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LOVE ARKANSAS? EAT LOCAL! SIGN UP FOR A CSA SHARE

Get your weekly produce delivered fresh from Arkansas farms. FOODSHED FARMS COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE They say “you are what you eat,” and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a way to know exactly what that means. Shareholders not only reap the benefits of eating fresh and healthy local food, but they are also helping the environment and our Arkansas economy at the same time. With the CSA model, shareholders pay in advance or in installments to provide upfront capital to our farmers. However, the uncertainties of nature always play a role. When there is abundance in one crop, shareholders reap the benefits of extra produce. When there is less of a crop than expected, all shareholders share the loss together with the farmers.

SHARES $450 (that’s $25 per week) for the 18-week growing season, starting in May.

SHARE BENEFITS Weekly delivery of farm fresh, sustainably grown produce, a newsletter full of recipes and stories about the farms your produce came from, and insight on foodie-centered community events in our region. Plus, you will know that you’re directly supporting Arkansas farmers!

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FOOD & FARM | 3


THE ISSUE LET THE RAIN 8 LORD, STOP

Unexpected winter lambs and an overabundance of rain can make for a season of frustration. But spring brings with it the excitement of growth.

13

10

DELICIOUS CONNECTIONS

Making connections is the basis of the local food movement—but making dinner is a more immediate concern. Luckily, the two are easily combined.

SO YOU WANT TO BE A FARMER

Five steps toward starting and maintaining a thriving farm of your own, with resources for planning, financing and more.

THE RECIPES

22

SPRING

30

SUMMER

40

FALL

48

WINTER

Turn the year’s first harvest into something the whole family will love.

As the leaves change, new things come into season. These hearty harvest ideas are sure to please.

The season of plenty is the time for enjoyment—and these recipes fit the bill.

The cold months need not mean a chill. Preserve a bit of summer to enjoy by the fire.

THE TECHNIQUE

53

LET’S GET CANNING

Canning is making a comeback, and there’s no reason that any home cook should be scared of it. Explore the methods of canning with this simple guide that will have you preserving harvest memories in no time.

THE LISTINGS

56 R E G I O N A L L I S T I N G S

Arkansas Grown Farmers Markets, CSAs and Grocers

Stay connected to Arkansas Food & Farm online. Find more features, photos and interactive listings. @ARFoodFarm

pinterest.com/arfoodfarm

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B R O U G H T T O YO U B Y

&

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NANCY NOL AN

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Committed. Strong. Reliable. Trusted. Member-owned. From your local farmers’ market grower to large row crop farmers— we finance it all. More than 10,000 customer-owners across Arkansas trust Farm Credit. With $2.6 billion in assets, the Farm Credit financial cooperatives of Arkansas serve agriculture, rural communities and the rural lifestyle. Customer-owners enjoy benefits like patronage refunds which total more than $152 million since 1997. Are you Farm Credit?

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ARFarmCredit.com farms of all sizes • fruits, vegetables, row crop and more hobby farms • country homes • home construction livestock • poultry • land • equipment • vehicles • ATVs

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FOOD & FARM | 5


A Special Publication of Arkansas Times ALAN LEVERITT Publisher alan@arktimes.com REBEKAH HARDIN Associate Publisher rebekah@arktimes.com

Blackmon Auctions has been auctioning farm equipment sincehas 1938. are a third Blackmon Auctions beenWe auctioning farmgeneration equipment company with roots in thecompany agricultural since 1938. We aredeep a third-generation with community. We sell for the individual farmer deep roots in the agricultural community. We sell for plus we conduct open the individual farmer, three plus welarge conduct threeauctions large opena year. The Backgate auction, which islargest the largest auctions a year. The Backgate auction is the farm farm auction of its kind in the United States. auction of its kind in the United States, selling 6,000 Selling 6000 items over 6 days. The Portland items over six days. We also conduct the Portland Open Open in South Arkansas and the Morrilton auction in south Arkansas, and the Morrilton Open, Open which is in central Arkansas. which is in central Arkansas.

PRODUCTION MANDY KEENER Creative Director mandy@arktimes.com KEVIN WALTERMIRE Art Director kevin@arktimes.com EDITORIAL MICHAEL ROBERTS Editor michael@arktimes.com MELANIE JONES Copy Editor melanie@arktimes.com ADVERTISING PHYLLIS A. BRITTON Sales Director phyllis@arktimes.com ELIZABETH HAMAN Sales Director elizabeth@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ANNE GREGORY | anne@arktimes.com BONNY GREGORY | bonny@arktimes.com BROOKE WALLACE | brooke@arktimes.com CARRIE SUBLETT | carrie@arktimes.com JEFF DELONEY | jeff@arktimes.com JO GARCIA | jo@arktimes.com LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com SALEE BLACK | salee@arktimes.com TIFFANY HOLLAND | tiffany@arktimes.com PRODUCTION WELDON WILSON Production Manager/Controller ROLAND R. GLADDEN Advertising Traffic Manager ERIN HOLLAND Advertising Coordinator GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS MIKE SPAIN VINCENT GRIFFIN SOCIAL MEDIA LAUREN BUCHER lauren@arktimes.com

www.blackmonauctions.com

BLACKMON AUCTIONS, INC & THOMAS BLACKMON REALTY PO BOX 7464, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72217 OFFICE: 501-664-4526 FAX: 501-664-4538

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OFFICE STAFF ROBERT CURFMAN IT Director LINDA PHILLIPS Billing/Collections KELLY LYLES Office Manager SUSIE SHELTON Circulation Director 201 E. MARKHAM ST., SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985 All Contents Š 2015 Arkansas Food & Farm arkansasfoodandfarm.com


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LORD, LET THE RAIN STOP.

I’m writing this in mid-March and our beautiful farm has turned into a mud pit.

T

he sheep have been confined for several weeks near tin snow shelters and now they are showing bottle jaw, a sign they have parasites from the now filthy mud. Ordinarily we would rotate them to fresh pasture every seven days to break the parasite cycle but we have been more concerned with the newborn lambs freezing to death. Somehow, Sambo our ram got in with the women in September instead of November so we’ve had nearly 50 lambs since January 5. All have been born in bitter cold and close to a dozen were born during the snow storm. While our friends were taking snow days, we spent ours desperately shoring up sheep shelters in danger of collapsing beneath the ice and snow. On the vegetable front I have 27 tons of chicken manure that need to get spread on tomato rows, but if I even get near it with the tractor, the field will be rutted for years. I should have sprayed the peach trees two weeks ago but we’ve not had two consecutive dry days above 40 degrees. I’ve got flats of butterhead lettuce that need to get into the ground but there is nothing but five inches of mud for as far as I can see. It’s nearly spring and we’re already worn down and way behind. But life is about to get great again. Very soon I can stop feeding my bees because they will be feasting by the thousands on our peach blossoms. My 1,500 heirloom tomatoes are going to grow fast and strong from my richly manured, raised beds. I’m experimenting with grafting my heirlooms onto disease-resistant hybrid root stock and if it works, it will change the way I farm. You cannot imagine how farming challenges the intellect and constantly presents opportunity for innovation. Sometimes I wake at night A L A N LE V ER I T T

Keeping warm: An early lamb needs extra protection against the snow.

It’s nearly spring and we’re already worn down and way behind.

8 | FOOD & FARM

by Alan Leveritt and cannot go back to sleep because I keep turning all these possibilities over and over in my head. Big dahlia roots and gladiolus are packed in peat moss in the sorting shed, ready to go into cut flower rows nearest the house in a few weeks. They will join mixed color Benary zinnias and sunflowers along with giant celosia for a Mardi Gras of color just 50 yards from my deck. The upper garden is full of raspberries and blackberries and this year I know not to plant tomatoes near the chicken coop where the little bastards freeranged my Carbons last year. Yet, this is Arkansas and sometimes I have the feeling I am just setting a fine table for every stinkbug, potato beetle and fungus in two counties. Organic pest control is a fantasy, but one that I pursue each year with a faith unmoored to reality. This year I’m going to crush it. I mix a four gallon cocktail of Pyganic 5%, neem oil, Bacillus Thuringiensis, Regalia, fish emulsion and water-soluble Kaolin clay. That should stimulate resistance to funguses, feed the plants, repel insects and kill beetles, hornworms, pin worms and stink bugs. But it never works that way. Lucy keeps stealing the football while I keep on trying to kick it. I still go out into the field with a sprayer full of my organic cocktail just before sundown, but I fear a better strategy is to just plant more than the bugs can eat.

Alan Leveritt Publisher, Arkansas Food & Farm Arkansas Times Publishing

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JOIN THE REVOLUTION Sign up at www.ArkansasGrown.org Arkansas Grown Participation Program Options & Benefits per year

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DELICIOUS CONNECTIONS by Michael Roberts

O

ur entire local food movement relies on connections to survive. Fresh food grown by local farmers can certainly improve the physical health of our bodies and the economic health of our communities, but these things can only happen when hungry consumers can find the foods they crave in their communities. Likewise, all the sweat and toil in the world does a farmer no good if they have no marketplaces in which to sell their produce. Arkansas Food & Farm seeks to create as many of those connections as possible. Arkansas specialty crop farmers sold over $120 million worth of food last year—money that came from people inside Arkansas and went to support people inside Arkansas. Think about that: Instead of sending money out of the state to buy fruits and vegetables that are picked green, trucked thousands of miles and artificially ripened, those millions purchased produce picked at the perfect moment of ripeness, trucked in from just down the road. During our first year of publication, I met so many great people around the state. In Bentonville, I talked coffee roasting with Airship Coffee’s Mark Bray—discovering we both roasted our first batch of coffee beans in an air popcorn popper. In Jonesboro, I bought the best roast I’ve ever cooked from Nine Oaks Beef, while Jack and Cori Sundell of Little Rock’s Root Café taught me what it takes for a thriving restaurant to source ingredients locally. These are the sorts of thing that make me proud to be a life-long Arkansawyer. The issue of Arkansas Food & Farm you’re holding in your hands is a special one. We’ve traveled the state to find out how chefs and farmers use the local produce we all love so much, collecting recipes for each season so that no matter when you’re shopping you can get an idea of something tasty to

BR I A N CH I L SO N

Arkansas specialty crop farmers sold over $120 million worth of food last year

10 | FOOD & FARM

make with our Arkansas bounty. Our listings this time around serve to show you where you can go buy local ingredients to make these delicious recipes for yourself—because one of the most vital connections we want to make in our growing food community is with you, the consumer who demands fresh food and loves to cook at home. The response from our chefs and farmers to our request for recipes was positive and overwhelming—so much so that we weren’t able to include all the great things we received in the limited space of our print magazine. So for more recipes from some of our favorite chefs and farms keep up with our Food & Farm Blog (arkansasfoodandfarm. com) for our food issue supplement series. The first farmers markets of the spring harvest season are just around the corner. For me, that’s an anticipation that comes over me like a kid at Christmas. I’m looking forward to another year of meeting new people in the food community and reconnecting with old friends. Come with us through a tasty journey through a year of Arkansas food—I’m positive you’ll find something that gets you in the mood to fire up the stove and put some fresh Arkansas produce on your table.

Michael Roberts Editor, Arkansas Food & Farm Arkansas Times Publishing @ARFoodFarm

Find out what’s in season at arkansasfoodandfarm.com

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


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The Fayetteville Farmers’ Market has earned a spot among the top markets in the nation and was recently voted “America’s Favorite” by American Farmland Trust. We’re open 3 days a week, starting April 4.

at Find out what’s fresh

12 | FOOD & FARM

le.com experiencefayettevil

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by M

s

bert

el Ro icha

A special section in partnership with

W

ith the growth of the local food movement exploding in the past few years, there’s never been a better time to consider starting a specialty crop agricultural business in Arkansas. The idea of making a living from working with a bare patch of soil has an appeal to many people who want to eat better, become better stewards of the environment or just enjoy working outside. It’s the execution of the dream that leaves so many frustrated to the point where many would-be farmers never put a single seed in the ground. continued on page 14

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

RE T T PE E K

Five Steps Toward Farming

FOOD & FARM | 13


T

his guide exists to present some clear signposts to help any potential farmer along the road to success. In it, we have detailed five separate areas that new farmers should look at when building a plan to farm, and provided a list of resources associated with each that take a lot of the fear out of starting a new agricultural endeavor.

1: EDUCATION

Previous page: Cattle graze at St. Joseph’s Farm in North Little Rock. Above: At North Little Rock Community Farm, volunteers learn how to build raised beds, a skill that can be applied to their own farm endeavors.

The Dale Bumpers School of Agriculture, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in different agricultural disciplines, as well as online programs and practical farm experience. The university system also operates the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension, a valuable resource for farmers of all experience levels. Call 1-800-2152024 or email the Dean’s office at dbcafls@uark.edu for more information.

***

Arkansas State University in Jonesboro offers degrees and practical instruction in the agricultural sciences through its College of Agriculture and Technology. ASU also offers community outreach programs on topics like soil and water education and agribusiness solutions. Contact 870-972-2085 or email CoAT@astate.edu for more information.

***

Arkansas Tech University in Russellville offers degree programs and practical experience through its Agriculture Department. Contact 479-968-0251 or email Susan Morrins at smorris@atu.edu for more information. 14 | FOOD & FARM

BR I A N CHIL SO N

Growing plants and raising livestock is science, and our understanding of this science gets better and better all the time. Arkansas has a number of excellent universities that are educating the farmers of tomorrow in the ways of crop and livestock management. In addition, our universities are constantly conducting research on various plant cultivars and livestock breeds, as well as studying food safety, processing and ways to increase yields. A farmer’s education comes from many sources—formal agricultural education, seminars and workshops as well as community outreach events.

Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia offers degree programs and practical experience and boasts an expanded agricultural center that opened in 2013. Contact 870-2354350 or email Jeffery Miller at jsmiller@saumag.edu for more information.

***

The University of Arkansas at Monticello offers degree programs and practical experience, as well as operating the Southeast Research and Extension Center. Contact 870-4601014 or email the Agriculture Department agridept@uamont. edu for more information.

***

The Foundation Farm School in Eureka Springs is a practical, non-traditional school that operates a three-season (spring, summer, fall) curriculum that takes students through an entire growing season. The school is tuition free and provides information about how to make small, specialty crop farming work in Arkansas. Contact Patrice Gros at 479-2537461 or email mamakapa@yahoo.com for more information.

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


2: LAND

They may not be making any more land, but it’s something pretty much every potential farmer needs some of to get a farm business running. Local real estate agents can help a beginner farmer with listings suited for agriculture, but there are some assets available specifically geared toward connecting folks that want to farm with the specific type of property that fits the farmer’s needs.

***

The Center for Rural Affairs has excellent information about alternatives to buying land, including farm transfers, which connect retiring farmers with younger farmers in order to keep land working. These land-match programs often result in better deals for beginner farmers as well as placing new growers on plots of land where there is already existing infrastructure. Go to www.cfra.org for more details. LandsofArkansasisanArkansas-specific section of a national clearinghouse for rural land for sale, including farmland, ranchland, houses and other buildings. www.landsofarkansas.com

***

Shared Earth is an online forum where people with land list what they have so that people looking for places to plant can match up with them. www.sharedearth.com

***

Land and Farm is a clearinghouse site that lists farm properties all across the country. Properties can not only be narrowed down by state, but also by specific county. www.landandfarm.com

***

Mossy Oak Properties of Stuttgart is an Arkansas-based company that offers hunting and farm land all across the state. www.farmandhuntingland.com

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

Shared Land: Fayetteville’s Tri Cycle Farm is a collaborative effort for beginning and experienced farmers alike to share growing space.

BE T H H A L L

***

P

urchasing or leasing land is difficult enough, but it’s the very soil itself that should concern any potential farmer. Before purchasing a plot of land, there are many things to consider about it:

***

The type of crops best suited for the soil.

***

Where water for irrigation will come from.

***

The sort of native plants (weeds) that grow there.

*** The general climate of the area—average temperatures, annual rainfall and prevailing winds are all issues that can affect the viability of a farm.

***

Infrastructure needs and an assessment of existing farm structures are also vital. The goal in assessing the infrastructure needs is to avoid hidden costs later.

***

Equipment costs are also vital to ascertain, because depending on the size of the farm, these costs can be quite expensive.

***

Soil testing services are available through each of the 75 county Cooperative Extension offices. Specific instructions for gathering a sample for testing along with a listing of each county office are located on the UAEX website at www.uaex.edu, search “soil testing.”

FOOD & FARM | 15


3: PLANNING

The USDA has numerous resources to help farmers develop business plans, understand how to balance finances and tips on diversifying farms to maximize profits.

Some of the resources available are:

***

Business plan resources including advice, balance sheet templates, information on incorporating the farm and information on turning a farm into a thriving agribusiness. These resources can take much of the guesswork out of business planning.

***

Information about farm financing, tips on building relationships with local markets and advice on diversifying farm products.

BE T H H A L L

***

A list of available financiers and loan programs, programs for veterans and information on disaster assistance for farmers. Visit ric.nal.usda.gov and search “small farm funding” for more information.

Tunnel Gardening: High tunnels, like this one at Dripping Springs Garden in Huntsville, allow farmers to extend their growing seasons, resulting in more produce for sale.

T

he USDA also operates the Start2Farm website www.start2farm.gov. Set up specifically for beginner farms, Start2Farm begins with an assessment questionnaire meant to help establish a starting level for the farmer. The site also includes information on financial planning, risk management, farm management, marketing and ways to plan for growth and expansion. On the state level, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension www.uaex.edu is of immense value. With offices in each county across the state, Extension is local— and with the power of the University of Arkansas system behind it, they have the means and resources to provide education on many areas that a beginning farmer needs to know. Some of the things available include:

***

Comprehensive information about land management, water quality, soil testing and sustainability. The free soil tests are part of the “Don’t guess—soil test” campaign.

***

Video tutorials and workshop information to provide visual aids for farmers. By utilizing these resources, potential farmers develop a base foundation that can be used when applying for grants and loans that are often necessary for new business ventures.

***

Pest management, including weeds, parasites, diseases and crop-eating insects.

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Marketing and business resources to help get crops to market.

***

Information on livestock and foraging. 16 | FOOD & FARM

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4: FINANCING

Money is the constant worry of any agricultural enterprise, and developing a business plan is the part of farming that is often the most difficult. Securing funding for equipment, land, seed and farm improvements doesn’t just depend on how much a farmer can grow the first year—if that were the case, no farmer in history would have made it too far.

P

lanning the financial side of your farm starts with a personal inventory. An honest personal inventory of a potential farmer’s management skills, willingness to work long hours and existing capital to invest are all vital before taking out loans that must be paid back no matter if the farm succeeds or fails. There are a great number of grant and loan programs available to beginning farmers and farmers looking to expand, some of which could be the difference between success and failure of the farm. In addition, many of these programs come with planning help. The government has programs (listed below) to help farmers defray some of the costs of land improvements, while local companies offer loans tailored specifically to any farm’s needs.

***

National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS): The NRCS is the part of the USDA devoted to helping farmers care for their land by helping fund a variety of improvements. Beginning farmers or farmers who are looking to expand their footprint in the market alike are eligible as long as the farm in question generates at least $1,000 per year. Programs offered include:

***

Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP): Offers technical and planning advice for resource assessment and monitoring. Also offers financial assistance to people looking to make improvements to farm or ranch land in the form of compensation for work done to make improvements based on an NRCS-approved plan. arkansasfoodandfarm.com

THE

FOUR Ps PURPOSE

Why do you want to farm? A personal mission statement can be an important part of maintaining the motivation required to take on the arduous task of starting a farm. Some farmers want to grow fresh food for their communities, while others enjoy outdoor work and want to make money doing it. Knowing your own reason is vital.

PLAN

Know your land, know your markets and know your limits. Farm planning means more than just growing and selling, it also means planning for crop failures and other setbacks. A good plan can mean the difference between withstanding diversity and a failing business.

PRODUCT

Growing produce is just the first step. Knowing where to sell it, how much to sell it for and how it will be transported to market is where crops turn into profit. Understanding local market regulations, county regulations and area needs means satisfied customers and more product sold.

***

Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP): For the federal government, the EQIP initiatives are a way to bring local farms into better compliance with environmental standards and promote soil, water and air conservation. For the farmer, these programs can provide funding for a variety of improvements to farmland, up to $450,000.

***

Air Quality Initiative: Owners of cropland, rangeland or pastureland where air quality is of concern can receive funding to address these issues with approved conservation techniques.

PEOPLE

The greatest resource for beginning farmers is other farmers. Developing relationships with others dealing with the same issues can teach a new farmer more than anything about the business of farming. Seek out local groups of farmers, and get involved with state programs like Arkansas Grown.

***

On-farm Energy Initiative: Balancing a farm’s energy needs versus the cost of supply is a struggle for beginning and veteran farmers alike. This initiative offers financial assistance for on-farm evaluation of farm and irrigation systems called an Agricultural Energy Management Plan (AgEMP). The AgEMP includes: Itemized energy use by individual systems to establish a baseline for electricity and other fuel improvements; recommendations for equipment improvements and upgrades; amount of potential energy reductions and financial savings for each recommendation; cost estimates of potential improvements; and length of expected payback for energy efficiency upgrades. continued on page 18 FOOD & FARM | 17


BE T H H A L L

Winter Planning: Bean Mountain Farm in Deer debuts a new “cold frame” that allows for year-round herb and produce farming.

O

nce the AgEMP plan is complete, the program then offers financial aid to farmers for the purchase of upgrades and improvements for a variety of farm facilities such as lighting, plate coolers, ventilation and fans, irrigation pumps, grain dryers, greenhouse improvements, maple syrup evaporators, heating and refrigeration units, insulation and building envelope sealing, motor controls and variable speed drives.

***

Organic Initiative: Farmers with USDA organic certification are presented with numerous new problems that their conventional counterparts don’t face. This program offers financial assistance to organic farmers for several of these issues, including: Developing a conservation plan; establishing buffer zones; planning and installing pollinator habitats; improving soil quality and organic matter while minimizing erosion; developing a grazing plan and supportive livestock practices; improving irrigation efficiency and enhancing cropping rotations; and nutrient management. 18 | FOOD & FARM

***

Seasonal High Tunnel System for Crops: High tunnels may not be the first thing that come to mind in terms of conservation, but they can be valuable tools for improving plant quality, improving soil quality, reducing nutrient and pesticide transportation, improving air quality through reduced transportation inputs and reducing energy use by providing consumers with a local source of fresh produce. For farmers, the benefit of these tunnels is the ability to farm in the winter, something that can be a great source of income during a time of year that can be lean for growers. For more information on government assistance and programs, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov, search “EQIP.”

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


F

or costs that can’t be absorbed by the farmer or paid for by government programs, loans become necessary. There are lenders that specialize in the needs of farmers and can work with individuals based on their specific circumstances. Farm Credit (www.arfarmcredit. com) is a specialized lender that works with farmers to provide loans based on an individual farmer’s needs. The lender provides operating loans, revolving lines of credit, home loans that meet specific criteria, livestock financing and has programs geared toward young and beginning farmers. Before talking to a credit company like Farm Credit, there are a few preparatory steps any farmer needs to take to insure that the loan officer can provide the best possible plan.

***

Make sure there is a business plan in place. The USDA has resources available for farmers to develop these plans. Other resources for farmers to develop a business plan include AgPlan from the University of Minnesota (www.agplan. umn.edu), while North Carolina State University has business plan assistance specifically geared toward organic farmers (www.ces. ncsu.edu).

***

Have a balance sheet for the farm. The Michigan State University provides templates for free that can be used to develop a balance sheet (www.msu.edu/~steind).

***

Know your markets. This is especially important because just knowing how to grow food is only half of what any farmer needs to know. The other half is knowing where to sell the crops. With all these things in place, your Farm Credit loan officer can then assess any collateral, talk about available capital and look at credit histories. Armed with this information, Farm Credit has a mission of tailoring their loan plans to each farmer’s specific needs. Of particular interest to the beginning farmer are Farm Credit’s loans to young and beginning farmers available to farmers under the age of 35, and farmers who have either never farmed or have been involved in farming for less than 10 years. Based on eligibility, business plan and credit score, custom terms for beginning and young farmers may be available such as modified credit standards, discounted interest rates, modified collateral standards and full or patial payment of any required loan guarantee fees. The greatest benefit to using Farm Credit is that they do not require that the farms they work with be of any certain size, so the small urban farmer is just as welcome to seek info on available loan programs as the large commodity crop farmer. The type of farm is also not restricted, as Farm Credit offers financing for the purchase and maintenance of livestock as well as crop loans for vegetable and grain farmers.

***

Bring tax information for the farm. The IRS has a guide for taxes specifically geared toward farmers. arkansasfoodandfarm.com

continued on page 20 FOOD & FARM | 19


Making it Work: Maintaining land, equipment and crop quality is an ongoing process that can reap great benefits for farmers and their communities.

5: KEEPING IT GOING

Developing a farm is hard enough, but the work maintaining one never stops. Once a farm is running, questions of insurance and risk management arise—and, of course, the on-the-job learning is a neverending process.

I

n terms of risk management, Arkansas Farm Bureau (www.arfb.com) provides multiple benefits for the Arkansas farmer including lobbying for farmers rights, monitoring and disseminating information that affects farmers, and providing education and safety information to the public. In addition, Farm Bureau’s insurance division (www. afbic.com) can provide the sort of safety net that means the difference between success and failure. Don’t think insurance is necessary? As the USDA says, “It doesn’t cost anything to ask about insurance.” The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service is another good resource that provides 20 | FOOD & FARM

tutorials for beginning farmers on making farms sustainable, creating business plans, marketing and assessing risks. In addition, the organization also provides substantial tutorials on row crops, specialty crops, livestock, organic farming, composting and water management. The site also lists internships available for potential farmers who want some practical experience before starting a business. Finally, the best resource for any beginning farmer is other farmers. The Arkansas Department of Agriculture’s Arkansas Grown program organizes an annual event for farmers to meet other farmers as well as chefs and grocery store representatives. The Arkansas Farmers Market Association (www.arkansasfarmersmarketassociation.com) is a valuable resource for what is happening in the state farmers market scene. Volunteering with student groups like the FFA and 4-H can connect any new farmer with farm families, a resource that cannot be discounted.

Local farmers markets are not just a resource for great local food, they are also a treasure trove of people who have the practical experience that comes with experience. Our specialty crop farming community is friendly and eager to share tips, secrets and information on things they’ve tried that did not work. Becoming a farmer means more than just growing crops and selling them— it means becoming part of a community that is connected both to the land and to one another. Just one more reason to get involved and get to know people all around the state!

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Arkansas Grown Through & Through JOIN THE REVOLUTION Sign up at www.ArkansasGrown.org Arkansas Grown Participation Program Options & Benefits per year

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•Arkansas Grown Stickers (up to 100) •Arkansas Grown sign (1) •Listing on Arkansas Grown Website •Listing on Arkansas Grown App •Participating in Arkansas Grown events •Right to use the Arkansas Grown logo

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Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Late Night OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Chef Matthew McClure James Beard Award Semifinalist

479.286.6575 TheHiveBentonville.com Located at

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BENTONVILLE

FOOD & FARM | 21


W

elcome to the inaugural food issue of Arkansas Food and Farm. We’ve collected recipes from chefs and farmers from all across the state in order to bring our readers a variety of exciting ideas using our state’s exciting fresh bounty. Hold on to this issue as the seasons change: As new produce comes into season, each section of our food issue will be a valuable resource in deciding what to put on the table.

Spring recipes BRAISED TURNIP GREENS | 23 - Kelley Carney -

PICKLED EGG SALAD | 24 - Matthew McClure -

MERQUEZ SAUSAGE | 25 - Brandon Brown -

STRAWBERRY CUSTARD PIE | 26 - Matthew Lowman -

FENTON 1932 DRESSING | 27 - Ann Harris -

HOT PEPPER JELLY CHICKEN BITES | 28 - Will West -

22 | FOOD & FARM

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Freckle Face Farm’s Mitchell and Jami Latture have turned their small family farm in McRae into a source of excellent meat for chefs all over central Arkansas. Part of their success comes from the Gloucestershire Old Spot breed and Old Spot cross-breed heritage hogs they raise, but it’s their dedication to sustainable farming practices and high quality that make them the default pork supplier for restaurants and retail consumers alike.

Braised Turnip Greens Kelly Carney is more than just a farmer selling high quality USDA-certified organic produce from North Pulaski Farms in Cabot—he also operates a CSA in central Arkansas and participates in many of the area’s farmers markets.

Ingredients

first greens of spring

3 bunches of turnip greens, rinsed and soaked, stems removed and reserved 1 macaroni pepper, sliced 5 slices Freckle Face Farm bacon, sliced 2 jalapeños, sliced sea salt to taste

Instructions

Coarsely chop the stems. In a Dutch oven, combine the chopped stems, macaroni pepper, jalapeños and bacon. Add salt and cook on medium-high for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Roughly chop the leaves of the greens and add to the pan. Press the greens down flat with a spatula or spoon and add water until it covers the greens by 2 inches. Cook on high until boiling, then reduce heat to medium-low and cook for 30 minutes. Drain and serve immediately, or keep in the broth to allow flavor to develop over the next 1-2 days. Serves 4-6.

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Pickled Egg Salad The Hive’s Matthew McClure is a two-time James Beard Award nominee. McClure’s love of local ingredients has helped in the development of Ozark High South Cuisine, taking seasonal food to new heights.

Pickled Eggs Ingredients

1 pint water 1 pint rice vinegar 1 teaspoon mustard seed 1 teaspoon black pepper (whole) 1 teaspoon allspice (whole) 2 bay leaves 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup salt 6 whole eggs (hard boiled & peeled)

Instructions

Combine all ingredients except for the eggs. Place ingredients in a pot on the stove and warm until sugar and salt are dissolved. Allow the pickling liquid to cool and then place the eggs in the liquid. Let set for at least 24 hours.

Pickled Egg Salad Ingredients 6 pickled eggs 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard paprika

Instructions

Grate pickled eggs on a mediumsized cheese grater. Mix the rest of the ingredients into the eggs. Use paprika to garnish and serve with toasted white bread. Serves 4-6.

21C M USEU M HOT EL S LLCL

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Merguez Sausage

(spicy North African lamb sausage) When it comes to local meat, butcher Brandon Brown has become one of Arkansas’ best sources. Committed to buying high-quality meat from sustainable farmers, Brown’s Hillcrest Artisan Meats has become not only the top butcher shop in Little Rock, but also a source of education on meat types, cuts and different types of sausage, charcuterie and other preparations. Brown sources his local lamb from Kenneth Crow at Cypress Valley in Hot Springs.

Ingredients

aromatic fennel adds depth

5 pounds fresh ground lamb 16 grams spicy smoked paprika 2 grams crushed red pepper 8 grams ground fennel seed 8 grams ground cumin 18 grams garlic 5 grams ground black pepper

Instructions

Add spices to freshly ground lamb. Use gloves to combine all ingredients together by hand until thoroughly mixed. Yields 5 pounds of sausage. This sausage is great as a burger, as an addition to soups (especially lentil), or formed into small logs and put on wooden skewers and flame grilled.

Grams vs. Cups

NANCY NOL AN

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Professional chefs generally prefer to weigh dry ingredients like spices and flour instead of measuring them in the traditional cups and teaspoons. This is because weighing ingredients is more accurate than measuring them in cups, and precise ratios are necessary to create the highest quality sausage or baked good. Small kitchen scales are inexpensive and a valuable addition to any home kitchen. FOOD & FARM | 25


Strawberry Custard Pie As the pastry chef for Little Rock’s South on Main, Matthew Lowman has created a revolving menu of regular and seasonal desserts that have drawn raves from diners and critics alike. Lowman’s desserts are inspired by things available at area markets—in particular fresh strawberries from Holland Bottom Farms in Cabot.

Oat Crust Ingredients

2 cups rolled oats 3/4 cup all-purpose flour (substitute almond flour for a gluten-free pie) 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon pinch of salt 1 stick (4 ounces) of butter, melted

Arkansas strawberries come into season toward the end of April and are usually available through the beginning of June. Look for dry, firm berries with fresh, green caps.

add a scoop of homemade ice cream

Instructions

Preheat oven to 325°F. Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl with a fork. Drizzle in the butter while stirring until butter is mostly incorporated. Evenly press into a pie pan (or a small casserole dish). Bake the crust for 12 minutes. Let cool before filling.

Custard Ingredients

3 cups Holland Bottom Farm strawberries, sliced 4 eggs 2 cups of sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla pinch of salt

Instructions

To assemble the pie, combine the eggs, sugar, vanilla and salt in a mixing bowl and beat with a whisk until the color has turned a light yellow (about 2 minutes by hand, or 1 minute in a mixer). Pour the strawberries into the cooled pie shell. Pour egg mixture over the strawberries (there may be excess egg mixture depending on pan size). Bake at 325°F for 15-20 minutes, or until the center of the pie barely wiggles when touched. This recipe also works well with any spring or summer fruit such as blueberries, peaches or rhubarb. Serves 6-8. NANCY NOL AN

26 | FOOD & FARM

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Fenton 1932 Dressing This refreshing salad was named after a set of Fenton dishes that Fayetteville’s Zuppa Zuppa Soup Kitchen owner Ann Harris once traded for soup.

Ingredients

5 strawberries granulated garlic to taste 5-6 slices fresh jalapeño 2-4 mint leaves 2-4 basil leaves juice of one lime one garlic glove 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil dash of sea salt dash of cinnamon splash of Sprite or sparkling white wine spring salad mix Parmesan cheese, as garnish crushed red pepper, as garnish

Instructions

Blend all ingredients (except salad and garnishes) just to the point where the strawberry seeds won’t dissolve. Add splash of Sprite or sparkling white wine to blend and stir. Place desired amount of salad in a bowl and top with dressing. Add Parmesan cheese and crushed red pepper, and garnish with a mint leaf. Serves 4-6.

LY N DI FU LT Z

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Hot Pepper Jelly Chicken Bites The House of Webster turned 80 years old in 2014 and it is still going strong. The business is split between online orders, gift shop, private label contracting and co-packing for other local northwest Arkansas gems, like My Brother’s Salsa. Head chef Will West launched a line of hot pepper spreads that includes Strawberry Pepper, Blueberry Pepper, and the super-hot Raspberry Chipotle and Mandarin Orange spreads in 2015.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil 2 boneless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon House of Webster Mandarin Orange Pepper spread 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ teaspoon balsamic vinegar ¼ teaspoon minced garlic sesame seeds, as garnish butter lettuce, as garnish

some like it hot!

Instructions

In a large skillet, heat olive oil over high heat and add chicken breast. Season chicken breast with sea salt and pepper. Cook for 5 minutes or until chicken is fully coated with olive oil and reduce heat to medium high. Cook for approximately 15 minutes until golden brown and turn off heat. Mix the Mandarin Pepper spread, Dijon mustard, balsamic and garlic in a small bowl until incorporated. Pour mixture over chicken and toss until evenly coated and until sauce has thickened. Add additional salt and pepper, to taste. Place butter lettuce on serving platter and place a chicken bite on each leaf. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve. Yields 8 servings. LY N DI FU LT Z

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YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

#VisitArkansas

Diamond Bear Brewery, North Little Rock

The craft beer scene in Arkansas is hopping. You can enjoy gourmet brewpub fare with local ingredients and sample international award-winning brews. But for the first part of the day, you might consider some of the other attractions that make Arkansas the perfect, undiscovered vacation paradise. ORDER YOUR FREE VACATION PLANNING KIT AT ARKANSAS.COM OR CALL 1-800-NATURAL.

Pinnacle Mountain near Little Rock arkansasfoodandfarm.com

Junction Bridge, Little Rock/North Little Rock

Scott FOOD & FARM | 29


Summer recipes ARKANSAS FARMERS MARKET BAGNA CAUDA | 31 - Scott McGehee -

GREEN BEAN SUCCOTASH | 32 - Angela Nix -

“CRACKBERRY” OMELET | 33 - Kelly Carney -

GRILLED STEAK AND FRESH MOZZARELLA FLATBREAD | 34 - Arkansas Beef Council -

BRADLEY COUNTY PINK TOMATO PIE | 35 - Kat Robinson -

PEACH GAZPACHO | 36 - Farmer’s Table Cafe -

30 | FOOD & FARM

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Arkansas Farmers Market Bagna Cauda

customize with your favorite seasonal veggies

(warm italian dipping sauce)

Chef Scott McGehee is one of Arkansas’ busiest chefs–his Yellow Rocket Concepts group has opened seven restaurants in as many years. From burgers (Big Orange) and tacos (Local Lime) to pizza (ZaZa) and beer (Lost Forty Brewing), McGehee has his fingers on the pulse of what Arkansas is hungry for.

Bagna Cauda Sauce Ingredients 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons butter 1 shallot, chopped 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped 8-12 flat anchovy fillets, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard Sea or kosher salt and cracked black pepper, to taste

Instructions

Combine the oil and butter in the serving vessel and bring to a simmer, taking care not to burn the butter. Add the shallot and garlic for just a minute or so, taking care not to burn or overcook. Stir remaining ingredients and season to taste. Serve warm with your favorite raw and blanched farmers market vegetables. Serves 8-10.

Building The Perfect Vegetable Board

NANCY NOL AN

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Fresh bell peppers and radishes are wonderful with this dip, while broccoli, cauliflower, romanesco and carrots are good either fresh or served lightly blanched. The bagna cauda dipping sauce pairs well with nearly every fresh vegetable seen at area markets, so don’t limit yourself to anything but your own imagination. FOOD & FARM | 31


Green Bean Succotash Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs has found new life as the first brewery in a National Park. Chef Angela Nix has created a menu that goes well with the brews.

pairs well with a crisp Arkansas craft beer

Ingredients

1/2 pound bacon, diced 1 sweet yellow onion, diced 1 tablespoon garlic, chopped 2 pounds green beans 1 cup corn, removed from cob

Instructions

In a pan, render bacon and drain. Add onion and garlic, sauté until aromatic. Add green beans, sauté 3-5 minutes on low heat, then cover for 2 minutes. Add corn, and salt and pepper to taste. Serves 8-10.

Keep Beans Snappy

In many parts of the state, green beans are known as “snap beans” due to their fibrous texture and the old tradition of sitting around and breaking the long beans up into bite-size pieces for cooking or canning. The classic way to cook them is to simmer them down with bacon until they are soft and savory, but cooking them until just tender in a recipe like this succotash leaves a brighter, sweeter flavor in the beans, making this bright dish taste fresh-picked.

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“Crackberry” Omelet

Eggs are an important part of what Rattles Garden in Vilonia does. In addition to their “Farmshare” CSA program (which provides a bounty of local produce), Rattles has added an “Eggshare” option that is good for a dozen fresh eggs from their pasture-raised chickens in every pickup.

North Pulaski Farm’s Kelly Carney calls his cherry tomatoes “crackberries” due to their addictive nature.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon butter ½ cup of North Pulaski Farms “crackberries” (cherry tomatoes) 1 jalapeño pepper, finely diced 2 Rattles Garden eggs, whisked together ¼ cup Honeysuckle Lane white cheddar, sliced thin or shredded salt and cracked pepper, to taste

Instructions

Melt the butter in a nonstick frying pan on medium heat. Cook the tomatoes and the jalapeños for 3-4 minutes. Add the eggs and cook 3-4 minutes. Flip the omelet over and add the cheddar on top. Cook for 2-3 minutes. Slide onto the plate and let the omelet fold over. Serve immediately. Yields 1 omelet per 2 eggs.

Honeysuckle Lane Cheese

This raw milk cheese producer located in Romance is a staple of both local farmers markets in central Arkansas and restaurant menus across the natural state. Whether it’s the white cheddar, yellow cheddar or Colby varieties, there’s always something tasty coming from Honeysuckle.

serve with red onions for added f lavor NANCY NOL AN

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Grilled Steak and Fresh Mozzarella Flatbread This dish from the Arkansas Beef Council pairs the richness of beef with the light flavor of seasonal spinach and mozzarella.

Ingredients

1 to 11/4 pounds beef top sirloin filets, cut 1-inch thick, tied 11/2 teaspoons lemon pepper 2 cups packed fresh baby spinach 1/4 pound fresh mozzarella cheese, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 11/2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 4 naan breads (Indian flatbread) or pita breads

Instructions

Press lemon pepper evenly onto steaks. Place steaks on grill over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 12-17 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 12-16 minutes) for medium rare (145째F) to medium (160째F) doneness, turning occasionally. Combine spinach, cheese and basil in large bowl. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar; toss to coat and set aside. Remove steak from grill and let stand 5 minutes. Place naan on grill, covered, and cook 1-3 minutes or until lightly browned, turning once. Carve steaks into slices. Toss steak slices with the spinach mozzarella mixture and spoon over bread. Serves 4-6.

spinach is full of vitamins and minerals

COU R T E S Y A R K A NSA S BEEF COU N CIL

34 | FOOD & FARM

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Bradley County Pink Tomato Pie From Arkansas Pie: A Delicious Slice of the Natural State, by travel writer Kat Robinson

Ingredients

1 9-inch deep-dish pie shell 3-5 large tomatoes, peeled, sliced to about ½-inch thick 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper additional herbs if wanted: basil, parsley, garlic salt, etc. 3/4 cup grated cheddar cheese 3/4 cup grated mozzarella cheese 1/4 cup scallions or chives 6 strips cooked bacon (optional) 1 cup Hellman’s Real Mayonnaise

Instructions

Bake pie shell for 10 minutes at 375°F. Layer tomatoes in shell and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and additional herbs and spices if wanted. Mix together mayonnaise, cheeses and scallions/chives. Spread mixture over tomatoes in pie shell. Bake at 350°F for 30 minutes until brown and bubbly. Crumble bacon on top. Allow to stand 5 minutes before serving. Serves 6-8.

Terry and Julie Donnelly have worked their Deepwoods Farm for 33 years, growing the tomatoes that are still the focus of the Bradley County Pink Tomato Festival in Warren. The fruit gets its name from its translucent skin through which the red heart of the tomato can be seen, giving it a light red or pink appearance. Chefs in Arkansas’ metropolitan areas are utilizing the pinks, along with heirloom varietals such as the Cherokee purple and Arkansas Traveler, in seasonal menus today.

POT SA N DPINS .CO M

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Peach Gazpacho At the Farmer’s Table Café in Fayetteville, there is often a line all the way out the door a sign that the fresh, local food being cooked up is not only sustainably raised but also capably prepared. The café’s Adrienne and Rob Shaunfield have made it their mission to only serve what they can source locally, and their commitment to their community makes every delicious bite that much sweeter.

Ingredients

1 head roasted garlic 4 quarts pureed organic local peaches 1 1/4 quart Green Zebra tomatoes 4 tablesoons fresh chopped rosemary sea salt and pepper, to taste fresh parsley, to garnish

Instructions

Puree all ingredients together in a high-powered blender until smooth. Chill and serve with fresh parsley to garnish.

The Green Zebra Tomato

There is some debate over whether the Green Zebra tomato is a true heirloom, but what isn’t up for debate is the excellent tart and tangy flavor these bright green tomatoes bring to any dish. Still green when ripe, the Zebra’s characteristic stripes make it a striking sight both in the market and on the table. Choose firm, succulent tomatoes with a bright green-yellow color. 36 | FOOD & FARM

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TED

ROO

00

E 20

SINC

we don't just say local

WE DO LOCAL Rooted in Arkansas. Blooming with community. Some restaurants are local because they are located here, in Arkansas. Our restaurants are local because we choose to serve locally grown foods as much as possible, partner with Arkansas farms in planning future growth and participate in the food community in a consistent and meaningful way.

Thank you to the Arkansas farmers, big and small, for investing in the future of our food community and local economy. Thank you to the growing number of restaurants and stores that choose to serve locally produced foods. And thank you, all of our guests, for choosing to dine with us. Let's get growing Arkansas!

FINE SALAD & WOOD-OVEN PIZZA CO.

ZazaPizzaAndSalad.com

BigOrangeBurger.com

LocalLimeTaco.com

For a list of the farmers we are currently working with visit ZazaPizzaAndSalad.com/about arkansasfoodandfarm.com

FOOD & FARM | 37


38 | FOOD & FARM

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Fall recipes CRANBERRY-PECAN COOKIES | 41 - Mylo Coffe Co. -

TOASTED PECANS | 42

- Arkansas Women in Agriculture -

CAVENDER’S BURGER | 43 -Cavender’s Greek Seasoning -

FARMER’S TABLE CAFE SWEET POTATO PANCAKES | 44 - Farmer’s Table Cafe -

RICELAND DUCK FRIED RICE | 45 - Georgia Pellegrini -

40 | FOOD & FARM

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Mylo Coffee Co. in Little Rock’s Hillcrest neighborhood plans to open a second brick-and-mortar location in 2015, but expansion has not changed their commitment to local sourcing. Baking requires very precise measurements, this is why many of the ingredients are listed in grams.

Cranberry-Pecan Cookies Mylo Coffee Co. was started in owner Stephanos Mylonas’ kitchen.

Ingredients

150 grams Arkansas pecans 225 grams unsalted butter, at room temperature 200 grams dark brown sugar 225 grams sugar 2 free-range eggs, at room temperature 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 225 grams all-purpose unbleached, organic War Eagle Mill flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 225 grams organic War Eagle Mill oats 100 grams raisins/cranberries

War Eagle Mill in Rogers is best known for its popular annual craft festival, but it’s the mill company’s commitment to using organic grains in its flour, cornmeal and other products that makes it so appealing to bakers like Stephanos Mylonas. The mill has been committed to providing high quality products since 1832, making them a true historic Arkansas treasure.

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 300°F. Place the pecans on a sheet pan and bake for 5 minutes, until crisp. Set aside to cool. Chop very coarsely. Beat the butter and sugars together on medium-high speed until light and fluffy. With the mixer on low, add the eggs, one at a time, mixing after each addition. Add the vanilla. Sift the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt together into a medium bowl. With the mixer on low, slowly add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture. Add the oats, cranberries and pecans and mix just until combined. Refrigerate the dough for 25 minutes. With a large ice cream scoop, portion the dough. Roll into a ball. Place on to a cooking tray and flatten slightly with a damp hand. Refrigerate until firm, about 25 minutes. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned. Transfer the cookies to a baking rack and cool completely. Yields 2 dozen. NANCY NOL AN

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Toasted Pecans Arkansas Women in Agriculture is a nonprofit made up of professionals from all aspects of farm life. This recipe is from their 10th Anniversary Cookbook.

Ingredients

4 cups pecan halves 1/4 cup melted butter 1 teaspoon Pink House Alchemy bitters 1 teaspoon seasoned salt

Instructions

Preheat over to 300째F. Spread pecans in a 9 x 13 pan. Combine remaining ingredients. Pour over pecans, stirring well to coat. Bake for 20 minutes. Stir pecans, and bake at 350째F for 15 minutes. Spread on paper towels and cool completely. For added flavor, toss pecans with red pepper for a spicy kick, or use 2 tablespoons of brown sugar for a sweeter touch.

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Cavender’s Burgers Cavender’s Greek Seasoning has long been the go-to staple of pantries all across the midSouth. The Harrison company’s secret family recipe is the perfect addition to almost anything—and is particularly nice with beef.

Ingredients

1 pound ground beef American cheese sweet onion bacon Cavender’s Greek Seasoning toothpicks or skewers

Instructions

Make two hamburger patties by hand 1/2-inch thick. Place one slice of American cheese and one slice of sweet onion (if desired) on one patty. Place second patty on top and knead edges until completely sealed. Wrap with a bacon strip and secure with toothpicks. Sprinkle Cavender’s Greek Seasoning generously on each side and grill approximately 10-15 minutes per side.

Building a Better Burger For a burger this good, bypass those skimpy processed buns and try unique artisanal breads from our talented Arkansas bakeries. Arkansas Fresh Bakery in Bryant and Boulevard Bread Company in Little Rock are fantastic choices, as is Little Rock’s Dempsey Bakery for gluten-free choices. Apple Blossom Brewing Company’s excellent bread can be found at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville, while Serenity Breadworks in Leslie is a north Arkansas treasure.

BR I A N CHIL SO N

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Farmer’s Table Cafe Sweet Potato Pancakes Breakfast is a big deal at the Farmer’s Table Cafe, and these pancakes are just one reason why.

Ingredients

6 free-range eggs 6 cups organic all-purpose War Eagle Mill flour 12 teaspoons aluminum-free baking powder 6 tablespoons brown sugar 6 teaspoons organic cinnamon pinch organic nutmeg 6 cups whole milk 12 teaspoons melted butter 6 teaspoons sea salt 41/2 cups cooked, pureed sweet potato (without skins)

Instructions

Combine all ingredients and cook on a hot griddle or in a cast iron skillet.

use golden sweet potatoes or Japanese whites

FA R M ERS TA BL E C A FE

Farmer’s Table Cafe sources their sweet potatoes from Summer Kitchen Family in Fayetteville and Sipes Busy Bee in Lincoln. Yields 10-12 pancakes

A Tasty Local Addition

Serve with Arkansas Made maple syrup from Our Green Acre Farm in Low Gap.

44 | FOOD & FARM

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Riceland Duck Fried Rice Stuttgart’s Riceland Foods is a coop of rice farmers from all over the mid-South. The company produces several different kinds of rice, each with a unique use in the kitchen. This unique recipe comes from chef and outdoor adventure expert Georgia Pellegrini.

Ingredients

4 tablespoons sesame oil 2 cups diced duck meat, soaked in 2 cups of orange juice for at least 4 hours 1 cup thinly sliced green onion (white and green portion) 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon grated ginger 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes 2 cups diced cabbage 2 cups sliced mushrooms 1 1/2 cups frozen peas Salt and pepper 2 eggs, lightly beaten 2 cups cooked long-grain brown rice 1/2 cup soy sauce

Instructions

Heat 2 tablespoons of sesame oil in a large heavy bottomed pot or wok over medium-high heat. Add the duck meat and cook through, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Add 2 tablespoons of sesame oil to the pot over medium-high heat. Add the green onion, garlic, ginger and red pepper flakes and stir fry for 1 minute until fragrant. Add the cabbage, mushrooms and peas, season with salt and pepper and sautĂŠ until soft, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

GEO RGI A PEL L EGR IN I

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Over low heat, pour the beaten egg into the pot and scramble with a wooden spoon or spatula. Fold in the rice and add in the vegetables and duck. Stir in soy sauce. Spoon the rice onto a serving platter and serve. Serves 4-6 continued on page 46 FOOD & FARM | 45


TYPES OF RICELAND RICE (www.riceland.com)

Extra long-grain rice will remain separate and fluffy when cooked, and is the perfect choice as an ingredient for main courses, side dishes or salads. Natural long-grain brown rice has a wonderfully nutty flavor and firm texture. The rice germ and bran layers are left on each kernel resulting in a natural, wholegrain product. Brown rice is higher in fiber and protein than regular milled rice. It offers great versatility and more variety to many everyday meals. Medium-grain rice has grains that are

shorter and wider than long-grain rice. The grains are ideal in desserts, pies, puddings and casseroles where a smooth texture and the ability to hold its shape are desired.

Parboiled long-grain rice is specially

milled and processed to produce superior cooking quality. This rice is a top choice for restaurants due to its fluffy texture, and works wonderfully in soups or as a side dish.

rice is a gluten-free healthy option 46 | FOOD & FARM

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Win ter recipes TOMATO, LEMON AND HONEY JAM | 49 - Kay Kelley Arnold -

PICKLED OKRA | 50 - Kay Kelley Arnold -

CHICKEN FEET BROTH | 51 - Misty Langdon -

48 | FOOD & FARM

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Tomato, Lemon and Honey Jam After retiring from Entergy, Kay Kelley Arnold began spending more time at Camp Idlewild, her cabin on the Little Red River where she is learning how to garden, fish and kayak and how to can fruits and vegetables.

Ingredients

3 pounds firm ripe tomatoes 1 cup honey 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons lemon zest large pinch sea salt 6 thin slices of lemon, rind on with seeds removed

Instructions

Scald, peel and drain the tomatoes to remove liquid. Dice and core tomatoes. In a large non-reactive pot, combine all ingredients except the lemon slices. Simmer over medium-low heat approximately 1½ hours, until mixture has become very thick. Stir often. Add lemon slices and any optional herbs and spices in the last 15 minutes. Process jam in pint jars for 10 minutes using the water bath method (page 54) Yields 6 pints.

Serving Suggestions

Goes well with biscuits or as part of a bacon lettuce sandwich.

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2 Pickled Okra Good in a Bloody Mary, as an accompaniment to salad or straight from the jar, there isn’t anything more Southern than pickled okra. -Kay Kelley Arnold

Ingredients

2 pounds young, small to medium okra pods 4 small dried chili peppers, split in half 2 teaspoons mustard seeds 12 sprigs fresh dill 4 cloves garlic, whole 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns 1/4 cup kosher salt 2 cups rice wine vinegar 2 cups water

Instructions

Wash the okra and trim the stem to 1/2-inch. Place 1 pepper, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 3 sprigs of dill, 1 clove of garlic and 1/4 teaspoon peppercorns in the bottom of each of 4 sterilized pint canning jars. Divide the okra evenly among the 4 jars, standing them up vertically, alternating stems up and down. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the salt, vinegar and water to a boil. Once boiling, pour this mixture over the okra in the jars, leaving space between the top of the liquid and the lid. Process according to the water bath method for 15 minutes (page 54). Let sit 2 weeks before use. Yields 6 pints.

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Broth has become the trendy new drink due to the vitamin and mineral content that comes from slowly boiling bones and marrow. Making broth is a great way to use parts of an animal that might be thrown away.

3 Chicken Feet Broth Misty Langdon’s Our Green Acre Farm in Low Gap is the only place in Arkansas that harvests and cooks maple syrup for retail sale. In addition to the sweet stuff, Langdon also raises cows, chickens and heritage breed pigs. This broth recipe utilizes pressure canning.

Ingredients

2 (or more) pounds chicken feet

Instructions

Before starting the broth, make sure the chicken feet are clean. If using store-bought feet, this requires only a quick inspection, as they are precleaned. Farm-harvested feet can be cleaned with a toothbrush. Either strip the skin from the feet, or leave the skin on and plan to strain the broth before canning. Place the feet in a large stock pot (the larger the better). Fill pot with cold water until the feet are covered by 2 inches. Heat the feet slowly on lowmedium. Cook for a minimum of 24 hours, checking the water level every hour and adding a small amount of water if needed. Stir occasionally. After 24 hours, strain the broth and use immediately or prepare your jars and pressure cooker according to pressure canning instructions and process for 25 minutes (page 54). Yields 6-8 quarts.

Finding Chicken Feet

Locate chicken feet at Hillcrest Artisan Meats in Little Rock or Butcher & Public in North Little Rock as well as your local Harps, Edwards Food Giant or City Market.

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A Wood Fired Artisan Pizza Restaurant Featuring locally sourced ingredients, local craft beers and cocktails, small plates and salads.

CREATING CONSCIOUS CUISINE • ON - SITE ORGANIC GARDENS • SUPPORTING LOCAL FARMS, RANCHES & BUSINESSES • ORGANIC AND LOCAL PRODUCE • LOCAL: ORGANIC BREADS, ORGANIC COFFEES, NATURALLY RAISED MEATS

Tues - Sun 11am-10pm

• CRAFT COCKTAILS, ORGANIC WINES, LOCAL BEERS, ALL NATURAL SODAS

• Private Party Space • Patio on the Bike Trail

• SEASONAL ROTATING MENU

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM-2PM TUES - THURS 11AM-9PM FRI - SAT 11AM-10PM 481 SOUTH SCHOOL AVE., FAYETTEVILLE (479) 444.8909 | GREENHOUSEGRILLE.COM

557 South School Ave, Fayetteville (479) 444-1947 | woodstonecraftpizza.com

WHO’S YOUR FARMER? Locally sourced, organic and homemade breakfast & lunch carry-out, catering, private dinners, community education & classes.

BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY Tues-sat 7am-4pm Sunday 8am-3pm WWW.THEFARMERSTABLECAFE.COM #WHERELOCALSMEETANDEAT 1079 S. SCHOOL AVE, FAYETTEVILLE 479.966.4125

52 | FOOD & FARM

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N A NC Y NOL A N

Do not fear canning. The benefits are many and despite its reputation as something difficult and time consuming, sealing delicious food in a jar for later consumption is so easy that you’ll be doing it in no time flat with the help of this simple guide.

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FOOD & FARM | 53


I

f you’ve never canned before, companies like Ball have you covered with pre-packaged “canning kits” that contain everything you’ll need to get canning, taking the guesswork out of what equipment to buy. These kits come with the basic canning supplies: • A stock pot for water • A rack to hold the jars • A special tool for pulling hot jars from the water There are also more complex kits that contain other tools like funnels for easier jar filling and spatulas for removing air from jars. These are nice but not necessary. Of course, you’ll also need jars. There is a large range of sizes, and most preparation recipes will specify what sort you need. So you have your tools and you have your jars: Let’s get started.

WATER BATH CANNING

Now that your initial inspection is complete, you’re ready to can. At its core, this is a simple process of heat and water that does not have to take a lot of time or effort. Just follow our easy steps. PART ONE: GET THE FOOD IN THE JAR • Place jars in a pot of hot (not boiling) water. The jars just need to be kept hot so that they will not break when hot food is put into them. Put some water inside the jars so that they will sink. Keep the jars hot until they are needed. • Place canning rack into the pot. Fill the canning pot halfway with water and bring it to a simmer, keeping pot covered. Don’t have a canning pot setup? Any large stockpot can be used, just be sure it can hold enough water for the size jars being used. Extra canning rings can be placed on the bottom of the pot for a makeshift rack. • Prepare your food for canning according to recipe—this is the fun part where you get to create exactly what goes in your jars! • Lift each jar from the hot water for filling. Empty the jar of any water and fill with the food, leaving some headspace —generally 1/4–1/2 inch.

• Run a rubber spatula around the interior of the jar to remove any air bubbles, then clean the rim of any food that might be there. Place the lid on the jar and allow the seal to make good contact with the rim. Screw the band on and get ready to seal everything up! PART TWO: SEAL IT UP FOR LATER • Load your canner rack with your filled jars, lower the rack into the water, which should cover the jars by 1-2 inches. Put your lid on the pot. • Increase the heat on the water until it comes to a full boil, and let the jars process for the time specified by the recipe being canned. • When your jars have been in the water according to the time specified by the recipe, turn the heat off, remove the canner lid off and let things calm down for 5-10 minutes. • Check the seals to make sure everything is sealed up. You have done it!

PRESSURE CANNING GETTING STARTED:

1. Make a thorough inspection of each jar and lid. Any jars that have nicks or other damage should be discarded because they can break or not seal. 2. Check lids. They should be clean, free of bending and not scratched or damaged. 3. Test your bands by screwing the bands onto the jars to make sure they fit. 4. Wash the jars thoroughly in hot, soapy water and rinse well. These jars are intended to sit around for some time, so they need to be as clean as possible. This initial inspection and cleaning is essential. 5. Use this initial inspection for both water bath canning and pressure canning. 54 | FOOD & FARM

Pressure canning is a more advanced process requiring a special pressure cooker, and is used for low acid foods like meat. Once the water bath method of canning has been mastered, buy yourself a pressure cooker and get to work! The preparation of jars for pressure canning is exactly like part one of part one of water bath canning. The difference comes in when actually processing the jars of prepared food. • Because of the difference in pressure cookers from different manufacturers, a careful reading of the instructions specific to the cooker being used is vital. There is no reason to fear the pressure cooker, but there is every reason to respect it. • The goal of using a pressure cooker is to expand 2-3 inches of boiling water into steam. Since steam takes up more volume than liquid water, it provides more pressure in the locked environment of the pressure cooker. There will be a recommended amount of steam pressure from the manufacturer, and each cooker comes with a vent pipe that allows for pressure regulation.

• Once the prepared food has been processed according to the recipe and cooker’s instructions, remove the pressure cooker from the heat. This will allow the remaining steam to condense back into liquid water, lowering the pressure. When the pressure gauge reaches zero, carefully unlock and remove the lid. Let the open pot sit for 10-15 minutes so that the jars start to cool. • Seal jars by placing lids on the jars and screwing on bands. Allow to sit undisturbed for 24 hours. Check seals and reprocess, refrigerate or use any product that has not sealed correctly. Store in a cool, dark place. arkansasfoodandfarm.com


FOR MORE CANNING TIPS VISIT THESE WEBSITES: ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE uaex.edu, search for “canning” BALL freshpreserving.com PICK YOUR OWN pickyourown.org P. ALLEN SMITH GARDEN HOME pallensmith.com, search “canning 101”

FIND ARKANSAS CANNED GOODS AT THESE LOCAL SHOPS: EGGSHELLS KITCHEN CO., LITTLE ROCK FARMER’S TABLE CAFÉ, FAYETTEVILLE HILLCREST ARTISAN MEATS, LITTLE ROCK OZARK NATURAL FOODS, FAYETTEVILLE THE SAVORY PANTRY, HOT SPRINGS THE FRESH MARKET, LITTLE ROCK SURFAS CULINARY DISTRICT, HOT SPRINGS WHOLE FOODS, LITTLE ROCK

FOR MORE CANNING RECIPES AND PLACES WHERE YOU CAN FIND CANNED GOODS FOLLOW OUR BLOG

arkansasfoodandfarm.com arkansasfoodandfarm.com

FOOD & FARM | 55


D fo og r q ea ui r t ck hi re s p fe ag re e nc e!

FIND YOUR SOURCES

For our Food Issue, we have limited our normal listings to grocers, CSAs and farmers markets. Don’t see your favorite CSA listed? For our full listings, check arkansasfoodandfarm.com, and if you’d like to see your farm listed in upcoming issues, submit the details at ArkansasGrown.org. It’s free and easy.

FARMERS MARKETS, CSAs, GROCERS Page 57

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CENTRAL ARKANSAS

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS

Page 69 ARKANSAS GROCERS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gravette • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • • Salem Greenway • Avoca Mountain Home Berryville • • Decatur Knobel • • Rogers • Hardy • Centerton Rector • Cherokee Village • • •• Pocahontas • • YellvilleCotter • • Gassville Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • Lafe • • Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale Evening Shade • Huntsville Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • • Harrison • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge • Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbourne • • Sage Farmington • • • Blytheville • Greenland Mount Pleasant • • Elkins • •Cave City•Smithville • Brookland • Parthenon Prairie • Fork Leslie Grove • West • • Mountain View • Deer • Jonesboro Swifton• • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley Cedarville Northeast Arkansas Newport • • • Clinton Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry Clarksville • Tyronza Alma • • • Lamar • Bee Branch • Ozark Cherry Valley Jerusalem • Bradford Cleveland • • • • Altus Bald Knob • • Fort Smith Dover • Center Ridge Judsonia • • Augusta London • • • Lavaca • Hattieville • Guy • Romance Charleston• • • McCrory Marion • Paris Russellville • • • Searcy • Springfield • Wynne • • Morrilton Dardanelle • Atkins Booneville • • • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • Conway • Vilonia • • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Ward Cabot • • • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Rover • • •Bigelow Des•Arc • • Mayflower Jacksonville • Roland • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • •North Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • Little Rock • • Scott Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Mena Benton • • • Woodson • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena Royal • Stuttgart • Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt Sheridan Grannis • Hall • Donaldson • • White • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady • De Queen Rison • • Nashville • Dumas Prescott • • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Warren • • Camden • Hampton • Dermott • Texarkana Louann • Lake Village • • Fouke Magnolia • • Hamburg Crossett El Dorado Eudora • • • • Bradley Junction City • Gentry

Lowell Cave Springs

Solgohachia

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Batesvi • Witt Spring • Dennard •Desha • • Shirley Cedarville Clinton • CENTRAL ARK ANSAS • Rudy • • Heber Springs Mulberry Clarksville Alma • • • Bee Branch Ozark • • Altus • Lamar Jerusalem • • Cleveland Bald Knob • Center Ridge • • Fort Smith Dover • Lavaca • • Judsonia London • • • Hattieville • Guy • Romance Searcy Charleston• • Paris Russellville • • • • • Springfield • Dardanelle Atkins • • Booneville • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae • El Paso Beebe Huntington • • • • Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston • • Ward Des•A Rover • • •Bigelow • MayflowerCabot Jacksonville • • • Waldron DeVall’s • Roland Sherwood Lonoke Bluf • • Central Arkansas Parks Little Rock • • North Scott Little Rock • CENTR AL AR K ANSAS • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Farmers Markets and•CSAs Mena Benton • Bauxite • Woodson • Mount Ida Hot Springs • • Hensley • Royal • • Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer Sheridan • Grannis • Donaldson White Hall • • Pine Bluff Half-acre intensive school farm A Sunday market that only includes • that Dierks • Arkadelphia • raises vegetables and eggs for market in Arkansas growers and producers. Grady De Queen • North Little Rock. Sells produce and eggs • through a mobile farmers market, weekly Hillcrest Farmers Market • Rison Nashville mers Markets r farm stand and at local farmers markets. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd., Little Rock • a F Pettigrew

Northwest Arkansas

Solgohachia

Also functions as an educational tool for the school district and is open to the public for tours, work days and to host events for the community. Monticello

501-661-1129

• produce, Rock-area locally grown • Foreman Little also jams, jellies, cut flowers, • Hopepastries, • Ashdown food trucks Southwest Arkansas Prescott

Verified Arkansas farmers and artisans selling products grown or made only in Arkansas. Arkansas Local Food Network 509 Scott St., Little Rock 501-291-2769. littlerock.locallygrown.net Year-round online farmer’s market. Products include grass-fed meats, organic and naturally-grown fruits and vegetables, gourmet cheeses, artisan breads, mushrooms, honey, nuts, garden supplies, jams, jellies, pickled products, and locallyproduced bath & beauty products. Arkansas Sustainability Network 509 Scott St., Little Rock, 501-291-2769 littlerock.locallygrown.net. An on-line farmer market operated by the Arkansas Sustainability Network. Bernice Garden Farmer’s Market 1401 S. Main St., Little Rock 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. May-October 501-617-2511. thebernicegarden.org

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

Perryville City Park, Perryville Hot Springs Farmers and Artisans Texarkana 501-889-5124 Market Louann Lak Fouke St., Hot Springs 121 Orange Local produce from within 25 miles of Magnolia Hambur market. WIC-approved market. Locally grown vegetables, fruits, berries, meat, eggs, breads, jams, jellies, and Crossett El Dorado River Market Farmers Market many others. Bradley 400 President Clinton Junction CityAve., Little Rock 501-375-2552. rivermarket.info Jacksonville Farmers Market 9 Municipal Drive, Jacksonville Open-air farmers market beneath the 501-982-4171 River Market Pavilions in Little Rock. Wide selection of produce, prepared food, Farmers market hosted by the city of and crafts from around the state. Jacksonville.

Argenta Farmers Market 6th and Main St., North Little Rock 501-831-7881 argentaartsdistrict.org/argenta-farmersmarket/

Warren Camden Hampton Perry County Farmers Market

The Locals 1024 Van Ronkle, Conway 479-259-1727. thelocals.be A coffee shop, community hub, and market space for local products and ideas. Hosts live music shows, meetings, workshops, and other special events. Market at Green Tree 9305 Rodney Parham Rd., Little Rock 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 501-225-6303 visitgreentree.com. Showcases fresh, locally grown produce and grocery items during the Arkansas growing season. North Little Rock Community Garden 2400 Lakeview Road, North Little Rock 67/167. 925-303-6344 facebook.com/NLRCommunityFarm.

• •

Sherwood Farmers Market 2303 East Lee, Sherwood 5p.m.-8p.m. Thurs. 501-835-6893 keepsherwoodbeautiful.net Arkansas-grown products from all around Central Arkansas. Shuffield Family Farm 10124 Garrison Road, Little Rock 501-285-5017 Offering organic salad greens, herbs, sprouts, tomatoes, squash, melons, beans, peas, wheat grass, cabbage, and peppers. Westover Hills Farmers Market 6400 Kavanaugh Blvd., Little Rock 4p.m.-7p.m. Tue. 501-420-4132 westoverhills.org Selection of Central Arkansas vendors of fruits, vegetables, and prepared products. FOOD & FARM | 57


CENTRAL ARK ANSAS

Bread & Food In The Natural State Arkansas Fresh Bakery is a wholesale bakery that caters to the central Arkansas area. Our products are made fresh and delivered daily. We have the ability and willingness to create a specialized product for your institution. Our day begins around 6pm. Products are prepared, baked, packaged, and ready for delivery by 8am.

CSAs

501-847-6638 · 1506 N Prickett Road · Bryant arkansasfreshbakery.com

Foodshed Farms 6800 Camp Robinson Rd., North Little Rock. 501-907-2603 Offers 30 varieties of seasonal produce through a CSA.

Now open by popular demand! 501-213-0084 · 304 N. Reynolds Road, Suite 5 • Bryant arkansasfreshbakery.com

North Pulaski Farms 13018 Ellen Cove, Cabot, 501-240-4233 Certified organic vegetable farm located in the northernmost part of Pulaski County. Rattle’s Garden 1780 Hwy 64 East, Vilonia, AR 72173 501-941-0331 www.rattlesgarden.com Offers a “farmshare” CSA program along with an “eggshare” supplement for fresh, free-range eggs. Scott Heritage Farm 15301 Alexander Road, Scott, AR 501-831-7881 scottheritagefarm.org A 30-acre Community Supported Agriculture family farm, participant in Arkansas Grown Farm To Table program. St. Joseph Farm 6800 Camp Robinson Road, North Little Rock stjosephfarm.com A diversified sustainable agriculture enterprise in coordination with Heifer International that provides education, community outreach and hunger relief. Runs a community supported agriculture cooperative with farmers in the Arkansas Delta, maintains a food forest, community garden, and hosts Farm to Table dinners. On-site farm stand open during the week.

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BRINGING THE FINEST OF ARKANSAS TO YOUR TABLE

CACHE PROUDLY SUPPORTS LOCAL ARTISANS AND FARMERS 425 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock | 501-850-0265 | cachelittlerock.com

FROM THE FARM TO YOUR TABLE

SAVOY PROUDLY SUPPORTS LOCAL ARTISANS AND FARMERS 1620 Market Street, Little Rock | 501-221-1620 | 1620savoy.com arkansasfoodandfarm.com

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Gravette • Gepp • • Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • Berryville Avoca Mountain H • • Decatur • • • Centerton• • Rogers Ch Yellville Gassville • • • Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • • Cotter Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale • Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • Huntsville • Har Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbour Farmington • • • • Mount Pl • Greenland Parthenon Elkins • • • Prairie West Fork Grove • • Leslie •M • Deer • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Witt Spring • Dennard Northwest Arkansas • Shirley Cedarville Clinton • • Rudy • • Alma • • MulberryOzark • Clarksville Bee Branch • • Altus Lamar Jerusalem Cleveland • • • Center Ridge • • Fort Smith Dover • Lavaca London • • • Hattieville • Guy • Charleston• • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • R • Booneville Dardanelle • Atkins • MorriltonConway Vilon •E Huntington • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston Perryville • • MayflowerCabot • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Ja • Waldron • Sherwo Central Arkansas • Parks • •North ScLit Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• GoDowntownFS.com/farmersmarket.aspx Locally grown seasonal produce, flowers, • Mena • Benton Mount Ida • Woods Bauxite Hot Springs Farmers market with verified growers and • Hensle eggs, and baked goods. From April 27-Oct. 31. • • • artisans. Fresh produce, crafts and pre• Royal Malvern pared foods available, along with regular Central Ozarks Farmers Poyen Bismarck • Prattsville •• live music.• and Artisans Market Sheridan Grannis • Harrison Court Park Square, • Donaldson • • Eureka Springs Farmers Market 7 a.m.-noon Tue., Sat. June-October • • Dierks Arkadelphia • 2075 E. Van Buren St., Eureka Springs De Queen • 7 a.m.-noon, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Tue.-Thu. (AprilFarmers market offering produce, crafts • Rison November, 9 a.m.-noon Thu. and flowers. Nashville • (November-April). 507-413-2573 Lowell Cave Springs

Gentry

NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS Farmers Markets and CSAs

mers Markets Far

Alma Farmers Market 533 Fayetteville Ave., Alma 479-632-4127 Alma-area produce and prepared foods.

Solgohachia

Clinton Farmers Market Foreman U.S. Hwy. 65 S., Clinton April-October. 870-504-1034Ashdown

facebook.com/ESFarmersMarket Prescott

Hope

A bi-monthly market on the first and third Texarkana Sat. of each month.

Produce, eggs, beef, pork, honey, flowers, Warren Southwest Arkansas fruit trees, planting vegetables, Camdenornamental Hampton plants and baked goods. Free coffee.

• Fouke

Louann Market Fayetteville Farmers 101 W. Mountain St., Fayetteville Magnolia 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tue., Thu.; El Dorado 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. 479-236-2910 Bradley fayettevillefarmersmarket.org.

Bentonville Farmers Market Central Avenue and Main Street, Bentonville 7 a.m-1 p.m. Sat. 479-254-0254 downtownbentonville.org/events/farmersmarket/

Conway County Farmers Market 117 S. Moose St., Morrilton 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 501-354-2393

A producer-only market that sells local foods, produce, meats, along with arts and crafts. With special programming such as chef demonstrations and live music, too. A new market will open at the Bentonville Community Center on May 6.

The Dirty Farmers Community Market 364 Main St., Clinton 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 501-253-4716

Arkansas’s largest farmers market, featuring certified local produce, meats, and prepared foods. Operates a winter market until March 28 at the Jefferson Center (612 South College Ave.) on Saturdays from 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Farmers market features locally-grown produce and the Greater Good Cafe, where you “eat what you need and pay what you can.”

Jefferson Center 612 South College Sunday Markets 9a.m.-1p.m. May 16 to Sept 13.

Downtown Fort Smith Farmers Market 201 Garrison Ave., Fort Smith 7 a.m.-noon Sat. 479-784-1001

Franklin County Farmers Market 300 W. Commercial St., Ozark. 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Sat. 479-667-2525 ozarkareacoc.org

Berryville Farmers Market 601 Dr Spurlin Circle, Berryville 7:30 a.m.-noon Sat. 870-654-5589 facebook. com/pages/Berryville-Farmers-market/406568499439280

60 | FOOD & FARM

Locally grown, in-season fruits and vegetables.

• • Junction City

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


Local produce and crafts from area growers. Gentry Farmers Market 500 E. Main St., Gentry 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thu.-Sat. 479-871-1052 facebook.com/TheChickenCoop.GentryAR/info Located under the pavilion at the Chicken Coop (the old Farmers’ Co-op). Offers fresh food, quality arts and good music. Will accept EBT/debit cards. Gravette Farmers’ Market 110 Park Drive, Gravette 479-787-5368 cityofgravette-ar.gov/gravettefarmersmarket.html

Sea Minerals FA Fertilizer & Animal Minerals

20%

The CLEAN ONE – Will NOT clog sprayers • 85-90 Minerals and Trace Minerals • $8/acre/application – 3 times/year • $2 per head per month

UNTIL MARCH 31

OFF

See us featured on American Farmer. Just go to our website.

Market features fresh and locally grown produce, live folk music on market days. WIC and Senior Nutrition vouchers accepted. Green Forest Farmers Market Green Forest Public Square, Green Forest 7 a.m.-noon Wed. March-October 870-480-6071 Local farmers market trying to make fresh produce available to the public within the most economical means possible. Green Fork Farmers Market 205 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Wed. 479-225-5075 greenforkfarmersmarket.locallygrown.net Year-round farmers market sells vegetables, herbs, fruit, honey, eggs, mushrooms, chicken, duck, lamb, pork, beef, salsa, lacto-fermented kraut, baked goods, plants, herbal soaps, bath and beauty products. Indoor market, open rain or shine. Pre-order system available online to reserve products for pickup at the market. Harrison Farmers Market 200 West Stephenson, Harrison www.harrisonarkansas.org/events

Find out about outdoor business options at this unique workshop, which will cover such topics as hunting leases, agritourism, fee fishing, maximizing natural resources to attract wildlife and much more.

For more information, go to RockefellerInstitute.org/Land or contact Abby Phillips at 501-727-6257 or aphillips@uawri.org.

Farmers market held each Tuesday and Saturday from 6a.m.-12p.m. Holiday Island Farmers Market 2 Holiday Island Drive, Holiday Island 8 a.m.-noon Fri. Heirloom vegetables, herbs, eggs, crafts. Johnson County Farmers Market 400 Cabin Creek Road, Lamar Noon-4:30 p.m. Tue., Thu., Sat 479-885-6575

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS r

ee

B as ns 15

Ar

ka

20

2015 Year of Arkansas Beer

during 2 Friday Art Nights at Historic Arkansas Museum 5–8 pm • Free nd

New market offering produce from Lamararea growers.

Tomatoes, potatoes, melons, peppers, fruits, berries and other produce.

Newton County Farmers Market 504 W. Court St., Jasper 7 a.m.-noon Wed., 4-6 p.m. Fri. May-November. 870-446-2240

Siloam Springs Farmers Market Corner of University and Mt. Olive, Siloam Springs 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Tue. and Sat. Apr. 20-Oct. 26. 479-524-4556 siloamsprings.locallygrown.net

presented by the Arkansas Brewers Guild

Produce and crafts from Newton County. WIC participant.

Sponsored by the Historic Arkansas Museum Foundation

Ozark Mountain Market Corner of Oak and Main streets, Leslie Second and fourth Sat. April-October. 870504-1034

JAnuARy 9 Diamond Bear FEbRuARy 13 Stone’s Throw Brewing MARcH 13 Ozark Beer Co.

A bimonthly produce and crafts market. Paris Farmers Market 25 West Walnut, Paris 707-502-5544 facebook.com/parisarkansasfarmersmkt Farmers Market on the courthouse square in Paris, Arkansas. Vendors are all required to be strictly Arkansas growers, producers, craftsmen, and artisans.

ApRiL 10 Lost Forty Brewing MAy 8 Apple Blossom Brewing Company JunE 12 Core Brewing and Distilling Co. JuLy 10: TbA AuguST 14 Moody Brews SEpTEMbER 11 Flyway Brewing OcTObER 9 Fossil Cove nOvEMbER 13 Gravity BrewWorks

@HistoricArk 62 | FOOD & FARM

Fresh fruits and vegetables, herbs, honey, nuts, farm fresh eggs, frozen meat, flowers, plants, jams, jellies, baked goods, homemade soaps, wood furniture and crafts available. Accepts SNAP/EBT and WIC. Tri Peaks Community Market West C Street, Russellville 8 a.m. to noon Sat. 479-264-3682 facebook.com/tripeakscommunitymarket

Arkansas produce sold directly by the grower.

Downtown market featuring local farmers, crafters, artists, musicians and food vendors.

Roberson Orchards Farm Market Hwy. 14 E., Omaha 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily August-February. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily June-September. 877-504-9050 facebook.com/robersonorchards

West Fork Farmers Market Corner of Hwy. 170 and Campbell Loop, West Fork 7:30 a.m.-noon Sat., 3 p.m.-dusk Wed. 479225-1611

Peaches, vegetables in summer, apples in fall. Store carries a selection of dried fruits, nuts, honey, sorghum, jams, jellies, relishes, and candies.

Market offers USDA meats, organic vegetables and artworks. The growers are expanding to year-round production and working to implement a “Farm to School” program with the West Fork Schools.

Rogers Farmers Market Corner of Arkansas and Elm Rogers 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Wed.,Sat. April 27-November. 479-246-8383 rogersfarmersmarket.org

Winslow Farmers Market Features the on-site Winslow Garden that benefits Winslow Community Meals Inc. Garden is run by volunteers and the local 4-H Club.

Farm fresh produce and local crafts.

Winslow Boulevard, Winslow, AR. Winslow. 9 a.m.-noon Sat. beginning in April. winslowar.com/index_files/Page993.htm.

Online market sells products farmed within 150 miles of Russellville year-round.

200 E. Third St. Downtown Little Rock 501-324-9351 HistoricArkansas.org

Springdale Farmers Market Corner of Hwy. 265 and East Emma, Springdale 7 a.m.-1 p.m. May-October 479-466-1285. springdalefarmersmarket.org

Pope County Farmers Market 2200 W. Main St., Russellville 479-747-5429

Russellville Community Market 501 S. Phoenix Ave., Russellville (913)636-8193 russellville.locallygrown.net

DEcEMbER 11 11th Ever Nog‑off

Producer-only market offering fresh produce, garden and landscaping plants, fresh-cut flowers, seasonal vegetables, local raw honey, baked goods and crafts.

Scott County Farmers Market 100 W. First St. (Scott County Courthouse), Waldron First Sat. of every month. 479-207-1040

Wren Thicket Market 1041 S. School Ave., Fayetteville 9 a.m.-noon Sat. wrenthicketmarket.com Year-round, online pre-order farmers market with pick-up at Firefighters Association Building; also some produce available to those who didn’t order. SNAP/EBT, SFMNP coupons accepted. Yellville Farmers Market 105 N. Berry St., Yellville arkansasfoodandfarm.com


We Buy Eggs and Produce From Caioty Farms in Sherwood

5:30-8:30 p.m. Sat. 2nd week in April-2nd week in September. 501-650-2356 facebook.com/YellvilleFarmersMarket Growers-only open air market in conjunction with “Music on the Square.” Offers locally grown vegetables, fruits, eggs, bedding and garden plants, baked goods, jams and jellies, worm castings and Ozark crafts.

CSAs

Caiotyfarms@yahoo.com

A Taste of Brazilian Cuisine

501.614.6682

te! house favori

GLUTEN FREE & VEGAN OPTIONS AVAILABLE HERE!

Cobblestone Project P.O. Box 1242, Fayetteville Farm project established to help impoverished and food insecure people. Northwest Arkansas Local Harvest P.O. Box 2968, Fayetteville 479-251-1882

It’s a Rosalia’s kind of day!

2701 KAVANAUGH BLVD • HILLCREST

501.319.7035

Community supported agriculture operator in Northwest Arkansas. Offers four 8-week seasons. Summer Kitchen Farm 3702 Wilson Hollow Road, Fayetteville 479-263-9965 Partners with CSA and local markets to provide raw milk, eggs, pork, chicken and vegetables. Can buy directly from farm. Wildfire Farm 4059 CR 516, Huntsville 870-545-3120. locallygrown.net Online farmers market serving Carroll County as well as shares in a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program.

Add your business or organization soon to be included in the next issue. Go to

arkansasgrown.org to register!

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

FOOD & FARM | 63


NORTHEAST ARK ANSAS

Holiday Island • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha Salem • Berryville • Greenway • voca Mountain Home Knobel • • • Rector • Cherokee Village • • Hardy Yellville Pocahontas Gassville • • • Harrison • Green Forest • • Cotter • Lafe Everton • Bruno Evening Shade • • Huntsville Western Grove • Harrison • • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge Melbourne • • Kingston • Jasper Sage Harriet •Smithville • Blythev Mount Pleasant•• Cave City Parthenon • Brookland • • Mountain View Deer Jonesboro • Leslie • • • Swifton• • • Fallsville igrew • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley • Newport Northeast Arkansas • Clinton Heber Springs • Clarksville • Tyronza Bee Branch Ozark • • Bradford • Lamar Jerusalem • • Cleveland • Cherry Valley Altus Bald Knob • Center Ridge Dover • Judsonia • • Augusta London • • • Hattieville • Guy • Romance • • McCrory Marion • Paris Searcy Springfield Russellville • • • Wynne • • • • Dardanelle • Atkins ville • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston MayflowerCabot • • Ward • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Perryville • • Rover • • Des•Arc • • Bigelow Roland • Jacksonville DeVall’s Fargo • Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • • Central Arkansas North Little Rock • Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Woodson • Benton • Mount Ida Bauxite • Hensley Hot Springs • • • • Helena Stuttgart Royal • • rkets Malvern mers MaAltheimer • Poyen Far Bismarck • • • Prattsville • Sheridan • De Witt • Donaldson White Hall • • Pine Bluff Downtown Newport • Arkadelphia Farmers Market • • Grady Newport Lake, Newport Wed., Sat. June-October. 870-664-0542 • Rison hville Farmers market selling local produce • Dumas and crafts from the Newport area. ASU Regional Farmers Market Prescott N.E. corner of Stadium Avenue and Ag• Gassville Farmers Market McGehee gie Road, Jonesboro ope Monticello Located to the Gassville Branch 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Sat. 870-892-2087 • Warren • • Library onnextHwy. Southwest Arkansas 62 West. asuregionalfarmersmarket.org • Camden • Hampton 204 S. School St., Gassville • Dermott 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. 870-435-6439 Offers local produce from Jonesboroarea growers. Louann • Lake Village • New market opened in 2014, offering produce from the Gassville area. LookCross County Farmers Market Hamburg • Magnolia ing for vendors; call for information. 705 E. Union Ave., Wynne • Crossett 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat. El Dorado Eudora • • 870-238-5745 • Mountain Home Farmers Market • Bradley 3296 Hwy. 201 South, Mountain Home City • JunctionFresh 6 a.m.-noon Wed. and Sat. fruit, vegetables and handmade Solgohachia

crafts.

May-September. 870-492-2303

Fresh local produce from area producers. 64 | FOOD & FARM

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


ville

•

NORTHEAST ARK ANSAS Farmers Markets

Ozark Mountain Market Corner of Oak and Main, Leslie 870-504-1034 Farmers and craft market held second and fourth Saturdays April-Oct. Ozark Locally Grown U.S. Hwy. 62 West, Mountain Home 870-421-2203 ozark.locallygrown.net/welcome Online farmers market covering northern Arkansas and southern Missouri. Spring River Farmers Market Cherokee Village Town Center, Cherokee Village 8 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Sat. 870-847-7286 facebook.com/pages/Spring-RiverFarmers-Market/445747875499383 Selling fresh produce and locally made crafts. arkansasfoodandfarm.com

Search the list online at

arkansasfoodandfarm.com! Add your business or organization soon to be included in the next issue. Go to

arkansasgrown.org to register!

greekseasoning.com FOOD & FARM | 65


• Booneville

SOUTHWEST SOUTHWEST ARK ARKANSAS ANSAS

SOUTHWEST ARK ANSAS Farmers Markets

Atkins

• Prescott • Foreman • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas • Texarkana • Fouke

Warren

• Camden • Hampton

Louann

• Magnolia •

mers Markets Far

• MorriltonConway Vilonia • El P • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston MayflowerCabot • Perryville • • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Jack • Waldron • Sherwoo Central Arkansas Litt • Parks • •North Scot Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Benton • Mena • Bauxite • Woodson • Mount Ida Hot Springs • • Hensley • Royal • Malvern Poyen Bismarck • • Prattsville •• Sheridan Grannis • • Donaldson • • WP • Dierks • Arkadelphia • De Queen • • Rison • Nashville Dardanelle

Huntington

Bradley

• El Dorado • Junction City

Howard County Farmers Market 110 S. Washington St., Nashville 870-557-2352

Sunshine Store 3719 Sunshine Road, Royal 501-767-4614

Produce grown within 50 miles of Nashville for sale by growers.

Offering local vegetables, homemade salsa and other products on Saturdays.

Nashville Farmers’ Market 110 S. Washington St., Nashville, AR. Nashville. 870-557-2352. Clark County Farmers Market U.S. Hwy. 67/10th St., Arkadelphia 7 a.m.-noon Tue., Sat. 870-246-1050 facebook.com/clarkcountyfarmersmarket Produce-only market featuring Clark County growers. Gateway Farmers Market 3019 E. 9th St., Texarkana 870-774-91713 Locally grown produce (within 75 Miles) sold by the grower. Hope Farmers Market Third and Elm streets, Hope 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Tue., Sat. May-September 870-703-8788 Home to some of the world’s largest watermelons. Features farm-fresh produce straight from the back of the trucks. 66 | FOOD & FARM

A local-growers-only market in an openair pavilion built by local volunteers with certified kitchen, small demonstration organic garden, gardening workshops and cooking demonstrations throughout most of season. Polk County Farmers Market 524 Sherwood, Mena 7 a.m. until sold out (about 10 a.m.) Tue., Thu., Sat. May-October. 479-394-6018 Local crops, fruits, honey, homemade breads, goat milk cheeses, local crafts, jams and relishes. Richland Creek Farm 1101 N.W. Ave., El Dorado 7:15 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue., Fri. 870-875-1078 facebook.com/farmfreshfoods. Sustainable-practice farm sells wide variety of vegetables, fruits and flowers to El Dorado and surrounding community.

Search the list online at

arkansasfoodandfarm.com! Add your business or organization soon to be included in the next issue. Go to

arkansasgrown.org to register!

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


arkansasfoodandfarm.com

FOOD & FARM | 67


• Bradford • Lamar Jerusalem • • Cleveland • Cherry Valley Bald Knob • Center Ridge Dover • Augusta • • Judsonia Guy Hattieville • • • • • • McCrory Marion • • Romance • Searcy Russellville • • • Springfield • Wynne SOUTHEAST ARK ANSAS • McRae El Paso • Booneville Dardanelle • Atkins • MorriltonConway Vilonia • • • Colt Proctor • • • • Beebe • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Ward Forrest City Cotton Plant Cabot • • • • • • Rover • • Bigelow • • Mayflower Jacksonville Des Arc • Palestine • • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Roland Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • •North Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Mena Benton • • • Woodson • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena • Stuttgart • Royal Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt Sheridan Grannis • Hall • Donaldson • • White • Pine Bluff • Dierks Arkadelphia • De Queen • Grady • SOUTHEAST Rison • • Nashville AR K ANSAS • Dumas Prescott • Farmers Markets • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Warren • • Camden • Hampton • Dermott • Texarkana Louann • Lake Village • • Fouke Hamburg • Magnolia • • Crossett Eudora • • El Dorado Bradley • • Junction City • Fort Smith • Lavaca Charleston•

• Ozark • Altus • Paris

London

Solgohachia

mers Markets r a F

Sells squash, melons, peppers, peas, beans, blackberries, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, pecans and wheat. Also raises goats. Tomatoes, peaches, squash, okra, cucumbers, cantaloupe, watermelon. Mel’s Farmers Market W. Main St., Lake Village 870-265-5325

BRINGING BRINGING ARKANSAS FARMS BRINGING BRINGING ARKANSAS FARMS TO BRINGING YOUR TABLE ARKANSAS FARMS ARKANSAS FARMS TO YOUR TABLE TOSINCE YOUR2011 TABLE ARKANSAS FARMS TO YOUR TABLE SINCE 2011 TOSINCE YOUR2011 TABLE SINCE 2011 SINCE 2011

Ashley County Farmers Market U.S. Hwy. 82, Crossett Area produce from Ashley County growers. Informal market; no set times. Hardin Farms 1 Disaster Ridge Road, Grady 870-866-3753

Farmers market offering fresh produce, nuts and eggs. Pine Bluff Farmers Market Saracen Landing, Martha Mitchell Expressway, Pine Bluff 6 a.m-1 p.m. Tue., Thu., Sat. Produce and crafts from Jefferson County. WIC participant.

LOCAL NATURAL MEATS LOCAL NATURAL MEATS LOCAL NATURAL MEATS CHARCUTERIE LOCALCHARCUTERIE NATURAL MEATS LOCALCHARCUTERIE NATURAL MEATS SOUPS SOUPS&& SANDWICHES SANDWICHES CHARCUTERIE SOUPS & SANDWICHES CHARCUTERIE 2807KAVANAUGH KAVANAUGH 2807 BLVD. •• 501.671.6328 501.671.6328 SOUPS & SANDWICHES MON-FRI&10-6 10-6 • SAT MON-FRI SAT10-5 10-5 SOUPS SANDWICHES 2807 KAVANAUGH BLVD. • 501.671.6328 MON-FRI 10-6 • SAT 10-5 2807 KAVANAUGH BLVD. • 501.671.6328 KAVANAUGH BLVD. • 501.671.6328 68 | 2807 FOOD & FARM MON-FRI 10-6 • SAT 10-5 MON-FRI 10-6 • SAT 10-5

BE T H H A LL

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


ARK ANSAS GROCERS

GROCERS

Flowers & Berries

LLC

Flowers & Berries

LLC

U-PICK Blueberries & Thornless Blackberries

U-PICK

Call 501-330-1906 for Blueberries Fruit Availability &

Thornless Blackberries An indicates Arkansas Grown members. Don’t see your favorite grocer who sells local foods? Have them contact Rebekah Hardin at rebekahhardin@arktimes. com and encourage them to register at ArkansasGrown.org. It’s free and easy.

Allen’s Food Market 60 Sugar Creek Center, Bella Vista. 479876-6190, facebook.com/allensfoods Grocery store that specializes in organic, locally and regionally produced items. Producers, contact Steve Morrow at steve@allensfoods.arcoxmail.com or number below. BJ’s Plants and Produce 113 Country Club, Sherwood. 501-8353004. bjsplantsandproduce.com Sells plants and wide variety of produce. Producers, contact Dede Chapman or Theresa Kyzer, at 501-835-3004 or Dede. Chapman@gmail.com Brookshire’s Food & Pharmacy Full-service grocery in variety of locations in southern Arkansas. brookshires.com City Market Grocery store with locations on 12th Street and Colonel Glenn in Little Rock and in Rose City in North Little Rock. Citymarketfoodstore.com Culinary District 510 Ouachita Ave., Hot Springs. 501-6242665. culinarydistrict.com

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

Offers kitchen supplies, gourmet ingredients and a large selection of local meats and prepared products. Edward’s Food Giant Grocery store with locations in Little Rock, Bryant, Forrest City, Harrisburg and Marianna. Producers, contact Jeff Nosbisch 501-850-6338 for produce or Bob Childers at 870-295-1000 for meat. edwardsfoodgiant.com

Open Mon-Sat 7AM-Noon 20309 AR 113, Roland, AR wyemountain.net

Fresh Market Specialty grocery with locations in Little Rock and Rogers. Producers, contact store manager Neal Augustine at 501225-7700. thefreshmarket.com Good Earth Natural Food 3955 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 855-2932784. goodearthvitamin.com Offers fresh organic local produce, packaged organic foods, earth-friendly home and personal care products and a huge variety of nutritional supplements. Green Corner Store 1423 Main St., Little Rock, 501-374-1111 General store and gift shop focusing on Arkansas made and produced products. Soda fountain serves ice cream and beverages produced by local company Loblolly Creamery. Greg & Jim’s Grocery & Grill 46 Old Military Road. W., Colt, 870-633-0541 Grocery also serves breakfast and lunch (six days) and dinner (two days) featuring sausage, bacon, country ham, steak, FOOD & FARM | 69


ARK ANSAS GROCERS

RVCA | NIXON | HIPPYTREE | VOLCOM |AG IRON&RESIN | WESC | DIESEL | SCOTCH&SODA

pork chops, eggs, waffles and hash browns, also barbecued pork cooked on site, catfish, burgers, deli meats, sandwiches, produce and a full line of groceries 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Wed., 6 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Thu.-Fri., 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. Harps Foods Regional, employee-owned grocery store with dozens of locations in Arkansas. harpsfoods.com Hillcrest Artisan Meats 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd. Suite B., Little Rock. 501-671-6328. facebook.com/ HillcrestArtisanMeats A butcher shop that uses only locally and regionally raised meats. Also, it carries local artisan products and a small amount of produce. Ask for owners Brandon or Tara Brown, producers. Hogg’s Meat Market 4520 Camp Robinson Road, North Little Rock. Hogsmeatmarket.com

Provisions For The Cultured Gentleman

11220 N Rodney Parham Rd | Suite 3 501.246.5466 shopcultureclothing.com

Travis McConnell’s

Butcher shop and catering business in operation since 1961. Processes wild game. 501-758-7700. Kroger National grocery store with some 50 locations in Arkansas. Producers will likely have the best luck contacting produce managers at their local stores. If not, try Joe Bell, head of marketing for the store’s Delta division, at 901-765-4315 or Joe. Bell@kroger.com. kroger.com Meat Works Butchery 816 De Queen St., Mena, 479-394-2900

OFFERING

Butcher’s Case Meats Fresh Sandwiches Meat & Cheese Plates Catering

COMING SOON

Butchery Classes Sausage Making Classes Email Travis for more information on classes at travis@butcherandpublic.com 521 Main St., North Little Rock (formerly Argenta Market)

501.410.7783

www.butcherandpublic.com 70 | FOOD & FARM

Grass-fed and finished beef, lamb, goat, pastured pork and chicken, also eggs, breads, vegetables, fruits, specialty oils, sauces, honey spices. Also delivers. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. Natural Things 5407 Highway 5 N., Bryant 501-213-0034 Natural foods store that sells mostly grocery items. Currently carries beef and pork products from MeatWorks in Mena and local cheeses. Soon to add local hummus and chicken. Olde Fashioned Foods 8434 Phoenix Ave., Fort Smith 479-649-8200 Offers local organic foods, herbs, alternative medicine and health products.

Ozark Natural Foods 1554 N. College Ave., Fayetteville. 479521-7558. Ozarknaturalfoods.com Natural foods co-op owned by a community of more than 10,000 investors. Producers, contact produce manager Pauline Thiessen at 479-521-7558 or pauline@onf.coop. Stratton’s Market 405 E. Third St., Little Rock. 501-2440542. duganspublr.com A small grocery and liquor store attached to Dugan’s Pub in the River Market with a nice selection of local produce, meats, cheeses and bread. To-go lunch and breakfast items, too. Producers, contact Don Dugan at the number below or at mail@duganspublr.com. Terry’s Finer Foods 5018 Kavanaugh Blvd., Little Rock. 501663-4154. Gourmet neighborhood grocery. Producers, contact store manager. Walmart Bentonville (corporate office) 800-925-6278 The international discount chain has sold Arkansas produce in its stores for 20 years. Local and organic produce available at locations statewide. Whole Foods 501 Bowman, Little Rock. 501-312-2326. Wholefoodsmarket.com. National chain with location in Little Rock. Producers, contact Calvin Burnett, associate store team leader, at 501-3122326 and calvin.burnett@wholefoods.com.

Search the list online at

arkansasfoodandfarm.com! Add your business or organization soon to be included in the next issue. Go to

arkansasgrown.org to register!

arkansasfoodandfarm.com


us n i o J ra fo

“farm fresh” food and wine experience!

Saturday, May 2 at the Zoo General Admission: 7-10 pm Reserve Wine Room Experience: 6 pm 50 Restaurants —the most at any event in Central Arkansas! 5 Live Music Areas Dozens of top quality wines

O

Beer garden & other specialty drinks

O

Get details and tickets:

www.littlerockzoo.com/wildwines Presented by:

Little Rock

Beverage Sponsor:

Benefiting the Arkansas Zoological Foundation for the Little Rock Zoo’s New Arkansas Heritage Farm Exhib it.

arkansasfoodandfarm.com

FOOD & FARM | 71


ÂŽ

and agriculture go hand in hand. To a farmer, the land is more than just a livelihood ... it’s a legacy, an heirloom, a gift to future generations of growers.

To see how Arkansas farmers are feeding a growing planet and reducing their ecological footprints, visit www.arfb.com and search for Arkansas Ag Facts. 72 | FOOD & FARM

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Arkansas Food & Farm  

The Food Issue

Arkansas Food & Farm  

The Food Issue