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ART HIVE CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

azine Ass ag o M

on ati ci

+

OPPORTUNITIES

Florid a

ISSUE N o 33

BEST OVERALL DESIGN 2019

IN THE ARTS:

GRANTS, JOBS, EVENTS

+ MUCH MORE!

GRATEFUL DEAD DRUMMER + ARTIST

MICKEY HART

CHANGING

LANDSCAPES

ART INTERVENTIONS

FOR A PLANET IN CRISIS

AIDA RODRIGUEZ COMEDIAN, ACTRESS, WRITER, AND ACTIVIST

PHOTO: LIMOR GARFINKLE

HOW TO SPOT A FAKE NEWS STORY • PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS • 7 TIPS FOR LAUNCHING A SUCCESSFUL KICKSTARTER ARTS CAMPAIGN DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 31, 2020


Month of Shows, Art, Ideas & Culture

Experience Florida’s Cultural Capital® for Less

Save on your escape to The Palm Beaches during MOSAIC with discounts on performances, museum admissions, limited-time engagements, exhibitions, accommodations and more.

MAY 1–31 GET YOUR CULTURE COUPONS AT MOSAICPBC.COM

Artwork by Bruce Helander, “Magical Mosaic (Everything Under the Sun)” (detail), 2020, paper collage on museum board.


ARTIST AS AN

ENTREPRENEUR INSTITUTE

CRASH COURSE IN BUSINESS SKILLS FOR THE MODERN CREATIVE Sessions teach artists how to launch and grow their careers in today’s marketplace.

JUNE 6, 13, 20 & 27

Open to artists and creatives of all disciplines, these four Saturday sessions include lectures, panels, and interactive workshops led by top-ranking South Florida arts practitioners and industry professionals. Limited space available. Artists residing in any county may attend. Register now.

REGISTER

Broward.org/Arts/Events

CONTACT

James Shermer 954-357-7502 / jshermer@broward.org

LOCATION

Don Taft University Center, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, FL


BRUCE HELANDER RECENT WORKS

The Color of Money, 2020, Original acrylic with embellishments on canvas with printed background, 77 ¼ x 53 ¼ in.

New Orleans March 7 – 28, 2020

Houston April 9 – May 16, 2020

Octavia Art Gallery | New Orleans 700 Magazine Street, Ste. 103 New Orleans, L A 70130 T. 504-309-4249

Octavia Art Gallery | Houston 3637 West Alabama, Suite 120 Houston, TX 77027 T. 713-877-1810


CONTENTS 12 OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS 14 ARTISTS AT THE COMMUNITY TABLE WORKSHOP 18 7 TIPS FOR LAUNCHING A SUCCESSFUL KICKSTARTER ARTS CAMPAIGN 24 INDUSTRY CLUSTERS: WHY YOU MIGHT NEED TO MOVE TO BECOME MORE SUCCESSFUL 26 THINK BEFORE YOU CLICK: HOW TO SPOT A FAKE NEWS STORY 28 THREE Cs of ILLUSTRATION: PART 3: COMMUNICATION 30 PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS: MICHAEL PATRICK O'NEILL 34 CHANGING LANDSCAPES: ART INTERVENTIONS FOR A PLANET IN CRISIS 36 (DIS)OBEDIENT: REDEFINING FEMINISM IN A FRACTURED REALITY 38 A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH:

AIDA RODRIGUEZ

42 DOWNTOWN WEST PALM BEACH: INTERACTIVE AND IMPULSIVE 44 MAGIC ROCKS! LEON ETIENNE MYSTIFIES POMPANO BEACH 46 GRATEFUL DEAD DRUMMER MICKEY HART 52 CURATING CULTURE: INTERVIEW WITH PRESIDENT & CEO OF THE CULTURAL COUNCIL FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY 56 8 TIPS FOR IMPROVING YOUR ARTS MARKETING 58 ARTISTS GAIN MARKETPLACE EXPERIENCE WITH ROB PRUITT AT NSU ART MUSEUM 62 NORTHWOOD VILLAGE IS HISTORICALLY HIP 64 FORT LAUDERDALE ART AND DESIGN WEEK 2020 70 WHAT TO DO WHEN DEPRESSION STEALS YOUR MOTIVATION Top to bottom: © Elijah O'Donnell; © Sydney Sims; Aida Rodriguez photo by © Gray Segments ;Opposite side, top to bottom: © Carina Mask; © Jon Hunt; © Markus Spiske

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CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

ART HIVE TEAM | publisher Art Hive Magazine LLC founders/executive editors Angela Yungk -angela@arthivemagazine.com Jessie Prugh -jessie@arthivemagazine.com social media manager Marcela Villa -marcela@arthivemagazine.com executive administrator Alejandra DueĂąas -alejandra@arthivemagazine.com editorial assistant Aurora Veracruz aurora@arthivemagazine.com deputy editor Andrea De La Cruz creative team Meredith Clements Karla Plenge David Runyon contributing writers Joanie Cox-Henry Helen Wolt Stewart Konrad Jon Hunt Bea Conrad Ashleigh Walters Marcela Villa Bruce Helander Christie Galeano-DeMott Christiana Lilly Ali Berger Corissa Buehner

CONNECT | general inquiries info@arthivemagazine.com advertising sales@arthivemagazine.com sponsorships events@arthivemagazine.com Hello Creatives Podcast Stitcher, iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play, or iHeartRadio social media fb/ arthivemagazine twitter/ @arthivemagazine instagram/ @arthivemagazine hashtag/ #arthivemagazine submissions arthivemagazine.com/submissions for guidelines submissions@arthivemagazine.com

DISTRIBUTION | brick-and-mortar For sale at Publix Super Markets, Barnes and Noble Bookstores and at arthivemagazine.com Complimentary issues can be found year-round at select high traffic locations, and high profile events throughout South Florida. Check our website for up to date lists of events. read online issuu.com/arthivemagazine Š 2012-2020 Art Hive Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or any other method, without permission of the publishers. The articles, advertising, and reviews appearing within this publication reflect the attitudes and opinions of their respective authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or editors. All rights to advertisements including artwork, writing, designs, and copyrights are property of respective owners, and no assumption of ownership is made by this publication, publishers, or editors.


HELLO | FROM THE HIVE

Photo by Gregory Ross

Let me not pray to be sheltered from dangers, but to be fearless in facing them.Let me not beg for the stilling of my pain, but for the heart to conquer it.” -Rabindranath Tagore

• The newest arts and culture television program to hit The Palm Beaches — Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches... A new 30 minute, six-part series designed to educate and inspire locals and tourists alike will be debuting this March on South Florida PBS—Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches! Hosted by Art Hive Magazine's own Angela Yungk and Jessie Prugh, Art Adventures is the ultimate guide to creative happenings and culture across The Palm Beaches. This program is funded in part by The Palm Beach County Film & Television Commission and the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County, and produced by JAG Production Group. We are happy to announce Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches has been officially picked up by South Florida PBS with the first episode debuting on March 20th on WPBT at 11:30am, and March 29th on WXEL at 3:30pm. South Florida PBS is Florida’s largest public media company and serves 6.3 million viewers from the Sebastian Inlet to Key West. It will also air everyday on The Palm Beaches TV—showing in over 4000 hotels rooms, The Palm Beach County Convention Center, and the Palm Beach Int'l Airport. *Do you have what it takes to be highlighted on our television program or in print?! Beginning April 2020 we will be hosting community outreach events to engage our local creatives to show us what they've got—including events such as casting calls, networking mixers, and speaking engagements. • Project Color Hive — an immersive pop-up to premiere at two exhibition spaces this Spring... Through the use of captivating colors and vibrant imagery, Project Color Hive aims to inspire audiences of all ages by shining a serious light on a relevant topic. Project Color Hive celebrates the importance of pollinators and how they affect the world around us. Our mission is to entertain and educate through the endless possibilities of immersive art and creativity. We want people to explore a new way to experience art. It’s our belief that the use of art can create a sense of responsibility for our environment. It’s likely most people have already heard of the significance of pollinators; however, we hope through immersive art we really leave an impression on the vital role they play in our world. Project Color Hive is the perfect next step in our company’s transition from covering the art scene to inspiring the art scene. There continues to be a cultural shift to focus on experiences. People want to see and do more than ever before. It is a trend that will continue, and we are excited to step into this space. Project Color Hive is curated by Art Hive Magazine in collaboration with artists Nicole Galluccio and Ashleigh Walters. * You’re invited to experience Project Color Hive come to life at 2 locations across South Florida: • Art Serve “Changing Landscapes” exhibition — Thursday, April 9 – Wednesday, May 27, 2020 • The New Boynton Beach Cultural Center — June through July 2020

Stay connected @projectcolorhive @arthivemagazine @jessieandangela

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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NorthwoodVillage.com


Explore Every Last Friday 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Shop, dine, design and unwind in the Historically Hip Northwood Village with shops open late, delicious unique dining options, street-side artists, artisans and live music.

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Enjoy a relaxing stroll through the Historically Hip Northwood Village Shop, dine, design, be pampered and enjoy in-store specials, happy hour deals, live music and more.

Northwood Village is ranked one of the top 10

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West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency |wpb.org/CRA|CRA@wpb.org| 561.822.1550


CREATIVE | OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS

OPPORTUNITIES IN

THE ARTS

OUR PICKS OF GRANTS, CALLS-TO-ARTISTS, EVENTS, JOBS AND WORKSHOPS TO PROMOTE TO PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF CREATIVES AND NONPROFIT CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT PROVIDE ART OR ACTIVITIES ENHANCING THE CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE COMMUNITY.

Files & Film 2020 Art Show Call to Artists Deadline: March 1 Files & Film 2020 – 7th Annual Juried Photographic Art Show in St. Petersburg, FL is accepting applications. Awards up to $400 will be given to participating artists. Information at artist.callforentry.org Rethinking Arts Marketing for the 21st Century Event: March 1 Presented by Capacity Interactive, Broward Cultural Division is hosting a seminar teaching artists and organizations how to update their marketing and outreach practices for the twenty-first century. To register for this event visit Broward.org/Arts/Events Opportunities for Artists in South Florida Informational Session Event: March 12 Broward Cultural Division is hosting an informational session for artists to learn more about the opportunities and workshops the Cultural Division offers, as well as more information on the upcoming Artists as an Entrepreneur Institute. To register for this event visit BCDoppsworkshop.eventbrite.com Grants Administrator, Young At Art Museum Deadline: March 12 Young At Art Museum is hiring a Grants Administrator who will be responsible for planning and implementing annual and long-term strategies for securing support from various governing agencies and organizations. Details at YoungAtArtMuseum.org Poetry as a Communication Tool Event: March 14 Come explore the art of poetry and learn how to use it to help aid in the art of communication. The workshop will focus on writing a poem that states exactly what you want to say, with beautiful but simple language that encourages dialogue, comprehension and the varied varies types of communication. To register for this event visit pompanobeacharts.org Fort Lauderdale Convention Center Public Art Call to Artists Deadline: March 16 Broward County Cultural Division is commissioning an artist or artist team to artwork that enhances the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center expansion and exterior plaza located in Fort Lauderdale. For information visit Broward.org/Arts/PublicArt

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How to Publish Event: March 21 This three hour seminar will cover topics such as: What's Happening in the Publishing Industry Today • The Latest Update from Writers' Conferences • Traditional Publishing vs. Self-Publishing • What's the Procedure to Get Published? • How to Write a Query Letter • Do You Need a Proposal? • Do You Need an Editor? • How to Get an Agent • How Important Is a Platform? Details at palmbeachculture.com What’s Your Elephant ? An Art Making Workshop Event: March 28 The purpose of “What’s Your Elephant" is to provoke awareness and facilitate discussions unveiling unaddressed topics including, but not limited to: gender, discrimination and abuse.This hands-on creative workshop is an invitation for the participant to share an ‘elephant’ that is personal to them or a topic they want to bring awareness to. For information visit worldandeye.com Creative Investment Program (CIP) Grant Grant Application Workshop: April 8 Grant Eligibility Deadline: April 20 Broward Cultural Division hosts an application workshop for the Creative Investment Program (CIP) grant that assists Broward County nonprofit cultural organizations and individual artists create projects that engage local audiences. To register for the workshop visit AprilCIP.eventbrite.com For more information and to apply for the CIP Grant visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding Cultural Festival Program (CFP) Grant Application Workshop: April 15 Broward Cultural Division hosts an application workshop for the Cultural Festival Program (CFP) that assists Broward-based not-forprofit organizations, municipalities, and agencies with funding for a public cultural festival-related activity. For information visit AprilCFP. eventbrite.com Arts for the Future 2020 International Student Art Contest Deadline: May 15 Arts for the Future invites students throughout the world to use their talents, imagination, and creativity to create original artwork. For information visit artscontest.org/

For more opportunities in the arts please visit broward.org/arts


Artists as an Entrepreneur Institute 2020 Event: June 6-27 Broward Cultural Division is hosting the thirteenth annual Artists as an Entrepreneur Institute, a four-day crash course for participants to learn a variety of skills and tools, from boosting business practices to strengthening sales. To register visit aei2020.eventbrite.com Donor Relations Associate, NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Deadline: Until filled The Donor Relations Associate is responsible for managing the donor relations program for existing donors as well as developing strategies to attract new members and annual support. For information visit NSUjobs.com Senior Curator, NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Deadline: Until filled The Senior Curator is responsible for developing and managing curatorial policies and procedures and for providing strategic leadership for the museum’s permanent collection and exhibitions. For information visit NSUjobs.com Teaching Artist, Resource Depot Deadline: Until filled Resource Depot is seeking teaching artists for their after school program through Prime Time of Palm Beach County. Their teaching artists go out to local after school sites & conduct 6, 1 hour long classes through a span of 6 weeks. If interested please send a resume, to Chelsea Odum at education@ resourcedepot.net Business for the Arts of Broward Curation Program Deadline: Ongoing Business for the Arts of Broward is now accepting artwork submissions from established and emerging artists for consideration in its art curation program. Selected work will be shown in businesses in Broward County. For information visit BFABroward.org Community Partner Call to Artists Deadline: Ongoing DOT Art is accepting proposals from artists to create and install temporary public art in their neighborhood, with up to $20,000 provided towards project costs. To apply visit nyc.gov

For more opportunities in the arts please visit broward.org/arts

ATTENTION SOUTH FLORIDA CREATIVES: Looking for a place to unleash your creativity? Check out a Creation Station today! For more information please visit broward.org/library Creation Stations at Main Library 100 S Andrews Ave., 1st Floor, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 For more information please visit broward.org/library Creation Station Lab Special features: Audio/Video Production • Electronics Kits • Arts & Crafts • Computer Programming • Virtual Reality Equipment • 3D Printer

The first free community center in Broward equipped with tools such as state-of-the-art computers and gadgets as well as public access to the latest virtual reality equipment. Location: 1st Floor Contact: 954-357-7537

Creation Station Business Coworking Hub Special features: Conference Room • 2 Meeting Rooms • Videoconferencing Equipment • Smartboard • Large Format Printer • Free WiFi • Seminars & Classes • U.S. Patent & Trademark Office • Wireless Printing Take advantage of free work and meeting spaces, high-tech equipment, business resources and expert assistance for creating and growing your business. Location: 7th Floor Contact: 954-357-7418 The Studio A creative safe space exclusively for ages 13 to 19. Enjoy access to video production gear, musical instruments, state-of-the-art computers and video games as well as hands-on design activities and collaborative workshops on social media, performance art and more. Location: 3rd Floor Contact: 954-357-7438 CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

13


CREATIVE SPACES | ARTISTS AT THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TABLE WORKSHOP

From left to right: Instructors Roseann Weiss, Darius Daughtry and Pacia Elaine Anderson.

Artists at the Community Development Table Workshop Learn the Priceless Art of Community Collaboration By Joanie Cox-Henry

T

he artists who attended the January Artists at the Community Development Table Workshop hosted by Broward Cultural Division and the non-profit organization Americans for the Arts (AFTA), began their morning in a room filled with shy, unfamiliar faces. By the end of the nine-hour workshop, group poems had been penned, innermost thoughts had been shared and friendships had been made. There was a genuine buzz of human connection in the air and the impact of this workshop was readily apparent. The workshop brought together dozens of artists for an honest discussion about what art really brings to the community development table. The free, immersive experience was all about illustrating how artists can impact public policy, civic systems and community growth and how empowering artists can lead to dynamic solutions within communities. 14

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Americans for the Arts, whose primary focus is advancing the arts in the United States, selected Fort Lauderdale as a workshop site along with five other cities in Tennessee, Alabama, Washington, Maryland and Louisiana. “Our goal is to offer arts-based solutions to community development,” said Marissa Shadburn, Americans for the Arts field education coordinator. Broward Cultural Division Grants Management Specialist Erica Mohan coordinated with AFTA to bring the event to South Florida after attending a similar event in Oakland, California. “I was grateful AFTA considered coming here. We were very lucky,” Mohan said. “During the Oakland workshop, art agencies from 48 states were being represented.” She thought “It would be a really great opportunity to teach local artists and eventually develop our own version of this program.”


Artists attending “Artists at the Community Development Table" Workshop in Broward County; Durante Blais-Billie, Cultural Ambassador of the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Photos by Downtown Photo

The workshop was well timed as the Broward Cultural Division begins a new focus on restructuring its significant grant program and goal of working together with the local community. “We’re thankful to Erica for her efforts in helping to bring this here,” said Broward Cultural Division Grants Administrator James Shermer. “We’re always looking for new ways to be more involved with the community.” Talks of a potential follow up workshop are currently in the early planning stages. “Our goal is to talk about how artists can work in our community and how important they are,” said Roseann Weiss, a creative strategist who worked at the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis for 14 years and was a major force behind the Community Arts Training Institute, which has inspired more than 300 artists to collaborate. Weiss was a leader of the Fort Lauderdale workshop along with artist Pacia Anderson. The duo delivered practical tips and tools aimed at empowering artists to become forces in their communities, develop community identity and work together to overcome challenges. “Artists need training and to talk about what the issues are,” Weiss said. “It’s important to also be working in communities you’re not necessarily a part of. It’s not something that happens overnight. Relationships are key.” Photos by Downtown Photo

THE WORKSHOP BROUGHT TOGETHER DOZENS OF ARTISTS FOR AN HONEST DISCUSSION ABOUT WHAT ART REALLY BRINGS TO THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TABLE. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE SPACES | ARTISTS AT THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TABLE WORKSHOP

WE NEED TO BE VERY INTENTIONAL IN THE ARTS ABOUT EQUITY AND HAVING AN AWARENESS ABOUT THE CULTURE WE'RE CREATING IS VERY IMPORTANT...

Top three photos: Artists attending “Artists at the Community Development Table" Workshop in Broward County; Bottom photo: Artist/Instructor Tara Chadwick speaking with attendee. Top photo by Madelyn Smith; bottom three photos by Downtown Photo

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FUNDED BY THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION, THIS WORKSHOP ALSO POSED THE QUESTION OF HOW ARTISTS CAN WORK TOGETHER TO INSPIRE POSITIVE CHANGE IN THE COMMUNITY. Anderson shared the story of The Pink House, which served as an arts and culture community hub for several years before it shut its doors in 2016. “The Pink House was a very transformative place for so many,” said Anderson. “What made it so special is art was never a separate thing there. It was everything.” The art of people creating culture and not the other way around was also a central talking point for Anderson. “We need to be very intentional in the arts about equity and having an awareness about the culture we’re creating is very important,” Anderson added. For this workshop, South Florida-based poet, playwright, director and educator Darius Daughtry and Tara Chadwick, whose titles include transformative art catalyst, community cultural consultant, museologist and curator, also led segments and group exercises. “This workshop was about being part of an intentional process to build the capacity of local community in Broward and to bring artists awareness of their participation in community development,” Chadwick said. “ “Putting the art and the artist back in community development is crucial to our next 100 years and next thousand years,” Chadwick said. “We need to relate to each other.” Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this workshop also posed the question of how artists can work together to inspire positive change in the community. “I work with core artists and building community through storytelling,” said Daughtry, who is also Founder and Artistic Director of the Art Prevails Project, a not-for-profit organization rooted in theater and creative writing designed to educate and inspire through cultural experiences. “We are complete experts on what’s happening in our city from societal issues to social justice. When all else fails, art prevails. We’re being more intentional about the work that’s actually happening and by working together, we’re having varied voices at the table.” Photos by Downtown Photo

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CREATIVE SOLUTIONS | KICKSTARTER ARTS CAMPAIGN

7 STEPS FOR LAUNCHING A SUCCESSFUL

KICKSTARTER ARTS CAMPAIGN Seven Steps for Launching a

Successful Kickstarter Arts Campaign

Crowdfunding is impacting the arts world, and artists and organizations are capitalizing on this resource that offers wide-ranging opportunity. By By BAJA Helen Writer Wolt Helen Wolt

others on Kickstarter, which is around 33 percent,” Massart said. Dance and theater campaigns have the highest rate with 60 percent rowdfunding is impacting arts world,projects and artists and said Jessica Massart, funded,senior followed by 59 percent percent in music. “Our mission, at its simplest, is to the bring creative to life,” performance lead in forcomics dance and and 50 theater at Kickstarter, organizations are capitalizing on this that offers Kickstarter lets creators pitch ideas directlyKickstarter to potenthe world’s largest crowdfunding platform forresource creatives. It has a proven record.The In its art, dance,model photography and theater categories, wide-ranging tial supporters, free from the confines of traditional gatekeepers. Arts boasts more thanopportunity. $70 million raised for 10,000 artistic projects. It reflects a contemporary trend in the future of arts funding, said “Our mission, at its simplest, bring creative to than life,” others on Kickstarter, Browardwhich Cultural Division Administrator “Across the platform, our rateisoftosuccess [in Arts]projects is higher is around 33Grants percent,” Massart said.James DanceShermer. and said Jessica Massart, senior performance lead for dance and theater theater campaigns have the highest rate with 60 percent funded, followed by 59 percent in comics and 50 percent in music. at Kickstarter, the world’s largest crowdfunding platform for “It allows investors to be on the ground level, which is appealing to creatives. It has amodel proven record. In its art,ideas dance, photography and supporters,the of donors,” Shermer said. The Kickstarter lets creators pitch directly to potential freenew fromgeneration the confines of traditional gatekeepers. It reflects a contheater categories, Kickstarter Arts boasts more than $70 million temporary trend in the future of arts funding, said Broward Cultural Division Grants Administrator James Shermer. raised for 10,000 artistic projects The Cultural Division recently presented several workshops with Massart and her colleague Daniel “It allows investors to be on the ground level, which is appealing to the new generation of donors,” Shermer said.Sharp, whose focus is photogra“Across the platform, our rate of success [in Arts] is higher than phy, public art, and political art. Some key takeaways:

C

The Cultural Division recently presented several workshops with Massart and her colleague Daniel Sharp, whose focus is photography, public art, and political art. Some key takeaways:

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All photos © Downtown Photo


IN ITS ART, DANCE, PHOTOGRAPHY AND THEATER CATEGORIES, KICKSTARTER ARTS BOASTS MORE THAN $70 MILLION RAISED FOR 10,000 ARTISTIC PROJECTS. Step 1: the THE end in mind STEP 1:Begin BEGINwith WITH END IN MIND Factors that boost a Kickstarter campaign include an engaging story and video, setting a realistic monetary goal and connecting with your audience. Rewards that resonate with backers at various levels are an asset, too. Massart recommends a six-week planning window. Kickstarter’s online tools can help build a project page from draft to launch and the site will save your progress as you edit your page so you can be sure every step supports your end goal. Step 2: story with a call to action STEP 2:Tell TELLa compelling A COMPELLING STORY WITH A CALL TO ACTION Your story should draw backers into your world. Be sincere. Address the hard questions such as where will the funds go and what are the risks. But keep it “short and sweet,” Sharp said. Position your call to action near the top so it’s clear. Use bullet points, images and headers to break the text into easy-to-read chunks. Avoid formal grant-writing lingo. This is a chance to communicate on a personal level. Anything that hits the “nitty gritty” and gets people excited, Massart said. Step 3: a great video VIDEO STEP 3:Shoot SHOOT A GREAT It doesn’t have to be fancy. Even a high quality phone camera can produce a good film if lighting and sound ring clear. Keep it short— no more than two minutes—and show your “ask” in the first 20 seconds, Sharp said. Tie the clip to your story by repeating text and headers. Step 4: I expect? STEP 4:What WHATcan CAN I EXPECT? Kickstarter fees claim about 8 percent of the total of fully funded campaigns. Its all-or-nothing structure reduces risk for both backers and creators by awarding only fully funded projects. Donors’ credit card pledges are not charged until a campaign attains its goal. Reaching the right audience at the right price point is essential. Most successful campaigns aim to raise no more than $10,000. For instance,

75 percent of fully funded projects are fueled by only 25 backers. “If your project tells a compelling story it should exist in the world,” Sharp said. “And if someone will want to give you money, $5, $10, or $100, they think that story should exist.” Social media can help spread the word. Step 5: enticing rewards STEP 5:Offer OFFER ENTICING REWARDS Donor rewards should reflect the project without adding a costly task or complication to the fund drive. Mementos are a good choice, but beware of production costs. And “everyone already has 30 tote bags and T-shirts,” Sharp said. Think about an experiential event such as a potluck dinner in the studio or an acknowledgment in an exhibition. Sharp recommends five to seven reward tiers targeted to donations of $25 to $100. Step 6: travels far STEP 6:AAcampaign CAMPAIGN TRAVELS FAR Beyond financial goals, consider the promotional angle and Kickstarter's ability to increase awareness or test demand for your work. A campaign can build buzz for ticket sales or an installation. Kickstarter’s one-to-one backer messaging lets you reach new fans. Additionally, Kickstarter can take a campaign to a wider global community or ethnic group. Projects can’t support a cause such as hurricane relief but they can fund concepts, activities and products beyond what grants can accomplish. “You’re not geographically tied to the fundraising,” Shermer said. “Artists who live on the East Coast can crowdfund projects in Chicago or Los Angeles.” Step 7: from the pros STEP 8:Get GEThelp HELP FROM THE PROS Watch videos and learn from winning campaigns on Kickstarter.art/ projects. Creators who seek guidance from the experts at Kickstarter can often lift their success rate to 90 percent, Massart said. She invites users to submit questions through the website’s contact page on kickstarter.art.

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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POMPANO BEACH

CULTURAL CENTER

FIRST FLEET NASA’s Space Shuttle Program 1981-1986

P HOTOGRAPHS

BY

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EXHIBITION RUNS APRIL 10 - JUNE 30 ARTIST’S TALK | MAY 7 | 6:30PM Funding for this organization is provided in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners as recommended by the Broward Cultural Council.


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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS:

WHY YOU MIGHT NEED TO MOVE TO BE SUCCESSFUL By Stewart Konrad If direct work experience is the only way to get to the cutting edge, but the cutting edge is 1,600 miles away, that may be where you or your business must go to keep up. Industries often cluster in specific spots, especially in new and emerging industries. In the past, industries often grouped around resources or customers, but with globalization and low transport costs, new industries tend to cluster around knowledge and expertise. Silicon Valley isn't the world's dominant tech hub because people mine silicon there; it's because that's where the best computer engineers already live.

Even with advanced communications technology, nothing beats faceto-face contact, especially when it is unexpected or informal. In industry clusters, people often bump into people from other companies, helping spread interesting ideas that spur creativity and innovation in other companies. Face-to-face contact also makes it easier to secure financing from major investors.

Why Industry Clusters During Microsoft's early years, its founders, including Bill Gates, decided they should be in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems created the first commercially successful microcomputer. Microsoft got its start writing software for MITS's Altair 8800, but the startup outgrew its reliance MITS and moved to a different tech cluster on the West Coast.

Outsiders Aren't Always Outliers Even after it moved, Microsoft settled outside Seattle instead of in Silicon Valley. That might help explain why Microsoft always seems to operate a little outside the Silicon Valley bubble. Sometimes the company appears to be off in a world of its own, which can lead to great innovation, such as Windows 95. However, it can also result in them playing catch-up, such as Microsoft's failed attempts to enter the smartphone market.

Some industries form clusters for obvious reasons. There are a lot of mines in Sudbury, Ontario, because that's where an ancient meteor impact left a lot of nickel behind. Manufacturing industries used to develop close to their consumer base because transport costs and tariffs made it practical to do so. Industries that supply each other also cluster together to increase efficiency.

Being in an industry cluster is useful for many companies, especially smaller companies that supply and service larger companies. Proximity helps build connections, both through formal business agreements and through informal chance meetings. But being inside an industry cluster can also trap companies inside industry bubbles.

But container shipping and globalization have cut transport costs, and tariffs have come down, so why are there new industry clusters? In the Cambridge Journal of Economics, researchers Peter Maskell and Anders Malmberg say it's because clustering helps modern companies trade knowledge and expertise. (academic.oup.com/cje/article-abstract/23/2/167/1679278) Maskell and Anders say three features define the modern economy: 1. The value of knowledge itself. Both skilled employees and data are increasingly important for companies. Data can move anywhere, but, "certain types of knowledge can only be learned through experience." In emerging industries, there's often no way to learn or even find out about the most advanced technology without being in that industry, or at least knowing people in it.

Photo by John Schnobrich

The Power of Face-to-Face Learning In another paper published in the Journal of Economic Geography, (academic.oup.com/joeg/article-abstract/4/4/351/1005137) researchers add that three main factors drive companies to cluster together: access to resources and markets, the availability of workers, and most importantly, the ability to have face-to-face contact.

2. Rapid product changes. The knowledge economy needs so much expertise and data because businesses are continually innovating to create new products. If there isn't a new and better phone, why get rid of your old one? 3. The embrace of change. It is now the purpose of "economic agents," (i.e., entrepreneurs, startups and corporations) to be creative and push change. In this age of "move fast and break things," everyone wants to be the most creative and innovative company on the block.

The Dot-Com Bubble and Problems with Clusters Governments often use incentives and subsidies to try and create new clusters, but some are more successful than others. For example, many former industrial cities in the northeastern United States have encouraged the development of high-tech industries with subsidies. Unfortunately, it's often tough to build a new cluster from scratch. Industry clusters aren't perfect systems. Sometimes entire industry clusters get caught up in their own hype, and everyone from engineers to investors start thinking in the same way. During the dot-com bubble, anyone and everyone poured money into internet companies without any idea how it was going to pay back. The upside of working in an industry cluster is having a free flow of information. However, this access can also be a downside if someone decides to steal company secrets or spread malicious rumors. Some companies working on highly specialized products might prefer to be off on their own where prying ears and eyes can't steal their ideas. If you genuinely want to be a part of a growing industry concentrated halfway around the world, you might have a tough time, not only because of the distance between you and the best supply chains but also because of the time and effort you may have to invest in learning what you need to know. Moving to find success is hard, and industry clusters aren't perfect, but sometimes the only way to be successful is to be where the action is. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

THINK BEFORE YOU CLICK: HOW TO SPOT A FAKE NEWS STORY By Bea Conrad Much has been made of the fake news crisis, from the role Russia played in the manipulation of American politics to the steps Facebook, Twitter and other platforms are taking to vet the stories appearing on their sites. What often gets lost in the shuffle is the role ordinary users play in the crisis. If you have ever shared a story after reading just the headline or commented on a story you never bothered to read, you are part of the fake news problem. If fake news is to be defeated, everyone needs to do their part. You do not have to be an editor or professional fact checker to spot a fake story; ferreting out the facts is easier than you think. So take on the clickbait sites and fake news profiteers and stop them in their tracks. Here are some easy ways to spot a fake news story and stop the spread of dangerous misinformation. Check the Quality of the Site While some fake news stories are planted by malicious governments or political dirty tricksters, the vast majority are put there for a more pedestrian purpose. Fake news is big business, and business is very good indeed. If you want to separate the wheat from the chaff and spot a fake news story, start by looking at the site where the post originated. If you land on a sloppy site filled with flashing banners and annoying pop-up ads, you can be pretty sure the story is not worth sharing. Go Beyond the Headline Clicking on the original story and checking out the site where it was posted serves a number of purposes. It allows you to assess the quality (or lack thereof ) of the site, but it also gives you a chance to look beyond the headline.

Photo by Elijah O'Donnell

A surprising number of story sharers never bother to look beyond the headline; they simply share the shocking information as it lands in their social media feed. Were they to go beyond the headline, they may find a deeper story, or a completely different one. Headline writers have learned their clickbait lessons well, and they work hard to craft the most enticing intros. Sometimes that means stretching the proof, and sometimes it means twisting it beyond all recognition. In many cases, the underlying story has little in common with the salacious headline, so delve deeper before you click share.

Recognize Your Confirmation Bias There is a strange psychological factor at play on social media, one the crafters of fake news stories have used to their advantage. That psychological impulse is known as confirmation bias, a strong desire to confirm our preexisting beliefs. If you think Donald Trump is the worst president ever, or George Soros is hiding behind every rock, stories that confirm those existing biases are more likely to get your attention, and your clicks. And since social media is built on algorithms, it tends to serve up what you already believe. As you move through your newsfeed, keep this confirmation bias in the back of your mind. Instead of just clicking and sharing, take a few minutes to recognize the psychological manipulation at work here. That pause can reduce the impulse to share everything you see, and help you become a smarter news consumer. Look for the Same Story Elsewhere The screaming headlines and salacious stories in your newsfeed certainly look like big news. If the news is really this important, you should be able to find it on dozens of sites, not just the one your Facebook friend shared. Before you click and share a breaking news story, take a minute to look for those facts elsewhere on the web. If the Pope really did endorse an American presidential candidate, or NASA really announced the sun will disappear for a month, that story should be everywhere. If it appears on just a handful of low quality sites, you can be pretty sure it is a fake. Fake news is not going away, not when it pays so well. The clickbait artists and headline writers have discovered a winning formula, and they will continue to spread their disinformation as long as users click on it. If you want to be part of the solution, keep a firm grip on your smartphone and avoid sharing until you have vetted the story thoroughly. Now that you know how to spot a fake, there is no excuse for sharing questionable information with your followers and friends.

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THE THREE Cs OF ILLUSTRATION

PART 3: COMMUNICATION

(an unintentional focus on 1982 and a little too much about a certain banana) Words and Illustration by Jon Hunt Illustrator Tommy Arnold has this to say about the role of artists: “For all types of artists, our shared singular aim is to communicate a message; that’s it. While that’s easy to say, it’s difficult to achieve – and in the process of learning to do it we can forget that elegantly crafted…paintings… aren’t the only way to do it. They are a means to an end. So, too, are the components of painting. Brushwork is a means to an end; the distribution of edges is a means to an end; value is a means to an end. In order to know how you can best communicate… you must know what you want to communicate.”1 In that single quote, Arnold sums up what I have been attempting to articulate in these three essays: My conviction that concept and craftsmanship serve as the compulsory foundation for our ultimate goal as artists—COMMUNICATION. Unless we are satisfied with only making vacuous decorative motifs, then our goal should be to facilitate effective communication of a concept or narrative articulated with the appropriate style and level of craftsmanship. But what exactly is effective communication? And why is it important anyway? 28

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[com·mu·ni·ca·tion] \ kə-ˌmyü-nə-ˈkā-shən\ noun. 1a: a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. also: exchange of information2 Music is similar in many ways to drawing and painting, but with a distinct audio rather than visual language. When it comes to classical music, musicianship matters. Every note must be played perfectly if the composer’s vision is to be expressed properly. Paradoxically, it is energy and directness that matters most in genres like punk and hardcore. Proper technique takes a back seat to expressiveness. A great example of a band utilizing specific production and musical techniques to communicate a mood is the song “Sleep Comes Down” recorded in 1982 by the English alt-rock band The Psychedelic Furs. The song was described by author Ira A. Robbins as “sweetly woozy”. Disorienting, psychedelic, and soporific, the lyrics and instrumentation play off of each other to evoke a downward spiral of acquiescence (reinforced by the artsy 1980s imagery of the music video3).


As I remind my Art Appreciation students—you shouldn’t have to personally like a song, painting or poem to be able to understand and fairly critique it. But one needs to have some means of insight into the artist’s intentions. The messages broadcast by most illustrations and traditional realist paintings are implicit in the art itself. The most adept illustrators are able to craft images that can stand alone, without the crutch of the text that helped to inspire them. Conceptual abstract art is a whole ‘nother animal, however. I discussed one of my biggest issues with conceptual art in part one of this series: Since the artist’s idea is supposed to be the most important thing, then the physical artifact is often seen as a begrudgingly necessary placeholder for that idea. The tangible construct is a mere signpost pointing to the full roadmap of the concept buried in a multi-page artist statement. Because the physical portion of the art on its own is relegated to red-headed stepchild status, the viewer is often left scratching their heads in confusion over the meaning of the art. Is that black plastic bag in the corner an Ironic Statement On Our Disposable Consumer Society or did the janitor forget to take out the trash? In my opinion, this contextual confusion and lack of clear communication in much of conceptual art weakens the impact of the art’s intended message. A perfect example of this breed of lackluster conceptual assemblage became the focus of a media frenzy during the 2019 Art Basel Fair in Miami, Florida. I’m referring of course to Comedian by Maurizio Cattelan (although hardly anyone seems to know the actual title of this now infamous work since there was no placard to identify it). Most people know it only as ‘the banana duct-taped to a white wall’. Yeh—that one. I’m bound to get some flack for this diatribe, but here I go anyway… I don’t get it. Sorry. Not sorry. Call me an uncultured neanderthal, but I do not see the “art” in this hackneyed display. Where some have chosen to ascribe to the banana a witty and sophisticated explication about the role of the artist in society, I can only recognize a trite ploy to manipulate the outrage culture of social media and feed the insatiable maw of sensationalistic news outlets. There is no evidence of craftsmanship, no technique and seemingly no concept at all other than the choice to use materials that would guarantee acrimony and confusion outside of the sacred circle of intellectual elites who “get it”. If you were to read the articles and essays written in defense of the banana you would think that it has defined a new aesthetic benchmark for the artistic canon of Western Culture—despite the fact that this sort of sardonic art-as-commentary-on-the-state-ofart has already been done to death by artists like Duchamp and Warhol. It all ends up sounding like a bunch of pseudo-intellectual apologist retcon nonsense to me. During an online conversation about the banana, illustrator Karla Ortiz had this to say about the debacle: “Personally, I am not angry at the grifters who take advantage of this ridiculousness. I am angry at the institutions, museums, auction houses and “experts” that continue to perpetuate… a grift that deprives us of what our collective and cultural perception of what higher visual arts can be. I am tired of this grift that gate-keeps and deprives the livelihood of honest actors: Honest inquisitive humans who create, who learn, who can tell stories, and leave you gasping at the beauty. I’m tired of this grift, that snatches away from the public the transformative properties of visual beauty; the inspiring recognition of human ability and the shared connection truly beautiful visuals can give us…Imagine telling the same cynical joke for 100 years and expecting it to be a hit every time. This has been done over and over and over and it’s so tired. So very…tired.”4

I couldn’t agree more. I proudly classify myself as an illustrator. I love narrative and symbolic art. I strive to create visuals that attempt to evoke the sublime while remaining grounded in the structure and physics of the real world. If I need to write an essay to explain my art to you, I have failed miserably at my job. Don’t get me wrong--I strongly believe that there is no one correct way to make art. Artists can choose from a broad spectrum of techniques to best communicate their ideas. Non-objective abstraction has its uses. But it is at best a shorthand; a fleeting glimpse of a concept—primitive grunts indicating broad, generic emotion. It revels in the id and communicates with the directness of an infant. Storytelling is next to impossible because of these limitations. In non-objective conceptual work much of the interpretation is left up to the viewer, leading to many contradictory meanings. A Pollock action painting can “make you feel something” much as un-structured post-modern poetry evokes emotion yet falls short of telling a cohesive story. Hyper-realist art has the opposite issue. It takes an enormous amount of skill and training to render subjects in a realistic manner. Much praise is heaped on artists who work in this style simply because of the sheer amount of work that it obviously takes to create at this level of craftsmanship. Yet some realist artists limit themselves to crafting empty vessels—polished and pretty art without any conceptual depth that could grab us emotionally or spark an intellectual exploration. Everything about this type of art is concrete and the goal is to be accessible, immutable, and easily interpreted—much the same as an autopsy. This style of art calls to mind the trope of the obsessive compulsive academic who is so worried about being misunderstood that she dedicates an entire page of her thesis to defining the etymology of a single word. Borrrring… And speaking of “boring”, what do all of my digressions and big words actually mean? In my own experience, the most satisfying and effective means of visual communication falls on a spectrum somewhere between the two extremes of non-objectivism and hyper-realism. I mean-why not choose to harness the clarity, structure and recognizable iconography of realism and integrate it with the energy and poetic ambiguity of abstract expressionism? This is why comics and cartoons are so well-loved. They utilize exaggeration, targeted abstraction and hieratic emphasis to make things instantly understandable. Cartoons and caricatures are beyond reality in a way that makes them accessible across all age groups, cultures and spans of history. And by the way, it’s not the realism that makes Classical Greek sculptures so powerful, but the way the sculptors selectively distorted the proportions and musculature to give their gods and athletes a superhuman appearance. Which leads us to Bladerunner. I can think of no better mix of poetry and science from recent decades than the “more human than human” replicants from Ridley Scott’s 1982 film. At the climax of the movie, artificial human Roy Batty (played by Rutger Hauer) ends a dizzying fight sequence (and his life) with one of the most moving soliloquys about the beauty and transience of life ever spoken5. Obviously, this is not something that would happen in real life, but Ladies and Gentlemen--this is ART. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1. http://www.muddycolors.com/2019/08/confirmed-kills/ 2. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/communication 3. You can watch and listen to “Sleep Comes Down” on youtube: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=O56Zefq4Ac8 4. Karla Ortiz is a painter, illustrator and concept artist for games and films. Check out her portfolio here: http://www.karlaortizart.com/ 5. Hauer’s “Tears in rain” monologue can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=NoAzpa1x7jU

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CONSCIOUS | PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS

PROTECTING PARADISE

THE WORK OF MICHAEL PATRICK O'NEILL By Ashleigh Walters

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he photographs Michael Patrick O’Neill captures seem to straddle the definitions of lucky moments and perfectly staged compositions, but neither is the truth. In almost three decades of worldwide travel and more than 3,500 dives, the Palm Beach Gardens-based photographer has combined hard work, passion and patience to tell stories through his extraordinary shots.    He has worked within inches of 1,000 pound mako sharks and a 16-foot green anaconda, but he has never been hurt by wildlife.    “Most of the danger, not surprisingly, is caused by careless people.  People pointing loaded spear guns at other divers, careless boat drivers not paying attention to scuba divers on the surface with the dive flag, boats breaking down in the middle of nowhere, and so forth. The animal that stands on two legs and looks a lot like you and me is the most dangerous one,” he said.    Humans can be dangerous to each other, but also dangerous to the natural world.  O’Neill has often photographed humans’ impacts on Florida's environment.    “Unfortunately, Florida is a basket case of environmental problems given the state’s explosive growth, now and in the future.”

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Entirely self-taught, O’Neill has been awarded some of the world’s most prestigious photography accolades, but much of his pride comes from his efforts to educate young people. O’Neill has written and photographed seven non-fiction marine life books, and presented to more than a half-million children in more than 400 schools.   He delights in the pursuit of what might be in front of his lens tomorrow.       “We are just starting to scratch the surface of the ocean, and we know so little,” he said.    facebook.com/mpopphoto instagram.com/mpophotography   Ashleigh Walters (www.AshleighWalters.net) is a painter and Anchorwoman at WPTV NewsChannel 5, which is viewed in the Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. WPTV is committed to PROTECTING PARADISE, by raising awareness of environmental issues and showing what’s being done to improve the quality of life in Florida. Find extensive coverage at www.WPTV.com/ProtectingParadise 

Headshot by Robert Nelson Photography


All photos © Michael Patrick O’Neill

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CONSCIOUS | PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS

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All photos © Michael Patrick O’Neill

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CONSCIOUS | ARTSERVE PRESENTS: CHANGING LANDSCAPES

CHANGING LANDSCAPES: Art Interventions for a Planet in Crisis

ArtServe, a non-profit that supports artists committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, is promoting environmental awareness and sustainable practices with its latest exhibition, Changing Landscapes: Art Interventions for a Planet in Crisis. On display from April 9 to May 27, the multimedia exhibition presents ecologically thematic works and performances that explore threats to the Florida Everglades, Lake Okeechobee and the surrounding seas. “Through engagements and programming, we’re celebrating climate solutions and ecological sustainability initiatives,” said ArtServe Executive Director Craig W. Johnson. “The goal of this exhibition is to show how humanity must be anchored and connected to the natural environment socially, economically, philosophically and spiritually.” Curated by ArtServe Chief Curator Sophie Bonet, and just in time for Earth Day on April 22, Changing Landscapes highlights and brings awareness to the human impact on South Florida’s fragile ecosystem. Featured artists and collaborators include Before it’s Too Late, Lizzy Taber, Cheryl Maeder, 1,000 Mermaids and Sibel Kocabasi, among others. Changing Landscapes kicks off with a VIP reception on Saturday, April 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at ArtServe, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. The reception includes an open wine bar, passed appetizers, exclusive performance pieces and tours of ArtServe’s creative laboratory, where artists experiment with concepts tied to environmental impact. During the reception, ArtServe will also award its Broward County Arts & Culture Visionary distinction to local leaders and ‘green’ influencers. 34

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For a family-friendly art outing, ArtServe is hosting its Changing Landscapes community reception on Saturday, April 25 from to 3 to 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 and include pizza, punch and art activities. Admission is free for ArtServe members and children 12 and under. Included in Changing Landscapes are: creative works that highlight and bring awareness to the Florida Everglades juxtaposed against performing and visual art works that ask audiences to consider the needs of our global environment and its inhabitants; reading, video and listening stations located throughout the exhibition that will provide participants with facts, insights and actionable items that cultivate knowledge and individual participation in areas of conservation, climate protection, sustainability and environmental advocacy; and a fully realized performance during select exhibition days that brings together the visual and performing arts to take audiences on journey through the Florida Everglades. Also included is Project Color Hive, an immersive, multisensory installation created by Art Hive Magazine in collaboration with artists Nicole Gallucio and Ashleigh Walters. Project Color Hive is a traveling, vibrantly painted ‘greenhouse’ that guests can enter to learn more about the importance of protecting pollinators. Furthermore, with the support of a $15,000 grant from PNC Arts Alive, Changing Landscapes will welcome approximately 1,000 thirdgrade students from Broward County Title I public schools to ArtServe, where they will experience the exhibition and learn about environmental stewardship during field trips.


Curated by ArtServe Chief Curator Sophie Bonet, and just in time for Earth Day on April 22, Changing Landscapes highlights and brings awareness to the human impact on South Florida’s fragile ecosystem.

“With the PNC Foundation’s support of Changing Landscapes, we’re able to inspire awareness of issues affecting the environment and engage and educate young people about environmental advocacy through the arts,” Johnson added. “This is the core of ArtServe’s position as a creative laboratory – leveraging art as a tool to fundamentally improve the current and future state of our community.” Admission to the ongoing visual art exhibition is free and does not include performances. ArtServe gallery hours are Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information about Changing Landscapes and ArtServe, visit artserve.org Left, Installations by Cheryl Maeder; Top, Project Color Hive by Art Hive Magazine

All photos courtesy of the artists

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CONSCIOUS | ARTSERVE PRESENTS: (DIS)OBEDIENT

(DIS)OBEDIENT: Redefining Feminism in a Fractured Reality

ArtServe, a non-profit that supports artists committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, presents (DIS)OBEDIENT: Redefining Feminism in a Fractured Reality from March 4 to 29 in conjunction with Women’s History Month and in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment. “The 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment serves as an inspiration for our artistic exploration of contemporary perspectives and movements in women’s rights,” said ArtServe Executive Director Craig W. Johnson. “This historic centennial is an exceptional opportunity to honor a milestone of our democracy and to explore its relevance in today’s continued fight for equal rights.” Curated by ArtServe Chief Curator Sophie Bonet and multidisciplinary artist and activist Carol-Anne McFarlane, (DIS)OBEDIENT explores the issue of gender inequality through visual and performing arts. (DIS)OBEDIENT offers commentary on topics ranging from wage disparities and exploitative advertising to underrepresentation in the art world and more. “We are living in a time where we must actively make spaces safe for others and encourage the sharing of perspectives and experiences that are different from our own,” said McFarlane. “The artwork in this exhibition is in direct dialogue with the sociopolitical structures that support division, simplification and erasure. These artists are confronting controlling images and stereotypes, binary reductions, erasure, sociopolitical challenges brought on by systemic inequality and injustice.”

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Activations and experiences scheduled throughout the exhibition include: (DIS)OBEDIENT: Redefining Feminism in a Fractured Reality Opening Reception Thursday, March 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. Join ArtServe as it kicks off (DIS)OBEDIENT: Redefining Feminism in a Fractured Reality with an opening reception on March 5. Explore the artistic representation of women in history and today, connect with South Florida’s leading female artists, experience a positive creative platform where self-identified female artists showcase significant works and join the discussion of ideas around gender, sexuality and culture. During the opening reception, ArtServe will also award its Broward County Arts & Culture Visionary distinction to major feminist influencers in the community. Unleashed Alchemy Workshop Thursday, March 12 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Presented in partnership with Melissa Vlahos, founder of The Unleashed Project, Unleashed Alchemy is a self-love, body-positive art experience. Unleashed Alchemy combines therapeutic art and somatic elements by understanding, identifying and embodying emotions as energetic feelings, sounds or colors in the body. Participants can enliven this relational experience by using self-applied body paint as a tangible means of expression.

Photos courtesy of ArtServe


(DIS)OBEDIENT explores the issue of gender inequality through visual and performing arts.

In this workshop, guests will learn methods to increase awareness of one’s inner landscape. The workshop will provide tactics to help reduce stress and tension, reset the autonomic nervous system, create a health dialogue with one’s inner critic, feel the vibration of sound to assist the clearing and balancing of emotions, and access better sleep and happier, healthier states of being with less anxiety. The workshop will conclude with an alchemizing sound bath. Unleased Alchemy is a by-donation workshop open to individuals ages 13 and up. No yoga or dance experience is necessary. There will be no nudity in this workshop. Thou Art Woman’s (MIS)BEHAVE Exhibition and Reception Friday, March 13 from 6 to 9 p.m. A collaborative effort with ArtServe’s (DIS)OBEDIENT exhibition, (MIS) BEHAVE: Lesbian Folklore & More explores the representation of lesbians in society and how those representations have been revered, reclaimed, rejected and redefined. The exhibition delves into how gender expression, gender presentation and lesbian sexuality have been used a means of creating circles of identity and acceptance in today’s landscape. (MIS)BEHAVE is organized by G. Wright Muir and features a musical performance by Kim Jay. Screening of “The F Word,” A Documentary Film By Robert Adanto Saturday, March 21 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. In conjunction with the (DIS)OBEDIENT exhibition, ArtServe will host a free screening of “The F Word,” a documentary film by Robert Adanto that chronicles radical fourth wave feminist performances and features interviews with Narcissister, Ann Hirsch, Kate Durbin, Leah Schrager, Go! Push Pops and other influential feminist artists. The film also features Dr. Kathy Battista, director of contemporary art at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in New York and author of “Re-negotiating the Body: Feminist Artists in 1970s London” as an onscreen expert. For more information about (DIS)OBEDIENT and ArtServe, visit artserve.org

Top photo © Joanna Nix; bottom photo © Hanson Lu

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AIDA RODRIGUEZ IS A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH

By Marcela Villa

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reativity comes in many forms, and Aida Rodriguez is here to show us all the different ways she can use her artistry to speak her mind. Aida is taking the comedy world by storm and representing for Latinos and women epically in her Netflix standup special on Tiffany Haddish’s They Ready. She speaks of her trials and tribulations of growing up Latina in America and the unique struggles that led her to that stage. Apart from her hilariously candid humor in her standup special, Aida is continuing to add to her creative accolades, and is now working on producing a new show for HBO Max that will be based on her life and that she will be acting in. She spoke with Art Hive about what it means to be a Latina in media, and the spontaneous nature of her creative pursuits. She inspires us to see how passions can take you anywhere you allow them to, as long as you put in the work, and can be even more rewarding when you remember to pay it forward. Marcela Villa: Hello Aida! I am so happy to be speaking with you today - a Latina representing in comedy. Aida Rodriguez: I am as well! I’m just happy to be talking to women and just being able to connect with other women specifically in other fields who tell our story. There is a serious void of Latinas in the media, period. It’s crazy because it took The View 20 years to put a Latina on there. It’s pretty unfortunate - they don’t think we have a point of view, which is the sad thing, because we do. They think we are a monolith, and so it’s really a lot of work because we have to work to unpack and dispel those things. MV: How does it feel to be pretty much a “token Latina” comedian today? AR: Sometimes it feels bad because I am not the narcissist that wants to be the only one. I know a lot of people of color who are just happy to be the only one, and for me, I want to look around and see a community of people that look like me telling our stories in all the varied forms. So, it feels good that there is some representation, but it also feels like there’s a lot of work that needs to be done.

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MV: You mentioned in your Netflix special that you lived with your kids in your car at one point; people usually choose a “safe” job when they are struggling in the hopes that something “safe” will guarantee their success. What motivated you to use your creativity to get you out of a hard place? AR: Well I had a job - the thing is I had a full-time job. I worked at a financial firm AND I was homeless. I don’t think people realize how hard it is to receive a living wage right now, and with the cost of things. . . that was about 10 years ago. I lived in California where the cost of living is very high, I wasn’t getting child support and so I didn’t get any alimony; it was all me. I became homeless because of a really messed up situation where I worked and my company did me wrong; they were using my apartment as a write-off for their office in California, and when they stopped paying the rent, they didn’t tell me. I went from living in a place assuming that my life was okay, to a sheriff coming to my door and removing me and my children from my apartment. It was very hard and, you know, I slept in my car, but I didn’t sleep in my car for an extended amount of time. . . A lot of people love the trauma porn; they like to make themselves victims and for people to know about their stories of triumph. There are a lot of people out there who are homeless and are trying, and they just can’t cut it because things are so expensive and it’s so hard to maintain a decent life when you are working so hard and not making enough money. My creativity at the time became my therapy because I couldn’t afford to go to therapy, so comedy was the one thing that I had for myself. Even though it was a dream, for me it was a later dream because I had to take care of my family at the time. I started doing standup and it was very cathartic and just to my surprise it became something that was lucrative, but I didn’t rely on comedy to take care of my children at the time when I started. It was just something that I added on my plate in addition to being a full-time mom, having a full-time job - it was something that I chose to do for myself and it ended up becoming something that later on would take care of me.


MY CREATIVITY AT THE TIME BECAME MY THERAPY BECAUSE I COULDN’T AFFORD TO GO TO THERAPY, SO COMEDY WAS THE ONE THING THAT I HAD FOR MYSELF.

Photo by Gray Segments

Photo by Tyren Redd

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MV: How did you know that comedy would be a good outlet for you to dedicate your time to, to use as an outlet and use as therapy? What drew you to comedy? AR: A friend of mine asked me to roast her for her birthday, which was really weird cause I was like, “me?” She was like, “you don’t understand how funny you are, you know how to speak in front of people, you don’t understand I need you to do this.” I ended up roasting her, but Chris Spencer who is a comedian, and he created Real Husbands of Hollywood with Kevin Hart, they were classmates, he roasted her as well. After the roast he was like, “Aida, you’re a comedian”; he was like, “you are natural born standup comic, it's undeniable, you really need to go do some open mics because you really are a comic.” Mind you, I wanted to do standup comedy when I was a little kid because I loved comedy my whole life, but I never thought that I would; my family was like, “that’s not a real job, and that’s for men,” blah blah blah. But I went to an open mic by myself; I just crept over to an open mic and I really liked it and was like, I want to keep doing this. It just happened for me that way, it was all coincidental. I had been writing. I remember temping at a telefloral company - I was temping there and I met this woman who was married to a comedian, he was kind of a part-time comedian at the time. She was like “you want to be a comedian, don’t you?” because I would talk about it all the time; I had been writing my jokes and she would give me notes, so I started writing my jokes maybe two years before I actually even did stand up. MV: Did you watch a lot of comedy growing up? AR: I did, I used to sneak and listen to Richard Pryor with my uncles because my mom wouldn’t let me listen to that. I grew up listening to comedy in Spanish. Alvarez Guedes was Cuban, and I used to listen to him a lot growing up as well because my parents would listen to him. Yeah, I love comedy. I love Johnny Carson late night; I used to sneak to watch all of that stuff because I loved it. MV: Are there any other ways that you like to express your creativity on the side besides what we know about you today? AR: It’s funny cause I would sing; I have a spiritual god father who played in a band, and I would go out and sing with them when I could cause I love salsa music -- I love Spanish music. I am always at a karaoke bar everywhere I go because I love music and I love the art of singing and expressing yourself through song. I am an artist. I love to write, not just standup comedy or television shows or movies; I’m a prose writer so I love writing short stories. I’ve been writing since I was very little and its always been an outlet for me and it’s something that I really enjoy. MV: I read some news that you have an upcoming HBO Max project that is based on your life. What can you tell us about that? AR: It’s a show that when I did They Ready, I had already planned to go out and work on selling a show that I have been working on with my two show runners, Chris Case and Nastaran Dibai; I went out and we had been working on it for months. I have been working on a tv show idea for me for the last 3-4 years and so I finally found my tribe that I could actually do the show with. Nastaran Dibai is an Iranian woman that is the executive producer of Dear White People; she is a writer on that show. Chris Case is a guy who is always gravitating towards comedians; he did a show with Jim Jeffries, he did a show with Bill Bellamy - he just gets comedy. The three of us got together and we went out and we sold my show; we went out all over the place and TBS bought the show which became HBO Max because of the merger when AT&T bought everything. Tiffany and I had been talking about doing some stuff together; she said she wanted to produce something with me where I was acting in it, so I brought her aboard. She and I talked about it, she had been so busy and running around, so I went to HBO Max and I said I want Tiffany to produce all my shows, and so I brought her onto the show. We can’t talk about throwing the rope back and then not do it; she did it to me where she gave me the Netflix special and then I brought her onto my show and now she’s an executive producer on my show. 40

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I AM ALWAYS AT A KARAOKE BAR EVERYWHERE I GO BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC AND I LOVE THE ART OF SINGING AND EXPRESSING YOURSELF THROUGH SONG. Photo by Limor Garfinkle


ONE THING I BELIEVE IN IS DILIGENCE; YOU GOT TO BE DILIGENT AND HARDWORKING, BECAUSE WORK ETHIC SPEAKS MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE THAT YOU HAVE.

MV: That’s amazing! When can we expect to see the show? AR: We are writing it now; we are just finishing up our first draft so we got to go through the process of developing. We are looking at 2021 probably for a tv show, cause right now we are just developing the whole thing. MV: How does it feel to be able to share your life story in a different creative way? AR: It feels good at first because I come from such a proud Latina family where we don’t air out our dirty laundry and everything is in secret and everything is in private. It feels good to know that through my comedy and my story I can release people like me from shame and guilt, because we are driven so much by it. I think it’s important to just be authentic and be real. It’s important for us to tell our stories because if we don’t tell our stories and they tell our stories, it's exploitation. When we tell our stories, we are just being transparent. If we tell our stories the right way and we honor ourselves and honor our culture and our people, then we can help a lot of people who are in the same situations and predicaments that we were once in. I think it’s important to do that because I think that culturally we are bound by a lot of rules and stigmas and it’s important to release ourselves from that. MV: What did you think of Jennifer Lopez and Shakira’s performance at the Super Bowl this year? AR: I was excited about it! You always hear so much stuff about Jennifer Lopez; she is always being criticized. It drives me crazy. First and foremost, people are like, “oh my god she’s 50, she looks so good for being 50” and I’m like - we place all this ageism and these body standards that are so unfair. Jennifer Lopez looks great because she is a woman that takes care of herself, and whether she’s 25 or 50, she’s always made it a priority to take care of herself. No woman is exempt from that if they make it a priority. Do they have access to some of the things that she has access to? Probably not, but I know a lot of women that are Latina who look amazing and who are 50. I think we put so much pressure on these women and it’s constant. I think what they did was great, there was a lot of messaging. She held up that Puerto Rican flag which was against the law at one time which sent a message; it had the American flag on the other side. I saw a lot of ignorance on social media, people saying she held up that flag; they don’t know that Puerto Ricans are American, which is so bad. The cages were very symbolic. Shakira and her intersectionality as being a woman that has Lebanese and Latino culture, she honored both of them yesterday. I just thought it was beautiful, I was so moved… Bad Bunny and J Balvin… We are here, and we get ignored a lot. We get ignored at the Grammys, we get ignored at the Oscars, at the Emmys, and I just think it was a powerful move of representation, of people that are here and are using their power and their privilege to shed light on the issues of people who

make up such a big part of this population, who are overlooked when it comes to receiving their just due so I thought it was powerful. It was fun and I thought it was great. I loved that people kept including Demi Lovato in it – it’s funny because Demi Lovato said she’s not Latina – that she’s not Mexican, she’s Spanish from Spain. She did her 23 and me. I thought it was cool, I thought it was great and I was glad that they included her in the celebration and that she uses her white privilege to partake. I’m all for that, all for it. MV: I was excited to see some afro-Colombian dances... AR: Oh that was the highlight of my night! The highlight of my night was – someone tweeted and I retweeted this – Shakira had more afroLatinos on that stage than Telemundo and Univision put together, and it’s the truth. I was really excited about it, I thought it was just fire from top to bottom. I am a big Shakira fan and I love her music and I watched her evolution. When she went up there to the World [Cup] games, she used the Waka Waka song which is Las Chicas Del Can, and they are Dominican, and I love that. I love that she’s bringing her reggaeton and her use of reggaeton to the forefront, and whatever it takes, if people are going to think that Shakira showed us the way, whatever, we been doing it for years, whatever, I am happy for anybody that sheds light on us. MV: What advice would you give to other creatives? AR: One thing I believe in is diligence; you got to be diligent and hardworking, because work ethic speaks more than anything else that you have. Secondly, I think you got to be gracious and remember where you come from and never forget the people that propel you or that launch you into your fame, or your stardom, or your success. Never forget those people because those are the people you’re going to end up coming home to when these industries chew you up, spit you out, and send you home. Lastly, I think it's important to go beyond yourself as a creative, I think you establish yourself, you win, you get what you want you, do your thing, and then like on an airplane, after you put the mask on, put the mask on somebody else. Extend it. If you’re a woman, extend more opportunities to other women; if you’re Latino, go out and help Latinos. I think it’s important for us to remember to have community because we have lost a sense of community through social media and when we do that, everything is us, us, us. You can’t go alone, no matter how much you think you can, you can’t. So for me, it's important to honor those things and I stand by that.

For more on Aida, please visit funnyaida.com

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CULTURE | WPB PRESENTS IMPULSE INSTALLATION

Top, Impulse in action in Downtown West Palm Beach, photo courtesy of WPB DDA; Bottom, Impulse in action in Beacon Park in Detroit, photo courtesy of Downtown Detroit

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DOWNTOWN WEST PALM BEACH:

INTERACTIVE + IMPULSIVE Visitors to Downtown West Palm Beach will soon have the opportu-

Visitors to Downtown West Palm Beach have the opportunity to crenitytheir to create their own one-of-a-kind and light show at a new, ate own one-of-a-kind sound and sound light show at a new, temporary temporary interactive art installation called Impulse. Consisting 13 interactive art installation called Impulse. Consisting of 13 seesawsofthat seesaws that project light and sound as the seesaws are in motion, the project light and sound as the seesaws are in motion, the public will be public will be able contributeartistic to Downtown’s expression able to contribute to to Downtown’s expression artistic on the open lot on the open across the streetCoffee from at Subculture Coffee directly acrosslot thedirectly street from Subculture 512 Clematis St. at 512 installation Clematis St. Theremain installation will remain in place untilThis March The will in place until March 29, 2020. will 29, 2020. will be the first Florida of the playful installabe the This first Florida appearance of theappearance playful installation from Lateral Office and Lateral CS Design since debuted at the Place des Festivals tion from Office andit CS Design since it debuted at thein Place the Spectacles in des Montreal a fewin years ago. Thea project is des Quartier Festivalsdes in the Quartier Spectacles Montreal few years funded the West Palm Beach Development Authority ago. Thebyproject is funded by theDowntown West Palm Beach Downtown De(DDA). velopment Authority (DDA).

With use, the seesaws produce light and sound to create an everchanging composition. By increasing light intensity and emitting a random sound sequence, Impulse is designed to produce experiences that reflect both intensity and calm. When not in use, the seesaws will remain illuminated throughout the nighttime, creating a festive atmosphere even when not in use.  The popular attraction is currently on a global tour produced by the Canadian agency Creos. Previous locations include Brussels, London, Chicago and Gold Coast, Australia. “Vibrant new experiences like this always draw a crowd and energize the entire area,” said the DDA’s Executive Director, Raphael Clemente. “Since this installation will be so close to the Virgin Trains USA station, we expect even more visitors to check it out and patronize nearby businesses. We know from previous installations like The Musical Swings and The Pool that West Palm Beach residents and visitors love interactive art.” Impulse will be open daily on a first-come, first-serve basis between the hours of  10 a.m. and 11 p.m.  The DDA will be providing seating around the installation for those waiting to take a turn.

IMPULSE IS DESIGNED TO PRODUCE EXPERIENCES THAT REFLECT BOTH INTENSITY AND CALM.

“Interactive art is important to Downtown West Palm Beach not only because it attracts more people to our District, but because of the joy and memories it creates when they visit,” said Raphael Clemente. “The sense of urgency created by temporary installations results in a very focused financial impact. Four years ago when we helped bring the Musical Swings to Clematis Street, their presence generated a sense of pride in our Downtown, as well as over $750,000 in additional spending in the surrounding area.” “Art is all about connection. It’s one of the reasons we’re drawn to it,” said Teneka James-Feaman, Executive Director of the Arts & Entertainment District. “Interactive art makes that connection more apparent because visitors can’t help but become part of the creation instead of passive observers. This immediately elicits an emotional response, forming a deeper appreciation towards the work. In the case of Impulse, this will likely be even more profound because the artwork consists of seesaws, a fun and playful symbol of childhood.”   For more information, please visit //DowntownWPB.com/Impulse

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CULTURE | MAGICIAN LEON ETIENNE IN POMPANO BEACH

Photos courtesy of the artist

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Superstar Magician Leon Etienne brings Magic Rocks!

to Pompano Beach Cultural Center

Leon Etienne burst onto the scene during Season 8 of America’s Got Talent, dazzling the judges with his sleight of hand, unmatched creativity and rock-n-roll showmanship. Since then, he has been travelling the globe, mesmerizing audiences wherever he goes. Florida fans will get the opportunity to enjoy his vastly entertaining Magic Rocks! show when he appears at the Pompano Beach Cultural Center on April 11, 2020. Growing up in Utica, New York, Etienne discovered his passion for magic by happenstance. “My mother had grounded me and sent me to my room where I quickly became bored,” he recalled. “I came across a book of magic tricks that I had received as a gift and ever since that day, I have been hooked.” While shows like America’s Got Talent and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon introduced his high-energy magic show to a world-wide audience, Etienne is passionate about having people experience his show live. “I love that people have seen my performances on TV and social media, but magic is an art form that has to be experienced up-close, in person,” said Etienne. The show in Pompano Beach will be a tremendous opportunity for current fans and those curious about his critically acclaimed act to experience an up close and personal version of his hit show Magic Rocks! in an intimate setting. The prestidigitation craze that has been sweeping the nation is due in large part to the incredible production values that stars like Leon bring to the stage. Magic Rocks! is truly a spectacle that has garnered a vast fan-base due to its highly entertaining premise. Magic Rocks! featuring illusionist Leon Etienne will take place April 11 at 8pm at the Pompano Beach Cultural Center, followed by a Meet & Greet. Ticket are $25 to $35 are available at ccpompano.org.

While shows like America’s Got Talent and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon introduced his highenergy magic show to a world-wide audience, Etienne is passionate about having people experience his show live. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Untitled, Acrylic /Canvas 24" 46

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VIBRATIONAL EXPRESSIONISM: PAINTINGS FROM THE HART

By Bruce Helander

F

lorida’s Gold Coast was developed by ingenious entrepreneurs from northern states who saw the commercial potential of sandy beaches combined with sunny weather. One of those visionaries was Henry Flagler, who built a railroad to carry his wealthy friends and others to a southern tropical paradise, and they brought with them a love of culture and a tradition of supporting the arts. South Florida can now boast a remarkable concentration of fine museums that seem to be bursting with exciting and innovative exhibitions, from the new Norton Museum of Art that will mount a Rauschenberg survey this season to the delightful exhibition curated by Bonnie Clearwater at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale simply titled “ Happy!”. The Coral Springs Museum of Art is definitely in this exciting mix with a history of innovative shows, from Hunt Slonem to the much-anticipated presentation of works by Mickey Hart, painter and former drummer for the Grateful Dead. The bold and expansive spaces of the museum’s main gallery will no doubt provide a commanding stage, not for a rock concert but for the remarkable paintings by a remarkably talented man. A show not to be missed!

All photos courtesy of Mickey Hart

There is a long and colorful history of rockers who were studio artists long before becoming recording artists. Bob Dylan began painting seriously well after his claim to musical fame and fortune, and ten years ago joined the mighty Gagosian Gallery in Manhattan. The Who’s Pete Townshend, faced with the decision to attend either music school or art school, ultimately chose to study graphic design. Ronnie Wood, John Mellencamp, Joni Mitchell and Jimi Hendrix all share a command of both painting and music. Actor Martin Mull and musician David Byrne started as artists, but each had a serious band while studying at the Rhode Island School of Design. In South Florida, Jason Newsted (former bassist of Metallica) has shown streetwise paintings at Art Miami, while Rick Allen and Paul Stanley exhibit regularly with Wentworth Gallery. Mickey Hart, drummer for the Grateful Dead and one of the most legendary figures in rock and roll history, now continues on his own with sold out stadium concerts featuring amazing rhythmical percussion compositions. These shows are mesmerizing and unforgettable and often require hundreds of drums and cymbals on stage with every imaginable shape and origin.

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Untitled, Acrylic/Masonite 16"x16" 48

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Lesser known perhaps are the paintings Hart produces in his Northern California home and art studio, where he creates exhilarating arrangements of swirling layers of mixed colors that often are applied directly to the round skins of a drumhead, creating a visual marriage with a circular surface made for drumming, as opposed to a square canvas. Coincidentally, renowned California artist Ed Ruscha recently created a series of works on drumheads. They say “practice makes perfect” in the music industry and that holds in the visual arts as well. Hart has been steadily experimenting in his art studio for years in order to perfect a remarkable technique of paint application to various surfaces (including canvas), utilizing abstract gestural color fields of meandering imaginative floating shapes that have developed a recognizable signature. These are professional works shown at respectable galleries, and Hart now has a prestigious museum exhibition in the works. As the curator for his upcoming survey of paintings at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, I had the pleasure of interviewing Mickey in his secluded wine country home about an hour north of San Francisco. It’s a short walk from his recording studio to his spacious art studio through his marvelous gardens. Here an assistant is setting up blank canvases for the maestro to cover with a magical mystery tour of color combinations that have a philosophical connection to the early days of the Grateful Dead and the ‘60s style of pulsating psychedelic tie-dye visual celebration. With a sincere anticipation of discovering inventive and professional works in Hart’s studio, I was instantly and pleasantly surprised by the creative spirit in the air and the consistency of his engaging and handsome canvases stacked in racks and leaning against the walls. A first glance reveals curious edges of canvas exposing a rainbow of sensual color combinations that seem to flow effortlessly like hot lava gathering speed. Hart seems comfortable with any creative challenge that expands his horizons and supports his experiments. For years, he has been creating handsome abstract color field compositions that surge back and forth within the picture plane, offering an observer the opportunity to connect the painted surface with a narrative interpretation. His circle paintings made from modern drumheads have a distant planetary visual aroma with one yellow sphere dotted with black fragments and a touch of pink, resembling our moon. Other works take on a feeling of a vivid pending storm as seen from a weather satellite across the canvas, an imaginary aerial vista of a mystifying ocean current, or in some cases, a canvas can seem like a sliced segment of a steaming volcanic rock formation. Contemporary color field painters like Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler, continued for decades to experiment in pouring pigment on canvas, manipulating the painting to encourage movement and mixation. The experience of visiting a serious painter who is also one of the legendary drummers of all time is not something an art critic like myself will ever forget. The intimate knowledge gained from examining wondrous works of art firsthand, fresh and engaging and inventive, was a valuable experience for me as a curator and artist who also was a drummer in art school and a painter as well. It’s not surprising that many of America’s great artists have multiple interests in all directions, and music and art seem to go hand in hand for many of them. The survey exhibition coming to South Florida (drumroll) will no doubt be a completely memorable experience, but I recommend you see the show and decide on your own. The museum exhibition opens to the public on Saturday, March 21, 2020, with a private artist reception later. Mickey Hart is represented by Wentworth Gallery, who shows his work regularly. More at wentworthgallery.com and coralspringsmuseum.org

Untitled; Psychopomp Mixed Media/Canvas 30"x22"

Bruce Helander is an artist who writes on art. He is a member of the Florida Artists Hall of Fame and a former White House Fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts. His work is in over fifty museum collections, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. All photos courtesy of Mickey Hart

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CULTURE | PEACE & LOVE FOR PARKLAND

PEACE AND LOVE FOR PARKLAND Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt - R&R STUDIOS, "PEACE & LOVE" @rrstudiosmiami, rr-studios.com

Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, of award-winning Miami-based R&R Studios created a 'social sculpture' made from thousands of flowers revealing the words PEACE & LOVE in remembrance of the second anniversary of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School tragedy. The monumental 30-foot high, 130-foot long installation is located at the corner of Sample Road and Sportsplex Drive. Unveiled on Valentine’s Day, it remains on display for the public through May 2020. Made possible by the communities of Parkland, Coral Springs and a $1 million grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies, the public art installation was the final project in the "Inspiring Community After Gun Violence: The Power of Art" five-part series.

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R & R Studios, a collaboration of Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt is a multidisciplinary practice weaving together visual arts, architecture, design and the city. Celebrated, as one critic put it “as architects of hope” their works propose encounters of stories and spaces, which alternate between the personal and the public, the quotidian and the extraordinary, the poetical and the political. R & R Studios works erase boundaries between art and life and suggest “imaginary solutions” for a better world. Rosario and Roberto are known for creating social sculptures for public pleasure. All together Now in downtown Denver, the biggest M in the world in Miami, The Living Room, their iconic Miami home turned inside out; Public Squares in Mexico and Copenhagen and most recently Besame Mucho their “super billboard” at Coachella Music and Arts Festival 2016.

More on the work of Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, visit rr-studios.com; more on the Power of Art series, visit powerofa.org.


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Photos 3 & 5 by Glickman Media Facebook/currentmiami, Instagram @current.miami www.current.miami Photos 1, 2, 4 by Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt R&R STUDIOS "PEACE & LOVE" @rrstudiosmiami www.rr-studios.com

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Cultural Council for Palm Beach County in Downtown Lake Worth Photo ©Sargent Photography


CURATING CULTURE

The arts scene in the Palm Beaches is booming, so we sat down with Dave Lawrence, President and CEO of the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County to chat about all the exciting initiatives that will be debuting.

By Christie Galeano-DeMott Palm Beach County entices us with its beautiful beaches and brilliant sunshine, but it’s the arts and cultural experiences that keep us all coming back. A former cellist, actor, and CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis, Dave Lawrence has been a part of the arts community for decades. Now, he’s using his experience to bring our arts organizations together and support creative professionals in our community while inspiring tourists to venture beyond the beaches, marketing the county as a destination for the arts. Art Hive: What is the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County, and why is it important to our community? Dave Lawrence: We are a local arts service agency. Everything we do is designed to support cultural organizations and creative professionals in Palm Beach County. We are a team of cultural architects. We are also here to support the ecosystem for the culture section of the county because quality of life is important. When businesses are looking to attract new talent, they are looking for opportunities to engage in the community and arts and culture is a way to do that. It’s also important to support arts education efforts so that people can continue to learn, explore and grow through the arts. AH: The Cultural Council for Palm Beach County has a long history of developing, enhancing and promoting the arts, but you recently rebranded. Why?

DL: We wanted to more clearly articulate our value proposition to our community and the impact of the work that we do. So we set out on a yearlong process to rebrand the Council. First, we changed our name – we are now the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County, instead of Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. And that “for” really signifies our focus on service – to the artists and to the cultural organizations. The new brand also is more inclusive so now our tagline is Arts. Sciences. History. Community. We want all of those entities that we serve and support to feel a part of our brand. It was also time to refresh the logo. AH: How do the arts help to develop a community? DL: In our county, they are an economic driver. The annual economic impact of the arts is more than $633 million. Tourism is the number two driver in our economy and cultural tourists have been shown to stay longer and spend more. So arts are a very important part of the tourism engine in Palm Beach County. Also, we are in such divisive times right now that people are looking for ways to come together, explore concepts, celebrate and sometimes even mourn together and the arts are a way to do that. AH: What are some ways the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County is helping to foster the arts in our community?

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Dave Lawrence, CEO & President of the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County Photo ©Sargent Photography

DL: We have a robust exhibition program here, we’re expanding DL: We have a robust exhibition program here, we’re expanding our our performance arts series thattake willplace takethis place this summer, and performance arts series that will summer, and we have have of a variety of services free artist services (like that workshops) awevariety free artist (like workshops) we offer.that Onewe of offer. One of the things mostis proud about is launched that we’vea the new things I’mnew most proudI’m about that we’ve just just a new funding forArtist artistsInnovation called theFellowArtist new launched funding program for artistsprogram called the Innovation Fellowship – funded through the Klorfine Foundation. ship – funded through the Klorfine Foundation. We will be awarding We $7,500 will be fellowships awarding five to artists five this$7,500 springfellowships to artists in this any spring discipline to use in to any discipline to use to to create enhance careers, create new work, enhance their careers, newtheir work, and to to celebrate innovation and creativity. to celebrate innovation and creativity. series aimed to educate bothboth locals and AH: A A new new30 30minute, minute,6 6part part series aimed to educate locals tourists on arts culture in the will be this year and tourists on and arts and culture incounty the county willdebuting be debuting this called, Art Adventures of The Palm This program funded in year called, Art Adventures of theBeaches. Palm Beaches. This is program is part by The Palm Beach County Film & Television Commission and funded in part by The Palm Beaches County Film & Television the Cultural Council Palm Beach County. you most exCommission and theforCultural Council for What Palm are Beach County. cited about this project? What are you most excited about this project? DL: One of the things the cultural sector faces constantly is remainDL: One of the things the cultural sector faces constantly is reing relevant to our audiences. We compete against Netflix and iPads. maining relevant to our audiences. We compete against Netflix and So opportunities where we can deliver content to people, which tell iPads. So opportunities where about we canarts deliver contentexperiences, to people, relevant and interesting stories and culture which tell relevant and interesting stories about arts and culture exbroaden that net of people that want to get involved. It’s a 30-minute

periences, broaden that net of people that want to get involved. It’s

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aoriginal 30-minute original program hosted by Angela Yungk and Jessie program hosted by Angela Yungk and Jessie Prugh from Art Prugh from Art Hive Magazine. goinglook to beatan in-depth look at Hive Magazine. It’s going to be an It’s in-depth cultural experiences cultural experiences PalmtoBeaches. It’s celebrate a way to our explore and in the Palm Beaches.in It’sthe a way explore and fantastic celebrate our fantastic cultural amenities. cultural amenities. The Tourist Development DevelopmentCouncil Council(TDC) (TDC) parent organizaThe Tourist is is ourour parent organization. tion. The Film and Television Commission andCultural the Cultural CounThe Film and Television Commission and the Council are cil areagencies sister agencies underneath the very closely sister underneath the TDC. WeTDC. work We verywork closely with these agencies throughout year. The Palm Beaches TV (the county’s tourwith these agencies the throughout the year. ThePalmBeaches.TV (the ism television channel) is really takingisoff, so we’re partner county’s tourism television channel) really takingexcited off, sotowe’re exwith the TDC and FTC to increase the number of hours of original cited to partner with the TDC and FTC to increase the number of programming. It’s programming. been at least a year more thea making), and any hours of original It’s or been at (in least year or more (in timemaking), we’re ableand to any partner other it justother broadens the the timewith we’re ableinstitutions, to partner with instituimpact and that’s really what we want to see happen. tions, it just broadens the impact and that’s really what we want to see happen. We are giving visibility to cultural organizations and creative professionals in a new way. I think telling interesting stories about fascinating

We are giving visibility to cultural organizations and creative propeople here in Palm Beach County is a wonderful result, and if it makes fessionals in a new way. I think telling interesting stories about fassomebody who hadn’t really thought about experiencing an institution cinating people here in Palm Beach County is a wonderful result, or buying a piece of art – if that’s the thing that makes them do it - it and if it makes would have beensomebody worth it forwho us. hadn’t really thought about experiencing an institution or buying a piece of art – if that’s the thing that makes them do it - it would have been worth it for us.


SOUTH FLORIDA SPOTLIGHT Joyce Belloise — Vice President of Content and Community Partnerships chats with Art Hive Magazine about how South Florida PBS highlights our local community. Can you tell us what South Florida PBS is? South Florida PBS is Florida’s largest public media company. It is the source for trusted content that educates, entertains and inspires. We serve 6.3 million viewers from the Sebastian Inlet to Key West. Joyce Belloise

Why is South Florida PBS important to the community? And why is representing the community important to South Florida PBS? Serving the local community has always been integral to our mission. We take pride in offering programs that are relevant and provide content that represents the diverse voices of South Florida. Our goal is to be a resource for lifelong learning and a trusted source of information. As an example, based on feedback from community listening sessions, South Florida PBS recently launched a 24/7 Health Channel offering viewers a direct connection to health experts and vital wellness information to help them live healthier lives. MLK mural at the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County by Kobra Photo ©Sargent Photography

AH: Why did you find it important to sponsor a program like this? DL: It fits our mission. We’re here to champion the cultural sector in Palm Beach County, and any time we can find a partnership to make that happen, it’s a good thing. I always enjoy working with our TDC sister agencies in cooking up new ways to work together. AH: Where can we catch the show? DL: The series will air on South Florida PBS. The first episode will air March 20th on WPBT at 11:30am and WXEL March 29th at 3:30pm. It will then air on The ThePalmBeaches.TV Palm Beaches TV which can be seen in hotel rooms, on ROKU or the free mobile app. For more information on the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County, please visit palmbeachculture. com

Can you share with us what kind of programming is presented on South Florida PBS that represents The Palm Beaches? We produce and broadcast an enormous amount of local content. With our strong focus on arts & cultural programming, we want to offer viewers of all ages and backgrounds a chance to experience the vibrant local art scene. On the Town in The Palm Beaches uncovers some of the cultural gems in our own backyards, while Art Loft provides a snapshot of the contemporary arts community. Check, Please! South Florida explores culture through our diverse dining scene, and Between the Covers brings bestselling authors from around the country to our Boynton Beach studio audience. Our film-maker initiative has profiled 66 local storytellers, featuring films that are all 'made in South Florida'...many of them in Palm Beach County. We’re looking forward to providing even more cultural content with the new series, Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches. Where and when can people see On the Town in the Palm Beaches? On the Town in The Palm Beaches can be seen on both WPBT and WXEL. The next episode will focus on the diverse ‘foodie’ experiences you can find around the county, and it will air on WXEL Saturday, March 28th at 5:30 p.m. and on WPBT Sunday, March 29th at 12:30 p.m. When can people expect to see Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches? Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches will air their first episode on South Florida PBS on Friday, March 20th at 11:30 a.m. on WPBT and on Sunday, March 29th at 3:30 p.m. on WXEL. For more information on South Florida PBS, please visit southfloridapbs.org  

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CULTURE | MIAMI ARTS MARKETING CONFERENCE

8 TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR ARTS MARKETING INSIGHTS FROM THE MARKETING PROS AT THE MIAMI ARTS MARKETING CONFERENCE

Speakers from Google, the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau, and the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, were among the expert marketers who shared their specialized knowledge at the Miami Arts Marketing Conference. Here are some of their savvy tips on ways to get ahead in the rapidly changing field of art and culture:

Content is Everything but Content Only Matters if You Know How to Communicate It Interesting and engaging content is key to attracting followers and keeping their interest. Bad or weak content is one of fastest ways to lose them. Your audience is your best collaborator. Get better at listening so you can be better able to connect with your fans. Once your audience knows you’re listening, it will give you the feedback you need to adapt and better market to them. Activating their creativity will help you become more accessible to their own followings and social circles.

Your Brand = The Language You Use + The Visuals You Use Differentiate yourself in a sea of sameness, by ditching the old idea of starting your branding with Who, What, Where. Instead, start the conversation with Why you’re doing what you do, rather than what you’re doing or how you’re doing it. Start thinking in terms of “we believe in this… so we do/have/provide you with 56

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this.” Keep messaging simple and clear. Remember, your brand is the personality of your organization.

Make Creativity Human Art is for everyone, and the backbone to making art more approachable is to link it to a human connection. Fifty percent of consumers’ brand experiences are emotional. Find ways through visual storytelling, social media campaigns, ads, video, anything to show your audience that you and your brand are human.

Collaboration Is Magic Welcoming potential collaborators is a great way to create new pathways for success. Instead of asking a question like ‘who wants to be my customer?’ try asking, ‘Who wants to collaborate?’ and see what happens.

Your Website Needs to Be Built Around Questions People Already Have When you update your website, make sure that Google knows about it. Are people searching for what you’re offering? Do you answer a question they have? Consider renaming pages so they reflect search terms that people are using when looking for a business like yours. Think about key words – are people looking for a “soiree” or will they be typing in “night out”? What about “wellness center” or “spa”? Create headlines that bring people to your website instead of someone else’s. Photos courtesy of Keith Spurlock Photography


REMEMBER, YOUR BRAND IS THE PERSONALITY OF YOUR ORGANIZATION.

CHECK OUT THE NEXT MAMP LAB Miami Arts Marketing Project is a high impact series curated for the arts and creative ecosystem that provides the discovery of the latest trends in marketing, innovation and exploration of innovative partnerships and new audiences. It’s a collaborative experience unlike any other. For more information please visit artsbizmiami.org/mamp

The Need for Speed

Test how fast your website loads – slow-loading sites may cause consumers to blow right past you without absorbing any information you offer. Test your website speed by going to g.co/testmysite

Search and Ye Shall Find

Do you know what else your consumers are searching for? Google Trends will help you find out. Armed with this information, you can mimic search terms on your website and media pages that help people find you when they search those other keywords. Find out what people are looking for by visiting g.co/trends Make it easy for people to find photos on your website when they search Google Images. Be sure to rename images with a title like “family eating” instead of a default number like “IMG_33224” before uploading them to your site. Remember: The smaller the screen, the less people want to read, so keep things short.

Facebook is a Pay-to-Play-Platform Without promoted posts, only 2% of your Facebook following will see your posts organically. Your friends are more likely to share content from an ad or a sponsored post. The best way to have people see your content without having to pay for a promoted post is to create a Facebook Group that ensures your visibility in your followers’ feeds. Imprint your brand digitally to potential consumers by making sure that there are several touchpoints for each consumer. Consider adding cookies on to your website so that when a person leaves your site and returns to Facebook, they see your Facebook ad everywhere.

LAB 2: MEDIA MARKETPLACE: HOW DO THE ARTS GET COVERED? March 31, 2020

Getting visibility in the media is constantly evolving. Local media leaders offer the inside scoop on how to get your arts group in the media spotlight. Explore how to think creatively and expansively about messaging to get your story told. Receive tips from the experts on learning to build relationships with local reporters, create strategies for press placement, fine-tune your message and pitch arts stories to non-traditional media. All participants receive the MAMP Media List for the Arts. SESSION LEADER: Melinda Sherwood, Kreps de Maria SPEAKERS: Melina de Rose, Artburst; Russell Motley, MIA Media Group; Marivette Navarette, Mujerista; Zach Schlein, New Times; Pola Bunster, Prism Creative Group

LAB 3: ROUNDTABLE ROUNDUP

April 28, 2020

Interact with peers, colleagues, and creative leaders to as we take a deep dive into key marketing tactics and strategies covered in our MAMP 2020 Envision Series. Explore best practices for Email Marketing, growing your lists with Data Mining and Segmentation, effective use of Google Grants and Adwords and more. This session is an innovative, interactive morning that is all about solutions – by you, for you – with input from our collective Brain Trust. SESSION LEADER: Brendan Glynn, Friends of WLRN

NEW for 2020: MAMP BREAKFAST CLUB New for 2020 and exclusive to MAMP Masters Partners, this topic-focused breakfast event is for marketing directors from some of Miami’s most influential arts marketers, organizations, and institutions. An invite-only event, these small format sessions are designed to build community among the executive level arts marketers and offer intimate roundtable conversations at a higher level of engagement. Contact Ana@ artsbizmiami.org for more information on how to participate. SESSION LEADER: Michelle Reese, HistoryMiami Museum CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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All photos © Downtown Photo


Local Artists Gain Creative Marketplace Experience at NSU ArtPRUITT Museum alongside Rob Pruitt WITH ROB AT THE NSU ART MUSEUM

By Christiana Lilly On a Saturday afternoon, people wander the aisles of a bustling open-air market. It’s positioned at the breezeway of NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale, with tables packed in and filled with curios and artwork. Guests walk from table to table, chatting with local artists about their creations and inspiration, picking up everything from watercolor prints to issues of Architectural Digest from the ‘80s. They may not know it, but they’re all unwitting actors in a living art piece. “They don’t even know in most cases that they’re actually participants in an artwork, but they are,” says Bonnie Clearwater, the director and chief curator of the museum. “You don't even have to be conscious of that. It was a fun experience and that's something they’re going to remember.” It’s Rob Pruitt’s Flea Market, a creation of the renowned New York-based post-conceptualist artist. Fort Lauderdale played host to coincide with the “Happy!” exhibition, which includes artwork by Pruitt. “It definitely falls within the arena of performance art but it’s also a group show,” Pruitt explains of the flea market. “[At a museum] you stand in front of something, you derive something from it, but with the flea market you get to engage with the artist, you get to hold the thing in your hand, you get to negotiate a price and potentially take it home and live with it.” For Miami mixed-media artist Emilio Martinez, the interaction was the best part of the day. Sitting before him on his table are works in pencil, charcoal, acrylics and oils, putting his creatures derived from dreams and imagination onto paper. “When you hear their thoughts of your work, it feeds more of my imagination,” he says. Considering the flea market as an installation or performance – how Pruitt sees it – Martinez became “fascinated with that idea.” But the artists not only explain their work to those who stop by. Another element has been added by Pruitt: haggling. As artists go back and forth on a price for artwork, Clearwater says it’s a practice in “understanding how value becomes assigned to art.”

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SINCE THEN, THE FLEA MARKET HAS BEEN HOSTED IN CITIES AROUND THE WORLD, INCLUDING PARIS, LOS ANGELES AND VENICE.

Donna Haynes, a Fort Lauderdale artist whose work explores nostalgia, says that the idea of bartering for art was new for her as well as many of those who stopped at her table. Many were not comfortable asking for lower than the artist declared. “I said, ‘This work is this much money, but it’s up for a haggle,’” she explains. “Some people have taken to it and some people won’t, but it’s very interesting. I haven’t really sold my fine art like this, it’s usually through the sale of a gallery. So, this is a new experience.” The origins of the flea market go back to 1999, when Pruitt was asked to organize a summer group show at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in New York City. Having never curated a show before, he worked to find a unique way to bring artists together. “I spent some time alone with my notebook thinking about, how could I be true to me and then come up with an original concept?” he says. “I thought about the things that I love and one of those things is being part of a community and hanging out with artists and it just occurred to me, it was a lightbulb moment, that the flea market was a way to do it.” Since then, the flea market has been hosted in cities around the world, including Paris, Los Angeles and Venice. “There’s a freedom to a flea market,” Pruitt says. “Sometimes a museum can be intimidating...this breaks down those barriers and that’s why it’s so nice that it’s happening right at the entrance to the museum. It’s working as a big welcome mat to get people in the door.”

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Top photo © Markus Spiske; bottom photo DowtownPhoto Photo All photos ©© Downtown


All photos © Downtown Photo

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HISTORICALLY HIP:

NORTHWOOD VILLAGE’S MAGNETISM

By Marcela Villa

I

magine a day packed with to-do’s: laundry, getting the dog groomed, errands…! Now, imagine those regular tasks with the added stress of making it to an event that day: hair appointment, pastry pick-up, gift shopping. Whether busy or laidback, don’t sweat it! Northwood Village has got you covered. The district, with its charming streets, suits all palates and styles by offering an array of eateries and shops that are meticulously curated by their business owners. A haven for the unique, visitors are guaranteed to enjoy a stroll without a single multinational company’s name piercing the landscape of homegrown boutiques, galleries, restaurants, and professional spaces. Over 100 businesses open their doors across three streets between Northwood Road and 25th Street, bordered by Broadway and North Dixie Highway. A dining destination for foodies, there are over thirty restaurants to sink your teeth into and with almost two dozen architects, contractors, interior designers and design boutiques, you need to look no further than Northwood Village to picture your own style and bring it to life. Spanning

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the range of this eclectic group of like-minded entrepreneurs, you will find all things from antiques to artists to accountants - just to name a few of the other various disciplines sprinkled throughout the district. At a time where people are excited to explore and stumble across hidden gems, Northwood Village fuels the foot-traffic frenzy by hosting events on a weekly basis. Each Saturday, “Afternoons in the Village” is held from noon until 6 PM. Shopkeepers love to mingle as much as the attendees, who are treated to special deals and invited to pamper themselves over the course of a few hours that features live music and happy hour. And, the last Friday of every month, stores stay open late for Art Night Out; a special monthly gathering in the Village with live music, streetside artists, restaurant specials and an atmosphere that lends itself to the perfect romantic evening, girls night out or any other social occasion for friends to unite.

All photos submitted


NORTHWOOD VILLAGE PLACES ITSELF ON THE MAP AS A HUB OF ACTIVITY THAT EASILY ACCOMMODATES PEOPLE ONTHE-GO AS WELL AS THOSE HAPPY TO LOSE AN AFTERNOON AMONGST THE SHADED SIDEWALKS AND ARTISTIC MURALS... So much commotion and vibrance draw only more of the same. Successful developer of 312 Northwood, virtually completely occupied, has been approved to build an additional residential property in the Northwood Village area. 312 Northwood touts a pet-friendly property featuring a full fitness center and pool, with proximity to Downtown amenities as well. The developer, Neil Kozokoff, president of Parkland Companies, is excited to announce similar amenities in the new building of over 100 units, that will offer studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom apartment layouts. Within walking distance of Currie Park and the Intracoastal Waterway, and a short bike ride or trolley tip to Downtown - it’s just 2 miles - the new housing inventory has given way to talks of other modern apartment complexes and mixed-use projects in and around Northwood Village. The West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has selected a developer for the “Anchor Site”, a 3+ acre parcel bounding the west side of the Village between Broadway and the railroad tracks. “This mixed-use project will continue to meet the demand evidenced by the inevitable growth in this area,” said Allison Justice, CRA Interim Executive Director. “We’re excited about the activity and interest in the north end of the City and are looking forward to an even brighter future for all of our residents and businesses in the months and years to come.” Northwood Village places itself on the map as a hub of activity that easily accommodates people on-the-go as well as those happy to lose an afternoon amongst the shaded sidewalks and artistic murals which lend themselves to those perfect instances to capture special moments. An atmosphere full of variety, the district makes a repeat-visitor of West Palm Beach locals and tourists alike, who are enticed by the thrill of discovery.

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CULTURE | FORT LAUDERDALE ART AND DESIGN WEEK

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All photos courtesy © Carina Mask


Fort Lauderdale Art and Design Week

artDISCOURSE Series Inspires Creative Connections

By Ali Berger Fort Lauderdale Art and Design week is becoming a popular and much anticipated South Florida art event. When co-founder Evan Snow partnered with chief curator Andrew Martineau, a special vision was created that offered the city of Fort Lauderdale another exciting opportunity to show off its artistic side. One special event of the week is Art Fort Lauderdale, a four-day art fair on the water that transports visitors to waterfront mansions filled with exquisite artworks. Riding along in a water taxi and stepping into lavish homes where you engage first-hand with the artists offers a unique and enjoyable visual and intellectual experience. Complementing the fair was the artDISCOURSE series, which offered in-depth insight into the creative process and artists’ personal creative journeys. Held at GALLERYone Hotel and other locations, the series featured discussions with artists on topics such as creativity as a means for overcoming personal struggles. Knowing how the artist felt, the story behind that piece you love, how art comments on current societal conventions, how it distracts from the mundane- were among the many conversations spawned from the artDISCOURSE series. One such talk was titled “The Journey of the Artist,” by Twyla Gettert. I was lucky enough to attend, and caught up with Twyla after her presentation. As a thirty-year career artist, Gettert had much first-hand experience to share with the audience. Her ‘journey’ began at the young age of six when she started painting with her mother. “My mother taught me to look and investigate, learn and see,” she said.

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CULTURE | FORT LAUDERDALE ART AND DESIGN WEEK

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All photos courtesy © Carina Mask


““

RIDING ALONG IN A WATER TAXI PERSONAL AND STEPPING INTO HOMES HER PRESENTATION ON HER JOURNEY AND HOW IT LED WHERE ENGAGE FIRST-HAND WITHSHE THENEVER ARTISTSTHOUGHT OFFERS POSSIBLE, HER TOYOU UNDERSTAND ART IN A WAY ACAPTIVATED UNIQUE ANDTHE ENJOYABLE VISUAL AND INTELLECTUAL EXPERIENCE. AUDIENCE.

“Painting is a form of expression, and it relies very heavily on seeing. When you hear the artist talk about their work, it offers a different sensation, one that is more grounded as an expression of energy.” As Gettert’s belief about creative expression intensified, the overall manifestation of her passion led her career to flourish and her work to be included in over 100 corporate and private collections. Her evolution as a full-time artist has included numerous awards and showings in major museum exhibitions as well as international shows. Her presentation on her personal journey and how it led her to understand art in a way she never thought possible, captivated the audience. She noted that the artDISCOURSE talk enabled her “to bring a journey in perspective from an experienced artist who’s worked in a lot of different mediums.” Another presenter, fashion designer and icon Beatrix Ost, spoke about The Art of Being You,” with a talk that covered a variety of important topics, ranging from the local art market to the future of the art world.

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CULTURE | FORT LAUDERDALE ART AND DESIGN WEEK

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All photos courtesy © Carina Mask


A Cultural Connection with the Bahamas By Ali Berger

EACH PRESENTATION OFFERED NEW APPRECIATION OF ART...

Other talks of the week included: “Exhibiting to the World” by Ferdinand and Keith Tomlin from the TOROSIETE Museum of Contemporary Art, and “Life is not for Beginners, With Art – You Never Walk Alone,” by Katti Hoflin. Each presentation offered new appreciation of art and reinforced the importance of continuing the conversation around creative expression.

One of the memorable stops on this year’s Art Fair on the Water was Bahamas Haus, an Intracoastal mansion featuring artworks by Bahamian artists that was part of the fair’s initiative to raise awareness of the necessity of investing in art to enhance local communities. The theme of the exhibit was ‘Resiliency of the Bahamian Spirit,” and it provided an opportunity to spotlight the vast devastation brought about by last year’s Hurricane Dorian. Ten percent of the exhibit’s sales proceeds were donated to rebuilding The Grand Bahama Children’s Home. Curator Jennifer Nayak explained one important goal was providing “collectors with little treasures they wouldn’t find unless they had their own local guide to work created in the Bahamas.” “Creating long-term interest for investment pieces, promoting cultural tourism between both coasts, there’s more than one reason to love the Bahamas.” Cultural tourism promotes an interest in experiencing the full flavor of a place, from learning about the people to resonating with their forms of creativity. In this way, Bahamas Haus enlightened patrons by offering an immersive experience that demonstrated the power of hope.

As the famous painter Edgar Degas once said, “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” Since sight is not limited to mere visual perception, but also expands deep into the conscious mind, hearing discourse on thought-provoking topics increases awareness and deepens the conversation, connecting us to each other and our community in a profound way.

For more information, visit artftlauderdale.com

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

STEALS YOUR MOTIVATION By Corissa Buehner

If you suffer from depression, you know that some days it is a victory just to get up and out of bed in the morning (or at any point throughout the day). Sometimes, you just do not have the motivation to do anything. And that can be a horrible and disappointing feeling. If you are currently struggling with depression and a lack of motivation, get to know some of the steps you can take to try to regain your motivation. Be Compassionate to Yourself The worst thing you can do to yourself when you are depressed is to belittle yourself . When you are depressed, it is time to spend some time and effort on self-compassion. Allow yourself to experience your feelings. Let yourself take a nap if you are tired. Do not get angry or frustrated with yourself. Think of what you would say to another person in your situation. What words of encouragement would you tell them? Tell yourself the same things you would tell them. This is selfcompassion.

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Set Small Goals When you are depressed, every little task can seem daunting and like it is too much to bear. Rather than set outlandish goals for yourself and setting yourself up for failure, try setting yourself small goals. Say to yourself that today you are going to take a shower, or you are going to unload the dishwasher. Are you a freelance artist? Does working from home make setting and accomplishing goals that much harder? For work goals, think about making it through an hour or a half day at work. Do the best that you can to set a series of little goals that you can achieve throughout the day. And remember that if you do not achieve all of your goals, to remain compassionate. You may only make it through a half an hour of work or might only get out of bed and make it to the couch. The point is that you are trying to achieve your goals and that you have attainable goals. And as long as you are trying to achieve something, you are succeeding.

Photo by Sydney Sims

WHAT TO DO WHEN DEPRESSION


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YOU MAY BE SURPRISED TO FIND THAT PUTTING YOUR FEELINGS INTO WORDS WILL ACTUALLY HAVE THE

A SEASON OF CULTURE AND DEEP REFRESHING IN THE GARDENS

PLASTIC REEF: SCULPTURE BY FEDERICO URIBE THROUGH MAY 31, 2020

Reach Out

If you have a therapist or a doctor that you trust and work with on your depression, reaching out to them should be a step you take when you are so deeply depressed that your motivation is completely shot. You can also reach out to a trusted friend or loved one. The point is to talk to someone about what is going on with you and how you are feeling. There is a great deal of power in saying things out loud. You may be surprised to find that putting your feelings into words will actually have the power to make you feel better. You might feel a weight has been lifted off your shoulders. And you might find that you feel just a little more capable of handling your depression. If you don't though, you will be reaching out to someone with the potential to help you through your depression and to give you the guidance that you need. Now that you know a few of the steps you can take when depression has stolen your motivation, you can be sure to give these options a try when you are feeling particularly down.

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POWER TO MAKE YOU FEEL BETTER.

WITH THESE HANDS: SCULPTURES BY JIM RENNERT THROUGH MAY 31, 2020

ARTISTS AT HOME: PHOTOGRAPHY OF HISTORIC ARTISTS’ HOMES & STUDIOS MAR 26 - JUN 15, 2020

JAZZ IN THE GARDENS

jazz in the

Sundays, 1-3 pm through March 15 gardens *                  * HISTORIC HOME, ARTIST STUDIO, EXHIBITION GALLERIES AND RARE PALM AND CYCAD GARDENS OF ANN WEAVER NORTON Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

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SHARING CREATIVE INSPIRATION, INTERVIEWS, AND INSIGHTS SINCE 2012 C REATIV E + C O NS C IO U S C U LTU RE IN S O U TH F L OR I DA

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hey, sugar! | 2014 | acrylic on canvas | 36 x 36 inches

ASHLEIGH WALTERS

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Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches is the ultimate guide to creative happenings and culture across The Palm Beaches. Join Jessie Prugh and Angela Yungk as they explore burgeoning art scenes, discover unique destinations, and experience the extraordinary events that create the cultural fabric of The Palm Beaches. Coming Soon!

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Art Hive Magazine /// Issue 33  

Creative and Conscious Culture /// Featuring Comedian, Activist, Actress Aida Rodriguez. Also featuring: Grateful Dead Drummer and Artist: M...

Art Hive Magazine /// Issue 33  

Creative and Conscious Culture /// Featuring Comedian, Activist, Actress Aida Rodriguez. Also featuring: Grateful Dead Drummer and Artist: M...

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