponsored by Horse Racing Ireland

Des Scahill (Commentator)

SERVICES TO RACING

Sponsored by Derrinstown Stud

Eddie Moran (Racecourse Client Relations) VALUE PURCHASE - GOFFS

Sponsored by Goffs Bloodstock Sales

Amy Kidd/Rachelle Treacy (Rashaan) VALUE PURCHASE TATTERSALLS

Sponsored by Tattersalls Ireland

Philip Reynolds (Presenting Percy)

Mary Kilduff, Amy Kidd and Rachel Treacy

Tara Martin, Eddie Moran, Nora Moran with Rachel and Cedric Herbecq

Jessica Harrington, Alan Cooper and Alex Cairns

| 86 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS |

084 AIRO 2018_AIRO Awards 2018_v2.indd 86

14/02/2019 13:38


| AIRO AWARDS 2018 |

Kathleen Whelan and Suzanne Fahey accept an award from Aiden Burns

Sonny Carey, Dr. Jennifer Pugh and Mary Kilduff

Sponsored by Hanged Man’s Restaurant

O’Connell Family (Un De Sceaux) RACING DREAM

Sponsored by Howden Insurance UK

Suzanne Fahey/ Kathleen Whelan (Sea The Lion)

LEADING OWNER - FLAT Sponsored by Weatherbys Ireland

Messrs Tabor/Magnier/Smith LEADING OWNER - N/HUNT Sponsored by Coolmore Stud

Gigginstown House Stud

OWNER/BREEDER - FLAT

Sponsored by Darley

Anthony & Sonia Rogers (Skitter Skatter) OWNER/BREEDER - N/HUNT Sponsored by Irish Thoroughbred Breeders

Niall Flynn (Colreevy & Just Janice)

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

RACING SYNDICATE/FAMILY

CHAMPION HORSE - FLAT Sponsored by Irish Thoroughbred Marketing

Niarchos Family (Alpha Centauri)

Leo Powell and Jake Wright Stephen Collins and Eddie Moran

CHAMPION HORSE - N/HUNT Sponsored by Diamonds & Pearls Boutique

Gigginstown House Stud (Tiger Roll)

Peter Roe

Richard Bonham, Niamh McCarthy, Jennifer Micklem Diamond and Ronan Groome

Aidan Walsh, Mary Scahill and Des Scahill

| THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS | 87 |

084 AIRO 2018_AIRO Awards 2018_v2.indd 87

14/02/2019 13:38


| JUMPING THE FENCE |

Clare Cannon BEHIND THE STABLE DOOR

A SMALL STEP FROM TRAINING WINNERS TO MENTORING THOSE WITH DISABILITIES. LISSA OLIVER REPORTS.

| MAGAZINE 2019 |

“It doesn’t matter how big or small a trainer is, the problems are the same, just on a different scale.” That’s the view of Bangor, County Down permit holder Clare Cannon who has managed to overcome more than her own fair share. With only four horses in training and a farm demanding her full-time commitment, she knew she had to diversify. Yet another problem was how? “My passion is to help others,” says Clare, who together with her partner already fosters children. “I was struggling to find my niche and I wanted to help people, but all my time is taken up by the farm. I wanted to be able to open my stable doors to people with disabilities and learning difficulties, to enable them to come in and work alongside me and develop skills, responsibility and purpose. Something I can do here, without neglecting my own responsibilities.” Setting up ‘Behind The Stable Door’, an equine assisted learning programme, was key to Clare’s new future and to her personal wellbeing, something many trainers struggle with. But it wasn’t easy to get the project off the ground. “I already had public liability insurance, but my insurance went up by €1,000 a year to allow me to have people with disabilities come onto

the farm and I just couldn’t afford it. I kept applying for various grants and help, but it seemed with every avenue I took there was another setback and I was ready to give up.” Luckily, Clare turned to the HRI/CARE Industry Assistance Programme and a counsellor restored her positivity, teaching her how to retain that vital positive outlook. As a result, she completed one last grant application and fortunately it turned out to be the successful one. “To receive that grant was so important, without it I couldn’t get the project off the ground,” admits Clare. “The great thing about equine assisted learning and equine therapy is that we’re not therapists, you don’t have to call yourself a therapist. I’m still a racehorse trainer and I’m just doing what I already do as part of my daily routine.” That now involves welcoming adults and young adults with varying levels of physical and learning disabilities into her yard and allowing them to shadow her and help her where they can. They are encouraged to take an active involvement and are entrusted with simpler tasks. “It’s not a big chunk of time that you have to give,” reveals Clare. “As trainers, we do a lot of coaching, with new staff and apprentices, they are skills we already have. Trainers are mentors and don’t even know it. What we do daily is not a million miles from what I’m now doing with ‘Behind The Stable Door’.” One young lady who has benefited from the therapy provided by her visits to Clare’s stable is looking forward to going racing with one of the horses who has so enriched her life. “I think Judy is ready to go racing and she might only be walking on the other side of the horse, but it will mean a huge amount to her,” Clare explains. Clare is also planning a racing club for people with special needs or those who may have social problems and feel they wouldn’t fit in to a standard racing club. “To go racing and not be judged, especially to be involved with a horse, could be massively uplifting for people.” She feels strongly that there are opportunities to extend ‘Behind The Stable Door’ to so many other farms, studs and stables in Ireland, allowing more people with disabilities to access the equine assisted learning she currently provides on her own. “I would love to see ‘Behind The Stable Door’ raise greater awareness, because it’s not about me, the concept of the project can be a lot bigger if others take it on board.”

| 88 | THE ASSOCIATION OF IRISH RACEHORSE OWNERS

088 AIRO 2019_Jumping the Fence.indd 88

14/02/2019 13:39


AIRO

AWARDS

2019

Celebrate excellence and achievement in the Irish horseracing industry at the AIRO Awards Dinner Saturday 9th of November 2019 in the Keadeen Hotel, Newbridge, Co Kildare To secure your tickets for this very popular event please contact

AIRO at 045-878173 Email: info@irishracehorseowners.com

Advert template.indd 1 1 AIRO Awards 2019.indd

14/02/2019 12/02/2019 13:53 12:09


Carton House

A haven of historic luxury set in the heart of Kildare, a short distance from all the equine highlights of the thoroughbred county. Stay at Carton House and experience all the resort has to offer, from championship golf to Carton House Spa, exquisite dining and much more.

cartonhouse.com Advert template.inddHouse_JM_AIRO19.indd 1 247048_1C_Carton 1

14/02/2019 05/02/2019 13:54 09:15

Profile for Ashville Media Group

Racing Certainty - AIRO 2019  

Association of Irish Racehorse Owners

Racing Certainty - AIRO 2019  

Association of Irish Racehorse Owners