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In partnership with the Arkansas Agriculture Department The Food Issue 2016 | arkansasfoodandfarm.com

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NOT ALL FOOD IS CREATED EQUAL

Subscriptions are now open for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) spring harvest shares from Foodshed Farms and Heifer USA. For as little as $27.50 (plus tax) per week, you can get a basket full of fresh, locally grown, GMO-free produce delivered to one of several Central Arkansas locations. Pasture-raised meat shares are also available. Shares are going fast, so don’t miss your chance to choose local food, choose health and choose to help Arkansas farmers.

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In partnership with the Arkansas Agriculture Department

The Food Issue 2016 WHAT’S INSIDE

12

A FOODIE’S DIY PARADISE

When it comes to growing and creating food and drink, Water Buffalo leads the way.

18

THE JOY OF PICKING YOUR OWN Harvesting your own fruit is a tasty, economical joy.

25

FARM TO TABLE RECIPES

Seasonal recipes from farmers and chefs who grow, use and love local ingredients.

THE LISTINGS

46

REGIONAL LISTINGS

Arkansas Grown Farmers Markets, CSAs, Grocers and Farm to Table Restaurants

ON T H E COV E R :

Photographer Lily Darragh captures the essence and downhome goodness of corn bread. Story on page 25. Stay connected to Arkansas Food & Farm online. Find more features, photos and interactive listings.

arkansasfoodandfarm .com

f a c e b o o k . c o m /a r f o o d a n d f a r m

@ A R Fo o d Fa r m

p i n t e r e s t . c o m /a r f o o d a n d f a r m B R O U G H T T O YO U B Y

& 4

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A Special Publication of Arkansas Times ALAN LEVERITT Publisher alan@arktimes.com REBEKAH HARDIN Associate Publisher rebekah@arktimes.com EDITORIAL MANDY KEENER Creative Director mandy@arktimes.com MICHAEL ROBERTS Editor michael@arktimes.com ADVERTISING PHYLLIS A. BRITTON Sales Director phyllis@arktimes.com ELIZABETH HAMAN Sales Director elizabeth@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ASHLEY GILL | ashley@arktimes.com BLAKE HANNAHS | blake@arktimes.com BROOKE WALLACE | brooke@arktimes.com LEE MAJOR | lee@arktimes.com LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com RHONDA CRONE | rhonda@arktimes.com TIFFANY HOLLAND | tiffany@arktimes.com PRODUCTION WELDON WILSON Production Manager/Controller ROLAND R. GLADDEN Advertising Traffic Manager JIM HUNNICUTT Advertising Coordinator GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS KEVIN WALTERMIRE MIKE SPAIN

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We’re cooking up soy dishes across the state. Stop in and order the featured dish with each of our partners to learn how the Arkansas soybean industry contributes to the food we eat.

Summer ‘15

Fall ‘15

Winter ‘15

Spring ‘16

For full tour details, check TheMiracleBean.com

THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

7


A

Publisher and farmer Alan Leveritt prepares sheep hides for tanning.

“Sitting outside on these warming nights, I can actually smell the change in the soil.”

t 6:30 this morning I was knee-walking up and down 120-foot raised beds trying to plant 250 blackberry canes before biblical rains began. The Ouachita and Natchez varieties, developed by the University of Arkansas, had arrived from Cox Berry Farm in Clarksville the day before and I worried they might not survive the week sitting in the sorting shed. We’ll see no fruit until next year, but the berries are well worth the wait. In October I sometimes find myself praying for an early frost, worn out from the heat and long hours stretching into summer darkness. Let it be over and give us a little rest, I think. But in March the buds are on the blackberries, enthusiasm is revived and the fall malaise forgotten. The peach trees, bare just a few weeks ago, are fat with unopened buds. The hoop houses are full of ripening strawberries and lettuce, and the elephant garlics are a foot tall. The heirloom tomatoes are still weeks from planting, but my little five-acre market garden has come to life. Sitting outside on these warming nights, I can actually smell the change in the soil. This year I am cutting back on my plantings, going from 1,700 heirloom tomatoes to about 800 along with hollyhocks, zinnias, yarrow, sunflowers and Asiatic lilies for cut flowers at the farmers market. I am letting about two acres rest this year, seeded in December with crimson clover, which is just coming up. After my honeybees have broken their winter fast, I will till the clover under and plant buckwheat, giving us a solid mass of white flowers and the bees their favorite pollen source. I’ve had a growing problem in this field with a noxious pig weed with sharp thorns and a resistance to Glyphosphate. The clover and recurring stands of buckwheat will hopefully crowd out some of the pig weed, and the periodic tilling and replanting of buckwheat will destroy the young weeds. My wife has been building her herd of Kathadin/Hampshire-crossed meat sheep for several years, and for the first time we have about 30 young rams ready for slaughter. There aren’t enough USDA-approved commercial, independent slaughterhouses in Arkansas, a fact I was reminded of when we called Cypress Valley in Romance in September to make a slaughter appointment in time for restaurant Thanksgiving menus, only to be told the first open date was Feb. 6. So we took 10 lambs to the slaughterhouse in February, and I began taking orders from my chefs. No one enjoys this part and we both have some ambivalence, but ultimately I am a carnivore and if I can’t bear to look my food in the eye, perhaps I need to make a change. This time I told the butchers to freeze the skins (which they usually throw away) and return them with the meat. There is a Quaker tannery in Bucks County, Pa., that has a reputation for tanning sheep skins but the skins have to be fleshed and salted before they are sent to the tannery. The skins and meat arrived on a Friday in late February, and after letting the skins thaw somewhat in a refrigerator, I laid the first one out on a plastic table and began the arduous process of scraping bits of meat and flesh from the skins until the skin was clean. After fleshing the sheepskin, I rubbed each skin with several pounds of salt, careful to salt every inch including the edges. If any spot is not salted, the skin will start to rot in a matter of hours. When I unpacked the skins from the slaughterhouse, they were a bloody mess. I ship them tomorrow and it is only now that I can see how they might return as soft and pliable sheepskin rugs. We will take another 10 lambs in next week, and later this summer, beautiful sheepskins will join the lamb, heirloom tomatoes, garlic, melons and flowers at our table at Bernice Garden Farmers Market in Little Rock.

Alan Leveritt Publisher, Arkansas Food & Farm Arkansas Times Publishing 8

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY L IL A L E V ER IT T

GETTING READY


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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY BR I A N CH I L SO N

T

he trees along my daily walk to the office have started to bud, and all across Facebook and Instagram, the Arkansas farmers I follow have begun posting pictures of prepared soil and seedlings. That means 2016 is about to give us a spring, and for us here at Arkansas Food & Farm, it’s time to shake off the winter cobwebs for another great year of fresh food from The Natural State. Our first issue of the year is always a special one. For the second year in a row, we’re launching with the Food Issue because we want to start things off by getting each of you as inspired by Arkansas food as the farmers and chefs who were gracious enough to let us publish some of their kitchen secrets. In these pages, you’ll find seasonal recipes perfect for the home cook, from breads and muffins to pasta and roasted vegetables. Of course, if you’re going to cook, you need ingredients—and we’ve got you covered there, too. Our U-Pick guide on page 18 is a great way to plan a day of fun harvesting your own food, while our Arkansas Grown farmers market, CSA, grocer and restaurant listings make it easy to connect with growers and producers all around the state. The only thing we can’t do is cook it for you—but we’ll be glad to show up and eat!


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PH OTOGR A PH Y BY BR I A N CH I L SO N

Clockwise from left: Nolen Buffalo prepares for a cheese making class; dozens of grain varieties are available for adventurous brewers; bags of malted wheat wait to become delicious beer.

A FOODIE’S DIY PARADISE When it comes to growing and creating food and drink, Water Buffalo leads the way by Michael Roberts

A

s Arkansas’ artisan food boom continues to grow, more people discover the joys of home g row n ve get ables a nd h igh- qua l it y food and drink made right here in The Natural State. Farmers markets are thriving like never before, and restaurant menus proudly tout the Arkansas farms and producers who provide everything from meats like beef, chicken and pork to aged cheeses, fantastic beer and locally roasted coffee. Ordinary Arkansans are doing extraordinary things with food, combining age-old gardening and food production techniques with the latest innovations modern technology has to offer. Perhaps you’ve had a pint of Arkansas beer or savored a bite of handmade, probiotic-rich sauerkraut and thought, “I want to make this myself.” If so, Nolen Buffalo of the Water Buffalo in Little Rock would like a word. Nolen calls his shop on Rodney Parham Road a “lifestyle improvement center,” and at first glance, the Water Buffalo’s 12

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

relatively small size (especially compared to stores like Lowe’s or Home Depot) seems to make that description seem grandiose. A closer look, however, reveals that Nolen has created a do-it-yourself wonderland, stocking products across a range of food-related hobbies. Hightech grow lights shine on a lime tree—which is somehow putting out fruit in the middle of an Arkansas winter. A barrel of goldfish swim lazily about, unaware that the murky water they produce is being used as fertilizer in an aquaponics project the Water Buffalo is conducting with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. And all around, the shelves are loaded with plant foods, organic herbicides, bags of soil, Arkansas-produced worm castings and supplies for making beer, wine, cheese and fermented vegetables. Suddenly, Nolen’s description not only feels apt—it’s clear it doesn’t say quite enough. The sheer number of products packed into the Water Buffalo can be overwhelming at first, a feeling Nolen strives to dispel. “We want to create a learning


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Clockwise from left: Citra is just one of the hop varieties for sale; Dark grain gives stouts their characteristic flavor; The Water Buffalo can teach anyone how to use supplies like these malt extract sweeteners.

center environment,” he says. “We don’t want to act in an intimidating way. It’s important for us to build relationships and help people know what the right or wrong purchases are for whatever they’re trying to do.” He truly believes that making beer, wine or cheese at home is something anyone can do. “You just need a recipe or a friend,” he says. “We can do both.” As part of that philosophy, the store has begun a weekly series of classes on Saturdays geared toward teaching customers how to get into home food and drink production. Topics covered are as varied as the store’s inventory, ranging from cheese-making, vegetable fermentation and the homebrewing of beer and cider, to lessons on soil pH and hydroponic gardening systems. Even better, the hands-on classes are provided to the public free of charge. In addition to his role as store proprietor and class instructor, Nolen Buffalo also takes on the daunting task of diagnostician and quality assurance tester. “Folks sometimes bring in their homebrewed beer and ask me to help them figure out what went wrong,” he says. His practiced nose, eyes and tongue can often pinpoint where a home brewer’s process needs improvement. “Sometimes you get beers in here that smell like a 12-year-old’s gym bag,” he says with a chuckle. “We teach brewers how to keep things clean and sterile to avoid that.” It’s his opinion that great local food businesses are often born from home hobbyists, and he sees his mission as helping his customers succeed. Business at the Water Buffalo is brisk, from customers looking to choose the perfect grain or type of hops from dozens of options to backyard gardeners looking for 14

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

just the right soil and nutrient combo to grow their own prize heirloom tomatoes and peppers. The store even gets the occasional visit from some of the big breweries and bars in town, because the Water Buffalo is the only local store around where a spare tank of CO2 or tap line can be purchased right off the shelf. Like an art supply store that tries to cater to artists using any medium, the Water Buffalo wants to make sure that no homegrown or homemade enthusiast is left out. Given that desire, it comes as no surprise that Nolen has plans for further expansion. “I see more and more people with backyard beehives,” he says. “So we’ve made space for beekeeping supplies.” Even bigger than that, though, is what the Water Buffalo has planned for the back corner of their store: a brewery, to be called Buffalo Beer. The half-barrel brewing setup is already in place, and Nolen hopes to have an open taproom this year. “We’ll have 15-25 beers from some of the local guys,” he says. “And of course we’ll be making our own.” He also hopes to let his beer-making classes in on things by holding one tap in reserve for exceptional home brews. It’s clear that Nolen Buffalo considers his shop a place for everyone in the community, from folks making beer, wine or cheese in their garages to Forest Park Elementary student Jessica Lewis, who recently won a science fair with a plant-growth experiment using hydroponic supplies from the Water Buffalo. Like so many local merchants, the greatest value in shopping at the Water Buffalo isn’t the plethora of great supplies—it’s the expertise behind the counter. Buying materials is one thing, but getting a lesson on how to make the most of them is invaluable.


JUST SAY CHEESE Want to become a cheese maker? It’s easier than you think! The Water Buffalo offers regular classes all about how you make delicious cheese at home. The process can be as simple as adding vinegar to warm milk to create a simple ricotta—it just takes a little time and know-how. If you’re looking to get started as a cheese maker, check out thewaterbuffalo.com for class schedules, and check out these simple tips:

1.

Keep it simple. Practicing with cheeses like ricotta and mozzarella will help you learn the basics.

2.

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Keep it clean. Bacteria love milk and cheese as much as we do.

3.

Be prepared. Make sure you have all your ingredients ready so you can focus on the process.

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Great milk, great cheese. Seek out milk from local dairies, preferably from grass-fed cows. Try different kinds until you find one that you love!

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Don’t be afraid to fail! Every experience is a learning one. If at first you don’t succeed, get more milk.

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Firing up the Facts About Meat Maybe you’ve seen the labels or heard the hype, but what do you really need to know about hormones and antibiotics in meat? What does it mean in terms of the health and safety of your food? Marketing and pseudoscience have made this a confusing topic, so we’re going to try to clear things up for you, just in time for grilling season.

Here’s what you should know: Like humans, hormones occur naturally in all animals. • Hormone levels found in meat are much lower than the hormones naturally occurring in the body and are tested for human safety. • The use of supplemental hormones in beef production has been scientifically proven as safe for consumers and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The use of growth promoting hormones and steroids in raising chickens and pork were outlawed by Congress in the late 1950s. • Chickens naturally grow to market weight faster due to advances in nutrition, breeding, housing control, and disease control.

No antibiotics are found in milk or meat. • Antibiotics sometimes must be used if an animal is sick. When this happens, there is a waiting period before the animal can be harvested for meat or before milk can be sold. This allows time for the antibiotics to be flushed out of the food supply before it is sold to consumers. • Organic farmers sometimes use antibiotics on sick animals and then sell the animal to conventional farmers. • Antibiotics are approved for animal, environmental, and human health so that they are safe for every aspect. They are required to be reapproved annually by FDA officials.

Ultimately, it’s all about food safety and our health! USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) sampling data show that bacteria on raw meat and poultry products are decreasing across the board − not increasing.

For more food and farm facts, visit arfb.com For tasty, seasonal recipes, visit tastearkansas.com


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PH OTOGR A PH Y COU R T E S Y A R K A NSA S PA R K S & TOU R ISM

THE JOY OF PICKING YOUR OWN Harvesting your own fruit is a tasty, economical joy. by Lisa H. Armstrong

W

hen you think about a u-pick (pickyour-own) operation in Arkansas, what images come to mind? Sweating over bushes picking berries? Pulling a cart while selecting peaches from an orchard? Or, how about enjoying a picnic under the shade of some fruit trees or a pavilion provided by the farmers? All of that and more is possible at the many U-Pick farming operations in The Natural State. All dates given to pick produce are approximate, so be sure and contact the farms before you head out. Wear lots of sunscreen, take that water bottle—and enjoy!

CENTRAL ARKANSAS THE CABOT PATCH 7 a.m.-noon daily during season. 500 Mt. Carmel Rd., Cabot 501-605-1313 thecabotpatch.8m.com Cost: $2.25 per quart. The Cabot Patch’s specialty is strawberries. Ripe berries are usually available starting in midApril, continuing through May and sometimes into early June. The farm provides buckets for picking, and there is a portable restroom on site for your convenience. CANEY CREEK BERRY FARM By appointment only. 2568 Little Creek Drive, Conway 501-548-0475 facebook.com/ CaneyCreekBerryFarm Cost: $2.50 per pound; $3 per pound to also keep container. Opened in 2009, Caney Creek Berry Farm uses sustainable practices at its blueberry and blackberry farm on 18

the outskirts of Conway. The owners provide quart and pint containers to use as you pick, or you’re welcome to bring your own bucket. “Most people who come here to pick berries want the experience rather than a lot of fruit,” Wilson says. There is also a processing barn with a public bathroom for your convenience. CADRON CREST ORCHARD 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 86 Mode Rd., Guy 501-679-3243 Cost: $2 per pound. You’ll find multiple fruit crops available at Cadron Crest Orchard, beginning with strawberries. This delectable red fruit can start ripening as soon as March and continue into early May, says orchard office manager Jeff Bushnell. Strawberries are followed by several types of nectarines, usually ripe for picking in May and June. You’ll be able to select from 18 varieties of peaches typically ready starting in June and continuing into early August. And if you want to finish

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Bright, colorful flowers and plump, juicy blueberries and blackberries await you at Wye Mountain in Roland.

out the fruit season at Cadron Crest, return for its lovely apples, including heirloom varieties like Arkansas Blacks, starting in August and continuing into October. CLARK’S PECAN GROVE 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wed. and Sat., Nov. 59 Jones Ln., Mayflower 501-454-2667 cowsandpecans.com Cost: Customers keep half of what they pick free. When the Clark family first started offering pecans to the public, owner Leanna Lee Clark says she might only see 14-15 people a day, but now there are sometimes 80-100 people who drive from all over southern Arkansas to the 30-acre orchard. You get to keep half of what you pick, but there is also a wait time on using pecans. “If you pick pecans, wait a week to 10 days before you eat them or use the nuts in cooking, as they need time to dry,” says Clark.

NANCY NOL AN


THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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WYE MOUNTAIN FLOWERS AND BERRIES Opens in May; call for hours. 20309 Hwy. 113, Roland 501-330-1906 wyemountain.net Cost: Blueberries, blackberries or raspberries $20 per gallon or $8 per quart. Established as a flower farm in 2000 by Butch and Beth Eggers, Wye Mountain Flowers and Berries is an oasis of gem-colored zinnias, snapdragons and sunflowers. The farm also offers u-pick blueberries, raspberries and blackberries in season. The farm is a longtime fixture in the River Market in Little Rock. Pick berries using your own buckets, or use the lined containers offered by the farm. The flower field does not disappoint either, and offers colorful zinnias, eucalyptus, chamomile, celosia, globe amaranth, artemisia, statice, gladiolus, black-eyed Susans, Mexican tuberose and other flowers.

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COX BERRY FARM 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. April-Oct. Call for seasonal availability. 1081 Hwy. 818, Clarksville 479-754-3707 coxberryfarm.com Cost: 2016 prices not yet set; 2015 prices for strawberries: $7.50 per gallon or $2 per quart; blueberries $14 per gallon or $3.50 per quart; blackberries $12 per gallon or $3 per quart. The Cox family has been growing different types of berries, peaches, and other produce on Redlick Mountain in Johnson County for over 30 years. Strawberries can be picked from late April through the month of May. Third-generation farmer David Cox says that the prices are variable, depending on the weather and other factors, so call ahead of time if you need to know the exact cost. REAGAN BERRY FARM Opens at 8 a.m. every weekend during season for picking; Call for appointment during the week. 241 E. 13th St., Fayetteville

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

479-443-5529 facebook.com/farmreaganfamily Cost: Call for seasonal pricing. Reagan Farm only grows on a little over an acre, but that relatively small space holds more than 22,000 plants and counting, says owner William Reagan. Berry picking usually starts the second week of April (depending on the weather) and generally lasts until mid-May. Buckets are provided to u-pick customers, as well as cardboard flats to take the berries home. “We don’t spray chemical fungicides on our fruit. That means that you and your family can sample berries in the field without concern,” Reagan says PEACH PICKIN’ PARADISE 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 1901 McGuire Rd., Lamar 479-754-2006 facebook.com/peachpickinparadise Cost: Call for seasonal pricing; 2015 prices were around $0.76 per pound. Mark Morgan’s grandfather started this Johnson County peach and nectarine orchard in 1977. “Our fruit is picked and sold fresh— not refrigerated and sold later,” says Morgan. The Morgan family encourages you to stay as long as you like, and you can even drive your car to areas of the orchard to pick your favorite varieties. “When you arrive, we will give you a map with the locations of several varieties of peaches ready to be picked,” Morgan says. You’ll have quite the choice with 18 different types of peaches and three varieties of nectarines. CLINE BERRY FARM 7 a.m.-9 a.m.; sometimes later in the day depending on availability. 224 S. Spruce St., Harrison 870-741-7121 clineberryfarm.com Cost: $12 per every 4-5 quart bucket. Imagine yourself a couple of miles outside of downtown Harrison on a scenic hilltop, and you’re picking blueberries. You’re most likely at Cline Berry Farm, where George and Carolyn Cline have been


growing high-bush blueberries for more than a dozen years. Their Collins, Bluejay, Blueray or Bluecrop berries usually ripen in June, but the weather in recent years has caused early ripening times or sometimes damage, says Carolyn Cline. The farm recommends pickers arrive early in the day, as the weather can get hot!

NORTHEAST ARKANSAS PINEY FORK BERRY FARM Call for hours. 163 Blueberry Lane, Evening Shade 870-368-5001 Cost: $2.25 per pound. If you’re in the Cherokee Village area, you might want to check out this longtime (and very popular) berry farm. For 30 years, Tony and Sharon Montgomery have been growing several types of highbush blueberries, including Bluecrop, Blueray, Bluejay, Jersey and Early Blue varieties.

PASTURE-RAISED BEEF, CHICKEN, & PORK. DELIVERED.

grassrootscoop.com

Their season “almost always starts June 12, runs three weeks, and quits by the Fourth of July,” says Sharon. There’s a processing shed on site with seats and chairs, and a former outhouse that has been outfitted with a flushing toilet, running water to wash your hands, and even drinking water. KILLOUGH FARMS Dawn to dusk daily during season. 661 Hwy 64B, Wynne 870-238-7038 Cost: $7.50 per gallon. Cecelia Killough grows pesticidefree blueberries one mile off Highway 64B, on a private gravel road that meanders through the woods. They grow two varieties of blueberries, Patriot and Bluecrop, on a two-acre establishment, so you’re assured of a friendly, small-farm approach. Bring your own bug spray and your own bucket—Cecelia suggests using a belt to hold the bucket around your waist.

AWARD WINNING WHISKEY DISTILLED FROM ARKANSAS GROWN CORN, WHEAT AND RYE GRAINS. AGED AND BOTTLED IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS OPEN DAILY FOR TOURS AND TASTINGS

1216 E 6th Street | www.rocktowndistillery.com | 501.907.5244 THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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JOIN THE HERD! LET US HELP YOU MAKE YOUR HOBBY MORE FUN! • Beer, wine, cider and mead making supplies • Cheese making supplies • Pickling supplies • Hydroponic, indoor, organic and aquaponic gardening supplies • New and used items

501-725-5296 • Fax: 501-725-5298 • www.thewaterbuffalo.com 106 S Rodney Parham Rd., Little Rock, AR 72205

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS OUACHITA BLUEBERRY NURSERY By appointment only. 344 Walter Adams Tr., Jessieville 501-984-5498 ouachitablueberrynursery.com Cost: Call for seasonal pricing. This family nursery is mostly known for the Rabbit Eye, Southern High Bush, Pink Lemonade and Sunshine Blue blueberry cultivars it propagates, but it offers u-pick blueberries in the summer months. Getting out and picking your own is a great way to discover just the type of berry you like—and maybe growing some on your own! In addition to the blueberries, Ouachita Blueberry Nursery has also added blackberries and muscadines to its repertoire, so call in advance to inquire about fruit availability. And for those looking to grow their own berries after picking, the nursery ships plants and takes orders online.

SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS A & B BERRY FARM 8 a.m.-dusk Mon.-Sat. 2929 Hwy 190, Prattsville 870-699-4792 Cost: Call for seasonal pricing.

Everything For Your Plants And Animals

• potting soils, fertilizers and seeds from basic to organic • landscape shrubs and trees • pesticides • dog foods • garden plants, ornamental flowers and water plants • fencing and livestock equipment, feed, gates, welded wire fence and more SEARCY 501.268.6673

MALVERN 501.337.9539

CABOT 501.941.2545

LITTLE ROCK 501.565.0961

BENTON 501.776.2727

BALD KNOB 501-724-2377

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/FARMERSASSOCIATION WEBSITE: FARMERSASSOCIATION.COM/ 22 ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Co-owner Anna Williams says “the best time to pick blueberries is the week before the Fourth of July and the week after. They make terrific jams and jellies, and you can even make blueberry wine.” Bill and Anna Williams grow several varieties of Rabbit-eye blueberries on their 1 1/2 acres, including Climax, a small, sweet variety, as well as the larger Premier and Chip Blue. This small farm allows pickers to use the restroom inside the private home, as well as to sit a spell on the carport “if they get tired” while harvesting the crop, says Anna.


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Northwest Arkansas Farmers Markets Locally Grown, Locally Made.

Join us for opening day

April 30 • 8am

Vegetables, Fruits, Meats, Eggs, Cheeses, Baked, Fermented, and Canned Products. Farmer’s Market

Saturday 9am -noon

DAYS & HOURS: SATURDAY 8AM to 1PM TUESDAY 5PM to 8PM

Pre-Order Online @ wrenthicketmarket.com

FIND US ON MILL STREET (BETWEEN JOHNSON & HUNTSVILLE AVENUES)

1041 S. School Ave. Fayetteville, Arkansas

101 E. Cherry Street DOWNTOWN

FAYETTVILLE SQUARE

Saturdays April - November, 7AM-2PM Thursdays & Tuesdays April - October, 7AM-1PM S 1st St

E Poplar St

fayettevillefarmersmarket.org E Cherry St

S Arkansas St

S 1st St

S Arkansas St

E Poplar St

101 E. Cherry Street

For information about Holiday Markets, Winter Markets & Special events, please check our website, Facebook page or call 479-236-2910.

101 E. Cherry Street

S Arkansas St

101 E. Cherry Street

E Cherry St

E Poplar St

S 1st St

101 E. Cherry Street

for more information visit MainStreetRogers.com

E Poplar St

E Cherry St

S Arkansas St

for more information visit MainStreetRogers.com S 1st St

S Arkansas St

S 1st St

E Cherr StSt E Poplyar

E Cherry St

Saturday & Wednesday 7am till 1pm, May thru October

for more information visit MainStreetRogers.com

for more information visit MainStreetRogers.com

Saturday Only 9am till 2pm, November thru April for more information visit MainStreetRogers.com

Local Farmers, Bakers & Artists Find Us On

At Frisco Station Mall 100N. Dixieland Rd, Rogers AR • VENDORS INSIDE & OUTSIDE • ACCEPT: WIC, SNAP, SENIOR NUTRITION COUPONS • COMPLETE LOCAL PRODUCER • OVER 30 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS

rogersfarmersmarket.org

Bella Vista Farmers’ Market Sundays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. starting April 17 till October

See You There!

Mercy Bella Vista campus, 1 Mercy Way 24

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Locally Grown Fruits, Vegetables & More May-October Thursday & Saturday 7am-1pm Outdoors at the Jones Center


Pick any month of the calendar you’d like, and you’ll find something delicious and local to eat in Arkansas. Need proof? Look no further than these seasonal recipes from farmers and chefs who grow and love local ingredients—because no matter the time of year, it’s always a great day for some home cooking.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH | STYLING BY MANDY KEENER THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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FRUIT COMPOTE

SALSCILLA FARMS, MAYFLOWER | YIELDS 6 HALF-CUP SERVINGS

NEED HONEY? More and more farms are getting into the bee business, and SalScilla Farms is no different, adding five new hives in early 2016.

INGREDIENTS: 4-5 cups fresh strawberries sliced

1 cup blueberries 1 pineapple, diced, with 1/2 cup of juice 6-8 fresh peaches, sliced 1 tablespoon honey

DIRECTIONS: Mix all fruit and honey in a bowl. Allow to chill for

at least 6 hours. Adjust sweetness with extra honey or sugar. Gently stir before serving to distribute fruit juices. Serve by itself or over yogurt or ice cream.

CURIOUS ABOUT WHEN YOU CAN GRAB YOUR FAVORITE FRUIT AT THE MARKET?

Wonder no more! Here are peak availability times for fruit in The Natural State.

SUMMER

Blackberries, June-July Blueberries, June-August Grapes, July-August Peaches, June-September Plums, June-July Raspberries, July-September Strawberries, May-June 26

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

FALL

Apples, August-October Muscadines, September-October Pears, August-October Pumpkins, September-October


NORMA'S PEACH DESSERT PEACH PICKIN’ PARADISE, LAMAR | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIENTS: 1 1/2 cups flour

2 cups plus 2 teaspoons sugar, divided use 1 stick butter, melted 8 ounces cream cheese 8 ounces whipped topping 4 cups sliced peaches 1 1/2 cups hot water 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 package peach gelatin

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375° F. Combine flour, 2 teaspoons of sugar and the melted butter. Press into a 9x13 baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes. Combine cream cheese, whipped topping and 1 cup sugar. Mix and spread over the crust. Top with the peaches. Combine the hot water, 1 cup sugar and cornstarch and cook until thickened. Add the package of peach gelatin. Pour over peaches and allow to chill.

Give your fruit a good rinse before using it. No soap required!

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SAUTEED MUSHROOMS ABC: GREENHOUSE AND HERB FARM, LONDON | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIENTS: 1 pound pink, blue, golden, pearl

or black oyster mushrooms 2 tablespoons organic butter 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup leeks, sliced 1 medium onion, sliced 4 cups greens such as kale or spinach 1 tablespoon honey

DIRECTIONS: In a large skillet, melt

the butter and add the mushrooms, taking care not to overcrowd the pan. Sauté mushrooms until they begin giving off their moisture. Add the onion and leeks, cooking until the onions become translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 2-3 minutes longer. Add in the greens and mix thoroughly. Cook until greens are tender. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. ARE MUSHROOMS THE NEXT BIG TREND IN LOCAL FOODS? We certainly hope so! In the past few years, farms like ABC have added spore-inoculated logs to their farms, and the result is a greater selection of fresh mushrooms all over the state. Our prediction is that shoppers, markets and grocers won’t be able to get enough of these delectable fungi.

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GRANDMA SARA'S SUMMER SURPRISE MCCOOL FARMS, ROVER | SERVES 2-4

INGREDIENTS: 2 large tomatoes, diced 1 onion, diced 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup sugar

DIRECTIONS: Mix all ingredients in a mixing bowl and let chill in the refrigerator overnight.

ADD A DASH OF COLOR

Turn this dish into a multicolored extravaganza by using different varieties of heirloom tomatoes like dark, glossy carbons, bright yellow pear, green-striped zebra or even small tomatoes like sungold. The only limitation is the size of the bowl you use!

THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

NEAL FAMILY FARM, ROGERS | YIELDS 16 STANDARD OR 6 JUMBO MUFFINS

INGREDIENTS: 2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup butter, softened 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 1/2 cups fresh blueberries 1 tablespoon sugar 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

LIKE BEING PICKY? Great pick-your-own opportunities abound all across Arkansas. Plan a tasty day of berry picking with our handy pick-your-own guide on page 18.

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350째 F. Line 16 2 1/2-inch (standard) or 6 3 1/2-inch (jumbo) muffin cups with paper bake cups, and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt. In a separate large mixing bowl, beat butter with an electric mixer on medium speed for 30 seconds. Add 1 cup sugar and beat until well combined. Beat in eggs, milk and vanilla. Stir in flour mixture until just moistened (batter should be lumpy). Gently stir in blueberries. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups, filling each nearly full. In a small bowl, combine 1 tablespoon sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle sugar mixture over batter. Bake for 25-30 minutes for standard muffins or 35-40 minutes for jumbo muffins, or until a wooden toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in muffin cups on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Remove from muffin cups and serve warm. 21C M USEU M H OT EL S LLCL

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TRIO'S STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE TRIO’S RESTAURANT, LITTLE ROCK | YIELDS 4-6 SHORTCAKES

DID YOU KNOW? Chef Capi Peck has been using fresh, local ingredients to create and serve some of central Arkansas’ best food for three decades, and this dish is a popular favorite.

SHORTCAKE INGREDIENTS: BERRIES & WHIPPED 4 cups flour CREAM INGREDIENTS: 1 1/2 pounds cold unsalted butter Arkansas strawberries, caps removed, washed and sliced 1/2 cup ice water

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 300° F. Place flour in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Cut the cold butter into pieces and add in several at a time, alternating with the cold water. Mix on medium speed until butter is completely incorporated into the flour. Pull golf ball-size pieces of the dough from the mass and roll each into a smooth ball. Flatten each ball onto a sheet pan. Make tiny holes in the dough with the tines of a fork to prevent the pastry from puffing up.

1/4 cup sugar 1 quart heavy cream 1/2 cup powdered sugar

Place 1/4 cup sugar per 1 quart of sliced strawberries in a large mixing bowl. Place sliced berries on top of the sugar and stir gently. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes so that the berries can release their juices.

ASSEMBLY:

Chill for two hours before assembling the shortcakes. Whip cream to soft peaks with the powdered sugar. To assemble: Place a baked shortcake round on a serving plate. Ladle strawberries with their juices over the shortcake and top with whipped cream.

Bake 20 minutes. Let cool completely and store in a covered container at room temperature for up to three days. THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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COUNTRY GOOD BAKED SQUASH BARNHILL ORCHARDS, LONOKE | SERVES 4-6

INGREDIENTS: 2 pounds small yellow squash

1/2 cup finely chopped onions 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup butter plus 2 tablespoons melted, divided use 1/2 cup milk 2 eggs, beaten 1/2 teaspoon, salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon parsley 1/2 cup cracker crumbs

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 400째 F. Cut unpeeled squash into slices, then cook with onions and water until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain the squash mixture and put in a 1 1/2 qt baking dish. Pour 1/4 cup of the butter over squash. Combine milk, eggs, salt, pepper and parsley and pour over all. Combine the 2 tablespoons melted butter with cracker crumbs and sprinkle over the top. Bake for 20 minutes.

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FRESH ZUCCHINI BREAD ME & MCGEE PRODUCE, NORTH LITTLE ROCK | YIELDS ONE LOAF

There’s more to Me & McGee than just produce—there’s also handmade peanut and pecan brittle! There are lots of great reasons to check out the North Little Rock farmers market scene, but the sweetest one just might be that first crunchy bite.

INGREDIENTS: 3 eggs 1 cup oil 2 cups sugar 3 tablespoons vanilla 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 3 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 cup nuts 3 cups grated zucchini

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350° F. In one mixing bowl, combine the eggs, oil, sugar and vanilla. Mix until blended. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, baking powder, nuts and zucchini. Finally, mix both bowls together. Fill selected bread pan 2/3 full. Bake for 1 hour. Remove bread from oven and let it rest in the pan for 5 minutes before removing. Remove bread from pan and place on a cooling rack until cooled.

A DASH OF IMPROVISATION

Have a nut allergy? Just don’t like them? Substitute raisins, dates, dried cranberries or even chocolate chips. And no matter what, be sure to eat your first piece warm from the oven with a healthy pat of fresh butter. THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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SWEET SPICED PUMPKIN SEEDS PEEBLES FARM, AUGUSTA | YIELDS 2 CUPS

SWEET CLOVES HELP GIVE PUMPKIN PIE SPICE ITS WONDERFUL FLAVOR

INGREDIENTS: 2 cups pumpkin seeds

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 300° F. Spray rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, toss pumpkin seeds with olive oil and maple syrup. In a small dish, mix together brown sugar and pumpkin pie spice; sprinkle mixture over seeds and toss to coat. Spread seeds onto prepared baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring halfway through bake time. Allow seeds to cool completely. Store seeds in an airtight container at room temperature. 36

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Peebles Farm in Augusta is one of Arkansas’ top destinations for fall fun on the farm. Once you’ve gotten lost in the corn maze, fed the llama and had a snack at the concession stand, make your way over to the u-pick pumpkin patch and grab just what you need for this recipe.


FALL BOUNTY PANCAKES FENTON’S BERRY FARM, HARRISON | YIELDS 8-12 PANCAKES

INGREDIENTS: 1 1/4 cups flour

1 tablespoon baking powder 1 tablespoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ginger 1 cup milk 2 eggs 1 cup canned or leftover mashed pumpkin, squash or sweet potato 1/4 cup oil

DIRECTIONS: Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl.

Place remaining ingredients in blender or mixing bowl and combine thoroughly. Fold wet mixture into dry mixture, leaving a few small lumps. Cook pancakes on a hot greased griddle until brown, flipping when bubbles start to form and break on surface. Serve with butter, syrup or jelly.

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QUESO BLANCO with SMOKED POBLANOS & GOAT CHEESE CAFÉ @ HEIFER, LITTLE ROCK | YIELDS 1 GALLON

GOAT CHEESE IN QUESO? We wouldn’t expect anything different from Heifer, which donates goats (and other livestock) around the world as part of its mission to increase food and economic security. Here in Arkansas, Heifer USA initiatives include the Foodshed Farms CSA and Grass Roots Farmers Cooperative, two organizations that help farmers distribute the fresh food they produce.

THE 2015 WORLD CHEESE DIP CHAMP!

INGREDIENTS: 4 poblano peppers

1 cup cherrywood chips, soaked in water 1/4 cup unsalted butter 1 white onion, diced 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 cup white wine 4 pounds queso blanco, diced 8 ounces goat cheese 1 cup cream cheese 2 cups heavy cream 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon chili powder Salt and pepper, to taste

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

DIRECTIONS: Soak cherrywood chips in water for at least 30 minutes. Heat a charcoal grill to 225° F. Add cherrywood chips and allow them to smoke. Smoke the poblano peppers for 1 1/2 hours, or until slightly charred and soft. Allow peppers to cool, then remove seeds and chop fine. In a large stockpot, melt the butter and sauté the onions and garlic until translucent and slightly caramelized. Deglaze the pot with the white wine. Add the queso blanco and allow to melt, stirring continuously so that the pan does not scorch. Add the crumbled goat cheese, cream cheese and cilantro, continuing to stir until blended. Add the heavy cream and stir. Add the cumin, paprika and chili powder, then adjust the salt and pepper to taste. Warm water can be added to adjust consistency. Serve with warm tortilla chips.


FRESH BUTTER

with

RADISHES

THE PANTRY & THE PANTRY CREST, LITTLE ROCK | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIENTS: 1-quart mason jar 1/2 quart heavy cream Pinch of sea salt or flake salt 1 loaf fresh grain bread 1 bunch fresh radishes White balsamic vinegar (optional)

DIRECTIONS: Pour heavy cream into the mason jar. Place lid on jar tightly, then shake until butter separates from the buttermilk, about 20 minutes. Slice the fresh bread, then slice the radishes.

Spread the fresh butter on the bread, then top with the radishes. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve. For an optional addition, toss the radish leaves with the white balsamic vinegar and place on top.

HOW DOES CREAM TURN TO BUTTER? Heavy cream has a reputation for being thick and decadent, and it’s all due to its high concentration of butterfat. Agitating the cream by shaking or churning causes the bits of fat to stick together. Do that enough times and a golden mass of butter appears just like magic! Be sure to taste the leftover buttermilk—it’s quite different from the store-bought kind.

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GLUTEN-FREE BUTTERMILK CORNBREAD DOGWOOD HILLS GUEST FARM, HARRIET | SERVES 4-6

INGREDIENTS: 10-inch cast iron skillet, deep sided

2 tablespoon shortening, butter or oil, melted in pan 1 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal 3 tablespoons gluten-free flour 3/4 teaspoons salt 1/2 cup sugar (or to taste) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 1/4 cup homemade buttermilk 2 farm fresh eggs

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 400° F. Mix all ingredients together and pour into hot skillet with the melted fat in it. Bake for 24 minutes until set and golden.

LITTLE DASH OF RELAXATION

The Ozarks are one of Arkansas’ most popular tourist destinations, and Dogwood Hills Guest Farm is a unique way to take a trip to the mountains. The farm features a bed and breakfast, hiking trails and a chance to experience life on a working farm. Visit dogwoodhillsbb.com for rate and reservation details. 21C M USEU M H OT EL S LLCL

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FUSILLI PASTA with PUMPKIN CREAM, TURNIP GREENS & BACON TRAVIS MCCONNELL, BENTONVILLE BUTCHER & DELI | SERVES 4-6

INGREDIENTS: 1 pumpkin, weighing approximately 1 1/2 pounds 1 pound turnip greens, chopped into large pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 yellow onion, medium diced 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 12 ounces fusilli pasta 2/3 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated 1 1/2 cups bacon cut into lardons

DIRECTIONS: Preheat the oven to 350째 F Cut top off of the pumpkin and split down the middle. Scoop out seeds and membranes and discard. Cut the halves into large slices and put into an ovenproof dish or sheet pan and bake, turning once, for 40 minutes. Blanch the turnip greens in just enough boiling water to cover the greens, 5-10 minutes or until tender. Drain and let cool. Remove the pumpkin from the oven and mash with a potato masher. Heat the oil in a pan and add the bacon. Cook until it starts to caramelize, then add onion and garlic. Cook until the onion is translucent. Cook the fusilli in seasoned, boiling water until al dente. Drain the pasta and add back into the pot. Add turnip greens, mashed pumpkin, cream and Parmesan. Season to taste with salt and pepper and mix gently. Heat through for a few minutes and serve immediately. THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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OZARK ROOT VEGETABLE HASH GREENHOUSE GRILLE, FAYETTEVILLE | SERVES 8

INGREDIENTS: 1 cup sweet potatoes 1 cup red potatoes 1 cup purple potatoes 1 cup parsnips 1 cup celeriac 1 cup onion 1/2 cup garlic Canola oil Salt and Pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375째 F. Thoroughly wash vegetables and cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Toss the vegetables in the canola oil, then salt and pepper to taste. Place vegetables on a baking sheet and roast for approximately 20 minutes. Alternatively, roast each type of vegetable separately for 8 minutes, then combine and roast together for 10-12 minutes. This will allow greater control over the doneness of each root vegetable.

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WINTER GARDEN PARANTHAS BO BENNETT, LITTLE ROCK TOMATO | YIELDS 4 PARANTHAS

INGREDIENTS: For the dough:

DIRECTIONS: In a mixing bowl, combine flour with water until a

For the filling: 1 1/2 cups cubed butternut squash 4 cups mixed winter greens 4 tablespoons cilantro 1 tablespoon dry fenugreek 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 pinch sea salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice (skip if sorrel is used)

Peel, cube and steam butternut squash until soft, then mash.

1 1/2 cups flour 1 cup water 3 tablespoons ghee or vegetable oil

sticky dough is formed. Knead the dough until smooth and elastic, adding a tablespoon of the ghee or oil as you knead. Let rest.

Boil greens in a pot of salted water, boil until tender. In a mixing bowl, add mashed squash, greens and the lemon juice. Salt to taste. Roll dough into an 8-inch disk, add filling to center. Fold the dough over and cook for 3 minutes until underside is browned. Brush with the remaining ghee or oil and flip to cook for an additional minute. Serve with tzatziki sauce or melted herb butter.

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ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS CAPERS RESTAURANT, LITTLE ROCK | SERVES 6-8

ROASTING CARAMELIZES NATURAL SUGARS, RESULTING IN DEEP, RICH FLAVORS.

INGREDIENTS: 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided use

6 cups sweet onions, thinly sliced 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced 1 1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 1/4 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved 1 teaspoon freshly chopped thyme Salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 425째 F. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet using medium-high heat. Add onions and garlic and brown for 5-7 minutes. Sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt, and reduce heat to medium low. Continue cooking until onions are very soft, approximately 20-25 minutes. Stir in thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste. In a large mixing bowl, toss the Brussels sprouts with 2 tablespoons of oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Roast the sprouts in a single layer on a rimmed cookie sheet for 20-25 minutes, stirring halfway through.

A DASH OF FRESHNESS

Making great Brussels sprouts means choosing the best. Buy them on the stalk if possible, and avoid large, overgrown sprouts or sprouts with dark spots. 44

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Toss the roasted sprouts with the onions and vinegar and adjust salt and pepper.


Bent onvi l l eFar mer ’ sMar ket Ever ySat ur day Apr i l23Oct ober29 Vi s i t Bent onvi l l e. c om Downt ownBent onvi l l e. or g #Vi s i t Bent onvi l l e #Bent onvi l l eFar mer s Mar k et

214 SE Moore’s Place, Bentonville, AR www.ovenandtap.com | 479.268.5884

@OVENANDTAP

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D fo og r q ea ui r t ck hi re s p fe ag re e nc e!

FIND YOUR SOURCES

For our Food Issue, we have limited our normal listings to grocers, CSAs, u-pick farms, farmers markets and restaurants. For our full listings, visit arkansasfoodandfarm.com, and if you’d like to see your farm listed in upcoming issues, submit the details at ArkansasGrown.org. It’s free and easy.

FARMERS MARKETS, CSAs, U-PICK FARMS, FARM TO TABLE RESTURANTS & GROCERS Page 47

CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Page 50

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

Page 54

NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

Page 56

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

Page 58

SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS

Page 59 FARM TO TABLE RESTAURANTS & ARKANSAS GROCERS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gravette • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • • Salem Greenway • Avoca Mountain Home Berryville • • Decatur Knobel • • Rogers • Hardy • Centerton Rector • Cherokee Village • • •• Pocahontas • • YellvilleCotter • • Gassville Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • Lafe • • Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale Evening Shade • Huntsville Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • • Harrison • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge • Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbourne • • Sage Farmington • • • Blytheville • Greenland Mount Pleasant • • Elkins • •Cave City•Smithville • Brookland • Parthenon Prairie • Fork Leslie Grove • West • • Mountain View • Deer • Jonesboro Swifton• • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley Cedarville Northeast Arkansas Newport • • • Clinton Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry Clarksville • Tyronza Alma • • • Lamar • Bee Branch • Ozark Cherry Valley Jerusalem • Bradford Cleveland • • • • Altus Bald Knob • • Fort Smith Dover • Center Ridge Judsonia • • Augusta London • • • Lavaca • Hattieville • Guy • Romance Charleston• • • McCrory Marion • Paris Russellville • • • Searcy • Springfield • Wynne • • Morrilton Dardanelle • Atkins Booneville • • • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • Conway • Vilonia • • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Ward Cabot • • • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Rover • • •Bigelow Des•Arc • • Mayflower Jacksonville • Roland • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • •North Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • Little Rock • • Scott Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Mena Benton • • • Woodson • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena Royal • Stuttgart • Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt Sheridan Grannis • Hall • Donaldson • • White • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady • De Queen Rison • • Nashville • Dumas Prescott • • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Warren • • Camden • Hampton • Dermott • Texarkana Louann • Lake Village • • Fouke Magnolia • • Hamburg Crossett El Dorado Eudora • • • • Bradley Junction City • Gentry

Lowell Cave Springs

Solgohachia

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016


• Fork Prairie Grove • West • Deer • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville

• Jonesboro • Leslie • Mountain View • Swifton• • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard •Desha Northwest Arkansas • • Trumann Shirley • CENTRAL ARK ANSAS Cedarville Northeast Arkansas • • Newport • Clinton Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry • Tyronza Alma • • • Clarksville Bee Branch • • Ozark Lamar Cherry Valley Jerusalem Bradford Cleveland • • • • Center Ridge Bald Knob • • Altus London • Fort Smith • • Dover • Hattieville Judsonia • • Augusta Guy • Lavaca • • McCrory Charleston• • • Marion • • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • Romance • Searcy • Wynne Dardanelle Atkins • • Booneville • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • • • • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Cabot • • Ward • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Rover • • •Bigelow Des•Arc • • Mayflower Jacksonville • Waldron • Fargo • DeVall’s • Roland Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • • Central Arkansas North Little Rock • Parks • Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville Mabelvale CENTRAL • • Hot Springs Village • Mena • Woodson • Benton ARKANSAS • Mount Ida Bauxite • Hensley Hot Springs • • • • Helena • Stuttgart • Royal Farmers Markets, CSAs Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt Sheridan & U-Pick Farms • Grannis • Donaldson White Hall • • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • • Grady • De Queen Rison • • Nashville • Dumas Prescott GUY • • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest ArkansasCadron Crest Orchard   Warren • • Camden • Hampton 86 Mode Rd., 501-679-3243  • Dermott Texarkana battlesorchard.com  • Louann • Lake Village • Offers u-pick strawberries, peaches, • Fouke apples, watermelons, cantaloupe Magnolia • and tomatoes throughout the season.• Hamburg Dorado • Crossett Eudora • • Elfor Call in advance availability, May• Bradley Sept. U-Pick.• Junction City Solgohachia

HOT SPRINGS CABOT Just Picked Vegetables 4007 W. Cleland Rd., 501-988-1003  U-pick seasonal produce including broccoli, bok choy, collard greens, kale and sugar snap peas. U-Pick. Mountain High Produce  1000 E. Justice Rd., 501-983-8881  U-pick strawberries during season. Call for availability. U-Pick. North Pulaski Farms  13018 Ellen Cove, 501-240-4233  Certified organic vegetable farm located in the northernmost part of Pulaski County. CSA. The Cabot Patch  500 Mt. Carmel Rd., 501-605-1313  cabotpatch.3m.com  Pick yourself or find pre-picked strawberries, peaches, okra, plums, purple hull peas, tomatoes, cantaloupe and watermelons. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 7 days, April-Aug. U-Pick. Caney Creek Berry Farm   2568 Little Creek Dr., 501-548-0475  U-pick berry farm. Call for availability. U-Pick.

Historic Downtown Farmers Market 121 Orange St., 501-545-0534 hotspringsfarmersmarket.com Offers fresh produce, locally prepared foods, crafts, demonstrations and entertainment. 7 a.m.-noon Sat., 4 p.m.7 p.m. Tues., May-Oct.; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Sat. Nov.-Apr. Farmers Market. HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE Green Market of Hot Springs Village 1105 Desoto Blvd., 501-992-5556 facebook.com/GreenMarketHSV Offers locally grown vegetables, fruits, Arkansas meats, eggs, homemade baked goods and handcrafted items. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Thurs. Farmers Market. LITTLE ROCK Arkansas Local Food Network   509 Scott St., 501-291-2769  littlerock.locallygrown.net  Year-round online farmers market. Products include grass-fed meats, organic and naturally grown fruits and vegetables, gourmet cheeses, artisan breads, mushrooms, honey, nuts, garden supplies, jams, jellies, pickled products, and locally-produced bath & beauty products. Farmers Market.

LET US HELP YOU CRAFT YOUR PERFECT TOOL BOX 4310 Landers Road North Little Rock, AR 72117 (501) 687-1331 www.krebsbrothers.com M-F 8-5 Sat. 9-5 OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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Westover Hills Farmers Market in Little Rock has found a faithful Wednesday night following.

Arkansas Sustainability Network   509 Scott St., 501-291-2769  littlerock.locallygrown.net  An online farmers market operated by the Arkansas Sustainability Network. Farmers Market.  Arkansas Urban Gardening Educational Resource   1800 S. Chester St., 501-529-8520.   Sells produce and fresh cut flowers. Farmers Market. Bemis Pumpkin Patch   13206 Asher Rd., 501-897-4931  bemispumpkinpatch.com  U-pick pumpkin patch that offers hayrides, games and other family fun. Facilities available for birthday parties, weddings and educational programs. Call for hours and availability. U-Pick. Bernice Garden Farmers Market   1401 S. Main St., 501-617-2511  thebernicegarden.org  A Sunday market that only includes Arkansas growers and producers.  10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. May-Oct.  Farmers Market. 

SUPER GOOD SMALL BATCH FROM SCRATCH HAND CRAFTED HORMONE FREE REAL + LOCAL MADE IN LITTLE ROCK

LOBLOLLY CREAMERY

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Bhealthy Farmers Market  9601 Baptist Health Dr.  Farmers market hosted by Baptist Health featuring fresh produce and health information. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues. Farmers Market. Little Rock Farmers Market  400 President Clinton Ave., 501-375-2552  rivermarket.info  Open-air farmers market beneath the River Market Pavilions in Little Rock. Wide selection of produce, prepared food and crafts from around the state. Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Westover Hills Farmers Market  6400 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-420-4132  westoverhills.org  Selection of central Arkansas vendors of fruits, vegetables and prepared products. 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Tues.  Farmers Market. MAYFLOWER Clark’s Pecan Grove  59 Jones Ln., 501-454-2667  cowsandpecans.com    A 30-acre orchard growing Papershell, Stuart, Desirable and Native pecan trees. Features 140 trees that are 30 to 40 years old. Open to the public in the latter part of October for picking. Customers can come pick pecans and are allowed to keep half of what they pick for free, but have the option to purchase more. U-Pick. NORTH LITTLE ROCK Argenta Farmers Market   6th and Main St., 501-831-7881  argentaartsdistrict.org/argenta-farmersmarket  Verified Arkansas farmers and artisans selling products grown or made only in Arkansas. Farmers Market. Dogtown Farmers Market 420 Main St. dogtownfarmersmarket.com New market opening in North Little Rock in 2016. Plans to offer local produce and other goods as well as special events throughout the season. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat., Apr.-Oct. Farmers Market.

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY BR I A N CH I L SO N

CENTRAL ARK ANSAS


Foodshed Farms at St. Joseph Farm  6800 Camp Robinson Rd.  stjosephfarm.com  A diversified sustainable agriculture enterprise that provides education, community outreach and hunger relief. Runs a community supported agriculture cooperative with farmers in the Arkansas Delta, maintains a food forest, community garden, and hosts farm to table dinners. On-site farm stand open during the week. CSA, Farmers Market. North Little Rock Community Garden  2400 Lakeview Rd., 925-303-6344  facebook.com/NLRCommunityFarm  Half-acre intensive school farm that raises vegetables and eggs for market in North Little Rock. Sells produce and eggs through a mobile farmers market, weekly farm stand and at local farmers markets. Also functions as an educational tool for the school district and is open to the public for tours, work days and to host events for the community. Farmers Market. ROLAND Wye Mountain Flowers and Berries  20309 Hwy. 113, 501-330-1906  wyemountain.net  U-pick blackberries, blueberries and raspberries. Also offers flowers in season. U-Pick.

GROW A LITTLE EXTRA FOR ARKANSAS’S HUNGRY

SCOTT

CAN YOU GROW A LITTLE EXTRA THIS YEAR?

Scott Heritage Farm 15301 Alexander Rd., 501-831-7881  scottheritagefarm.org  A 30-acre family farm and participant in the Arkansas Grown Farm to Table program. CSA. SHERWOOD Sherwood Farmers Market  2303 E. Lee, 501-835-4699  keepsherwoodbeautiful.net  Arkansas-grown products from all around central Arkansas.  Farmers Market.

Gleaning, the age old practice of gathering produce left in the fields after harvest to feed the poor, is alive today in the Arkansas Gleaning Project. In 2015, more than 1 million pounds of gleaned produce went to food banks, food pantries, soup kitchens and shelters all across the state. From urban gardeners to GAP-certified operations, there’s a place for growers of all sizes in the Arkansas Gleaning Project. Yields are weighed and documented by tax receipts issued by the Arkansas Gleaning Project. Contact Jeremy Adams at jeremy@ arhungeralliance.org or 501-399-9999. Visit arhungeralliance.org for more information.

“I never want to plow under produce I’ve grown when there are hungry people who need it. I feel good about donating what’s left in my fields and growing a little extra.” — Randy Clanton Clanton Farms, Bradley County

The Arkansas Gleaning Project is a program of the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance /ARHungerAlliance

Arhungeralliance

@ARHungerRelief THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Gravette • Gepp • • Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • Berryville Avoca Mountain H • • Decatur • • • Centerton• • Rogers Ch Yellville Gassville • • • Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • • Cotter Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale • Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • Huntsville • Har Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbour Farmington • • • • Mount Pl • Greenland Parthenon Elkins • • • Prairie West Fork Grove • • Leslie •M • Deer • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Witt Spring • Dennard Northwest Arkansas • Shirley Cedarville Clinton • • Rudy • • Alma • • MulberryOzark • Clarksville Bee Branch • • Altus Lamar Jerusalem Cleveland • • • Center Ridge • • Fort Smith Dover • Lavaca London • • • Hattieville • Guy • Charleston• • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • R • Booneville Dardanelle • Atkins • MorriltonConway Vilon •E Huntington • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston Perryville • • MayflowerCabot • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Ja • Waldron • Sherwo Central Arkansas • Parks • •North ScLit Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• The Dirty Farmers Community Market Woods Doorganics  • Mena • Benton • Mount364IdaMain St., 501-253-4716  Bauxite • Hensle 703 SW 2nd St., 479-802-1624  Hot Springs • • • features locally grown Royal Farmers market doorganics.com  • produce and the Greater Good Cafe, Online meal kit delivery service that • Malvern Bismarck • Poyen where you• “eat what you need and pay supplies some ingredients from an Prattsville Sheridan • Grannis p.m. Tues.- • what you can.” 11 a.m.-2 urban farm. Also•sources from local Donaldson • • Sat. Farmers Market. farms and farmers markets. CSA. • • Dierks Arkadelphia • De Queen ELM SPRINGS BERRYVILLE  • • Rison Berryville Farmers Market  • Nashville MelonJ Gardens  Lowell Cave Springs

Gentry

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS Farmers Markets, CSAs & U-Pick Farms

ALMA Alma Farmers Market  533 Fayetteville Ave., 479-632-4127  Alma-area produce and prepared foods. Farmers Market. BENTONVILLE Bentonville Farmers Market  105 N. Main St. (Bentonville Square)  479-254-0254  downtownbentonville.org/events/ farmers-market  A producer-only market that sells local foods, produce and meats, along with arts and crafts. With special programming such as chef demonstrations and live music, too. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. Farmers Market.

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Solgohachia

126 Water Ave., 479-601-3099 601 Dr. Spurlin Cr., 870-654-5589   OffersPrescott a variety of gardening services, facebook.com/pages/BerryvilleForeman from simple tilling and soil preparation Farmers-market  Hope Ashdown to full garden installation and Locally grown seasonal produce, Warren Southwest Arkansas maintenance throughout the growing flowers, eggs and baked goods. From Camden Hampton season. Also offers an on-site and u-pick Apr. 27-Oct. 31. 7:30 a.m.-noon Texarkana market. U-Pick. Sat. Farmers Market.

CLARKSVILLE

• Fouke

Cox Berry Farm 1081 Hwy. 818, 479-754-3707  Offers strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, tomatoes, peaches, apples, pumpkins and nursery plants. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat.  U-Pick. CLINTON  Grass Roots Farmers Cooperative  314 Highway 65B, 479-310-0037  grassrootscoop.com  Farmer-owned and farmer-operated co-op. All members are raising livestock in Arkansas and are committed to the highest standards of agricultural sustainability. CSA. 

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

Louann

EUREKA SPRINGS

• Magnolia

Ashley’s Blueberries 245 CR 329, 501-253-8344  Bradley Sells organic high-bush blueberries. U-Pick.

• El Dorado • Junction City

Eureka Springs Farmers Market 2075 E. Van Buren St., 507-413-2573  facebook.com/ESFarmersMarket  Produce, eggs, beef, pork, honey, flowers, fruit trees, planting vegetables, ornamental plants and baked goods. Free coffee. 7 a.m.-noon, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. (April-Nov.), 9 a.m.-noon Thurs. (Nov.-April). Farmers Market.  Foundation Farm  10 Woolridge, 479-253-7461  foundationfarm.com  Farm and school offering fresh local produce and free classes on how to farm. CSA.


Cobblestone Project P.O. Box 1242  Farm project established to help impoverished and food insecure people.  CSA.  Fayetteville Farmers Market  101 W. Mountain St. (Fayetteville Square), 479-236-2910  612 S. College Ave. (Jefferson Center)  fayettevillefarmersmarket.org  Arkansas’ largest farmers market, featuring certified local produce, meats, and prepared foods. Two locations: Fayetteville Square, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues., Thurs.; 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.; Jefferson Center, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun. Fayetteville. Farmers Market.   Green Fork Farmers Market  205 W. Dickson St., 479-225-5075  greenforkfarmersmarket. locallygrown.net  Year-round farmers market sells vegetables, herbs, fruit, honey, eggs, mushrooms, chicken, duck, lamb, pork, beef, salsa, lacto-fermented kraut, baked goods, plants, herbal soaps, bath and beauty products. Indoor market, open rain or shine. Pre-order system available online to reserve products for pickup at the market. 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Wed. Farmers Market. 

Come find your favorite Arkansas farmers and meet some new faces at the new DOGTOWN FARMERS’ MARKET Opens Saturday, April 23rd 7AM-12PM 410 Main Street, NLR

(in the parking lot next to the Argenta Branch Library)

Proud to support Argenta! Like us on Facebook! | info@dogtownfarmersmarket.com

Mason Creek Farm 15620 Black Oak Quarry Rd., 479-4226000  Subscription farm offering delivery services of pastured poultry, eggs, organic herbs and heirloom vegetables. CSA, Wholesale Farm.  Northwest Arkansas Local Harvest  P.O. Box 2968, 479-251-1882  Community supported agriculture operator in northwest Arkansas. Offers four 8-week seasons. CSA.  Reagan Berry Farm  241 E. 13th St., 479-601-2268  Family farm offering u-pick strawberries. U-Pick. Sta-N-Step Farm  3104 Wildcat Creek Blvd., 479-361-2789  sta-n-step.blogspot.com  Pick your own blackberries, blueberries and raspberries. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues., Sat. U-Pick.  Summer Kitchen Farm  3702 Wilson Hollow Rd., 479-263-9965  Partners with CSA and local markets to provide raw milk, eggs, pork, chicken and vegetables. Can buy directly from farm. CSA.

"I've always had a passion for good food and drink. I started a business in 2011 to apply that passion to cheesemaking. It is a true pleasure to make cheese from the delicious raw cow, sheep and goat milk of Central Arkansas." -Kent Walker We aren’t just a cheesemaking operation, we are a full service cheese shop as well as a wine and beer bar! OPEN HOURS: WED-SAT 11AM-10PM SUN 11AM-8PM TOURS: EVERY SAT & SUN AT 3PM $10 PER ADULT KIDS FREE STOP BY OUR TASTING ROOM!

323 S CROSS ST. LITTLE ROCK 501-301- 4963 www.kentwalkercheese.com THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS

Wren Thicket Market 1041 S. School Ave.  wrenthicketmarket.com  Year-round, online pre-order farmers market with pick-up at Firefighters Association Building; also some produce available to those who didn’t order. SNAP/EBT, SFMNP coupons accepted. 9 a.m.-noon Sat. Farmers Market. FORT SMITH  Downtown Fort Smith Farmers Market  201 Garrison Ave., 479-784-1001  GoDowntownFS.com/farmersmarket.aspx  Farmers market with verified growers and artisans. Fresh produce, crafts and prepared foods available, along with regular live music. 7 a.m.-noon Sat. Farmers Market.  GENTRY  Gentry Farmers Market  500 E. Main St., 479-871-1052   facebook.com/TheChickenCoop. GentryAR  Located under the pavilion at the Chicken Coop (the old Farmers’ Co-op). Offers fresh food, quality arts and good music. Will accept EBT/debit cards. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. Farmers Market. GRAVETTE Gravette Farmers Market  110 Park Dr., 479-787-5368   cityofgravette-ar.gov/ gravettefarmersmarket.html  Market features fresh and locally grown produce, live folk music on market days. WIC and Senior Nutrition vouchers accepted. Farmers Market. GREEN FOREST Green Forest Farmers Market  Green Forest Public Square, 870-4806071  Local farmers market trying to make fresh produce available to the public within the most economical means possible. 7 a.m.-noon Wed. MarchOct. Farmers Market. HARRISON  Central Ozarks Farmers and Artisans Market  Court Park Sq.  Farmers market offering produce, crafts and flowers. 7 a.m.-noon Tues., Sat. June-Oct. Farmers Market.  Cline Berry Farm  224 S. Spruce St., 870-741-7121  clineberryfarm.com  Offers several varieties of blueberries during season. U-Pick.

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HOLIDAY ISLAND Holiday Island Farmers Market  2 Holiday Island Dr.  Heirloom vegetables, herbs, eggs, crafts. 8 a.m.-noon Fri. Farmers Market. HUNTSVILLE  Dripping Springs Garden  1558 CR 548, 870-545-3658  drippingspringsgarden.com  One of Arkansas’ oldest organic farms, offering seasonal produce, cut flowers and educational outreach. CSA. Wildfire Farm  4059 CR 516, 870-545-3120  locallygrown.net  Online farmers market serving Carroll County as well as shares in a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. CSA. JASPER Newton County Farmers Market  504 W. Court St., 870-446-2240  Produce and crafts from Newton County. WIC participant. 7 a.m.noon Wed., 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Fri. MayNovember. Farmers Market. LAMAR  Johnson County Farmers Market    400 Cabin Creek Rd., 479-885-6575  Market offering produce from Lamararea growers. Noon-4:30 p.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market.  Peach Pickin’ Paradise   1901 McGuire Rd., 479-754-2006  Mark Morgan’s farm grows peaches and nectarines. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. June-Aug. U-Pick. LONDON Renee’s Berry Garden  1265 Will Baker Rd., 479-293-3229  sites.google.com/site/ reneesberrygarden  Pre-picked and u-pick blueberries. Call ahead for picking conditions. U-Pick. MORRILTON  Conway County Farmers Market  117 S. Moose St., 501-354-2393  Locally grown, in-season fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. Farmers Market. MULBERRY Bluebird Song Farm 5260 Chastain Rd., 479-997-1996 Conventionally grown muscadine grapes and blueberries. U-pick fruit and blueberry bushes for sale. U-Pick.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

OMAHA Roberson Orchards Farm Market  Hwy. 14 E., 877-504-9050  facebook.com/robersonorchards  Peaches, vegetables in summer, apples in fall. Store carries a selection of dried fruits, nuts, honey, sorghum, jams, jellies, relishes and candies. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily Aug.-Feb. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily JuneSept. Farmers Market.  OZARK  Franklin County Farmers Market  300 W. Commercial St., 479-667-2525  ozarkareacoc.org  Local produce and crafts from area growers. 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Sat.  Farmers Market.  PARIS  Paris Farmers Market  25 W. Walnut, 707-502-5544  facebook.com/parisarkansasfarmersmkt  Farmers market on the courthouse square in Paris. Vendors are all required to be strictly Arkansas growers, producers, craftsmen and artisans. Farmers Market. ROGERS Downtown Rogers Farmers Market 101 E. Cherry St., 479-936-5487 mainstreetrogers.com Farmers market in downtown Rogers operated out of a newly renovated, city owned indoor/outdoor location. 7 a.m.12 p.m. Sat., April 30-Oct 29; 4 p.m.-8 p.m. May 19-Aug. 18. Farmers Market. Neal Family Farm  1246 W. Laurel Ave., 479-659-1750  facebook.com/Nealfamilyfarm  U-pick blueberries in season. U-Pick. Rogers Farmers Market  100 N. Dixieland Rd., 479-246-8383  rogersfarmersmarket.org  Farm fresh produce and local crafts. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Wed., Sat. April 27-Nov.; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. Nov.-April. Farmers Market. The Blueberry Barn  650 Lippert Dr., 479-636-9640  U-pick blueberries. Call for picking conditions. U-Pick.  The Blueberry Patch  1201 Longview Dr., 479-631-2483  Offers pre-picked and u-pick blueberries. Buckets and bags furnished. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.Sat. U-Pick.


RUSSELLVILLE Pope County Farmers Market 2200 W. Main St., 479-747-5429  Arkansas produce sold directly by the grower. Farmers Market.  Russellville Community Market  501 S. Phoenix Ave., 913-636-8193  russellville.locallygrown.net  Online market sells products farmed within 150 miles of Russellville yearround. Farmers Market.  Tri Peaks Community Market  West C St., 479-264-3682  facebook.com/ tripeakscommunitymarket  Downtown market featuring local farmers, crafters, artists, musicians and food vendors. 8 a.m. to noon Sat. Farmers Market.  SILOAM SPRINGS  Siloam Springs Farmers Market  Corner of University and Mt. Olive, 479-524-4556  siloamsprings.locallygrown.net  Producer-only market offering fresh produce, garden and landscaping plants, fresh-cut flowers, seasonal vegetables, local raw honey, baked goods and crafts. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues. and Sat. Apr. 20-Oct. 26 Farmers Market. SPRINGDALE Songbird Gardens  301 Michael St., 479-966-3255  songbird-gardens.com  An urban farm selling CSA-style garden boxes. CSA.  Springdale Farmers Market  Corner of Hwy. 265 and E. Emma, 479-466-1285  springdalefarmersmarket.org  Fresh fruits and vegetables, herbs, honey, nuts, farm fresh eggs, frozen meat, flowers, plants, jams, jellies, baked goods, homemade soaps, wood furniture and crafts available. Accepts SNAP/EBT and WIC. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. MayOct. Farmers Market.

WALDRON Scott County Farmers Market  100 W. First St. (Scott County Courthouse), 479-207-1040  Tomatoes, potatoes, melons, peppers, fruits, berries and other produce. First Sat. of every month. Farmers Market. WEST FORK West Fork Farmers Market  Corner of Hwy. 170 and Campbell Lp., 479-225-1611  Market offers USDA meats, organic vegetables and artwork. The growers are expanding to year-round production and working to implement a “Farm to School” program with the West Fork Schools. 7:30 a.m.-noon Sat., 3 p.m.dusk Wed. Farmers Market. WINSLOW Winslow Farmers Market  Winslow Blvd.   winslowar.com/index_files/Page993.htm  Features the on-site Winslow Garden that benefits Winslow Community Meals Inc. Garden is run by volunteers and the local 4-H Club. 9 a.m.-noon Sat. beginning in April. Farmers Market.

BREAKFAST LUNCH PRIVATE DINNERS CATERING

YELLVILLE Yellville Farmers Market 105 N. Berry St., 501-650-2356  facebook.com/YellvilleFarmersMarket  Growers-only open air market in conjunction with “Music on the Square.” Offers locally grown vegetables, fruits, eggs, bedding and garden plants, baked goods, jams and jellies, worm castings and Ozark crafts. 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Sat. Second week in April through second week in Sept. Farmers Market.

VAN BUREN Van Buren Farmers Market  1409 Main St., 479-218-2316  Offers a variety of seasonal vegetables, handmade crafts and artisan food products. Farmers Market. 

Locally Sourced

In 2015, the Arkansas Department of Agriculture’s Homegrown by Heroes program launched with great fanfare. If you are a veteran and a farmer, you need to register for this great program! And shoppers, when you see that Homegrown by Heroes label, be sure to thank that farmer for his or her service. For registration details and eligibility requirements, visit arkansasgrown.org or farmvetco.org/homegrown-by-heroes.

TUES-SAT 7AM-4PM SUN 8AM-3PM 1079 S. SCHOOL AVE. FAYETTEVILLE 479.966.4125 THEFARMERSTABLECAFE. COM

THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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NORTHEAST ARK ANSAS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gravette • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha • Bentonville Salem • • Greenway • Avoca Mountain Home Berryville • • Decatur Knobel • • • Centerton• • Rogers • Rector • Cherokee Village • • Hardy Pocahontas • • YellvilleCotter • • Gassville Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • • • Lafe Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale Evening Shade • Huntsville Western Grove • • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • Harrison • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge Kingston Jasper • Harriet Melbourne • • Sage Farmington • • •Smithville • • Blytheville • Greenland Mount Pleasant • • Parthenon Elkins • •Cave City Brookland • • Prairie • West Fork Grove • • Leslie • Mountain View • Deer • Jonesboro Swifton• • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville Cash Witt Spring • Batesville • • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley Cedarville Northeast Arkansas Newport Clinton • • • Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry Clarksville • Tyronza Alma •NORTHEAST • • Lamar • Bee Branch • Ozark Cherry Valley Jerusalem • Bradford Cleveland • • • Bald Knob • Altus London • Dover • • Center Ridge ARKANSAS • Fort Smith Judsonia • • Augusta Guy • Lavaca Hattieville • • • Charleston• Romance • • McCrory Marion • Russellville • • Paris & U-Pick • Searcy • • Springfield • • Wynne Farmers Markets, CSAs Farms • Dardanelle • Atkins Booneville • • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • • • • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston • Forrest City • • Ward Des•Arc • Cotton Plant • Palestine Rover • • •Bigelow • MayflowerCabot Jacksonville • • • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Roland Sherwood Lonoke Bluff • • • Central Arkansas Parks Little Rock • • North Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville Mabelvale • Hot Springs Village•• • Mena Woodson • Benton • Mount Ida Bauxite • Hensley Hot Springs • •JONESBORO • • Helena Royal • Stuttgart • Farmers Market  ASU• Regional Malvern Poyen •Stadium • Bismarck • Altheimer • De Witt N.E. Prattsville corner of Ave. and Aggie Sheridan • • Grannis • Donaldson White Hall • Rd., 870-892-2087  • Pine Bluff • Dierks asuregionalfarmersmarket.org  • Arkadelphia • Offers local produce from Jonesboro-• Grady • De Queen Rison area growers. 7 a.m.-11 •a.m. Sat. Farmers • Nashville Market. • Dumas Prescott • MOUNTAIN HOME • Foreman McGehee CALLING Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Mountain Home Farmers Warren • • Market  Hampton CHEROKEE VILLAGE  • Camden 3296 Hwy. 201• S., 870-492-2303  • Dermott ALL KIDS! Texarkana • Fresh local produce from area Spring River Farmers Louann • Lake VillageThe Fouke Market  producers. 6 a.m.-noon Wed. and Sat. • ASU Regional Farmers • Cherokee Village Town Center, May-Sept. Farmers Market.  Market in Jonesboro’s Nutritional Magnolia Hamburg • 870-847-7286  • Information and Fitness for Crossett El Dorado facebook.com/pages/Spring-RiverEudora • • • Ozark Locally Grown  Today’s Youth (NIFTY) program is Farmers-Market  • Bradley U.S. Hwy. 62 W., 870-421-2203  Junction City ready to serve up a helping • Selling fresh produce and locally made ozark.locallygrown.net/welcome  Gentry

Lowell Cave Springs

Solgohachia

crafts. 8 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Sat. Farmers Market. CHERRY VALLEY

Riley’s Orchard 3964 Hwy. 364, 870-588-4335  Offering peaches and grapes. Grapes are u-pick. Peaches sold at Jonesboro Farmers Market. Call ahead for availability and picking conditions. U-Pick.  EVENING SHADE  Piney Fork Berry Farm  163 Blueberry Ln., 870-368-5001  Highbush blueberries available during season. Call ahead for availability. U-Pick.

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Online farmers market covering northern Arkansas and southern Missouri. Farmers Market. NEWPORT

Downtown Newport Farmers Market Newport Lake, 870-664-0542  Farmers market selling local produce and crafts from the Newport area. Wed., Sat. June-Oct. Farmers Market. WYNNE Killough Farms  661 Highway 64B, 870-238-7038  Pick your own blueberries onsite. Daylight hours during season. U-Pick.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

of farmers market fun!

Gardening classes, tasting parties, farm animal visits and crafts are just a taste of all the great activities available. The NIFTY program holds events one Saturday each month, and every Saturday in July. The program is free, and there are no age requirements. See asuregionalfarmersmarket.org for more details.


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• Booneville

SOUTHWEST SOUTHWEST ARK ARKANSAS ANSAS

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS Farmers Markets, CSAs & U-Pick Farms

• Texarkana • Fouke

NASHVILLE

Joe Crews 217 Little River 142, 870-542-7220  Seasonal produce that you pick yourself. Call for availability. U-Pick. HOPE  Hope Farmers Market  Third and Elm St., 870-703-8788  Home to some of the world’s largest watermelons. Features farm-fresh produce straight from the back of the trucks. 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Tues., Sat. MaySept. Farmers Market.

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Blue Bayou Orchard 601 W. Hempstead St., 870-845-2333  Peaches available, either pick yourself or buy by the pound. Call ahead for availability. U-Pick.  Jamison Orchard  195 Orchard Rd., 870-845-4827  Third-generation peach farm, also grows plums and blackberries. Sold u-pick at the orchard, at farmers markets and wholesale to vendors and restaurants. U-Pick.  Nashville Farmers Market  110 S. Washington St., 870-557-2352  A local-growers-only market in an openair pavilion built by local volunteers with certified kitchen, small demonstration organic garden, gardening workshops and cooking demonstrations throughout most of season. Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

• Magnolia

Polk County Farmers Market 524 Sherwood, 479-394-6018  Local crops, fruits, honey, homemade breads, goat milk cheeses, local crafts, jams and relishes. 7 a.m. until sold out (about 10 a.m.) Tues., Thurs., Sat. MayOct. Farmers Market.

ASHDOWN

Warren

• Camden • Hampton

Louann

MENA

Clark County Farmers Market U.S. Hwy. 67/10th St., 870-246-1050  facebook.com/clarkcountyfarmersmarket  Produce-only market featuring Clark County growers. 7 a.m.-noon Tues., Sat. Farmers Market.

Atkins

• Prescott • Foreman • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas

ARKADELPHIA

• MorriltonConway Vilonia • El P • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston MayflowerCabot • Perryville • • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Jack • Waldron • Sherwoo Central Arkansas Litt • Parks • •North Scot Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Benton • Mena • Bauxite • Woodson • Mount Ida Hot Springs • • Hensley • Royal • Malvern Poyen Bismarck • • Prattsville •• Sheridan Grannis • • Donaldson • • WP • Dierks • Arkadelphia • De Queen • • Rison • Nashville Dardanelle

Huntington

Bradley

• El Dorado • Junction City

ROYAL Sunshine Store 3719 Sunshine Rd., 501-767-4614  Offering local vegetables, homemade salsa and other products on Saturdays. Farmers Market. TEXARKANA Farmers Market of Texarkana  3004 Linden Ave., 870-772-4558  Farm with seasonal produce including corn, fruits, honey and other vegetables. Wholesale Farm.  Gateway Farmers Market  3019 E. 9th St. 870-774-9171  Locally grown produce (within 75 miles) sold by the grower. Farmers Market.

DO THIS! APRIL 9 DUTCH OVEN WORKSHOP Lake Catherine State Park Picnic Hill Pavilion 1200 Catherine Park Rd., Hot Springs 501-844-4176


Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Late Night OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Chef Matthew McClure James Beard Award Semifinalist

479.286.6575 TheHiveBentonville.com Located at

BENTONVILLE

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Judsonia • • • • • Hattieville • Guy Romance • • McCrory Marion • • Searcy • • • • Springfield • • Wynne Dardanelle • Atkins Booneville • • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • SOUTHEAST ARK ANSAS • Huntington • • • Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Ward Cotton Plant Cabot • Forrest City • • • Rover • • •Bigelow Des•Arc • • Mayflower Jacksonville • Palestine • Waldron Roland • Fargo • DeVall’s • Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • •North Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • Little Rock • • Scott Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Benton • Mena Woodson • • • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena • Stuttgart • Royal Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt • Sheridan • White Hall • Grannis Donaldson • • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady • De Queen Rison • SOUTHEAST • Nashville • Dumas Prescott • ARKANSAS • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Warren • Farmers Markets, CSAs • Camden • Hampton • Dermott & U-Pick Farms • Texarkana Louann Lake Village • • • Fouke • Magnolia • Hamburg • Crossett Eudora • • El Dorado • Bradley • Junction City

Charleston

• Paris

London

Russellville

Solgohachia

PINE BLUFF Pine Bluff Farmers Market Saracen Landing, Martha Mitchell Expy.  Produce and crafts from Jefferson County. WIC participant. 6 a.m-1 p.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market. POYEN 

CROSSETT Ashley County Farmers Market  U.S. Hwy. 82  Area produce from Ashley County growers. Informal market; no set times. Farmers Market. EUDORA  Atkins Farms  253 Atkins Ln., 870-355-2211  Offers u-pick blueberries and blackberries during season. Also offers squash, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, corn, string beans, butter beans, pinkeyed peas, zucchini and okra. U-Pick. HAMBURG Triple M Farms of Ashley County  2383 Hwy. 189 N., 870-853-9285  Sells wholesale and retail u-pick tomatoes, peppers, watermelon, pumpkins and cantaloupe. U-Pick. LAKE VILLAGE Mel’s Farmers Market W. Main St., 870-265-5325 Farmers market offering fresh produce, nuts and eggs. Farmers Market.

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Ken Landreth  706 W. 6th St., 501-844-6510  Seasonal produce available for wholesale or u-pick. U-Pick.  PRATTSVILLE  A&B Berry Farm  2929 Hwy. 190 S., 870-699-4792  Pick your own blueberries during season. U-Pick.  RISON  Joe Willis  10920 Hwy. 63, 870-357-2302  Offers tomatoes, peaches, squash, okra, cucumbers, cantaloupe and watermelon. Farmers Market. SHERIDAN Grant County Farmers Market 101 W. Center St., 870-942-2231 Seasonal, open-air market offering produce from local farmers. Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

STUTTGART Arkansas County Farmers Market S. Main St., 870-946-3231 Offers Arkansas County produce, including cucumbers, squash, zucchini, blackberries, potatoes, eggs and more. WIC accepted. 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market. WARREN Jim Parker 23210 U.S. 63 N., 870-357-2748  Sells u-pick tomatoes, blackberries and cantaloupe. U-Pick. WASHINGTON  Old Washington Farmers Market  106 W. Carrol St., 870-703-4154  oldwashingtonfarmersmarket.com  Farmers market in historic Washington offering seasonal produce and artisan prepared foods. Farmers Market.


FARM TO TABLE RESTURANTS

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY BR I A N CH I L SO N

A wood-fired stove and the freshest local ingredients make Bentonville’s Oven & Tap a farm to table favorite.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS LITTLE ROCK Big Orange   17809 Chenal Pkwy., 501-821-1515 207 N. University Ave., 501-379-8715 bigorangeburger.com Gourmet burgers and salads are featured on a menu that uses local and seasonal produce whenever possible. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Boulevard Bread Co.   1417 Main St., 501-375-5100 1920 N. Grant St., 501-663-5951 boulevardbread.com Fresh bread, fresh pastries, wide selection of cheeses, meats and side dishes at the local chain's catering and baking headquarters. Good coffee, too. Brave New Restaurant   2300 Cottondale Ln., 501-663-2677 bravenewrestaurant.com Chef/owner Peter Brave was doing “farm to table” before most of us knew the term. His focus is on fresh, high-quality ingredients prepared elegantly but simply. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat.

Cache Restaurant   425 President Clinton Ave., 501-850-0265 cachelittlerock.com A stunning experience on the wellpresented plates and in terms of atmosphere, glitz and general feel. It doesn’t feel like anyplace else in Little Rock. 11 a.m.-close Mon.-Fri., 5 p.m.-close Sat. Last seating at 9:45 p.m. each evening.  Capital Bar and Grill  111 Markham St., 501-370-7013 capitalbarandgrill.com Big hearty sandwiches, daily lunch specials and fine evening dining all rolled up into one at this landing spot downtown. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-midnight Fri.-Sat., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun.   Cheers in the Heights   2010 N. Van Buren, 501-663-5937 cheersith.com Good burgers and sandwiches, vegetarian offerings and salads at lunch, and fish specials and good steaks in the evening. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.   Ciao Baci 605 N. Beechwood St., 501-603-0238 ciaobaci.org The focus is on fine dining in this casually elegant Hillcrest bungalow, though excellent tapas are out of this world. The tree-shaded, light-strung deck is a popular destination. Copper Grill   300 E. Third St., 501-375-3333 coppergrilllr.com Comfort food, burgers and more sophisticated fare, including fresh salads. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat.

Milford Track   10809 Executive Center Dr., 501-223-2257 milford-track.com Healthy and tasty are the key words at this deli/grill that serves breakfast and lunch. Bread is baked in-house, and there are several veggie options. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.   Mylo Coffee Co.   2715 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-747-1880 mylocoffee.com Bakery with a vast assortment of handmade pastries, house-roasted coffee and an ice cream counter. Soups and sandwiches, too. 7 a.m-9 p.m. Tues.-Thurs., 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. So Restaurant 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-663-1464 sorestaurantbar.com Call it a French brasserie with a sleek but not fussy American finish. The wine selection is broad and choice. The Fold Botanas Bar   3501 Old Cantrell Rd., 501-916-9706 thefoldlr.com Gourmet tacos and botanas, or small plates. Try the cholula pescada taco. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-midnight Fri.-Sat.   The Root Café   1500 S. Main St., 501-414-0423 therootcafe.com Homey, local foods-focused cafe. With tasty burgers, homemade bratwurst, banh mi and a number of vegan and veggie options. Breakfast and Sunday brunch, too. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Sat., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun.

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FARM TO TABLE RESTURANTS

Trio's   8201 Cantrell Rd., Ste. 100 501-221-3330 triosrestaurant.com Fresh, creative and satisfying lunches; even better at night, when the chefs take flight. Best array of fresh desserts in town. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5:30-close Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun.    NORTH LITTLE ROCK Mugs Café 515 Main St., 501-379-9101 mugscafe.org Quaint and casual breakfast and lunch spot located in the heart of North Little Rock's Argenta district. Farm fresh sausage and eggs make up the backbone of a tasty menu beyond standard breakfast fare. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Ristorante Capeo   425 Main St. 501-376-3463 capeo.us This excellent, authentic Italian restaurant was the trailblazer in the nowhot Argenta neighborhood of downtown North Little Rock. 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat.

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS BENTONVILLE The Hive 200 N.E. A St., 479-286-6575 thehivebentonville.com The chef describes the menu as “Ozark High South,” with offerings like pimento cheese, an “Arkansas Trail Mix” of pecans, soybeans, black walnuts and cheddar straws, grits, etc. You must have the frisee, egg or no. The pork chop is great. Breakfast 6:30 a.m.-10 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Sat.-Sun.; lunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; dinner 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; Sunday brunch 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Bar hours: 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 5 p.m.11:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Oven & Tap 215 S. Main., 479-268-5884 ovenandtap.com With a menu focused on fresh, local ingredients cooked to perfection in a wood-fired oven, Oven & Tap has become one of the crown jewels in the growing northwest Arkansas farm to table scene. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 4 p.m.-10 p.m. Tues.-Sat.; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun.

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Tusk & Trotter 110 S.E. A St. tuskandtrotter.com Brasserie focused on locally-sourced ingredients. The dinner menu has everything from French fries (pommes frites) to burgers to duck confit. At lunch, find a lamb sandwich from local growers to hot dogs. Microbrews, too. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun.

Ozark Natural Foods Café 1554 N. College Ave., 479-521-7558 onf.coop Small cafe housed in Ozark Natural Foods grocery store offers locally-roasted coffee, muffins and scones for breakfast, salads and sandwiches, hot bar, vegan dishes, bakery items, local meats and produce when possible. Hot bar 11 a.m.-2 p.m. daily.

EUREKA SPRINGS

Boardwalk Café 215 E. Court St., 870-446-5900 arkansashouse.net/menu-wide.html Specializes in organic food, made from locally grown and raised ingredients. Adjacent to the Arkansas House resort. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon., Tues., Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri.-Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

Fresh 179 N. Main St., 479-253-9300 freshanddeliciousofeurekasprings.com Farm to table full-service restaurant and market serves homemade breads and pastries, cured meats, gourmet cheeses, salads, homemade pasta and more, dine in or take out. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon., 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs.-Sat., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sun. The Garden Bistro 119 N. Main St., 479-253-1281 eurekagardenbistro.com Farm-to-table bistro featuring fresh vegetables and herbs from local producers. Seasonal menu featuring meats and produce available from the area. FAYETTEVILLE The Farmer’s Table Café 1079 S. School Ave., 479-966-4125 thefarmerstablecafe.com Locally-sourced café serving some of the best breakfast and lunch in the state. 6 a.m.-4 p.m. Tues.-Sun.; 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Greenhouse Grill 481 S. School Ave., 479-444-8909 greenhousegrille.com Menu created with local and organic products when possible, including herbs grown by the restaurant. Among the offerings: Sweden Creek Farm Organic Shiitake Mushroom Fries, Kale & Carrot Summer Rolls, Roasted Fennel and Apple Salad, and Cage Free Chicken & Apricot Marsala. Live music on occasion. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Tues.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. Hammontree’s 326 N. West Ave., 479-521-1669 hammontreesgourmet.com Fancy grilled cheese with local ingredients and gourmet cheeses. Salads, turkey burgers and soups also available. There’s outdoor seating along the front. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016

JASPER

HARRISON Prairie Market’s Tall Grass Deli 115 W. Industrial Park Rd., 870-743-3267 Health food restaurant in a health food store that also functions as farmers market, serves locally sourced food. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. ROGERS The Green Bean 5208 Village Pkwy., Ste. 11, 479-464-8355 or 479-381-2055 itsagreenbeanworld.com Organic, often local, luncheon fare; also at the Rogers Farmers Market on Saturdays. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. SILOAM SPRINGS 28 Springs 100 E. University, 479-524-2828 28springs.com Inn at the Mill’s Chef Miles James’ new restaurant features seasonal menu, locally sourced food, craft beers and hand-mixed cocktails. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat., bar open until last call.

DO THIS! APRIL 1 19TH ANNUAL FOOD & FOAM FEST Dickey-Stephens Park 400 W. Broadway St., North Little Rock 501-664-4591


PH OTOGR A PH Y BY DA N A V ICK ERSO N

ARK ANSAS GROCERS

GROCERS The new Natural Grocers on Rodney Parham Road in Little Rock offers up local, organic produce and Arkansas made products. Allen’s Food Market  60 Sugar Creek Ctr., Bella Vista  facebook.com/allensfoods  Grocery store that specializes in organic, locally and regionally produced items. Producers, contact Steve Morrow at steve@allensfoods.arcoxmail.com or 479-876-6190.   Brookshire’s Food & Pharmacy  brookshires.com  Full-service grocery in variety of locations in southern Arkansas.    

Culinary District 510 Ouachita Ave., Hot Springs.   501-624-2665  culinarydistrict.com  Offers kitchen supplies, gourmet ingredients and a large selection of local meats and prepared products.  Edwards Food Giant  edwardsfoodgiant.com  Grocery store with locations in Little Rock, Bryant, Forrest City, Harrisburg and Marianna. Producers, contact Jeff Nosbisch at 501-850-6338 for produce, or Bob Childers at 870-2951000 for meat.  

Fresh Market thefreshmarket.com  Specialty grocer with locations in Little Rock and Rogers. Producers, contact Neal Augustine at 501-225-7700.  Good Earth Natural Food  3955 Central Ave., Hot Springs  855-293-2784  goodearthvitamin.com  Offers fresh, organic local produce, packaged organic foods, earth-friendly home and personal care products, and a huge variety of supplements.  

Little Rock’s dining and craft food and beverage scene is on the rise. Whether enjoying a romantic dinner for two, using our Locally Labeled Passport program to sample our city’s everexpanding offerings of ales, wines and spirits, or savoring any of the amazing products our artisan food producers are making, there’s never been a better time to enjoy great food and drink in Little Rock.

Lost Forty Brewing > To see more, visit LittleRock.com

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ARK ANSAS GROCERS

Greg & Jim’s Grocery & Grill 46 Old Military Rd., Colt  870-633-0541  Grocer that also serves breakfast and lunch six days a week and dinner two days. Full line of groceries and produce.   Harps Foods  harpsfoods.com  Regional, employee-owned grocery store with dozens of locations in Arkansas.  

Supporting Our Community By Buying Fresh, Local Produce From Farms and Farmer Markets 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd. Little Rock, AR. 72205 sorestaurantbar.com

Hillcrest Artisan Meats 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd., Ste. B, Little Rock  501-671-6328  facebook.com/HillcrestArtisanMeats  Butcher shop that carries local and regional meats. Also carries local artisan products and a limited selection of produce. Producers, ask for Brandon or Tara Brown.   Hogg’s Meat Market  4520 Camp Robinson Rd., North Little Rock  501-758-7700  hogsmeatmarket.com  Butcher shop and catering business in operation since 1961. Processes wild game.   Kroger  kroger.com  National grocery store with some 50 locations in Arkansas. Producers should contact produce managers at individual stores.  Meat Works Butchery  816 De Queen St., Mena  479-394-2900  Grass-fed and finished beef, lamb, goat, pastured pork and chicken as well as eggs, breads, vegetables, fruits, specialty oils, sauces, honey and spices. Also delivers. 

Open 4 p.m. till close Monday through Saturday 605 N. Beechwood St. Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501.603.0238 ciaobaci.org

Natural Grocers 9210 N. Rodney Parham Rd., Little Rock 501-312-8300 Fresh produce, meat and dairy along with natural supplements and grocery items.

Natural Things 5407 Hwy. 5 N., Bryant  501-213-0034  Natural foods store that sells mostly grocery items.   Olde Fashioned Foods  8434 Phoenix Ave., Fort Smith  479-649-8200  Offers local and organic foods, herbs, alternative medicine and health products.   Ozark Natural Foods  1554 N. College Ave., Fayetteville  479-521-7558  ozarknaturalfoods.com  Natural foods co-op owned by a community of more than 10,000 investors. Producers, contact produce manager Pauline Thiessen at 479-5217588 or Pauline@onf.coop.   Stratton’s Market  405 E. Third St., Little Rock  501-244-0542  duganspublr.com  Small grocery and liquor store attached to Dugan’s Pub in Little Rock.   Terry’s Finer Foods  5018 Kavanaugh Blvd., Little Rock  501-663-4154  Neighborhood grocery offering fresh, gourmet produce and grocery items. Walmart  Bentonville (corporate office)  800-925-6278  The international discount chain has sold Arkansas produce in its store for 20 years. Local and organic produce available statewide.  Whole Foods  wholefoodsmarket.com  National chain with locations in Little Rock and Fayetteville. See website for information about placing products.

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Full Bar 1920 N. Grant St. | 501.663.5951 www.boulevardbread.com Located in the Heights, SOMA & Baptist Hospital 62

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2016


Capsicum, Herb of the Year

TM

2016

Susan Belsinger

Celebrate Capsicum, the 2016 Herb of the Year, on the Herbal Field Trip and Medicinal Herb Workshop May 6-7 at Ozark Folk Center. Learn to identify wild herbs and mushrooms, grow beneficial plants and learn about the role of the village herbalist. And while you’re at it, put June 17-18 on your calendar for the Farm to Table Weekend to enjoy the freshest farm-grown produce! Space is limited, so call 870-269-3851 to register today.

May 6-7 • Herbal Field Trip & Medicinal Herb Workshop A great weekend to learn about identifying wild plants and mushrooms, using herbs and essential oils, and self-sufficiency. Great guest speakers and a fun hike, too.

June 17-18 • Farm to Table Weekend Local foods, local farmers and local traditions. Join us for a weekend of workshops, classes, great food and lots more.

For a complete calendar of events and concerts, visit OzarkFolkCenter.com.

Home of

OzarkFolkCenter.com Park Information: 870-269-3851 Cabins at Dry Creek: 800-264-3655 THE FOOD ISSUE 2016 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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Farm-to-Table Dining in Your Own Backyard F O R D I N I N G AT I T S F I N E S T

501.221.1620 info@rhcatering.com www.rhcatering.com R E N TA L FA C I L I T I E S AVA I L A B L E W I T H A L L A S P E C T S O F E V E N T P L A N N I N G A N D F U L L S E R V I C E C AT E R I N G

Arkansas Food & Farm | The Food Issue 2016  
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