Page 1

IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE! ICA HOME & LIVING

Summer 2016

6

TOP TANS

FRESH IDEAS FOR DELICIOUS FISH

Fake it Don’t bake it

BREAKING BREAD Our Best Bakes

DREAM TRIP

CAMBODIA CALLING

ROADTRIP REBELS

DIAMONDS & PEARLS

Meet the Camper Van Girls

TALENTED IRISH JEWELLERS MARIE’S MA

CARONS

SUMMER 2016

Daily Disasters / Tea & Chat / Tech Updates / Emily Hourican / Travel Vaccines / Great Gardens / 48 Hours in Kilkenny / Blue Room

ICA Summer 2016_Cover .indd 1

A BEKNO OVE 25/05/2016 11:29


Copyright ©  Husqvarna AB (publ). All rights reserved.

COMPLEX LAWN ‡ ˆ PERFECT RESULT

Every member of the Husqvarna Automower® 300 series works quickly, quietly and efficiently, handling lawns up to 1500m². They navigate obstacles, narrow spaces and even 40% slopes to ensure your whole lawn is greener, healthier and more even than ever. For more information visit husqvarna.com

HUSQVARNA AUTOMOWER® 310

HUSQVARNA AUTOMOWER® 315

€1,729.99 .99

€1,999.99 .99

HUSQVARNA AUTOMOWER® 310/315 Advanced and efficient 4-wheel robotic mowers that handle challenging lawns and slopes with an incline of 40%. The 310 covers up to 1000m² and the 315 up to 1500m² with advanced navigation that guides the mower through narrow passages. Intuitive menu system on the large, user-friendly display allows personal settings. For more information visit husqvarna.com

AUTOMOWER® SNAP-ON COVER

€64.99 The snap-on covers can be bought as an accessory to Husqvarna Automower® 310/315.

CALL YOUR LOCAL HUSQVARNA DEALER TODAY FOR A FREE LAWN SUITABILITY ASSESSMENT!

75 HUSQVARNA DEALERS NATIONWIDE Find Your Local Dealer on Husqvarna.ie/dealerlocator or call Liffey Distributors for more info 01-824 7041

ICA Ad Template.indd 92 240119 Liffey Distributors.indd 92

23/05/2016 15:08 14:31


welcome|resolution “The question isn’t who’s going to let me; it’s who’s going to stop me?” AYN RAND NOVELIST, PHILOSOPHER, PLAYWRIGHT, AND SCREENWRITER February 2, 1905 – March 6, 1982

W

elcome to the third issue of the ICA magazine of Home and Living. We continue to receive lots of positive feedback from Guilds. Members have commented that the magazine is a useful recruitment tool. One member advised me that she had left her copy in the Doctor’s surgery with her contact details. She was surprised and delighted to receive two phone calls that week with enquiries for membership! So ladies, when you have finished reading it, pass it on! Together with Shirley Power and Mary MacNamara we have just completed our first AGM as officers and the first of our three year term. It has been a very eventful year with many challenges and celebrations to keep us on our toes. You will enjoy very interesting articles from CLARE and WEXFORD Federations in this issue. Wexford has the distinction of being one of the few locations outside of Dublin to rebel during that famous Easter one hundred years ago, and as we all know it is also the birthplace of ICA. I am delighted that there is an excellent article paying tribute to the many HANDCRAFT teachers and tutors in ICA, covering crafts from BLACKWORK to BEADING and

No part of this may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Opinions and comments expressed herein are not necessarily those of ICA Home and Living . While every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained within this publication is correct at the time of going to press, Ashville Media Group accept no responsibility whatsoever for any inaccuracies that may occur. © 2016/2017

many more in between! They talk about how their interest in the craft started and what they enjoy. For me the most important aspect of their craft is how they are passing on their skills! As usual there are some delicious recipes including some lovely ones for home-made ICE CREAM and SORBETS, a focus on COFFEE and some of the GADGETS that have become so popular and great midweek recipes for SEAFOOD, BREAD and PULSES. For all you bakers out there, don’t forget to enter the BROWN BREAD Baking competition 2016 and be in with a chance to win €10,000! More information on www.ica.ie One of my favourite articles this month is the one about CAMPER VANS and life on the road. Having read the fun that some of our fellow members have in their vans I am seriously contemplating a trip down to our next meeting in a vintage Volkswagen camper van! As we wind down for a well-deserved summer break, I hope you will enjoy this edition of the magazine in the sunshine and maybe try your hand at my macarons!

It has been a very eventful year with many challenges and celebrations to keep us on our toes.

Marie O’Toole National President

PUBLISHED BY Ashville Media Group, Old Stone Building, Blackhall Green, Dublin 7. Tel: +353 (0) 1 432 2200. Fax: +353 (0) 1 676 6043. Web: www.ashville.com

EDITOR Mary Connaughton CONTRIBUTORS Rachel Murray, Conor Forrest, Orla Connoly and Emily Crowley CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jane Matthews DESIGN Jennifer Reid PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE Nicole Ennis

MANAGING DIRECTOR Gerry Tynan SALES DIRECTOR Paul Clemenson CHAIRMAN Diarmaid Lennon SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 1

001 ICA Summer 2016_Resolve_Marie.indd 1

20/05/2016 16:28


Contents 18

24

BREAKING BREAD Get to grips with sourdough, finesse your focaccia and get cracking on Scandinavian crispbread with our six-page special

FISH SUPPERS

30

COFFEE BREAK

68

Delicious ideas for six quick and interesting fish dishes to see you through the week, along with a super Sunday risotto with fresh grilled tuna. It all about the fish

From it’s intense aroma and rich, silky flavour to the caffeine lift– we give you the low-down on how coffee can boost your memory and pep up your power nap!

We meet Philip McCabe to discuss the importance of bees to our environment and the impact of their decline on the food chain. And to discover how we can encourage their survival

HONEY BEES

24

THAT FRIDAY FEELING

75

FEELING BLUE

15

COMPETITION!! Win a fantastic top-ofthe-range Beko double fan oven with an A energy rating, easy to clean interior and a two year warranty!

59

JEWEL HEADER

2 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

002 ICA Summer 2016_Contents.indd 2

20/05/2016 16:34


SUMMER 2016

53

FOOD

FASHION & BEAUTY

10 Macarons ICA National President, Marie O’Toole shares the secret of a perfectly formed macaron

53 Wedding Bells Dress to impress for a season of occasions

12

16

Citrus Ice Make the most of ripe lemons, limes and oranges with grown-up sorbets and zesty treats Bean Feast Inspiring ideas to get your pulses racing

34

CRAFT

34 Craft Week The ins and outs of the annual craft extravaganza in An Grianán and what you had to say about it!

71

INTERIOR WORLD Conservatory Makeover Create a welcoming and relaxing, sunny sanctuary all year round

75 Feeling Blue Calm and tranquil blues make the perfect restful bedroom 86 Pimp my Ride So you’re ready for life on the road (see p 84)? Add some colour with these bright, fun accessories

002 ICA Summer 2016_Contents.indd 3

59 Diamonds & Pearls Shimmering gems and precious metals from Irish designers 61

Satin Stitch Haute couture’s in thrall to the decorative power of embroidery

60 Fake It Get a natural golden, glow without baking your skin this summer

63

Regulars 3

Welcome National President Marie O’Toole welcomes you to the Summer 2016 issue of ICA Home & Living

5

Tea & Chat Grab a cuppa and settle down it’s time to relax

ESCAPE

63 Walled Gardens Plan a mini-escape and visit some spectacular Irish gardens 76 48 Hours in Kilkenny Your guide to being queen of the castle in Kilkenny this summer

IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE!

7

9

78 Pack like a Pro Pare it back to lean, clean, tight and light 41 79 Travel Vaccines Heading further afield? Get those shots sorted 80 Going Solo in Asia Independent Travel is the freedom to explore within a group 86 Motoring We’ve ditched the battered scooby-doo van and gone five star luxe with the ICA ladies dream camper vans for the ultimate road trip

Little Helpers Relax this summer with our smart buys and useful apps Daily Disasters Natural cleaning products and quit smoking ICA Past, Present & Future Wexford ICA keep the flame alight generation after generation

45 Federation Focus The Banner County ladies have plenty to yell about! 88 Aerial View Journalist and author Emily Hourican on life after cancer and the joy of baking

Summer 2016

6

TOP TANS

FRESH IDEAS FOR DELICIOUS FISH

Fake it Don’t bake it

BREAKING BREAD Our Best Bakes

DREAM TRIP

CAMBODIA CALLING

ROADTRIP REBELS

DIAMONDS & PEARLS

Meet the Camper Van Girls

TALENTED IRISH JEWELLERS MARIE’S MA

SUMMER 2016

71

WEDDING SEASON

ICA HOME & LIVING

67 Staying on Course What’s happening in An Grianán in 2016?

49

57 Layering Out shine the unpredictable summer weather with clever layers

STOCKFOOD

10

80

GO IT ALONE

CARONS

Daily Disasters / Tea & Chat / Tech Updates / Emily Hourican / Travel Vaccines / Great Gardens / 48 Hours in Kilkenny / Blue Room

ICA Summer 2016_Cover .indd 1

A BEKO OVEN 19/05/2016 17:47

On the Cover MAGNIFICENT MACARONS

CHILL OUT

Sorbet Special

PG

12

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 3

20/05/2016 16:34


LPG

Warming the heart of your home Put Flogas at the heart of your home and get 1,200 litres of LPG free. If you’re thinking of converting your existing oil heating system to gas or building your own home, talk to us about our fantastic offer of 1,200 Litres of LPG for FREE* when you install a new Flogas Cosy Home heating system. Flogas is your one source for efficient heating, hot water, cooking, gas fires and tumble drying.

1,200 lit res of LPG

Free

Discover what Flogas can do for you today: Republic of Ireland T: 041 983 1041 | E: info@flogas.ie | www.flogas.ie Northern Ireland T: 028 9073 2611 | E: info@flogasni.com | www.flogasni.com Terms & Conditions apply. See www.flogas.ie/t&c

Wherever you are

ICA Ad Template.indd 92 239953_Flogas_AMA_ICA.indd 1

23/05/2016 09/05/2016 14:38 09:58


chat|tea If you’ve any great photos that you’d like included in futures issues of the magazine let us know we will arrange to get them from you and back to you unharmed!

BLAST IT Juicing has taken the nation by storm and everyone is blitzing their way to better health. But if you’re new to the craze where do you start? Select a recipe below, place all the ingredients in your nutri-bullet or blender and blitz until smooth. Pour over ice and serve.

Book of Good

UNLIKELY BUT TRUE…

“Women make up one half of society. Our society will remain backward and in chains unless its women are liberated, enlightened and educated.” Saddam Hussein, The Revolution and Woman in Iraq. 1985 “It is difficult for young, ambitious men now in some parties, sometimes because they are being pushed aside in favour of young, ambitious women. And they feel a certain sense of grievance, that is undoubtedly true.” Frank Flannery, McGill Summer School, 2015

SHARE YOUR FAVOURITE PIECE OF SEXIST NONSENSE WITH: editor@icahomeandliving.ie

Childrens Books for LauraLynn Ballymun Guild member Mary Shiel has brought out two books of children’s stories in aid LauraLynn Children’s Hospice. Each of the books contains two complete stories and is priced at €5 with 100% of the proceeds going directly to the charity. The wonderful facilities provided by LauraLynn to terminally ill children and their families is well known, and would not be possible without ongoing support. Mary, who has previously published two successful children’s books in aid of St. Francis Hospices, is hoping to repeat this success with the two new books. Both books are perfect for bedtime reading by grown-ups, or for children between 7 and 10 to read alone. They can be bought from: www.lauralynn.ie or by contacting Mary at: Ph. (01) 8375837 or Email: johnpshiel@eircom.net

Ann Flanagan An Grianán bids farewell to Ann who’s been a terrific manager and support to our members. We wish her a fun filled retirement! SEND YOUR NEWS TO: editor@ icahomeandliving.ie

ALMOND, PEACH & BANANA 10 almonds 2 ripe peaches, stoned 1 small banana, peeled 250ml ice-cold water

STYLE REVOLUTION

Add a few touches of green and gold to revolutionise your wardrobe this summer. LEFT: Kelly Military Shirt, Monsoon €60 RIGHT: Eau Des Indes, Rituals; Arnotts €39 BELOW: Trudy Green, Black Eyewear, €220

CUCUMBER, APPLE & MINT ½ cucumber, chopped 1 granny smith apple 1 sprig of mint 250ml ice-cold water

BEETROOT, APPLE, CELERY & GINGER 2 whole cooked beetroot 2 eating apples 2 sticks celery 1cm fresh ginger or 1tsp Worcestershire sauce 250ml ice-cold water

MELON & RASPBERRY 200g cantaloupe melon flesh 20 raspberries 200ml ice-cold water

SPINACH, FENNEL & MELON 2 handfuls of baby spinach ½ a fennel bulb chopped 200g honeydew melon flesh 200ml ice-cold water

Crochet Bikini, New Look, Top €25; Brief €20 ABOVE: Straw Hat, New Look €18 RIGHT: Sarong/Scarf, Matthew Williamson; Debenhams €22 SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 5

005 ICA Summer 2016_Tea_Chat.indd 5

20/05/2016 16:36


PURCHASE A HERITAGE CARD & EXPLORE IRELAND’S HERITAGE

Heritage Cards can be purchased: at participating heritage sites, by phone: 01–647 6592 / Lo Call 1850–600 601 by fax: 094–937 3395

Provides for Free Admission To more Than 45 of Ireland’s finest Heritage sites Unlimited access for up to one year

€ 25

€ 20

€ 10

€ 60

Adult

Senior

Child/Student

Family

Historic Houses, Gardens & Parks Start your journey at Dublin’s littlest big house. Or biggest little house. Whichever way you see it, the 18th century Casino at Marino, designed by Sir William Chambers for the First Earl of Charlemont, is unique. It measures barely 40 square-feet yet contains 16 rooms. 10 minutes west of the Casino lies the National Botanic Gardens. Dating from 1795, this wonderful oasis is home to Ireland’s richest plant collection (over 300 of its specimens are rare or endangered) and a beautiful Victorian palm house. Leaving Marino, make your way from one of Ireland’s smallest mansions to one of Europe’s largest walled parks. Phoenix Park is a former royal deer enclosure sprawling over west Dublin, and at its heart you’ll find Farmleigh House, developed over several decades by Edward Cecil Guinness (Lord Iveagh, 1847-1927). The 78-acre estate is today owned by the Irish government, and has hosted Queen Elizabeth II and Emperor Akihito of Japan among other visitors. Nearby, across the River Liffey, you’ll find the War Memorial Gardens. This green oasis is famous both as a memorial to Irish soldiers who died in the First World War, and as one of four Irish gardens designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.. Not all houses are stately piles, of course. Leaving Dublin, an hour’s drive south along the N81 takes you to the thatched

Dwyer McAllister Cottage, sitting in the shade of a mountain near Donard, Co. Wicklow. From here it’s a 45-minute drive south to Altamont Gardens, the jewel in the crown of Carlow’s Garden Trail. A blend of formal and informal arrangements here tumble around an 18th century house, and are famous for their February snowdrops (chalk it down for Valentine’s Day). Altamont is just one of many surprises awaiting on a driving tour of Ireland, with others ranging from artist Derek Hill’s Glebe House & Gallery in Donegal to Emo Court, a neoclassical mansion in Co. Laois and for years the residence of Major Cholmeley-Harrison. Both somehow still feel like homes. From Altamont, continue south through Bunclody and New Ross to the John F. Kennedy Memorial Park & Arboretum. Dedicated to the memory of JFK, the 252-hectare Arboretum contains 4,500 types of trees and shrubs from all temperate regions of the world, planted in botanical sequence. If you like those, try these: Other great Historic Houses, Parks and Gardens to visit in Ireland include Áras an Uactaráin, Arbour Hill, the Garden of Remembrance, Iveagh Gardens, the Pearse Museum, St. Enda’s Park and St. Stephen’s Green (Dublin), Doneraile Park and Fota Arboretum & Gardens (Cork), Coole Park (Galway), Derrynane House (Kerry), Castletown House (Kildare), Kilkenny Castle (Kilkenny), Heywood Gardens (Laois), and the botanic gardens at Kilmacurragh (Wicklow).

Further info: www.heritageireland.ie

ICA Ad Template.indd 92 1 239266_OPW_IB_ICA.indd

23/05/2016 05/05/2016 14:34 15:16


tech|update

little helpers SPEND MORE TIME OUTSIDE WITH THESE TERRIFIC LITTLE GADGETS The garden’s been weeded, bedding plants are in, grass is mown, the birds are singing in the trees and the sun is shining (for the time being). So what are you waiting for? Get out and enjoy the fruits of your hard work, plump up a comfy beanbag, Elephant Belle €149.00, Harvey Norman and loll around until the urge to fire up the BBQ takes hold. We love the Landmann Piccolino Portable Charcoal BBQ €49.99 from TossBryan, Fermoy. If your garden’s looking a little forlorn or you’re feeling a little more to the manor born then pack a high-class picnic in the Trespass Delux Pack €49.00, Argos and head to one of our wonderful walled gardens (p63) and enjoy the expert work of their gardeners. If you’re feeling particularly fancy you can pack a bottle of your favourite bubbly in the funky PackIt Freezable Wine Cooler in Ziggy Design €24.95, Stock Design Ireland. Cheers!

Eco-quandary I have a terrace of potted plants and containers but they dry out so quickly even if it’s not sunny. How can I waste less water? There are several quick solutions to this problem. Firstly try adding water-retaining granules to the soil/ compost mix in your pots and planters. Follow the packet instructions. Most retain water hundreds of time their size and they are great in hanging baskets, as these normally PAGE

12

Holiday Apps

require very frequent watering. It’s worth changing some of your planters for lightweight versions with built in water butts.These capture rainwater and hold it in a chamber away from the roots letting it feed the plant. Get yourself a rain barrel and a rain-trap diverter to capture all that free water from your gutters. Going forward choose plant varieties that require little water or are hardy to dry in windy conditions.

ORANGES & LEMONS

Use your smartphone to get the most out of summer whether you’re staying home or heading abroad we’ve some great little apps to help out.

PAGE

Wolfram

PackPoint

Project Noah

The Field Trip

Take the worry out of spending time in the sun. The Wolfram Sun Exposure App calculates how long you can stay in the sun without burning based on your skin type and SPF.

Enter the details of your trip and the activities you’re planning and this app will tell you precisely what you should bring based on the weather and your itinerary.

Turn a day in the garden into a nature expedition with this interactive field guide. Discover local wildlife and plants, by taking pics and uploading them to find out more information.

Gives you the lowdown on your location in real time. Where the cools spots are, interesting facts about the place and you can personalise it to your interests.

24

GET FRESH WITH FISH

PAGE

57

FASHION LOVES EMBROIDERY SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 7

007 ICA Summer 2016_Tech.indd 7

20/05/2016 16:37


fix|how to

daily disasters

Vinegar salt

Clean up Your Act Bicarb, vinegar, lemon We’re all aware of the environmental damage that many of the chemical compounds in household cleaners can do. So think about what a difference it would make if we each switch to one or two home made cleaning solutions. Most of what you need is already living in your kitchen cupboards so it’s kinder on your pocket too. Make kitchen and bathroom cleaning spray by pouring 500ml white vinegar and 200ml water into a bottle, add citrus peel and cinnamon sticks and leave for a week. Transfer to a spray bottle and you can use it to clean hard surfaces. Refresh your kitchen cleaning cloths by soaking in a basin of warm water and two tablespoons of baking soda. Mix a teaspoon of baking powder to a paste with a few drops of water and use to clean stubborn stains on kitchen counters or painted walls. Use baking soda and lemon juice paste to wipe out your fridge and get rid of any odours. Mix coarse sea salt with a little water to remove tea stains from mugs or to clean baking dishes. If you have an unvarnished wooden table you can use olive oil to treat the wood, pour a few drops onto a soft cloth and buff the wood in circular motions, add a few more drops for each section of the table, when you’ve done the entire surface go back over it end to end in sweeping motions. Fragrance your home with an uplifting scent – add a few drops of essential oil such as tea-tree, lavender, mint or neroli to water in a spray bottle and spritz as necessary.

How can I stop feeling like the black sheep of my family? My sisters went to college, got good jobs and are married with kids. I’ve been working in dead end jobs, travelling and have no intention of getting married. Before you change your family’s views you need to ease up on yourself – stop drawing comparisons with your sisters and focus on the positive aspects of your life. The world is full of people with different lifestyles and values. I’m sure no one wants you to be a carbon copy of your sisters, so work out the things that would make you proud. Your work situation is not bad, you’ve always had a job, gained a lot of experience and get along well with people. Perhaps you need to reframe what you are looking for, think about whether additional training can help you progress. You are widely travelled which has given you cultural experiences, independence and resilience that your sisters may not have. The relationship matter is entirely your personal business and as long as you are socially active and content it is of no concern to anyone else. Build on the many positives in your life and let people value you for who you are.

I’ve been smoking for the last 50 years and although I’ve tried to give them up a few times I’ve never quite managed to quit. Now my grandchildren are on at me on every occasion about smoking but I can’t seem to find the willpower. Help!

Smoking is partly about addiction and partly about habits. Most smokers have their own routine whether it’s the first cigarette of the day or post lunch cup of tea and cigarette. So figuring out ways of changing these routines can be critical in helping you to quit. Identify your own patterns and think of ways of disrupting them. Getting help from your pharmacist, doctor or local stop smoking group can help too. There are a couple of websites (get the grandchildren to help with this!) with excellent help and advice on quitting try quit.ie or quitwithhelp.ie. Good luck!

Tweet Tweet your favourite story #loveica

Follow Get the latest updates facebook.com/ IrishCountrywomensAssociation

Send Send us your top tips, queries or advice for our next issue editor@icahomeandliving.ie

8 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

009 ICA Summer 2016_Daily Disasters.indd 8

20/05/2016 16:40


ICA Ad Template.indd 92 240036_1C_Gempack_AMA_ICA.indd 1

23/05/2016 11/05/2016 14:36 11:51


PHOTOS: JANE MATTHEWS

skills|baking

ICA President, Marie O’Toole, shares her recipe for her famous macarons.

S N O R MACA

THE ICA WAY

T GET THE PERFECT SHAPE: See our tip on the next page

hese colourful little delights have an equally dazzling history. They’ve been produced in Venetian monasteries since the 8th century AD and were brought to France by Catherine de’ Medici when she married Henri II of France. There the Carmelite nuns took up the baking baton when they made and sold macarons to pay their rent as they sought asylum in Nancy during the French Revolution. The nuns became known as the ‘Macaron Sisters’. Probably the most famous macaronmuncher was Marie-Antoinette who apparently insisted they were coloured to coordinate with her dresses on any given day. (And you wondered why they guillotined her?) The filling was not added until the 1830s when Pierre Desfontaines of the famous French pâtisserie Ladurée came up with the idea of sandwiching two macaron shells together with a layer of ganache or jam. And the macaron as we know it today was born.

10 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

010 ICA Summer 2016_Macaroons.indd 10

23/05/2016 09:44


baking|skills MACARONS

ICA President, Marie O’Toole

Makes 24-30 2 large egg whites at room temperature 35g caster sugar 150g icing sugar 75g ground almonds Pinch of salt A few drops of food colouring FILLING 50g butter 75g icing sugar, sifted A few drops of food colouring Note: You could also use cream or ganache

1

Sieve the icing sugar and ground almonds, discarding any pieces that are too coarse to pass through the sieve. Whisk the egg whites with pinch of salt until quite stiff. Add caster sugar a spoon at a time and keep whisking. Then add the icing sugar and ground almonds. It is tricky to get the mixture just right; try not to over or under beat the mixture, it should be quite stiff with no grainy bits in it. Add a few drops of food colouring and bear in mind that it will fade when cooked. Put the mixture into a piping bag with a half-inch nozzle and pipe the mixture onto parchment lined baking sheets. When you have finished piping, bang the tray on a worktop to eliminate any air bubbles. Leave to rest for 30 minutes. Pre-heat the oven to 170°C then place the macarons in the middle shelf for approximately 20 minutes, or until crisp to the touch. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. To make the filling whisk together the butter and icing sugar. Add the food colouring a little at a time and beat well to combine. When the macarons have completely cooled, pipe with filling using a piping bag with a quarter-inch nozzle and sandwich together.

2 3

4

5

MARIE & THE MACARONS I first made macarons for a friend’s 50th birthday some years ago and they turned out great, with many compliments received. I’ve been making them ever since and they’re really worth the effort. They’re a bit tricky but the more you practice the easier it gets. Once you’re confident it’s easy to start experimenting with multiple flavours and colours – there are so many gorgeous combinations to play with. They’re the perfect little treat for any occasion and they really look stunning. When I was making this batch for the photo shoot all of the kids on the road were delighted as they got to sample the ‘seconds’ from each batch! Marie O’Toole – National President ICA

ICA TIP To get the perfect size and spacing on your macaron tray, take the sheet of baking parchment and use an eggcup or small cookie cutter to trace 4-5cm circles spaced 3-4cm apart. Turn the parchment face down on the baking tray before piping your mix. You can still see the circles but the pencil won’t transfer and mark them!

SEE OUR ...

Citrus Recipes

12

PG

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 11

010 ICA Summer 2016_Macaroons.indd 11

20/05/2016 16:42


skills|ice cream

Sharp & Sweet Zesty citrus fruits are now ripe for the picking so snap some up and create refreshing sorbets – add a few extras to switch them from palate cleansers into grown up desserts. MAKE ICE CREAM & SORBET While ice creams are based on a custard recipe to which flavours are added, sorbets are a syrup base where the key flavours are infused into a sugar syrup before water is added. In both cases the chilling and churning have the most impact on the texture. The more frequently it’s churned the finer the ice crystals and the smoother the result. *If you’re not using an ice cream maker pour your cooled sorbet mix into a deep container that is suitable for freezing. Cover with a lid or clingfilm and freeze for an hour, remove from the freezer and whisk well (with a balloon whisk or stick blender) to break up the ice crystals that are starting to form, continue this process every 30 minutes until you have a smooth textured ice cream or sorbet. To make a granita follow the sorbet recipe and method but serve semi-frozen with a straw.

LEMON

CLEMENTINE

Serve with...

Serve with...

FRESH RASPBERRIES AND DARK CHOCOLATE SHARDS

FROZEN CLEMENTINE SEGMENTS DIPPED IN CHOCOLATE AND TOASTED ALMONDS

1 lemon peel finely diced 240ml water 120g sugar 120ml lemon juice 120ml fizzy water 1tsp lemon zest, finely grated First make the lemon syrup by combining the diced lemon peel, still water and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat, and allow to cool. Strain the lemon syrup into a bowl and add the grated zest and mineral water. Pour into an ice cream maker, and churn according to the instructions. If you do not have an ice-cream maker follow the *directions opposite.

150g golden caster sugar 4 clementines, finely zested 600ml clementine juice 150ml water 1 lemon, juiced Put the sugar, zest and water into a saucepan, bring to the boil then simmer for 5 minutes. Let the syrup cool before adding the clementine and lemon juice. Pour into an ice cream maker and churn according to the instructions, or follow the *directions left.

LIME MOJITO SORBET Serve with... MANGO AND PINEAPPLE FRUIT SKEWERS

ICE CREAM MACHINES The range is vast as is the difference in price. While it may be true that you get what you pay for it’s worth bearing in mind just how frequently you will use it and they can be used for making sorbet, granita and frozen yoghurt. The top three under €100 are Magimix 11047 Le Glacier, €76, Argos, Kenwood IM200, €40, Arnotts; Andrew James, €60, Power City. Or blow the budget on the Italian Gaggia RI9101 Gelateria, €350, Amazon. You’ll need to eat a lot of ice cream to justify this one.

240ml lime juice 240ml water 250ml sparkling water 240g caster sugar 5 sprigs of mint Zest of 4 limes Juice of 1 lemon 150ml white rum Put the sugar, mint and still water into a saucepan, bring to the boil then simmer for 5 minutes. Let the syrup cool then add to the lime zest, lemon juice, lime juice, sparkling water and rum. Pour into an ice cream maker and churn according to the instructions.

12 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

012 ICA Summer 2016_Citrus2.indd 12

20/05/2016 16:42


ice cream|skills

1

2

3

CHOOSING FRUIT

STORING FRUIT

JUICING FRUIT

Choose clementines, lemons and limes with bright skin. Clementines should feel soft while limes and lemons should feel firm. Some varieties of lemon have dull, matt skin, in particular Amalfi lemons which are prized for their highly aromatic thick skin and sweet juice.

Don’t be tempted to pile them all in to the fruit bowl, decorative as it may look! The best way to keep citrus fruit is in zip-lock bags in the fridge. This keeps them for weeks longer. Most fruit, except organic, has been irradiated or treated with wax to preserve it.

Fresh citrus juice provides an incredible dose of vitamin C, but it starts to degrade quickly. Juice only what you need. To get the max juice out of limes or hard lemons, heat them in the microwave for 20 seconds or roll them on the counter top with the palm of your hand before cutting them. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 13

012 ICA Summer 2016_Citrus2.indd 13

20/05/2016 16:42


skills|preserves ICA TIP For orange or lime jellies replace the juice and zest accordingly and add ½tsp of citric acid when adding the zest. LEMON JELLIES Makes

SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE

LEMON CURD From

Sally Dunleavy, Mayo Federation

From

YIELDS 23JARS

Statia Ivers, Wicklow Federation YIELD 4 JARS

85g butter 450g sugar 4 un-waxed lemons, juice and zest 6 eggs, beaten Melt the butter in a clean non-aluminium saucepan over a gentle heat. Add the sugar, lemon juice and lemon zest and mix well. Add in the beaten eggs and continue to cook slowly over a very gentle heat, stirring until it thickens. If it looks like it might bubble, remove from the heat. You can work over a bain-marie instead of on the hob, this should help prevent curdling. Once it is ready transfer into sterilised glass jars, cover with waxed paper and seal with a lid. Store in the fridge until ready to use.

1½ kg Seville oranges, halved and juiced, pips reserved 2 lemons 2½ kg sugar 3 lt water Scrape most of the pith out of the juiced orange halves. Place the pith with the pips in a muslin bag and tie loosely. Shred the peel and place in a saucepan with the juice, water and muslin bag of pith and pips. Bring to the boil and simmer until peel is soft. Remove the muslin bag and add the sugar. Continue to heat and stir the sugar until it has dissolved. Boil rapidly until setting point is reached, skimming the surface to remove any impurities. Allow to cool slightly and pour into sterilised jars.

ICA TIP A sugar thermometer is invaluable when making preserves and sweets. They’re not expensive and they take the guesswork out of gauging setting points and avoid scorched pans. Choose one that’s easy to read and clips on to the side of the pot. Practice with a pan of boiling water. Well worth the investment.

40 JELLIES

2½tbs gelatin 180ml water 180ml fresh lemon juice 1tbs lemon zest 480g granulated sugar Lemon food colouring (optional) 200g granulated coating sugar In a small bowl, mix together the gelatin, 60ml water, and lemon juice. Stir well so the gelatin softens. Line a swiss-roll pan with parchment so it overhangs the edges; spray lightly with vegetable oil by spraying the inside with oil. In a heavy based pan mix the sugar and 120ml water and heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Continue cooking without stirring until the syrup reaches 110C on a sugar thermometer. Remove from the heat and add the gelatin, food colouring (if using) and lemon zest. Stir until completely combined and then pour into the lined swiss-roll pan. Let it set completely overnight. Sprinkle half of the coarse sugar onto a clean work surface or tray. Lift the jelly from the pan by holding the edges of the parchment and invert onto the sugar and peel off the parchment. Sprinkle the remaining sugar over the surface of the jelly. With an oiled sharp knife or pizza cutter carefully slice the jelly into strips and then squares. Completely coat each surface with the sugar. You can place them on a sheet of parchment and leave to dry for a full day, turning occasionally. Then pack in an air-tight container and resist eating for two days to allow the flavour develop more fully.

14 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

012 ICA Summer 2016_Citrus2.indd 14

20/05/2016 16:44


Beko|competition

get cooking Beko, Ireland’s leading home appliance manufacturer, is asking ICA readers to fill out this quick survey to be in with a chance of winning a top of the range double fan oven worth €450. 1. Your son is bringing home his new girlfriend for the first time. What do you whip up? a) Brownies b) Apple/Rhubarb Tart c) Cup cakes d) Meringue e) Your showpiece .....

3. How often do you use your oven? a) Daily b) More than twice a week c) Monthly d) Once a week e) Other ....

tell us

tell us 4. How often do you clean your oven?

2. The grandchildren are on a sleepover, they love your .... a) Brown Bread b) Homemade Pizza c) Lasagne d) Quiche e) Your secret weapon .....

a) Daily b) Twice a week c) Once a week d) Once a month e) Do you have any cleaning tips?

tell us

tell us 5. What was the first thing you taught your son/ daughter to cook and why?

How to enter To be in with a chance of winning the Beko double oven (pictured) simply tick the relevant boxes for each of the five questions above and send your answers to Beko Competition, ICA Home & Living Magazine, Ashville Media Group, Blackhall Place, Dublin 7 with your name and contact details.

tell us

Your Details NAME: GUILD: ADDRESS:

CONTACT NUMBER:

ss steel A stainle cm Beko 90 ven an O Double F 450 worth € Features include: The double fan oven has a large 113 litres capacity with an easy-to-clean enamel interior. True fan cooking, conventional cooking, grilling, and defrosting options. The built-in oven has an A Energy Rating, saving you money on your energy bills. Includes a year warranty on all Beko built-in appliances and an easy to remove full glass inner door. For more information visit www.beko.ie

Winner will be notified on September 1st, 2016 Terms & conditions: Prize is non-transferable. Closing date for all entries is the 31st of August 2016. Competition is not open to employees of Ashville Media Group or Beko. No cash or gift card will be awarded in lieu of prize. Winner will be selected at random from a draw and will be contacted by phone. Competition entrants must be resident in the island of Ireland. One entry per person. Competition is subject to all usual terms and conditions. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 15

ICA Spring 2016_BEKO comp.indd 15

23/05/2016 15:07


food|store

Legumes Lentils & Beans

Legumes are typically low in fat, contain no cholesterol, and are high in folate, potassium, iron and magnesium. A good source of protein and fibre, legumes are a healthy addition to any meal.

1

FLAVOUR: Delicate grassy flavour and texture ranges from tender to floury. USE IN: Dried are best in dishes that need slow cooking like lamb stews, or cooked and pulsed with spices to make dips. Fresh broad beans make great salads with mint, peas and artichokes or feta.

2

FLAVOUR: Creamy smooth with full, savoury flavour. USE IN: Widely used in South American and Asian cooking, black beans are delicious in stirfrys with pork, soy, ginger and chilli. Also great with rice, they love garlic, onion, chili and fresh coriander. Season with cayenne, salt or red wine vinegar.

3

4

5

6

7

8

BROAD BEANS

GREEN LENTILS

FLAVOUR: Mealy texture and mild mushroomy flavour. USE IN: They hold their shape and absorb flavours well. Make a salad with feta cheese, beetroot, red wine vinegar, olive oil and lots of chopped herbs. Or serve warm stirred through fried lardons of bacon or pancetta.

BLACK BEANS

HARICOT BEANS

BORLOTTI BEANS

FLAVOUR: Mild nutty flavour and smooth texture - these cream and pink speckled beauties turn a shade of taupe when cooked. USE IN: Italian cooking, tomato-based sauces with sausage and in salads with tuna, onion, red pepper parsley and balsamic dressing.

9

KIDNEY BEANS

FLAVOUR: Soft creamy texture with deep, full flavour. Toxic until cooked. USE IN: Chillies and stews with or without meat. Also use in Mexican salads with chopped avocado, spring onion, celery, sweetcorn, fresh chilli, lime and light vegetable oil.

FLAVOUR: Tender, and floury with a delicate flavour. USE IN: Best known as the baked bean, serve in a tasty home-made tomato sauce flavoured with celery, onion and sage. Great in hearty pasta and bean soups like Minestrone and pasta e fagoli with toasted crusty bread.

CHICKPEAS

FLAVOUR: Savoury, nutty flavour and firm texture. USE IN: Indian dishes in place of meat. Blitz with tahini, garlic, lemon and olive oil to make hummus. Sauté red pepper, onion, chorizo; add a tin of chickpeas and tomatoes, cook for 30 mins, season and serve with rice or crusty bread.

RED LENTILS

FLAVOUR: Sweet, earthy flavour and soft comforting texture. USE IN: Stews and soups to thicken and add texture. Make an Indian dahl with red lentils, turmeric, cumin, chili, garlic, butter and good stock. Combine cooked lentils, leftover veg, seasoning and beaten egg to make vegi-burgers.

PUY LENTILS

FLAVOUR: Delicious peppery flavour and blue-green colour make them the most prized lentils. USE IN: Pork, sausage and bacon dishes. Sauté a mix of finely chopped celery, carrot and onion, add the lentils, cover in ham stock and cook. Season with black pepper and parsley; serve with good sausages or duck confit.

DRIED VS CANNED BUYING & STORING Dried beans and pulses kept for over a year will take longer to cook. Most, except lentils, require soaking overnight. Some are toxic if not boiled properly. Never add salt to the cooking water as it toughens the skins and prevents them becoming tender. Add seasoning after you have drained them. Bicarbonate will speed up the cooking and tenderise dried beans and chickpeas.

While dried beans and pulses are cheaper and involve less packaging and waste, you need to plan ahead if they require an overnight soaking before cooking. Nutritionally there is very little difference however canned varieties, while more convenient, often contain higher levels of salt - it’s worth trying different brands to compare flavours. The texture of dried, soaked and cooked is known to be a little firmer and the flavour more pronounced.

16 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

016 ICA Summer 2016_beans.indd 16

20/05/2016 16:44


store|food

1 3

5 9 4

2

6

8

7

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 17

016 ICA Summer 2016_beans.indd 17

24/05/2016 11:13


food|bread

Staff

Life Of

A fundamental staple of every culture, bread is ingrained in our culinary consciousness. It intertwines our earliest food memories with religious and pagan symbolism. Leavened or unleavened, this humble food is the universal symbol of life, acceptance and friendship.

18 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 18

20/05/2016 16:47


SCHÜTTELBROT INGREDIENTS 375g rye flour (medium or light) 500 ml water, divided 1 tsp dried yeast 125g bread flour 1 tsp salt 1/4 tsp each ground caraway, fenugreek and fennel 30g candied orange peel 1 tsp allspice 1 tbs fine powdered instant coffee

Mix 150ml of the water with the yeast and mix in 250g of the flour to make a batter. Cover the batter to keep it from drying out and leave it for thirty minutes at room temperature. Mix the sponge (the batter) with the rest of the ingredients and beat for 2 - 3 minutes to create dough that is too soft to knead. Cover the dough and allow it to rise for two hours until doubled in bulk and bubbly. Preheat the oven to 200C and flour a baking sheet or pizza stone. On a well-floured surface divide the dough into balls of approx. 150g in size. Let the dough balls rest while the oven heats. Then place one onto the floured baking sheet or pizza stone and shake the baking sheet or stone in a circular motion to relax the dough into a flat circle. You can stretch it like pizza dough with your hands if it’s proving tricky. Place in the oven and cook for 20 minutes. Place on a wire rack to cool and crisp up.

ICA TIP Use leftover dough or batter from any of the recipes to make smallscones,crackers or bread rolls – perfect with soup or a packed lunch.

READ ON..

Scandinavian Flatbread PG

78

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 19

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 19

20/05/2016 16:47


food|bread BUCHTELN BAKED, SWEET YEAST DUMPLING 100ml milk, room temperature 250g cream flour, plus extra for working 35g sugar 10g yeast 40g soft butter 2 egg yolks Salt

DARK RYE BREAD WITH CARAWAY SEEDS

1tsp lemon zest 1tbs melted butter for coating Icing sugar to dust (optional) Apricot jam Custard to serve

350g plain flour 350g dark rye flour 60g unsweetened cocoa powder 7g pack of instant yeast 2 tsp caraway seeds 2 tsp salt

6 tbsp treacle or blackstrap molasses 2 tsp sugar 30g butter 2 tbs vegetable oil 500ml water 1 tbs milk for brushing

Make a sponge with lukewarm milk, yeast and 1/3 of the flour. Dust with a little flour and cover with a cloth. Leave to rise in a warm place for about an hour. Then add the rest of the flour, sugar, egg yolks, lemon rind and a pinch of salt. Knead to form a semi-stiff dough. Finally, work in the soft butter. Cover with a cloth and leave to rise again until the bulk has increased considerably. Roll the dough out on a floured surface and cut into 6cm circles. Place a tsp of apricot jam into the centre of each circle then pull the edges in to seal the jam into the centre of the bun. Coat each bun in the melted butter and place side-by-side, seam side down, in a well-greased circular cake tin. Preheat the oven to 180°C; bake for 30 minutes until golden. Remove from the tin and place on a wire rack to cook. Sprinkle with icing sugar (optional) and serve with custard.

In a large bowl mix the plain flour, cocoa, yeast and caraway seeds. In a microwaveable bowl add the treacle/molasses, butter, sugar, water and oil, heat for two minutes until the butter is melted and the ingredients are easy to whisk together. Put the wet ingredients into the dry and mix by hand or using an electric mixer until well combined. Add the rye flour little by little until you have a soft dough. Knead with the dough hook or by hand until smooth and pliable. Set aside, cover and allow it to rest for half an hour. Preheat the oven to 190°C. Knock back the dough and shape into one large or two smaller loaves, slash the top diagonally, cover and allow to prove for an hour. Then brush with a little milk. Place on an oiled, floured baking tray and bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes. Remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.

SEEDED WHOLEGRAIN TREACLE BREAD

SCANDINAVIAN CRISP BREAD WITH HERB CRÈME FRAÎCHE

450g wholemeal flour 150g plain flour 2 tsp bread soda 50g oats 50g mixed seeds (pumpkin, sesame, sunflower plus extra for sprinkling) 1tbs treacle

100ml vegetable oil 700ml buttermilk

100g sesame seeds 100g pumpkin seeds 100g cornflour 50g linseed ½ tsp salt 50ml rapeseed oil 200ml boiling water

Preheat the oven to 165°C. Sieve the plain flour with the bread soda and mix with the wholemeal flour, oats and seeds in a large bowl. Whisk the buttermilk, treacle and oil together in a large jug. Slowly pour the mixed liquids into the dry ingredients stirring with a wooden spoon. The mixture should be thick but not dry. Butter and flour a large loaf tin or two smaller tins. Pour in the prepared mixture, sprinkle some seeds on top and place in the preheated oven. Bake for 45-60 minutes depending on the size of the loaf. Check with a skewer, which should come out clean if the bread is cooked or by tapping the bottom of the loaf, it should sound hollow if cooked. Remove to a wire rack when ready and serve slightly warm with cold butter.

For The Herb Crème Fraîche: 100g crème fraîche 1 tbs fresh herbs such as dill, tarragon, parsley or chives Pinch of salt 1tsp grated lemon zest

Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line a 30 x 40cm baking tray with baking parchment. Combine all of the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl, stir in the oil and boiling water. Let it stand for 15 minutes. Spread onto the lined baking tray, sprinkle with the additional seeds and place in the oven for an hour and a half. Remove to a cooling rack and when cool break into pieces and serve. [Tip] If you have several baking trays you can put a tablespoon of the mixture onto each and spread into neat circles. Reduce the cooking time accordingly. Mix all the ingredients for the herb crème fraîche and serve with the crispbread.

ICA TIP Buttermilk adds a delicate acidity to bread but if you don’t have any to hand simply add a tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar to 250mls of milk or substitute with three parts plain yogurt mixed with one part water.

20 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 20

20/05/2016 16:47


bread|food

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 21

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 21

20/05/2016 16:48


food|bread Sunday

How to ... MAKE A SOURDOUGH STARTER OR SPONGE

500g plain flour or bread flour (100g per day for 5 days) 500ml water (100ml per day for 5 days) A large non-metalic mixing bowl Cling film or lid for the bowl Mix 100g of the flour and 100ml of water together in the mixing bowl to make a thick sticky batter. Cover the bowl loosely and leave overnight in a warm, draught free place. You should see bubbles appearing on the surface by the following day. Add another 100g of flour and 100ml water the following day and mix well. Repeat the process in full every day for 5 days until you have a thick, yeasty smelling, spongy batter that’s ripe and ready to use. To maintain the starter you can use or discard half of it every day and continue to feed it with 100g flour and 100ml water for as long as you want to maintain it.

SOUR DOUGH BREAD LEAVEN 1 tbsp active starter 75g plain flour 75ml water

BREAD 700g bread flour 525ml water 1tsp salt

The night before you plan on baking create a leaven by taking 1tbsp of your starter (see opposite) and combining with 75g flour and 75ml water, mix to a thick batter, cover and leave at room temperature overnight. It should have a bubbly surface the next day and a little will float if dropped into water. In a small bowl combine the salt and 50mls of water, mix to dissolve the salt. Add the leaven to the remaining water and mix to dissolve as much as possible. Sieve the flour into the water and leaven mix and stir with a spatula to combine to a loose dough. Rest the dough for an hour or two. Then add the salt water to the dough, working it in by hand until it is all absorbed. Begin folding the dough in the bowl, lift and stretch by holding it against one side of the bowl, then fold the dough back over the top of itself. Do this four times, rotating it clockwise between folds. Let the dough rest for half an hour and repeat the process. Do this every half hour, six times in total. The dough

will become silky smooth and tighter as you work. Allow the dough to rise for an hour, it will look moderately larger but not double in volume. Divide the dough into two loaves taking care not to knock it back. Gently shape into rustic loaves, turning gently to shape. Rest the dough again for half an hour before transferring to floured proofing baskets or bowls lined with clean, well floured tea towels. Dust the loaves liberally with flour, flip over and fold top, bottom, right and left as before. Then transferring to the proving basket/ bowl seam side up. Dust the top with plenty of flour cover loosely with cling film and leave to rise for 4 hours or overnight in the fridge. Preheat the oven to 240°C. Heat two heavy oven-proof casserole dishes with lids in the oven. Tip each loaf into a casserole, slash the top of the loaf at an angle, replace the lid and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes then reduce the oven to 200°C and bake for another 10 minutes before removing the lid and continuing to bake for 10 - 20 minutes until deep brown. Lift the loaves from the casserole dishes onto a wire rack to cool to room temperature before slicing.

22 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 22

20/05/2016 16:48


bread|food

FOCACCIA WITH SALT, PLUM TOMATOES, COURGETTES AND HERB 420ml warm water 1 x 7g pack of dry yeast 1 tbsp sugar 500g strong white flour, plus additional for kneading 1 tbs salt, plus coarse sea salt for sprinkling 240ml extra-virgin olive oil Choice of Toppings (choose one or two) 3 sprigs of rosemary or thyme, leaves only 12 cherry tomatoes halved or sundried tomatoes 12 black olives 1 finely sliced onion 1 finely sliced courgette 2 tbs coarsely grated Parmesan cheese

Pour the warm water, yeast and sugar into a bowl and mix with a fork; keep in a warm spot for 10-15 mins until bubbling and aromatic. Combine the flour, 1 tbs salt, half of the olive oil in a mixing bowl or food processor with a dough hook. Add the yeast mixture and stir in or turn food processor on to a low speed. Once the dough has come together turn out onto a floured worktop and knead for 10 minutes until soft and elastic. If using a food processor this will take 5 minutes at a medium speed. Add a little more flour if the dough is too tacky to handle. Lightly oil a mixing bowl and place the dough in the

bowl, cover with cling film or a clean cloth and keep in a warm spot to prove for an hour. Coat a Swiss-roll tin with most of the remaining olive oil; retain 1-2 tbs of oil for finishing. Put the dough onto the tin and begin press it out to fit the size of the pan. Flip the dough over so that it’s evenly coated with the olive oil on both sides. When the dough fills the pan to the edges use your fingers to make regular dents, almost all the way through the dough, all over the surface. Leave the tin in a warm spot for an hour until the dough has risen. Pre-heat the oven to 200°C while you top the

focaccia dough with sea salt and rosemary. You can use additional toppings such as cherry tomatoes, finely sliced courgettes, onions, cheese or olives ¬ on all or part of the focaccia, drizzle over the remaining oil and spritz with a little water. Place the dough in the middle of the oven and bake for about 30 minutes until golden brown. Remove from the oven and allowing it to cool slightly before turning out onto a wire rack to cool. Slice and serve.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 23

018 ICA Summer 2016_Bread Special.indd 23

20/05/2016 16:48


food|weeknights

5

Easy dinners FABULOUSLY FRESH SEAFOOD

When the weather warms up and you crave something light yet tasty think fish. There is such an amazing array of fresh fish and seafood all caught of our glorious coast that it’s a shame we don’t indulge in it a lot more often.

I

reland has some of the most pristine fishing waters in the world, where generations of fishermen have landed catches of fresh and seawater fish. Now prized for its health giving properties, fish’s rising popularity is evident in the range of seafood on offer in local fishmongers and supermarkets. There’s enough variety to eat fish all week and not get bored. It’s also a very economical dinner with mussels, mackerel and trout being particularly inexpensive. Try salmon, tuna and mackerel which are rich in omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D and lean protein. They combine anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties helping to reduce inflammation such as rheumatoid arthritis, protect brain and heart health and reduce symptoms of depression. Prawns are rich in calcium and zinc, which are all good for bones, teeth and skin; prawns and mussels both contain iodine which help an underactive thyroid produce tyrosine - they’re low in fat (except when smothered in Marie-rose sauce!). White fish such as cod, haddock, plaice and John Dory all help build lean mussel. Fish is versatile, tasty healthy and quick – and there’s not many things you can say that about!

1

2

3

4

5

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Fish Parcels with Root Vegetables

Mackerel with Prawn Saffron tomato and Skewers with Salmon Soup courgette Asian Greens concasse and Noodles

Fragrant Asian Mussels

Monday FISH PARCELS WITH ROOT VEGETABLES 4 x 150g portions of white fish such as cod or flounder 4 medium carrots 2 parsnips 10-12 baby potatoes 1 orange, zest and juice 2tbs fresh tarragon, chopped roughly 3tbs olive oil Salt Pepper

Skin the fish and season with salt, pepper and orange zest. Peel and chop the vegetables into bite-sized chunks. Boil a pan of salted water and par cook the vegetables for about 5 minutes until barely tender – but not fully cooked. Drain and allow to steam dry. Toss the vegetables in half the oil. Preaheat your oven to 1800C. Cut 4 large circles of baking parchment or foil using a dinner plate as a template. Place a portion of vegetable on each one, top with a portion of fish. Mix 1tbs of the orange juice with the oil, season with salt and pepper and drizzle over the fish and vegetables. Sprinkle over the tarragon. Seal each parcel by twisting both sides of the parchment together – like a Cornish pastie. Place the parcels onto a baking try and place in the pre-heated oven for 15-20 minutes. When cooked serve each parcel on a dinner plate and open at the table. Serve with a little crusty bread and green salad.

24 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

024 ICA Summer 2016 Weeknights_FISH.indd 24

20/05/2016 16:52


here | strap

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 25

024 ICA Summer 2016 Weeknights_FISH.indd 25

20/05/2016 16:52


food|weeknights Tuesday

Wednesday

MACKEREL WITH TOMATO AND COURGETTE CONCASSE

PRAWN SKEWERS WITH ASIAN GREENS AND NOODLES

6 fresh mackerel fillets 2 red onions 1 large courgette 400g large, ripe tomatoes 3 tbsp olive oil 1tbs red wine vinegar 1 lemon, a little zest grated 1tbs parsley, chopped Salt Black Pepper

20-25 prawns, shell on, heads removed 2 heads of pak choi, sliced 1 yellow pepper, sliced 1 red chilli, sliced 1 clove of garlic, chopped 2tbs soy sauce 2tsp fish sauce (optional) 1 lime. 200g glass noodles, cooked 2tbs coriander, coarsely chopped Salt 2tbs vegetable oil

Boil a pan of water, cut a cross on the top and bottom of each tomato, plunge them into the boiling water for about 1 minute, remove, cool and peel them. Quarter the tomatoes to remove the seeds and core then dice the flesh. Chop the courgette and onions into small dice the same size as the tomato. Heat 2 tbs of olive oil in a pan over a medium heat, add the red onion and sauté for 2 minutes until translucent then add the courgette and continue to cook for 3-4 minutes until tender, season with red wine vinegar, salt and a twist of pepper. Gently stir in the chopped tomato, check the seasoning again and set aside. Heat half the remaining oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. Slash the skin side of the mackerel with three shallow cuts. Place the mackerel fillets on the pan (two at a time depending on the size) fry gently until the skin is golden then carefully turn over and cook for 2-3 minutes on the flesh side. Finally, pile the vegetable concasse onto a serving dish, sprinkle with the lemon zest and parsley, lay the mackerel filets on top and serve with wedges of lemon.

Heat a griddle pan over a medium heat. Place the prawns into a bowl with1tbs oil, the garlic and a pinch of salt. Coat the prawns well then place on the griddle pan cook for 1-2 minutes on each side then skewer 5-6 of the cooked prawns per person. Meanwhile heat the remaining oil in a wok or frying pan and sauté the chilli, yellow pepper and pak-choi for 4-5 minutes. Season with the soy sauce, fish sauce and a squeeze of lime-juice. Portion the noodles onto your plates, top with the stir-fried vegetables and a skewer of prawns. Serve with the remaining lime wedges and garnish with coriander.

ICA TIP Switch vegetables to baby gem lettuce, mangetout and peas seasoned with mint and butter; replace the noodles with toasted baguette to give the dish a French twist.

Thursday

Friday

SAFFRON SALMON SOUP

FRAGRANT ASIAN MUSSELS

4 salmon darnes 1 tin butter beans pinch of saffron (15 strands) 10 new potatoes, peeled and diced 1 white onion finely diced 400g fresh baby spinach 1.5 l vegetable stock 3tbs vegetable oil Salt Pepper

2kg fresh mussels, scrubbed 2 limes, zest and juice of one 2 red chillies, chopped 1tbs basil, chopped 1tbs chives, chopped 2cm ginger, grated 1 clove of garlic, chopped 2tbs vegetable oil

Heat 2tbs of vegetable oil in a large, deep pan. Sauté the onion until translucent then add the potato dice, stock and saffron, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Heat the remaining oil in a frying pan and season the salmon darnes and cookfor 2-3 minutes on each side. Drain and rinse the butterbeans then add to the stock along with the spinach, cook until the spinach is wilted. Place a salmon darn in each bowl then ladle over the stock and vegetables.

Heat the vegetable oil over a medium heat in a wok or deep pan with a lid. Add the chillies, garlic and ginger and sauté gently for 3-4 minutes until tender. Increase the heat and tip in the mussels (discard any that are already open), put the lid on the pan and shake vigorously or stir the mussels every minute for 5 minutes. Remove the lid, all of the mussels should have opened, stir in the lime-juice and zest along with the chopped herbs. Tip into a large serving platter, garnish with lime wedges and serve.

26 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

024 ICA Summer 2016 Weeknights_FISH.indd 26

20/05/2016 16:52


here | strap

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 27

024 ICA Summer 2016 Weeknights_FISH.indd 27

20/05/2016 16:53


food|weeknights Sunday GRILLED TUNA WITH VODKA RISOTTO SERVES 4 4 x 150g tuna steaks 1 large fennel bulb, finely diced, green fronds reserved and finely diced 1 large white onion, finely diced 2 celery sticks finely diced 100g butter 4 tbs vegetable oil 300g risotto rice, arborio or carnaroli 1 litre vegetable stock, simmering 200ml vodka 1 lemon, zest and juice 200g parmeasan cheese Pepper and salt

To garnish 100g green beans, chopped and blanched 100g cherry tomatoes, quartered 50g black olives 50g flat leaf parsley, tarragon or fennel, roughly chopped

To make the risotto, gently heat the butter and 2tbs of vegetable oil in

Risotto 101 ✱ Prep everything before you begin. ✱ Use good quality, simmering stock. ✱ Always begin by cooking the rice in the butter for a few minutes, it should not colour just begin to cook before adding the liquids. ✱ Alcohol such as vodka or wine should be added before the stock and cooked-off before adding the stock. ✱ The slow addition of stock and constant stirring are critical to a good risotto, only add more stock once it’s all been absorbed and keep stirring until it’s cooked. ✱ A risotto can be a meal in itself, just add fresh prawns and new season peas or as an accompaniment to meat or fish dishes. ✱ Risotto alla Milanease is bright yellow, thanks to couple of pinches saffron. It’s cooked with white wine, chicken stock and plenty of butter and Parmesan. ✱ Should you have any risotto left over, shape it into balls, filling each with a little mozzarella or meat sauce, coat them in flour egg and breadcrumbs, then deep fry and you have delicious arancini!

a wide deep pan. Add the chopped fennel, celery and onion and sauté for 10-15 minutes without colouring. Mix in the rice and stir well to coat in the butter. Continue to cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring constantly until the rice begins to become translucent. Add the vodka and increase the heat, stir well until the vodka has reduced considerably. Take a ladle of the vegetable stock and add to the rice, stir until the stock is absorbed, then add the next ladle of stock. As you reach the end of the stock, add the lemon juice and zest. Continue to stir and add, testing that the rice is cooked, add a splash of boiling water if necessary to finish cooking the rice. The rice should be tender but not mushy and the liquid should be reduced to a creamy consistency. Stir in the Parmesan cheese and chopped fennel fronds and taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper if necessary. Stir the blanched green beans through the risotto. Set aside.

To cook the tuna, heat a skillet over a medium heat. Oil the tuna steaks with the remaining 2tbs of oil, season well with salt and pepper and place on the skillet. Cook for 2-3 minutes each side depending on the thickness of the steak. Remove from the heat when cooked. To plate, place a mound of risotto in the centre of each plate, top with the tuna and garnish with the tomatoes, olives and chopped herbs.

ICA TIP Try John Dory or swordfish instead of tuna in this dish and garnish with samphire or a few steamed clams or mussels for a special occassion.

28 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

024 ICA Summer 2016 Weeknights_FISH.indd 28

20/05/2016 16:53


Everything you love about Beko, built-in

At Beko, we bring helpful solutions and technologies to millions of homes in Ireland... ...like an oven that cleans itself at the touch of a button and washing machines that clean large loads in just 39 minutes. Now all of these helpful solutions are available in our stylish, new built-in range, which comes complete with a 2 year warranty. So you can get everything you love about Beko, built-in.

Beko, over 3 million appliances sold in Ireland.

View our new range at beko.ie/builtin

23477_Beko_built-in_Ireland_Advert_306mmx229mm_AW.indd 1 ICA Ad Template.indd 92

239532_Beko_IB_ICA.indd 1

20/04/2016 16:14 23/05/2016 22/04/2016 14:49 14:08


food|coffee

Coffee

Smarter Coffee Drinking Science has figured out how to consume coffee for maximum benefit. Chances are, you’ve been doing it all wrong. Here are six easy steps to getting it right.

1

NO COFFEE BEFORE 10AM

We know this sounds counterintuitive but drinking coffee in the early morning offers no benefit. Your body is already pumping out enough cortisol to wake you up and get you performing at your peak. Add coffee into the mix and it actually competes with the cortisol driving your body to increase it’s craving for coffee. At lunchtime and in the early evening the body also boosts cortisol production. So, to maximize the perk-up of a good caffeine boost, respect your circadian rhythm and time your coffee break for the lulls in-between.

PEAK CORTISOL 89AM

10 11.30AM

25PM

PEAK CORTISOL

COFFEE

4

PRODUCTIVITY YES, CREATIVITY: KIND OF

While caffeine makes you more alert and focused ergo potentially more productive, the jury is out on its impact on creativity. One school of thinking suggests that focusing the mind inhibits free flowing thoughts and spontinaity therefore restricting creativity.

COFFEE

121PM

5

PEAK CORTISOL 56.30PM

2

BOOST YOUR MEMORY

Research from Johns Hopkins showed improved memory consolidation in testing when 200mg of caffeine was consumed following a learning exercise. No improvement was shown if the coffee was consumed before the exercise and more caffeine did not increase the results.

400MG OF CAFFEINE PER DAY ✱ ABOUT IS THOUGHT TO BE SAFE FOR MOST ADULTS

KNOW HOW MUCH YOU ARE CONSUMING

When calculating how much caffeine we consume it’s easy to overlook other sources in our drinks and foodstuffs such as a cup of tea which has 75mg, a galss of cola can have 40-50mg and energy drinks up to 80mg. Even dark chocolate adds 43mg per 100g to the tally. Be alert! INSTANT COFFEE 65100MG BREWED COFFEE 80135MG ESPRESSO SHOT 100MG DRIP COFFEE 115175MG

MEASUREMENT BASED ON A REGULAR 8OZ COFFEE CUP

3

TAKE A NAP

Some days your body just needs a little sleep to get you through. You don’t need a full eight hours to recharge, have a coffee first then aim for a 20 min power nap in a comfortable spot followed by a 10 min walk in the fresh air and a glass of cold water to rehydrate you. It takes 45 mins for the caffeine to kick in so it won’t stop you napping.

6

DON’T SABOTAGE THE BENEFITS

Caffeine has a half-life of six hours, so if you have 200mg at mid-day, by 6pm there will still be 100gm in your system. Overdoing it can result in heightened anxiety, a jittery feeling or insomnia. In extreme circumstances it can lead to heart palpatations. Some people are more sensitive to its effects than others.

YOUR DAILY GRIND

DID YOU KNOW ...

For the French Press use 7g coarse ground coffee per cup - pour over recently boiled water, stir well and allow to infuse for four minutes. Pour immediately.

For the Percolator use a medium ground coffee, roast to your taste. Ensure that the water is fresh. If the coffee sits for long it will stew and taste bitter.

For the Moka Pot choose a fine medium roast espresso coffee such as Lavazza or Illy. Don’t over-pack the chamber. Remove from the heat once it’s ready.

Used coffee grinds are excellent fertiliser plus they act as slug and ant repellents. Place a ring of the used coffee grinds around your plants to feed and protect them. They’ll also help turn hydrangea blooms blue.

30 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

030 ICA Summer 2016_Coffee.indd 30

20/05/2016 17:04


coffee|food HOME GROUND CAPSULE COFFEE Capsule coffee has become incredibly popular in recent years with the the Nespresso machine. The branded capsules can be purchased in the temple of coffee that is the Nespresso shop. However the supermarkets are hot on their heels with affordable and decent quality alternatives.

It doesn’t get any fresher that this. Be like most self respecting Italians and buy your beans ready roasted, then grind them as you need. You do need to be organised but it provides top quality, fresh, flavourful coffee.

READY GROUND Perfect for your mocha pot or cafetiere, ready ground coffee comes in various grades from fine for espresso making to coarse for a percolator, and different strengths. Keep in an airtight container once opened, ideally in the fridge. It will hold it’s flavour for about two weeks.

DON’T FORGET TEA CAN GIVE YOU A CAFFEINE KICK TOO The amount of caffeine in your cup of tea depends primarily on the length of time you brew it for. Irish Breakfast tea ranges from 17mg for a 1 minute brew to 30mg for a 5 minute brew. Trendy matcha tea equals the caffeine content of black coffee. There are many varieties such as mint, rooibois, chamomile are naturally caffeine free.

FRESH BEANS Go to a good coffee supplier to buy beans. They will explain the various types and their distinctive flavours and you can choose to buy a single type or a blend. They will roast the beans and you can grind them at home or they’ll grind them for you if you prefer.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 31

030 ICA Summer 2016_Coffee.indd 31

20/05/2016 17:04


239637_2L_Clonakilty_AMA_ICA.indd 1

06/05/2016 12:55

Kearns Fruit Farm was established over forty years ago on the family farm at the foothills of Mount Leinster. Originally, we began growing fruit for jam production and the farm has now developed into a large family run business producing and growing for supermarkets and the fresh fruit market. C- 6% M-14% Y- 35% K- 7%

C- 85% We are Bord Bia approved and members of Good Food M-17% Y- 76% Ireland and members K-of57%Guaranteed Irish. With all our experience, we strive M-100% to produce the finest quality strawberries Y-100% K-10% and raspberries, blackberries , and also produce all our own homemade jam. Fresh as nature intended.

We invite you to try out our freshly picked juicy fruits at any of our stalls in Wicklow town, Avoca Kilmacanogue or in the People’s Park, market in Dun Laoghaire on Sunday’s. We also work with other local producers and also supply other products like natural fruit juices, cherries, Wexford Honey, Kildare blueberries and Wexford Queen potatoes. You can also buy direct from our farm outside Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford and all visitors are welcome. Fresh and frozen fruit is available on the farm, where you can also buy fruit for jam and juice making, smoothies etc.

AN BORD BIA APPROVED

Curraghgraigue, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. • sales@kearnsfruitfarm.ie Find us on Facebook www.kearnsfruitfarm.ie. For more details, Office: 053 9255495 Mob: 087 6630347//087 8241978.

239882_2L_Kearns_AMA_ICA.indd 1

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

06/05/2016 12:44

23/05/2016 14:42


coffee|food SERIOUS MACHINARY

LIGHT & FLUFFY The coffee machines below come with integrated milk frothers for delicious fluffy cappuccinos. For coffee machines that have been going a little bit longer these addons give a frothy upgrade. Treat yourself to a cocoa duster for some cafe style finesse.

If you inbibe industiral quantities of coffee, have a small army to cater for or you want to impress an Italian then these heavy duty babies will do the business and give you the best espresso this side of the Colosseum.

DeLonghi Milk Frothing Jug, €19.99, Harvey Norman

Barista & Co Copper Cocoa Shaker, €25.00, Debenhams

ABOVE: Sage Dual Boile Espresso Machine, €1,700, Harvey Norman BELOW: Sage Barista Express, €699.00 Harvey Norman

WWW.ETSY.COM/SHOP/SARIKO1981

Krups Aeroccino Milk Frother, €99.99, Harvey Norman

Daily Grind

OUR PASSION FOR COFFEE HAS LED TO A PROLIFERATION OF GADGETS AND GIZZMOS PROMISING US COFFEE NIRVANA. SO WHETHER YOUR FIX IS A HOT TO TROT ESPRESSO SHOT OR A FABULOUSLY FROTHY CAPPUCCCINO HERE ARE THE CREAM OF THE CROP.

SMALL & MIGHTY These counter top coffee makers have impressive results. Do your research and choose one that suits your level of consumption. Check out the cost and availability of the coffee pods they use too.

Delonghi Dedica Red Coffee Maker, €209.99, Currys

Nespresso Inissia Coffee Machine, €99.99, Arnotts

Bosch Tassimo Multi Beverage, €89.90, Harvey Norman

OLD SCHOOL Unapologetically low tech! The plunger or cafetiere is a reliable, economical and delivers great coffee from coffee grounds and boiling water. 3 Cup Copper Coffee Plunger, €39.99, CoffeeShop.ie

FULL OF BEANS

ABOVE: Delonghi Coffee Grinder, €49.99, Arnotts. BELOW: Sage Smart Grinder, €279.99, Harvey Norman.

WHY GRIND YOUR OWN BEANS? The oils released when the coffee bean is ground start to degrade and loose their flavour shortly afterwards. The fresh oils are important in creating the aroma and creamy taste. Freshly ground beans makes the best coffee. STORAGE: Keep roasted beans away from air, moisture, light and heat to keep them in perfect condition. Buy just enough to last a couple of weeks and grind only what you want to use.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 33

030 ICA Summer 2016_Coffee.indd 33

20/05/2016 17:05


skills|crafts

34 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 34

23/05/2016 17:35


crafts|skills

Meet the Makers & the educators Jewels, beads, needles, thread, scissors, fabric, wool, glass, metal, patience, precision and a good sense of humour. When craft week kicks off in An Grianán you’d better come prepared!

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 35

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 35

23/05/2016 17:36


skills|crafts

Breda Bohan – Tutor Bohernabreena Guild, Dublin I’ve been teaching blackwork for the last five years. I started after my husband passed away seven years ago. I found it absorbing and relaxing and it did help to pass the time too. The fact that many of the stitches are repetitive means you can get into a grove with it and it’s genuinely therapeutic! It would be one of my favourites out of all the crafts.

Hannah Allman Derryquay Guild, Kerry The wonderful thing about the ICA is the opportunities it offers women to meet new people and form friendships. It’s irrelevant whether you come alone or with friends, you’ll meet plenty of people. I’m in the ICA 32 years now and I’ve learned candlewick crochet, Mountmellick and now blackwork and card making.

What is:

What is:

Black work

Cut work

Blackwork is a type of embroidery, using black thread on white cloth or Aida fabric. Blackwork uses a variety of stitches and was typically used for decoration in the Victorian era.

Cutwork is generally done on linen fabric with cotton embroidery, pearl cotton thread. Generally you work around the design with a button hole stitch and spaces are left which are then cut out afterwards.

Mae Connally

Anne Kelly

Celbridge Guild, Kildare

Cranagh Guild, Kilkenny

I love doing blackwork, it’s embroidery that’s done on counted thread cloth using all black thread on a white or cream background. They look elaborate but it’s very easy to master. I seem to have inherited my mother and grandmothers passion for crafts! I can hardley believe that I’ve been in the ICA for 37 years at this stage and I’ve been an ICA craft teacher since 1984.

My last big project was my daughter’s wedding dress. I hand-beaded the bodice with techniques I’ve learned here at An Grianán, using pearls and crystals. She was delighted as it was just the way she imagined it. Joining the ICA was the best thing I ever did. It opens up a whole world and gives you an outlet for your skills and the opportunity to develop them even further.

36 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 36

23/05/2016 17:36


crafts|skills

Anne Gabbett Mungret St Paul’s Guild, Limerick I always want to learn new skills and kind of get infected. I’d love to learn Carrickmacross lace and I hope to do my demonstrators next year for Limerick Lace. I’ve received the craft award so that’s a great achievement in itself. So, the next step is to do the demonstrators and qualify to teach it. The ICA is big part of my life, I joined 35 years ago and have been involved at Federation level for the past twelve years.

Kay Roche

Aileen Breheny

Inistioge Guild, Kilkenny

Lucan Guild, Dublin

The internet and Pinterest are terrific for craft inspiration from all over the world. I love Pinterest, if I got as much crafting done as I do spending time on it, I’d be very productive! I’ve done quite a few crafts in ICA but I’ve been learning all my life. I started crocheting when I was four or five. My mother and my greataunt taught me, we did dressmaking, crochet, embroidery, all sorts of needle work. These skills stay with you your whole life.

What I love about the ICA is that you’re just yourself, you’re nobody’s wife or mother, granny or anything. We’ve got to know one another over the years (I joined in 1981) and we’re also in a group of friendship. I have all of these friends now for all of my life. We all bring something to the guild. So many people have so many gifts that they don’t know they have but we bring this out in one another. I like crocheting, knitting and I also like some forms of sewing. At the moment our guild is crocheting little blankets for one of the nursing homes. The president approached the owner of the nursing home and she said she would appreciate them so we’re making them for over the old people’s knees. It’ll be us someday ourselves, so we’re thinking ahead! SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 37

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 37

23/05/2016 17:36


skills|crafts

Teresa Armstrong Brickens Guild, Mayo When I came to An Grianán for the first time we were up half the night, we just found it really exciting. It’s great to meet all the women because we all chat and catch up. Then we can go into one of the rooms at night and sometimes we sit and put the world to rights...well we try! On the craft front I do a mixture of everything, I’m a ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’! Here you do a new thing everyday so it is quite intense but I thoroughly enjoy every moment of it. There was a draw for a little knitted baby coat but someone won it before me. Incredibly, she heard that I wanted it and gave it to me and I gave her five of the cards I had won. I really wasn’t expecting that. Her grandchildren are past the age for this but I’ll be able to give it to my new grandchild.

What is:

Beadwork Beadwork is the art of attaching beads to one another by threading them through a needle and onto thin wire or thread. Beadwork techniques can include weaving, stringing, embroidery, crochet and knitting.

What are:

Zipper Flowers Zipper flower making is the art of using separated zippers to make intricate flower designs. It’s typically achieved by cutting and gathering unzipped zippers, similar to how you would gather thread and glueing them into place.

Margaret O’Rourke

Deirdre Flanagan

Blanchardstown Guild, Dublin

Ballina Guild, Mayo

The ICA has just become a part of my life because I love crafts and I’m constantly doing things. I’ve been doing beaded jewellery for over ten years now and what we’re doing today is just a lovely pattern using the pearls, the C-beads and the crystals. You can use beads to embellish all sorts of things, you can put it into ribbon embroideries or even decorate jumpers.

In 1973 my husband got transferred to the West of Ireland. I got asked if I would like to join the ICA and I landed on my feet because I love fiddling and sewing! At An Grianán I learned how to bead, and I love coloured beading. I love colour, but I don’t like big gaudy things – I like subtle colours and delicate beading. Over the years I can say I’ve learned a whole string of crafts including quilting, patchwork, and calligraphy.

38 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 38

23/05/2016 17:36


crafts|skills

Carol Lynch Muff Guild, Donegal Today I’m teaching cutwork. There are different types of it but I’m teaching renaissance which is for beginners. I first learned cutwork when I came to a class on it here in An Grianán. It’s done on linen fabric with cotton embroidery, pearl cotton thread and generally you work around with your button hole stitch. Spaces are left which are then cut out afterwards when the stitching is done. That’s where it gets it’s name.

Pauline Bligh Lucan Guild, Dublin My grandmother started me off with embroidery and showed me how to turn the heel on small little socks. I got my skills from her. Then it skipped a generation, my mother couldn’t thread a needle! Today I’m doing cutwork, one of my favourite crafts. I’ve done Carrickmacross lace and there’s some similar stitches in that so it comes easy to me. I’ve been president of the Lucan Guild for the past number of years and this year we celebrate our fiftieth year in ICA. We weren’t there when it opened naturally!

Olive Parke Muff Guild, Donegal I joined the ICA with my mum when I was 18. I love Christmas decorations, that’s what I taught for my class yesterday. Christmas decorations in April! I enjoy crochet too but had to teach myself. It didn’t seem to matter which way people were showing me, I just couldn’t pick it up, so I had to sit down with the book until I worked it out myself. It was one of my hardest to learn and now it’s one of my favourites.

Margaret Clince Garristown Guild, North Dublin I’ve been teaching beading for the last fifteen years. What I like about the hobby of beading is that if I buy an outfit and I have no jewellery, I can go to my bead box and say, “Yeah that colour will be quite nice with my outfit.” The ladies here today have never beaded before so there’s something for every level. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 39

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 39

23/05/2016 17:36


guild|history

WEXFORD

1916

Footsteps through time Enniscorthy, April 27th, 1916. Volunteers in the southeastern town mobilise on Easter Monday in tandem with their colleagues in Dublin, Ashbourne and Galway, despite confusion over countermanding orders issued by Eoin MacNeill, Chief of Staff of the Irish Volunteers. Led by Robert Brennan, Seamus Doyle and J.R. Etchingham, a party of Volunteers, accompanied by members of Cumann na Mban and Fianna Éireann, take over the town in a surprise attack, blockading the local RIC barracks following an unsuccessful assault. Supplies are commandeered from local shops (with receipts issued), and the local railway station is taken over. The tricolour is hoisted over their newly formed headquarters in the Athenaeum theatre on Castle Street. Victorious, the Volunteers conduct uniformed parades through the streets.

OUTNUMBERED Like the Rising elsewhere around the country, the insurrection in Wexford was to be an overall unsuccessful military operation. Those who rose in Wexford were poorly armed – rifles and ammunition were in short supply, and some of the insurgents carried pikes. The British forces, consisting of around 1,000 men, along with field guns and naval artillery,

PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK DARCY

In a special year for the Irish nation, which celebrates 100 years since the proclamation of the Republic outside the steps of the GPO, the ICA has and will be involved in a number of commemorative events in 2016, writes Conor Forrest.

LADY TALBOT POWER In 1911 Lady Talbot Power (of Powers whiskey) was considered a strong social influence in the Oylegate community. A avid craftswoman and splendid baker, she was widely known to promote the ICA and all the ideals that the organisation encompassed. One of the many ways she supported her Guild was by opening her family home, Edermine, for local ICA meetings and events.

under the command of one LieutenantColonel G. A. French, outnumbered the Volunteers. It was, however, to be a bloodless affair. When word of the Dublin surrender reached Enniscorthy on April 29th, the Volunteers refused to believe it. Two Volunteers – Seamus Doyle and Seán Etchingham – were escorted to Arbour Hill Prison in Dublin on April 30th, where Padraig Pearse was being held. Pearse affirmed the order of surrender, and the Enniscorthy garrison surrendered the following day. Though initially tried by courtmartial and sentenced to death, the leaders of the Rising in Wexford had their sentences commuted to five years of penal servitude. Around 150 of those arrested in Enniscorthy were transported to Frongoch, a prison camp in Wales. Nevertheless, Wexford has the distinction of being one of the few locations outside of Dublin to rebel, echoing the distant memories of the insurrection in 1798, of the United Irishmen, Father John Murphy and of Vinegar Hill. Interestingly, Wexford can also lay claim as the founding location of the ICA, which began life in the parish of Bree. Next door to Bree you’ll find the Oylegate Guild, which was created not too long after the overall organisation’s conception, and had the distinction of being the first Guild to celebrate their centenary year, in 2010.

40 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

040 ICA Summer 2016_Wexford_Bridgetown.indd 40

20/05/2016 17:10


history|guild

Although the Guild cannot claim a direct link to the Easter Rising in Wexford, Guild member Mary Somers tells me of several interesting connections. Una Brennan of Coolnaboy, Oylegate (who, incidentally, came from the same family as racehorse trainer Jim Bolger), for example, was a committed nationalist and feminist, and wrote for The Echo newspaper. Una joined her husband, Robert Brennan, in the Atheneum theatre in Enniscorthy during Easter week, and was one of the women who raised the tricolour above the building on Easter Monday. “Her husband claimed that she was one of two female members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) – herself and Maud Gonne,” Mary explains. “While the Rising was underway their children were left in

PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK DARCY

(CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE) Cake for the ICA’s centenary celebrations in 2010; ICA Oylegate branch in 1910. Commemorative sculpture depicting Lady Talbot Power and Miss Jane Ryan, who kept the ICA alive during difficult times; Oylegate Guild at the centenary celebrations, with the longest serving member of the ICA, the late Mrs Margaret Quirke. (Back Row, L-R: Emer Rosler, Breda Cody, AnneMarie Dennison, Dolores Devereux, Bernice Bateman, Anne Cahill, Anne Doran. Front Row, L-R: Joan Whelan, Mary Somers, Margaret Quirke, Kathleen Shiggins, Patricia Edwards.

Coolnaboy, and they went to school in Oylegate for a while. Their daughter was Maeve Brennan, who wrote for Harper’s Bazaar and The New Yorker.”

COMMEMORATION As one of the oldest Guilds in the Wexford Federation, Oylegate ran a commemorative event for the Federation on April 24th (the actual centenary date) – an afternoon of ceilí and set dancing was held at the Community Centre in Oylegate. That followed a national event held in An Grianán earlier this year in March, which included talks by writer and historian Lucy Keaveney (co-founder of the Countess Markievicz school) and Mary O’Rourke, a former Irish politician. Another interesting historical talk given at

one of the most recent Wexford Federation meetings, was by Anne Kehoe, Oylegate Guild, who spoke about Grace Gifford and Joseph Mary Plunkett, one of the seven signatories of the Proclamation. The ICA was involved in an event that took place around Enniscorthy on Easter Monday – the Back Road to the Rising – when a number of people walked routes named after locals associated with the Rising in Wexford, from Ballindaggan, Ferns, Oylegate, Oulart Hill and Clonroche into Enniscorthy. The ICA is also ran a creative writing competition this year, entrants wrote a short story on the theme of the 1916 Rising, including the words ‘I was there’. The competition was won by Maeve Edwards of the Delgany Guild. “It brings it all back, reinforces people’s memories as to what happened and how brave they were at the time,” says Mary. “The likes of Una Brennan back in 1916, to be out there, going into Enniscorthy to fight for freedom. It’s unbelievable, really.” SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 41

040 ICA Summer 2016_Wexford_Bridgetown.indd 41

20/05/2016 17:10


guild|Bridgetown BACK ROW (l-r) Joe Keane, Federation PRO; Joan Furlong, Women’s Refuge Officer; Cassie Murphy, Ms Greene, Bridgetown College Principal; Aine Maher, Mary Nolan, Federation Treasurer; Mary FitzGerald Federation Vice President. FRONT ROW (l-r) Zara McGuire, Guild Secretary; Hannah Dodd, Guild President; Deirdre Connery Federation President; Shauna Boyne, Guild Treasurer; Molly Kavanagh, Guild Vice President.

GO GIRLS

Every once in a while an idea takes hold that has the power to transform an organisation’s future. When a teacher inspired the idea of forming a Guild with transition year students, it was the touch-point to bring a new wave of enthusiastic and tech savvy members. When a transition year student in Bridgetown College, Shauna Boyne, heard one of her teachers, Ms Fitzgerald speak about the activities of the ICA, her enthusiasm led her to delve further. As Shauna explains: “When we found out that students could start a Guild in Transition Year and Fifth Year, we asked other girls in the school and found lots of interest in the venture. All of us were very excited about our first meeting. We came together and met at break time with Ms FitzGerald and she told us what ICA was all about and what was expected of us as an ICA Guild. We elected President, Hannah Dodd, Secretary Zara McGuire and Shauna is the Treasurer, Molly Kavanagh is the Vice President and the other members are Aine Maher and Cassie Murphy. Formed in October 2015 the Bridgtown Flowers have been busy with meetings under the guidance of one of their teachers Ms Mary Fitzgerald, who is currently Vice-President and Information Officer with Wexford Federation. Ms Eileen Creevey, TY CoCoordinator and the School Principal, Ms Fionnuala Greene, have also been a huge support to the girls. Wexford Federation Committee members attended the formal launch which brings the total number of Guilds in Wexford to thirty-three. The new members are very enthusiastic, setting up a Facebook

and Instagram account to promote their activities. They have an interest in drama, singing and acting. Some of the students are involved in mini companies and the sale of cakes as part of their Transition Year projects. This is the first post primary school in Ireland to set up a Guild and the news has spread quickly on Facebook with sharing of the photo from the launch. We hope it encourages other schools in the County and further afield to consider setting up more Guilds. We wish the new members every success for the future. “Bringing ICA to our school is something unique and new to do. It has brought a change to our lives and given us a new focus and connected us to other Guilds in the Federation. We were delighted to hear that we were making history as being one of the youngest Guilds ever and the first in a post primary school. We decided to call ourselves the “Bridgetown Flowers” as we are blossoming into women and ICA is helping us learn new skills and bond as a Guild,” says Shauna. The Bridgetown Flowers have created quite an impact in the locality and received visits from the Federation President, the Treasurer and the PRO along with the Women’s Refuge Officer, who were all delighted at the initiave shown by the young women. “Deirdre Connery, Wexford Federation President, presented us with our ICA badges which we wear proudly every day in school. The Principal Ms Greene joined us for the event along with some of our teachers including the Transition Year Co-ordinator Ms Creevey whose mum is also in the ICA,” explains Shauna. The Guild has no intention of sitting back and has already been very active organising a clothing appeal for the homeless, a food appeal for the St Vincent de Paul and a bake sale to raise money for membership fees. Future plans include make-up evenings and knitting blankets to send to refugees in Syria. The Guild hopes to enter the Special Occasion Competition in June which is one of the major competitions in Wexford Federation. “We are confident that the ICA will continue to grow and develop in our school and be part of school life for many years to come,” concludes Shauna.

(Left) Back row: Cassie Murphy, Aine Maher, Shauna Boyne; Front row Molly Kavanagh, Hannah Dodd , Zara McGuire.

42 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

040 ICA Summer 2016_Wexford_Bridgetown.indd 42

20/05/2016 17:11


CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF ICA HOME & LIVING?

WE KNOW HOW YOU FEEL HOME IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE!

& Living GETTING CRAFTY Behind the Scenes at Handcraft Week

BLOOMING MARVELLOUS Helen Dillon on Garden Colour CULTURE CLUB

3 EUROPEAN CITIES TO SEE

IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE! ICA HOME & LIVING

Summer 2015

5

A GREAT 2-NIGHT BREAK

STYLE INSPIRATION

BREAKING BREAD Our Best Bakes

23/05/2016 16:06

HOME IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE!

PARTY POPPERS

FAB FASHION & BRILLIANT BEAUTY CRAFT CRAZY

5 FREEZER FRIENDLY DINNERS

TALENTED IRISH JEWELLERS CARONS

Chocolate &

Spice

NAUGHTY BUT NICE FESTIVE BAKING

BETWEEN THE COVERS WITH PATRICIA SCANLAN

Tea & Chat / Winter Woolies / Competition / Daily Disasters / Carlow Federation / 48 Hours in Galway / Motoring / Health & Wellbeing ICA Winter_Cover .indd 1

DIAMONDS & PEARLS

MARIE’S MA

16/11/2015 10:18

SUMMER 2016

2 NIGHTS IN DUBLIN

CAMBODIA CALLING

Meet the Camper Van Girls

PAPER-GLASS-SUGAR

GETTING CRAFTY BEHIND THE SCENES AT HANDCRAFT WEEK

DREAM TRIP

ROADTRIP REBELS

Winter 2015

& Living

FRESH IDEAS FOR DELICIOUS FISH

Fake it Don’t bake it

Tea & Chat / Brain Workout / Competitions / Daily Disasters Useful Gadgets / The Last Word / Much More ICA Pitch_Cover FINAL.indd 1

6

TOP TANS

EASY DINNERS Hit a Herbal High

SHINE IN GREAT SHADES

Summer 2016

Daily Disasters / Tea & Chat / Tech Updates / Emily Hourican / Travel Vaccines / Great Gardens / 48 Hours in Kilkenny / Blue Room

A BEKNO OVE

ICA Summer 2016_Cover .indd 1

19/05/2016 17:47

SO TO KEEP YOU SIZZLING ALL SUMMER JUMP ON BOARD AND SURF OUR GREAT NEW WEBSITE

ICAHOMEANDLIVING.IE Get a twice-weekly fix of fabulous food, creative crafts and all the gossip from the Guilds. We’re online now with great content and competitions to keep you on your toes until the next issue of ICA Home and Living lands.

full page filler.indd 8

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

PINTEREST

INSTAGRAM

ICAHOMEANDLIVING

@ICAHOME_LIVING

ICAHOME_LIVING

@ICAHOMEANDLIVING

23/05/2016 16:34


guild|history

WITH A BANNER

Yell

Clare ICA started in 1945, a time that many aspects of life were changing for women in Ireland and the world. It has remained a vibrant part of life in Clare ever since and continues to evolve with the times as ICA Clare Federation President, Joanne Allen explains.

I started in ICA by helping to restart the Scariff Guild in 2013 with a great bunch of ladies. I originally hail from Wexford, went to Primary and Secondary school in Carlow, College in Limerick, met my husband and got married and moved to Scariff in 1996. I have one daughter Rachel, who will be sitting her Leaving Certificate this year. As I am now in my early forties I had got to a stage in my life where my life was not revolving around work or family life and I was looking for

something for me. ICA doesn’t define me as someone’s mammy or someone’s wife or partner, I am me and I am being accepted for who I am and what I could offer as a President. I have a beautiful Sterling Silver Chain of Office engraved with every President from 1945, which was passed to me for my 3 year term. Every time I place it over my head I get a feeling of pride and strength passed onto me from those ladies, who have come before me and I know I will do my very best for the Clare Federation.

ICA for Clare means I for Inclusion, C for Challenges and A for A lot of Fun. We are all here to share, listen and grow together in a safe and respectful place. In Clare ICA we try to follow a plan, we don’t listen to critics, we get on with the job that needs to be done, we try not to miss the boat and we remember that we are all in the boat together and that no matter what we have to face we will get it done together. As a committee we agree it is always important and good to try new things!

44 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

044 ICA Summer 2016_Clare.indd 44

20/05/2016 17:13


history|guild

June 2015 saw the start of this new committee with a commitment to all Guilds that communication would be an important aspect for Clare ICA moving forward. We encouraged all Guilds to have an email address and held a training session on this form of communication. We introduced our new E-newsletter, which was emailed to Guilds after every Federation Meeting to communicate all key information quickly and clearly. It is also a way for Guilds to share ideas, information, tips etc. Our Clare Federation ICA Facebook page has become a hive of activity with loads of information and pictures being displayed. As they say ‘Sharing is Caring’! September 2015 saw a new initiative where every Guild has 2 minutes to talk at Federation meetings about what is happening at their Guilds. It links us all together. Also in alphabetical order 2 Guilds would have a craft table presenting what they have achieved and attempted in their Guild. Again another way for Guilds to get ideas on arts, crafts and activities they can do. There is a ‘Book Table’ at every

Federation meeting – books can be donated and are greatly appreciated. Books cost €1 each. When you have finished your book, bring it back and let someone else enjoy! We also encourage businesses, speakers, and demonstrators to come to our Federation meeting. This gives them an attentive audience from the county of Clare and an opportunity to talk to Guilds after. We have had a chocolate maker, Keep Fit instructor, Clare Older People’s Council, and an Inspirational Walker in the Burren, but to name a few. As a result of this we have started a database of speakers, activities and demonstrators available in Co Clare for our Guild members. We’ve changed our competitions and contests at Federation level to a point system with all entries getting one point for entering. The individual winner of each night will get 5 points. At the AGM each year the individual winner with the most points will receive a prize and the Guild with the most points will get the Marion O’Donoghue Endeavour Shield. We also support competitions and contests run by National Office.

At our Christmas Federation meeting we encourage members to bring their crafts, baking etc. to sell and show off their wonderful talents. We have a craft board competition every year at our AGM – from this competition we try to encourage Guilds and individuals to try new crafts. Every year we organise a trip to An Grianán – last year was so successful that Kay, our Teachta Officer had people on a waiting list for this year’s outing, which takes place from Wednesday 24th to Friday 26th August, with visits to Newbridge Silverware, Malahide Castle, Avoca Woollen Mills Museum and classes in gardening, beekeeping, flower arranging and cookery will ensure a fun packed three days! We support many charities through the year including Team Hope Christmas Shoebox Appeal, Green Ribbon, Little Innocent Big Knit, Jacket Off Your Back Campaign and Clare Age Expo with Guilds doing their own fundraising for charities important to their local village or area. We have an ‘active’ Sports and Leisure SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 45

044 ICA Summer 2016_Clare.indd 45

20/05/2016 17:13


guild|history

We are ...

THERE ARE 17 GUILDS IN CLARE WITH A TOTAL OF 252 MEMBERS.

Ballynacally Bridgetown Broadford Clooney Quin Corofin Cranny Coolmeen Cratloe Doora Ennistymon

Feakle Fergus Gortlomáin Kilmurry McMahon Labasheeda Scariff Sixmilebridge Tradaree

OUR FEDERATION COMMITTEE MEMBERS ARE: PRESIDENT Joanne Allen, Scariff Guild SECRETARY Aisling Fin, Cratloe Guild TREASURER Theresa O’Sullivan, Clooney Quin Guild PRO Mary Neylon, Kilmurry McMahon Guild SPORTS & LEISURE OFFICER Concepta Lillis, Gortlomáin Guild TEACHTA Kay Garrihy, Ennistymon Guild CRAFTS Nora Shanahan, Fergus Guild CONTESTS Marie Garry, Ballynacally Guild RECRUITMENT Siobhan Ryan, Sixmilebridge Guild TIMIRE Margaret Queally, Ennistymon Guild INTERNATIONAL Annemarie Sheedy, Sixmilebridge Guild INFORMATION OFFICERS Jackie Slattery, Clooney Quin Guild Aloma McKay, Ennistymon Guild Monica Doyle, Sixmilebridge Guild Bridget McGuane, Corofin Guild Tess Ryan, Clooney Quin Guild

Officer who has us rambling the Burren, visiting Fr Ted’s house, bowling, keeping fit, visiting gardens & parks and who encouraged all Guilds to apply for the Go for Life Grant from Age and Opportunity. This saw a 50% increase of Guilds receiving monies. As we say in Clare ICA - life is for living, get out there and have fun! This year our aim was to raise the profile of Clare ICA and to encourage and promote our Guilds in the county, with a headline event which was a fashion show held on Friday 26th February! This would showcase the wonderful shops and designers in Co Clare, would raise the profile of the Irish Countrywomen’s Association and support our chosen local charity for the year - Bushy Park - an addiction treatment centre in Ennis, Co Clare. We asked each Guild to provide 2 models and under the expertise of Tess Purcell of Coast Modelling Agency, the clothes were shown off so professionally on the night. We also displayed a plate from each Guild with items of what ICA meant to us. This was a wonderful experience and a most enjoyable night

was had by all. We even had IRISH TV there for the night filming us! All of our Guilds meet on a monthly basis, where we organise and partake in activities such as art, crafts, sport, historical/local outings, educational classes, fundraising, nights out etc. There is also time allocated to discuss women’s views, to provide women with opportunities for personal development, mutual support, education and information, and issues that are fundamental to the provision of equality for women in Irish society today. Most importantly there is always time for a cuppa and a chat. It’s a place for women to escape and have time to themselves in our rapidly growing busy world. New members are always welcome at all of our Guilds. Our future plans are to continue the importance of promoting crafts and the need to pass on and share our talents with one another. With this in mind we hope to start craft days for Guilds to get together and learn some new skills from one another. On a personal level I look forward to visiting more Guilds around the county and continuing to grow our Federation with communication and openness.

Contact

EMAIL: icaclarefederation@gmail.com FACEBOOK: Clare Federation ICA

46 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

044 ICA Summer 2016_Clare.indd 46

20/05/2016 17:14


GET IN

TOUCH

we want to know more about you we also love feedback... especially when it's good

Send us your photos

tell us about your guild

E M HO 5 AVEL,

OK, TR

T AND

CRAF

ISE!

SOCIAL

CIAT

’S ASSO

OMEN TRYW

COUN

&L

ASS OC

IAT IO

IVIN

N: W

G

SH FAB FA LIANT & BRILTY BEAU Y CRAZ -SUGAR CRAFT -GLASS PAPER G IN GETTFTY CRA D THE BEHINES AT EN SC DCRAFT HAN K WEE

EN’S

K, T

TO TANP S

late o c o h C &

BR ake it BREEAAKING D

Our

Bes t

RO Bakes REBAEDTRIP Me LS Ca et the

IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE!

Spice Winter 2016

FT

AN

DS

OC

IAL

ISE

!

DRE A TRIPM

MAR

SUM

SCAN

IE’S

MA

IA & PMOND EA S

CA

ME

RON

TALE RLS NTED JEWE IRISH LLER S

S

R2

016

8 15 10:1

Summ

er 20

16/11/20

16_C

over

.indd

1

rs in

d 1

er .ind

ter_Cov

CRA

CAM B CAL ODIA LING D

/ Drs ng te aily DisasT Wellbei ravh &Disas Daily el V te tion / oring / Healt accin rs / T ompeti ot es / ea & C lies / C Galway / M oo W r Gre at G hat / T Winte 48 Hours in e ard Chat / / ens ch Upd Tea & Federation a / 48 Hou tes / Em Carlow ICA

EL,

ID FRE A S DEE LICS FORH IO FISUS H

Vanmper Girls

EEN BETW VERS THE CO LAN

TRICIA WITH PA

HTS 2 NIGIN IN DUBL

RAV

6

Fa Donke it ’t b

BUT HTY T E NAUG ES IV NICE FBAKING

ICA Win

EC OO

Sum 201mer 6

ER FREEZ LY FRIEND S DINNER

Y PARTPERS POP ION

NTR YW OM

ME

&

HC OU

HO

Winter 2015

Living

IRIS

ICA

IRISH

E CO ION: W

il Kilk y Hour ic enn y / B an / lue Ro

om

A B E KO OVEN 19/05

/2016

Winter issue

Out November

17:47

SENSATION

EMAIL MARY EDITOR@ICAHOMEANDLIVING.IE ICA Spring_Cover .indd 1

full page filler_get in touch.indd 8

23/05/2016 15:50

23/05/2016 16:01


WE WANT

YOU to send us your memories IRISH COUNTRYWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION: WE COOK, TRAVEL, CRAFT AND SOCIALISE!

Winter 2016

Winter issue

Out November

EMAIL MARY EDITOR@ICAHOMEANDLIVING.IE

SENSATION ICA Spring_Cover .indd 1

23/05/2016 15:50

Widest selection of seafood, deli items and fresh produce available under one roof.

58/59 Glasthule Road, Sandycove, Co. Dublin

239705_4C_Vibes and Scribes_IB_ICA.indd 1 page 47_New_quarters.indd 8

Cavistons12:18 Filler_ICA.indd 1 22/04/2016

Shop: 01 280 9120 Restaurant: 01 280 9245

info@cavistons.com www.cavistons.com

25/05/2016 11:17 25/05/2016 11:25


inspiration|style Metal detail floral envelope clutch bag, €22, Littlewoods

Navy knit evening dress, €472, Arnotts

Lucina cerise silk hat with orchid trim, €340, Suzie Mahony Designs

Red closet split-front dress, €67.50, Oxendales

Margot bright pink crepe dress, €1,163, Roksanda at Harvey Nichols

Floral coat, €1,595; floral dress, €1,495, both Louise Kennedy

wedding belles

Dahlia mood ring, €245, Brown Thomas

WHETHER YOU ARE THE MOTHER OF THE BRIDE, FRIEND, OR RELATIVE A WEDDING IS A MOMENTOUS OCCASION AND ONE WORTH PULLING OUT ALL THE STOPS FOR.

Pink shopper and red purse set, €110, Calvin Klein

Fuschia court shoes, €125, Buffalo

Concealed baguette encrusted cuff, €220, Alexis Bittar at Brown Thomas

Pink millinery hat, €130, Bundle MacLaren Millinery at Boticca.com

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 49

049 ICA Summer 2016_Fashion.indd 49

20/05/2016 17:15


style|inspiration 2

1

2

3

4

1 3

right

4

5

6

stripes

MAIN IMAGE: Stripe dress €194, Sport Max at House of Fraser 1 Stripe print silk scarf, €250, Brown Thomas 2 White textured tailored jacket, €145, Lorraine Kelly at Oxendales 3 Silver art deco pendent, €140, Follie Follie 4 Navy and white stripe with print dress, €251, Arnotts 5 Leather tote, €169.90, Tommy Hilfiger 6 Navy textile wedge sandal, €90.90, Tommy Hilfiger

3

1 2

2

6

4

peach perfect

5

MAIN IMAGE: Coral blush dress in linen mix fabric with a high sheen finish and embroidered lace detailing, €294, Caroline Kilkenny 1 Bronze abstract jacquard print dress with bow tie belt, €248, Caroline Kilkenny 2 Orange pink dress, €435, Niamh O’Neill 3 Ivory drop pearl earrings, €7, Wallis 4 Berries ring in 9k gold with white diamond, POR, Eily O’Connell 5 Nude wedge, €85, Dune 6 Peach clutch, €275, Coccinelle at Arnotts

50 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

049 ICA Summer 2016_Fashion.indd 50

20/05/2016 17:16


inspiration|style 1 5 3

2 4

1

6 6 7

lime delights

MAIN IMAGE: Lime tunic top, €79; wide leg printed trousers, €109; Emma earrings, €27, Coast 1 Green tunic top, €79, Coast at Arnotts 2 Printed wide leg trousers, €48, River Island 3 Crystal bracelet, €310 Kenneth Jay Lane at Brown Thomas 4 Floral sleeveless top, €24.99, H&M 5 Floral culottes, €39.99, H&M 6 Black flat leather sandal, €95, Dune 7 Havana oversized square sunglasses, €240, Stella McCartney at Brown Thomas

2

4

1

3

1 5 3

formal

6

6

7

attire

MAIN IMAGE: Navy and white stripe blazer, €104.99, Joanna Hope at Oxendales 1 White culottes, €58, Marks & Spencer 2 White double strap cami, €9, River Island 3 Orange animal dot jacket, €265, Caroline Kilkenny 4 Crystal pavé jacket earrings, €130, Vanderkar at Brown Thomas 5 Leopard print, €75, Bella Balou at Arnotts 6 Yellow mini embossed city bag, €29.95, Zara 7 Black sandals, €150, Kurt Geiger at Arnotts SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 51

049 ICA Summer 2016_Fashion.indd 51

20/05/2016 17:16


e l y t S n i p o h S

Whether it’s a complete new look or a one-off dress for a special occasion, our dedicated Personal Shopping team are on hand to offer expert advice tailored to your needs. To make an appointment please contact: Phone: +353 1 8045842 Email: personalshopping@arnotts.ie

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

24/05/2016 15:58


trends|style

Layers

HOW TO WEAR .... Poolside flowerpatch blue mirrored sunglasses, €165, Karen Walker at Harvey Nichols

AN IRISH SUMMER MORNING CAN QUICKLY TURN INTO A WINTER AFTERNOON. YOU CAN NEVER QUITE PREDICT THE WEATHER, THAT’S WHY LAYERING IS THE KEY TO DRESSING FOR ALL EVENTUALITIES.

Peach haypenny bridge silk modal mix scarf, €125, KDK

BASIC LAYERING

Add a roll-neck to a flat collared coat. This look is always on trend.

Pink cardigan with outside seams, €59, Cos Gold metal stretch belt, €20, Topshop

Chanel

1 CLINCHED AT THE WAIST Use a waist belt to hold layers together and give your figure an hourglass shape. 2 WRAP UP A scarf is a colourful accessory to add to your wardrobe and it will keep you a little warmer if there is a breeze outside. 3 IN THE SHADE Sunglasses are must in summer. 4 LIGHT LAYERING Invest in a light cardigan to add an extra layer to any outfit.

Pale blue gathered silk blend blouse, €836.08, Roksanda at Harvey Nichols

Navy roll-neck wool blend jumper, €816.02, Rosetta Getty at Harvey Nichols

Indigo trousers, €100, Arnotts

Floral wrap dress, €129, Pase Eight

Dior

White Oxford shirt, €89, Jaeger

Navy flowing trousers, €29.95, Zara

White leather dress jacket, €535, Caroline Matthews at Arnotts Team a wrap dress with leggings or linen trousers if it’s not a day for bare legs and if the sun comes out so can your legs!

Blush v-neck sleeveless dress, €2,200, Valentino

Wear a shirt under a sleeveless dress on chilly days.

A double breasted coat is perfectly acceptable in the summer, leave it sitting on your shoulders and pop it on and off as you need to.

Pink double breasted coat, €2,995, Alexander McQueen at Brown Thomas

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 53

053 ICA Summer 2016_Fashion Layering.indd 53

20/05/2016 17:16


style|jewels Shell pendants in sterling silver and 22ct gold plating, from €95, Martina Hamilton at the cat and the moon.

VIVIEN WALSH’S workshop is attached to her shop in Monkstown, Dublin. “Very often a new collection can develop from something somebody says,” says Vivien.

Mo Chroi hearts pendant, €145, Barry Doyle Design

MARTINA HAMILTON THE CAT AND THE MOON Martina created the cat and the moon in 1988. She continues to design new jewellery collections annually.

Gold three stone ring, €60, Vivien Walsh Ruby cocoa pod lago ring, €105, Juvi Designs

JEWELLERY SHOWCASE JUVI Married couple Vincent Tynan, a silversmith, and Julie Danz a jewellery designer share a passion for finding beauty in the raw.

BARRY & ADRIENNE DOYLE Barry learned the goldsmith trade from his father, while partner Addrianna is a gem specialist.

IRISH JEWELLERY DESIGNERS CREATE ONE OF A KIND BESPOKE, CONTEMPORARY PIECES. 9ct yellow gold U shaped ring punch set with rubies, €670, Eva Dorney

EVA DORNEY “Though I can turn my hand to most styles my own design is informed by strong, contemporary forms and my jewellery shares clean, architectural lines,” says Eva.

Green wire multi-strand necklace with murano glass clasp, €225, Eva Dorney

Sunbark ring in 9k yellow gold with a white diamond, €1,330, Eily O’Connell at Cold Lilies

54 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

054 ICA Summer 2016_Jewels.indd 54

20/05/2016 17:28


jewels|style

Ogham multi-layer necklace in rose gold, €435, Willow and Clo at Cold Lilies

Anodised aluminium rings from the ‘Tectonic’ range, €100, by Filip Vanas at The Design Yard

SABINE LENZ ENIBAS Sabine Lenz and partner Len Lipitch handcraft silver jewellery that interprets traditional themes in a contemporary way.

Berry leaf pearl drop earrings, €118, Enibas

Silver ring with 18ct yellow gold studs, €380, Inga Reed at the Design Yard

Grey horn, bamboo coral focal bead with sterling silver discs and clasp, POR, Ann Tyrrell Designs

Cube geometry necklace, €245, Scribble & Stone

Galaxy ring, from €280, Stonechat

ANN CHAPMAN STONECHAT “I love how diverse my role in the shop is – from quietly working in the workshop to the social side,” says Anne

DEIRDRE GRIFFIN “Glass Fusion is the art of melting glass on glass. The minute I tried it, I fell in love.” Forrest greens, €60, Deirdre Griffin

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 55

054 ICA Summer 2016_Jewels.indd 55

20/05/2016 17:28


Nominate your

favourite to win! YO UR

V O UR FA

NATE I M

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS PLACE TO EAT ITE NO

TWEET YOUR NOMINATION

@HC_Review

to be in with a chance to

Y O UR

V O UR FA

NA M I TE

WIN 100 VOUCHER PLACE TO STAY ITE NO

www.hotelandcateringreview.ie/awards

#KEELINGSGOLDMEDAL HOTEL

GMA 2016 Filler_ICA.indd 1

CATERING

RESTAURANT

25/05/2016 10:50


embroidery|skills

Silken

threads

ELIE SAAB

Embroidery is one of the world’s oldest crafts and today, remains the most delicate stitch in haute couture.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 57

057 ICA Summer 2016_Embroidery.indd 57

24/05/2016 09:24


skills|embroidery

OPUS ANGLICANUM MASTERPIECES OF MEDIEVAL EMBROIDERY Victoria and Albert Museum, London This October, masterpieces of English medieval embroidery will be on display in London’s Victoria and Albert museum, together with works returning to England for the first time since they were created in the middle ages, in what will be the largest exhibition on the subject in half a century. Masterpieces of English medieval embroidery will be displayed including over 100 exquisite hand-made objects associated with some of the most notable figures of the middle ages, from Edward I and his Queen Eleanor of Castile to Edward the Black Prince and the sainted martyr Thomas Becket. nd ia a

M Albert useum, Lo nd

on

o Part

f a horse trapp er, Vi

ct

or

If you have a trip to London planned between October 2016 – February 2017, this exhibition is well worth a visit. For more information go to www.vam.ac.uk YVES SAINT LAURENT

T

he art of embroidery is practiced worldwide, embroidery works found in China date back to the 5th century BC while in Ireland the earliest pieces of embroidery date back to pre-Christian times, around 400 AD. Elaborately embroidered clothing, religious objects and vestments, and household items such as the pieces on show in London’s Victoria and Albert museum, were seen as a mark of wealth and status. These pieces are know as Opus Anglicanum, a technique used by professional workshops and guilds in medieval England. The early 19th century saw creative needlework develop in Ireland and today Mountmellick embroidery is the most well-known worldwide. Today, haute couture houses use the same basic stitches such as chain stitch, rich stitch, raised paillettes and vermicelli to hand embroider the most luxurious fabrics. The late François Lesage, the world’s most famous embroiderer once described his love of the craft as “writing your dreams with a needle”. The most prestigious fashion houses, including Yves Saint Laurent, worked exclusively with François—a creative partnership that lasted 44 years. Among their most famous creations are two exquisitely designed jackets, one in an Iris pattern and the other featuring Van Gogh’s Sunflowers. These required 600 hours of work. The Iris jacket was made with 250,000 sequins in 22 colours, 200,000 beads and 250 meters of ribbon.

58 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

057 ICA Summer 2016_Embroidery.indd 58

Capsule Wardrobe Gold and pearl tessellated envelope clutch, €50, Accessorize

Embroidered court shoe, €105, Dune

Tyche ivory embroidered tulle dress, €1066, Diane Von Furstenberg at Harvey Nichols

23/05/2016 09:16


embroidery|skills JILL DE BÚRCA

Jill de Búrca Star of the Irish singer

RIGHT: Cream embroidered sleeveless peplum top, €695; BELOW: Cream embroidered short sleeve top, €690, both at Arnotts

Blush pink shift dress with floral embroidery, €40, Glamorous Calla Meadow embroidered canvas sandals, €708, Tabitha Simmons at Harvey Nichols

057 ICA Summer 2016_Embroidery.indd 59

Jill De Búrca worked in the UK for a number of years as a sought after embroidery and embellishment designer who has sold her work to a wide range of top designers, some of whom include Calvin Klein, Diane Von Furstenberg, BCBG, JCrew and Thurley. An NCAD graduate who studied textiles and specialised in embroidery for her degree, Jill moved to Brighton to train with Larch Rose, a highly creative fashion and textile design studio who were dedicated to producing innovative, directional and trend-driven work for the fashion industry. While in Brighton she also trained with Jenny King master embroiderer and has worked extensively over the years on the production of Erdem’s exquisitely embroidered clothes and on show pieces for Mary Katranzou and many private commissions. “The machinery and techniques used in embroidering the clothes are very rare. The Irish singer machine for satin stitch, which was once used to embroider Irish dancing costumes in Ireland, is a skill rarely used today. I was lucky enough to have trained with one of the only design studios still using this amazing machine. The free-hand satin stitch embroidery that can be produced on an Irish singer is arguably superior to more recent techniques both in terms of creativity and quality. I am very proud to preserve a technique that could otherwise, sadly, become a dying art,” comments Jill. She moved back to Dublin in 2014 and has since launched her own label. “My work is very fashion forward but utilises techniques and craftsmanship from the past. I use Irish singer embroidery to do a free-hand satin stitch. Despite the meticulous details, my clothing remains very wearable with a sports luxe edge,” says Jill. Recently she won ‘Irish Designer of the year 2015’ at the Irish Innovation awards in Galway and also won the ‘Ones to Watch’ category at Kerry Fashion Week 2015. Jill also featured in 2015 Brown Thomas ‘Irish Designers Create.’ Jill De Búrca’s collection is now exclusively available at the Design Centre.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 59

23/05/2016 09:09


beauty|body

5

summer beauty buys

SKIN

Lancôme overnight recovery sleeping mask, 55, stockists nationwide Use as a mask applying generously and remove with tissue after 20 minutes, or as a night cream applying one pea-sized amount and gently rubbing in.

SAFE TANNING THE SUN CAN DO A LOT OF GOOD. IT REGULATES SLEEP CYCLES, STIMULATES THE BODY’S PRODUCTION OF VITAMIN D, AND ENHANCES FEELINGS OF WELLBEING. BUT THERE’S ALSO A DOWNSIDE, EXPOSURE TO THE SUN CAN LEAD TO WRINKLES, AGE SPOTS, AND EVEN SKIN CANCER. Sunshine is considered the single biggest cause of visible ageing. But you don’t have to succumb to damaging rays. Even if you’ve been a sun worshipper in the past, it’s never too late to start protecting your skin. Always apply sunscreen at least 20 minutes before sitting in the sun. A higher SPF does not mean longer coverage. It doesn’t matter what number sunscreen you buy, you must always reapply generously. Skincare specialists recommend reapplying sunscreen every 90 minutes and layering an SPF 15 over an SPF 30 does not get you the protection of an SPF 45. Stick to wearing the right amount of sunscreen, and reapply regularly for optimum protection. Certain medication, such as prescriptions for high blood pressure, can make you sensitive to the sun, and watch out for celery and lime and other citrus fruits that have furocoumarins. The sun interacts with these chemicals and can cause blotchy dark spots that take months to fade, so be careful when you’re sipping cocktails by the pool.

BODY

No7 beautiful skin intensive body butter, 21.50, Boots Enriched with shea butter, sweet almond oil and argan oil, this body butter will leave your skin moisturised for at least 48 hours.

FACE

Armani maestro glow 46, Brown Thomas Armani maestro glow contains no water, gliding onto the skin, leaving a lasting glow.

EYES

RevitaBrow, 97, Harvey Nichols RevitaBrow helps revitalise eyebrows so they look thicker and fuller. It also works on moustaches and sideburns, perfect for the man in your life!

SPFS for skin types Photoderm AR SPF 50+ tinted: This high protection cream matches a broad range of pale skin tones, and offers excellent protection and coverage, €14.50, stockists nationwide; Altruist dermatologist sunscreen SPF 30 & high UVA protection: Altruist has a broad range of photostable UV filters, including the most advanced filter available Tinosorb A2B, €12, Amazon; No7 protect and perfect intense face SPF 30: The lotion is powered by Matrixyl 3000 Plus to help restore youthful skin whilst also helping to prevent dark spots and hyper-pigmentation. Suitable for use under make up, €20, Boots.

LIPS

Pro colour lipstick in boudoir pink, 4, PS at Penneys Penneys have really upped their beauty game. Their PS collection has expanded and we love this boudir pink lipstick, perfect for summer.

60 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

060 ICA Summer 2016_Beauty Tans.indd 60

23/05/2016 09:46


body|beauty

Faking it Using tanning products is the smartest way to avoid sun damage to your skin but with so many products on the market it can be hard to decide which one will suit your complexion best. TanOrganic tanning oil, 19.99 TanOrganic is 84 per cent aloe vera based ensuring your skin is left hydrated and moisturised. It’s an eco-certified self-tanning brand made wholly from natural and organic ingredients. This gradual tan leaves a lovely natural light tan and although the brand prides itself on not having the usual fake tan smell, we wouldn’t go that far however, that is the only complaint. There is enough oil for five to six full body applications and it’s friendly to skin.

L’Oréal Paris sublime bronze dream legs BB, 13.49 This is the perfect product if you want a sun-kissed look in minutes. It’s a wash-off formula with a really smooth application. Get the best results and apply straight after showering. If you are on-the-go or decide to do a quick change into a dress and want to add a sun kissed look to your legs, the sublime bronze dream legs is great. You will need very little product and it leaves a very natural finish.

Garnier skin naturals summer body moisturising lotion, 5.33 This is by far the best buy. First of all, it is a steal at just €5.33, it smells divine, and it doesn’t leave you feeling wet. This gradual moisturising lotion applied daily, builds a radiant glowing gradual tan. We highly recommend using this product especially for those who are not masters at tanning. Garnier Ambre Solaire BB legs body bronzer, 11.99 This is a wash-off formula. The lotion has the signature Garnier smell, and if you are a fan of the brand you’ll love this. It’s easy to apply and the shade is a perfect light, natural summer glow however, it did not dry as quickly as others be. Leave this product on for at least 20-30 minutes before getting dressed.

Rimmel Sun Shimmer self tan mousse, 10.79 Rimmel’s first ever mousse tan comes in light, medium, and dark matte. The mousse is a dark colour which makes it easier to apply and less chance of getting tan streaks. This tan develops after one hour but for the best results we recommend leaving over night and showering off the next morning. The mousse is a gorgeous natural bronzed colour, with a red undertone rather than an orange shade. It dries quickly, so you need to be quick when applying otherwise you could be left with patches.

Sally Hansen airbrush legs lotion, 16.89 Sally Hansen leg make up has always been a cult favourite among any self-tanning lovers. Easy application, flawless finish, as well as acting as a concealer to eliminate the appearances of bumps, bruises and veins. Sally Hansen’s cream is no different to the original Sally Hansen spray, in fact it’s better. The no mess formula means no tan splashes on the bathroom floor! It’s much more water resistant too.

1, 2, 3 of tanning

Self-tanning can be a daunting experience, the last thing you want is your tan to turn you into an oompa loompa. Try these three simple steps and remember less is more.

Exfoliate

Moisturise

Apply

La Maison de Senteurs Huile d’olive body scrub, 13, Marks & Spencer

Italian summer fig body lotion, 17, The Body Shop

Cocoa Brown pink velvet tanning mitt, 5.99, Penneys

Moisturise your elbows, knees ankles and hands.

This genius double-sided invention ensures there are no tanning stains left on your hands.

Exfoliate to remove any dead skin cells. This ensures tan is applied smoothly.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 61

060 ICA Summer 2016_Beauty Tans.indd 61

23/05/2016 09:46


Come and see our 1,000 acre estate and enjoy the perfect day out! • 6 Acre Victorian Walled Garden • Restored Rooms in the Abbey • Gothic Church • History Talks and Guided Tours • Woodland & Lakeshore Walks 131.5x198mm.pdf

31/07/2014

+353 (0) 95 52001 bookings@kylemoretourism.ie www.kylemoreabbey.com /KylemoreAbbeyandGarden /Kylemoretoday /kylemoreabbeygardens

17:52:42

239385_Kylemore Abbey_IB_ICA 2016.indd 1

C

31/03/2016 15:21

‘I inherited a house with it a garden, in a climate favourable to growing less common plants’ – Lord Milo Talbot

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Visit Lord Milo Talbot’s Botanical Collection of Plants at Malahide Castle. Open all year

round from 9.30am

• 5000 Species of Plants • Interactive Garden Exhibition • 6 Glasshouses • 22 Acre West Lawn • • Avoca Cafe & Retail • Guided Tours of Malahide Castle • Just 13KM from Dublin City Centre. Accessible by DART, Bus or Car. Visit www.malahidecastleandgardens.ie for more information or call 01 8169538.

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

23/05/2016 14:44


visit|garden Kylemore Abbey, Co Galway

I

n the early 18th century landowners began relying on walled garden for security purposes. These high walls kept intruders out and prevented possible attacks while also keeping wild animals away from the plants and vegetables. Over the past three hundred years the inside of these walls have evolved into wonderfully decorative yet practical gardens, often supplying the main house with fruit, vegetables and herbs throughout the year. The walls of the gardens help to raise the temperature of the soil and create a more protective environment for the plants, sheltering them from wind and frost. Today over a hundred walled gardens are still intact, we’ve chose five that are a unique and interesting source of inspiration for gardeners and garden lovers.

KYLEMORE ABBEY The gothic castle known as Kylemore, was built in 1867 by Mitchell Henry and subsequently sold to the Duke, William Angus Drogo Montague, and Duchess of Manchester where they lived until the expensive estate became too much for them. Kylemore then became a home for the nuns of the Benedictine Order since 1920. These nuns restored Kylemore and turned it into a world-renowned all-girls boarding school. The estate sits on 15,000 acres at the bottom of a valley next to Pollacapall Lough. One of the last walled gardens to be built in Ireland during the Victorian era, the walled garden itself covers 6 acres. In 1990s the nuns began restoring the gardens and fallen glasshouses used decades before. Today, visitors can see two glasshouses and the brick bases of many others amongst the plants, vegetables, banana trees, herbs, and winery. Other than the gardens, visitors enjoy seeing the restored rooms of the Abbey and Gothic Church as well as taking in the woodland and lakeshore walks. Make a day of it by indulging in tea or traditional homemade cooking at Mitchell’s Cafe, then go shopping for the best Irish crafts and gifts. Don’t just take our word, Kylemore Abbey was voted the number-one must-see attraction in Connemara and the West of Ireland.

Secret Garden HIDDEN BEHIND THICK STONE WALLS ON TREMENDOUS ESTATES, THESE LUSH GARDENS ARE SURVIVORS OF THE “BIG HOUSE” ERA, TODAY THEY PROVIDE AN INTIMATE GLIMPSE INTO A FORMER WORLD AND PROVE TO BE A DELIGHTFUL SANCTUARY FROM THE HUSTLE OF DAILY LIFE. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 63

063 ICA Summer 2016_Irish Gardens .indd 63

23/05/2016 09:52


garden|visit Powerscourt, Co Wicklow

Let’s go see... Great Irish Walled Gardens KYLEMORE ABBEY GARDENS: Estate Open Daily: April to July 9:00am to 6:00pm, July - August 9:00am to 7:00pm PRICES: Adult €13, Senior €10, Student €9.00, Child under 10 are free, Family Day Pass 1 (2 Adults & 1- 6 Children aged 10 years and under) €26.00, Family Day Pass 2 (2 Adults & 1-6 Children aged 017/Student) €35.00 ADDRESS: Kylemore, Connemara, Co. Galway

POWERSCOURT Located in Wicklow and covering over 47 acres. The Powerscourt Estate was originally a 13th-century castle that was extensively altered during the 18th century by German architect Richard Cassels. The walled gardens are one of the oldest parts of the estate and feature fascinating plants along Ireland’s largest herbaceous border with plants chosen by Lady Powerscourt. The Walled Gardens were once known as ‘The Kitchen Garden’ as vegetable and fruit trees once grew here to keep the family kitchen well stocked. The 240-year-old Bamberg gate came from a Cathedral in Bamberg, Germany. Relax by the small fountain or the tranquil pond, which is a memorial to Lady Julia Powerscourt. Today you will spot some tasty apples during the autumn. Visitors can tour the house, stroll through the garden, have coffee at Avoca Cafe and indulge in a little shopping too.

KNAPPOGUE CASTLE Tucked away in the hills of Quin, Co. Clare, the Knappogue Castle offers a 1.7-

acre garden. The Castle itself is a 15th century restored medieval tower house. In the 1920s Knappouge Castle was passed on from the original MacNamara Clan to an American architect who restored the castle. Lying slightly north of the castle is the Knappogue Walled Garden bordered by 4-meter high stone walls covered in roses, grapevines, and fig trees. The purpose of the gardens was to provide fruits, vegetables and flowers for the house as well as entertain the family and guests for pleasure. The gardens were restored into rectangular shape to align with the Victorian’s love of order and symmetry. At the center of the garden is a statue of Bacchus, the Greek God of wine. Throughout the grounds there is a pergola, a tranquil gazebo, the rockery with fernery, shrubberies and pathways lined with herbaceous borders. Maps dating back to 1840 suggest that Knappogue was once open parkland surrounded with ornamental ponds and a large orchard. The remains of a glasshouse and a brick fireplace with a stone flue are visible remnants of a small ‘bothy’ or gardener’s shelter. Nowadays you can relax in the oasis of climbing roses and clematis of this beautifully restored garden.

Knappogue Castle

LISMORE CASTLE Located in Waterford, Lismore was originally built in 1185 by King John and since then this castle has been under renovation multiple times. The gardens are some of the oldest cultivated gardens in Ireland. The gardens offer spectacular views of both Lismore Castle and the surrounding countryside of the Blackwater valley. The seven-acre garden plays host to magnolias, camellias, rhododendrons, and her-

POWERSCOURT GARDENS: Open Daily: 9:30am – 5:30pm • Gardens close at dusk in Winter • The Gardens are open year-round and only close December 25th & 26th PRICES: Adult €9.50, Senior/Student €8.00, Child €5 (children under 5 are free) Family Ticket for 2 adults & 3 children €25.00 WATERFALL: Opening Times: • Jan/Feb/ Nov/Dec 10.30am – 4.00pm • Mar/Apr/ Sept/Oct 10.30am – 5.30pm • May/Jun/ Jul/Aug 9.30am – 7.00pm • Closed two weeks before Christmas PRICES: Adult €6.00, Senior/Student €5.50, Child (under 16) €3.50, Family Ticket for 2 adults & 3 children €16.00 ADDRESS: Powerscourt Estate, Enniskerry, Co. Wicklow, Ireland. KNAPPOGUE CASTLE KNAPPOGUE GARDENS: Open Daily: 9:30am – 5:30pm • Gardens close at dusk in Winter • The Gardens are open yearround and only close December 25th & 26th PRICES: Adult €12 Student €8.00, Child €6, Family Pass (2 adult & 3 children) €30, Family Pass (2 adult & 4 children) €32 ADDRESS: Quin Rd, Ennis, Co. Clare LISMORE CASTLE OPENING MONTHS: April-September OPENING HOURS: Monday –Sunday 10:30am – 17:30 (last admission 16:30) GARNISH ISLAND APRIL: Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 17:30, Sundays 13:00 – 18:00. MAY & SEPTEMBER: Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 18:00, Sundays 12:00 – 18:00. JUNE: Monday – Saturday 10:00-18:00, Sundays 11:00-18:00. JULY & AUGUST: Monday – Saturday 09:30 – 18:00, Sundays 11:00 – 18:00. OCTOBER: Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 16:00, Sundays 13:00 – 17:00. Last ferry landing 1 hour before closing.

64 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

063 ICA Summer 2016_Irish Gardens .indd 64

23/05/2016 09:53


visit|garden

Garnish island

baceous borders. A 17th century defense wall surrounds the castle and gardens. The “Pleasure” gardens seen annually by hundreds of visitors were created by Joseph Paxton, a friend of the 6th Duke Devonshire, better known as the Bachelor Duke in the 19th century. The Upper Garden is a complete replica of the 17th-century walled garden first constructed here by Richard Boyle, the First Earl of Cork, in about 1605. The outer walls and terraces remain and the plantings have changed to match the tastes of those living within the castle.

GARNISH ISLAND Our last garden is a little off the beaten track. Located in the sheltered harbour of Glengarriff in Bantry Bay, in southwest Ireland, Garnish Island is result of the creative partnership of Annan Bryce,

who purchased the island from the war office in 1910, and Harold Peto, architect and garden designer. These gardens are only accessible by ferry, passing seals basking on rocks. Once on the island, visitors and their dogs (pets are allowed if on lead) can explore the whole 37-acre island; the gardens are a unique microclimate that supports hosts a range of exotic species. The island plays home to man made structures as well such as the Martello Tower on the south side of the island, the Grecian Temple on the western side, the clock tower near the walled gardens and an Italian Temple near the Italian Gardens. The island is a real haven and the perfect daytrip with kids who’ll enjoy the magical buildings and glades not to mention chugging alongside a seal colony on the boat trip.

Lismore, Co Waterford

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 65

063 ICA Summer 2016_Irish Gardens .indd 65

23/05/2016 09:53


NEWTOWNBARRY HOUSE & GARDENS

House & Parklands

Russborough is a Palladian Mansion set in 200 acres of lush Wicklow countryside situated at the foot of the Wicklow mountains with magnificent views of the Blessington lakes.The house was opened to the general Public in 1978 by Sir Alfred Beit so that Visitors could experience the grandeur and culture of this amazing place. A visit to Russborough House & Parklands now includes; a guided house tour & exhibition centre, Maze, Fairy trail, Playground, Sheepdog Demonstrations & parkland walks. The Courtyard houses the Artisans and the 18th century wall garden is being carefully restored. New From Easter 2016 the National Bird of Prey Centre.

OPENING HOURS - May - August 2015 • Open Tuesdays to Sundays, and Bank Holiday Mondays. • Gardens: 12-6pm • Farm Cafe, Gallery & Craft Gift Shop: 12-6pm Newtownbarry House, Bunclody, Co. Wexford, Ireland. Tel/Fax:053 937 6383 | www.newtownbarryhouse.com

•TULLYNALLY• CASTLE GARDENS Castlepollard, Co. Westmeath

Gardens open weekends April, May and September. ThursdaysSundays, June, July and August from 11am – 5pm. Groups welcome at other times.

Explore 10 hectares of romantic walled and woodland gardens and visit one of Ireland’s largest castles still lived in as a family home. (Guided tours of castle can be arranged for groups) Cafe and giftshop in the castle courtyard. tel: 0449661159, email: tullynallycastle@eircom.net For further details, see www.tullynallycastle.ie

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

Russborough, Blessington, Co. Wicklow. Tel: 045 865238 Email: info@russborough.ie 40 mins from Dublin off the N 81, 3 Km past Blessington.

www.russborough.ie Come Visit Us

Belvedere House

Gardens & Park Mullingar Co Westmeath

The magnificent 160 acre Lakeside Estate of Belvedere House Gardens & Park boasts a restored 1740 Georgian Villa. Victorian Walled Garden, Georgian parkland punctuated with Follies including the ‘The Jealous Wall’. 4 children’s play areas, a magical Fairy Garden & picnic areas. Visitor Centre with Café & Gift Shop. Whether you are part of a gardening group, historical society, school tour, active retirement association, family gathering or group of friends, a visit to Belvedere is a superb day out with a difference.

2 1

1 Hour from Dublin Open Daily from 9.30 Admission rates Adult €8.00 Child €4.00 Student/Senior €6.00 Family (2+1) €20.00 Catoca Fine Foods & Giftware 044-9349060 info@belvedere-house.ie www.belvedere-house.ie

A Fascinating Georgian Estate

for

on Day Admission with this Voucher (not valid special events or with other offers) ICA16

23/05/2016 16:58


crafts|courses

dates for your diary

Find the course to suit you. Get ready for a fun-filled few months ahead as summer 2016 arrives and you make time to learn and immerse yourself in something new or refresh your skills in one of the many crafts. We really do have something for everyone so book a crafty mini-break now and follow your passion!

Mon 30th – Fri 3rd May/June 2016

Tue 7th – Fri 10th June 2016

Wed 8th June 2016

Wed 8th J June 2016

Fri 10th – Sun 12th June 2016

Mon 13th – Fri 17th June 2016

Mind & Body Overhaul: Reflexology, Yoga & Holistics , Watercolours, Papercrafts – Iris Folding & Card Making, Fun Fitness, Beaded Jewellery Prices €185 per person, €99pp non-residential.

Cookery – Summer Recipes; Gardening; Fabric Boxes; Tai Chi; Beaded Jewellery Prices €259 pp ICA members, €289pp non-members.

An Grianán Annual Golf Outing Golf outing followed by prize giving and gala dinner. Seapoint Golf Club, Price €45, Optional B&B €45. Must be pre-booked.

One Day Course Cookery, Gardening. Arrive at 10.30am, depart after class at 4pm. Price €55pp. Includes tuition, tea/coffee and scone on arrival and 3 course set menu lunch.

Annalong WI, Tallaght Guild & Kildare Federation 3D Decoupage, Time for Yourself, Fabric Sculptures, Fun Fitness, Pitch & Putt, Digital Photography.

Acrylics, Beaded Jewellery, Pamper Me, Bags for all occasions, Ribbon Embroidery with Elna Andrews

Fri 17th - Sun 19th June 2016

Tues 21th – Fri 24th June 2016

Sat 25th June 2016

Fri 1st - Sun 3rd July 2016

Mon 4th – Thurs 7th July 2016

Mon 11th – Fri 15th July 2016

South Tipperary ICA Ribbon Embroidery, Mindfullness, Town & Country Walking Tour, Mosaic Jewllery, Mixed Crafts, Fascinators

Cookery – Make the most of entertaining this summer, Painting & Sketching, Glass Art, Style & Image, Knitting & Crochet.

Friends AGM

Donegal & Mayo ICA Mixed Crochet, Fabric Sculptures, Historic Tours, Mountmellick Embroidery, Coloured Glass Design, Pamper Me

Historic Homes & Gardens Tour, Time for Yourself, Mixed Crafts, Stained Glass, Patchwork – Introduction

Annual Garden Party Tickets €55 Arrive 3pm. Accommodation with breakfast price €45 Showcase of Crafts, Flowers, Needlework, Artwork and Assorted Gifts. Contact us for an application if you would like to be a stall holder.

Mon11th – Fri 15th July 2016

Mon18th – Fri 22nd July 2016

Fri 22nd – Sun 24th July 2016

Tues 2nd – Fri 5th August 2016

Wed 3rd August 2016

Mon 8th – Fri 12th August 2016

Guided Walking Tours of Drogheda & Boyne Valley. (NEW) (To include one day 1916 Commemoration Tour of Dublin), Aromatherapy, Painting on Silk, Beaded Jewellery, Handmade Designer Bags.

Open for Bookings Fascinators, Yogla Handsewn Gifts Or organise a course of your own with a minimum of 10 people.

Short Break Golf – Work with a pro; Yogla; Oil Painting & Sketching; Singing for Pleasure; 3D Decoupage €259 ICA Members €289 Non-members

One Day Course Yogla; Singing for Pleasure €55 per person incls tuition, tea/coffee and scone on arrival and 3 course set menu lunch

Open for Bookings Botanical Painting; Creative Writing; Basket Weaving using Paper; Tai Chi; Free Motion Quilting

Sat 13th – Sat 20th August 2016

Wed 24th – Fri 26th August 2016

Wed 24th August 2016

Fri 26th – Sun 28th August 2016

Mon 29th – Fri 2nd August/Sept 2016

Irish Recorder and Viola Course All bookings through P. Flanagan on 01 833 7869

Clare Tours Booking via Kay Garrihy on 085 751 2099 3 day tour departing from Clare. 2 B&B plus dinner in An Grianán, with evening entertainment.

One Day Course Natural Homemade Beauty Care; Line Dancing. Arrive 9.30am, depart at 4pm. €55pp. Incl. tuition, tea/coffee and scone on arrival and 3 course set lunch.

Open for Bookings Yogla; Acrylics; Mixed Crafts; Bags & Bears. Or organise a course of your own with a minimum of 10 people

Arts Week Palette Knife Painting; Beading & Embroidery; Colour Glass Design; Book Club – For all lovers of reading; Historic Homes & Gardens Tour.

Digital Photography, Health & Fitness, Acrylic Painting, Parchment Craft, Line Dancing, Blackwork Embroidery.

FEES 2016/2017 Mid Week Courses Non-members ICA and W.I. Members Non-resident (Mon–Thurs) Non-resident (Mon–Wed) Weekend Courses Non-member fee

€360 €330 €135 €110

ICA and W.I. Member €185 Non-resident €125 Cancellation Policy for 2016 Deposit of €100 is required when booking. This is non-refundable.

Follow

Send

Follow us: facebook.com/AnGriananICA

email us: admin@an-grianan.ie

€195

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 67

034 ICA Summer 2016_Craft Weekend.indd 67

23/05/2016 17:08


skills|beekeeping ★★★

environment challenge

Create A

Buzz W

FEW WOULD FREELY CONSIDER THE BEE A WELCOMED VISITOR IN THEIR HOME AND SOMETIMES EVEN THE SLIGHTEST WHISPER OF A BUZZ CAN RESULT IN A RACE FOR THE INSECT SWATTER. YET, THE HUMBLE BEE IS MORE CRITICAL TO OUR DELICATE ECOSYSTEM AND WAY OF LIFE THAN MOST ARE AWARE.

hile they are most famously known for supplying sweet tasting honey, bees routinely carry out a myriad of tasks that ensure the survival of our fragile environment. One of the most important undertakings carried out by a colony of bees is pollination. This occurs when a single bee visits a flowering plant to collect nectar. While there, pollen can attach itself to the hair of the insect and as the bee travels, the pollen comes into contact with the stigma of another plant and fertilisation can occur. It’s this one process that allows fruits to swell and grow. The majority of food plants we encounter require this type of pollination to produce fruit, nuts and seeds. It’s responsible for approximately one third of the food we

68 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

068 ICA Summer 2016_Bee Keeping.indd 68

23/05/2016 09:47


beekeeping|skills Bee Gone? So what would happen with extinction of the bee? “Well without the bees we’re going to have no environment, it’s as simple as that,” says Philip. With the loss of bees we may lose the abundance of the plants they pollinate, the animals that forage on that plantlife, not to mention the environmental repercussions from the loss of vegetation. Eventually the loss of life could work it’s way up the food chain to the human population. While we are capable of sustaining a fractional amount of pollination without bees, it would never be at an equal level to what we have now. This could inflate the prices of supermarket fruit and vegetables, leaving them as a luxury item for the average buyer.

the beekeeper to see if they like it,” recommends Philip. “It’s not difficult to have one or two hives in your garden, you just have to know how to manage them properly.” Once bees have a natural environment to carry out their work, their numbers will steadily increase and this growth is unlikely to increase the occurrence of stinging in your garden. For the most part, once busy and left to their work undisturbed, bees rarely attack others. However, if welcoming a swarm into your garden seems like a drastic step, there are smaller efforts you can carry out to contribute. Any green fingered gardener can take the time to plant a colourful array of bee-friendly blooms or clusters of pollen rich plants for bees to feed on. Philip also suggests purchasing local raw honey from beekeepers in your area, like the multi-floral raw honey he produces in An Grianán. It is a perfect way to encourage and support the survival of the bee, while you reap the benefits of this golden treat.

PHOTOS: JANE MATTHEWS

The Basics of Attracting Bees

consume daily and the honeybee is accountable for approximately 80 per cent of pollination worldwide. Seventy out of the top 100 food crops - which supply about 90 per cent of the world’s nutrition is pollinated by bees. Considering its ecological importance, it becomes worrying that the bee population has been in decline for the last decade. The two most common causes for this disappearance are believed to be as a direct result of human action - pesticides and habitat loss. Selected pesticides cause confusion in bees, leaving them struggling to learn where their food sources are and how to find their way back to the colony. “Our losses have increased in recent years because of the extensive use of chemicals by the farming community, particularly neonicotinoids, which were banned by the European

food safety authority,” says Philip McCabe, President of Amondia, a global organisation of beekeepers. Not only has industrialisation of farmland greatly contributed to the loss of bees through chemical pollution, but also through loss of their natural habitat. This has caused a lack of availability of nesting sites and food plants. Without natural or semi-natural environments that provide food (pollen and nectar), and a variety of wild flowers our pollinators cannot survive. In the natural cycle bees require nectar for food and the flowers require bees to reproduce. One of the most obvious ways to encourage the bee population is by becoming a beekeeper. Philip assures us any local beekeeping organisation would be delighted to help someone learn the craft. “People can work alongside

Colour Bees have excellent colour vision so you can begin by planting bright shades throughout your garden. Studies have shown they’re particularly drawn to hues of purple, blue, white and yellow.

Timing If you plant flowers that bloom all at once your bees will have an abundance of nectar at the beginning of summer and then nothing else until the following year. Work in a variety of blooms to your garden to supply a steady supply of pollen throughout summer and spring.

Choice Honey bees love single petal flowers because they provide more nectar. Try to incorporate lilies, orchids, bluebells and tulips into your garden.

Wild Don’t be afraid to leave clusters of your garden untouched and wild as insect life thrives in this environment. You can leave a section of your lawn uncut or plant an arrangement of wild flowers.

Herbs Rosemary, thyme, mint and coriander will not only attract welcomed insect-life but act as a tasty addition to home made recipes.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 69

068 ICA Summer 2016_Bee Keeping.indd 69

23/05/2016 09:54


POWERSCOURT GARDENS Voted No.3 Garden In The World – National Geographic

Japanese Gardens | Pepperpot Tower | Pets’ Cemetery | Terrace Café | Gift Shop | Garden Centre Great For Groups | Competitive Group Rates Available | Only 20km From Dublin City Centre | Free Coach Parking Powerscourt Estate, Enniskerry, County Wicklow, Ireland T: + 353 1 204 6000 W: www.powerscourt.com E: info@powerscourt.net

239661_Powerscourt_IB_ICA summer.indd 1

25/04/2016 12:31

Wells House & Gardens

Open Daily House Tours, Garden Tours, Mrs Stone’s Restaurant, Craft Courtyard, Woodland Walks Group options also available Call 053 9186737 or email info@wellshouse.ie for more details. Ballyedmond, Gorey, Co Wexford

239247_Wells House_IB_ICA SUMMER.indd 1

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

A GREAT

House & Gardens

A GRAND

Adventure For All

22/03/2016 16:49

23/05/2016 14:46


makeover|conservatory

Java Pendant Lantern,

M&S, €115.00

1

LIGHTING

When it comes to conservatories it goes without saying that lighting is paramount. While gaping windows will fulfill all your needs during the day, invest in some warm lighting fixtures to accompany your late night reading or evening cup of tea.

Wood & Metal Set of 2 Lanterns,

Littlewoods, €85.00

2

Cushions, from a range at IKEA

GAP INTERIORS

DIRECTION

All the sunshine in the world will be useless if it can’t find its way to your windows. If you’re still under construction, do a little research to find out where the sun rises and falls best at your home to ensure you’re building in the right direction.

10

great conservatory makeover tips

Want to turn your conservatory into the highlight of your home? We’ve found 10 great makeover tips that will do just that!

3

COMFORT

Other areas of the house may be purely functional, but the conservatory is your personal leisure space.Comfort should be your main concern so don’t be afraid to add some plush cushions in a range of patterns and textures, or a decadent armchair for maximum relaxation.

071 ICA Summer 2016_Conservatory.indd 71

4

NEUTRAL TERRITORY

Neutral colour schemes always work best when creating an open, bright space. Use a neutral as your base paint then dot the room with splashes of colour to add vibrancy.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 71

23/05/2016 13:24


conservatory|makeover

5

7

WHAT TO PLANT

The most effective way to add life to your home is the introduction of a wide array of plant life. A conservatory can allow you to have all of the perks of a summer garden, even when the chilly Irish weather isn’t co-operating. • Gardenia Jasminoides: Releasing an intoxicating perfume whenever they bloom, these ivory coloured flowers will be a welcome addition to any room. • Climbers: Climbers can transform your conservatory into a scene from the wild tropics. While they require a little upkeep, the aesthetic effect of these green vines is certainly undeniable. • Herbs: Potted mint and parsley flourish in a conservatory environment, needing little tending, and are equally as pleasing once transferred to the cooking pot. • Miniature Roses: These tiny, light loving blooms come in a variety of hues to add some subtle colouring to your conservatory, with minimal effort required on your part. • Begonias: The sun loving begonia is the perfect decoration for any hanging baskets you might have. As a plus, the multi-coloured tropical plant requires little maintenance for the gardening novice.

Encaustic Tiles, from €1.20, each besttile.ie, nationwide

9

ON THE TILES

House Party Pip from €4.50 - €50.00, Standún of Spiddal

6

SOMETHING ELSE

While we all want our decor to be bang on trend, every space needs that je ne sais que, that something else, in order to stand apart from the crowd. Work with your design team to find a piece of artwork or interior feature that showcases your personal style and tastefully incorporates it into the conservatory layout.

8

TIME FOR TEA Accessories are the string that pull every well styled room together. For a space intent on relaxation, there’s definitely the possibility of tea and even your functional items should align with your decor. Cups, saucers and trays can all be used as design features! With an array of different patterns you can assuredly find a set to fall in with your chosen interior style. Traditional orangery, Prices from £40,000 (9m x 5.2m), Vale Garden Houses

This is one space you can afford to splash out a little and choose a flooring that will provide year round comfort, style and visual interest. Encaustic tiles are pretty, reminiscent of sunny climes and have a soft matt texture that’s non-slip under foot. Made in Spain and North Africa, encaustic tiles are made by forming different coloured clays into patterns ranging from Moorish to modern and baking until solid. The variety of colours and exquisite patterns is dizzying and the finish is so tactile that you’ll find them difficult to resist. They work well indoors or outdoors and they’ll certainly add character and charm to any conservatory.

10

NOW PUT YOUR FEET UP

The final step in arranging any room is by far the most satisfying. After all the decisions have been made and the labor is completed, all that’s left is to sink slowly into a chair, pull a footstool close and feel the sunshine on your face.

Paper Lantern Fairy Lights, €8.00, Tiger Stores

GET FESTIVE

A tasteful conservatory can be the perfect setting for a summer tea party or an evening drinks reception. So even though you’re designing this space as your own personal haven, don’t neglect to think of it as a social venue also. Ensure you have plenty of room for some additional light furniture and easy movement throughout. To enhance the festivities of a summer garden party you can always indulge in some jovial purchases. These playful touches can be a string of paper lantern fairy lights strung across your open windows, or floral umbrellas perched beautifully by the iced tea.

Assorted houseplants from a range at Ikea

Blue White Stool, €45 at Heatons, nationwide

72 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

071 ICA Summer 2016_Conservatory.indd 72

23/05/2016 13:25


2016 Kube IrishInteriors_IB_ICA.indd Country92 Association Magazine FP 210x285mm (April).indd 1 ICA Ad Template.indd 239453_Kube 1

06/04/2016 16:28 23/05/2016 07/04/2016 14:37 14:22


N OMINAT E ! AYero TbOtcD h d il h #

GRANDPARENT OF THE YEAR #bootsmiawards2016 #idmgrandparent Now accepting nominations! Log on to www.maternityandinfant.ie to nominate today!

100% Magenta

MI 2016_210x285mm_Grandparent.indd 1

100% Cyan 95% Magenta

25/05/2016 11:35


trends|interiors Light blue Pols Potten metal sunflower mirror, €113, amara.com

BELOW: Sky blue Sheridan Bonham cotton mix duvet set, £84, House of Fraser

Sky blue Arti table lamp, €85, Fearne Cotton for Littlewoods Ireland.

LEFT: Midnight blue Tom Dixon glass and wood scent diffuser, €111, amara.com

BELOW: Dark blue, anchor tile marine wallpaper, €102 per 10 metre row, IN-SPACES

RIGHT: Midnight blue Lalique crystal glassware vase, €290, amara.com

BELOW: Blue cotton print Paul Costelloe Living Persia cushion, €50, Dunnes Stores

FEELING BLUE SUMMER HAS ARRIVED AND THOSE COOL BLUE SKIES MEAN IT’S TIME TO ADD A FRESH LOOK TO OUR BEDROOM DÉCOR.

White Eichholtz Chair Barrington, €1,300, Tigress Luxury Interiors ABOVE: Wedgwood Hibiscus Floral Plate 20 cm, €24.50, Brown Thomas

LEFT: Blue tin & wood, Paul Costello Living lantern, medium €50, Large €65, Dunnes Stores. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 75

075 ICA Summer 2016_Interior desires.indd 75

23/05/2016 10:46


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Kilkenny Castle; Shopping on St. Kieran’s Street. Campagne Restaurant; Ceramic from Bríd Lyons, from a range available at Kilkenny Design Centre.

PHOTOS: TOURISM IRELAND/FÁILTE IRELAND.

escape|cities

SEE THE SIGHTS ... Easily accessed via the M7 motorway from all corners of the country, it won’t be too long before you find yourself in the heart of this charming medieval city, with pretty shop fronts, historic bridges and plenty to do and see. Once you’ve parked the car and dropped the bags off at your hotel (Langtons is a handy central location), grab some leaflets from the tourist office on Rose Inn Street and begin exploring what Kilkenny has to offer. Kilkenny Castle is the obvious place to begin your tour, and is well worth the visit for any history buff. Located on the banks of the River Nore, the castle was originally built during the early 13th century, and was home to the Butler family for almost 600 years. Today you can take a tour through the impressive rooms in this iconic landmark, from the imposing entrance hall to the elegant drawing room. Once you’re finished (weather-permitting), don’t forget to take a stroll through the beautiful parkland (open all year round) on the castle grounds – if you’ve brought the kids, they’ll be happy to learn there’s a great playground located within. From here, it’s a short stroll to the Kilkenny Design Centre (open seven days a week), located just across the street from the castle entrance. Home to some of the best in Irish fashion and crafts, you might just come away with some inspiration for projects of your own. Next up is Rothe House and Garden, a great example of a 17th century merchant’s house on Parliament Street. The museum contains a rotating display of interesting pieces, ranging from Viking artefacts to stone axe heads, while the garden – a recreation of green areas from the period – is filled with beautiful flowers, vegetables, herbs and a range of marvellous fruit trees. Try to keep your hands off!

DAY

HOURS IN... KILKENNY

HOME TO THE BUTLERS, SMITHWICKS AND THE ALMIGHTY CATS, 48 HOURS MIGHT NOT BE ENOUGH TO TAKE IN EVERYTHING KILKENNY CITY HAS TO OFFER, WRITES CONOR FORREST. 76 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

076 ICA Summer 2016_48 Hours in Kilkenny.indd 76

23/05/2016 10:51


cities|escape

ABOVE: Rothe House. RIGHT: St. Canice’s Cathedral. BELOW: Smithwicks Experience.

Rudolf Heltzel Goldsmith (Patrick Street) are worth a visit. If you’re searching for a gift, check out Butterslip Boutique on Rose Inn Street – with a range of eclectic products sourced from all over the world, you’re sure to find something of interest! You can’t leave the city without learning more about the legendary Kilkenny cats, who have won the All-Ireland Hurling Championship an unprecedented 36 times since 1904. The Kilkenny Way is a two-hour trip filled with sporting heritage and adventure – visit the Legends Hurling Museum, learn about the history of the GAA, take in a tour of Nowlan Park (home of Kilkenny GAA), test your skills with some tips from Kilkenny Way coaches, and then take in a game at the Legends Hurling Bar along with a tasty dinner to sate your appetite.

MARC O’SULLIVAN

LIFE AT NIGHT ... If you’re staying the night, Kilkenny boasts a vibrant nightlife. Stop by Matt the Millers on John Street Lower, with trad sessions held every Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday. Or, if you’re into your craft beers, Brewery Corner on Parliament Street – run by craft brewers O’Hara – is well worth an investigation, with an extensive list of local and international choices. If you’re looking for a livelier experience, look no further than Langtons on Rose Inn Street. With live music every night and six plasma screens for sporting events, an enjoyable night is in store! LET’S EAT ... You’ve probably worked up quite the appetite by now, and don’t worry – the food here is fabulous. Check out Campagne on Gas House Lane. Their delicious à la carte menu is available from 6-10pm – choose from a range of tasty treats including smoked haddock, wild rabbit and Irish venison. If you’ve got a thirst to match your hunger, a visit to the Smithwicks Experience comes highly recommended. Located only a few metres from Rothe House on Parliament Street, the Experience brings to life the 300 years of history behind the popular ale, and you can look forward to a perfect pint of the rich ruby ale at the end of the tour. PAUSE FOR PRAYER ... You may be on a much-welcomed break, but that’s no excuse to miss mass. Head down to the beautiful St. Mary’s Cathedral, located on the highest point in the city. A significant landmark in Kilkenny, mass is celebrated each Sunday at 10am, 11am and 5.30pm, and 9am on weekdays. If you’re still in a religious frame of mind, stop by St. Canice’s Cathedral (a seven-minute stroll from St. Mary’s) and marvel at the Round Tower, the oldest standing structure in the city.

DAY

SHOPPING STROLL ... Once mass is over, relax and take a leisurely stroll through Kilkenny’s bustling shopping district. With a range of stores from Vero Moda to Carraig Donn, there’s something to suit every interest. Home to a very artistic population, the craft jewellery stores are a particular treat – MTW Jewellery ( just off the High Street) and

BELOW: 18ct Rose Gold with Concave Cut Smokey Quartz, €1,300. RIGHT: Half Moon Peridot ring, sterling silver 18ct yellow gold, €580; both from a selection at MTW Jewellery.

TOP TRAVELLER TIP Much of the parking in Kilkenny City is paid, with the exception of the Newpark Shopping Centre (Johnswell Road), while the car park on Gaol Road is free for the first hour. If you register with ParkMagic before your travel, however, you can park in designated spaces (identifiable by the red lines surrounding the spaces, with ‘Park by Phone’ printed on the ground) for just €1 per day/per park zone. Simply phone ParkMagic on 0818 220 107, visit www.parkmagic.net or download the free Android/iOS app. Once you’re registered and have added an initial deposit, you can top-up by phone, via the website or the app. Further information, and a parking space map, is available on www. visitkilkenny.ie/parking_in_kilkenny. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 77

076 ICA Summer 2016_48 Hours in Kilkenny.indd 77

23/05/2016 10:52


travel|packing

10

tips for travelling light When travelling abroad we try to plan for every outcome and eventually it leaves our luggage splitting at the seams. Packing the essentials without weighing down the plane is a tricky process, but we think we’ve cracked it with these Top Ten Tips for Travelling Light.

1

2

Womens Kiwi Pro Stretch Converts, €49.20, CragHoppers; Outdoor Adventures Store

PRECIOUS CARGO:

THINK SMALL:

Cargo pants – the ultimate fashion statement the nineties – make a comeback! For day trips, you’ll love the handy pockets and comfortable fit, not to mention the adjustable zips that quickly turn these versatile trousers into a breezy pair of shorts as the day heats up.

5

CUT OF YOUR JIB Multi-tasking items are a godsend. A decent hammam towel can be used as a cover up, picnic blanket, towel, beach towel, headscarf, skirt or scarf to cover your shoulders on visits to temples or churches.

PowerCube extended, multi-plug adapter, €22.45, Maplin

8

ADAPTABILITY

Avoid packing chords and foreign adapters to match every device you’re carrying, instead pack a universal adapter and a compact extension lead. You’ll save space in your suitcase, not to mention time looking for multiple sockets.

The biggher your suitcase the more you’ll pack. Think light – use a smaller case, edit once, sleep on it and edit again with fresh eyes. You must be 70% sure you’ll use an item for it to make the cut.

6

THE RIGHT FOOTING

It is possible to restrict your footwear to just two pairs. A decent set of walking shoes or trainers (pack some hiking smart socks to avoid sweating) and a light pair of slip-on footwear or sandals for more leisurely activities.

9

3

EMERGENCY IDEA

A small medical kit is good but you’re not packing for war! Things worth including are re-hydration salts like Dioralyte, insect repellent, ibuprofen, bandages and travel sized sunscreen. Remember that other countries have shops and pharmacies too.

7

4

TRAVEL MATERIAL

Merino wool is the best kept secret of the dedicated nomad. This sturdy fabric withstands the rigours of travel, it wicks sweat from the body, is anti-microbial and odour resistant, plus it can be hand-washed and dried quickly. Items of merino wool clothing include tee’s, sweaters, socks and even underwear.

Columbia Women’s Ventralia Razor OutDry; €104.50, 53degreesnorth

AIRPORT ATTIRE

If you can’t resist taking a particularly large item or a bulky pair of hiking shoes then the best way to keep your luggage light is to wear this clothing as you travel, freeing up that much desired space in your suitcase.

White Ladder Striped Shirt, €16, Penneys

10

LugLoc luggage locator, €60.00, www.lugloc.com

LIFETIME LUGGAGE

For any serious traveller, a compact backpack is the only carry on luggage worth taking and nothing compares to the Pacsafe backpack range for personal security. As well as being lightweight for easy travelling, it also features slashguard protection and security locks to ward off opportunistic thieves.

Merino wool short sleeved sweater, €418.65 , Ralph Lauren

MIX IT UP

A little clever co-ordination works wonders. Build your travel wardrobe on a three colour pallet and add pops with accessories. Each piece must work in three different combinations to create multiple outfits. It has to work hard to earn a place on your trip! Pacsafe Venturesafe X30 Anti Theft Adventure Backpack 30L, €206.00, ebay.ie

78 | ICA HOME & LIVING | AUTUMN 2015

078 ICA Summer 2016_Packing Light.indd 78

23/05/2016 13:26


vaccines|travel CHECKING OUT When travel fever hits a trip to your GP may be your first stop. Western Europe, North America, Canada, Australia and New Zeland present very little threat to our health but if you are venturing to other destination it’s important to ensure that you have up-to-date vaccinations or booster shots. MMR, diphtheria-tetanus pertussis, varicella vaccine, polio vaccine and the flu shot are designed to aid in the prevention of and fight against these illness. You don’t want an overseas illness be the most exotic part of your trip!

EXTRA CARRY ON If your destination has very basic or poor sanitation, take extra precautions and ensure you the necessary vaccines. The most common of these include hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines which are aimed at reducing the risk of illness caused by contiminated food or water. So at least you can indulge in the local cuisine without risk of serious infection.

NEEDLE PAINS You may experience some mild side effects following your vaccinations, these can include soreness, redness or swelling in injection site, fatigue, headaches, muscle or joint pain, fever, chills, nausea and diarrhoea. These symptoms are of no concern once they are mild and last only 2-3 days. If you experience a severe reaction to your travel vaccines such as a high fever, behavioural changes, trouble breathing or a strained/increased heart rate, contact your doctor immediately.

THINK AHEAD Most travel vaccines have a long lifespan but they do need time to spread throughout the body and build maximum protection. Ideally you should schedule to hve your vaccines six weeks before you’re due to travel - contact your GP in advance as they may need to order them. If you’re travelling at short notice then four weeks is considered sufficient by most doctors. If you aren’t travelling for an extended period of time you can receive your vaccinations up to two weeks before you leave the country.

TRAVEL GUIDE Give your doctor full details of your itinerary as it can affect the type of vaccines you’ll need. Let them know if you’ll be

A Dose ofTRAVEL Avoid the headache that accompanies overseas illness and learn all you need to know about receiving your travel vaccinations.

participating in outdoor activities, swimming in the sea, lakes or rivers and if you’ll be travelling to rural areas where you’re likely to be incontact with a greater range of insects and animals. The length of your stay and modes of transport you’ll use while abroad are also factors for consideration. These details may indicate a more specific range of vaccines than someone staying in a hotel or resort and swimming in the pool.

SELF HELP Most trips will pass without incidence but it’s handy to bring a basic kit. An anti-diahorea medication, rehydration salts and water purificatin tablets are a good idea. Antiseptic and hydrocortisone cream for insect bites and rashes. Antihistamines if you’ve a history of alergies. If you’re planning on an extended stay in a remote region your GP may prescribe a broad-spectrum antibiotic in case of infection. Before you return home you can donate anyting you don’t use to a local clinic. SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 79

079 ICA Summer 2016_health_Vaccines.indd 79

23/05/2016 13:28


escape|asia

LEFT: Phnom Pros, one of the less visited temples, is easily reached from Kampong Cham by tuk-tuk. While beautiful it has a dark past; 1,700 bodies to date have been recovered from the surrounding fields. RIGHT: Ta Phrom, most recognisable today as the scene from Tomb Raider.

ABOVE: Durian fruit, reputedly so pungent many drivers have refused to allow their passengers to eat it on the bus. BELOW: the Venice of Cambodia, houses on stilts in Tonle Sap. When the snows in the Himalayas melt each year the lake rises approximately 30 feet.

F GOING SOLO

CAMBODIA & LAOS THINKING OF TAKING A TRIP TO ASIA THIS YEAR? CONOR FORREST EXPLORES THE SAFER OPTION OF INDEPENDENT TRAVEL AND EVERYTHING THAT ENTAILS, AND PROFILES LAOS AND CAMBODIA  TWO COUNTRIES YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS.

or those considering travelling abroad on their own, or for couples who may feel a little daunted by the prospect of visiting an entirely different culture, independent travel – in which you can take advantage of a half curated, half independent tour – offers the best of all worlds. It’s a great way to step outside the guidebook and see beautiful and unique parts of the world that many tourists will never get the chance to experience, travelling, eating and sleeping the way the locals do. CAPTURE CAMBODIA

So where to first? You could do far worse than Cambodia, a country with truly breathtaking scenery and some of the friendliest people on the planet. Though it’s not possible to see everything the country has to offer in one trip, there are several sights that are unmissable. Catch the sunrise at Angkor Wat, an astonishingly beautiful Hindu temple and the largest religious monument in the world, take a wander through the bustling capital, Phnom Penh, which lies on the banks of the Mekong River, and pay a visit to the floating lake villages of Tonle Sap, built on three storey stilts to avoid the annual rising waters. If you want a truly authentic experience, speak to the locals who will give you an idea of what everyday life in Cambodia is truly like. Some independent travel packages offer home stays, a must for anyone wanting to learn about the culture – sign up when you can! You might want to wait until the conclusion of your trip, when your stomach has adjusted, but try some of the local delicacies such as deep fried spiders and crickets, which taste a bit like roasted potato skins (or so we’re told). Nor

80 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

080 ICA Summer 2016_Independent Travel Asia FINAL.indd 80

24/05/2016 09:05


asia|escape the low down INDEPENDENT TRAVEL

PHOTOS: JANE MATTHEWS

ABOVE: Otres Beach just outside Sihanoukville, perfect for relaxing away from the crowds. BELOW LEFT: Angkor Wat at sunrise. Get there early and choose your spot wisely. BELOW RIGHT: Night markets are the best way to shop. Out of the heat of the day and after a few cocktails, shopping should always be this pleasant. Prepare to haggle.

TOP TRAVELLER TIP If you’re visiting any of Cambodia’s spectacular temples – including Angkor Wat – make sure to arrive before the Korean tour buses. Watch the sunrise and wait for their departure (they, along with other visitors arriving as part of package holidays, tend to return to their hotels after the sun comes up) before enjoying your breakfast and then beginning your exploration of these fascinating historic complexes.

should you be afraid to branch out a little off the beaten track. We spoke with one recent traveller to the country who stayed in the beachside town of Sihanoukville, known for its nightlife, beaches and tropical islands, described as “Ibiza on steroids”. A mere five miles down the road, however ($2 via a tuk tuk, the best way to travel around in Cambodia) is Otres Beach, a far more relaxing affair complete with beautiful sand, massages, food, drinks and plenty of sunshine. Horrors, however, do lurk in its not-too-distant history – the Cambodian genocide orchestrated by Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge witnessed the deaths of between more than one and three million people between 1975 and 1979. Similar to the concentration camps of Europe, Cambodia’s Killing Fields are a harrowing yet necessary stop for those wishing to learn more about the regime and its victims – pay a visit to the Toul Sleng Genocide Museum (once known as S-21), a monument to the millions who lost their lives.

If you’re travelling solo, most independent travel companies, such as TravelBag, Explore, Intrepid or Responsible Travel, will bunk you with a fellow traveller of the same sex (if you’re not travelling with your other half ), though you can usually pay a single supplement if you’d prefer your own space. The former is, however, a great way to meet new people, share travel stories and watch your bucket list get longer and longer. There’s also a great mix of ages and experiences – with people from many different nationalities and backgrounds ticking off their dream destinations. Don’t be afraid to say hello – many people on these trips will be from different countries with varying standards of English, so an open and friendly perspective will make for a much more enjoyable trip! Packages are generally split into several categories: basic, classic and comfort. Basic is usually the most flexible option, offering the chance to travel with your group from A to B, and then leaving you to your own devices as regards shopping, food and taking in the local sights, though they will provide some advice on what to do and see. Your budget should include sufficient funds for daily activities and meals. Classic-type packages offer a happy medium – there’s a bit more guidance provided, and many activities will be built-in. You should bring enough money to pay for dinners and drinks, and a few souvenirs. Comfort, meanwhile, does exactly what it says on the tin. Great for a more relaxing trip abroad, comfort packages tend to eschew the backpacker feel for more luxury accommodation – though you may wind up being on your own in a fancy hotel. Regardless of which package you choose, there are a few things to keep in mind. First – pack light. Bring functional clothes that you’re happy to wear straight from your backpack, and invest in comfortable and sturdy footwear. Second, keep an open mind, particularly when it comes to food. Deep fried spiders are widely available in Cambodia, for example and, while that might not seem particularly appealing, they’re actually not that bad. A sense of humour and a friendly disposition will make it a much more enjoyable trip!

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 81

080 ICA Summer 2016_Independent Travel Asia FINAL.indd 81

24/05/2016 09:05


escape|cities TOP TRAVELLER TIP Home to a more traditional and conservative culture, you should avoid dressing in what could be a disrespectful manner, as appearance is very important in Laos. Men should avoid going without a shirt or t-shirt, while women should cover their shoulders and thighs (the same is applicable when visiting Buddhist temples or holy sites). Avoid touching someone with your feet (should that scenario ever arise), or touching the top of people’s heads – both are considered to be rude gestures.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The ancient town of Luang Prabang in northern Laos; Monks cross a bamboo bridge over the Nam Khan in Luang Prabang; The golden temple at Wat Chom Si, at the top of Mount Phou Si; Vientiane, the capital city and economic centre of Laos, home to more than 750,000 people.

LARK IN LAOS

If you’ve got the time (and the funds), take a trip to neighbouring Laos. A landlocked country surrounded by Cambodia, Myanmar, China, Thailand and Vietnam, Laos combines old world charm, an incredibly friendly people and some truly fantastic sights – if you want to experience everything Laos has to offer, we recommend you take at least seven/eight days to absorb its wonderful culture. In Luang Prabang, an alluring city consisting of 58 small villages, famed for its gorgeous architecture, fantastic food stalls and numerous Buddhist temples and monks (the latter walk the streets at dawn collecting alms), time almost seems to stand still. If you’re passing through, take the opportunity to visit Wat Chom Si, a gilded temple that sits atop Mount Phou Si, offering fantastic views of the surrounding city and countryside. Vientiane is the country’s capital, though it offers a far more relaxed experience than you might be expecting. Spend your day wandering through the temples, street merchants and museums. In the evening time, grab a tasty Beerlao, head down to the banks of the Mekong River and watch the sun set. Though the city is home to a network of buses – the ubiquitous three wheeled taxis known to some as tuk-tuks, are your best means of transportation. If you’re a foodie, don’t miss the chance to try some Lao cuisine – drop into Vientiane’s Makphet Restaurant, run by non-profit Friends International, for some tasty examples. Distinctively different to other Southeast Asian countries, their staple food is

steamed sticky rice which is eaten by hand. Larb, however, is the closest thing to a national dish that you’ll find – a delicious mixture of meat (chicken, beef, duck, pork, turkey or fish) flavoured with fish sauce, lime juice, roasted ground rice and fresh herbs, accompanied by sticky rice and raw vegetables. We’re making our reservations already!

82 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

080 ICA Summer 2016_Independent Travel Asia FINAL.indd 82

24/05/2016 09:05


commercial feature

Glasnevin Cemetery Museum & Guided Walking Tours Located just 2.5km from Dublin, Glasnevin Cemetery covers 124 acres of glorious parkland with plenty to appreciate – perfect for those interested in exploring the legacies of Ireland’s heroes. “We have welcomed many ICA groups to Glasnevin” says Ann Kilcoyne. “Many people were stirred by the award winning documentary One Million Dubliners. The film offers a glimpse into the unknown, humorous and affecting, it explores life, death and the afterlife, ending in a way that will stay with you forever”. Awarded Best Cultural Experience in Ireland at the Irish Tourism Industry Awards and listed on Tripadvisor at #2 best things to do in Dublin, this hauntingly gorgeous Victorian Garden cemetery is a must see.

Each tour guide is passionate about sharing their love of heritage and history, telling the stories of Ireland’s complex history through daily walking tours. “They have an incredible knack of turning a learning experience into a period of magic with a careful balance of passion, sensitivity and even fun”, says Ann. The Glasnevin story is told through exhibitions, dramatic reenactments and walking tours. Learn about the harsh realities of life in Dublin; hear the stories of gravediggers and grave robbers, cholera epidemics, and world wars. Since 1832, 1.5 million people have been interred in Glasnevin. This is a history lesson made fun and memorable by guides who know their stuff. Be prepared to enjoy yourself. Rates: Adults e12.00/ Seniors, students e8.00 / Family e25.00. Tickets include guided tour, museum/exhibitions, reenactment, e5.00 genealogy voucher, 10% discount in Café. Car/coach parking available onsite

Open 0900hrs – 1800 Daily / Public and private tours daily / Re-enactment at 1430 / Pedestrian link to Botanic Gardens

239534_Glasnevin Cemetery_IB_ICA.indd 1

2L_CP_Glasnevin Cemetery_ICA.indd 83

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING 22/04/2016 15:05 | 83

24/05/2016 10:07


motor|moving on

WHAT GOES

ON TOUR ys on tour

F

sta

or many people, the campervan represents freedom – freedom to hit the open road and lay your head where you please. It’s more personal than a hotel, more comfortable than a tent – an opportunity to bring your home with you when you travel. And, for some of the latest campervans on the market, that has never been more true.

ATTRACTA BERKERY, DOLLYMOUND GUILD, DUBLIN FEDERATION VAN: BAILEY ORION CARAVAN. We’re a member of the Irish Camping & Caravan Club. Ours is one of the smallest – they call it the Tardis. If you have a motorhome, you have to pack everything up. And you can’t get in everywhere in town. If you have a car, you can go anywhere. There are advantages and disadvantages – it’s what suits you best.

CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: Solar briefcase. You open it out and connect it to the caravan – it saves your battery! Solar Briefcase, €74.95, Maplins

Taking a trip in your camper this summer? Conor Forrest picks out three of the top choices on the market, and enlists the help of some ICA campervan experts.

Top 3 Campsites 1 IRELAND: Ballinacourty House, Co Tipperary Fabulous views, free hot water, myriad activities and an on-site restaurant. Need we say more?

2 EUROPE: Camp Liza, Slovenia Nestled in Slovenia’s beautiful Bovec Valley, Camp Liza is a heavenly retreat for nature lovers.

3

APARTMENT ON WHEELS MORELO LOFT. You know how it goes – you’re heading on

holiday and you’d like to take your apartment with you. That’s essentially what the Morelo Loft is – based on the Iveco Daily, it’s affordable luxury on the move and, measuring 8.88m long and 3.39m high, it’s perfect for Irish roads. The living room is better furnished that some houses and comes with floor heating, a panoramic skylight and satellite TV, while the separate kitchen includes a fridge, worktop, gas hob, oven (with grill) and a Nespresso machine. I’ve got less appliances in my own home. At night, you’ll get tucked up in a Queen size bed, and there’s even space for your scooter at the rear. Add to that solar and fresh water systems, an air suspension and a gas generator, and you might make the move permanent. PRICE: beginning from €154,500

USA: Silver Lake Campground, CA Tucked away in California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains, it’s a base for everything from hiking and horse-riding to biking and fishing.

84 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

084 ICA Summer 2016_Motoring_Campervans.indd 84

23/05/2016 14:08


moving on|motor

GETTING THE BAND BACK TOGETHER?

SMALL BUT PERFECTLY FORMED ITINEO LB600. Searching for a compact camper? French brand Itineo might just have the perfect solution for you. Perfect for Ireland’s narrow sideroads, the Itineo LB600 is a two berth, French-bed camper that combines functionality with comfort and a surprising amount of space for its small dimensions. Measuring just under six metres in length, Itineo have crammed quite a lot into the LB600, making it a very practical choice. That list includes a comfortable lounger area, a 142L fridge, five seats, a bathroom with a separate shower, as well as optional 20L oven (and a grill), motorbike carrier and some upgraded engine choices. The freshwater and waste water tanks can hold up to 120L and a very handy reversing camera comes as standard – where do I sign up? PRICE: approx €63,000 (based on UK prices)

AMERICAN EAGLE. If the Morelo Loft is an apartment on wheels, the American Eagle is a five-star hotel. Nothing short of pure elegance accompanied by modern technology, it comes with a polished porcelain tile floor and handcrafted hardwood cabinets lining the walls. Relax on one of two couches and watch your favourite film on the 48” TV. If you’re feeling peckish, stroll over to the full size fridge and rustle something up on the flush induction cooktop. No need to wash up – there’s a dishwasher for that. If you need to freshen up, the bathroom includes a walk-in shower, plenty of sink space and an optional emergency exit – shelving behind the toilet doubles as steps. And then there’s the bedroom, with its handcrafted hardwood headboard, TV, hidden safe and an adjustable mattress with head and feet massage functions. Good luck getting out of bed. PRICE: a mere €644,000 ($700,000)

DEE DEVEREUX REGIONAL PRESIDENT, WEXFORD VAN: SWIFT KONTIKI. I love our campervan, it’s our little luxury in our retirement. We’ve used it to visit three of our daughters in England and we also used to go drag racing, but we found it too crowded in the end and the rave music all night wasn’t our cup of tea! We prefer a quiet life nowadays, so we have weekly trips down to Saltee Chipper in Kilmore Quay, we eat our cod goujons while watching the sun set over the Saltee Islands – magic. CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: It has to be the tea, absolutely – it’s a must! Remember the teas-made? Meet the new kid on the street Teforia Tea, $1,499, teforia.com

BREDA BANVILLE, WEXFORD FEDERATION VAN: CUSTOM CAMPER ON IVECO DAILY CHASSIS. We call it Rock Rambler, after the Rock of Camross. I live in Camross and the Rock looks down over our house, and then you ramble! It’s the sense of freedom – you’re flexible. It’s a great way to relax and recharge the batteries. We always say we’re like a tortoise. We move along with the shell on our back, at our own pace.

CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: I wasn’t big into iPhones prior to this, but as you know you’re hooked on them, you feel like it’s attached to you!

Iphone 6s, available nationwide.

SUMMER 2016 | ICA HOME & LIVING | 85

084 ICA Summer 2016_Motoring_Campervans.indd 85

23/05/2016 14:08


motor|update Multi-colour plastic cups, €6, Penneys

Peru parasol, €165, Marks & Spencer

Cylinder hanging vase, €5, Tiger

Bermuda record player, €195, Cuckoo Land

PIMP

your

RIDE

Garden Birds Stainless steel hip flask, €13, Dotcomgiftshop

Sometimes the golden oldies are the best. Volkswagen’s Type 2 campervan is an iconic vehicle, beloved of hippies and retro enthusiasts alike over the years. Using a rear-engine (unusual for vans of the time), T2 vans were highly versatile, used as hearses, ambulances, fire engines and police vans over the years, and also found popularity as a base

Two person cook set, €60, Regatta

Cute, compact and completely customisable – here’s how you can make the VW Camper your own. for a camper conversion by companies including Westfalia. Relatively bare on the inside compared to modern campers, the T2s are ripe for customisation – we’ve got a few ideas on how you can make your model unique. PRICE: anywhere from €2,000 to €18,000 on DoneDeal.ie (or get in touch with Wicklow-based rental company Lazy Days – phone 087 288 5771 or visit www.lazydays.ie).

Flower fairy lights, €17, IKEA

Yellow cut out lantern, €33, Marks & Spencer

PG

Crochet fold-up chair, €390, KSL Living United By Design

78

Silver wine cooler and flutes, €290, Annabel James

DRIVE AWAY ...

48 Hours in Kilkenny

86 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

084 ICA Summer 2016_Motoring_Campervans.indd 86

23/05/2016 14:09


GTI

239359_newAnchor Point_IB_ICA.indd 1

13/04/2016 16:34

ESCORTED HOLIDAYS & TAILOR-MADE GROUPS

The Group Travel Specialists

GTI specialise in TAILOR-MADE tours for groups interested in Sporting, Sightseeing, Battlefield, Historical, Cultural or Relaxing Holidays. We can put together a quote & itinerary based on any group’s requirements. For individual customers, GTI provide diverse, fascinating ESCORTED HOLIDAYS to unique destinations accross the globe

Riches of Vietnam & Cambodia Cu Chi Tunnels, Mekong Delta & Angkor Wat 15 - 29 October 2016 from €2599pp 15 - 29 March 2017 from €2699pp Fully Escorted Price Includes: • Return flights from Dublin to Ho Chi Minh with Etihad Airways plus 2 internal flights including taxes & charges • Professional tour manager and executive coach transfers • 12 nights hotel accommodation throughout with breakfast • 5 evening meals and 5 lunches included • Fascinating excursions to include tours of Ho Chi Minh, the Cu Chi tunnels, a boat trip through the Mekong Delta to the colourful floating market of Cai Be, the vibrant floating villages of Chau Doc, Phnom Penh, the Killing Fields of Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge and the remarkable temples of Angkor Wat

MANY MORE GREAT DESTINATIONS AVAILABLE!

AGRICULTURAL TOURS

BATTLEFIELD TOURS

As Ireland’s leading AGRICULTURAL TOUR specialist, we offer itineraries that combine the perfect balance of educational agricultural visits & cultural excursions. From South Africa to Myanmar, Portugal to Slovenia & Vienna to Bilbao GTI has a holiday to suit everyone.

SPORTING TOURS

WHY TRAVEL WITH GTI? 3 Irish owned & operated since 2003 3 Fully inclusive packages with flights, hotel, coach, guides & excursions 3 Experienced, friendly, well-travelled staff 3 Tailor-made group itineraries to suit all budgets 3 24-hour emergency phone service 3 Special group rates & free places 3 Fully licensed & bonded (TA 0533)

CULTURAL HOLIDAYS

Call: 01 843 4734 │ Email: info@gti-ireland.com │ Visit: gti-ireland.com

Prices based on twin share. Single supplements apply. Optional insurance available (T&Cs apply). Non refundable/non transferable deposit required to book. Flights, taxes & itinerary subject to change. Booking T&Cs apply. E&OE 240028_GTI_IB_ICA.indd 1

ICA Ad Template.indd 92

12/05/2016 17:13

23/05/2016 14:48


meet|the author

AERIAL VIEW EMILY HOURICAN, BESTSELLING AUTHOR AND MUM OF THREE SHARES HER ACCOUNT OF HAVING CANCER AND COMING OUT THE OTHER SIDE FIGHTING FIT.

I

n November last year well-known journalist and author Emily Hourican was diagnosed with a cancerous tumour in the base of her tongue. Emily shared a very honest and brave account of her journey through treatment in the Sunday Independent. Each week Emily’s cancer diaries moved thousands of readers across Ireland. “Writing the cancer diaries really helped me and so many people from around the country wrote to me. Everyone was really encouraging and cheered me over the finish line, it was extraordinary. I still can’t believe the kindness, generosity and decency of people,” says Emily. Emily finished treatment three months ago and thankfully, she is feeling really well. “I still have side effects that will take a while to go, my mouth is still quite sore and my tastes buds are funny but I am positive everything will return to normal when it’s ready,” she adds. Emily wasn’t a likely candidate for tongue cancer and this unfortunately went against her: “I am young, I gave up smoking over 20 years ago, I drink very little alcohol, I have a very healthy diet and run daily.”

WIN A SIGNED COPY

“At one stage doctors thought it could be my thyroid and a couple of health professionals said I could be psychosomatic, which is common in women in their 40’s.” Emily had no signs of illness apart from a lump in her throat, the lump wasn’t sore and it didn’t effect her eating but it was always there. It wasn’t until she attended an ENT consultant that she got the news she never expected. “Anyone who is not happy with a diagnosis needs to keep going back to their GP or a consultant, and if they’re still not happy, I would say to get another opinion. Who cares if you are dismissed as a complete hysteric or someone who is manifesting anxiety around symptoms it doesn’t matter, you are better off being told you are a hypochondriac than waiting months and months for a proper cancer diagnosis,” explains Emily Emily had her first round of treatment on the 23rd of December, her 44th birthday. She endured seven weeks of treatment and was randomly chosen for a trial drug, cetuximab, rather than chemotherapy. Cetuximab is more targeted, less toxic, but it has plenty of unpleasant side effects of its own,

SEND US 50 WORDS ABOUT YOUR BEST FRIEND AND BE IN WITH A CHANCE TO WIN A SIGNED COPY OF THE PRIVILEGED To enter send your answer to the question above, along with your name and address or phone number to ICA Home & Living Magazine, c/o Ashville Media Group, Old Stone Building, Blackhall Green, Dublin 7 or email your answer with THE PRIVILEGED in the subject line to hello@icahomeandliving.ie

including acne, extreme tiredness, increased risk of mouth ulcers and inflammation of the mouth. “When I was at my lowest I had given up all hope of ever getting better. If someone had said to me ‘I was in the exact same boat as you and now three months later I feel really great,’ I would have been really encouraged. I honestly thought that I would feel awful and be unable to eat for years to come,” says Emily. On the other side of treatment Emily had the release of her new book, The Privileged to look forward to. “The book was written before my diagnosis and I was very excited about it. It was lovely to know that once I was out the other side of treatment I had something that had nothing to do with cancer to look forward to.” “The book is about friendship, honesty and loyalty. Even though I wrote it before I had cancer, having cancer showed me again how incredible friends are, how much we rely on them and how brilliant they are in our lives.” “The Sunday Times review compared The Privileged to Maeve Binchy’s Circle of Friends for the 21st century lady, and it is currently number three on their bestseller list. I am truly flattered,” Emily added. At the moment Emily is concentrating on spending quality time with her children which means they are spending a lot of time in the kitchen: “I love cooking but I love baking more. They love to cook high calorie sugar fueled buns with icing and chocolate brownies but I am more interested in baking without sugar. I use lots of coconut flour and date syrup for a sweet taste. This afternoon I am making hazelnut bread.” Emily’s final words of wisdom are simple: “If there is something in your life that you do, that you shouldn’t, my advice is to stop doing it. There is no momentary pleasure that is worth that kind of an illness. Life is amazing and sometimes we forget that because we are so bogged down by work or bills, and all the other stressful things that happen in our lives. Life can change at the tap of a finger and we should enjoy every moment.”

Terms & conditions: Closing date for all entries is the August 31 2016. Competition is not open to employees of Ashville Media Group. No cash or gift card will be awarded in lieu of prize. Winner will be selected at random from a draw in ICA, 58 Merrion Road, Dublin 4. Competition entrants must be resident in the island of Ireland. One entry per person. Competition is subject to all usual terms and conditions.

88 | ICA HOME & LIVING | SUMMER 2016

088 ICA Summer 2015_Ariel View_emily.indd 88

23/05/2016 14:11


Screening Services

Save

Women’s Health Check This Month’s Health Check Service for Women

FREE

33%

Diabetes Test Diabetes Screening Test Was €15 Now €10 Iron Level Screenings Was €30 Now €20 Thyroid Check Was €30 Now €20 Cholesterol* Was €15 Now €10 Cholesterol – Lipid Profile (showing breakdown)*

Was €30 Now €20 Menopause Test Was €30 Now €20 FREE Blood Pressure Check

*selected stores only Store Locator:

Open until 11pm, 7 nights a week* Available at: Dundrum Town Centre & Pavilions Shopping Centre *Open until 6pm in Pavilions S.C. & 7pm in Dundrum Town on bank holidays

■ Dundrum Town Centre Late night Pharmacy, open until 11pm Ph: 01 2986709 ■ Swords Pavilions S.C. Late night Pharmacy, open until 11pm Ph: 01 8406555 ■ Blanchardstown S.C. Ph: 01 8222171 ■ Ballymun Ph: 01 8577005 ■ Citywest S.C Ph: 01 4660094 ■ Clarehall S.C Ph: 01 8473519 ■ Glasnevin Ph: 01 8342493 ■ Lucan, Griffeen Ph: 01 5056449

www.mccabespharmacy.com

ICA Ad Template.indd 92 239323_1C_MCCABES_JR_ICA.indd 1

■ Kimmage, Dublin 6W Ph: 01 4906011 ■ Lusk, Station Road Ph. 8431100 ■ Malahide, Supervalu S.C. Ph: 01 8453898 ■ Malahide, The Diamond Ph: 01 8450807 ■ Malahide, Yellow Walls Ph: 01 8456146 ■ Swords, Rathbeale Rd Ph: 01 8402764 ■ Swords, Ridgewood Ph: 01 8900053 ■ Rush, Skerries Corner Ph. 01 8949100

■ Santry, Gullivers Centre, Northwood Ph. 01 8429615 ■ Dundalk, Adelphi Court, The Long Walk Ph: 042 9352053 ■ Dundalk, Lis na Dara, Co. Louth Ph: 042 9357515 ■ Limerick, The Crescent S.C. Dooradoyle Ph: 061 304351 ■ Wexford, McCauley’s Pharmacy, Main Street Gorey Ph: 053 9421904 ■ Wexford, Sherwood’s Pharmacy, 2 North Main Street Ph: 053 9122875

You’re Amazing. Let’s keep you that way!

23/05/2016 29/03/2016 14:35 15:26


ICA Ad Template.indd 92 239951_Firebird_AMA_ICA.indd 1

23/05/2016 06/05/2016 14:38 15:52

ICA Home & Living Summer 2016