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CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

ISSUE No 29

OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS!

CALL-TO-ARTISTS, GRANTS, JOBS, SUBMISSIONS, & MUCH MORE!

TEMPLE OF TIME: HONORING THE VICTIMS OF PARKLAND ONE YEAR LATER

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH THE YOUTUBE STAR AND DIY DIVA

PHOTO BY RAUL AGUILAR

Karina Garcia 6 WAYS TO BREAK AWAY FROM THE GRIPS OF IMPOSTER SYNDROME HOW TO BE THE BEST AMBASSADOR FOR YOUR CREATIVE BUSINESS | DRAWING AWAY DEMENTIA LORD OF THE BLING: THE WORK OF JONATHAN STEIN | THE WORK OF MORTON KAISH

Display Until May 31, 2019


DISCOVER WHAT

INSPIRES

YOU

PROMOTING OUR DIVERSE ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATIONS Brought to you by the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority

Downton Abbey Now – April 22 CityPlace 575 S. Rosemary Avenue

Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry Now – May 26 Henry Morrison Flagler Museum One Whitehall Way The West Palm Beach Arts & Entertainment District is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization.

DOWNTOWNWPBARTS.COM

Nina Chanel Abney Now – June 25 Norton Museum of Art 1451 S. Olive Avenue


Garden Club Flower Show

The House of Blue Leaves

March 16 Palm Beach County Convention Center 650 Okeechobee Boulevard

April 24 The Society of the Four Arts 2 Four Arts Plaza

May 17 – June 2 Palm Beach Dramaworks 201 Clematis Street

Spring Choral Concert with Concert Choir and Women’s Chorale

Disney’s The Lion King

Pairings: Food & Wine Event

April 24 – May 5 Kravis Center for the Performing Arts 701 Okeechobee Boulevard

May 30 DowntownWPB (Various Locations)

Palm Beach Book Festival

April 5 Desantis Family Chapel 300 Okeechobee Boulevard

Little Women April 11 – 14 Fern Street Theatre 500 Fern Street

Escher String Quartet April 25 Norton Museum of Art 1451 S. Olive Avenue

   


SUBMIT YOUR NOVELLA! to the Miami Book Fair / de Groot Prize

Winners receive cash awards, publication and the opportunity to present at the Miami Book Fair. SUBMIT! “A kind of magic may emerge.” (Marci Vogel, 2017 winner)

SUBMISSION PERIOD: February 14 to April 30, 2019 FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT MIAMIBOOKFAIR.COM/DEGROOT Marci Vogel’s novella, Death and Other Holidays, was published by Melville House in November 2018.

CREATIVE WRITING, CRAFT TALKS, PUBLISHING & PARTIES MAY 8 - 11, 2019 WORKSHOPS WITH AWARD-WINNING AUTHORS IN FICTION, POETRY, NONFICTION, SCREENWRITING & PUBLISHING

SPECIAL FEATURES:

Workshop in Spanish with ANDRÉS NEUMAN Manuscript consultations with literary agent MELISSA DANACZKO

IN

N OV E MB E R ,

A ND

A L L

Y E A R

RO U N D

REGISTER TODAY! MIAMIBOOKFAIR.COM


I palmbeachculture.com/exhibitions

Glenda Green, “Sea of Love”

FE BRU ARY 15 – M AY 1 8

Love is a universal language—whether it’s between two people, the world around us, or even self-love—this complex emotion spans cultures and defines who we are. In this exhibition, there are representations of all facets of love, as a concept, represented in many ways: color, sensation, awareness, empathy or even through nature, technology, dance and beyond. Twenty Palm Beach County artists will be sharing their love in this exhibition, co-curated by artist, educator and designer, Kristin Miller Hopkins.

Proceeds from artwork sales directly benefit local artists and support the Cultural Council’s mission to grow arts and culture in Palm Beach County.

Exhibition is generously sponsored by:

Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building 601 Lake Avenue • Lake Worth, FL 33460 Tuesday – Saturday • 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free and open to the public


BRUCE HELANDER “THE PATTERNS WE PERCEIVE – NEW PAINTINGS ON FABRIC & OTHER MYSTERIES”

Bruce Helander, Mums the Word (4), 2019, Painted acrylic embellishments on printed fabric, 52 x 52 in.

Represented by:

211 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480 • fritzgallery.com • info@fritzgallery.com • +1 (561) 906-5337 Tuesday-Saturday 11am-5pm (Sunday and Monday by appointment only)


CONTENTS 12 OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS 14 BETTER BRAND BUILDING: BEING THE BEST AMBASSADOR FOR YOUR BUSINESS 16 THE SEINFELD METHOD TO SUCCESS 18 DRAWING AWAY DEMENTIA 20 6 WAYS TO BREAK AWAY FROM THE GRIPS OF IMPOSTER SYNDROME 22 LORD OF THE BLING: INTERVIEW WITH JONATHAN STEIN 28 THE HAMILTON EFFECT: HOW ARTS AND CULTURAL SPENDING ENHANCES THE LOCAL ECONOMY 32 ART DELINQUENCY DISORDER OR WHY CAN’T I EVER FINISH ANYTHING? 34 MY CREATIVE BRAIN: AN EXERCISE IN IMAGINATION 40 INTERVIEW WITH YOUTUBE STAR AND CREATIVE ENTREPRENEUR: KARINA GARCIA 44 VANESSA TILL HOOPER’S VISUAL VOYAGE 48 BUTTERFLIES IN THE GARDEN: THE WORK OF MORTON KAISH 54 SILICON BEACH: SOUTH FLORIDA STARTUPS 58 DAVID BEST’S TEMPLE OF TIME 62 FILLING THE VOID: THOU ART WOMAN 64 ARTIST AS ENTREPRENEUR INSTITUTE 2019 68 FORM AND FUNCTION: HOW FAPAP PRESERVES AND PROMOTES PUBLIC ART 72 A NEW SUNSET: REBIRTH OF A PERFORMING ARTS MECCA IN WEST PALM BEACH

Top left, Cloudscape, page 68, photo submitted; Center left, Karina Garcia, page 40, photo by Raul Aguilar; Bottom left, Silicon Beach, page 54, photo by Ryan Spencer; Top right, Seinfeld Method, page 16, photo by George Pagan; Center right, Hello Kitty, page 22, photo courtesy of Jonathan Stein; Bottom right, Ashleigh Walters, page 34, photo by Robert Nelson Photography

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

7


HELLO | FROM THE EDITORS

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

ART HIVE TEAM | publisher Art Hive Magazine LLC. founders/executive editors Angela Yungk -angela@arthivemagazine.com Jessie Prugh -jessie@arthivemagazine.com deputy editor Marcela Villa -marcela@arthivemagazine.com executive administrator Andrea De La Cruz -andrea@arthivemagazine.com

Photo by David Runyon

social media Jennifer Love Gironda -damuse@arthivemagazine.com copy editor Karla Plenge

WHAT WE ARE UP TO | Art Hive Magazine and Capital One® have joined forces this past year to bring fun and diverse networking events to their West Palm Beach café called “Hello Creatives at the Café.” Hello Creatives is all about bringing out the best in our community—to learn and grow from our very own array of artists, creatives, and entrepreneurs. Past events have included artist talk backs, networking mixers, and even a dance party! This spring we have two unique events that will inspire and ignite just about any crowd! If you live in the South Florida area, be sure to stay tuned to the Art Hive Magazine social media pages for more details on these great opportunities to meet and mingle with your local movers and shakers. April / Alumni Mixer: If you are an alumni of Palm Beach State College’s business degree program you will definitely want to check out this mixer. This will be an opportunity to network with local alumni and future college grads. May / City Mixer: Do you want to know what is going on in downtown West Palm Beach? Join us as we get together with the West Palm Beach DDA to learn more about city initiatives, growth, and artist opportunities for the upcoming 2019/2020 season. All of our events require an RSVP and have limited availability. Make sure to stay tuned into our social media pages to sign up and attend—we look forward to seeing you at the cafe!

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO | MOSAIC: What is MOSAIC you ask? It stands for: “Month of Shows, Arts, Ideas & Culture.” Launched in 2018, MOSAIC’s primary purpose is to get you out to experience all of the wonderful exhibitions and events that Palm Beach County has to offer. You can even pick up a Cultural Coupon at many different locations to get exclusive discounts and deals to hotels, galleries, museums and more! To find out about this month long event, please visit mosaicpbc.com. When you are out and about during the month of May, make sure to use #MOSAICPBC to highlight where you are visiting! Want a copy of Art Hive Magazine…for free? Check out these events where you can get a copy while supplies last! Miami International Film Festival: March 1-10, 2019. If you plan on being at the festival, be sure to pick up a copy of Art Hive Magazine while you are there, seven different theatre locations: Silverspot Cinema (Downtown Miami) / Olympia Theater (Downtown Miami) / MDC’s Tower Theater Miami (Little Havana) / O Cinema Miami Beach (Miami Beach) / Coral Gables Art Cinema (Coral Gables) / Nite Owl Theater (The Miami Design District / Paradise Plaza (The Miami Design District) Equality Florida Gala: March 22, 2019. Make sure to get your tickets to this Andy Warhol themed Gala—it will bring out the artist in just about anyone! Art Hive Magazine will be available to all attending guests.

CONNECT WITH JESSIE & ANGELA | Instagram: @angela_arthive, @jessie_arthive, @arthive_magazine | arthivemagazine.com 8

ARTHIVEMAGAZINE.COM

creative team Meredith Clements David Runyon Andrea De La Cruz contributing writers Christiana Lilly, Chris Smith, Ashleigh Walters, Jon Hunt, Jessie Prugh,Drew Scott Marcela Villa, Angela Yungk, Christina Wood, Bruce Helander Helen Wolt, Monique McIntosh, Josh Stephens, Jennifer Love Gironda

CONNECT | general inquiries info@arthivemagazine.com advertising sales@arthivemagazine.com sponsorships events@arthivemagazine.com Hello Creatives Podcast iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play, or iHeartRadio social media fb/ arthivemagazine twitter/ @arthivemagazine instagram/ @arthive_magazine #arthivemagazine submissions arthivemagazine.com/submissions for guidelines submissions@arthivemagazine.com

DISTRIBUTION | brick-and-mortar For sale at Publix Super Markets, Barnes and Noble Bookstores and at arthivemagazine.com Complimentary issues can be found year round at select high traffic locations, and high profile events throughout South Florida. Check our website for up to date lists of events. read online issuu.com/arthivemagazine

© 2012-2019 Art Hive Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or any other method, without permission of the publishers. The articles, advertising, and reviews appearing within this publication reflect the attitudes and opinions of their respective authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or editors. All rights to advertisements including artwork, writing, designs, and copyrights are property of respective owners, and no assumption of ownership is made by this publication, publishers, or editors.


June 13 – 16, 2019 Photograph taken at Museum Tinguely, Basel


Discover THE HEART & SOUL OF WEST PALM BEACH

During the classic “Chitlin’ Circuit” era of the 1930’s and 40’s, the Sunset Lounge was one of the largest ballroom stops in the southeast for touring African American entertainers and also housed its own famed house band, the Royal Sunset Orchestra. Featuring acts from Count Basie and Duke Ellington all the way to James Brown, the Sunset was the place to “see and be seen” during the days of the Big Band. Now, the Sunset is being revived as the cornerstone of the West Palm Beach CRA’s economic redevelopment efforts in the Historic Northwest. Closed for a complete renovation and update, the Sunset will reopen in the Spring of 2020 with a sterling lineup of musical performances as well as a signature new Lounge and Restaurant. Stay tuned for news of festivals and pre-opening celebrations in the Historic Northwest-the Heart and Soul of West Palm Beach.

Roots

EXPLORE YOUR ...

Sunset Lounge located at the corner of N. Rosemary Avenue and 8th Street in Downtown West Palm Beach

OWNER

SUNSET LOUNGE HISTORIC REHABILITATION 609, 607, & 603 Eighth Street, West Palm Beach, FL 33401

Historic Sunset Lounge Rendering

City of West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Assoc. (WPB CRA) Jon Ward, WPB CRA Executive Director Genia Baker, Project Manager 401 Clematis Street, 2nd Floor West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561.822.1437 Phone: 561-822-14374 / Fax: 561-822-1563 gbaker@wpb.org RMA Arthur Cantero, Owner's Representative 2302 E. Atlantic Blvd. Pompano Beach, FL 33062 Phone: 954-261-4668 arthur@rma.us.com ARCHITECT

REG ARCHITECTS - INTERIORS - PLANNERS, INC. Rick Gonzalez, AIA, President Darrin Engel, Assoc. A.I.A., Sr. Project Manager 300 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: 561-659-2383 / Fax: 561-659-5546 rick@regarchitects.com

FIND YOUR ... CONSTRUCTION MANAGER Cooper Construction Management Kareem White, Project Manager 3000 High Ridge Road, Suite 7 - Boynton Beach, FL 33426 Phone: 561-588-5222 / Fax: 305-402-2262 kwhite@coopercmc.com CONSULTANTS

CIVIL ENGINEER

McLeod McCarthy & Associates, PA Tom McCarthy, P.E., President 1655 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Ste. 712 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: 561-689-9500 / Fax: 561-659-8080 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT Schmidt Nichols Jon Schmidt, ASLA, Leed AP, Principal 1551 N Flagler Drive Suite 102, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: 561-684-6141 / Fax: 561-684-6142 GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

Terracon Consultants, Inc. Dan Marieni, P.E., Geotechnical Department Manager 1225 Omar Road West Palm Beach, FL 33405 D (561) 494 7010 / O (561) 689 4299 / M (954) 980 4703 dan.marieni@terracon.com

Sunset Lounge Historic Rehabilitation

Rhythm

609, 607, & 603 Eighth Street, West Palm Beach, FL 33401

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

Jezerinac Group, PLLC Ronald M. Jezerinac, President 4400 PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 Phone: 561-622-8585 MEP, FIRE PROTECTION & PHOTOMETRICS

ARTIST'S CONCEPTUAL RENDERING OF EXISTING BUILDING AND PROPOSED ADDITION

LIVE YOUR PRELIMINARY CD SET Located in the City of West Palm Beach CRA District

... Destiny

Ellis Consulting Engineers, Inc. Ben Jay Ellis, P.E., Principal 1106 North G Street, Ste. B Lake Worth, FL 33460 Phone: 561-370-3300 / Fax: 561-370-3294

Sheet Number

Sheet Name

Joe Snider Consulting, Inc. Joe Snider, AIA, LEED Fellow, FGBC Des. Prof. 1010 NE 8th Avenue, #35 Delray Beach, FL 33483 Phone: 561-862-8938 / www.JoeSnider.com

CITY OF WEST PALM BEACH

HISTORIC SITE #8PB1442

SHEET INDEX - DESIGN DEV.

A-Cover Sheet A.CV Cover Sheet B-Civil C1.1 Conceptual Paving, Grading and Drainage Plan C1.2 Water & Waste Water Plan C2.1 Preliminary Engineering Details C2.2 Preliminary Engineering Details C-Landscape LI-1 Landscape Index LP-1 Landscape Plan LP-2 Landscape Specifications TD-1 Tree Disposition Plan E-Architectural A.SI Site Information A0.01 Architectural Info A0.02 Life Safety Plans A0.03 Code Analysis A0.04 P&Z Site Plan

NO. DATE DESCRIPTION

GREEN / LEED CONSULTING

SHEET INDEX - DESIGN DEV.

Sheet Number A0.05 A0.06 A0.07 A1.00 A1.01 A1.02 A1.03 A1.04 A1.11 A1.12 A1.13 A1.21 A1.22 A1.23 A1.30 A1.31 A1.32 A1.33

Sheet Name

Transparency Percentage Active Use Percentage F.A.R. CALCULATION Proposed Site - Plan Proposed 1st Floor - Plan Proposed 2nd Floor - Plan Mezzanine/ Roof Terrace - Floor Plan Proposed Roof - Plan Proposed 1st Floor - Reflect. Ceiling Plan Proposed 2nd Floor - Reflect. Ceiling Plan Mezzanine/ Roof Terrace - Ceiling Plan 1st Floor Finish Plan 2nd Floor Finish Plan Mezzanine/ Roof Terrace Finish Plan Seating Count Layout A Seating Count Layout B Seating Count Layout C Seating Count Layout D

THEATRE / ACOUSTICAL

TSG Design Solutions Albert Cadaret III, ASTC, President 1850 Forest Hill Boulevard, #205 West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Phone: 561-967-4511

SHEET INDEX - DESIGN DEV.

Sheet Number A1.34 A1.35 A1.36 A1.37 A2.01 A2.02 A3.01 A3.02 A3.03 A3.04 A3.05 A3.10 A4.01 A4.02 A4.03 A4.04 A4.05 A4.06

Sheet Name

Mezzanine/ Roof Terrace Layout A 2nd Floor Seating Count Layout A 2nd Floor Seating Count Layout B 2nd Floor Seating Count Layout C Proposed North & South Elevations Proposed West & East Elevations Proposed Building Sections Proposed Building Sections Proposed Building Sections Building Sections Building Sections Wall Sections Ballroom - Interior Elevations Ballroom - Interior Elevations Kitchen Enlarged Plan & Elevations First & Second Floor Bathroom Plans & Elevs. Mezz./ Roof Terrace Toilet Plans & Elevs. Stair Plans & Sections

SHEET INDEX - DESIGN DEV.

Sheet Number A4.07 A4.08 A5.01 A5.02 A5.03 A5.04 A5.05 A5.06 A5.11 A6.01 A6.02 A6.03 A6.04 A6.05 A7.01 A7.02 A7.03 A7.04

PROGRESS DATE

07/05/2018

NTS

SCALE DRAWN

DE

CHECKED REG #

REG 14033

REG © 2018

Sheet Name

Stair Plans & Sections Elevator Plans & Sections Elevation & Sections Details Door & Window Details Door & Window Details Floor & Ceiling Details Roof Details Millwork & Finish Details Armstrong Ceiling Blades Wall Types Door & Window Schedules Door & Window Types Finish Schedule & Notes Equipment/Furniture Live 3D Views - Progress Live 3D Views - Progress Live 3D Interior Sketches Live 3D Interior Sketches

OWNERSHIP AND USE OF THESE DOCUMENTS & SPECIFICATIONS AS INSTRUMENTS OF SERVICE ARE AND SHALL REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF THE ARCHITECT WHETHER THE PROJECT THEY ARE MADE FOR IS EXECUTED OR NOT. THEY SHALL NOT BE USED BY THE OWNER OR OTHERS ON OTHER PROJECTS OR FOR ADDITIONS TO THIS PROJECT BY OTHERS, EXCEPT BY AGREEMENT IN WRITING AND WITH APPROPRIATE COMPENSATION TO THE ARCHITECT.

07/05/2018 Learn more about upcoming events, programs, activities and business opportunities at wpb.org/CRA Cover Sheet Contributing Building in the Historic NorthWest District, a Nationally and Locally Designated Historic District

PRELIMINARY CD SET

A.CV

West Palm Beach CRA | 401 Clematis Street | West Palm Beach, FL 33401


Visit

Just two miles north of Downtown West Palm Beach between Dixie Highway and Broadway

SHARE A...

PICTURE YOUR...

Style

Taste Best Artsy Instagram: Northwood Village “Live out your hipster fantasy at Northwood. From bohemian coffee shops to unique art exhibits, the West Palm Beach neighborhood is the coolest place to be seen. Walk around, enjoy the art, and don’t forget to take a picture with the blue eye wall, Northwood’s most iconic photo spot.” Boca Magazine

CAPTURE THE...

Moment

The Most Instagram-worthy Spots in Palm Beach “If you’re looking for a more boho side of West Palm Beach, Northwood Village is your destination. And, with many one-of-a-kind boutique shops, galleries, restaurants, and cafes, you will find many walls to take the perfect selfie.” The Lifestyle Insider

Visit Northwood Village today to enjoy your most Instagramable moments. Learn more at northwoodvillage.org

CRA@wpb.org | wpb.org/CRA | 561.822.1550

West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency CRA Board Members Chair: Mayor Jeri Muoio; Commissioners: Keith A. James, Christina Lambert, Cory Neering, Paula Ryan, Kelly Shoaf


CREATIVE | OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS

OPPORTUNITIES IN

THE ARTS

OUR PICKS OF GRANT PROGRAMS, CALLSTO-ARTISTS AND JOBS TO PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF CREATIVES AND NONPROFIT CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT PROVIDE ART OR ACTIVITIES ENHANCING THE CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE COMMUNITY.

Community Arts Education Partnerships (CAEP) Grant Grant Deadline: March 1 Broward County is accepting applications for the CAEP Grant; the purpose of the Community Arts Education Partnerships incentive program is to expand access to arts education occurring in community-based settings located in Broward County. Projects may include performances by or exhibitions of professional artists; arts instruction; arts intervention; healing/expressive arts; and arts integration projects that promote the development of knowledge, skills, or appreciation related to arts and culture. Awards may range up to $7,000 and are contingent upon funds available. Visit Broward.org/Arts for more info and to apply. ArtFest in the Pines Call to Artists Deadline: March 1 Pembroke Pines is seeking artists to apply for ArtFest in the Pines, Pembroke Pines 2-day art festival filled with talented artists, funfilled entertainment, diverse cuisines, live hands-on art demonstrations, a student art competition, a farmers market, a kids art and game zone, children and adult workshops at The Frank Art Gallery and so much more! Artists will be judged for Best in Show and Best in Category competition, with the opportunity to win upwards to $4,500 in cash prizes. For more information and to apply, visit: https://www. zapplication.org/event-info.php?ID=6968 Thou Art Woman Events: March 1-3 Thou Art Woman is a community of women who love women and the arts. As an annual event hosted since 2014, Thou Art Woman offers a safe space where women can share their creativity and truth. Weekend ticket holders will have access to a three-day span of events, including "At the Edge" Art Exhibit with mix-and-mingle, Open Mic & Performance Night at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, and a "Brunch with Us" at the Riverside Hotel where attendees can interact with speakers, performers, and each other. View more information and purchase tickets at ThouArtWoman.com. Art & Soul Exhibition Call to Artists Deadline: March 15 Business for the Arts of Broward (BFA) is seeking entries from established and emerging artists for its 5th Annual Art & Soul set for Thursday, April 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. at CIRC Hotel. Work must be 2D and original in concept, design and execution. Works selected are based on originality, creativity, workmanship and artistic distinction. All work(s) must be submitted as a 300 dpi jpeg. Artists may submit up to four different works for consideration that they personally have created. Artwork should be saved with the artist’s name and title. Each jpeg of the work must be accompanied by an Art & Soul artist’s entry form, which can be filled online at www.bfabroward.org/ programs/art-and-soul/art-soul-entry-form/. 12

ARTHIVEMAGAZINE.COM

Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute Informational Session | Mandel Public Library Event: March 25 Presented in conjunction with the Mandel Public Library - An informational session will be offered to artists in the region to learn more about the upcoming Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) and the various services the Broward Cultural Division offers to artists in the region, including funding, professional development and networking opportunities. Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) is a course of study designed to assist individual artists, of all disciplines (visual, musicians, writers, media, theater, performing arts), by cultivating and advancing their business skills, and helping them to strengthen their operating infrastructure and expand their business. To learn more and register for this FREE event, visit OppsforArtistsWPB.eventbrite.com. Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute Informational Session | General Provisions Event: March 27 An informational session will be offered to artists in the region to learn more about the upcoming Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) and the various services the Broward Cultural Division offers to artists in the region, including funding, professional development and networking opportunities. Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) is a course of study designed to assist individual artists, of all disciplines (visual, musicians, writers, media, theater, performing arts), by cultivating and advancing their business skills, and helping them to strengthen their operating infrastructure and expand their business. To learn more and register for this FREE event, visit OppsforArtistsGP.eventbrite.com. Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute Info Session | ArtServe-1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale Wednesday, April 3, 5:30 pm Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) returns for its 13th year this June on four consecutive Saturdays. Open to artists in all creative fields, AEI’s lectures, panels and interactive workshops are led by South Florida’s top-ranking arts practitioners and industry professionals. From boosting business practices to strengthening sales, AEI has it covered – freeing you up to focus on your art. With 20 individual classes led by South Florida’s top-ranking arts practitioners and industry professionals, the 2019 AEI seminar offers dynamic presentations, panels and interactive workshops tailored to today’s creative marketplace. Learn more about the courses and registration at ArtsEvents.Broward.org or attend this free informational session: oppsartserve.eventbrite.com.

ABOVE: Graffiti wall by Grace Walzel; OPPOSITE PAGE: Violinist by Soroush Karimi; Together by Nicole Baster


F LO R I DA P U B L I C A R T

FA PA P A N N UA L CO N F E R E N C E FORT LAUDERDALE MAY 8 - 10, 2 0 1 9

Florida Association of Public Art Professionals (FAPAP) Annual Conference: May 8-10 FAPAP’s annual conference offers thorough discussions on current trends, best practices, and issues of Public Art, as well as networking opportunities for both artists and administrators. The Florida Association of Public Art Professionals is dedicated to the development, advocacy, promotion and education of the public art field in the State of Florida, as well as to promote national best practices in the administration of public art programs. The organization is for individuals interested in Public Art - from seasoned professionals, to students, as well as for people working in related industries. More info and register at FloridaPublicArt.org. Great American Beach Party Call to Artists Deadline: May 18 ArtServe seeks entries for Art and Handmade Craft Vendors for The Great American Beach Party hosted by the City of Fort Lauderdale. A portion of Fort Lauderdale’s world famous A1A will be transformed into an entertainment packed beach party featuring art, music, live performances, a sand sculpting competition, classic car show and fun activities for the entire family. Visit artserve.org. Gallery Space on Wilton Drive | Ongoing Grand Properties LLC are offering an existing gallery space in small mixed use building with professional offices and co-work spaces. Excellent exposure with full glass shopfront and private entry. Strong pedestrian area and growing in the future. Email info or questions tonylogrande@aol.com. Musicians and Performers | EastSide Active Living, Hollywood | Ongoing EastSide Active Living resident-centered programs focus on emotional, mental and physical wellness. The activities team at EastSide are seeking musicians, singers and artists in the community who would like to host a class, or prepare a program to engage and stimulate residents. Call Melissa Guerra on 610-389-7609 for details. Performing Artists & Vendors Saturday Sessions | Fort Lauderdale | Ongoing Every 1st Saturday of the month, Art Prevails Project presents Saturday Sessions - an exciting showcase of emerging performing artists set in the heart of Historic Sistrunk community. Poets, musicians, vocalists, actors, and more grace this monthly stage and dazzle the audience with their talent. Submit performance and vendor opportunities by emailing programs@artprevailsproject.org.

Open Calls | Art and Culture Center/Hollywood | Ongoing Building community by activating alternative and underutilized spaces, Hollywood’s Art and Culture Center has kickstarted three initiatives for South Florida-based professional and aspiring artists. Read about each at artandculturecenter.org/open-call. Artists On The Rise | Ongoing Helping artists channel their talents to battle mental health disorders, Artists on the Rise invites talented artists to submit their work for monthly exhibits and sales at local businesses. Email artistsontherise1@gmail.com. Hand 2 Hand Crafts at The Arthouse | Ongoing Hand 2 Hand Crafts (H2H) is seeking submissions from local artists and craftspeople to sell items at the community-based Pop-up Shop at YAA House. Artists interested in participating should email photos of work, name and phone number to h2hpopshop@gmail.com or contact Patricia Troope at 954-424-5035. Call for Artists | Frank C. Ortis Art Gallery and Exhibit Hall | Ongoing The Frank C. Ortis Art Gallery and Exhibit Hall is now accepting artwork submissions and exhibition proposals from artists at any stage in their career. All media are acceptable. Applicants must submit the following: 10-20 high resolution .jpg images or .mov files of current artwork with title, date, media, and dimensions, as well as an artist statement or exhibition proposal of 250 words or less, and an updated resume in Word or PDF format. Please submit all materials in one email to thefrank@ppines.com with the subject line GENERAL ART SUBMISSION. Awesome Foundation Miami | Monthly Grants | Ongoing If you’ve got an idea and you need some support to take your initiative to the next level, you’ve come to the right place. Applications are reviewed on a monthly basis and grants are up to $1,000. Apply for a grant today! Deadlines are the 15th of every month. Visit Awesomefoundation.org.

For more opportunities in the arts please visit broward.org/arts

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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MOSAIC M O N T H O F S H O W S , A R T, I D E A S & C U LT U R E

M AY 2 0 1 9

M O S A I C P B C . CO M

LET INSPIRATION LEAD YOU ON AN ART-FILLED ADVENTURE IN THE PALM BEACHES: WHERE CULTURE ALWAYS SHINES


CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

BETTER BRAND BUILDING:

HOW TO BE THE BEST AMBASSADOR FOR YOUR CREATIVE BUSINESS

By Bea Conrad When you own your own small business, you are the public face of the company. But being an effective brand ambassador is easier said than done, and not all business owners are up to the task. If you want to represent your company more effectively, you need to become the best brand ambassador you can be. Learning to reach out to the local community, showcase your expertise, and hire the right people can all enhance the effectiveness of these efforts, so you can grow your business and continue to build your brand. Distill Your Message If you want to tell the story of your company as a brand ambassador, you need a simple and concise message. Think about what your company does and the customers it serves, then distill your brand message into just a few short sentences.

Photo by Remy Baudoin

If you want to be an effective brand ambassador, start with a simple elevator pitch. Make sure it is no longer than 30 seconds, about the time it takes for a quick elevator ride, hence the name. This short and succinct message is not just for the Hollywood crowd; the elevator pitch can be a valuable tool for any brand ambassador. You never know who, or when, you are going to meet someone indispensable to your business, so having a clear, preplanned message can help ease anxiety should you meet someone you’d like to collaborate with or do freelance work for. Be Involved in the Community Community involvement is a great way to build your brand and increase the visibility of your company. Giving back to the community can take many forms, from fielding a team for a charity fun run to showing up for local fundraising events. As a brand ambassador, you should always be on the lookout for these opportunities. So check the community calendar, think about the ways you and your business can give back and start making your plans.

Showcase Your Expertise As a business owner, you are an expert in your field, so why not show off what you know? There are countless ways for business owners to showcase their expertise and their experience, and there are now more outlets than ever before. Whether you post instructional videos online or teach a class at the local community college, you will increase the effectiveness of your brand ambassadorial efforts and keep your business in the spotlight. Acting on your expertise can also help you grow your personal and professional network, so you can attract new customers and help your small business grow. Make the Most of Public Events Great brand ambassadors understand that there is no substitute for public exposure. Getting out and about and being involved in the community is essential, but it is important to make the most of those outings. Here are some simple ways to optimize and enhance your public face as a brand ambassador. • Nurture your contacts in the media. From local radio stations to television and newspapers, the media can be your best friend. Nurture those media contacts and keep them apprised of events and public appearances involving your company. • Be on time for the event. You cannot be an effective brand ambassador if you are not there, so be on time (or early). Plan for unexpected impediments, like heavy traffic and detours, by building extra time into your appearance-day schedule. • Come prepared. Make sure you have everything you need to tell the story of your company, from handouts for would-be customers to freebies for attendees. Always bring more than you think you will need; you do not want to run out halfway through the event. • Dress the part. If you want to represent your company well, you need to look your best. Think about

what you are going to wear, try on several outfits and choose the look that best represents you and your business. • Be friendly and approachable. A smile goes a long way, so be friendly and approachable whenever you are representing your brand. Welcome people enthusiastically, answer their questions and learn about their relationship with your company and your brand. • Communicate effectively. Effective communication is key, so make sure your skills are top notch. From how you talk to people and interact to the quality of your written communication, make sure that everything you do is a positive representation of your brand. Remember That Your Employees are Brand Ambassadors Too As the owner of the company, you are the most important brand ambassador, but you are not the only one. The men and women you hire are brand ambassadors too, and the things they do will reflect, either positively or negatively, on the business you have built. Hiring decisions are critical for any business owner, so think carefully before you extend an offer. Background checks are a must, as are the skills and qualifications your employees bring to the business. As the owner of your own small business, you are the best ambassador for your brand. Being a brand ambassador is one of your most important tasks, and the better you do, the better your company will be. The tips listed above can help you be the best brand ambassador ever, allowing your business to thrive no matter how challenging the economic environment. Check out our podcast Hello Creatives! on this topic: “How to be a Brand Ambassador for Your Company.” You can find Hello Creatives! on iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play, Stitcher, SoundCloud & Spotify. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

SEINFELD METHOD TO SUCCESS:

HOW DOING THE OPPOSITE OF YOUR INSTINCTS CAN CREATE OPPORTUNITY By Angela Yungk

In “The Opposite,” a classic episode of Seinfeld from its fifth season, the character George Costanza, normally down on his luck, turns his whole life around in a matter of days by doing the opposite of all his instincts. He decides that if all his instincts have made a disaster out of his life, then the opposite of his instincts will fix everything. Of course, Seinfeld is a comedy, but there’s more than a little merit to this life philosophy. Through the course of your life, you build up a whole set of habits and attitudes that guide you through the day. Without these habits, it would be impossible to function. Imagine if you had to consciously think about every step when walking, as if you were a toddler again. But sometimes these learned habits get in the way, because their automatic action makes it hard to do things differently. The Seinfeld opposite method of success doesn’t actually work by doing the exact opposite of everything, but by reminding you to question your assumptions about how to act. As long as you don’t take it too far, there is merit in using this method to break out of a rut by creating more successful habits. At the very least, you’ll stand out from the crowd, and sometimes that’s half the battle. George Does the Opposite

Photo by George Pagan

In “The Opposite,” George laments his disaster of a life. He’s broke, unemployed, and he lives with his parents in his 30s. Finally, in a fit of frustration, George decides that he’s tired of doing the same thing day after day, and instead of ordering tuna on toast with coleslaw and a cup of coffee, like he does every day, he orders chicken salad on un-toasted rye with potato salad and a cup of tea instead, remarking that, “Nothing has ever worked out for me with tuna on toast!” Being a comedy where humor comes from the unexpected, things go awfully well for George. He starts dating a beautiful woman, his unemployment and baldness notwithstanding. And not only that, she sets him up with an interview for a front office job at the New York Yankees. Once again George puts his opposite method into action, and he insults the head of the Yankees to his face. George is hired on the spot. The premise seems outlandish, but it’s not quite insane. By doing the opposite of his instincts, George forces himself out of his old routines, and his ac-

tions gain a new sort of do-or-die confidence. Even when he insults the Yankee’s boss, he shows a sort of straight talk that the boss appreciates, having gotten tired of lackeys and yes men. Ingrained Habits Versus Neuroplasticity In an interview discussing “The Opposite,” Jason Alexander, the actor who plays George, describes how a number of his friends actually tried the opposite method in real life. And according to Alexander, many of them did very well with it. The success of the opposite method comes down to the way habits form. Researcher Wander Jager describes how “Habits provide a significant advantage in terms of savings on cognitive effort.” But habits also stop you from incorporating new information into your automated instincts, “Hence, whereas the habit may originate from a process in finding out the optimal behavior given the prevailing circumstances, the circumstances may since then have changed such that alternative behavior would yield better outcomes.” If you commit to doing the opposite of your instincts as George does, it will force you to consciously think about every decision you make, thus cutting through the bad automatic habits you’ve built up over the years. If those habits haven’t lead you to good results, then doing the opposite might be just what you need. Or at the very least, it might not be any worse than what you’re already doing. For example, if you habitually put off work in favor of browsing Facebook, committing to doing the opposite would probably be a great help. Your brain might get stuck in ruts, but through the wonder of neuroplasticity it’s still possible to change your ingrained patterns if you stop and think before letting automatic habits take their course. Scott Adams, the cartoonist behind Dilbert, describes success as being more about your processes than your goals. Instead of constantly trying to get to far away goals, he describes how when he was writing a book he created, “a process I was pretty sure would get me there.” It’s much easier to think about how to improve your habits little by little each day than it is to constantly worry about some far away goal. Committing to doing the opposite can keep you thinking in the present and help you see what’s really happening instead of what your ingrained habits think is happening.

What is Opposite Anyway? In “The Opposite” when George orders chicken instead of tuna, Seinfeld suggests that the real opposite of tuna is not chicken but salmon. The opposite of subjective things is itself subjective. The opposite method isn’t really about doing the exact opposite, but trying to think about how to do things outside your ingrained habits. Nevertheless, often doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing feels like a breath of fresh air. Think about the cycles of style in fashion, architecture and even in TV. Trends often seem to suddenly change all at once. After years of flared jeans in the 1970s, everyone seemed to suddenly go the opposite way at the beginning of the 1980s. Then after years of straight jeans, flares came back suddenly in the early 2000s only to then suddenly disappear in the late 2000s and reappear once again in 2018. People get tired of the same thing over and over again, and being the first person to do something different will often put you ahead of the trends. Part of George’s success in “The Opposite” was simply the confidence he had in his actions because he had nothing left to lose. Seinfeld itself was part of a cycle. It’s cynical worldview was a breath of fresh air after the decade of sappy family comedies that had previously dominated prime-time TV. Along with other new cynical shows, such as The Simpsons, Seinfeld was ahead of the pack. There isn’t really a right way of doing things in life. Life is about the confidence of your own actions, especially if you differ from other people. Do the opposite and you might find a new route through life that’s fresh enough to lead to success. Maybe you’ll even be able to weasel your way into a position at a major sports team like George Costanza. Check out our podcast Hello Creatives! on this topic: “Do the Opposite: The George Costanza Method of Success.” You can find Hello Creatives! on iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play, Stitcher, SoundCloud & Spotify.

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Kailee M.

Everything you say and do creates an impact. becauseofyou.org


CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

HOW DRAWING FIGHTS AGING MEMORIES AND DEMENTIA

By Drew Scott Everyone’s memory declines with age. A number of factors lead to memory decline, but drawing is one of the most promising ways to improve memory, according to researchers. By connecting and processing information with multiple parts of the brain at once, drawing makes it easier for the mind to find its way to information when needed. How Drawing Connects the Brain Researchers have known for some time that writing notes by hand makes information easier to remember than writing it on a digital device. For example, students who write notes on laptops tend to copy what they’re hearing verbatim, but writing by hand forces students to rephrase and consolidate information as they’re writing it down. By interacting with the information, writing notes by hand creates more new connections in the brain, providing more ways back to the information when it’s needed again. Drawing to improve memory works on the same principle, but adds even more ways to represent the information. As a result, this activates different parts of the brain that would be idle when only writing.

Photo by RawPixel

In a 2018 study, researchers from the University of Waterloo found that when people represent information in drawings, it doesn’t seem to matter if the drawing is good. Instead, what matters is processing information into a visual form. Researcher Melissa Meade says in a press statement that, “We think that drawing is particularly relevant for people with dementia because it makes better use of brain regions that are still preserved, and could help people experiencing cognitive impairment with memory function.” Another previous study from the same researchers notes that, “people have a massive capacity for remembering the detail in images,” and that drawing causes four main effects: elaboration on the information, processing of visual imagery, motor action,

and the creation of a picture memory. This means that drawing brings together several brain processes at once, helping store that information in multiple places. For example, if someone needs to remember the date of a doctor’s appointment and they write down the information, there won’t be much way for their brain to retrieve that information if they lose the note. But if they added a little doodle of a doctor on the note, the mind can connect the date to their picture memory of the doodle, giving another pathway back to the information again. Drawing Builds on Classic Memory Techniques Drawing is just one way to improve memory by connecting information to other information or images. Many people use mnemonic devices, such as rhymes, to store information in multiple layers, and before the printing press made information in books widely available, people trained their memories far beyond what most modern people can do. In fact, as mass printing became possible, the teachers of centuries ago lamented that students no longer retained information as they once did. In the ancient world of Greece and Rome, people used the “method of loci” for memorization. They visualized a place they knew well, such as a childhood home, and they then placed information into this visual memory for easy retrieval by visualizing that place again. Drawing is just one of many ways to improve memory, and according to researchers it’s one of the best, especially for people starting to feel the effects of age. Take advantage of the brain’s natural connections to store information in multiple places, making it easier to find when it’s needed again. Check out our podcast Hello Creatives! on this topic: “How Drawing Fights Aging Memories & Dementia. ” You can find Hello Creatives! on iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play, Stitcher, SoundCloud & Spotify. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

6 WAYS TO BREAK THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL OF IMPOSTOR SYNDROME By Drew Scott If you’ve ever felt like you might not be worthy of your success, or that people overvalue your skills, you might be experiencing feelings linked to what psychologists call impostor syndrome. People with full impostor syndrome worry that they’re constantly going to be found out as a fraud and think that their success was all luck or lies, but most people experience some symptoms of impostor syndrome at some point.

is simply to start. If necessary, bargain with yourself. Tell yourself, “I will do 20 minutes of work, and then take a break.” Repeat the bargain as many times as you need to throughout the day to get back to work.

Up to 70 percent of Americans have had some feelings of being a fraud at some point in their lives, according to a 2011 study. Left unchecked, impostor syndrome symptoms can create a cycle of procrastination or over preparation while avoiding important work, making people’s impostor syndrome a self-fulfilling prophecy.

As a sort of productive procrastination, researchers also note that many people with impostor syndrome tend to over prepare for tasks instead of tackling the task itself. For example, some college students spend weeks researching essays, while leaving writing them to the night before.

Become a more productive, successful person, and avoid getting trapped by impostor syndrome with these six tips.

Obviously some tasks require more preparation than others, but check in with yourself once and a while to make sure you’re not over preparing to avoid real work. If you’ve already read fifteen books on 9th century Byzantine politics, one more probably isn’t going to give you the magic idea you need to write your essay for you.

1. Treat failure as a learning opportunity Many people with symptoms of impostor syndrome had an easy time in school, meaning they never learned how to keep going after they fail. Instead of picking themselves up after they fall, they lie there on the ground assuming that standing is just not something they can do. However, with enough time and practice, most people have the ability to learn almost any skill. Failure is only final if you decide that it’s final. But it you treat it as a moment to learn and improve yourself, failure is an opportunity. Many skills, especially physical skills, take a lot of practice to learn. Just knowing how to hit a ball with a bat is a lot different than actually doing it in real life. 2. Create a system instead of reaching for goals Instead of reaching for far-flung goals every day, it’s often better to create a plan that will get you to long-term goals without actually worrying about long-term goals. For example, Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams describes on his blog how he works with “systems” that get him to goals. Instead of thinking every day about finishing a book, Adams creates a habit to simply write every day and eventually the book gets done. Large goals are often overwhelming. People with impostor syndrome often avoid their work or important tasks because their fear of failure makes them anxious about even starting work. Instead of constantly fretting about how you’re going to get to your goals, break your goals into a repeatable habit you can stick to every day.

Photo by Logan Fischer

3. Break procrastination habits A few breaks throughout the day are important to let your mind filter information, but procrastination can easily run out of control, especially in the modern age of endless scrolls. Not only does the break keep on going, but instead of helping sort anxious thoughts, social media floods your mind with even more information. To avoid impostor syndrome procrastination, acknowledge anxiety about how your work will turn out, and remind yourself that the only way to do your best

4. Don’t use busywork to avoid important tasks

5. Remind yourself that your performance doesn’t reflect your innate character Nothing in life is perfect, and if you expect perfection of yourself, you will always be dissatisfied. Accept that you can be successful without being perfect. Many of the most successful people are far from perfect. Even if you fail, and even if your productivity or work aren’t exactly what you want, spending all your time worrying about that isn’t going to make it any better. Your work is not an exact reflection of your innate talent, and the only way to get better is to keep going. 6. Take solace in the fact that many successful people feel like they’re faking it Even the most successful people experience impostor syndrome. Even Albert Einstein doubted his own abilities, despite all his success and the great respect people gave. He once said that, “I feel compelled to think of myself as an involuntary swindler.” However, if the people around you believe you have the skills and knowledge to reach whatever success you have, it’s probably a good bet that you do have the skills you need. You might feel like you’re faking it, but so do many of the people around you. In reality, everyone is has to make it up as they go along. As people get older they often tend to experience less impostor syndrome symptoms. You will get used to your role, but that’s only if you don’t let impostor syndrome overwhelm you. Keep moving forward to continued success by putting the work in and making good habits. Otherwise, fear of failure or fraudulence might become their own self-fulfilling prophecy. Check out our podcast Hello Creatives! on this topic: “6 Ways to Break the Downward Spiral of Impostor Syndrome.” You can find Hello Creatives! on iTunes, iHeart Radio, Google Play, Stitcher, SoundCloud & Spotify.

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Jonathan Stein, Wake Up Call, photo courtesy of the artist


LORD OF THE BLING THE WORK OF JONATHAN STEIN

Introduction by Jessie Prugh and Interview by Jennifer Love Gironda

Jonathan Stein’s contemporary crystallized works of art have been displayed alongside the world’s most sought after artists at some of the hottest art fairs around the globe—including America’s foremost contemporary art fair: Art Basel Miami Beach. Best known for his campy Swarovski crystal encrusted food celebrating pop culture iconography, Stein’s extensive portfolio includes working with big-name acts and companies such as Katy Perry, Office Depot, and NASCAR. He has won over the hearts of collectors and fans alike, enamoured not only by his savory sculptures, but also with his commitment to lending his talents to better the lives of others. Having earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from Boston University, and Associate Degree in Commercial Photography from The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, Stein shares his talents and education as the Creative Director of Drops of Hope, a non-for-profit charity organization that provides transportation for pediatric cancer patients and their families to and from the hospital. Stein is the quintessential embodiment of a conscious creative; an artist with a higher purpose. After years of admiring Stein’s art showcased at South Florida’s preeminent art fairs, Art Hive Magazine’s own ‘Sparkle Queen’, Jennifer Love Gironda met with Stein to discuss the social activism behind the sparkling veneer of his work, and dish over the enlightening advice he feels every creative person can incorporate into their lives. Can you trace the beginnings of how you became ‘The Lord of the Bling’? That’s a really long story! The shorter version brings me back to a Commercial Product Photography class I was taking at the Art Institute in Fort Lauderdale. The class was designed to teach students the best way to light and style name brand products. While classmates were setting up traditional product shots featuring bars of Dove Soap in soap dishes with bubbles or Monster Energy Drinks glistening with tiny beads of moisture, I wanted to push creative boundaries and to be honest I am a glutton for punishment. I took a Ritz Cracker Box and began hand jewel encrusting the entire surface with sequins. (This was years before the wonderful world of Swarovski). At the time, I thought a lot about art history and Andy Warhol’s fixation with mass production and multiplicity. I also thought of John Waters and all things kitsch. The goal of my product photography shoots were to pay homage to iconic mass-produced foods from the early 1950s (which were once grand staples of the American diet but now in modern times are considered “White Trash Delicacies”). Thus, I sequin encrusted items like Oscar Meyer Bologna, Spam, Crisco, Cheese Whiz and set them up in white gloved opulent art installations. My objective was to raise the importance and status of these now kitschy brands. The works quickly became a question of “Classism”, the haves versus the have-nots. The images which first began as slightly comical in nature, now shown light on the power and darker side of advertising. I was able to dress up a can of Crisco and make it look valuable, even sexy. Was that a good thing? Moreover, the more I reflected on American culture and our need for consumption, I realized that Burger King used to demand “we should have it our way” and we were a “super-sized nation” so just jeweling the packaging of actual sized food items wasn’t enough. We needed bigger. And since bigger is better (or so they tell me) I began to sculpt enlarged recreations of these consumables, casting each clay sculpture in bronze and “bedazzling” them with tens of thousands of Swarovski crystals. I’ve been deemed the founding father of the Swarovski sculpture movement and have been working for close to 20 years to push the boundaries of crystal art and crystal paintings. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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When we met at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary you explained a little bit about your creative process to me and I was FASCINATED. I don’t think people, myself included, realize all the work that goes on under those crystals! Can you walk us through the creation process of a piece of your art? When I’m not spending months on end hand jewel encrusting my sculptures, I am always excited and fascinated to talk to art enthusiasts especially at my shows. I always love when people tell me “how I did or should do my work, to make it easier on myself.” Many think I smear glue on top of my sculptures and drizzle crystals on like glitter. I have others who ask me if the crystals come in large colored sheets that I hand cut up and decoupage onto the surface of my sculptures. My process is fairly simple. I will sculpt in clay or carve foam renditions of a popular food item two to six times the normal size of that item. Most of my works are about 14 inches to 4 ft. tall. I mold each item and cast them in bronze or resin. The larger than life sculptures are then hand painted and stenciled. Then I set to task hand jewel encrusting each piece by hand using a toothpick and my special adhesives. I work with Swarovski crystals that range in scale from the size of a poppy seed to that of a dime. One by one, most sculptures have a minimum of 20,000 hand-placed Swarovski crystals adorning the surface and up to over 200,000 for a New York Yankees stadium seat; which I jeweled to raise money for the Boys & Girls Club of New York. In essence it’s me hunched over with a wax-covered toothpick and trays and trays of different sized colored flat backed crystals. Boy do I wish it was as easy as tossing them on like glitter! I was also very impressed by your passion for social issues. Can you share how you have used your ‘art sparkle’ to brighten the world around you? I’ve been working with Swarovski crystals for close to 20 years and I often use my jewel encrusted works to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for worthy South Florida non-profit organizations. I also am currently the Director of Operations for Drops of Hope Inc., a South Florida pediatric cancer non-profit that builds free fantasy bedroom makeovers for underprivileged children battling cancer. Art has the power to impact our communities for the better. It creates avenues for ordinary citizens to be heard and to positively express themselves. I have worked with major corporations like Coca Cola, The New York Yankees, Miami Dolphins, Hello Kitty, Gibson Guitar, Remy Martin Cointreau, Nascar, Katy Perry and more to help charities and children’s hospitals. I also design and curate art exhibitions and museum shows designed to illuminate critical social issues while also creating opportunities for artists to have greater platforms to showcase such socially relevant art. The sparkle lures the viewer in, but is there a lasting message you would like people to take away from your art? My work is designed for all. More importantly, they are inviting pieces that play to all ages. Kids love them for they are grandiose representations of foods they love. Many adults love them because they conjure nostalgic feelings of youth or they play upon their current hunger to surround themselves with shiny sparkly distractions. You don’t have to read into the work if you don’t wish and I am more than okay with that. For me, there is a much greater context and intention behind these trophy pieces. I ultimately ask viewers to delve beneath a shiny veneer where the work deals with issues of overconsumption, socio-economic imbalance, the immense power of advertising, American consumer values and greed. But… if it simply makes you smile, or leaves you wanting more, then I’ve done my job.

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Top to bottom: Souper Size Me, Mid Life Crisis, and Gotta Get My Fix, photos courtesy of the artist Opposite page: Work by Jonathan Stein, photo courtesy of the artist


WHEN I’M NOT SPENDING MONTHS ON END HAND JEWEL ENCRUSTING MY SCULPTURES, I AM ALWAYS EXCITED AND FASCINATED TO TALK TO ART ENTHUSIASTS ESPECIALLY AT MY SHOWS.

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What has been your favorite piece of art that you have created? I work in a lot of mediums, so that’s a tough question. In my Shiny Sparkly Swarovski collection, I love my SPAM can, my Horowitz Margareten Matzoh Box and my crystallized Hello Kitty Gummy Bear bag. For Hello Kitty’s 40th birthday, Sanrio commissioned 40 artists from around the world to create an original work of art that honored her. I sculpted a 20-inch bag in resin filled with 3-inch Hello Kitty Gummy cast in resin. The piece was a part of a traveling museum show first presented at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California. Beyond my jeweled work, I am also tremendously proud of my Post Hurricane Harvey Mixed Media Installations that paid tribute to Houston residents that lost their homes to flood damage. I was volunteering after the waters receded in Houston doing art therapy projects with a forgotten community. We helped rebuild homes in between a town art project we installed in a church that was feeding, clothing and providing supplies to displaced families. When I returned to Florida I did a series where I recreated synthetic, moldy and flood damaged walls out of distressed drywall. I wanted the stories of the families I met to be honored in an art installation that stresses the fragility of life. What has been the biggest obstacle in your career? The toughest challenge I face as an artist is accessibility. I do a lot of strong social activist artwork and strong community outreach projects designed to inspire and unite our community through art. Not everyone cares truthfully. Most institutions are numb or have set agendas that don’t welcome the creative efforts of local activist artists. Even though I work in the non-profit sector, I have tried and won’t give up trying to connect with organizations to help feed the poor, continue to inspire developmentally disabled individuals, recognize the voices of marginalized populations but can’t always get past “GO” either. This alone wears on me greatly for I am driven to help make a difference; thus it forces me to find alternative ways of affecting social creative change. We have some of the best museums here in South Florida, I simply wish they took notice of the incredible local talent that despite everything works daily to produce socially conscious artwork that deserves to be spotlight. Do you have any advice for emerging artists based on what you have learned in the art world? For artists, don’t give up. If you don’t see enough opportunities out there, then create your own. I never knew a large portion of my “art time” would be spent doing research. I’m always looking for creative solutions to problems that no one seems to be focused on. Networking is essential. Find strength in collaborations and in seeking out like-minded creatives; for one voice may be powerful but 200 in unison demands more attention from the powers that be. Web: jonathan-stein.com Instagram: @jonathansteinart Representation: Gallery Biba, gallerybiba.com

Opposite page: Putting on the Ritz, photo courtesy of the artist Above: Work by Jonathan Stein, photo courtesy of the artist

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CONSCIOUS

BROWARD COUNTY’S HAMILTON EFFECT ARTS AND CULTURAL SPENDING BOOSTS THE LOCAL ECONOMY

ABOVE: Elijah Malcomb, Joseph Morales, Kyle Scatliffe, Fergie L. Philippe and Company - HAMILTON National Tour, photo by ©Joan Marcus 2018

By Helen Wolt Alexander Hamilton worked to stabilize and define our economic system 240 years ago. Today, the Founding Father’s story is making an economic impact. The award-winning show that bears his name draws fans who support local commerce as they flock to theaters. Restaurants, hotels, parking and ground transportation are at the frontline of patron spending. Retail stores amass a share. Jobs are created and revenue grows for state and local government. Hamilton: The Musical opened in December 2018 at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in Fort Lauderdale’s Riverwalk Arts & Entertainment District. All performances during its five-week stop sold out. “The Broward Center has a long history of being a place where mega Broadway musicals make their South Florida debuts,” said Kelley Shanley, president and CEO of the Broward Center. “Every major musical since Phantom of the Opera has chosen the Broward Center as the place to debut in South Florida.” 28

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During Hamilton’s run nearby eateries saw an immediate response from theatergoers. The Chimney House, a Broward Center preferred restaurant partner located at 701 W. Las Olas Blvd., was packed near curtain times. “We are accustomed to be busy when there’s a show and fully booked, but not to that degree for five weeks straight,” said owner Frank Rodriguez. “We had a wait list every night. That’s not normal.” Hamilton production staff kept the business bustling between performances, too. “It’s a big show,” Rodriguez said. “We usually get a lot of cast members and support people before the show.” Downtown at the Royal Pig Pub, 359 E. Las Olas Blvd., servers met a steady flow of diners before and after Hamilton. “We got an influx of people going to see the show,” said general manager Jacques Martel. “It was definitely over the norm.”


TOP: Broward Center for the Performing Arts, photo courtesy of BCFPA BOTTOM: Standing ovation at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, photo courtesy of BCFPA

BROWARD’S NONPROFIT ARTS AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS—AND THEIR AUDIENCES—GENERATED $414 MILLION IN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY... CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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“Additionally, theater patrons are known to spend their dining dollars around the county,” said Shanley. “A recent American Express study found that restaurant choice is more likely to be based upon where folks live and what is en route to the venue,” he said. “The geography is all over the place,” Shanley said. “You can have pre-theater dining in Pompano Beach. People are dining all over and coming to the center.” Lodging a production of 68 crew and cast members for five weeks was another economic driver. In addition to hundreds of hotel stays, the temporary residents purchased the same goods and services all residents use: going to the doctor, shopping for daily needs and recreation. “Their impact is really pretty important,” Shanley said. The Riverside Hotel, a Broward Center preferred hotel program participant at 620 E. Las Olas Blvd., noted some of its guests had traveled as far as Texas, New York and South Carolina to attend Hamilton, stated general manager Heiko Dobrikow. “While in the locale, cultural visitors often seek out other cultural experiences,” said Ivonne MacMillan, public relations manager for the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau. “The area abounds with historical and multicultural attractions, museums and arts events.” Overall, Broward’s nonprofit arts and cultural organizations—and their audiences—generated $414 million in economic activity, according to the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 report (AEP5) for fiscal year 2015. Organizations spent $148.5 million—which leveraged $265.7 million in additional spending by their audiences. Those gains fueled the creation of 11,078 full-time jobs and more than $40 million in local and state tax revenue. Broward County was one of 341 regions studied in the AEP5 which was released in June 2017 by Broward Cultural Division in partnership with Americans for the Arts, a national nonprofit for advancing the arts. Its data demonstrates the far reaching effects of arts-related spending. Sixty-three percent of visitors surveyed for the report indicated that the main purpose of their trip was “specifically to attend this arts/cultural event.” Nonresidents also spent an average of 66 percent more than local attendees. The findings reveal the power of a vibrant arts scene to boost tourism and support local business—and more. “The impact goes beyond economics. A lot of it goes to attracting new audiences to the arts. A lot goes to education as well,” Shanley said. “Hamilton in general made a profound impact on younger audiences. It made a dramatic connection to history, in that sense, to a whole generation. That time feels more real and relevant than it has before.” TOP to BOTTOM: About 2,500 high school students plus teachers from Broward and Miami-Dade counties participate in the Hamilton Education Program, photo courtesy of BCFPA; Students participating in the Hamilton Education Program enjoy the show, photo courtesy of BCFPA; A packed house anticipating the show of the season, photo courtesy of BCFPA

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TOP: Company - HAMILTON National Tour, photo by ©Joan Marcus 2018 BOTTOM: Excited student participating in the Hamilton Education Program, photo courtesy of BCFPA

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Photo by Mitchell Griest

CONSCIOUS |

ART DELINQUENCY DISORDER

I

OR WHY CAN’T I EVER FINISH ANYTHING?

By Jonathan Hunt hunch like a disoriented vulture over my keyboard. While sipping coffee and thinking about what the heck I’m going to write about I can’t help but marvel at how much I am like Leonardo da Vinci. Don’t get me wrong— Old Leo had more skill and influence in his left pinky toe than I do in my entire body— yet we do have one thing in common: ADD. Allow me to clarify: Although according to circumstantial evidence, the great Leonardo may have had a form of Attention Deficit Disorder 1, I am actually referring to something else-- Art Delinquency Disorder (Yeh, I just made that up, so don’t go looking for the Wikipedia page). Some art historians have referred to ma man Leo as a “procrastinator”, but that’s a misrepresentation. Leonardo had wide-ranging interests and an unbridled imagination that was constantly driving him to explore new stuff. He never hesitated to begin a new piece—it was finishing it that pained him so much. Because of his nagging perfectionism, Leonardo never even considered his most famous piece, The Mona Lisa to be complete.

After a quick inventory and a heavy sigh I have discovered that there are approximately twenty four digital and traditional art pieces in various states of completeness scattered around my studio and on my hard drives. Twenty. Four. Ouch. It appears that like Leonardo, I have no problem at all starting new stuff, but I can’t seem to finish the damn things-- possibly including this article. So under the guise of an informal, pseudo-scientific survey, I attempted to make myself feel better by polling a bunch of my artist friends. I wanted to discover if anyone else suffered from this newly-named creative syndrome and if so, how do they get past it? The results were an intriguing glimpse into the creative process. Here’s what some of my fellow artists had to say (quotes have been edited for length and/or “imaginative” grammar). 32

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“It sucks! I have like 5 paintings that are still half done... You have so many ideas that you want to set on paper, or canvas or digitally, that you create a clutter of ideas half materialized. I’m so exhausted with tattooing and drawing tattoos that I just don’t want to pick up a brush or a pen… So setting time to work on art gets tossed in the back of the line. My job requires a lot of creative energy, and I think that is a huge reason why my creative mojo goes empty by the time I want to work on anything. I just want to bullshit on a couch playing video games or watching true crime documentaries.” - Melissa Rivera, Tattoo Artist & Painter | melvespertine.com “When I’m working on a personal project I’m connecting with it on a deep emotional level. Every project is different and I think when it comes to larger scale projects I have a hard time completing them because the emotional push/pull that takes place every day takes me further from the mental space I was in at the start. That’s usually why I end up setting a project aside. Then I wait in hopes that a similar experience, memories or emotions make their way back into my life and reconnect me to the work and drives me forward. That’s when the unfinished work gets finished.” - Brandy Rumiez, Illustrator & Designer | brumiez.com “You know I just think of it as part of the process. I don’t think of it as unfinished. I think of it as a first attempt. We aren’t cameras and I think we put a lot of undue pressure on ourselves to be perfect and deny the trial and error of the work.” - Wesly Alvarez, Professor of Arts and Humanities, Creative Storyteller “For me the best and truest way for me to get out of any art funk is to either A: Go away for a few days and disconnect from life and reconnect with friends who are like minded and help artistically push me. B: Dig deep in my unfinished artwork archive and find a good challenge to finish. One that I put away because it was coming out “ugly” and it gives me motivation to make it art again.”- Bobbi Laine, Tattoo Artist/co-owner of Crossed Cannons Collective | c3ofpa.com “It’s rare that it happens on a job to be honest. Maybe because I have the pressure and obligation to get it done.... but when I do traditional art like painting in oils or pen or drawing it is way more discouraging... Like today I went hiking and painting and could not get my painting finished because of many reasons and I just packed and kept walking.”- Jose Vega, Lead Background Artist Castlevania Netflix series “I used to struggle with this a lot in school. I would be super inspired to start a new piece that seemed brilliant in my mind, but as I would get to the difficult stages of figuring out form and lighting and actually rendering the details, I’d get lost and discouraged. I’ve since learned that a big help can be to simply figure all the gritty details out before you start. Do more thumbnails, make color comps, get better references, and fix the anatomy/perspective issues before you dive in and commit. Of course, no matter how well prepared you are, at some point the piece will hit that stage where you will doubt. It will look awkward and you will lose motivation. It is that point where you have to let discipline take over where passion and interest leave off. Whether it turns out to be what you envisioned, or something else, you owe it to the process to complete the piece. It, and you, will be better for it.”- Cassidy James Cook, Tattoo Artist & Illustrator “There is almost a synergistic anxiety created through the professional and personal work. The pressure to draw how you want but also work on a portfolio that is appeasing to clients and your well-being is the most difficult balance. As for finishing pieces, I developed habits that help me thru the creative process… as an artist with ADHD I realized I needed some kind of forced focus. I will leave a piece on the desk or easel and see it through. It is my focus throughout the day at work. I’ll make decisions (visually in my head) and then execute when I return home from work. The piece will stay in its place and I commit till it is done.” - Danny M. Kidwell, Illustrator | IG: @ dannykidwell_artist “I have a block now, because of so much work, being a creative director and also having a passion for illustration sometimes it’s conflicting, because you have so much responsibility but the good thing is that when I get to illustrate

I feel like I’m more aware of the techniques I want to improve, etc... So sometimes having a block is what I need to regain the interest in making my skills better.” - Camila O. H., Art Director, Designer, Illustrator | ohcamilart. com “I do have a pretty good completion rate at this point in my career, but a couple of years ago I had a five-year chunk of time when my studio was stacked and packed with either half finished or undone works. All fine art... And after much searching and thinking I realized I was thinking too much about what would “do well”... what would sell. Since then, I’ve adjusted that thought and abandoned it.” - Craig McInnis, Freelance Artist & Creative Director | craigmcinnis.com “I’ve started using my unfinished projects as insulation. Also, got to the point where I don’t have artist’s block. I just sit down and make something happen, especially if someone’s paying me. But I’ll have periods where I don’t feel like making anything happen, and don’t feel bad about it anymore. I don’t feel defined by my productivity like I used to when I was younger. It always comes back eventually.”- Alessandro Echevarria, Illustrator | lamekids.club “Many times I start to work on a piece because I think up a new technique for expressing something on paper or canvas. It could be a way of showing light or motion; sometimes a specific detail. Once I complete that specific thing I often leave the rest undone as I’ve learned what I set forth to learn.” - Heidi Hämäläinen-Stewart, Multi-Media Artist & Art Director “If I start a piece and I get it to the point where the drawing or basic concept is fleshed out but I don’t know which medium I wish to proceed with to finish the piece I will often abandon it. Often times the frustration of trying different mediums to see which one I like best and coming up empty handed will force me to put it aside and hope I stumble across the perfect “style” somewhere in the future…” - Christopher Carey, Customer Service Rep. at DeviantArt “My art productivity has been stuck in a tar pit since graduation. Finally I figured out why: I lost the youthful fun I had when creating my pieces. Before college I didn’t focus on skill exactly, I just wanted the image/idea on paper. After college, I became stuck on the details of why I’m drawing this or that, things that slow the creative process down. Thankfully once I figured this blocking point out, my creative swing is coming back!”- Chalin Lukas, Illustrator & Painter “I have a lot of unfinished work that goes into the pile of “sketches” after awhile. My personal work plays second fiddle to my commercial work, because I need to build capital to use on my personal projects down the road. I have learned to count time, not by days and weeks, but by years.”- Marcel E. Mercado, Illustrator & Concept Artist | marcelmercado.com “Cause I’m too busy making ends meet and selling my soul to the corporate world for them dolla dolla bills ya’ll! My last few jobs demanded a lot of creativity that made me feel a bit drained to come home and draw after just drawing all day at work. I am also my own worst critic, so unless it is perfect, I feel like I am garbage at doing it. So it’s like anxiety building up to working on art, and the pressure of making it perfect every time almost overwhelms to a point where I don’t even want to do it. Then I feel guilty about not arting. It’s a vicious circle. However, I started allowing myself to have a crappy digital sketchbook in my iPad Pro, so I am slowly re-learning joy in making art.” - Faye Yudin, Illustrator & Designer | fayeyudinart.com “I sometimes fall into a pit of despair and think ‘why bother.’ After a while I think ‘Why not?’”- Lorna Hernandez, Art Professor & Digital Goddess “Why not?”, indeed. 1.“Famous People with ADHD” https://psychcentral.com/lib/famous-people-with-adhd 2. “Leonardo da Vinci” https://www.history.com/topics/renaissance/leonardo-da-vinci CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Photo by Robert Nelson Photography


MY CREATIVE BRAIN Words and Illustrations by Ashleigh Walters

THINK OF USES FOR THIS OBJECT: A SOCK. A recent study used this exercise to discover creative thinkers are not just “left brained” or “right brained,” they are “whole brained.” They access multiple brain networks that don’t typically work together, across both hemispheres. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scanned the brains of 163 people while they thought of uses for objects like a sock, a rope, a brick and a knife. A more creative answer from the group: use the sock for water filtration. In simple terms, research suggests that if you enjoy the above exercise, and others think your answers are clever, you are likely a creative thinker.

4. Can you spot a face, a letter, or a number in the natural surroundings of clouds, stones, and street lights?

Several of my friends have asked me to spend time with their children to “unleash their creativity,” because I find the process so much fun. HERE’S A HANDFUL OF THE EXERCISES I LIKE TO TRY THAT YOU CAN TOO: 1. Scribble a line onto a paper. Now make it into something new. 2. What would it look like if you combined a watermelon with a banana? 3. Imagine you are three inches tall, looking up at yourself at this moment. Describe it in detail.

5. If you were to design a dream home with no limitations, as fanciful and outlandish as you can imagine, what would it look like? 6. Spend five dollars at the dollar store or local thrift shop to get materials to build a piece of art or craft a costume. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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5 TIPS FOR BOOSTING A CHILD’S CREATIVITY (AND POSSIBLY YOUR OWN) 1. MAKE PHYSICAL SPACE: My parents provided a full cabinet of craft supplies at my height in our kitchen growing up, plus a giant desk filled with supplies in my room. A creative child won’t be able to resist using both the obvious (scissors, glue, paint, felt) and less obvious (stale dried beans, empty egg cartons, broken toys that can be given new life) to create.

EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY COULDN’T RESIST THE DRAW...TO DRAW!

2. LET THEM HELP: My sister allowed each of her children to choose a paint color for their bedroom walls. She also displayed their artwork in massive, gilded frames around the house, next to professional art pieces. Every member of the family couldn’t resist the draw...to draw!

-ASHLEIGH WALTERS

3. MAKE MENTAL SPACE: Deadlines can be helpful to the creative thinker, but time to daydream and think and play is essential to well-being. 4. BE A PARTNER IN CREATIVE CRIME: Sit and create something next to them, and use positive words to describe both of your work. Consider after-school activities with children who are also creative. Many museums and community centers offer classes and activities for free. 5. TALK IT OUT: Talk about what you see that’s made by human hands - from art museums to graffiti to window display. What do you see? What would you do differently? Is it effective? Ashleigh Walters is an artist, art enthusiast and Anchorwoman at WPTV NewsChannel 5, the NBC affiliate in West Palm Beach, Florida. More at AshleighWalters.net

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iTUNES • STITCHER • GOOGLE PLAY • iHEARTRADIO SPOTIFY • SOUNDCLOUD


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ALL HAIL THE

KARINA GARCIA INTERVIEW BY MARCELA VILLA

PHOTO BY RAUL AGUILAR CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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W

ith the development of the internet has come a whirlwind of entertainment, career and creativity opportunities. We have made a spotlight available for all those willing to take the plunge and show us who they are, show us something we haven’t seen before, or show us something we didn’t know we needed. Karina Garcia is a young 25-year-old who found her niche, defined it, and has made it into an empire in her own right. The “Slime Queen” started making do-it-yourself (DIY) videos on YouTube before she delved into the world of homemade slime videos. Slime, a slippery, gooey, and fascinating substance to touch and play with, was known but not a cultural phenomenon until Karina took her spotlight. Her fascination and passion with slime manifested into the creation of hundreds of slime videos of all types of varieties, colors, smells, and sensations. In a world with information overload, where everything seems to have been done, but yet there is still so much to discover and create, Karina Garcia has made a name and brand for herself, all while staying true to who she is. This young Mexican-American girl took her love for arts and crafts, and her fascination with slime, and shared it with the world, showing us video by video until we loved it too. She herself is a lover of slime; from the smells and textures, to the colors and aesthetics of a perfectly drizzled slime, she loves it all and it manifests itself in her videos. Her passion keeps the videos coming for her audience, and always with an interesting twist. The unconventional subculture that she created has brought her success through her YouTube page, as well as commercial success with the selling of her “Slime Kits”. Her product line, Craft City, has slime kits, along with other DIY products that are both adult and child-friendly. Karina is the epitome of the modern American dream. With creativity, passion, and courage to follow her heart and share it with the world, she created an empire beyond her wildest dream. She took an idea, a market that hadn’t been explored, and a world that she can mold into her own, and found the bridge to connect that passion to open doors for her that were never there before. She spoke with Art Hive to give us insight into her young, entrepreneurial mind and inspire us all with her recipe for creative success. You are a self-made YouTube phenomenon with almost nine million subscribers to your channel and have managed to level-up your whole family by doing what you love! Did you ever imagine you would be this successful by building an ‘empire of slime’? Not at all! My first slime video was actually just going to be another DIY video, so when it got the response it did, I was surprised and it motivated me to make more fun, over-the-top videos. I recognized that slime was a hit after the first video.   Your creative videos include original DIYs, slime how-to’s, product reviews and much more! How do you choose your video topics and manage to keep them fresh and entertaining for your followers? Are there any new topics or avenues of interest you want to explore in future videos?  Brainstorming video ideas is a really fun part of my YouTube channel. Once you’re in the YouTube world, you’re always drawing inspiration from everything and your creative juices are always flowing. I also read what my followers are talking about, I see what my fellow slimers are up to and of course I talk to my friends and family about what other fun things I can do.    42

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WITH CREATIVITY, PASSION, AND COURAGE TO FOLLOW HER HEART AND SHARE IT WITH THE WORLD, SHE CREATED AN EMPIRE BEYOND HER WILDEST DREAM.


IN A WORLD WITH INFORMATION OVERLOAD, WHERE EVERYTHING SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN DONE, BUT YET THERE IS STILL SO MUCH TO DISCOVER AND CREATE, KARINA GARCIA HAS MADE A NAME AND BRAND FOR HERSELF, ALL WHILE STAYING TRUE TO WHO SHE IS.

As far as your work/life balance goes—how do you manage your time between researching, collaborating, creating, and marketing videos, with making time for you; your time to unwind and reset. I think at this point I’ve kind of gotten used to the busy lifestyle. I try to manage my time though. I recently hired someone to help me film and edit my videos. She’s a huge help! We film videos in bulk 2-3 times a week! But even with that, I have meetings, business trips, etc. Most days out of the week I’m usually working but I take advantage of weekends to spend time with friends and family. I love having a busy schedule, whether it’s working or hanging out with friends. I guess I just kind of got used to the hectic schedule. I get really bored if I sit at home all day.    Can you share with us what lead you to the creation of Craft City?  I always wanted to make a product. I always discussed this dream with friends and family years ago. Whether it was slime, a DIY kit or a toy, my dream from the beginning was always having a toy/craft product. So when the opportunity came, the first thing that came to mind was slime because it had become such a huge part of my life. Now Craft City has become a slime and crafting empire. Craft City is not just a slime brand, it’s a crafting line! Slime may be my best selling and most well-known product, but there are so many other products on the shelf that people might not know about like the DIY Squishy Art Bakeshop Kit. It’s exciting because we are already expanding, and you’ll see us in different isles soon!   What do you love most about being a ’Creative Celebrity’ and ‘Slime Superstar’? What do you dislike the most? It’s so fun to be able to share my love and passion of slime and crafting with everyone. Especially the kids! They’re so pure and loving, it feels like we’re family. Positives outweigh the negatives but if there’s something I don’t like is that there will always be haters who assume they know your whole life story. It’s definitely something I’m used to by now. But I’m also human, so mean comments can sometimes bring you down, I can’t lie!    Do you have any creative obsessions (other than slime)? Is there something your fans would be surprised to hear that you are into?  I’m obsessed with makeup and fashion. Although I feel most people would probably not think that. I like to be more laid back about my wardrobe in videos because I want everyone who watches my videos to feel like we are hanging out in my room just chilling. But I like to go full glam when I go out with friends. I love dresses, heels, makeup!    What are some habits that you have learned or established since the beginning of your endeavor that you feel has contributed to the upward trajectory of your creative career?  I think one of the main things I have learned to do is to tune out the negativity. There is always going to be someone who doesn’t believe in you, but I have really taught myself to not let these people get me down, but instead drive me to work harder in reaching my dreams.   What is one of the most important things you have learned so far being an entrepreneur? It sounds cliché, but I would say keep it up, have fun, and do what you love! Do what you do because you’re having fun, not because of other people’s expectations. Don’t lose sight of your vision and appreciate the people that support you and your vision even if your vision is building an empire on something like slime.  If you could give your younger self a piece of advice, what would it be?  I would have to say it would be that no dream is too crazy or too small to achieve. Look at me – I made an entire career out of slime. It’s crazy!

• More on Craft City: craftcitylife.com • Check out Karina’s multiple social media accounts! YouTube channel: Karina Garcia + IG @karinagarc1a CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Above: Vanessa Till Hooper’s Visual Voyage, an interactive light wall located inside Port Everglades Cruise Terminal 25; photo by Emily Castro

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VANESSA TILL HOOPER’S

VISUAL VOYAGE ENGAGES TRAVELERS THROUGH TECHNOLOGY By Helen Wolt Vanessa Till Hooper is on the leading edge of art and technology. The Boston-based artist combines her talent for art with training as an architect and high-tech skills to create interactive artwork. Hooper’s latest project is a light wall that fuses technology and the internet to put viewers in control. Titled Visual Voyage, the installation is tailored for travelers in Port Everglades Cruise Terminal 25, which is the winter homeport for Celebrity Cruises’ new ship Celebrity Edge. Visual Voyage features a stylized map that continues along the equator. It stretches across two large sections of wall in the cruise terminal’s check-in hall covering about 298-feet with 10-foot tall panels. Colorful LED lighting illuminates the panels. Passengers waiting to embark on a cruise can connect via smart phone to send the lights racing across the map. Broward Cultural Division’s Public Art & Design committee commissioned the artwork. Port Everglades Assistant Director Peg Buchan said Hooper’s artwork stood out for its “youthful generational appeal” that relates to travel and prompts visitor participation. “Port Everglades was excited by the concept of a modernistic art creation. Hooper’s work complemented the fresh contemporary vibe of Cruise Terminal 25 and—much like cruising aboard the Celebrity EDGE—the artwork seems to exemplify a new era,” Buchan continued. As the installation’s finishing touches were completed this November, Hooper took the time to talk about her lifelong exploration of art. “In the Fall of 2017 I left the creative technology design firm Materials & Methods in order to strike out on my own as Studio HHH. Visual Voyage was the very first project for me as an independent artist/designer. It was perfect timing, and an incredible opportunity for me to quickly grow my team, and to establish the aesthetic and design principles of the studio.” What was your inspiration for Visual Voyage? “I was inspired by the individual getting on a ship and the experience that’s unique to traveling by ship. When we travel by plane, we skip over time zones and you’re suddenly in a new one. When you travel by ship you get to experience each of these moments distinctly, as well as crossing the equator and the International Date Line.” How does the interactive light wall work? “On the Port’s website [passengers will access the light wall in the terminal via their mobile devices], when you interact with the installation by pressing a button that says EAST or WEST you can move the sun’s light in that direction. Each two panels of the installation represent one segment of the 24-hour clock of the globe. Then you send the light—one hour at a time—all the way to one end or all the way to the other end, and when you cross the International Date Line on either side, then you get a light show across the whole wall.”

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“

...THIS ARTWORK IS DESIGNED TO BE

DELIGHTFUL AND ENGAGING FOR ALL TYPES

AND AGES OF TRAVELERS WHO PASS THROUGH THIS GREAT HALL, FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. -VANESSA TILL HOOPER 46

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How long does it take for the light to traverse the map? “It depends on how many people are working the opposite direction. If you’re in the space alone and you click and click, you can get over there in about 30 seconds. If a lot of people are trying to move the light in the opposite direction it might take you longer.” What impression do you hope Visual Voyage will impart to viewers? “It should be delightful. It should be visually appealing and add richness to the environment but at the same time be playful and engaging. It should inspire visitors to the terminal to think about their voyage in a new way, and to muse about the global map and imagine where they might go next. The check-in hall is approximately the length of a football field. How did its size impact the design? “Our approach to this project started with thinking about its scale, it is a unique challenge to work in a space that is so large that it would be impossible to interact with it through touch, we had to find a method of interactivity that could be achieved from anywhere in this great hall.” Do you have a strong background in technology? “I have developed one somewhat reluctantly, I love the flexibility and fluidity of using technology to enhance human experience, so I’ve had to learn quickly. What led you to specialize in interactive art? “I have a bachelor’s degree in art, and a master’s degree in architecture from Southern California Institute of Architecture. As I entered into my practice, I was immediately drawn to creating environments that use technology to enhance personal connection and cross-collaboration. The work we do in my design practice, Studio HHH, has become a combination of both art and architecture, using technology to spark curiosity and engagement. I seek out new opportunities to combine art and experiential design, allowing the public to connect with art in new and exciting ways.” What other interactive projects have you completed? “In 2016 our team was invited to create an original piece of art onboard the Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines ship Ovation of the Seas. We developed our second gesturally interactive art wall with layers of digital art content that the passengers could change and manipulate with arm motion or simply by walking past the wall.” How is Visual Voyage unique from your other public artworks? “It is unique because of its tremendous scale, and because of the way viewers interact with it. This artwork is designed to be delightful and engaging for all types and ages of travelers who pass through this great hall, from all over the world.” For further information about the Cultural Division’s Public Art & Design program and more public art projects at Port Everglades, visit PublicArt. Broward.org.

Opposite Page and Above: Vanessa Till Hooper’s Visual Voyage, an interactive light wall located inside Port Everglades Cruise Terminal 25; photo by Emily Castro

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BUTTERFLIES IN THE GARDEN: MORTON KAISH

By Bruce Helander The exhibition of exquisite works by New York-based painter Morton Kaish at the Ann Norton Sculpture Garden, in West Palm Beach is a celebration of the perpetual cycle of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness through the intrinsic beauty of our landscape, and the inventive juxtapositions that could be interpreted in this show as a nouveau garden of earthly delights. Mr. Kaish has spent his entire professional life exploring the components of nature, among other topics, from abstracting plants and flowers to exotic landscapes and the flamboyant butterflies that accent our atmosphere with a passionate emphasis on the effects of light and color on these entities. This current exhibit, titled “An Eye for Nature: Paintings and Prints by Morton Kaish,” offers visitors a survey of simply charming organic assortments that magically bring the outdoors in. In this memorable exhibition of more than thirty individual works, Kaish appears to be an avid adventurer and explorer of a multitude of flowering plants that often seem to take on their own distinct personality. Whether a single iris or a gorgeous bouquet, the artist intuitively has a perfect sense of composition and a remarkable aptitude for mixing pigment and forming it into a memorable abstracted configuration. Perhaps the most captivating are Kaish’s examinations and reinterpretations of one of the planet’s most colorful insects, the butterfly. The artist seems to have no boundaries when it comes to decoding Lepidoptera and their extraordinarily complex magnificence, making them prime cultural suspects as a popular motif in visual and literary art. Butterflies are often polymorphic, and many species make use of camouflage, mimicry and aposematism to avoid predators while at the same time attracting a suitable mate. Butterflies evolved from moths around 190 million years ago during the Jurassic period and artists have shown a particular interest in these vivid subjects for thousands of years, including some evidence of their status carved into Pompeian walls. Butterflies specifically appeared in art 3,500 years ago in ancient Egypt, where the brilliantly hued winged creature still retains its profound intrigue and metaphorical importance relating to rebirth (pollination) and freedom. There was a perpetual interest in adopting the butterfly as an honorable topic for art through the Renaissance and later Surrealism, and in 1956, Salvador Dali’s painting, Landscape with Butterflies, which expresses two butterflies hovering in the air as almost a dream sequence. One of the most astounding works of art highlighting butterflies in current contemporary art is Damien Hirst’s collage on canvas from his “Kaleidoscope” series, which measures 17 feet wide and contains over 2,700 real butterflies. Hirst’s painting references the spiritual symbolism of the butterfly, used by the Greeks to represent Psyche, the soul, and in Christian imagery to signify the resurrection. The ongoing interest and interpretation of these beautiful airborne flappers remain a favored choice not only for artists, but as corporate logos, fashion and musical lyrics. Elements of nature such as animals, trees and flowers served as popular motifs since humankind evolved into documentarian image-makers. Depending on the era, floral paintings often carried either mythological, religious, or medical meanings. In ancient Greece, for instance, a carnation symbolized love while ivy embodied marital fidelity in the Middle Ages. The great institution of flower paintings extended to the modern day, and botanical elements found a home in almost every art genre that followed. Production of flower paintings thrived particularly in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, when painters specializing in botanical illustration first appeared. These works had a high decorative component, but also an illuminating undertone that gave the artist philosophical connotations. Not unexpectedly, Holland has a particularly extensive floral painting tradition. From narrative art bouquets fashioned in the nineteenth century to the untamed sunflowers by Van Gogh, some of the most famous and most loved flower paintings came from the “land of tulips.” During the same interval, Claude Monet’s famed waterlily series evoked a kind of meditative state that seemed to hypnotize those observing this work, a reaction that continues today. Bright and original close-ups by Georgia O’Keeffe and more recently Marc Quinn pushed the blossoms out of their normal surroundings, allowing the viewer to zero in on the stark beauty of the colorful blooms and the singularity of each specimen. The American artist Alex Katz (Art Hive issue #25), renowned for his abstract investigation of three-dimensional space using simple brush strokes and flat planes, began using flowers as a focus in the late 1960s, and since then, his career has blossomed (apologies, but I couldn’t help myself !).

Opposite page: Morton Kaish, New Day, 2016, Photogravure etching on rag paper, 29 x 22 in.

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Morton Kaish, Arrival V, 2018, Acrylic on linen, 24 x 24 in.


Morton Kaish, Arrival VII, 2018, Acrylic on linen, 36 x 36 in.

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One of the first artists who specialized in flower artworks, Ambrosius Bosschaert, was a pioneer of painting highly detailed floral arrangements that usually depicted vivid, realistic bouquets. In 1643, the tulip bulb became so expensive that portraits of these beautiful flowers became a suitable and inexpensive substitute for the genuine article. As the floral trend continued, Mary Cassatt frequently incorporated elements closely related to home life, so flowers in vases and gardens became standard fare. Her masterpiece titled Lilacs in a Window (1883), which embodied the artist’s angular fluency and skillful academic painterly style, remains a remarkable example of American Impressionism. Throughout her career, Georgia O’Keeffe generated over 200 exceptional paintings of flowers at close range, as if seen through a magnifying glass. Red Poppy (1927) is a perfect example, and sixty-five years later the iconic image was honored in a series of U. S. postage stamps. From a critical point of view, even a quick glance at the varied works in “An Eye for Nature” establishes Kaish as an artist who obviously has polished his craft with a distinguished maturity and discerning individuality that only come from decades of intensive studio effort coupled with a resourceful and confident imagination. In this exhibition, Kaish wisely has limited his concentration to only two of the most beautiful subjects in nature: floral compositions and the common butterfly in all its glory. The butterfly series positions the colorful spread of wings into a four-part harmonic visual melody, where each open wing carries an independent tune painted with a handsome design on a post-surrealist platform amid layers of swirling ambulatory interpretations. The artist presents the viewer with an essential pictorial and metaphorical connection to this butterfly by literally transferring its personality traits, exotic and bold, rhythmic and romantic, vibrant and enigmatic, to a two-dimensional surface that completes the metamorphosis. Kaish also gives a new twist to floral studies by treating these bouquets as color fields that one might find in action painting. Blooms, buds, leaves and stems are all connected at the hip to provide a mystical mystery tour of native harmony and surprising, but pleasing tint combinations.

BLOOMS, BUDS, LEAVES AND STEMS ARE ALL CONNECTED AT THE HIP TO PROVIDE A MYSTICAL MYSTERY TOUR OF NATIVE HARMONY AND SURPRISING, BUT PLEASING TINT COMBINATIONS.

With all this flowery history, pomp and circumstance it is indeed appropriate and serendipitous that Morton Kaish’s delightful artwork has flown south from his studio in New York like a floating dandelion seed or migrating butterfly gliding effortlessly on currents of air to propagate a display within the boundaries of one of the most famous public gardens in Florida. This two-acre property directly across from the Intracoastal Waterway in downtown West Palm Beach is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and features a collection of 250 species of tropical palms. The former residence of sculptor Ann Norton, converted to an exhibition space in 1977, presents many of her towering outdoor brick cubist-inspired sculptures that emanate a romantic synthesis of sculpture and fauna in a verdant green jungle-like setting. This unusual combination entices visitors (and native butterflies!) to discover with great astonishment another secret garden worthy of a book title, charmingly secluded in an urban preserve with a handsome historic building that schedules lively exhibitions by known artists in an intimate setting. This exhibition is a rare opportunity to see and contemplate enchanting works by Morton Kaish, a recognized modern master who offers an indelible impression of the inherent splendor in nature and meets the challenge of artists to cleverly interpret the aesthetics of our environment. The exhibition continues through May 5, 2019. For more information: www.ansg.org More at mortonkaish.com —Bruce Helander is an artist who writes on art. He is the former Provost of the Rhode Island School of Design, where he received a master’s degree in painting and first met Peter Voulkos and Norm Schulman, the head of the ceramics department at the college. He is a former White House Fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts and is a member of the Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

Opposite page: Morton Kaish, Cherrybuds, 1998, Acrylic on linen, 48 x 44 in. Above: Portrait of the artist, Morton Kaish, in his studio, New York City.

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By Chris Smith

T

hink of the technology startup scene and the initials “SF” tend to be synonymous. The iconic Silicon Valley district, in and around the San Francisco area, remains the Mecca for entrepreneurs with epochal ideas hoping to bring them to fruition in the digital realm. However, another SF – our very own South Florida – is rapidly emerging as an innovation hub for established and nascent companies, with startups in a number of crucial sectors leading the way. Just as importantly, the necessary ecosystem to support that innovation continues to come together throughout the tri-county area. The investment climate is heating up, with major Silicon Valley venture capital forms like 500 Startups putting boots on the ground. Meanwhile, there are mentorships and accelerators available through organizations like Endeavor Miami and networking organizations like Refresh Miami are helping local tech entrepreneurs through the fraught process of turning an idea into a product, while staying afloat financially. Couple all that with a vast, diverse and affordable talent pool, there are plenty of reasons for entrepreneurs to resist the temptation to head out west on the fabled technological gold rush. Jaclyn Baumgarten, CEO and co-founder of Miami-based boat rental marketplace Boatsetter should know. She left San Francisco for South Florida in 2015 to grow her business in the boating capital of the world. She says the area has everything it needs to emerge from Silicon Valley’s shadow. “In order for a region to act as a true hub for innovation, it needs to have three core elements in place and already thriving,” she tells Art Hive in an interview. “You need access to investment capital, access to quality human resources and a community of entrepreneurial individuals who are actively nurturing collaboration between entrepreneurs, mentors, funders, educational institutions and government. South Florida definitely has all three of those. “I’ve been extremely pleasantly surprised at the ecosystem that has developed here to support and foster entrepreneurialism.”

One of the organizations helping to foster and grow the startup community is Refresh Miami. The nonprofit’s mission is to educate, inspire, connect and grow the tech industry through networking events, by hosting guest speakers from inside and outside of the area, and by providing educational workshops for entrepreneurs. In the 13 years since “four people in a Starbucks” began meeting up, the group has grown to over 10,000 members. Some of Refresh’s Miami’s companies have enjoyed success in raising funds through one of those regular speaker visits. A recent talk from angel investor Jason Calacanis resulted in his first investments in the South Florida market. Executive director Maria Derchi Russo admits that overall the environment for companies seeking investment still lags behind the major tech hubs, but the group advises members that raising venture capital isn’t always an accurate barometer of success. She says: “What’s not talked about enough is how you should hold out as long as possible to focus on revenue, because by accepting money you’re giving away pieces of your company. “Fundraising takes so much time and energy and really takes your focus away from building your business. Companies that have succeeded down here have been the ones who can show traction behind what they’re doing, which results in better terms with the VCs obviously.” “People are more cognizant of [the need for diversity] here,” Maria adds “and because we’re younger than some established ecosystems we can get that right from the start rather than try to fix it later.” Some locally-based firms, like Dania Beach’s secretive augmented reality startup Magic Leap earned more than $2 billion in venture funds before publicly revealing a product. Many local firms like Tippy, the Fort Lauderdale-based tipping service for salon employees, have relied heavily on private investment from within the beauty industry to help bring its product to market. “There’s ample opportunity. We haven’t found any need to go out west or back up north,” CEO and co-founder Terry McKim tells us. “There is capital down here that is hungry to invest in local opportunities. It’s amazing the calls we get from up north. A lot of people want to be here. We’re excited about the talent we’re getting.”

Opposite Page: South Florida, photo by Ashley Satanosky

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COUPLE ALL THAT WITH A VAST, DIVERSE AND AFFORDABLE TALENT POOL, THERE ARE PLENTY OF REASONS FOR ENTREPRENEURS TO RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO HEAD OUT WEST ON THE FABLED TECHNOLOGICAL GOLD RUSH.

While Miami’s relatively youthful startup scene continues to grow through a number of different avenues, there’s also a pronounced desire to do things a little differently. Companies founded and funded by white men still largely dominate Silicon Valley. 2018 research showed just 2% of VC funding goes to firms led by women, while 3% of partners at VC firms are black and 1% are Latino. Members of the community say South Florida’s natural diversity will help with greater inclusivity and representation, but there’s also a proactive push too. “I can tell you, as a female CEO, abso-frickinglutely!” says Jaclyn Baumgartner on the need for more diversity. “At Boatsetter, we’ve got team members from 14 different countries, speaking 10 different languages. It’s almost unavoidable that your South Florida team is going to have not only a massive breadth of deep cultural insights, but probably native-level fluency in a large number of languages as well.” Maria Derchi Russo from Refresh Miami runs the Women in Miami Tech group, while the Venture Café nonprofit is committed to creating more inclusive opportunities for underserved communities. Felicia Hatcher runs the annual Black Tech Week, coding workshops in lower opportunity communities at Code Fever, as well as the black-operated coworking space, Space Called Tribe. South Florida Start-Ups To Watch... Magic Leap Dania Beach Founded 2010 The highly secretive augmented reality startup builds a headset that helps to seamlessly blend digital imagery with the real world. Its first hardware product, the Magic Leap One goggles are currently in the hands of developers hoping to create AR experiences for the masses. No date has been set for a consumer release for the product, but the company has raised over $2.3bn in venture funding. “Retinas are the canvas, light is the medium, Magic Leap One is the brush,” the company says. Tippy Fort Lauderdale Founded 2016 The move away from cash payments has harmed those in the beauty industry who rely on tips to supplement their income. The solution is Tippy, a terminal that enables customers to swipe their credit card specifically to tip their stylist. The tip is deposited directly into their bank account, while the app monitors tipping history and can provide reports come tax season. The terminal is currently in 60 salons locally, but is teaming with L’Oreal for national distribution in the coming year. Caribu Miami Founded 2016 Another Miami startup with a female Latina

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CEO in Maxeme Tuchman, Caribu is a videocalling app that enables parents and their children to draw together, or read bedtime stories together regardless of where they are in the world. It’s FaceTime meets Kindle In 2018 it won $100,00 in investment and a place on AT&T’s accelerator program for educationbased tech companies. Park Jockey Brickell Key Founded 2013 The company handles the parking at Miami Heat games, the boat show, and at Port Miami and Port Everglades. However, it also helps commercial property owners monetize their parking spots, while the mobile app helps drivers find spaces without driving around Wynwood for hours upon end. It has raised over a billion in funding, operates internationally and has acquired a number of other parking companies. Fortr3ss Brickell City Center Founded 2015 A leading provider of voice authentication services for the financial services industry. It can simplify the login process, enable users to easily change their passwords and even secure your smart speakers to prevent unauthorized parties making voice commands. Best of all, if deployed in a call center environment the tech enables you to access your account without answering umpteen security questions. Whereby.US Miami Founded 2013 A digital newsletter production platform, it specializes in helping locals get the most from their surroundings with daily updates on events, food, drink, and even handy tips like dos and don’ts for recycling. Locally, it creates The New Tropic newsletter, which reaches 1.5m Miamians’ inbox each month. The Silicon Valley-funded startup also curates newsletters for locals in Orlando, Portland and Seattle and wants to expand to 250 cities. Streann Media Midtown Miami Founded 2014 You too can create your own digital content empire like Netflix or Amazon Prime. Streann offers end-to-end solution that hosts live and on-demand audio and video in dedicated apps, while also enabling creators to cross-publish publish to other platforms. It helps clients monetize their streams through advertising, while improving engagement through realtime chat tools and offering detailed analytical reports. If you’re a social media influencer looking to make a few bucks with selfies, Streann can help you too.


Above: Miami, photo by Ryan Spencer

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Above: Four days prior to completion, the Temple of Time being constructed by David Best and his team of artists/builders who traveled from California; photo by Meredith Clements

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AND THEY WILL COME

AS THE PARKLAND ANNIVERSARY APPROACHED, ARTIST DAVID BEST BUILDS A TEMPLE IN MEMORIAM

By Monique McIntosh

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here will be no news photographers or cameras inside the Temple of Time—an installation in Coral Springs by artist David Best, dedicated to those affected by the Parkland school shooting. Following its aftermath nearly a year ago, the community has had to negotiate its grief under the headlights of constant media coverage. But as the first anniversary approached on February 14, Best aims to create “a place where no one is watching,” he explained at the artist’s meet and greet event in late January at the Coral Springs Museum of Art. Instead, the temple will become a place “where people can feel safe to grieve.” The installation marks the first project of the museum’s public art initiative, “Inspiring Community Healing After Gun Violence: The Power of Art,” in partnership with the cities of Parkland and Coral Springs. A recipient of the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Public Art Challenge, the series will launch five large-scale temporary public art projects into 2020, in collaboration with community members. The other projects will be led by artists Steven and William Ladd, Kate Gilmore, Carl Juste, and Rosario Marquardt and Roberto Behar of R&R Studios. As the first of these, the temple installation provides a poignant launch to the program. The artist has built similar sanctuaries for communities around the world, from acolytes at the Burning Man festival in Nevada, to neighborhoods in Northern Ireland affected by the sectarian conflicts known as the Troubles. Filled with exquisite millwork and filigree created from recycled wood, the artist’s elaborate structures feel somewhere between medieval cathedrals and Balinese temples. But they are never meant to evoke a particular faith. “I’m the carpenter,” explains Best in an interview. “I build the building, and the people put their beliefs in it.” For the Temple of Time, community volunteers, students, families and first responders worked alongside Best and his longtime temple crew of artists/ builders based in San Francisco for two weeks to create the temple. Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School also worked with Best to create abstract symbols that were incorporated into the design. The temple is built on the former site of the Coral Springs City Hall on West Sample Road.

FILLED WITH EXQUISITE MILLWORK AND FILIGREE CREATED FROM RECYCLED WOOD, THE ARTIST’S ELABORATE STRUCTURES FEEL SOMEWHERE BETWEEN MEDIEVAL CATHEDRALS AND BALINESE TEMPLES.

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THEN, LIKE ALL OF BEST’S TEMPLES AROUND THE WORLD, THE TEMPLE OF TIME WILL BE BURNED TO THE GROUND BY VOLUNTEERS WHO HELPED BUILD THE STRUCTURE. The actual construction process also becomes a sanctuary of sorts for these volunteers. “I’m not asking somebody who lost someone to come build something,” explains Best. “I’m asking them to come build something for someone else. It’s oftentimes more healing and helpful to do something for someone else.” Preserving this sense of refuge, the installation opened quietly to the public on Feb. 13, and will remain open to visitors every day until May 1. Inside, the temple will not feature individual memorials, but instead provides a space for visitors to add and build onto the existing structure, whether writing names and notes on the walls, or leaving personal photos and tokens behind. “I have no expectations whatsoever,” explains Best on how the community will use the structure. “There is no sign on the temple saying that you have to do this or that. I just make it, and they can figure out what they need.” Then, like all of Best’s temples around the world, the Temple of Time will be burned to the ground by volunteers who helped build the structure. The practice leads back to the very first iconic temples Best built for the Burning Man festival, where fire art has always been a part of the festival’s artistic ritual, including the centerpiece incinerating of the Burning Man effigy. After years watching participants joining the final temple fire, Best knows the process may be different for everyone. “Burning is not going to erase the memory of someone who lost their child, but it’s kind of a step of going towards it and looking at it in a different way,” says Best. “I don’t mean to be so pretentious as to think I can offer someone a solution. I’m not a healer. Only time is what it’s going to take for them. And time is what the temple is.” To learn more about the Temple of Time go to poweroa.org or visit it before May in the City of Coral Springs.

Above: The completed Temple of Time on the eve of February 14; photos by Meredith Clements

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Top: Detail of construction process of David Best’s Temple of Time, photo by Meredith Clements; Bottom, left photo: David Best speaking with an MSD student at the Meet and Greet pre-build lecture at Coral Springs Museum of Art, photo courtesy of coralspringsphotos.org; Bottom, center: Small pieces and supplies used to create the numerous mosaics in the Temple of Time; photo by Meredith Clements; Bottom, right: David Best speaking at the Meet and Greet pre-build lecture at Coral Springs Museum of Art, photo courtesy of coralspringsphotos.org

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CONSCIOUS |

FILLING THE VOID: THOU ART WOMAN

Above: Diana King performing for a packed house at TAW, photo by David I Muir

By Christiana Lilly When Ghenete Wright Muir came out as a gay woman, after years of being married to a man, she was looking to connect with people like her. People who enjoyed visual art, poetry, music, spoken word. But there wasn’t a space like that for LGBTQ women. So, Wright Muir decided to change that and created Thou Art Woman. “Thou Art Woman really took to fill a void in the lesbian and queer woman community, for the LGBT women community. An alternative space for us to be ourselves, really,” says the cofounder. In its fifth year, Thou Art Woman has grown from an open mic night to a three-day art celebration. It all began in the summer of 2014, when Wright Muir and some friends organized an open mic night at 1310 Gallery in Fort Lauderdale. Her friend dubbed it Thou Art Woman, and the free event was so successful that people asked for it to be a monthly gathering. Instead, Wright Muir hosted it a few times a year and it only grew in popularity, forcing them to move to the ArtServe auditorium. This year, it’s expanded for the first time to three days and the open mic night will be at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts’ Amaturo Theatre. 62

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“It’s still a little surreal, I’m pinching myself,” she says of the event with humble beginnings. “It was really just creating a space to be ourselves and share our stories and connect with each other.” This year’s Thou Art Woman—falling in Women’s History Month— opens at the Riverside Hotel with a LGBTQ Business Roundtable Breakfast. That evening, March 1, is the opening of “At the Edge,” a visual art exhibition curated by Dr. Sarah Clunis of Xavier University in New Orleans, at 1310 Gallery in Sailboat Bend. Thou Art Woman partnered with Equality Florida, Broward Cultural Division and Old Dillard Foundation to present the Business Roundtable. The second night is the open mic night, but because of the scale of the event, people submit their work ahead of time for a chance to be selected and to keep the original event spirit alive, a few people will be picked from the audience to perform. Wright Muir and Nik Harris will be hosting the evening at Broward Center, and featured performers include May Reign the Poet, Rebecca “Butterfly” Vaughns, DA HAUS, TheePoeticTruth and Inez Barlatier. The weekend closes during “Brunch With Us” at the Riverside Hotel in downtown Fort Lauderdale, a relaxed meal where speakers, performers and guests from Thou Art Woman are encouraged to interact and reflect on the weekend. Lady of Harp will be performing.


From Top to Bottom, Left to Right: EsOh, G Wright Muir, Richard Wright, Erin Lee and Tabatha Mudra; Attendees of TAW 2018; Lori Pratico and Rebecca “Butterfly” Vaughns; photos by David I Muir

Thou Art Woman is not only a weekend to celebrate the arts, but also an opportunity for Black LGBTQ artists to prosper. The morning of March 1, Equality Florida is hosting an intimate roundtable discussion focusing on black LGBT entrepreneurs. The goal is to connect the business community in Broward County and create a place where Black LGBTQ people can thrive.

While the “At the Edge Exhibit” is a space for the 14 artists to showcase their work, most importantly, it’s also an opportunity for them to sell their pieces. The goal is for artists to be successful. This also continues a mission of Equality Florida’s, called Equality Means Business, where they press the importance of diversity and inclusion in “drawing top talent” to Florida’s economy.

“Old Dillard Foundation is proud to support our Black LGBTQ community,” says Dr. Denise St. Patrick Bell, Executive Director of Old Dillard Foundation. “We’re excited to partner with Thou Art Woman and Equality Florida to continue the work after the weekend, with more gatherings and arts activities as part of the Broward Cultural Division’s Destination Sistrunk, cultural and heritage tourism program.”

“They don’t want to be starving artists, they want to be artists, and so we hope that this can make connections, open doors, increase possibilities, and have the visibility to draw people to our state,” Smith says.

“We want this to be a place where people with talent and good ideas can fire up our economy,” says Nadine Smith, the co-founder and CEO of Equality Florida, the state’s leading LGBTQ agency. “One sector that has expressed that there are more obstacles are Black LGBTQ folks in the community.”

“The diversity of our community is not fully visible or represented, so to have a space that is open to everyone but very much centers the life and experiences of Black lesbians and the entire LGBTQ community is a rare treat.” For more information, visit thouartwoman.com.

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CONSCIOUS | REAL ANSWERS FROM REAL ARTISTS

QUESTION:

WHAT WAS THE MOST IMPORTANT TAKEAWAY YOU LEARNED FROM ARTIST AS AN ENTREPRENEUR INSTITUTE? Photo by Quetsy Estremera

Photo submitted

Tatiana Malinine

Kelcie McQuaid IG: @kelciemcquaid

IG: @tatiana_malinine

I've taken quite a few business courses over the years and all the concepts regarding economics and target markets seemed complicated and irrelevant. In the AEI course I re-encountered many of the same concepts, but they were presented to me in a new way that made sense and I finally understood how to use these concepts to build my business. Most business courses are designed by linear thinkers for linear thinkers. AEI is truly designed for the creative brain.

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…I believe the most impactful experience [of AEI] was a group project prompted by civic engagement. We were asked to collectively brainstorm and present an idea as an exercise. My table was full of great artists from our community who helped me streamline and articulate an idea I had been tossing around for a while. We were able to present, and clearly define how a project like this could engage the community and leave a lasting impression. It was very inspiring and helped me see that with a little cooperation our local art community could really come together to produce amazing results for the betterment of South Florida and creatives at large. We’re so lucky to have an accessible, super in-depth, professional development program for artists that helps us connect, right here in Broward County.


KX2: Ruth Avra & Dana Kleinman IG: @KX2art

Photo submitted

AEI was a mind-blowing experience for me as a “mid-career” artist, especially since I went into the seminar thinking that it was going to be targeted to artists at the beginning of their careers. The seminar’s materials opened my eyes to different markets and opportunities I did not even know existed for artists. The instructors provoked me to completely shift gears and take more control over my career expanding beyond traditional gallery relationships. - Dana Kleinman

Miguel Mesanza IG: @artbymime

Photo submitted

Photo submitted

...transforming an artist into a business person takes a positioning duality that requires a balancing act in between emotions and financial sense. One can be good at many things but cannot excel in everything. So, be resilient.

Vicki Rosenthal IG: @vickirosenthal.art

One of many important takeaways from my AEI experience is that art has an important place in history, marking this moment in time on current issues—socially, politically, environmentally. As artists, it is our responsibility to utilize our talent to acknowledge and express this moment in time. I was inspired the first day; I get chills thinking about it now and so grateful that Broward County Cultural Division, ArtServe and other organizations within our area are earnest about promoting the arts.

Alexandra Bello IG: @AlexandraBello

“ Photo by Alexander Thomidis

Photo by Jon Delgado

The most important lesson I learned during AEI is that perfection is not required for publishing works of art. Eighty percent perfection on a published work is better than 100% perfection on a work that no one will see. Seeking perfection blocks artists from developing a following and slows their momentum.

Edrian Thomidis IG: @artsy.soul

Everything I learned at AEI in one word: Mindset. Once I shifted my mindset into business mode and saw most of what I knew about business and marketing applied to my art with concise real-life examples, I was able to see the possibilities. The first tangible change was defining my audience and my art products.

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CONSCIOUS | REAL ANSWERS FROM REAL ARTISTS

Janie Casoria justjanie.net

“ “ “ “

Photo submitted

As with many artists, I work in a variety of mediums because I need to be prolific, and constantly challenged so I am never bored. But I have learned to read my audience and FOCUS on a specific art form when promoting my work. I can’t deprive myself from working with different mediums, but I don’t need to spew out a litany of everything I do all at once.

Lisa Botto Lee IG: @LisaBottoLee

Photo submitted

To be as professional as possible in all aspects: Marketing, print and social media. Networking: You must get out there and shake hands and meet new people. Don’t be afraid to challenge yourself and try new things.

Harriet Silverstein IG: @harriet.silverstein

Photo submitted

The most important lessons I learned in AEI were presented in Phoenix’s inspiring closing speech. She spoke about “standing in a place of strength,” as an artist and as a complete person and the necessity to “shift from the doing to the being.” These points resonated with me and continue to advise me in my artistic practice. Importantly, I continue to see the successful results of applying Phoenix’s wisdom and experience to my art.

Photo by Peter Betan Photo

Kay Kiria Betancourt IG: @Kay.Kiria I learned how to bridge my work as an artist with the public. Since then, I have been exhibiting more, created a social media presence and have received press and made more art sales.

Yvette Michele Booth IG: @yvettemicheleart

Photo submitted

The art world is like a buffet. You must figure out where you are best able to showcase and sell and focus there. AEI showed me there is a whole world of opportunity and as an artist that you should seize the day.

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ARE YOU PREPARED TO TURN YOUR PASSION INTO PROFIT—YOUR ART INTO A BUSINESS?

Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) returns for its 13th year this June on four consecutive Saturdays, June 1, 8, 15, 22. Open to artists in all creative fields, AEI’s lectures, panels and interactive workshops are led by South Florida’s top-ranking arts practitioners and industry professionals. From boosting business practices to strengthening sales, AEI has it covered—freeing you up to focus on your art. June 22, the seminar’s final Saturday, features a Business Plan Clinic and Workshop to guide attendees through the creation of a simple business plan—a vital tool for both artists and arts-based business owners. This program fills up fast—make sure to mark your calendars for AEI 2019! Artists residing in any county are invited and welcome to attend. Learn more about the courses and registration at ArtsEvents.Broward.org or attend one of the free upcoming lectures about AEI coming to a County near you! Brought to you by Broward Cultural Division (Broward.org/Arts).

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Volkan Alkanoglu’s Cloudscape at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport


FORM AND FUNCTION HOW FAPAP PRESERVES AND PROMOTES PUBLIC ART

By Christina Wood Lots of folks know the latest gadgets will be on display at CES, even if they don’t know the letters stand for Consumer Electronics Show. Some conferences are just so big and so well known that a handful of letters is all most of us need to identify them. The FAPAP Conference is not one of them. FAPAP stands for the Florida Association of Public Art Professionals. The group has 130 members, most of whom are artists or arts administrators. Malinda Horton, association manager, admits it’s a small organization, but she says it’s an important one. “It really helps show our state and our different communities – no matter what size they are – how art and culture can impact your life.” Every year, the members of FAPAP gather in a different Florida location to share ideas and find inspiration. This year, they’ll be heading to Fort Lauderdale and checking in at the Riverside Hotel on Las Olas Boulevard, which will be buzzing with talk of art installations as well as public art ordinances and best practices from May 8 through 10. Holding the conference in Broward was a logical choice. The Broward Cultural Division has a dynamic Public Art & Design Program. Since it was created in 1976, the program has built up a collection of more than 260 public artworks located throughout the County. “We’re very supportive of public art here; we understand the positive impacts of it,” says Christina Roldan, a public art project manager for the Cultural Division and the current president of FAPAP. “We want to show off what we’re doing!” “They do some really interesting projects,” says Horton, who is based in Tallahassee. “I’m excited to come and see what those look like and what they’ve [Broward County] accomplished.”

All photos submitted

A tour of the local public art scene is always a highlight of the FAPAP Conference, but if you think the attendees will be looking at a bunch of big bronze statues commemorating people most of us don’t remember, think again. The County’s public art collection includes murals, interactive installations, integrated architectural work, digital media, paintings, tapestries and more.

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CULTURE |

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Opposite page, top to bottom: Volkan Alkanoglu’s Cloudscape at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport; Emily White’s Wavelength at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport; Above: Colleagues at FAPAP Conference in Tampa, Florida

“What are the transportation issues? What are the climate issues? What do the buildings look like? All of that can come into play in public art.” Public art is about more than creating something beautiful to adorn the community. Artists are commissioned, usually by a city or county agency, to create a work for a specific site. They might find inspiration in the local landscape, the culture of the community or the story of its people. Roldan says that many of the works in Broward County’s collection are inspired by the natural environment of South Florida. “Wavelength” by Emily White, an award-winning installation that floats above travelers passing through Terminal 1 at the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport, was inspired by the way light transforms into color when it refracts through water – but not just any water. “The suspended artwork is based on a ray of light cutting through the water in Broward County,” Roldan says. “It reflects the colors of the local area; it’s inspired by local themes. It gives you a sense of place.” Public art can be used to address social and environmental issues of local importance or celebrate community identity. As demonstrated by “Cloudscape” by Volkan Alkanoglu, a recent addition to the public art collection Roldan manages at the airport, it can also enhance public infrastructure. Assembled like a large three-dimensional puzzle with billowy and dynamic shapes, “Cloudscape” is composed of interconnected abstract forms that appear to change and move – just like the clouds in the sky over Broward County. In addition to reminding travelers of South Florida’s enviable weather, the piece provides a safe area for children to play – and a welcome respite for traveling parents. “This one was very involved,” Roldan says. “We even had to get certification from the National Recreation and Park Association, which involved a site visit from an out-of-state representative who came down here to measure and inspect the sculptural structures, the flooring material and the site.” Most public art professionals don’t find themselves worrying about play area standards, but they do have more to worry about than aesthetics. In the realm of public art, issues like ADA accessibility, insurance, maintenance and risk management can arise. Insight on how to deal with them can often be found at the FAPAP Conference.

All photos submitted

According to Horton, the informal networking may be as valuable as conference sessions dealing with current trends in the industry. “Sitting down in the afternoon when the sessions are done,” she says “I think it really helps. I’ve seen programs grow and I’m not sure if they would have ever gotten to the point that they are without a group like this.” Roldan hopes the attendees at this year’s conference will take home information they can use – whether they gained it from a conference session on community engagement or from a conversation with a colleague over coffee. She also hopes they will take home ideas. “I hope everyone who comes to the conference will learn new things about what’s happening in the public art world and will be inspired.” The Conference is available to members, students, institutions, artists and anyone with an interest in learning about public art and costs $75 for a single day or $175 for the full conference; visit FloridaPublicArt.org for more information or to register. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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A NEW SUNSET REBIRTH OF A PERFORMING ARTS MECCA IN WEST PALM BEACH

D

uring the classic “Chitlin’ Circuit” era of the 1930’s and 40’s, West Palm Beach’s Sunset Lounge, built in 1923, was one of the largest ballroom stops in the southeast for touring African American entertainers. It even housed its own famed house band, the Royal Sunset Orchestra. Showcasing classic Big Band acts like Count Basie and Duke Ellington all the way into the funky 1960’s with James Brown and Tina Turner, the Sunset was the place to “see and be seen.” Today, the Sunset is being revived as the cornerstone of the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency’s (CRA) economic redevelopment efforts in the Historic Northwest section of the city. Currently closed for a multi-million dollar renovation and update, the Sunset will reopen in the late Spring of 2020 with a definitive lineup of musical performances as well as a new signature lounge and, for the first time, a fabulous full service restaurant. A series of festivals and pre-opening celebrations in the Historic Northwest will keep the redevelopment of the Sunset topmost in the minds of local residents. In 2016, as the CRA began planning the rehabilitation of the Sunset, they were excited to learn that the project was a finalist in the Knight Foundation’s national “Cities Challenge” grant competition. One of the secondphase questions asked of all finalists in the Challenge was a familiar one to anyone involved in historic restoration work: “What are the threats to the success of the project?” The classic concerns for preservationists are things like “The city is building a six-lane highway through the project property” or “If the termites

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stop holding hands, the building will fall down.” Not in this instance, though. No impending roadwork threatened the site and, built entirely of concrete, the Sunset is a bunker of a building, the kind of place you want to be in a hurricane. It even survived a raging fire in the 1930’s that destroyed every other building on the block. A 1942 trade ad trumpeted the Sunset as “the largest fireproof dance hall in the Southeast!” In the case of the Sunset, a much-loved community asset in a greatly ignored and down-at-the-heels neighborhood that was understandably suspicious of infrequent government initiatives, the threat to the project was more insidious than the usual physical challenges. The threat was “What if the CRA spends literally millions of the public’s tax dollars on this project and the community it was meant to enhance simply rejects it?” The successful project would be one that was built with the community, not merely for the community. It would have to be transitional, not merely transactional. The CRA went on to win the Knight Foundation’s “Cities Challenge” and the grant award funded the start of a two-year process that allowed the Agency to intentionally focus on how local government could be doing a much more effective job of civic engagement, of creating real points of connection with the community. It enabled the CRA to take the luxury of time to slow down an aggressive design and construction schedule to meet and interact with neighborhood champions through a series of events and listen to their opinions on what became the evolving plan. More importantly, it made the Agency view its work through the lens of racial equity.


Above: Cultural tourism is the most desirable component of the tourism industry on which Florida thrives. Rendering of the new Sunset.

What CRA staffers soon learned was that community discussions that began focused solely on the Sunset project created a welcoming atmosphere that led to ongoing dialogues on dozens of other issues that neighbors wanted to talk about, but had never felt empowered to discuss. Many of the conversations were facilitated by consultant Dr. Alicia Winn, a third-generation community member whose doctoral degree in Applied Cultural Anthropology provided a megaphone for the neighborhood and who translated the role and mission of the Agency back to the community. What began as a focus on a specific capital project led to a much richer result. Neighborhood groups that had long stagnated began to organically reconnect. A lodge-full of community-minded veterans were drafted to become Community Ambassadors, checking in on shut-ins, delivering newsletters, putting security-minded eyes on the street. A “Clean and Green” team was created to pick up street trash and maintain uncut lawns, improving the overall neighborhood demeanor. Cultural tourism is the most desirable component of the tourism industry on which Florida thrives. Cultural tourists stay longer and typically spend more money at their destinations. By most accounts, the fastest growing segment of the cultural tourist industry is currently Black cultural tourism. Remodeling and operating the Sunset Lounge and Ballroom will create the basis for a vibrant Black cultural tourist industry in West Palm Beach and will spin off dozens of additional diverse economic development opportunities for the city.

The remodeled Sunset will share frontage with a new, block-long, “jazz park.” Through the use of interpretive artist-designed ceramic tiles, the theme of the park will reflect the African American experience in West Palm Beach. The Sunset’s restored second floor ballroom is envisioned to serve as a meeting hall for social events as well as service clubs. It will function as a cultural center for exhibits, lectures and performances. The Sunset will be available as a rental space for public events, such as reunions and wedding receptions, creating another income stream to defer operating costs. The Sunset’s new food and beverage operation will be the lynchpin in launching a vibrant culinary destination, enhancing the nearby awardwinning Queen of Sheeba Ethiopian restaurant, Trindy Gourmet catering and other planned food components, creating economic opportunities for local food entrepreneurs. All will draw new traffic to the Historic Northwest, creating and supporting businesses along the Rosemary and Tamarind corridors. Creating positive economic activity in the neighborhood will showcase it as a welcoming place to live, increasing security for current residents, stabilizing property values as well as encouraging the purchase of owner occupied homes. The new Sunset will be the catalyst for creative sector growth and community stability in the Historic Northwest district of West Palm Beach and a cultural destination soon to be worthy of your consideration.

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Friday, March 22 • 6-9 PM at Culture Lab • 575 S Rosemary Ave West Palm Beach

Tickets are $150

To RSVP visit equalityflorida.org/palmbeachgala or call 813-870-3735 Sponsorship opportunities begin at $500. Please contact Ashley Capps at ashley@equalityflorida.org or 239-245-4586 for details. S P O N S O R E D BY

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR EQUALITY FLORIDA INSTITUTE MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES AT WWW.FLORIDACONSUMERHELP.COM OR BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN FLORIDA (1.800.435.7352). REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. REGISTRATION #CH7992.


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Profile for Art Hive Magazine

Art Hive Magazine /// Issue 29  

Creative and Conscious Culture /// Featuring Slime Queen Karina Garcia, How to be the best Brand Ambassador for your creative business; Draw...

Art Hive Magazine /// Issue 29  

Creative and Conscious Culture /// Featuring Slime Queen Karina Garcia, How to be the best Brand Ambassador for your creative business; Draw...

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