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ART HIVE CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Florid a

ISSUE No 32

BEST OVERALL DESIGN 2019

TONY

DUNGY

AUTHOR & ADVOCATE PUTS

'FAMILY FIRST'

OPPORTUNITIES

IN THE ARTS! GRANTS, JOBS, SUBMISSIONS, & MUCH MORE!

INTERVIEW WITH

MAGIC CITY'S

AHOL

SNIFFS GLUE

H S A W N I A R R.B menon

Mcultural Pheno A

PHOTO: OLIVIER MASTEY

CLASSICAL HIP-HOP DUO BLACK VIOLIN || PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS || NEUROSCIENCE EXPLAINS WHY SOCIAL MEDIA IS MAKING YOU UNHAPPY DISPLAY UNTIL FEBRUARY 29, 2020


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2019 PÉREZ CreARTE GRANTS WINNERS, MAKING OUR CITY A GLOBAL HUB FOR ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE:

Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County African Heritage Cultural Arts Center Artists in Residence in Everglades (AIRIE) Arts for Learning/Miami, Inc. Bakehouse Art Complex Borscht Corp. Edge Zones Greater Opa-locka Community Development Corporation

Miami City Ballet Miami Light Project, Inc. Miami Music Project Miami New Drama Moonlighter Makerspace Nu Deco Ensemble O Cinema O, Miami Oolite Arts

Guitars Over Guns

The Fountainhead Residency, Inc.

HistoryMiami Museum

The Motivational Edge

Miami Book Fair at Miami Dade College

Young Musicians United

Photo © Alexander Iziliaev.

The Jorge M. Pérez Family Foundation at The Miami Foundation will invest $2 million through the Pérez CreARTE Grants Program, supporting artist fellowships, spaces for creating art and education programs for local youth. To learn how these winners help develop South Florida as a world-class urban center, visit MiamiFoundation.org/JMPerezFamilyFoundation.


PICTURE YOUR...

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CAPTURE THE...

Moment

NorthwoodVillage.com


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West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency |wpb.org/CRA|CRA@wpb.org| 561.822.1550


RECENT WORKS

TRIPLE ACOUSTICS, 2019 Paper collage with embellishments on museum board, 18 ¾ x 12 in. Original acrylic with embellishments on canvas with printed background, 79 ¼ x 50 ¼ in.

brucehelander.com

karene@helanderstudio.com

+1 561 655 0504


CONTENTS 12 OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS 14 VISIONARY CREATORS ADD DRAMA TO PORT EVERGLADES 18 BROWARD TO BROADWAY: CLASSICAL HIP-HOP DUO BLACK VIOLIN EMPOWER YOUTH 24 NEW FLOATING ART INSTALLATION ARRIVING TO WEST PALM BEACH 28 THREE Cs of ILLUSTRATION: PART 2 CRAFTSMANSHIP 30 PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS: REBECCA FATZINGER AND CRISTINA MALDONADO 34 WORLDWIDE WOW: INTERNATIONAL ART JEWELERS BRACE FOR BIJOUX! 36 STREET SMARTS: MR.BRAINWASH 42 HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF YOUR MUSEUM VISIT 44 5 WAYS PAST FAILURES CAN PAVE THE WAY TO FUTURE SUCCESSES 46 INTERVIEW WITH AHOL SNIFFS GLUE 50 THE RHYTHM OF REDEVELOPMENT 52 BOYNTON BEACH PUBLIC ART IS ADDING NEW ENERGY TO CITY IN 2020 56 CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION: ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE PALM BEACHES 58 ARTISTS ON CLIMATE CHANGE 60 CULTIVATING CREATIVITY IN POMPANO BEACH 64 ADVOCATE + AUTHOR TONY DUNGY PUTS 'FAMILY FIRST' 66 INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION THROUGH DANCE 72 NEUROSCIENCE EXPLAINS WHY SOCIAL MEDIA IS MAKING YOU UNHAPPY

Left, top to bottom: ©Mr.Brainwash Studio; ©Jon Hunt; ©David Muir Right, top to bottom: ©Downtown Photo; ©Jung Ju Lee; Influx by Cecilia Lueza

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DELPO K KYRGIOS

COCO COCO COCO

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

ART HIVE TEAM | publisher Art Hive Magazine LLC founders/executive editors Angela Yungk -angela@arthivemagazine.com Jessie Prugh -jessie@arthivemagazine.com deputy editor Marcela Villa -marcela@arthivemagazine.com executive administrator Alejandra DueĂąas -alejandra@arthivemagazine.com editorial assistant Aurora Veracruz copy editor Karla Plenge Andrea De La Cruz creative team Meredith Clements David Runyon contributing writers Joanie Cox-Henry, Stephen Humphreys, Tony Phillips, Jonathan Hunt, Jennifer Love Gironda, Ashleigh Walters, Jeanne Martin, Jonathan Ortiz-Smykla, Bea Conrad, Lorena Ledesma

CONNECT | general inquiries info@arthivemagazine.com advertising sales@arthivemagazine.com sponsorships events@arthivemagazine.com Hello Creatives Podcast Stitcher, iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play, or iHeartRadio social media fb/ arthivemagazine twitter/ @arthivemagazine instagram/ @arthive_magazine hashtag/ #arthivemagazine submissions arthivemagazine.com/submissions for guidelines submissions@arthivemagazine.com

DISTRIBUTION | brick-and-mortar For sale at Publix Super Markets, Barnes and Noble Bookstores and at arthivemagazine.com Complimentary issues can be found year-round at select high traffic locations, and high profile events throughout South Florida. Check our website for up to date lists of events. read online issuu.com/arthivemagazine

Š 2012-2020 Art Hive Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or any other method, without permission of the publishers. The articles, advertising, and reviews appearing within this publication reflect the attitudes and opinions of their respective authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or editors. All rights to advertisements including artwork, writing, designs, and copyrights are property of respective owners, and no assumption of ownership is made by this publication, publishers, or editors.


HELLO | FROM THE EDITORS

Photo by Aurora Veracruz

FEBRUARY 14-23 2020

Art Adventures ready to air in the New Year! Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches will air in 2020 in more than 5,000 hotel rooms, the airport and convention center and on the ThePalmBeaches.TV. We will be hosting and producing the series in collaboration with JAG Production Group, Palm Beach Film Commission and Cultural Council of Palm Beach. Art Adventures of The Palm Beaches is the ultimate guide to creative happenings and culture across The Palm Beaches. Join us as we explore burgeoning art scenes, discover unique destinations, and experience the extraordinary events that create the cultural fabric of The Palm Beaches. We’re curating creative experiences across The Palm Beaches focused on art and culture. We invite you to join us as we travel from Jupiter to Boca Raton--and everywhere in between--and navigate through more than 42,000 annual events and get insider access to over 200 cultural institutions. Get ready to embark on an art-filled adventure across the seven unique regions that make up “Florida’s Cultural Capital.”   Get ThePalmBeaches.TV on your phone! Download the app for FREE at the Apple store or on the Play Store for Android. Interested in underwriting opportunities? E-mail us at underwriting@arthivemagazine.com. Art fair season has officially begun here in South Florida! From contemporary to fine art, film, video, and immersive experiences, there is an art form for just about anyone to enjoy. If you want to know where to go and what to do, check our art fair list in the Fall issue of Art Hive. We are excited to announce that Art Hive will be available at many art fairs and cultural events this season. Check out the list below to find your complimentary copy…while supplies last! •Art Basel Miami Collective Booth •Continuum Art Fair •West Palm Beach Arts Festival •Palm Beach Modern and Contemporary •Art Boca •Art Palm Beach •Art On The Square •PULSE Miami •Art Miami •Aqua Miami •Spectrum/Red Dot Miami •CONTEXT Miami •Design Miami •Delray Beach Open •8th annual STEAM luncheon PBSC

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CONNECT WITH JESSIE & ANGELA | Instagram: @jessiexangela, @arthive_magazine | arthivemagazine.com

*Schedule/match times/players subject to change. Tickets are not eligible for refunds or exchanges. Campaign creative by WheelhouseBranding.com


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January 30/ February 03, 2020 Palm Beach County Convention Center COLLECTOR'S PREVIEW T h u r s d a y J a n u a r y 30 6 p m / 1 0 p m GENERAL Friday Saturday Sunday Monday

ADMISSION J a n u a r y 31 February 1 February 2 February 3

12pm/7pm 12pm/7pm 12pm/7pm 12pm/6pm

LOCATION Pa l m B e a c h C o u n t y C o n v e n t i o n C e n t e r 6 5 0 O k e e c h o b e e B o u l e v a r d We s t Palm Beach, Florida 33401 www.nextlevelfairs.com/artpalmbeach

Art 2020 Palm Beach Next Level Fairs presents


CREATIVE | OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ARTS

OPPORTUNITIES IN

THE ARTS

OUR PICKS OF GRANTS, CALLS-TO-ARTISTS, EVENTS, JOBS AND WORKSHOPS TO PROMOTE TO PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF CREATIVES AND NONPROFIT CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT PROVIDE ART OR ACTIVITIES ENHANCING THE CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE COMMUNITY.

South Arts State Fellowships and Grand Prize Deadline: December 3 South Arts provides funding of $5,000 to $25,000 to individual visual artists throughout the Southern states. Artists are encouraged to submit pieces that reflect the diversity of the region. For more information visit southarts.org Tourist Development Tax Grant Program (TDT) Application Workshop Workshop: December 4 Broward Cultural Division hosts an application workshop for the Tourist Development Tax (TDT) grant. Applicants must demonstrate how their projects will enhance Broward County as a tourist destination and generate hotel and motel bed nights. For information and to register, visit browardartstdt.eventbrite.com Art Fort Lauderdale 2020 Call to Artists Deadline: December 10 Art Fort Lauderdale 2020 is accepting submissions from local creatives for the fourth edition of this four-day curated fair along the Intracoastal Waterway. For more information and to apply, visit artftlauderdale.com Creative Investment Program (CIP) Application Workshop Workshop: December 11 Broward Cultural Division hosts an application workshop for the Creative Investment Program (CIP) grant that assists Broward County nonprofit cultural organizations and individual artists create projects that engage local audiences. For information and to register, visit cipapplicationworkshop. eventbrite.com Coral Springs Call to Artists Deadline: December 23 The City of Coral Springs Public Art Program is accepting submissions from artists for their bi-annual Temporary Sculpture Program. The City will provide up to $49,000 toward the purchase of up to nine different artworks selected for this temporary display. For more information and to apply visit artist.callforentry.org

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Creative Investment Program (CIP) Eligibility Deadline Deadline: December 27 Broward-based not-for-profit cultural organizations and individual artists looking to create cultural projects for their community are encouraged to apply for the Broward Cultural Division’s Creative Investment Program (CIP) grant. For more information and to apply, visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding 2021 Funding Arts Broward (FAB!) Grant Deadline: January 24, 2020 Funding Arts Broward (FAB!) is awarding $2,000 - $15,000 grants to South Florida-based nonprofit, visual, music, and performing arts organizations that present high-quality programming in Broward County. For more information and to apply, visit fundingartsbroward.org/grants Cultural Tourism Program (CTP) Grant Deadline: January 27, 2020 Broward Cultural Division is providing funding for the Cultural Tourism Program (CTP) grant that funds exhibitions, performances, and other cultural and marketing activities. For more information visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding Cultural Investment Program (CINV) Grant Deadline: February 3, 2020 Broward Cultural Division is providing funding to local not-forprofit cultural organizations to reimburse program expenses associated with programming and exhibitions. For more information visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding Creative Investment Program (CIP) Grant Deadline: February 10, 2020 Broward Cultural Division is providing funding to local not-forprofit cultural organizations and artists looking to create projects that engage with local audiences. The eligibility deadline for this grant is December 27, 2019. For more information visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding

For more opportunities in the arts please visit broward.org/arts


Tourist Development Tax Grant Program (TDT) Deadline: February 15, 2020 Broward Cultural Division is providing funding for the Tourist Development Tax (TDT) grant. Applicants must demonstrate how their projects will enhance Broward County as a tourist destination and generate hotel and motel bed nights. For more information visit Broward.org/Arts/Funding Business for the Arts of Broward (BFA) Open Call Deadline: Ongoing Business for the Arts of Broward (BFA) is accepting artwork submissions from local emerging artists to be considered for their art curation program. Selected artwork will be shown in local businesses around Broward County. For more information and to apply, visit bfabroward.org Art Brawl Call to Artists Deadline: Ongoing Art Attack! seeks local artists to paint live at the FAT Village monthly Art Walk. Artists will also be given a 6x6’ space to create and sell their artwork. For more information and to apply, visit risingzen.com/art-brawl-submissions The Frank Art Gallery Call to Artists Deadline: Ongoing The Frank Art Gallery is accepting artwork submissions and exhibition proposals from local creatives at any stage in their career. Selected artists will be considered for inclusion in solo or group exhibitions and will have opportunities to participate in receptions, talks, workshops, and other events. For more information and to apply, visit thefrankgallery.org/p/ getinvolved

Andrews Avenue Bridge Call to Artists Deadline: January 31, 2020 Broward Cultural Division’s Public Art & Design Program is seeking to commission a professional visual artist or lighting design team to create an artistic lighting design for the recently renovated Andrews Avenue bridge located in Downtown Fort Lauderdale. Project budget: $490,000. For more information and to apply visit Broward.org/Arts

The Goods at Art Walk Call to Artists Deadline: Ongoing FAT Village is accepting applications from local creatives to showcase their artwork at the monthly Art Walk in Fort Lauderdale. Artists will have a designated space to showcase their artwork to thousands of visitors participating in the monthly art crawl. For more information and to apply, visit fatvillage.com/artwalk

For more opportunities in the arts please visit broward.org/arts

CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE SPACES | PUBLIC ART AT PORT EVERGLADES

Exuberance by Alice Aycock. Photo submitted.

VISIONARY CREATORS ADD BREATHTAKING DRAMA AND BEAUTY TO PORT EVERGLADES Sculpture by Alice Aycock and mural by Leon Bedore are the newest additions to public art program

A dramatic outdoor sculpture evoking the beauty and power of natural elements and a colorful indoor mural melding street art with contemporary design, are the two newest additions to the public art at Port Everglades. Created by internationally renowned sculptor Alice Aycock and acclaimed muralist Leon Bedore, also known as "Tes One," the artworks were commissioned by Broward Cultural Division in collaboration with the Port and are part of Broward County’s robust public art program. Thoughtfully situated in a roundabout located between four of the Port’s cruise terminals is Alice Aycock’s dynamic three-dimensional hybrid of architecture and sculpture—titled “Exuberance”— that suggests waves, water, wind, and vortexes of energy. In addition to being a stunning work of art, it also is a highly recognizable wayfinding tool visible from multiple locations. Created from powder-coated aluminum, the sculpture’s color gradation from white to blue stands in strong visual contrast to the color palette of the surrounding buildings and plaza.

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Transcendence by Leon Bedore. Photo submitted. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Exuberance by Alice Aycock. Photo submitted. 16

ARTHIVEMAGAZINE.COM


Transcendence by Leon Bedore. Photo submitted.

WITH ITS UNEXPECTED BURSTS OF SATURATED COLOR REMINISCENT OF GRAFFITI ART, HIGHLY TAILORED SWIPES AND SHARPLY FORMED SHAPES, THE MURAL COMPLEMENTS THE TERMINAL’S SLEEK INTERIOR...

As Port Everglades Acting Chief Executive and Director Glenn Wilshire points out, “Port Everglades uses its industrial landscape as a public art palette for artists to create visually stimulating works that engage cruise guests, and, in some cases, can serve a practical purpose such as helping visitors navigate through the Port.” Invigorating the newly expanded and renovated Cruise Terminal 25 is Leon Bedore’s 75-foot long mural titled “Transcendence.” With its unexpected bursts of saturated color reminiscent of graffiti art, highly tailored swipes and sharply formed shapes, the mural complements the terminal’s sleek interior and makes travelers aware they are entering a new and exhilarating experience and exciting journey ahead. Phillip Dunlap, director of Broward Cultural Division, notes the artworks underscore the County’s “continuing commitment to bringing high quality art to the public, which includes the nearly four million Port visitors who cruise annually.” For more information about Broward County’s Public Art & Design Program, visit Broward.org/Arts.

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CONSCIOUS | BLACK VIOLIN

Top: Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste of Black Violin pictured with Anne Sylvester and Corryn Freeman, the administrators of Black Violin Foundation Inc. Far right, top to bottom: Kev Marcus of Black Violin with Tauri Eligon, Principal of Walker Elementary School; Jay Charles, longtime friend and former violist, and orchestra band mate of Black Violin asks a question at the Dreamers Dream event.

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BROWARD TO BROADWAY CLASSICAL HIP-HOP DUO BLACK VIOLIN EMPOWERS YOUTH THROUGH MUSICAL PROGRAMS THAT FOSTER INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY

By Tony Phillips “There’s a book called The Blue Ocean,” Kev Marcus tells an enthusiastic audience assembled on a recent Sunday afternoon at the Broward Center’s Porter Riverview Ballroom. “It’s all about swimming in your own ocean instead of swimming with everyone else.” Marcus is one half of the classical and hip-hop duo Black Violin and he references this book to introduce the first track from Black Violin’s fourth studio album entitled Take The Stairs. The song is “Showoff ” and Marcus says, “It’s us doing that thing nobody else knows quite how to do.” Marcus and Wil Baptiste, the other half of Black Violin, met in 1996 a few miles northwest at Dillard High School of the Performing Arts on their first day of a two-week summer orchestra intensive. “My mama made me do it,” Marcus explains while shouting out his mother in the audience, “but when we got to Dillard, it was considered cool, so I made friends.” One of those friends was Baptiste, who remembers meeting Marcus at summer school while still a student at Sunrise Middle School. “He was sitting next to me,” recalls Baptiste. “I was first chair and he was second.” “You were not first chair!” Marcus interjects. “I saw all these wood instruments,” Baptiste remembers, “and thought I’m clearly in the wrong class. I tried go to the band section, but they told me no, you’re in this class. I was mad. I wanted to play sax, you know, John Coltrane, the cool stuff. It took me a day and a half to even pick up a violin, but after a week, I loved it. It made me feel different.” “People’s perception of me changed,” he recalls of both their full scholarships to Florida universities. “I would tell people I got a scholarship for violin and they’d say, ‘Really? You?’ They could not believe we could play at the level we could. That’s how Black Violin came together, but it all started with my mama.” Their creativity and flare didn’t stop there, always creating, always evolving. Baptiste notes, “Even back in those days, we were always doing cool stuff to stay in our instruments. I remember Kev wrote this song on his phone using Busta Rhymes’ song “Gimme Some More.” I was like, ‘Damn, you got a phone!’ But then he taught everyone else and we went to competitions playing this song.” Cut to 2005, where Black Violin performed on NBC’s nationally televised Showtime at the Apollo, in front of what Marcus calls, “the hardest audience on the planet.” Black Violin was paying its dues on the club scene before Mo’Nique announced their victory. “I don’t even know how we found the money,” Marcus recalls, “we were so broke, but five of us flew to New York. It was the real thing. We rubbed the log and won four times.”

Photos © David Muir

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“That was the start of our career.” Marcus continues, "Slowly, over many years, we had to build up to this and prove to people that two brothers playing the violin is something your theater wants to book. Since then, we’ve played Broadway, gone to Iraq and performed for our troops and played Obama’s inauguration.” Today, Black Violin now collaborates with local and national education programs like TurnAround Arts and connects with more than 100,000 students a year, mostly at lowincome and Title 1 schools. “What is it that Uncle Ben says to Spiderman?” Marcus asks. “We didn’t even think about how kids would react to it. We were just trying to do us, but after not too long, we knew that we had them in our hands, so we had to say something to them.” The Black Violin Foundation is a non-profit whose mission is helping emerging young musicians make music in a way it’s never been made before. Marcus’ wife, Anne Sylvester serves as the Foundation’s president. The organization presents performance workshops for students that accompany Black Violin’s 150 shows a year. It also awards music scholarships and provides musical instruments to individuals or programs in need and strives to empower youth by working with them in their communities to provide access to music programs that foster creativity and innovation. Baptiste’s wife, Corryn Freeman is the Foundation’s Vice President. “They were struggling,” Sylvester remembers of Black Violin’s early years, “but they had the drive. They were working hard. It wasn’t like, ‘Oh, we think we want to do this.’ They were passionate about it so you could see the potential.” The band is just back in town after two weeks on the road, the outer limit both wives place on touring. The Impossible Tour, which takes its name from the Take The Stair track “The Impossible Possible,” will see Black Violin back out on the road for another two weeks launching their new album in New York. “We’re learning as we go,” Sylvester laughs, including her BVF vice president Corryn Freeman. But from how successful the work they’re doing is, you wouldn’t know it.

BLACK VIOLIN: IMPOSSIBLE TOUR Friday, February 21, 2020 • 8:00 PM Au-Rene Theater at the Broward Center, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Top to bottom: Audience asks Black Violin if they feel a responsibility to use their platform to speak about social and political issues during the question and answer portion of the Dreamers Dream event; Principal Latosha Williams of Bethune Elementary with an orchestra student.

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For more information on tickets to see Black Violin, please visit browardcenter.org


Top to bottom: Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste of Black Violin pictured with host Sam G.; Students from Walker Elementary and Bethune Elementary performing Dreamer with Black Violin.

The duo’s Black Violin Foundation is a non-profit whose mission is helping emerging young musicians make music in a way it’s never been made before. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Kailee M.

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Rendering of Sofia Valiente’s boat; Photos submitted


NEW FLOATING ART INSTALLATION ARRIVING IN WEST PALM BEACH

A unique public art installation from award-winning artist Sofia Valiente is now open in Downtown West Palm Beach just west of the Palm Beach County Convention Center. Foreverglades, is a remarkable photography exhibit focused on life in The Glades and is housed in a replica of a 1920’s steamboat, which is docked in the Stub Canal Turning Basin in Howard Park, immersing visitors in the history of long-ago Florida. The exhibition is free and open to the public and runs until the end of February 2020.   The exhibition emphasizes the pivotal role played by the fertile Belle Glade region in the development of South Florida. Originally settled in 1925, Belle Glade was a major center of agriculture, providing food for much of the region. Valiente has spent the past five years photographing residents of the region, resulting in compelling portraits of the people, places and location that is too often overlooked in historical perspectives. “This is a contemporary story informed by history,” said Valiente, who lives in Belle Glade. “The photographs explore the identity of the region and reflect on what that means to people who currently live there. I decided to house the exhibition inside an accurate replica of a steamboat so that the context as well as the photographs could transport the imagination back into time, and capture that enduring link between Belle Glade and West Palm Beach.” The striking, 41-foot freight boat that will house the exhibition is sure to be a head-turner for commuters along the busy Okeechobee Boulevard corridor. It will be docked at the site of the Turning Basin where ships brought agricultural goods from Belle Glade to West Palm Beach during the 1920’s before roads connected the two communities. The commercial activity that took place in the basin is central to West Palm Beach’s own history and development, prompting West Palm Beach to grow faster than established cities such as Lake Worth.

Photo ©Bravo Media/Barbara Nitke

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“I’d like for people to get a feeling and a sense of their roots, what Florida once was and how we came from swamp to what we are today. Whether you grew up in Florida, came for retirement, or migrated for work…whatever your story here is, I believe each person will take something away from it.”

“I wanted to create an original space and framework to view the project in— one that was historic and made the most sense for the subject matter. Additionally, I wanted to give the experience that I had in Belle Glade to others. The exhibit will feature my long-term photographic project which was produced over 4 years and features stories from the Glades communities. The artifact of the steam boat was so particular to the pioneer days in Florida and there are no remnants of that in South Florida today as most history has been paved over. The idea of people coming to this inhabitable landscape, with their few belongings, and making a life of their own, that pioneer spirit is important to understand our identity.” The exhibition is free, funded in part by the Knight Foundation, the Florida Department of State Division of Cultural Affairs, and the West Palm Beach Arts & Entertainment District. For more information, including project updates, visit www.facebook.com/RootedintheMuck.

About Sofia Valiente:

Sofia Valiente is an award-winning photographer and storyteller. In 2015, she received the World Press Photo award for Miracle Village (1st prize, portraits, stories). Sofia’s work has been published in Time, The Guardian, El Mundo, Vice, American Photo Magazine, and many other media outlets. For the past five years Sofia has been living in the heart of Belle Glade, Florida developing her project Foreverglades, about the “last frontier” of the United States. To learn more about Sofia’s work, you can visit her website at: sofiavaliente.com or follow her on Instagram at @valiente_sofia

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THE THREE Cs OF ILLUSTRATION

PART 2: CRAFTSMANSHIP Words and Illustration by Jon Hunt

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he last time we met on these pages, I was pontificating about the importance of Concept in fine art and illustration. Today I would like to discuss the actual skill it takes to coax an idea into physical form. But first, I should mention that in a telling demonstration of irony, I actually misspelled “craftsmanship” in my last article. *sigh* So much for my aspirations of being a shining beacon of technical perfection. Anyway…

[crafts•man•ship ] \ ˈkræfts.mən.ʃɪp \ noun. Skill at making things, or the skill with which something was made or done1 I used to be a craftsmanship snob. Let me explain… I graduated from art college in 1988 (right around the time Gutenberg invented moveable type2). The only computers I was aware of during my art education were used by the receptionist and the registrar to type letters and do scheduling. I learned how to make art the “good old-fashioned way.” I was trained in the use of many traditional art tools, but my medium of choice was watercolor— transparent watercolors only, thank you very much. You know, REAL watercolor. I was partial to Winsor & Newton Series 7 sable brushes and only worked on sized, 100% rag watercolor paper (preferably mould-made, deckle-edged 140# hot pressed). I refused to “cheat” by using opaque white gouache or color pencil (although I would occasionally employ a single edged razor blade to flick out highlights). I was so dedicated to these lofty artistic tenets that sometimes the final result suffered. I mean seriously, you can’t paint around every single blade of grass or strand of hair, even with masking fluid. At some point, it became painfully obvious that if I wanted to make a living as an illustrator I would have to compromise. I started to include color pencils and other opaque water-based media in my watercolors. I supplemented my series 7s with cheaper synthetic brushes. The work went much faster, was less stressful and most importantly— the quality didn’t suffer. In fact, experimenting with combinations of different media actually expanded my ability to make engaging work on a deadline. I simply stopped fetishizing the process, which in turn precipitated my emancipation from those ridiculous self-imposed rules. The artistry didn’t suffer in the least. And dammit, it was fun! Assessing craftsmanship can be a tricky road to navigate. People outside of the art field tend to exclusively equate a high level of polish and technical skill with craftsmanship. And indeed, accurate perspective and anatomy, clean, crisp linework and smooth gradients coupled with luxurious slatherings of photo-real detail are impressive to be sure. Who has not heard the oft-repeated exclamation “That is SO cool! It looks just like a PHOTOGRAPH!”? But what of the gestural, spontaneous mark-making of the Impressionists and Abstract Expressionists? Are those artists simply lazy or unskilled? Or is something else going on here? During the concept and sketch stage, I am rarely concerned with the rendering or level of finish of my image— it’s the idea that counts and I do my best to get that idea into visual form as quickly and efficiently as possible. Once I am happy with the initial sketch, I may then pose a model, research costumes and architecture and consult photographs. But the funny thing is, I sometimes actually prefer the rough, intuitive quality of the original design so much that I dial back my rendering in the final image in an attempt to reclaim the naive energy of the original sketch. I have always recommended that before taking any classes, young artists should acquire a few basic art supplies, then go home and play. No rules. See for yourself how the various media feel, look, and smell3. Only once you have gained some undirected experience smearing charcoal, troweling acrylics onto canvas and smashing pixels around, will you be ready for some structure and focus. My reasoning for this is that after you have become intimately familiar with the materials on your own terms you will be less likely to accept “You can’t do that with

(insert art media here)!” from hung up art professors and workshop facilitators. (Think of it as “dating around” before you have to “honor and obey, in sickness and in health”) Now don’t get me wrong—there are certain cases where doing things the “right way” is extremely important. Take oil painting for example: There are some fundamental techniques and rules that have been developed over the centuries that artists should adhere to if they want their paintings to survive the rigors of time. One of the most basic techniques is to work “fat over lean,” which is to say that each progressive layer of paint contains more oil than the last. This method allows the painting to dry properly which helps prevent chipping and cracking (keeping in mind that it can take decades for an oil painting to fully dry). Please note that while following procedures such as this will help to ensure that the art will remain intact for future generations, it contributes little or nothing to making the painting “better” conceptually. A skillfully made painting is not by default a compositionally exciting or creatively innovative painting. There is yet another way to think about skill and training and how these relate to craftsmanship. Imagine, if you will, a rebellious teen in her parents’ garage, guitar slung low, cheap amp cranked up to 10. She’s learning her favorite Hüsker Dü song. She plays for hours every day until she can do every part perfectly. She hasn’t practiced scales or done any other technical training. She can only play that one song. So, in truth, she isn’t actually what I would call a “guitarist”. She may be a Rock Star, but she is certainly not a Musician at this stage of the game. Eventually, she gets tired of that one song and starts trying to write her own stuff. She doesn’t read music, but she knows what sounds good. Eventually, through perseverance and a whole lot of messing around, she comes up with her own strategies for writing and performing original tunes. She discovers that when you make your own rules, limitations can blossom into something akin to a distinctive “personal style4.” She may never become a virtuoso like Julian Bream or Joe Satriani, but let’s face it-- Angus Young and Dave Grohl have done pretty damn well for themselves. So, what is “better”? The violent black strokes slashed onto white canvas by Abstract Expressionist Franz Klein5? Or the dispassionate, rectilinear precision of a painting by Piet Mondrian6? I’ve come to the conclusion that “craftsmanship” is not necessarily a synonym for “skillfully or properly constructed using proper archival technique.” We’re not engineering bridges here-- this is just art for goodness’ sake! No, craftsmanship in my opinion is a purely situational construct based on: 1) The concept that an artist is trying to convey (e.g. visceral/emotional vs. intellectual/clinical) 2) The context in which that idea is to be expressed (e.g. punk show vs. classical concert) 3) How that idea is best communicated to the viewer. (e.g. bold/immediate vs. calm/measured) And that, Dear Reader brings us to the subject of my next missive; the last of the Three Cs: COMMUNICATION. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/craftsmanship 2. This is not a true statement. 3. Tasting art supplies is not generally recommended. Don’t be that person. 4. Ever wonder why Black Sabbath’s Tony Iommi and The Grateful Dead’s Gerry Garcia have such distinctive guitarsounds? Garcia was missing the ring finger on his right hand and Iommi is missing two! 5. http://www.artnet.com/artists/franz-kline 6. http://www.artnet.com/artists/piet-mondrian

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CONSCIOUS | PROTECTING PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS

PROTECTING

PARADISE WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS

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Photo by Robert Nelson Photography


TRASH TO TREASURE THE WORK OF REBECCA FATZINGER AND CRISTINA MALDONADO By Ashleigh Walters Dozens of shoes. A used toothbrush. A mailbox. There isn’t a kitchen sink in the mix *yet,* but if any interesting form of beach trash gets in the path of two determined South Florida friends, it will be transformed into art.   About three times a week, Rebecca Fatzinger and Cristina Maldonado set out independently. They stroll a combined 13 miles of coastline, scooping up trash from beaches.  Maldonado walks a more remote stretch, from Normandy Beach to Middle Cove Beach, and finds what she labels “Ocean Trash.” Fatzinger goes from Bathtub Reef Beach to Jensen Beach, where she finds “Lazy Local Trash.”    They haul it all home, assess the scraps, and save the most interesting pieces out of the recycling and trash bins. Their collaborations become creative sculptures, from The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album cover, to a wild gorilla, to topical messages regarding the Parkland School shooting, offshore drilling, and Bahamas relief efforts. They call it “TC Trash Art.”   While the friends have never kept track of the sheer volume of trash they’ve collected during the years, they have witnessed the complexity of the issue of beach and ocean trash. They’ve found crates carried in currents from both Africa and Spain.  Sadly, they’ve also found dead fish trapped inside plastic objects and a dead sea turtle with fishing line around its flipper.   “What started off as a silly hobby has become a bit of an obsession. Our goal has always been to inspire others to get out and do beach clean ups. Once you do beach clean ups often enough, it changes your lifestyle and you become much more self-conscious of your plastic consumption,” Maldonado explained.   Beautiful, quirky, and unexpected; the impressions left by TC Trash Art are anything but disposable.

CONNECT WITH TC TRASH ART

INSTAGRAM: @TCTrashArt + @TCTrashArtTrash FACEBOOK: facebook.com/TCTrashArt + facebook.com/DailyTrashHauls

CONNECT WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS TWITTER: @AshleighWalters FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ashleightv

Ashleigh Walters (www.AshleighWalters.net) is a painter and Anchorwoman at WPTV NewsChannel 5, seen across Florida's Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. WPTV is committed to PROTECTING PARADISE, by raising awareness of environmental issues and showing what’s being done to improve the quality of life in Florida. Find extensive coverage at WPTV.com/ProtectingParadise All photos © Rebecca Fatzinger and Cristina Maldonado

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Pin by Gulnur Ozdaglar

WORLDWIDE WOW INTERNATIONAL ART JEWELERS BRACE FOR BIJOUX! By Jeanne Martin Artist Gulnur Ozdaglar forms graceful flowers over a candle-sized flame in the small studio under her apartment in Ankara, Turkey. A modern day alchemist, she crafts magnificent adornments from plastic bottles that she says would otherwise go to the trash bin.

She cuts sheets of metal and folds them into forms for the series bound for BIJOUX! Bouncing back and forth from a necklace, to a brooch, to a ring, she spends anywhere from a day to a couple of weeks to finish one piece depending on how complicated the design is.

Gulner is one of the juried international artists bolstering their jewelry collection for BIJOUX!, the contemporary jewelry show to be held at the Armory Art Center on February 5-8, 2020. Top art jewelers are from Argentina, South Korea, Israel, Spain, Holland, the UK, Canada, and all over the US.

Laura thought she would major in dance in college until she was whisked away by a love of metalsmithing. “Dance is something that led me to understanding the body and has a lot to do with how I design. If I am designing a necklace or a ring I am giving a lot of consideration of how it will work with the silhouette and how the person who is wearing it will be moving through the world.”

Gulner collects the clear, blue, and green bottles abundant in Turkey and on trips to Europe plunders reds, cobalt blues, and pinks. She asks, “What does this plastic want to be?” The forms they take are mostly organic, flowing shapes. She applies her knowledge of design to form jewelry that is beautiful, light, gentle-to-the-body but durable enough to survive years. And her clients can stand out while taking a stand. Gulner says that contemporary jewelry creates its value not from the precious material, but the idea behind it. “Our jewelry is the symbol of how intellectual, how humanist, how conscious we are.” Choreography in Metal Morning begins for Laura Wood in the well lit studio with hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings of a large barn at the Pennland School of Arts and Crafts in the Appalachian Hill country of North Carolina. It is here she is in the third and final year of residency. 34

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Rather than starting with a final drawing, Laura begins with a large array of forms. She likes to see how the forms work together and how to engineer them for the body. “Very similar to how I might choreograph dance, there are a certain variety of movements and shapes and you string them together where they are appropriate.” Laura finishes the metal with powder coating and recently started a series with enamel finish. Laura has participated in BIJOUX many times. Why? She likes the event because having a set number of artists that all create jewelry grabs the attention of the most interested clients. “It is not so large that people have to wind their way through a maze to get to the jewelry they want to see.” Another boon is spending time with colleagues and peers. “It is a really fun time to get to meet new jewelers from other parts of the world.” “My jewelry is the type of work that is going to start a conversation. You will receive a compliment. If you are not the type of person that enjoys that kind of attention, you might not want to gravitate to my work.”


GULNER SAYS THAT CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY CREATES ITS VALUE NOT FROM THE PRECIOUS MATERIAL, BUT THE IDEA BEHIND IT.

Inspired by Structure

At sundown, South Korean artists Jung Ju Lee bends to examine the structure of a crystalline rock used to build the abandoned railway in her adopted city of Rochester, NY. This is her “happiest time of day,” when she traverses the city and finds a new way of thinking—inspired by the rocks. Classic buildings. The sky. Jung works 10 hours a day from her small, third-floor studio overlooking the skyline of Rochester. Huddled at a work bench cluttered with pliers, power tools, files, and parts, Jung spends 5-7 days working on a single woven, wire mesh piece. Inspired by architecture, Jung starts with a free-style drawing, then a 3D rendering she likens to building a bridge. Folding and cutting two sheets of wire mesh she creates patterns while the relationship between the horizontal and vertical lines create an optical illusion. “I feel there may be something in between the 3 dimensional space” Jung explains. The woven wire is structurally strong and the clasps are hidden “like a woman’s bra.” Jung prefers to create unique pieces but produces limited editions upon client request. BIJOUX! Has Changed the Face of Jewelry in the Palm Beaches “They were lined up around the corner last year, beating the doors down. Women will always buy jewelry and lipstick” said Donna Schneier of Palm Beach. Donna is the Founder and Producer of BIJOUX!. Donna first formed the contemporary jewelry show Loot at the Museum of Art and Design in New York. So when she moved to Palm Beach, BIJOUX! was born. The event's greatness is due to Donna’s great eye for jewelry created by artists who bring an array of cultures and influences to their work. Previously held at the Norton Museum of Art, BIJOUX! is to be held at the Armory Art Center in downtown West Palm Beach in 2020 — and Donna is delighted. “It is a much larger space and as a school, the Armory will add demonstrations, workshops, and lectures to BIJOUX!.” Because proceeds from the event will benefit the Armory Art Center, guests can leave with jewelry that makes a statement while they benefit the transformational mission of the Armory Art Center.

BIJOUX! at the Armory A CONTEMPORARY ART JEWELRY SALE February 5-8, 2020 11:00 am - 5:00 pm Armory Art Center Downtown West Palm Beach 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Open to the public. (561) 832-1776 armoryart.org All photos courtesy of the artists

Top to bottom: Necklace by Gulnur Ozdaglar; Grid Black Necklace by Jung Ju Lee; Open Weave Necklace by Laura Wood; Pin by Jung Ju Lee CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Photo by OLIVIER MASTEY


STREET SMARTS By Bruce Helander

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treet art has evolved from daring spray-painted tags on subway cars and urban walls to a surprisingly ironic “gentrification” of a creative genre once considered a visual impairment on the environment that also was quite illegal. In the early days of this nighttime activity, clandestine artists were subject to multiple arrests in an unsigned “crime scene.” One of the most famous early proponents of this movement was Keith Haring, who was ticketed regularly in the subways of Manhattan for his quick cartoonish scribbles, often drawn on empty underground black billboards. The motivation for this growing fraternity of young artists was to offer a recurring graphic message to passersby, who subconsciously would be made aware of a new way to communicate outside of the traditional gallery system. Often these anonymous and unsigned murals transformed into sophisticated applications of spray paint and the inventive use of cut stencils, which allowed for repetitive imagery that could be applied in just a few seconds. After a decade or so of streetwise activity in municipal centers like London and Manhattan, the communicative and aesthetic power and acceptability soon began to infiltrate urban areas in South Florida, where sidewalk murals were celebrated as a device to bring art to the masses. Paradoxically, a once forbidden craft received an official blessing from cities that realized the value of converting bland downtown walls into glowing artistic billboards for self-expression. For example, West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale promoted these colorful wall paintings with organized tours and even subsidized materials for artists to expand to other locations. The Wynwood neighborhood of Miami became a mecca for concentrated street art that influenced scores of young artists and now is considered one of the street art capitals of the world according to a recent feature in The New York Times. The story also reported that “bright, colorful murals are turning up all over town on the walls of office buildings, warehouses, corner stores, and even public schools and a police station. The Wynwood neighborhood is so dense with murals that it is getting difficult to find an empty wall.” One street artist, Thierry Guetta, AKA “Mr. Brainwash,” skyrocketed into practically overnight fame and fortune and has developed a respectable presence in South Florida with numerous gallery exhibitions and projects. The Coral Springs Museum of Art has just acquired a major work by the artist that will be on display in their new acquisitions and permanent collection show opening November 30, 2019 (continuing through March 7, 2020) and has scheduled a major museum-wide exhibition for December 2020. DTR Modern Galleries in Palm Beach will have a special showing of Mr. Brainwash works this December and throughout the winter season.

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Aerial view from Mr. Brainwash’s solo show in Seoul Korea at the ARA Museum in 2016. The slogan “life is beautiful” is a regular thematic image in neon and paint.

His energized visual environments and provocative installations have become a crowd-drawing sensation around the world. The backstory of Mr. Brainwash, MBW for short, now a well-known acronym and not to be confused with a BMW or receiving an MBA, is as fascinating as his artwork. A self-made millionaire, with income derived entirely from his engaging art, Thierry Guetta’s natural born entrepreneurial and promotional instincts combined with a natural aesthetic sense have made a name for him basically overnight by art world standards, as he rolled up his sleeves and followed non-stop the street art syndrome connected to a midnight illegal (and often dangerous) work ethic as an artist influenced by of Banksy and Shepard Fairey. My first essay on graffiti and street art was published in May of 1980 in Art Express magazine. At the time, there were only a handful of subway car painters looking for public exposure while subverting the gallery system with an end run, but only for a while. Most notably, the artist “Crash” ended up at Sidney Janis and Jean-Michel Basquiat with Annina Nosei and Gagosian. The rest is history, and Mr. Brainwash is a part of that successful evolution from the streets to galleries to museums. In order to fully appreciate and understand the work of Mr. Brainwash, it is critically important to take a look back at the history of his artistic genre and how he progressed, paralleling the evolution of street art to fine art, as well as the pioneers who first ventured outside who helped him develop into his own recognizable style. Street art initially was about communicating freely without commerce to passersby who eventually would start to recognize a style or pattern or sticker that ultimately would become more pronounced and iconic, like Shepard Fairey’s mesmerizing “Obey” poster that depicted a mesmerizing wrestler named “André the Giant,” which was plastered on hundreds of walls and buildings around the world. The history of domestic street art originated with tagging, or scratching names and images on public property. But one also can look at painted murals in early 20th century Latin America through Latino gangs’ spray-can graffiti in the 1950s, all of which at the time seemed like a worthless throwaway gesture, but has evolved into a complex and respected art form that, in some cases, has become so valuable that works allowed to fade on the street are now being excavated (wall included) to be sold to the highest bidder. Coincidently, during the writing of this piece, Banksy dominated the Sotheby’s Frieze Week October evening sale of contemporary art in London (but this time without the shredding) with a work titled “Devolved Parliament” (2009) that sold for $12.1 million. At the same sale, a large Jean-Michel Basquiat painting, “Pyro” (1984), went for nearly the same amount, making for a remarkable moment in art history where two former street artists were leading an evening sale. 38

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Photos courtesy of Mr.Brainwash Studio


Mr. Brainwash, room with multiple sculptures from his solo exhibition in London, 2012. Photograph by Matt Chung.

THE HISTORY OF DOMESTIC STREET ART ORIGINATED WITH TAGGING, OR SCRATCHING NAMES AND IMAGES ON PUBLIC PROPERTY.

Thierry Guetta began his career unwittingly as an amateur filmmaker who obsessively never went anywhere without a movie camera, which continued to be a preoccupation in his life and work. He was a natural born cameraman, utilizing his penchant for documenting intriguing scenes to nearly everything in front of him, from his kid’s birthday parties to life on the street to self-portraits. He had no definitive master plan for his growing library of video canisters, but he also had no intention of stopping this habitual documentarian activity, and in the meantime, he was “sharpening” his vision each day. Ironically, his penchant for filming on the street led him to capturing fugitive artists engaging in their slightly shady branding craft at night. One thing led to another, and ultimately the idea of making a documentary film on street artists became a full-time passion, even though Guetta had no training in film production or editing. He kept on filming, getting more involved with the subjects of his videos and their working habits. He even became a trusted assistant to Shepard Fairey, traveling around the world as “an accomplice,” according to Fairey, as he met other street artists with odd sounding names like Swoon, Buffmonster, Neckface and Sweet Toof, who provided a ready-made motley cast and unpaid crew of dedicated artists delighted to have their working methods recorded and exposed. Thierry was at the right place at the right time to assimilate the street aesthetic and the mechanics behind the movement. He had the inside track, volunteering to help artists while learning the craft firsthand, and acquired a remarkable perspective on street art that no one else had, gaining a veritable PhD in street art. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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Madonna album cover designed by Mr. Brainwash, incorporating collage, silkscreen and Warholian pop imagery with a distinctive touch.

So, it is reasonable to conclude that Thierry eventually would use this invaluable, hands-on experience to launch his own street art activity and career. While it might be difficult to imagine a world now devoid of graffiti, it was instituted first in America by patrolling gangs on the lower east side of Manhattan in the 1930s that would “tag” their disputed territories. In fact, for thousands of years, there has been evidence of human imagination that communicated with sketched gestures on walls portraying abstract signs, symbols, people, animals and even diagrams of stars and planets, beginning 15,000 years ago during the Stone Age. Mankind obviously had the intuitive spirit and built-in DNA to use art to converse to others and to decorate our surroundings. What motivates some of us to scratch an anonymous message or a glyph that was meant to be read or interpreted comes down to basic human nature to share aspirations and opinions and well-crafted stencils, and in many cases, simply to gain attention. Perhaps the most legendary early tagger was the unidentified serviceman “artist” during World War II whose catchphrase was “Kilroy was here,” usually accompanied by a scribble of a bald man with a big nose looking over a wall, that seemed to appear everywhere. Familiarity attached itself to this simple repetitive cartoon-like drawing, which became iconic (like early street art) as the most recognized tags in modern times. In the 1980s, along the back streets of Paris, “Blek le Rat” started spray painting stenciled images of small comical black rats on backstreet walls. “Mr. Rat” notably stated: “This movement is the democratization of art: if the people cannot come to the gallery, we bring the gallery to the people!” The evolution (and revolution!) of messaging/marking urban walls has continued to grow as the medium’s versatile and revolutionary nature has increasingly attracted important collectors in recent years. Keith Haring, known for his animated childlike style, gained recognition for his subway drawings and went on to create large-scale murals, but did not live to see his work reach today’s auction records. Areas such as the Wynwood neighborhood in Miami are now completely saturated by a rainbow of imaginative and colorful compositions and has become a major draw for tourists. Originally street art was associated with controversial guerrilla art practices and then progressed to a more refined and disciplined “attack” of repetition and outlandish design that finally was accepted by the general public and now celebrated. 40

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Photos courtesy of Mr.Brainwash Studio


Installation of Mr. Brainwash’s New York exhibition “Icons” in 2010

HIS ENERGIZED VISUAL ENVIRONMENTS AND PROVOCATIVE INSTALLATIONS HAVE BECOME A CROWD-DRAWING SENSATION AROUND THE WORLD. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST:

mrbrainwash.com DTR Modern Galleries: dtrmodern.com Coral Springs Museum of Art: coralspringsmuseum.org/mr-brainwash —Bruce Helander is an artist who writes on art. He is a former White House Fellow of the National Endowment for the Art, former Provost of the Rhode Island School of Design and a member of the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. His most recent book, “Chihuly: An Artist Collects,” was published by Abrams, Inc. CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT

OF YOUR MUSEUM VISIT By Bea Conrad

M

useums offer priceless cultural treasures, from amazing works of art worth millions of dollars to full-size dinosaur skeletons that are millions of years old. Whether you are an avid art lover, a budding archeologist or a history buff, you can find a museum that matches your interests and piques your curiosity.

Go Beyond the Highlights Everyone who visits the Louvre will want to see the Mona Lisa, and visitors to the Vatican will spend plenty of time checking out the iconic ceiling. But there is more to these museums than their highlights, and rushing to those classics does you, and the institution, a real disservice.

If you are new to the museum landscape, you will want to make the most of your first visit. The museum experience can be intimidating at first, and knowing what to expect can help a lot. Here are some simple ways to make the most of your first, or next, museum visit.

You will still want to see those highlights, of course, but there is no rush. Instead of simply following the crowds and fighting for a quick glimpse, linger in the hallways, explore the side galleries and revel in all the amazing works of art. You just might discover your next favorite work in the unlikeliest of places.

Learn About Discounts and Special Offers Some museums, like the treasures of the Smithsonian, are totally free, while others can put a real dent on your wallet. But even the most expensive museums offer specials and discounts, so cash-strapped visitors can soak up the culture at a more affordable price. If you want to make the most of your visit, and your money, ask about discounts and special visiting times. Many museums offer significant admission discounts to students and military veterans, while others provide free or low-cost admission on certain nights. Researching these discounts ahead of time will reduce the cost, so you can afford a second visit.

Photo by Ryan Stefan

Check Out Upcoming Exhibitions When you visit a typical museum, you are really visiting two different sets of exhibits. One set of exhibits is there to stay, which is the aptly-named permanent collection, while other exhibits are viewable only for a short time. If you want to make the most of your visit, check out the museum website for information about upcoming special exhibits. If you see something you like, you can time your visit to coincide with your chosen special exhibit.

Visit During the Off Times From natural history museums and planetariums to famous art museums and cultural institutions, popular sites can attract millions of visitors a year. So when you go, chances are you will not be alone. If you want to make the most of your time and get the most from your visit, try to go during the off times. Depending on the institution, that may or may not be during the week; many museums attract dozens of school field trips a week. Knowing when to go is half the battle, and if you choose well you can explore at your leisure. From the best art in the world to the most iconic artifacts from lost civilizations, museums are treasure troves of culture. These august institutions have something to offer everyone, from curious school kids and vacationing families to lifelong learners and couples on their first dates. Chances are there is a great museum within easy driving distance of your home, so do yourself a favor and get ready to explore. The tips listed above will help you make the most of your museum trip, so you can get your fill of beauty and culture.

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

5 WAYS PAST FAILURES CAN PAVE

THE WAY TO FUTURE SUCCESSES By Drew Scott Fear of failure and the craving for success are key parts of human nature, but the path to fame and fortune is rarely a smooth one. While entrepreneurs and business leaders come from all walks of life, they all have one thing in common: they have all failed, and overcome those failures.

#3 Failure Encourages the Acquisition of New Skills There is nothing like the failure of a business or the flaming out of a seemingly great idea to create a new way of thinking. When your business fails or your entrepreneurial dreams falter, you may have no choice but to go to work.

From tech leaders like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs to scientists like Albert Einstein and Sir Isaac Newton, everyone who has done anything important has failed, sometimes spectacularly. Any study of the lives of these remarkable individuals is in part a study in failure. Facing adversity and overcoming challenges is what these individuals did, and part of what ultimately made them so successful.

Going to work for someone else may seem like a failure, but the skills you learn could be extremely valuable down the line. You may learn a new way of doing business, knowledge you can use while pursuing your next great idea.

So while everyone hopes for an overnight success, the odds of failure are far higher. The good news is that those early failures can pave the way to future success. Here are five reasons entrepreneurs, business leaders, and others should embrace the power of failure. #1 Failure Builds Resilience The teacup on your table is fragile, while the table itself is more resilient. That fragile teacup must be carefully protected, lest it fall and break apart, while the table can take some abuse and survive just fine.

Instead of giving up, these successful individuals pick themselves up and dust themselves off. They take the hard lessons they have learned and turn them into something good, improving on past ideas, seeking out new partners, and turning ideas over in their heads until something clicks.

But some things, including the entrepreneurial mind, are the opposite of fragile; they actually get better when they are challenged. This antifragile nature is a key part of entrepreneurial and business success, and one of the key reasons early success so often paves the path to later success.

#5 Failure Can Create Optimism You might think that failures, especially repeated ones, would trigger despair and despondency, and for many people that is true. But for those who were ultimately successful, failure seems to have had the opposite effect.

Simply being challenged can make your business, and your ideas, better. No matter what the obstacle, there is something to learn from it, and entrepreneurs know better than most the power of resilience.

It may seem counterintuitive, but failure can actually trigger optimism in entrepreneurs and business leaders who are ultimately successful. Instead of shrinking from the challenge, successful individuals see optimism and opportunity.

#2 Failure Can Spark Creative Problem Solving When things do not go as planned, entrepreneurs get going. Failures can spark creative problem-solving in individuals with an entrepreneurial streak. Photo by Sebastian Leon Prado

#4 Failure Provides Learning Opportunities Entrepreneurs and business leaders are wonderful learners. More than their less successful peers, these unique individuals have the ability to learn from their mistakes. They may fail spectacularly many times over, but they learn something new each time their ideas are shot down.

Without challenge, entrepreneurs and business owners can get stuck in a rut, doing things the same old way and falling victim to newer and more nimble competitors. The lessons learned through those early failures can be extremely valuable, sparking creative thinking and helping business leaders stay ahead of their competitors.

The most successful business leaders are a diverse group of men and women. Some came from wealthy families and got a great start in life. Others were born into abject poverty and had to struggle for every meal. Still, others emerged from the middle class, greatly exceeding expectations and building their businesses from the ground up. But those disparate men and women all have one thing in common: a history of past failures. And unlike so many of their peers, they were able to turn those early failures around, learning important lessons along the way and turning their failures into enormous successes.

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Mural by Ahol Sniffs Glue, photo taken at ArtPalmBeach 2018, photo by LILAPHOTO 46

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Interview edited for length and clarity. Image on opposite page, courtesy of Jennifer Love Gironda


AHOL SNIFFS GLUE By Jennifer Love Gironda

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ecently I had the pleasure of interviewing Miami-based artist Ahol Sniffs Glue (a.k.a. David Anasagasti) at the renowned Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. We met up prior to his gig, in which he'll be leading his own tour of selected artworks for Norton's Art After Dark series, (an on-going free, weekly program offering a diverse range of events and workshops to the public.) I did my best to ‘do my homework’ on this homegrown Hialeah artist, probably best known for his iconic ‘drowsy eyes’ graffiti that overlooks much of Wynwood, but I still had some lingering questions. What do I call a boss artist like him? Mr. Ahol? Mr. Anasagasti? Or just David? These are the things that keep me up at night. If you are from South Florida, or have ever taken a stroll through the Wynwood Walls district, you have probably seen his signature eye motifs painted on the sides of buildings, stuck on stickers, and tagged on buses—basically on anything that 'sits still' long enough to get the ‘Ahol’ treatment. Since most of his works belong to the street, many of his collectors have flocked to Frame Art Gallery in Brickell to claim a piece of their own. Some collectors and fans were lucky enough to grab one of his limited-edition pieces with Swiss based company, Swatch. However, if you don’t live anywhere near his street art, you can live vicariously through his social media accounts--my favorite is his Instagram, @aholsniffsglue. I didn’t know what to expect with this interview, other than the chance to chill out and chat with a gifted and cool artist. Fortunately for me it went beyond a typical interview and became an unparalleled experience. I was pulled into an incredible afternoon with Ahol and his documentary crew from Hungry Ants Media, going behind the scenes at the Norton Museum. He gave me a sneak-peek of several of his chosen artworks for his upcoming Art After Dark tour, each more vibrant and astonishing than the last. I was even honored to witness his excitement at tagging a trash can at the museum, quipping, "Now I can say I have a piece at the Norton." JLG: A tagline that I always see with your work is ‘Miami Full Time.’ Can you describe what that means to you? Ahol: Many years ago, when I was throwing parties downtown and I was actively painting on the streets and stuff like that, that’s when I started writing ‘Miami Full Time.’ It was a long time before anyone was even using it--before hashtags so I was putting it out there. JLG: So, it was back when a hashtag was still called a number sign? Ahol: I was writing ‘Miami Full Time’ because I was always working a regular job, whether I was doing art, graffiti, organizing art shows or working my regular job. I was still living, partaking, suffering and drawing Miami. So ‘Miami Full Time’ is just that--it’s a mindset. It’s something I associate with living in Miami, dealing with Miami and representing Miami wherever you go.

Ahol: Yeah it totally is, it’s Miami pride. It’s accepting that our city has its imperfections and we know alotta the stuff that people say about Miami is true unfortunately. But we accept it and we live it, and we try to do our part. We’re the band-aids, trying to cover something that is inevitable. JLG: I can relate to this. I grew up in North Carolina, that’s why I sound like this (readers, if you don’t know I have a HEAVY southern accent that I haven’t been able to shake). It was different than here, more rural- but it wasn’t super nice. We didn’t have money, but we always tried to do our best to make it better than it was. Ahol: Totally. I mean, I was first generation born in Hialeah from Cuba, so I know what it’s like to grow up, you know, ‘Hialeah trash,’ but at the same time--you make the most of it, and it is what it is. No matter what position you are in life, you can always be like ‘this person has it better, or this person has it worse.’

JLG: It sounds like it’s a whole ‘vibe’. Interview edited for length and clarity

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MY ATTACK METHOD IS I SHOOT FROM THE GUT—I TRUST MYSELF. JLG: Yeah, if you can ‘escape the life’ and are able to make something…

JLG: And if you aren’t enjoying what you are doing, putting some love into it--why are you bothering to do it?

Ahol: Not even escape it--it’s coping. The thing is, being held down by the life, that is the expectation--the rhythm of what you’re thrown into, like ‘oh, you’re not at this level by this timewhat are you doing?’ The reality is that we really are in control of whatever it is that we do. And if you are going to go against the norm, which is like [the] typical way of living, then you’re going to piss off a lot of people that are close to you that are going to look past everything else that you’re doing. Just know that when you’re making your own wave you can’t expect people to want to jump off your bridge with you. That’s why it really is a long-term type of justification--I knew I was pursuing something that was making me feel better and wanted to see it flourish.

Ahol: Yeah. And I am fully aware of what art I make that is more digestible, and more what people like. And I make sure that I fill that demand. But I’ll be damned if I’m not going to make all the other weird sh-t that I do and pursue it and do it. When you commit to something, whether it's your optimal, idealistic type of scenario or a scenario that’s not the greatest but you’re still doing it based on your way of making your decisions--you have to give it a hundred and ten percent.

JLG: How long have you been ‘in it’, in this art life? Ahol: Art wise, creatively--graffiti stuff like that--for about twenty years. So as far as being able to live off it it’s been like, for the last eight years. JLG: So, you’re not an ‘overnight success’? Ahol: No. And the thing is I have always worked regular jobs too, which is what has made me this blue-collar type of hustle, madman. I am fully aware, that I will never go hungry because I know that if people aren’t buying my art then it doesn’t mean that I am going to stop making art. What it’s going to mean is that I’m gonna be making the art because that is what I feel that I have gotta do. But my obligation as a civilian is paying rent and doing all that. So, then you gotta do what you gotta do. You can’t judge by the crowds or critics--they can say whatever they want about your art. But at the same time, you have to survive. If you’re not surviving and you’re making art and you’re not selling it that’s what builds a bitter artist in my opinion.

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JLG: Were there any influences early on that led you to live the art life? Ahol: I came up in the whole punk rock world, Ramones and stuff like that--really rough around the edges. I’ve always loved graffiti from like Beat Street. Growing up in Hialeah, me being close with my brother, we would always draw. JLG: You were in a band, right? Was it a punk rock band? Ahol: Yeah, it was a punk rock band. The band was the Panty Raiders. My brother was the singer and I played bass--my name was Davey Dukes [laughs]. I was a horrible base player, but my favorite part was making the fliers, hyping it up, making the whole theatrical production. As far as influences--something that moves me is the reality of the creative world, being able to make your own name and being able to make your own world. People that were getting up, people that were taking me under their wing, showing me ‘this is graffiti, this is how we get up.’ JLG: Because they know what it is ‘supposed’ to look like? Ahol: If you do something that looks sloppy then they will know that you were scared and it looks ridiculous. The people that influenced me were the people that schooled me, showed me what’s tasteful, how to get up –-‘alright if you see this spot…how to hit the right spots.’ Interview edited for length and clarity. Image on opposite page, courtesy of Jennifer Love Gironda


JLG: You are known for your iconic, bold ‘drowsy eye’ motif. Do you remember when you first started to work with this image? How had the image/meaning changed over time? Ahol: The eye has been the most digestible type of thing but then that kind of resorts to the way that the whole world is made. People find out about stuff because someone tells them that it’s cool or because it is shoved down their throats. I do a lot of characters. I love the illustrations that I do--I did a short film, did a music video but at the same time seeing a character out of its context is not as strong as a flood of eyeballs all over the place--especially from Miami. People outside of Miami may not know me, but more and more they are knowing me because of the frequency that I am going out and selling all over. For the most part anyone that comes to Miami they are going to see it [the eyes] everywhere. It’s kind of like you make a monster. It’s like music--people just want to hear that one song. So, I make it [the eyes] as fun for me as possible, that’s how I have fun making different variations of it, the drippy sh-t, the more abstracted ones, the more typical ones… JLG: Yeah, I saw you are working with some watered-down acrylic on canvas... Ahol: I’m working with everything--canvas, spray paint, watered down acrylics, paper with inks--I still make the illustrations, I still do the digital--all that sh-t doesn’t stop. If I take the time to make something that means that I respect my time and I respect the piece that I am making. If it fits my criteria, and it is strong and it goes along with what I am trying to push, then I take a picture of it and I put it online. Putting it online is like--there it goes. I just like to show that I am confident with all of my moves, anything that I do, for as non-thought out as some things are--everything is thought out. My attack method is I shoot from the gut--I trust myself.

THE REALITY IS THAT WE REALLY ARE IN CONTROL OF WHATEVER IT IS THAT WE DO.

CONNECT WITH

AHOL SNIFFS GLUE Instagram: @aholsniffsglue Website: aholsniffsglue.com Email: aholsniffsglue@gmail.com

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THE RHYTHM OF REDEVELOPMENT By Lorena Ledesma

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ou can almost feel your foot tap, tap, tapping away to the electrifying trumpet blare and piano riff as life is breathed back into Louis Armstrong and other premier jazz pioneers’ old stomping ground, the Sunset Lounge. Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Nat King Cole are among the Sunset’s other most notable performers during the glitzy heyday of this glamorous hotspot. The club continued to roar from the 1930s and into the 1970s, but desegregation took a toll on its popularity, as Black patrons and performers were now able to pay and play at a variety of once-prohibited locations. The crowds thinned out, and the Lounge became a standing relic.

The West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) zeroed in and purchased the once-glimmering jazz landmark, which was first built in 1925 – an act that would represent the first spark to ignite renovations throughout the Historic Northwest District. More than mere acquisition, new love is to be shown to the barrelroofed venue, located on 8th Street between Henrietta and North Rosemary Avenues. The CRA will expand the structure by another 7,200 square feet to accommodate a lobby, kitchen, broadcasting room, green room, and dressing rooms which will complement the grandeur of the dining room, bar, and ballroom of the original venue. Additionally, above the ballroom and mezzanine, there will be a garden rooftop. “Imagine enjoying dinner and a show or even taking a music class. The future of this district is bright and it’s all becoming a longawaited reality. In early 2021 you’ll be able to enjoy tasteful dining and spectacular contemporary performances by some of today’s hottest artists in this celebrated historical destination. We’re inviting everyone to find their rhythm, explore their roots and live their destiny in the Historic Northwest,” said Genia Baker, the CRA’s Sunset Lounge and Historic Northwest Project Manager.

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The Historic Sunset Lounge, due in part to its relationship with the West Palm Beach Center for Arts & Technology, will offer music lessons and other performing arts opportunities for children and adults administered by local and national professionals which may include dance, drama, broadcast technology, beginner’s workshops and masterclasses. Visual art exhibitions by local, national and international artists will be displayed throughout the building. A partnership with the Smithsonian Institution is also planned to host exhibitions through their SITES program, (Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service). Just opposite the Sunset Lounge to the south, you will find Historic Northwest District visitors and residents sitting on benches, playing in the playground, and strolling along the piano-key pathway throughout the Heart and Soul Park. Designed to visually echo the velvety notes from the Lounge, this park’s lush greenspace and water features will combine to provide an atmosphere in harmony with the revitalization of the surroundings as well. To further invigorate the neighborhood, the CRA will also redevelop the block at the corner of 7th Street and Rosemary Avenue. It is still to be determined if the lots will be occupied by restaurants, apartment buildings, or retail spaces are to be built. This area, the “Alley,” will be a pedestrian-friendly and outfitted with gorgeous hedges and light fixtures to encourage the long-standing sense of community at any hour of the day. Cooper Construction and Design2Form were contracted to begin the transformations of the Sunset Lounge and Heart and Soul Park, respectively. Project completion is expected by the fourth quarter of 2020. The mood of the Historic Northwest District is represented in architecture of the revived Sunset Lounge: a seamless nod to the past while proudly embracing its future.


All photos courtesy of the WPB CRA

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Chromatic Tower by Cecilia Lueza


BOYNTON BEACH

PUBLIC ART ADDING NEW ENERGY AND UNIFYING VISION TO CITY FOR 2020

By Joanie Cox-Henry The Albert Paley "Cavalcade" sculpture sits proudly in front of the 500 Ocean Apartments in Boynton Beach. This vibrant 40 foot high artwork is not only the tallest public art in Palm Beach County, but after being installed in the fall of 2017, it was an indicator of the larger than life art movement currently thriving in this burgeoning city. The City of Boynton Beach Art in Public Places recently presented the launch of its 2019-2020 Avenue of the Arts exhibit: Color Effects with artist Cecilia Lueza. The dynamic solo exhibit offers five geometric sculptures showcasing the resilience of community and environmental awareness. The sculptures range from "Influx" a bold ocean wave-inspired piece at Dewey Park to the thought-provoking, "Dual Nature" sculpture in the 200 block of East Ocean Avenue. “The Avenue of the Arts exhibit will connect the community and bring local and national attention to the Town Square Redevelopment Project,” said Debby Coles-Dobay, Public Arts Manager for the City of Boynton Beach. “Beginning Nov. 30, we are offering free monthly docent-led tours of the five sculptures including access to an Otocast app that connects tour goers to hear the artist talk about her artworks.

All photos courtesy of the artists

The debut of the tours also coincides with Small Business Saturday, which will be a wonderful way to support the local businesses in this area. In fact, special discounts and deals from area businesses will be available to tour attendees who RSVP in advance.” With Boynton now known as the “Kinetic Art” city, the exhibitions annually coming to Avenue of the Arts are creating cultural tourism. This International Kinetic Art Biennial, which is in its fourth year and next set for 2020-2021, has garnered the attention of international artists and art patrons to engage in art that moves, interacting art experiences and more. “The Color Effects exhibit is going to continue to bring a really good crowd to this area,” said Amanda Johnson, owner of Amanda James Gallery located at 400 Gulfstream Blvd., in Boynton Beach. “The Color Effects exhibition is really colorful and the artist is female, which is powerful. It’s taking Boynton to a new level and promoting and inspiring artful living for all ages.”

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Deep Ocean & Shore Reef by Amanda Johnson

Duel Nature by Cecilia Lueza 54

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Influx by Cecilia Lueza


Johnson is also the emerging public artist who created the “Deep Ocean & Shore Reef ” Parking Garage project for Town Square, which is slated to open in spring of 2020. “I was selected to design the south parking garage in the new town square,” Johnson said. “My design has a connection to the ocean and amazing reef and marine life in Boynton Beach. Working with Debby, she really helped me learn what it means to serve the community as an artist and helped me highlight what makes Boynton Beach so special.” In addition to the “Deep Ocean & Shore Reef ” garage, the public art in the Town Square Redevelopment Project is going to offer five stunning public artworks including: "Community Heartbeat," Fire & Rescue Station window mural slated for completion in January 2020. Created by artist Lynn Doyal, this vibrant artwork depicts Boynton Beach Fire Rescue Department’s infinite connection with its citizens. “Building Up Community" will be located in the new Police Station Plaza at 2080 High Ridge Road and targeted for completion in March 2020. Designed by Krivanek+Breaux/ Art + Design, this inspirational artwork promotes harmony in the community. Created by internationally beloved sculptor, Ralfonso, “Meet me at the Kinetic Art Plaza” the 27’ high x 26’ wide stainless steel kinetic sculpture titled “Reflections,” is gearing up to be finished in March 2020. To unite Boynton Beach’s infinite diversity, the twenty one 3' to 11’ long bird-like wings rotate with the wind and intersect with each other representing the flow and unity in nature. “The Reef ” interactive artwork by The Urban Conga will utilize sight, sound, touch and movement to promote social interaction for all ages and abilities in front of the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum courtyard. As an added feature, at night, this art inspired by ocean reef marine life will change colors for a unique experience that will stimulate the senses. Targeted completion date June 2020. Donald Gialanella is the artist behind “Synesthesia” Interactive Plaza on the south side of East Ocean Avenue for completion in June 2020. This sculpture consists of eight 10 foot tall vertical stainless steel tubes arranged in a 20-foot diameter circular array. Geared toward people of all abilities, ages and demographics to engage and connect, people will be encouraged to snap selfies by the reflective mirror-polished surfaces of this art work. This installation piece is so high tech, as people approach it, proximity sensors are activated and emit sounds from Boynton’s coastal environment. The new Town Square public art projects, rotating Avenue of the Arts exhibitions, International Kinetic Art Biennial and the 80+ public artworks throughout the City sets the stage for Boynton Beach as the HeART of the Palm Beaches.

All photos courtesy of the artists

Top to bottom: Daring by Cecilia Lueza; Cavalcade by Albert Paley; Reflections by Ralfonso

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CULTURE | CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION

CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION Encouraging Creativity and Critical Thinking in The Palm Beaches

By Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla In our technology-driven world, Palm Beach County may not be Silicon Valley, but the Center for Creative Education is doing their part in preparing students to complete and succeed in this very evolving world. According to the website Palm Beach Tech, “Palm Beach County will become a premiere technology and innovation hub by 2030.” The digital arts and media programs at the Center for Creative Education (CCE) is currently preparing middle and high school aged youth to lead the charge for this to happen. CCE is providing students with equipment and software that are standards within the industry, they are applying these new skills to real life projects. Their recently completed homeless documentary titled ‘Unwelcome’ is a student-made project about homeless young adults in Palm Beach County. CCE Instructors work with students on every aspect of film production. Students work to complete projects that include movie posters, short films, animation, websites, and even musical compositions in an on-site computer lab and recording studio. Throughout this process, students collaborate with peers, communicate clearly, think critically, and most importantly, they are encouraged to be creative. 56

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The value of taking on social issues, like homelessness, lies in the meaningful connections students create between themselves and the issues. Students are then capable to form their own opinions and think about creative solutions for not only homelessness but for many other social issues facing our world today. The ability to make connections and to apply creative solutions are skills required in our 21st Century global economy where the creative capital of our youth will dictate our future success in maintaining our position of world leadership. The incredible challenge of training students today for the jobs of tomorrow is not lost on CCE. While CCE provides students access to state-of-the-art hardware and software, it is provided in an environment where they are expected to demonstrate initiative and self-direction, leadership, adaptability, and accountability. These are the skills that will lead to the success of today’s students as they adapt to jobs and challenges of the future. Photos courtesy of Center for Creative Education


Much of the work created in this program is often displayed at the center’s art gallery or shown in their 175-seat digital theater, providing the public the opportunity to see the efforts and to hear the voices of our future leaders. Open enrollment is available for all elementary, middle, and high school-aged youth seeking after school opportunities. The Center for Creative Education may be reached at 561-805-9927 or by email at info@cceflorida.org. Center for Creative Education 425 24th Street West Palm Beach, FL 33407 561-805-9927 / info@cceflorida.org / www.cceflorida.org Follow CCE on Social Media Facebook (@cce.florida), Twitter (cceflorida), Instagram (cceflorida), and YouTube (CCE Florida)

MY DIGITAL MEDIA CLASS AT CCE WAS AMAZING. THROUGHOUT THE MONTHS THAT I HAD CLASSES THERE, I ALWAYS HAD A FUN AND AMAZING TIME AND ALWAYS FELT IMPORTANT AND LISTENED TO. - MARY CREATIVE + CONSCIOUS CULTURE

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All photos © Downtown Photo


ARTISTS ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Multidisciplinary art event at The Frank united visual artists, performing artists and poets Artists took action against climate change at The Frank in Pembroke Pines in October when visual artists, poets and performing artists gathered to address climate change at “Art for the Earth.” The program was part of Climate Change Theatre Action, an international series in which over 140 collaborators in 23 countries host events throughout the world. With support from Broward County’s Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division, and the Broward Cultural Division, Pembroke Pines was one of 60 cities across the United States to participate in this dynamic series. Presenting a selection of artworks that deal with climate change and environmental conservation, the event featured a performance by Kellianne Jordan, a pop-up exhibition by visual artists Kim Heise and Lucinda Linderman, and readings by Clayre Benzadón, Christell Roach and Caitlin Andrews, three poets from University of Miami’s Sinking City literary magazine. “Collective action inspired from the emotional responses to climate focused art is as necessary to reduce emissions and slow climate change as the science-based policy and infrastructure investments local governments are implementing. Hopefully, this evening will be the first of many for empowered artists and art lovers in the Broward community,” said Dr. Samantha Danchuk, Assistant Division Director of the County’s Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division.

For more information about Climate Change Theatre Action, visit ClimateChangeTheatreAction.com.

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CULTURE | CULTIVATING CREATIVITY

CULTIVATING CREATIVITY

Pompano Beach Welcomes the Culturally Curious

D

uring the past few years the City of Pompano Beach has garnered a growing buzz about their expanding arts and culture scene. In the midst of an economic renaissance, this city, like many towns, leaned on the arts to enhance awareness; but its welcoming approach is a differentiator. Pompano Beach’s prominence as a nurturing community for emerging artists is also reflected in its outstanding efforts to invite everyone to experience the joy of creativity! “In the past year, we have made a tremendous effort to offer programming, workshops, classes and events that encourage people to explore their creative side and learn more about the art forms that inspire them,” said Phyllis Korab, Cultural Affairs Director. Part of the City’s artistic identity comes from its rich history, which has been carefully preserved and regularly celebrated at its venues. Bailey Contemporary Arts, the Historic Ali Cultural Arts and The Blanche Ely House Museum each have significant histories and preservation narratives that have filled many news articles. The City’s bold initiative to rebuild its downtown area, supported by the strength of the arts, speaks to the Cultural Affairs Department’s commitment to community and is reflected in the authenticity of the programming. The historic venues, along with the new cultural center, have provided a compelling new hub for the culturally curious. “I feel we are heading in an exciting direction,” continued Korab. “One that is propelling Pompano Beach to new levels of recognition. I believe what is setting the Pompano Beach Arts brand apart is our commitment to creating events that feel accessible to all levels of cultural awareness. We hope to create an environment that will tap into those who want to learn more, experience more and become more, with no restrictions on where or how you begin.” The Pompano Beach Arts website features a diverse and exciting array of programing including free art exhibitions and lectures, affordable visual arts workshops, family-friendly events, salsa dancing, opera, comedy, poetry slams and a myriad of other genres with varied price points. The season ahead is filled with opportunities to stimulate your senses. Here are a few ideas to explore: • Existencia Natural – Natural Existence Exhibition: This installation of works by Cuban artist Guillermo Portieles, curated by David Mateo, is presented in partnership with the Latin American Art Pavilion (LAAP). The exhibition runs until December 28 at The Pompano Beach Cultural Center. • Pompano Stand-Up Live! – Carl Payne and Friends: Laugh it up as some of the best comedians step up to the mike to riff about an array of side-splitting antics and insights. Carl Payne of TV’s Martin hosts an all-star lineup. The show takes place 8pm on November 2 at The Pompano Beach Cultural Center.

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Top to Bottom: Photos submitted


• Exit 36 Slam Poetry Festival: Experience a four-day poetry festival showcasing regional, national and internationally recognized spoken word artists and writers. The event will feature performances, workshops, a beach party and more. December 11-14 at multiple Pompano Beach cultural arts venues. • Building a Feminist Archive: Cuban Women Photographers in the US: Cuban Women Artists in the U.S. Exhibition: Features 11 women artists whose work in photography provide a glimpse into diverse histories on race, gender, community and migration. At Bailey Contemporary Arts through December 21. • ArtLit 2020: This free community event celebrates art and literature with music, live chalk art, virtual reality demonstrations, interactive experiences and more. This event take place January 11 from 10 am – 7 pm and is presented in partnership with Broward County Library. • Connections by Lori Arbel Exhibition: This mixed-media artist uses layers of ink, paint and other markings to create works that explore moments of connection in our modern world. This exhibition The Pompano Beach Cultural Center is on display from January 10-March 31. • Soulful Sundays: Soulful Sundays features South Florida's top performers and bands playing genres including soul, R&B, neo soul, blues, jazz and funk. Merging local and national artists, organizations and vendors, this program creates an unforgettable monthly musical experience. Second Sundays of the month at The Historic Ali Cultural Arts. • Lyrics Lab: Lyrics Lab is a unique, no-ego, open-mic. Get up and share or just kick back and have a cocktail while enjoying some incredible performance art at Bailey Contemporary Arts. Check website for dates. • A Taste of Jazz: This new kind of combo features entertaining and educational encounters with the musical genre, accompanied by wine tastings. Different topics are explored each month at Bailey Contemporary Arts. Check website for dates. • South Florida Chamber Ensemble Series: Intimate Saturday afternoon concerts in the Bailey Contemporary Arts gallery that highlight important issues including disability rights, prison reform and clean water though reflective musical selections. Varied dates. • Claire Satin Exhibition: This artist’s works concentrate on the exploration of paper and metal as mediums, breaking down the boundaries of traditional sculptural forms. This exhibition at Bailey Contemporary Arts runs through February 28. • Ceremony Exhibition: Historic photos and memorabilia highlighting Pompano Beach’s homecoming parades, proms, sports banquets, and community based cultural events are celebrated at The Blanche Ely House Museum through March 31.

For more detail and many more events, please visit

pompanobeacharts.org

Top to Bottom: © Bertrand Gabioud; © The Kevetill; © Charles Dludlu

• Vantage Point Exhibition by installation artist Ya La'ford who is best known for her signature use of wall-to-wall recurring geometric patterns including her highly regarded infusion of hypnotizing LED luminaries, will activate the Pompano Beach Cultural Center’s exhibition space with a large-scale installation from January 10 – April 2.

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Supporting the cultural arts community in South Florida.

WLRN’s same-day discount ticket service. Visit CulturalConnection.org for details and tickets. Learn more at WLRN.org

LRN Public Media


SHARING CREATIVE INSPIRATION, INTERVIEWS, AND INSIGHTS SINCE 2012 C RE ATI VE + CONS CIOUS CULTURE IN S OUTH FL O R ID A

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IN THE ARTS! CALL TO ARTISTS, GRANTS, SUBMISSIONS, & MUCH MORE!

DECEMBER•JANUARY•FEBRUARY

SUMMER 2017

Display until August 31, 2017

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SOUTH FLORIDA /// ISSUE No 24

CREATING YOUR MOST

CAPTIVATING

BLOG CONTENT

INTERVIEW WITH AWARD-WINNING JOURNALIST

LISA LING

“I THINK THAT ART AND CULTURE ARE REALLY POWERFUL MEANS OF DIPLOMACY”

DISPLAY UNTIL FEBRUARY, 2018

Photo By © Sheenon Olson From Atma Beauty

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How you use the opportunities you’re given to affect the world around you will determine the legacy you leave behind. - Tony Dungy

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Photo © Family First


THE MENTOR LEADER TONY DUNGY

TO HEADLINE 8TH ANNUAL PBSC STEAM LUNCHEON “Mentor leadership focuses on building people up and building leaders for the next generation.” Tony Dungy has strayed from stereotype to redefine the image of a professional coach and bring a new definition to leadership all while maintaining a dignified approach to mentorship, education and family.

The first African American coach to win an NFL Super Bowl, Tony Dungy has known an outstanding career as a professional athlete, broadcast analyst and bestselling author. On February 20, Palm Beach State College’s signature event of the year, STEAM 2020, welcomes Tony Dungy and his inspirational lessons on life, leadership and the toughest game he has known: fatherhood. A strong proponent of sportsmanship, teamwork and the significance that athletics brings to shaping young people’s lives, Tony will share his inspiring messages to the community as the College celebrates its most recent achievements in enrollment, completion, growth and leadership. Tony Dungy’s storied career and philosophy for life complement the College’s Panther Strong 2023 Strategic Plan with a vision to transform lives and strengthen the community. In fact, as the College prepares its students to be the workforce of tomorrow, the luncheon’s mission to raise awareness and scholarships for STEAM-dedicated students becomes more evident. By elevating the significance and purpose of the event over its eight-year history, PBSC is only beginning to scratch the surface of how it impacts the community as the heart of Palm Beach County. “The first step is to understand and appreciate that the journey is as important as the destination,” opines Tony Dungy. And a journey that begins at Palm Beach State College is turning out to be a lucrative one for many students who are able to attend the oldest public college in the state because of the scholarship funds raised at the STEAM Luncheon. “Our goal as an academic institution is to prepare our students for what lies ahead,” relates PBSC President Ava L. Parker, J.D. “I am committed to ensuring that our students will be ready to meet the challenges of evolving workplace environments. As advances in technology change the needs of employers, our graduates will have the training and experience to respond and support the needs of their employers. Tony Dungy’s participation in our STEAM Luncheon is an opportunity to expand the awareness of the programming and training that we provide at the College to a diverse audience.”

David A. Rutherford, Vice President of Institutional Advancement and Executive Director of the PBSC Foundation, sees Dungy’s visit to Palm Beach State as a beacon for a bright future. “Tony Dungy has been more than a coach for players; he’s been a mentor for life, empowering young lives through the power of leadership, integrity and character. All of us can take an inspirational page from his playbook, from the merits of a winning attitude to the value of a caring family to our responsibility to those in need.” Twenty-one years ago, Tony helped launch All Pro Dad, the fatherhood program of Family First which offers guidance to parents, families and those hoping for a better future. Today, he serves as a studio analyst for NBC’s Football Night in America. Tony and his wife, Lauren, have known 36 years of marriage, family and partnership and are parents to ten children, seven of whom are adopted. Just as Palm Beach State is providing student-centered learning experiences that transform lives and strengthen the community, the Dungy Family Foundation is impacting communities by developing youth programs, furthering education and mentoring today’s young people to be trustworthy leaders for tomorrow. For Tony Dungy, the goal is clear; we can all help our team be better. ---------------------------------------------------------------Presented by Bank of America, the STEAM 2020 Luncheon is a celebration of Palm Beach State College’s commitment to addressing the projected shortage of local, skilled professionals in STEAM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math). Goals include increasing student scholarships, business partnerships, internships and other academic programs enhancements to prepare more graduates for these high wage, high demand positions. The event, chaired by South Florida businesswoman and philanthropist Yvonne Boice, takes place on Thursday, February 20, 2020, at 11:30 a.m. at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts’ Cohen Pavilion in West Palm Beach. For information on ticket sales and sponsorship opportunities, please visit www.palmbeachstate.edu/foundation/steam or call 561-868-3450.

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CULTURE | INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION THROUGH DANCE Wild Beast Collective & Fågelbo present The Agapanthus Turn: Various Sketches

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION THROUGH DANCE From Sweden to Florida, Jenny Larsson returns for Fågelbo Residency in Broward

By Joanie Cox-Henry When choreographer Jenny Larsson applied for her first grant in Broward County seven years ago, had the answer been no, she admits her art would not be where it is today. “You need someone believing in your ideas. It means everything,” Larsson said via a FaceTime interview from her home in Sweden. “I wouldn’t be able to do this without Broward County.” After living in Fort Lauderdale for 11 years and also spending a couple of years residing in New York, Larsson, who is a mother to three children ages 6,10 and 12, is gearing up to return to Fort Lauderdale in April for her latest Fågelbo Residency, which is the first international interdisciplinary residency in Broward. A new application cycle opens on December 1, and visual, performance and multimedia artists are encouraged to apply. “The art scene in Sweden is very different than the one in Fort Lauderdale,” said Larsson, who moved back to Sweden in January. “In Sweden, it’s more experimental and research-based arts in progress. 66

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The dance scene is more experimental than it is here and we talk about modern dance and ask ‘What is dance?’ It has come full circle since the ‘60s and ‘70s when people were questioning everything. Today people are interested in talking about norm critique, for example.” Through the advice of arts professional Adriane Clarke, Larsson checked out FATVillage and has since had three residencies there. Larsson also has been a consistent grantee of the Cultural Division’s Creative Investment Program from 2015-2019, which enables a Broward-based practicing professional artist age 18 or older to receive up to $2,000 for an exhibition, live performance, lecture/ demonstration or other arts activity that engages an audience. Cultural Division Grants Management Assistant Erica Mohan, who previously assisted Larsson at a performance, is eager to see Larsson continue to evolve with her Fågelbo Residency. She is also pleased with how Larsson has expanded the Cultural Division’s Creative Investment Program to a new realm. All photos courtesy © Mitchell Zachs


Wild Beast Collective & Fågelbo present The Agapanthus Turn: Various Sketches

Wild Beast Collective & Fågelbo present The Voynich Mechanism

“Jenny is such a great dancer, it’s amazing to see the way she thinks and the story she tells through dance,” Mohan said. “The fact that she’s pushing her limits to make something you don’t typically see in Broward is important for our local art scene.” “The latest Fågelbo Residency will show Broward residents the experimental influences she’s bringing to Broward and show local artists that the art scene is developing into something to recognize on an international level,” Mohan added. “Visual art combined with performance art is meant to impact you in a different way, and I think everyone can appreciate how unique Jenny’s residency program really is.” Leah Brown, gallery director and curator of THE PROJECTS Contemporary Art Space in FATVillage, has been working with Larsson for six years and is delighted with Larsson’s desire to maintain a connection to the Broward art scene after returning to her native country. Larsson has continued to nurture her South Florida connections by staying in touch via FaceTime and Skype.

WHEN CREATING ART, LARSSON OFTEN QUESTIONS HER RELATIONSHIP WITH

THE UNTAMED...

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CULTURE | INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION THROUGH DANCE

Wild Beast Collective & Fågelbo present The Voynich Mechanism

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All photos courtesy © Mitchell Zachs


Wild Beast Collective & Fågelbo present The Agapanthus Turn: Various Sketches

“I love this idea of an exchange culturally with the subarctic and subtropic,” Brown said. “The Fågelbo Residency has always been about pairing one performance artist with one visual artist. All the artists who apply -- even the ones who don’t get selected -- have a chance to have their work go before an international committee, which is a huge deal.” “It’s only going to get bigger from here,” Brown says. “I love Jenny’s passion, creative spirit, sense of humor and positive energy. With this latest project, she’s creating a platform for other artists.” Edison Peñafiel, a Broward-based visual and multimedia artist, has partnered with Larsson on multiple projects including her first residency with Fågelbo in FATVillage. He deems Larsson’s work poetry in motion and notes, “FATVillage has allowed us to present our work in different ways, which is something we’re all grateful for as artists.” When creating art, Larsson often questions her relationship with the untamed, hence the name for her group of artists from various disciplines, the Wild Beast Collective, of which Peñafiel is also a member. “One of my biggest inspirations is the forest, which I defi-

nitely missed being in while I was living in Florida,” Larsson said. “I’m from the North of Sweden and love the forest and the change of seasons. I like creating art in unconventional places and exploring issues like climate change and other environmental concerns. Larsson also aims to be behind the camera more directing short films and documentaries for 2020. “There are so many stories waiting to be told and I have a passion for storytelling,” said Larsson, who created her short film, “Home,” during a 2017 AIRIE artist residency in Everglades National Park. “I especially love talking to old people. They have a gift some people in their 20s don’t.” As Larsson gears up to leave her snow skis back in Sweden for her Fågelbo Residency, she’s eager to encourage deeper dialogue about performance art. “You need fresh air blowing into the county,” Larsson said, citing a need for more art and new artists coming in. She notes the art scene in South Florida makes it a “vibrant and interesting place to live. I think there’s an openness for both traditional and experimental art. But we need to keep growing to prevent stagnation.” 

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DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD Lili’u cast bronze with patina 24 x 29 x 9.5 in. 2019 ZOLLA/LIEBERMAN GALLERY Chicago

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary, presented by Art Miami and hosted by the City of West Palm Beach, kicks off the winter season presenting investment quality Blue Chip contemporary and Post-War works from 60 top international galleries. Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Pavilion 825 S Dixie Hwy @ Okeechobee Blvd | In the heart of downtown West Palm Beach

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CREATIVE | SOLUTIONS

MAKING YOU UNHAPPY By Stephen Humphreys There’s a long list of celebrities, from Ed Sheeran to Armie Hammer, who deleted their social media accounts because they felt that being online was toxic and was making them unhappy. Of course, you don’t have to be famous to need a break from Twitter and Instagram; advice columns routinely suggest spending less time scrolling if you want to feel happier. But why is checking your social media making you unhappy? Part of the reason is the addictive nature of smartphone apps. App designers use discoveries from neuroscience to get you hooked. Whether that’s the color of notifications (that little dot telling you there’s new items is almost always red, so that your brain thinks it’s urgent) or the use of a “refresh” button (your feed will auto-refresh anyway, but when you click on that circular arrow it helps to hardwire the action into your brain) everything is designed to give you a tiny hit of the feel-good chemical dopamine, then to hold out the promise of more. Like most addictions, there’s a law of diminishing returns; the more dopamine hits you get, the more you need, and the worse withdrawal becomes. Eventually you’re not clicking to feel good, but to stop yourself feeling bad. The other reason social media use causes unhappiness is because of the way human brains are wired. You have a built-in system in your 72

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brain that helps you understand other people; if you didn’t, you’d be constantly puzzled or terrified about what other people were doing. Psychologists think that this is related to cells in your brain called mirror neurons. These neurons activate when you perform an activity but they also activate when you see someone else doing the same thing. Scientists think that these mirror neurons are linked to empathy and help you understand how to behave in social situations. In other words, you know the “right” thing to do because you see other people doing it. This works perfectly well in real-life situations. As a child, you learn how to behave at mealtimes by seeing what other people do. If, as an adult, you’re invited to your first formal banquet, you spend a lot of time anxiously looking to see what everyone else is doing, so that you can copy the “right” behavior. But in the virtual world of social media, you might be copying all kinds of things that actually aren’t right for you at all. Mirror neuron expert and neuroscientist Marco Iacoboni says, “When it comes to social media, when we see other people liking certain things we are driven automatically to like that thing ourselves.” In other words, your brain gives you a powerful push to act or look like someone who may be totally different to you. The result is disappointment, frustration and unhappiness.

Photo by Marc Schaefer

NEUROSCIENCE EXPLAINS WHY SOCIAL MEDIA IS


“

...EVERYTHING IS DESIGNED TO GIVE YOU A TINY HIT OF THE FEEL-GOOD CHEMICAL DOPAMINE, THEN TO HOLD OUT THE PROMISE OF MORE.

But if your brain is wired to like and copy what you see other people doing, why are there so many trolls and so much hostility online? Researchers from the University of Queensland scanned the brains of volunteers while they watched people perform particular actions. As expected, mirror neurons in the volunteers’ brains were activated. But when other volunteers were given different instructions before watching the same actions, other parts of the brain showed as active on the scan. The team concluded that your state of mind and your preconceptions will affect the way your brain responds. If your favorite artist is in a Twitter fight with a rival, you’ll be using the mirror neurons in your brain to understand why each of them is arguing. But because you like one person more than the other, different parts of your brain respond, and you’ll see one person’s tweets as attacking, but the other’s as simply standing up for themselves. Your preconceptions influence who you want to be like - and who want to be different from. Social media can be a great way to connect with others and to share ideas and experiences. But there’s a growing recognition that there’s a dark side too. Your brain evolved to help you live in a community with others; your mirror neurons help you copy the behavior of people you like and be different from people you don’t like. When other people like you, your brain gives you a hit of dopamine and you feel good, so you’re driven to keep on building those relationships, copying what you see other people doing and saying. But when the person you’re copying is too different - they don’t have the same family background or financial situation or responsibilities or body shape or abilities as you then your built-in urge to like and copy is going to drive you further and further away from happiness.

A SEASON OF CULTURE AND DEEP REFRESHING IN THE GARDENS 

THE PRACTICE OF OPTIMISM: SCULPTURE BY FEDERICO URIBE NOVEMBER 20 - FEBRUARY 2, 2019



WITH THESE HANDS: SCULPTURES BY JIM RENNERT JANUARY 9 - MAY 31, 2020



PLASTIC REEF: SCULPTURE BY FEDERICO URIBE JANUARY 9 - MAY 31, 2020

Holiday Jazz Tribute Honoring Veterans December 15, 1:00-3:00 pm

jazz in the gardens Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

HISTORIC HOME, ARTIST STUDIO, EXHIBITION GALLERIES AND RARE PALM AND CYCAD GARDENS OF ANN WEAVER NORTON      Â Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?  Â?Â

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