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Joining the Dots IN CRYSTAL PALACE

Joining the dots


Study issued March 2015


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In light of evolving proposals for the area, the Mayor of London has commissioned 00 to carry out a study of Crystal Palace, including Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge. The focus of the study is to document and share the richness of the area, and to explore opportunities for regeneration which build on existing riches, ideas, and proposals uncovered.

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Contents Executive Summary

A

Introduction - Why Crystal Palace? - Scope of Study - How to use this document

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A New Approach: Joining the Dots - A Generative Approach - Inspiration - Methodology

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Area Context - Policy Overview - Area Mapping - Three Town Centres

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Insights - Civic Host Space - Enterprise - Networks - Local Capacity

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Tactics - Physical Intervention - Programme - Infrastructure - Governance & Asset Management - People

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Forward Strategy - Upper Norwood: Retain and Grow - Anerley: Redefine - Penge_ Reinvigorate

G

Pull-out - Starting your project - Inspiration - People Directory - Spaces & Networks Directory - Funding sources - References

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report captures the findings of the commissioned study that have emerged from multiple and on-going conversations with residents and organisations across the Crystal Palace area. While perhaps obvious to local people, Crystal Palace is multi-faceted, comprised of different neighbourhoods mainly incorporating Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge, each with distinct characteristics, qualities, and ultimately needs; its richness and potential is its varied nature. A simple conclusion of this study is that it is vital to view Crystal Palace through this kaleidoscopic lens. Accordingly, this report outlines both broad strategies to build consensus and coordinated actions across the area, as well as neighbourhood specific proposals. Core findings of the study common across all three areas can be summarised as: Opportunities • A strong presence of civic networks and activity and skills, with some gaps identified in forward planning, project management, business planning and finance. • Clear opportunities to strengthen civic and professional networks, particularly involving youth & enterprise. • A desire for and potential to establish protocols for inviting or assessing locally-led proposals for the area. • A general demand for accessible co-working and ‘maker space’ (particularly for creative/craft-based enterprise). • Enhanced coordination for local growth

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Challenges • Resident perception of Borough disinvestment and lack of policy prioritisation of the town centres. • An absence of clear, navigable ‘touch down’ points and processes within Councils on specific topics (from accessing Council-owned buildings and land, to starting Business Improvement Districts or Neighbourhood Forums), and resident desire for ease and clarity of communication. • Low awareness amongst local organisations of forthcoming funding and commissioning opportunities • Concern about lack of mixing between sections of the community and a desire for inclusive spaces and regeneration processes. • General concerns about the loss and potential loss of affordable spaces for community and businesses. The study highlights opportunities for the five Boroughs to strategically work together, investing in a range of tools and resources shared across the areas, from a Crystal Palace People Directory, structured programme of networking events, and space booking system covering a wide range of community and public assets, to ‘Resident Host’ and ‘Resident Entrepreneur’ roles focused on bridging networks and lending additional capacity to civic organisations. Subsequently, a set of more detailed recommendations respond to the particular challenges and opportunities of each town centre context: Upper Norwood being widely perceived as a thriving community hub concerned with protecting and growing its independent nature, Anerley lacking a central core and identity, and Penge remaining a useful commercial centre in need of imaginative re-invigoration of its public realm and High Street. Joining the dots


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An approach to the coordination of investment and commissioning for the areas is summarised as: Retain & Grow (Upper Norwood) Seek multi-Council cooperation in: • Supporting the development and growth of a communityled vehicle with the mandate to represent a community spanning Borough boundaries up to Council and potentially city-government level; • Devising tactics for retaining the area’s unique character, and acting as a platform for delivery of local aspirations; • Providing shared investment into new roles focused on increasing the capacity of local organisations through specialist expertise and by acting as single point of contact sign-posting new projects to relevant officers within multiple Boroughs. Redefine (Anerley) Seek support in: • Addressing Anerley’s lack of distinct core or identity by investing in an ‘anchor’ space for the area, potentially in the form of co-working or ‘maker space’ building off the current enterprise activities locally, and the light-industrial and workshop heritage of Upper Norwood to serve as a flagship for a more general work-focussed renaissance. Re-invigorate (Penge) Develop Community – Council partnerships to deliver: • A series of programmatic investments easing access to spaces on Penge High Street, including potential investment in a High Street business incubator; • “Open Space” license for local landlords easing access to available spaces; • Networking events for businesses and community; public space enhancements potentially including heritage-based way-finding and orientation schemes. Joining the dots


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WHY CRYSTAL PALACE? This study has been produced at a time of profound economic challenges, and the emergence of a growing localism agenda underpinned by legislative and practical tools enabling new opportunities to shape local resilience. The combination of central government’s shrinking support for local boroughs (falling by an estimated 40%) combined with its commitment to a ‘‘radical shift of power from the centralised state to local communities”has underscored the necessity of enabling new approaches to regeneration.1 With some councils nearly halving in size, it is now more important than ever to see their remaining resources focused on building stronger communities, and facilitating greater civic action. Earlier this year, the area known as Crystal Palace was proposed as a Strategic Outer London Development Centre for leisure, tourism, culture and sport within the Further Alterations of the London Plan (FALP) and hosted a number of debates and consultations surrounding the future of several of its major assets, including the Crystal Palace Park and the National Sports Centre, stimulating calls for more coherent locally-led vision for the area as a whole. These developments, combined with the long-standing frustrations associated with its location straddling 5 boroughs, and 11 wards, presents a timely challenge to productively imagine new ways of working together differently in Crystal Palace.

1 New Local Government Network (2014) The Council and the Common: Local Government in 2020

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Commission Boundary Boundary of the study area suggested by the Greater London Authority, incorporating the centres of Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge, with a wider area of influence incorporating Gipsy Hill and Sydenham

SYDENHAM GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK UPPER NORWOOD

PENGE ANERLEY

Core study area Wider area of influence

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SCOPE OF STUDY This study and accompanying toolkit aim to capture a richer understanding of the different elements that together comprise Crystal Palace. A central focus of the study has been to take stock of the distinct qualities and characteristics of Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge - the three neighbourhoods defined as the core focal points within the study area - to provide a perspective on their relationship to one another, including the distinct and common challenges, assets and opportunities associated with each. The brief originated as an ‘audit’ of Crystal Palace incorporating spatial use in the town centres, quality of public realm and potential improvements, and heritage and green space assets. An additional aspiration of the brief was to uncover and stimulate dialogue with local organisations and individuals engaged in projects across the areas, including those interested in shaping, or being involved in proposals and priorities for future regeneration. The brief included a checklist of auditing activities spanning from the analysis of the shop fronts and building facades and identification of vacant sites, to the mapping of land use and the identification of significant historic buildings and green routes. The initial groundwork in Stage 1, consisting of desk-top research on local policy, ‘walk-abouts’ and interviews, uncovered a remarkable density of civic activity, networks and passion for the area. At a mid-point review with the Greater London Authority, it was agreed that the remainder

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of the commission should focus on exploring the potential for locally-led regeneration by understanding the strengths and requirements of the networks identified, rather than an emphasis on physical realm assessments in the original brief. It is intended that the insights gathered throughout the study be packaged as a report and toolkit - a useful resource for Council officers and residents alike. As such, the document contains an analysis of town centre challenges and opportunities, civic networks and cross-area working, informed by open-ended conversations in and about Crystal Palace - a first step towards building up an improved understanding and governance of the area as a whole, and towards enhanced coordination of projects, identification of shared priorities as well as new funding and commissioning opportunities.

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How to use this document This document aims to be a productive resource for residents, local authorities and organisations within ‘Crystal Palace’ by: • Providing a joined-up overview of the distinct characteristics, riches, ideas and networks associated with each of its constituent neighbourhoods, along with a coherent overview of the area as a whole • Stimulating discussion around the tools and tactics that could unlock new ways of working on local challenges and opportunities The study presents an overview of general and thematic issues and insights identified in conversations with residents, organisations and Councils across the study area, followed by relevant tools, and recommendations. The Pull-out section is intended as a document for both Councils and residents to dip in and out of - a ‘first draft’ containing the template versions of resources that can continue to be developed and used beyond the scope of this commission. It contains the beginning of a directory for people and spaces - aimed at making the richness of networks, spaces and organisations here more visible and contactable; a long list of ideas documented throughout the study; and inspiring case studies illustrating where local authorities, housing associations and civic organisations are working together in new and creative ways.

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: chs oadot pr e A p th w ing N e in

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A New approach

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A generative approach A traditional approach to envisioning future area improvements often relies on top-down, prescriptive solutions. These processes can result in projects being delivered in isolation and failing to build upon local skills and capabilities. Instead, residents are only consulted on a set of pre-determined solutions, eventually resulting in the delivery of one preferred scenario. A generative approach puts processes in place to ensure that projects are connected, share and learn from each other, and seed and lever further investment and benefits. Key to this is recognising local residents as potential coproducers. This might begin with an open invitation to local residents to identify opportunities for their area and surfacing a wider group interested in taking those ideas forward. Consultants and Councils would then help residents test and iterate and learn from those ideas. This means seeing projects as opportunities to continually generate new ideas and solutions. In Crystal Palace, characterised by strong civic networks and complexity of governance, top-down approaches risk being irrelevant or rejected. Instead, Local Authorities need to invest in resources and protocols that enable people to become co-producers, such as: 1) shifting to match funds instead of grants to support inkind community contribution; 2) new forms of local governance such as Parish Councils, which support the emergence of local priorities; 3) initiatives that provide the stimulus to further projects, such as community-owned energy companies capable of generating their own micro-funds; 4) spaces that build local skills and networks. Joining the dots


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Traditional Approach

Generative Approach

Product specified End point determined

Known starting point but openended solutions

Opportunities identified

Invitation

Consultants devise

Opportunities identified

Connect to other projects

Implemented/ Build

END Test: Prototype Iterate Learn & share

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Implemented/ Build

Iterate - generate next project

Identify group to do

Proposal tested locally


The following are a few examples of where cities, residents are finding ways to adopt generative approaches to projects. They include: • • • •

A tiered neighbourhood fund in the city of Seattle that matches in-kind contributions from residents London’s first Parish Council, a new self-funding community government mechanism for the Paddington area of Westminster Council. A community owned energy company run by volunteers and enabled by a relationship with Hackney Council A community-run ‘living room’ run by local residents

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Inspiration

Inspiration


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SEATTLE NEIGHBOURHOOD MATCH FUND A match fund recognising in-kind contributions

Local Examples Croydon Match Fund ÂŁ385,000 available between 2013 until March 2015 for local projects in Croydon wards

A fund available to Seattle residents, matching in-kind contributions from residents with grant support from the city towards neighbourhood improvement projects Funding for projects via Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is available in tiers of $1K, $25K, $100K People contribute a range of skills from grantwriting, public art, accounting & landscaping & more Provides a connection between citizens and city government via Neighbourhood Coordinators to promote and support applications Joining the dots


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QUEENS PARK COUNCIL PARISH A governance structure to shape local priorities

A new Parish or Community Council focused on neighbourhood planning issues - from youth and elderly activities, coordination of events, management of allotments and now the potential management of local park as source of income. ÂŁ40 levy per household from 12,000+ residents Affords 2 members of staff + 1 office Anticipated to raise ÂŁ100k per year Skills needed include networking and outreach between both policy makers and residents, knowledge of local government, planning issues and policy and engaging support and buy-in from local community Paddington Development Trust provided legal and governance support to campaign groups throughout the process Joining the dots


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hackney ENERGY A locally run energy project inviting micro-investment

A newly formed community-owned solar panel project installing a 120kW solar array on the roofs of 14 buildings in Banister House, a Homerton (Hackney) estate. Resident can buy shares for a minimum of ÂŁ50. People outside of the estate will be able to buy shares for a minimum of ÂŁ250 with a 4% return on investment. Project realised through: Project manager plus buddy to drive project Book-keeping and legal issues Solar Power expert Someone to work with suppliers, build partnerships and communications The project was supported by the not-for-profit group Repowering London; an agreement with the Council resulted in a lease allowing access to roofs spanning two decades Joining the dots


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THE LIVING ROOM A shared space run by and for local residents in Rotterdam

A welcoming communal space in a former shop in the city of Rotterdam, which residents joined together to redecorate, and where people from the neighbourhood share meals, hold events and look after their children together, in a shared and open living room. Residents membership fee - Everyone contributes 3 euros per month to keep it running People contribute a range of skills from treasurer, decorators, space diary keepers and key-holders, people keeping tidy to people running classes, eg art classes for the local children An expanding group of neighbours now including the local police Joining the dots


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Methodology

Methodology

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mETHODOLOGY: The Engagement Process

Early on, the richness of community networks and activity across the neighbourhoods was recognised as a distinct asset to be documented, learned from and built off. Where possible, the study was used to prompt new connections and conversations around new ways of working together to bring about desired change. Using a generative approach, we seeded new introductions, discussions, potential partnerships and collaborations between individuals and groups. This allowed for an iterative exploration of ideas for the area, and crucially, enabled multiple ways for residents to connect with us and share their knowledge, concerns and ideas. The process has begun to identify shared themes, build bridges between communities of shared interest, broadcast awareness of existing projects and networks and - last but not least - validate these interests and priorities back to councils.

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Upper Norwood

Joining the dots

Penge

Anerley

Joining the dots is a study commissioned by the Mayor of London looking

Across a four month period 00 actively met and networked at the Crystal Palace area, including Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge. with local community groups citizens the of the The focus is to better understand localand priorities, shareacross the richness area, and to explore opportunities for regeneration which build on study area. The name ‘Joining the Dots’ was givenexisting to the riches, ideas, and proposals gleaned from meaningful community dialogue. study, and a website and twitter account were set up to Over the next month, we’ll be hosting drop-in conversations, meetings, open communicate upcoming activities in the area with a neutral workshops and events. We wanted you to be aware of ongoing opportunities to beopen part ofidentity, discussions, herethe is a breakdown of what we’re leave up to, and and sosothat social media might when: a legacy, with the possibility of these social media tools (Twitter, website) being adopted by interested local groups following the commission.

Weeks 1-2

Julyin-Ideas’ Sept ‘Feeding 11 October - 1 November

Programme

Weeks 3-4

Week 5 Groundwork ‘Testing & Developing& Deskwork ‘Sharing Ideas’ Ideas’ Thursday 20 November Desk-top research, 1-1 meetings Mon 3 - Fri 14 November

and walkabouts

Thur 30 October Wed 22 October Public Drop-in Conversations Public Drop-in Conversations 1pm - 4pm: Anerley Town Hall 10am - 1pm: Anerley Town Hall, Anerley 5.30pm - 8pm: Sainsburys forecourt, Upper 5.30pm - 7.30pm: Sainsburys forecourt, Penge Norwood Sat 25 October Sat 1residency November in area, 5 week local Public Drop-in Conversations Public Drop-in Conversations 11am - 2pm: Outside Blenheim Centre, Penge 6 public drop-in events 11am - 2pm: Outside Sainsbury’s, Upper to hard-to-reach groups web: www.joiningthedots.cc OutreachNorwood

Oct -Nov

Public Drop-in Conversations

email: hello@joiningthedots.cc

Dec

Public Workshop & Exhibition

00 is a multidisciplinary design practice who bring together skills in action-led research, urban design strategy, architecture and place-making. www.project00.cc

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What we did ‘Walkabouts’ Locally guided walks to gather a contextual understanding of the study area, resulting in the documentation of a rich diversity of community resources and assets across the neighbourhoods, including meeting and host spaces, growing networks, workspaces, built heritage, public pathways and civic networks and initiatives, as well as brownfield or abandoned sites. These findings have been fed into the People & Spaces Directory in the ‘Pull Out’ section of this document.

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Snapshot of engagement

271

individuals attended public drop-in events

children and young people engaged with at public events

260

local individuals and community contacts on ‘Joining the Dots’ mailing list

1-1 meetings and conversations with small groups

14

35

18

Council officers met with across 5 Boroughs Twitter followers of ‘Joining the Dots’

120

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Desk-top research Desk-top research covered the history of Crystal Palace, Anerley, Upper Norwood and Penge, local demographics, neighbourhood profiles and consisted of a literature review of policy documentation across the five boroughs.1 Research also covered best practice across a number of potentially relevant topics spanning community-led vehicles such as Neighbourhood Forums, Parish Councils, Community Land Trusts and Business Improvement Districts to alternative models of retail, meanwhile use and other tactics for High Street regeneration. Local Drop-ins We visited Anerley, Penge and Upper Norwood at regular intervals between October and November, hosting a series of public-facing exhibition sessions to raise awareness of the project, host conversations around local interests and priorities, as well as making drop-in visits to hard to reach groups. 1-1 semi-structured interviews and group meetings We met with a range of local Stakeholders and community groups including Council Officers in planning, economic development from across the five boroughs, Metropolitan Police Officers, local Housing Associations, community organisations, real estate agents and local councillors.

1 This included Unitary Development Plans, Core Strategy Documents, Local Development Frameworks, Economic Development Frameworks, Employment Land Studies, existing Heritage Strategies and Community Plans.

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Photo from Joining the Dots Dec 2nd workshop in Anerley Town Hall

Workshop & Networking We hosted an open workshop with 45 residents of Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge, inviting guest speakers from Camden Collective, Meanwhile Space and Impact Hub Brixton to share their experience on accessing empty spaces, forming a business improvement district and curating a community-based enterprise space. We also tested area-wide insights gathered over the course of the study and scenarios and tactics for accessing space, forming groups, initiating a directory of resources, and bridging different networks. These explorations have informed the proposed tactics and forward strategy in sections E and F respectively, and lead to the beginnings of the people and spaces directory in section G.

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Snapshot of participants at the Open Workshop Along with local residents, traders, and aspiring local social entrepreneurs, representatives and individuals from the following groups and organisations attended the area-wide workshop:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Affinity Sutton, Community Investment Team Alexandra Cottages Residents Association Anerley Regeneration Project Bromley Council, Regeneration Lambeth Council, Brixton and Clapham Town Centre manager Bromley Parks Friends Forum/ Parks Partnership Officer Community Canteen, Penge Crystal Palace Community Development Trust, youth programme Crystal [Fun] Palace Crystal Palace Park Working Group Crystal Palace councillors Crystal Palace Transition Town (including Patchwork Farms, Palace Power and Food Market projects) Friends of Crystal Palace Subway Friends of Crystal Palace Dinosaurs St Hughes community centre, Anerley The Stitch Club/ Makerhood News from Crystal Palace Penge and Cator Councillors Penge Forum Penge Town Team Penge Tourist Board Penge Traders Association Upper Norwood library

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Co nt ex t

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43,400

estimated total population living across wider Crystal Palace

19,200 estimated households

5

boroughs

3

Metropolitan Police boundaries

2

postal boundaries

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AREA Overview Officially the name ‘Crystal Palace’ applies to an electoral ward within the London borough of Bromley. In reality, the name is taken to mean a wider area roughly comprised of Crystal Palace Park and the surrounding neighbourhoods of Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge, Gipsy Hill and parts of Sydenham - an outer London area (zone 3) spanning five boroughs, eleven wards, two postal districts and three metropolitan police boundaries.

SOUTHWARK LEWISHAM LAMBETH

Crystal Palace

Penge and Cator

Upper Norwood

CROYDON

BROMLEY

A map of ‘Crystal Palace’ showing borough boundaries (black), ward boundaries (colour block) and Metropolitan police boundaries (dotted orange) across the three areas, against the study area and wider area of influence defined in the brief (dotted black lines)

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Centre Designations

“An attractive, easily accessible, and safe major town centre”

Deptford

12

New Cross

13

Peckham 16

“Lewisham’s most important shopping area.”

Brixton 7

Lewisham

“The fastest growing (and most ethnically diverse) area of Lambeth, but with limited appeal of retail offer.”

Streatham

10

“A local centre catering for immediate population with a limited number of ‘high street’ names”

Catford 11

Forest Hill

15 “A local centre with high vacancies”

8 ‘A ribbon retail offering with the potential to attract beyond its immediate core catchment.”

Norbury 2

Sydenham

Gipsy Hill 9

Upper Norwood Anerley

Penge

“A compact shopping area benefitting from a busy mainline station serving the local population only.”

South Norwood 3

Croydon Town 1

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“A linear centre with low vacancy 14 and many high street with names serving local residents ”

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Beckenham


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Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge are ‘edge of authority’ centres sitting within a wider network of district and town centres of varying local significance to their local economies.

sham’s important ping area.”

10

Upper Norwood is the District centre described in Croydon Council’s Review of Town Centre Designations as ‘vibrant village location with an eclectic retail offer’ and ‘surprisingly high number of restaurant users bearing in mind the size of the shopping area and the transport links.’

Also a designated district centre, Bromley Council states the importance of Penge remaining “firmly in the Council’s Croydon radar for economic development” (Penge Town Centre01Draft Croydon Town - Metropol Norbury - District centre Renewal Strategy) while Anerley, largely omitted from02 03 South Norwood - District Bromley’s Core Strategy, functions as a local neighbourhood centre and shopping parade of use to its immediate Bromley 04 Bromley Town Centre - M 05 Orpington - Major centre catchment area.

06 Beckenham - District cen

KEY

Lambeth 07 Brixton - Major centre 08 Streatham - Major centre 09 Gipsy Hill - Local centre

Lewisham 10 Lewisham - Major centre 11 Catford - Major centre 12 Deptford - District centre Metropolitan 13 New Cross - District cent centre 14 Sydenham - District cent 15 Forest Hill - District centr

Bromley Town Centre 4

Southwark

16centre Peckham - Major centre District

Local centre Major centre

Orpington 5

Note: All quotes sourced from Council documentation, including Review of Town Centre Designations

Study area

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Context

Across the five boroughs there is general policy alignment in supporting and stimulating town centres and enterprise, as well as accommodating new homes; however, the edge condition means that the area suffers from a lack of cohesive thinking, prioritisation and sustained investment. This study evidences the area’s great potential and possible mechanisms to overcome local challenges, highlighting the importance of both investment and resourcing into these areas to enable joined-up working to succeed.

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policy context The following is a condensed overview of Council priorities; a synthesis of policy documentation and interviews with Council officers spanning housing, regeneration, economic development and planning and regeneration. This analysis highlights the key council priorities as reflected in the Core Strategies and Local Development Frameworks. London Plan Further alterations to the London Plan (January 2014) propose Crystal Palace as a Strategic Outer London Development Centre for leisure, tourism, arts and culture and sports.1 Policy 2.16 specifies this is for the purpose of a) co-ordinating public and private infrastructure investment b) bringing forward adequate development capacity c) placing a strong emphasis on creating a distinct and attractive business offer and public realm through design and mixed use development as well as any more specialist forms of accommodation d) improving Londoners’ access to new employment opportunities Several areas within the study area also fall within the criteria for ‘Regeneration Areas’, defined by the London Plan as falling within the 20% most deprived Lower Super Output Areas (SOAs) particularly in respect to health, education, crime, income and unemployment (higher than the subregional average). Within the study area, these include Betts Park in Anerley, and Maple Road and Franklin Road in Penge, suggesting that these are priority areas for coordinated investment between Councils and strategic local partners. 1 https://www.london.gov.uk/sites/default/files/FALP.pdf

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Croydon Croydon’s Opportunity Area, defined within Croydon’s Opportunity Area Framework, which sets planning, regeneration and design guidance for major growth centres in London, does not include Upper Norwood, instead highlighting opportunities for growth and intensification within Croydon Metropolitan Centre. With an already dense urban environment set within a conservation area, development opportunities within Upper Norwood are limited. There are no vacant development sites of significance within the neighbourhood, and any new provision of residential or commercial premises will come from the redevelopment of existing sites, which are subject to the guidelines set out in the Upper Norwood Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan, limited in focus on the physical fabric of the area. Instead, nearly 80% of the housing capacity in the borough is to be met within the wards of Addiscombe, Broad Green and Fairfield (central and south Croydon) (Local Housing Land Availability Assessment 2009). Looking ahead, the Croydon Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) identifies several projects vital to delivering on Croydon’s overarching objectives across enterprise, education and community with relevance to the study area, including the development of enterprise centres for creative and cultural industries. Upper Norwood is named as one within a borough-wide network of four such centres, though this vision is not currently matched with commitments from

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core budgets, and the delivery of schools and housing are weighted more critically within the IDP. Upper Norwood is currently developing its Growth Plan, which will set out expectations for intensity of new development in Upper Norwood. Bromley Bromley Council is in the process of producing its Local Development Framework and Local Plan. Its interim Core Strategy Issues document identifies the Council’s overall priorities of retaining a high quality of life for its residents, accommodating new housing (and related infrastructure) in the borough dealing with demographic change, and responding to the Mayor’s designation of Regeneration Areas within its border. Opportunities mentioned in the Core Strategy Issues document include enhanced youth and healthcare facilities, greater coordination of plans, and potentially shared facilities and services across borough boundaries. Bromley’s most recent housing trajectory (2011) suggests that the borough is exceeding the annual housing requirements of the London Plan. Penge and Anerley themselves contain a density of large social housing estates owned by Affinity Sutton, including The Groves, Castle Dean, Chulsa Estate, Anerley Hill and St Hughes, and which, having undergone renewal in the 1990’s and Decent Homes upgrades since, have no pending plans to be redeveloped or upgraded. Policy EMP4 in Bromley’s Unitary Development Plan (2006) protects existing B1, B2 and B8 uses within defined Business Areas, as the loss of employment land

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to other uses is recognised as an ongoing issue for the Borough, which remains a place for highly skilled individuals to live, rather than work. GVA Grimley’s Employment Land Study recommends that more proactive roles within the council, such as ‘Small Business Champions’ or a Town Centre Managers, would be beneficial in strengthening small business and local economic development, and also recommends that Bromley continue to improve its retail offer within local centres (beyond Bromley) to ensure they do not lose out to competition from Croydon. Specific mention of the study area is focused on Penge, with Bromley’s aspirations for it to achieve the status of “a vibrant town centre for local people and visitors alike” containing with a rich mix of uses, a strengthened night-time economy, and renewed public realm. The Penge High Street Renewal Plan sets out ideas for how this can be achieved, such as a unique business brand, shop-front improvements and enhanced Town Centre Manager role, although recent changes within Bromley Council have resulted in a reduced role of Town Centre Management in Bromley, from one full time on-site Town Centre Manager, to a one day role shared across seven other town centres. The Bromley Local Plan Options and Preferred Strategy suggests they are open to working with adjacent authorities and local stakeholders in order to plan across administrative boundaries and to meet the duty to co-operate.

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Southwark As explained by an officer interviewed for the study, this area of Southwark, mainly residential and affluent, is not a priority for the Council, who have minimal ownership of land or housing stock. Instead, they are focusing to the north of the borough, with Canada Water, Peckham, and Old Kent Road defined as Opportunity Areas to absorb much of the borough’s projected workspace and residential development. Lewisham Lewisham’s Regeneration Strategy identifies Convoys Wharf, Deptford, Lewisham and Catford town centres as major opportunity areas for new homes and jobs, physical and environmental improvements. In 2012, Lewisham made a successful Outer London fund bid for works to Catford Broadway and Deptford High Street. Council ownership of development sites and land adjacent to the study area is low, as much of the Council’s housing stock was transferred to L&Q in 2010. Sydenham, the town centre closest to the study area, is characterised as a well-used town centre that has had High Street investment and hosted Portas Pilot retail improvements. Nonetheless, it is perceived by Council Officers as a complementary offer to Penge, rather than in direct competition. Relevant forthcoming developments include a 13,000m2 retail park at Bell Green.

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Lambeth Lambeth’s Local Development Framework articulates the borough’s top strategic objectives as accommodating population growth, maintaining a varied supply of business premises within neighbourhoods and seeking contributions to employment and skills support programmes. Vauxhall and Waterloo are identified as Opportunity Areas at the borough-wide scale capable of accommodating large scale development and substantial numbers of new employment and housing and Lambeth’s working with Southwark and Wandsworth Councils to achieve this is another strategic objective. At the same time, Westow Hill/Crystal Palace is identified as a key cross border issue within the Local Plan (Proposed Submission November 2013), with Policy PN11 stating that Lambeth is willing to work in partnership with neighbouring Councils to improve traffic conditions and coordinate the management of the centre, preserve retail uses and active ground floor frontages. Relevant forthcoming developments include the potential formation of a business improvement district (BID) for West Norwood, as well as the potential renewal of Central Hill Housing estate, Upper Norwood. The redevelopment of South London YMCA (Sylvan Hill) will provide 80 supported housing units, forecast to complete in January 2015, with a further 41 units delivered by January 2016 via the redevelopment of Virgo Fidelis Convent School, Central Hill, Upper Norwood.

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NATIONAL POLICY

REGIONAL POLICY

CROYDON

UNITARY DEVELOPMENT PLAN CROYDON METROPOLITAN AREA ACTION PLAN

HOUSING LAND AVAILABILITY ASSESSMENT

BROMLEY

UNITARY DEVELOPMENT PLAN AFFORDABLE HOUSING SPD

EMPLOYMENT LAND UPDATE

LAMBETH

UNITARY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

UNITARY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

LEWISHAM

BOROUGH POLICY

LDF CORE STRATEGY

COMMUNITY PLAN LEWISHAM REGENERATION STRATEGY

SOUTHWARK

UNITARY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

SOUTHWARK PLAN

SPD S106 SOUTHWARK ENTERPRISE STRATEGY

PENGE TOWN CENTRE RENEWAL STRATEGY

STUDY AREA RELATED

2006

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2008

2009

2010


C15 LOCALISM ACT

New rights and powers for communities as well as Local Authority ‘Duty to cooperate’ on strategic cross boundary matters

NPPF

National Policy Planning Framework, a document making government planning policies easier to understand

TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING 2013 NO. 1101

DCLG TECHNICAL CONSULTATION ON PLANNING

Ammendment allows change of use from B1 (office) to C3 (residential)

Seeks to enable change of use from B1c (light industry) to C3 (residential)

DEVOLUTION + PRO-GROWTH LONDON PLAN

FALP

Contains spatial strategy for London, designates both Renewal Areas and Strategic Outer London Development Centres

INFRASTRUCTURE DELIVERY PLAN

Draft Further Alternations to the London Plan

LOCAL PLAN/LDF OPPORTUNITY AREAS PLANNING FRAMEWORK

PUBLIC REALM DESIGN GUIDE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

CORE STRATEGY ISSUES DOCUMENT

LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SCHEME pending completion

LOCAL PLAN pending completion

LDF CORE STRATEGY COMMUNITY PLAN

LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

LDF CORE STRATEGY BUSINESS GROWTH STRATEGY

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN SPD DRAFT CIL LEVY CHARGING SCHEDULE

LDF CORE STRATEGY

INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN

LOCAL DEV SCHEME

OPEN SPACE STRATEGY

SPD AFFORDABLE HOUSING

NEW SOUTHWARK PLAN pending completion

SPD DRAFT CIL pendng completion

SPD Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

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Cross Borough Working A series of cross-borough forums, working groups and Action Plans have been initiated and continued on an ‘ad hoc’ basis, due to budgetary or resource constraints.1 A sample of cross-borough collaboration types, below, suggests that sustaining formal partnerships (and coordinated investment) across boroughs has proven a challenge in the past.

INFORMATION SHARING The sharing of evidence to inform the preparation of Local Development Frameworks, consultation on major planning applications close to borough boundaries, or working groups to discuss cross-borough issues such as strategic needs assessments, borough figures and allocations EG SE Housing Partnership A forum shared between Lewisham, Southwark, to discuss housing needs, allocation and how to deal with specific issues such as hoarding Joint procurement of IT and waste services eg Lambeth and Southwark’s joint procurement of Veolia waste services or Lewisham and Southwark’s joint procurement of Capital IT for finance and procurement software South London Partnership planning and regeneration group Bromley, Lambeth and Croydon are members of wider group of Councils addressing strategic planning issues including economic growth, housing and transport Crystal Palace Park Management Group A forum set up in 2011 and including Crystal Palace Park Executive Project Board, London Borough of Bromley Project Team and Crystal Palace Park stakeholder groups.

1 Source: Croydon Council Officer, Department of Development and Environment

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COORDINATION Medium intensity collaboration involving coordination of budgets towards the delivery of projects, infrastructure and public services EG Worklessness Pilot undertaken by Lewisham, Southwark and Lambeth and delivered in partnership with the Southwark Employment Academy Neighbourhood Partnership A community forum for Upper Norwood chaired by Croydon Council and supported by logistical or specialist input as required - discontinued Upper Norwood Library Joint funding between Croydon and Lambeth Councils of Upper Norwood Library on Westow Hill -previously discontinued, newly secured for 3 years Joint Area Action Plan for Upper Norwood Croydon and Lambeth -discontinued

MULTI- LATERAL Programmes, projects or investments requiring in-depth coordination of policy, budgets and other resources, with ongoing commitment to joint working on wider strategic objectives, potentially of regional importance EG Cross-borough Youth Forum A programme aimed at reducing rivalries and tensions among Crystal Palace Youth, managed by the Crystal Palace Community Development Trust, with attempt to secure funding from across the 5 boroughs - unsuccessful

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Mapping

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Area Mapping

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CULTURAL ACTIVITY When looking at culture in the area, we have focused on everyday convening as it defines and shapes the character of the place, and is reflected in the way that people exchange, learn and participate in shared activities. We looked at a sample of what is on offer, the diversity of spaces and the organisations hosting cultural activities. The mapping (on the following pages) reveals a richness and density of activities across the areas, which helped inform an understanding of local cultural values - what should be recognised and potentially built upon. Upper Norwood hosts a wide diversity of meetings, events and networks in various venues and spaces, from quiz nights in Westow pub, cyclists social hubs at local cafes and cycle shops, large-scale music events at St Johns the Evangelist, to community growing projects in vacant land across the area. The Upper Norwood Triangle is commonly characterised by residents for its day and night-time range of restaurants, cafes, bars and entertainment choices. Residents of Penge reported a shortage of things to do locally but there is a wealth of campaigns and interest groups looking to improve the town centre, host events in public parks, and enhance knowledge of the area’s heritage. Local businesses are also starting to reflect residents’ desire for convening spaces and activities, for example Alexandra Nurseries incorporates a popular cafe and hosts workshops by a local residents. Situated in close proximity between both Upper Norwood and Penge, Anerley lacks a wide cultural draw, but hosts several cherished assets such as Anerley Town Hall, the Anerley Arms and St. Hughes community centre. Joining the dots


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Alexandra Nurseries, hosting craft-making workshops in Penge

The Pineapple Club, a social meet-up for older people of Caribbean descent at Anerley Town Hall

St Johns the Evangelist, one of many active churches in the study area

Cadence, a social hub for cycling clubs and networks in Upper Norwood

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A snapshot of the cultural activities and community activities locally, illustrated through flyers and adverts for local events and networks.

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COMMUNITY AND cultural host spaces GIPSY HILL

CO W

10

UPPER NORWOOD CO N

06

03

CO N CO N

08

CU W

10

06

CRYSTAL

11

CU N

04

CO N

13

CO N

01

CO N

16

CO N

14

PH N

07

PH N CU N CO N

06

15

12

CO N

CU N

03

CU W

05

CO N

04

05

CU W

02

CO N

02

CU N

CU N

CO N

PH N

04

01

05

04

ANERLEY HILL

CO N

07

CO N

03

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CO W

CO N

A


N

CO W

12

SYDENHAM

CU W

01

PALACE PARK

CU P

03

CO P

CO W

21

15

CO W

09

CO W

CO P

CO P

07

CU P

05

08

CO P

22

08

CU P

CU P

06

01

CU P

02

PH P

05

PH P

03

CO P

09

CO P

20

11

CU A

02

CO P

02

CO P

04

CO P

01

02

CU P

04

CO P

12

CO P

14

16

03

04

CO P

CO W

CO W

CO P

CO P

01

02

14

CO W

CU A

05

06

05

PH P

CO A

01

CU P

CO P

PH P

CO A

01

17

PENGE

CO P

ANERLEY ROAD

CO P

CO A

01

CU A

03

CO A

05

19

CO P

10

CO P

13

CO P

16

CO P

18

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Cultural organisations and host spaces:

LEGEND CO W 01 CO W 05 CO W 06 CO W 08 CO W 09 CO W 10 CO W 12 CO W 13 CO W 14 CO W 15 CO P 01 CO P 02 CO P 03 CO P 04 CO P 05 CO P 06 CO P 07 CO P 08 CO P 09 CO P 10 CO P 11 CO P 12 CO P 13 CO P 14 CO P 16 CO P 17 CO P 18 CO P 19 CO P 20 CO P 21 CO P 22 CO N 01 CO N 02 CO N 03 CO N 04 CO N 05 CO N 06 CO N 07 CO N 08 CO N 10 CO N 11

Crystal Palace Community Development Trust Croydon Radio Friends of Crystal Palace Park Crystal Palace Park Farm Friends of Crystal Palace Dinosaurs Crystal Palace Community Association Sydenham Society Paxton Green Timebank MWAH CIC (intergenerational wellbeing) Bromley Friends Forum Mens Sheds Shaw Trust Penge Traders Association Penge Tourist Board Penge Mosque Penge Library Penge East Community Centre The Living Well Project The Salvation Army Age Concern Community Vision daycare Penge Congregational Church Penge Partners Bapist Church Penge Penge Over 60s Network Bromley Active Living Centre Penge Green Gym SE20 Art Group Penge Cycle Club Friends of Cator and Alex Alexandra Residents Association Upper Norwood Joint Library Crystal Palace Transition Town St John the Evangelist Salvation Army Upper Norwood Phoenix Community Centre Upper Norwood Community Resource South London YMCA Christ Church, Gypsy Hill Gipsy Hill Residents Association Friends of Crystal Palace Subway

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LEGEND cont. CO N 13 Central Hill TRA CO N 14 Crystal Palace and Norwood Rotary Club CO N 16 Norwood Society CO N 17 Sunday Assembly CO N 18 Makerhood CO A 01 St. Hugh’s Community Centre CO A 02 Streetwise Youth Centre CO A 03 Waterside Community Centre CO A 04 Palace and Penge WI CO A 05 Christ Church and St Pauls CO A 06 Glow healthy living network CO A 07 Love Penge gardening group CO A 08 The Mixtape project Cultural Events/Networks CU W 01 Crystal Palace Park Bowl Ampitheatre CU W 02 Crystal Palace Museum CU W 03 Crystal Fun Palace CU W 05 Crystal Palace Fun Runners CU N 01 Crystal Palace Overground Festival CU N 02 Picture Palace Campaign CU N 03 Silicon Triangle Group CU P 01 The Bridge House CU P 02 Penge Festival CU P 03 Penge in Bloom CU P 04 Pengelum Festival CU A 02 Pineapple Club CUP 05 Coffee Mornings CUP 06 Alexandra Nurseries PH N 05 Grape & Grain PH N 07 Westow House PH P 01 Goldsmith Arms PH P 02 Golden Lion pub PH P 03 Crooked Billet Pub

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GREEN & GROWING SPACES The area is dominated by the Crystal Palace Park, designated Metropolitan Open Land (MOL).1 The park is the primary regional attraction within the area, containing the National Sports Centre, its athletics stadium and aquatics centre, as well as acting as a link within several strategic regional walking routes including the All London Green Grid, Green Chain, and Capital Ring. A smaller network of growing spaces and green links also complement the area, including Transition Town’s ‘Patchwork Farm’ initiative, a network of community gardens, including St Johns Community Garden and Tranquility Garden, wellloved walks including Stambourne Woodland Walk, and a series of green spaces representing opportunities for enhancement and investment, such as Beaulieu Heights and William Booth park and the former Orchard School sports ground, Anerley.

1 MOL is a classification of open land intended to protect areas of landscape, recreation, nature conservation and scientific interest or strategic importance.

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St Johns Community Garden, Upper Norwood (Transition

Signage for Green Chain Walk, Penge

Orchard Sports Ground, Anerley

Stambourne Walk

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GREEN & GROWING SPACES

GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL

GR N

03

GR N

UPPER NORWOOD

06

GR N

04

GN W

03

LEGEND

Green Projects GR N 01 Patchwork Farms GR N 02 St Johns Community Garden GR N 03 Edible Bus Stop GR N 04 Tipsy Garden GR N 05 Westow Park Community Garden GR N 06 Crystal Palace Museum Garden GR N 08 Palace Pint Green Spaces: GN W 01 All London Green Grid GN W 02 Green Chain GN W 03 Capital Ring Walk GN W 04 South Norwood Lake GN W 05 Beaulieu Heights GN N 01 Stambourne Woodland Walk GN N 02 Auckland Road GN P 01 Penge Green Gym GN A 01 William Booth open space GN A 02 Orchard School Sports Ground

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ANERLEY HILL

GR N

05

GN N

01

GN N

02

GR N

02


N

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GN W

02

SYDENHAM

PALACE PARK

PENGE

ANERLEY ROAD

GN P

01

Regional Park

Community Park

Woods

Growing Project

/ Allotments

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WORKSPACES While containing severe pockets of multiple deprivation, the wider study area is described by one Council Officer as ‘the stockbroker belt’ with a dormitory relationship to central London, characterised by low density of workspaces, office and industrial land, and strong connectivity to the centre of the city by an overland rail network.1 Whilst you would expect to see office rental provision in outer London locations, there is also provision and evidence of demand for more creative, flexible workspaces supporting start-ups, home workers, artists, makers and social entrepreneurs. The area has attracted young professionals and creatives, and anecdotal evidence suggests there is a concentration of homeworkers, as well as demand for affordable, collective workspaces as manifested in:

• The long waiting list for Gipsy Hill Workshops • The conversion of an light industrial unit into studios

at Create SE20 in Penge, and Haynes Lane Courtyard, Antenna Studios and Coopers Yard Studios in Upper Norwood • Local residents starting a co-working club at the Westow House Pub • Anerley Enterprise Centre’s feedback that there is demand for start-up business space that they have not been able to offer due to current lease restrictions 1 Bromley Economic Development and Employment Land Study GVA Grimley (2010)

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Antenna Studios, Haynes Lane , Upper Norwood

Coopers Yard Studios, Upper Norwood

Franklin Road Workshops, Penge

Create SE20 Workshops, Penge

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WORKSPACES

GIPSY HILL

UPPER NORWOOD LEGEND

CRYSTAL

WS N

01

WS N WS N

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04

WS N

08

WS N

06 WS N Light Industrial 02 LI W 01 Sydenham Industrial Estate WS N 05 LI N 01 Westow Hill LI N 02 Victory Place LI N 03 Carberry Road LI N 04 Paxton Mews LI P 01 Penge Industrial Estate, Oakfield Road LI P 02 Franklin Road Industrial Estate, Anerley LI P 03 Focusmoor Works LI P 05 Newlands Park

Workspaces WS N 01 Coopers Yard Studios WS N 02 Haynes Lane Courtyard WS N 03 Westow Hill Office Space WS N 04 Westow House Co-working WS N 05 Antenna Studios and Cafe WS N 06 Haynes Lane Studio Stained Glass WS N 08 Gypsy Hill Workshops WS P 01 CreateSE20 WS P 02 63 Croydon Road WS A 01 Anerley Business Centre

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ANERLEY HILL


N

SYDENHAM

PALACE PARK

PENGE WS P

01

WS A

01

ANERLEY ROAD

WS P

02

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SPORT & RECREATION The area acts as a destination for sporting activities GIPSY HILL attracting people from wider South London for the activities and events offered at the Nation Sports Centre, and as a meeting point for cyclists from across London - known as ‘weekend warriors’ - due to good links to popular routes into Kent.

UPPER NORWOOD

CRYSTAL

‘Weekend Warrior’ cyclists meeting place

BU N

01

BU N

02

ANERLEY HILL

This concentration of cyclists has developed popular meeting points and services, specially between Upper Norwood Triangle and Crystal Palace Park.

In addition to cyclists coming from other side of the area, there is a local culture of cycling, for example, Cycles SE20 cycle shop also runs adult and children cycling clubs, running multiple weekly trips from the shop on Penge High Street into the Kent lanes. LEGEND Sports Destinations SP PK 01 National Sports Centre SP PK 02 Crystal Palace Boating Lake Key Sport related businesses BU N 01 Cyclist meet up Cafe BU N 02 Cadence Cycle Centre BU P 01 SE20 Cycles SP A 01 South Norwood Lake and Cricket Ground SP A 02 Orchard Playing Ground

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02

SP A

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N

SYDENHAM

PALACE PARK National Sports Centre Athletics track Swimming pool

SP PK

01

Sports pitches

SP PK

02

BU P

01

PENGE

ANERLEY ROAD

Route to Kent lanes and North Downs

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HOUSING & DEPRIVATION An influx of new home buyers and rising house prices combined with existing pockets of social housing is contributing to what is described by one local resident as ‘islands of social housing.’ Alongside highly desirable, historic properties and a level of affluence, there are pockets of high deprivation, including 20% most deprived Lower Super Output Areas (SOAs) in London, with concentrations of poorer scores to the north west of Upper Norwood, Penge and Anerley. There are 17 Registered Housing Providers, owning approximately 95% of social housing stock in the Upper Norwood Ward,1 while a single Registered Landlord (RSL), Affinity Sutton owns the majority of stock in Anerley and Penge. The top ten RSLs with presence in the area include:

• • • • • • • • • •

Affinity Sutton Amicus Horizon CCHA Family Mosaic Hastoe Hyde L&Q Moat Radcliffe Riverside

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View of tower block in the Groves, Anerley and Penge border

View of Queen Adelaide’s Estate, Penge

Source: Regeneration Officer, Lambeth Council Department of

Development Environment View of social housingand stock, Otford Road, Penge

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HOUSING & DEPRIVATION Super-imposing deprivation mapping upon the study area shows the distinct nature of these social housing ‘islands’ compared to their surrounding context, especially Dulwich to the north and south and east into the rest of Bromley and Kent.

LEGEND

Social housing estates

Deprivation is indicated by the colour of the map, as below (most deprived in red):

Source: Open Data Communities: DeprivationMapping Available via http://opendatacommunities.org/ showcase/deprivation

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N

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

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Council ownership Remaining Council-owned housing stock and commercial units across the three areas are limited, largely limited to parks and schools. Anerley & Penge

Bromley-owned properties within the study area include1 1. 186 Maple Road (old Penge Library) 2. Blenheim Shopping Centre, High Street Penge, SE20 7QB Status: Reversionary freehold interest, subject to 100 year lease) 3. 1 Oakfield Road Status: freehold owned by the Council, currently in 37th of 125 year lease to Safestore Properties Ltd 4. Oakfield Road Industrial Estate Status: Reversionary freehold interest 4 5. Anerley Town Hall Status: future determined end Nov 6. James Dixon Primary School 3

le Ro a

d

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M

ap

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1 Source: Bromley Council’s Strategic Property team, Department of Regeneration and Transformation

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igh

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Legend Bromley Council owned Land Buildings Long-term lease Designated Community Asset

N

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Upper Norwood Croydon-owned property within the study area: 1. Upper Norwood Library Status: Jointly owned with Lambeth, with Croydon equity soon transferred to Lambeth entirely 2. Phoenix Community Centre, Westow Street Status: A long leasehold interest in this, currently let to a Community Association 3. Barnardo’s Centre, Westow Street Status: long-term lease 4. Westow Park, Gatestone Court, Central Hill College Green and others in Bedwardine Road

Lambeth-owned property within the study area: 5. Central Hill Estate, Westow Hill (social housing)

Legend Croydon Council owned Land Buildings Sold Lambeth Council owned Land Buildings

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LAMBETH

1

Ch urc hR oa

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S tow Wes

t tree

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CROYDON oad eR

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in ard edw

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BROMLEY 3

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Connectivity The area overall is well-connected by rail and overground. Crystal Palace, Penge West, Penge East and Anerley stations offer a range of routes to Victoria, London Bridge, Charing Cross and East Croydon, while London Overground stations provide a link to East London. There is also a tramlink along the south of the study area, connecting East Croydon with Beckenham.

27 mins to London Bridge mins to 32 25 mins to London Victoria Bridge

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

17 mins to London Victoria

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD

mins to Victoria

26 34 mins to Dalston Junction

ANERLEY HILL

19 mins to London Bridge

40 mins to Charing Cross ANERLEY ROAD

1 Source: Bromley Local Plan Options and Preferred Strategy available via http://cds.bromley.gov.uk/documents/s50006861

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Fourteen bus services run from the Crystal Palace Bus Terminus including a 24 hour service and three night bus routes. Both Penge and Anerley are relatively well served by eight routes and a night bus. A (non-exhaustive) sample of transport options available within the study area include: Railway / Overground The area is well connected to central London, with the addition of the London Overground in 2010 enhancing connection between eastern portions of outer London. Crystal Palace Station - to London Victoria in 26 minutes, Dalston Junction in 34 minutes • Penge East – to London Victoria in 17 minutes • Penge West - to London Bridge in 24 minutes • Kent House – to London Victoria in 20 minutes • Gipsy Hill Station - to London Victoria in 25 minutes, London Bridge in 32 minutes • Birkbeck Station - to London Bridge in 36 minutes Walking Anerley Hill is cited by residents as a barrier to movement for the elderly, and conversations revealed limited movement of residents between the town centres of Penge and Upper Norwood. Sample walking times include: • Penge East/West - to Anerley in 19 minutes • Anerley - to Crystal Palace Station in 20 minutes • Crystal Palace station - to Upper Norwood in 15 minutes Cycling There is a strong culture of weekend cyclists into Kent and the Mayor of London has additionally proposed a Cycle Superhighway Route from Penge to ‘the City’ via Elephant & Castle.1 Joining the dots


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Subjective Mapping Multiple conversations conducted across the areas have begun to reveal several common social and geographic boundaries which distinguish Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge from one another and their role within ‘Crystal Palace.’ For some residents, ‘Crystal Palace’ represents a geographically specific area, such as Upper Norwood’s conservation triangle and Crystal Palace Park; for others, it is more esoteric and relative – a square mile radius from the location of a historic oak tree once located at the south west corner of the park, for instance.

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

‘Crystal Palace’ UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

a) This sample social mapping exercise with a local resident identifying the ‘core’ area of ‘Crystal Palace’ as Upper Norwood Triangle and Crystal Palace Park (solid purple line) and its wider area of influence (dotted purple line).

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While there is no single clear boundary for the area (and this is an exercise being undertaken within the Localitysupported Neighbourhood Forum initiative), conversations with residents across all three areas regularly used ‘Crystal Palace’ interchangeably with Upper Norwood. Additional readings of the areas included that Penge and Upper Norwood are perceived as highly separate town centres, while Anerley occupies an ‘in-between’ role between the two, shifting according to the socio-economic backgrounds of its residents, their patterns of shopping and socialising. Upper Norwood residents reported rarely travelling to Penge, except when travelling to destination stores such as Homebase, while many Penge residents reported they visited Upper Norwood primarily for leisure or special occasions such as dining and night-life, rather than ‘day-to-day’ necessities. The conversations also uncovered social distinctions loosely associated with the geography of the area, notably a widespread perception of wealthier residents living ‘up the hill’ in locations such as Upper Norwood and the wider ‘ridge’ incorporating Dulwich, while Penge was repeatedly referred to as the ‘poor cousin’ to Upper Norwood, and Beckhenham, to its south. Conversations with Anerley residents on the whole revealed a narrative of decline. The mapping exercise with local residents (samples opposite and overleaf) illustrate that the boundary of ‘Crystal Palace’ is highly subjective and changeable, according to an individual’s knowledge of history, where they shop, socialise, educate their children, or access healthcare and amenities. Joining the dots


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SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

1-mile

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’

PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

b) This mapping illustrates an historic definition of ‘Crystal Palace’, as told to us by residents, of a 1-mile radius from an old oak that used to be located at south-west corner of the park

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’CRYSTAL PALACE PARK UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

c) Here the wide area defined as Crystal Palace reflects residents’ discussions about the extent of a potential Crystal Palace Neighbourhood Forum

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SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

‘Crystal Palace’

UPPER NORWOOD

ANERLEY HILL PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

As this resident lives in Anerley and feels the importance of Westow Park, these and Crystal Palace Park are included in their ‘Crystal Palace’ with a wider area includuding Penge.

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

‘Crystal Palace’ UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

This mapping reflects the resident’s daily routes to define Crystal Palace - living in Anerley, working and socialising in the Triangle and walking in Westow Park and Crystal Palace Park.

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SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’

PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

This mapping reflected the resident’s involvement with Crystal Palace Transition Town so includes all their projects

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL PENGE

The inclusion of Gipsy Hill shows its importance to this resident, reflecting ANERLEY ROAD where they live

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GIPSY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD

Penge

ANERLEY HILL

PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

Anerley

This Penge resident reflects the feeling that Penge is forgotten, including Crystal Palace Park as part of Penge in reference to it having been Penge Common before being enclosed

SYDENHAM

GIPSY HILL

‘Crystal Palace’

CRYSTAL PALACE PARK

UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL

Anerley PENGE ANERLEY ROAD

Penge

Whilst this Penge resident shows a considered opinion of the extents of Anerley and Penge, whilst denoting Crystal Palace as a vague area

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Local youth workers suggest that social boundaries play a strong role in restricting movement across the areas for the young and disadvantaged. This has some roots in the ‘postcode wars’ that prevented young people from freely moving beyond their own postcode, and Anerley railway is cited as a natural divide separating young people from Queen Adelaide’s Estate from facilities as close as St. Hughes Community Centre. According to local organisations such as Affinity Sutton, who coordinate youth programmes locally, young people are unlikely to travel to new areas or neighbourhoods for the ‘sake of it’ and instead need a reason to go. Other boundaries mentioned included tensions surrounding the area’s situation between inner and outer London. This condition was regularly referred to in Penge, where residents cited high rates of poverty, and poorer quality public realm and amenities as ‘inner city’ qualities of the area, in comparison to the wider surrounding context of affluent suburbs of Kent, referred to by one Southwark officers as the ‘stockbroker belt.’ Upper Norwood residents drew attention to the political distinctions between Labour-controlled wards of Crystal Palace (Bromley); Upper Norwood (Croydon); Gipsy Hill (Lambeth) compared to the majority of Bromley.

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Three Town

Centres 1. Upper Norwood 2. Anerley

Three Town Centres

3. Penge

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GIPSY HILL

CRYSTAL

UPPER NORWOOD ANERLEY HILL

Legend Borough boundary Indicates Town Centre (non residential buildings shaded to distinguish extent)


N

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Upper NORWOOD

“It’s where everybody wants to be, ideally” “I have to contact Bromley regarding issues about my house, contact Croydon about the Farmers market, and I liaise with a food board in Lambeth.” “If you want a nice birthday card, you come to Crystal Palace”

“Upper Norwood is doing fine. Other areas of the borough are suffering from run-down public realm and vacancies on the rise. It doesn’t need a massive amount of intervention.” Croydon Planning Officer

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With expansive views overlooking the rest of London, Upper Norwood is widely perceived as a prominent ‘community hub’, packed with restaurants, markets and festivals, and lively pubs hosting social programmes and activities run by highly networked interest and activist groups. The area is well-loved district centre and celebrated as a local destination for distinct architecture and built heritage,independent spirit, local markets and growing and activist networks. With an already dense urban environment set within a conservation area, there are few vacant development sites of significance within the neighbourhood, and any new provision of residential or commercial premises will come from the redevelopment of existing sites, which are subject to the guidelines set out in the Upper Norwood Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan, although Central Hill Estate, on Westow Hill, is highlighted in conversation with a Lambeth Councillor as being earmarked for redevelopment. Of the three areas, its residents are most likely to report cross-borough boundary issues, ranging from school places (shortages); concerns regarding consultation on forthcoming developments in neighbouring boroughs, and complexity of contacting Councils. Residents cite rising rents (commercial and residential) alongside the future of Crystal Palace Park, traffic congestion and school places as key concerns. Upper Norwood is identified by Croydon Council as an ideal location for a hub for creative enterprise, but core funding has not been committed. Joining the dots


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DISTINCT CHALLENGES

Borough coordination of shared resources A number of resources, such as Upper Norwood Library, Crystal Palace Park, are used by residents spanning Croydon, Lambeth, Southwark and Bromley Perception that area is Council’s priority Councils in this area are perceived as ‘enforcers’ rather than ‘enablers’ of local activity Complexity of Civic to Council communications Residents of Upper Norwood must liaise with multiple councils on issues such as refuse collection, parking and planning issues Low public sector leverage Low Council ownership of commercial units and sites, apart from Central Hill Estate (Lambeth Council) means there is little scope for the application of tools such as asset transfer Retaining retail and residential affordability The popularity of the area has resulted in rising rents 2 posing a risk to long-term affordability of business premises and the presence of independent retail Traffic Issues include congestion of Upper Norwood triangle (Westow Hill, Westow Street); unsafe pedestrian crossing at northwest corner of Crystal Palace Park and the speed of traffic, related accidents and mortalities down Anerley Hill1 1 Source: http://www.crashmap.co.uk/ 2 Increase of rates for triangle traders in 5 years reported by Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce

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DISTINCT opportunities

Distinct cultural identity and offer Distinct independent character and retail offer District level attractor and evening destination Strong Civic Capacity Evidence of a strong presence of skilled and networked individuals and groups with passion for local area stewardship, including an organised business/trader representation, in the form of the local Chamber of Commerce, with the potential to expand their capabilities in area such as forward planning, project management, business planning/finance to play more active role in local asset management. Community-led vehicle The presence of civic networks and interest groups spanning borough boundaries indicates that there is scope to establish a more formal vehicle with the mandate to represent Upper Norwood as a multi-borough neighbourhood back up to Councils and the Greater London Authority Traffic Existing LIP funds available via TfL authority to could be leveraged for traffic calming measures on Anerley Hill

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Anerley “Anerley is grim. It hasn’t got any ‘oomph’” - Anerley resident “There aren’t any other places on this hill that people remember” - Crystal Palace Development Trust, on Anerley Town Hall

“There’s no discernible ‘centre’ to Anerley” Joining the dots


C63

Anerley is designated by Bromley Council as a local neighbourhood centre used by its immediate catchment area. From a qualitative standpoint, it is hard to recognise a single centre or core. Instead, Anerley consists of 2 linear parades of shops one near Anerley station separated by housing to another at Anerley Hill, closer to Upper Norwood. Overall, it functions as a kind of corridor between Upper Norwood and Penge rather than a destination in its own right. It is home to several centres used by the local community, including St Hughes centre, transferred to the community by Affinity Sutton Housing Association, and Anerley Town Hall, a Victorian building that served as the Town Hall until the 1930s. It is currently leased to Crystal Palace Community Development Trust (CPCDT), and acts as host space for local events, youth programmes, networking events for the elderly, the Citizens Advice Bureau and CPCDT managed Enterprise Centre on behalf of LBB. Locality funds a Community Organiser role based out of St Hughes Community Centre to build local connections and support the community to develop projects; however, scale of the catchment area is very small, and the role lacks a wider peer network to effectively leverage ideas and connections. The area surrounding Betts Park falls within Mayoral designated ‘Renewal Area’ spanning into parts of Penge. Joining the dots


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DISTINCT CHALLENGES

A lack of distinct centre Anerley has no single distinct core. Instead, local shopping and amenities are hosted in two clusters, one around Anerley Hill, towards Upper Norwood, and one around Anerley Station and Anerley Town Hall. Physical and social boundaries The railway line is reported to be a natural dividing line cutting off Anerley from organisations, services and networks in Penge Local retail offer Alongside everyday amenities such as convenience stores, hairdressers, doctors and chemist, the parade suffers from a dominance of fast food outlets. Institutional ‘thinness’ Anerley Town Hall is one of the sole civic meeting points and amenities for the area; its future is uncertain and it currently lacks flexibility in rental/use model for its enterprise space to support start-up businesses Civic and Business Networks There is less evidence of connection in and across civic organisations in the area, including that of an established trader network Public realm Low evidence of investment in public realm and poor uptake of available match funds for shop-front improvement via Anerley Regeneration Project by shop-keeper

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C65

DISTINCT OPPORTUNITIES

Transport and Connectivity Anerley is well positioned, with London Overground and National Rail connections enabling travel to London Bridge - 21 minutes, West Croydon - 9 minutes and Dalston Junction - 39 minutes Presence of opportunity sites Anerley contains several opportunity sites for future development, as well as under-utilised open land such as former Orchard School playing field and William Booth open space Light industrial activity Anerley is in close proximity to Oakfield Industrial Estate and Franklin Road Estates, which could in future be play a role in strengthening a more enterprise-based identity for the area Policy focus With ‘Renewal Area’ status, Anerley is an intended target of coordinated investment by Bromley Council and local stakeholders Strategic location for Regeneration Straddling two district centres (equally accessible to Penge and Upper Norwood residents) and in an area of high social housing, Anerley provides an opportunity to leverage the provision of a new enterprise ‘anchor’ as a regeneration tool for the area Youth networks Contains a clustering of youth-focused organisations that could be meaningful, if involved in the area’s future plans

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PENGE

“Penge is a viable town centre that needs some investment & re-invigoration”

“Penge is more about your KFC, McDonalds and shops like that... it doesn’t compare to the triangle.”

“Penge has an identity.. like it or not.” - Bromley Councillor

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C67

Penge is a designated District Centre, described by residents as having an ‘inner city’ feel, surrounded by more archetypal ‘commuter suburbs.’ One of the main employment centres within the London Borough of Bromley, Penge has a diverse high street well equipped with range of useful everyday businesses (fishmongers, baker, butcher, post office, pharmacies) and anchor supermarkets/ superstores with few shops remaining vacant, apart from Maple Road, which also used to host a local market. It also contains notable pockets of built heritage, such as the Waterhouse Alms houses, Alexandra Cottages. Parts of Penge, including Maple and Franklin Roads, fall within the Mayoral designation of Renewal Area. It contains a high concentration of privately operated mental health facilities, and a density of social housing in the Groves, largely owned by Affinity Sutton housing association. Residents generally report feeling of disinvestment and lack of funding compared to neighbouring boroughs (High Street improvements, for example). There is evidence of strong civic networks, such as the resident-led food bank and help support services at the Holy Trinity Church on Lennard Road, and there is also evidence of newly forming networks and interest groups, such as the newly forming Penge Town Team, Penge Tourist Board, and others.

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C68

DISTINCT CHALLENGES

Retail offer and diversification An absence of restaurant, entertainment and cultural activities, and a weak night-time economy Commercial space affordability Commercial rents are reportedly rising in Penge, although rents remain lower for units on Maple Road Quality of public realm and maintenance Limited impact of past public realm enhancements, such as Empire Square, Arpley Square and Blenheim Forecourt. Evidence of poor quality public realm maintenance, including refuse collection, street clutter and signage Forgotten Identity The ‘poor cousin’ to Beckenham - a lack of local council investment in promoting and publicising the district centre’s potential Decreasing Council capacity Bromley Council must save £60 million in spending over the next four years1 , which has resulted in the closure of assets such as the Citizens Advice Bureau (February 2012) and public toilets (January 2015) as well as decreased role of the town centre manager, who now oversees seven town centres across Bromley. An outer London Borough with inner borough needs Bromley often not part of many organisations ‘targeted areas’ for funding and this has caused issues for organisations applying for funding to work with young and disadvantaged. 1 Source: http://www.bromley.gov.uk/info/200110/council_budgets_and_spending/1001/ our_budget_your_views

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C69

DISTINCT opportunities

Transport and Connectivity As well as containing strong transport links to central London, there is scope to improve pedestrian linkages along new desire lines, such as a crossing at Maple Road linking to the island at Penge Lane, which could be potentially pedestrianised in the future A useful retail district Perceived by residents as a useful shopping area with several key ‘anchor’ stores including Sainbury’s and Homebase Hidden heritage Alms Houses, Alexandra Cottages and gardens - not accessible or well known as public assets but could be further enhanced by linking with a number of interested local partners Institutional presence A number of national institutions have presence in Penge, ranging from Mens Sheds, Age Concern and Women’s Institute Growing civic networks Evidence of new civic networks and projects being initiated, including the newly formed Penge Town Team, Penge Tourist Board, alongside existing networks such as the SE20 Arts Group and church networks, as well as evidence of an active traders assocation Space for test trading Persistent vacancy in units, including those on Maple Road provide an opportunity for the Council to test new models of High Street retail and civic space Joining the dots


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IN SI

D

GH TS While each area is distinct, there are common challenges and opportunities across them. The following is a condensed summary of core thematic insights applicable to all three, followed by a section containing corresponding Tactics. Themes: - Civic Host Space: - Enterprise: - Networks: - Local Capacity

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Space

Across the three neighbourhoods, residents are passionate about protecting existing civic host spaces - accessible, affordable and neutral places to meet or host activities. While the number of publicly owned buildings (and land) have reduced, mapping of the area shows there are also a number of host spaces not being as well occupied as they could be, and conversations reveal that people desire spaces able to host new combinations of activities than currently on offer.

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Civic Host Space

Civic Host


D4

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D5 Insight:

RETAINING Valued spaces

Description: There has been a marked decline in publicly owned (civic) buildings and land across Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge, with the threat of further losses due to budgetary constraints. The Upper Norwood Library, Anerley Town Hall, Grape and Grain pub and Haynes Lane Market and food market are examples of well-loved community touch-down points, and there is remarkable capacity and will of residents to shape strategies for retaining remaining spaces.

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D6

Challenges:

Loss or threat to valued spaces

An area with limited council owned commercial property (Croydon and Bromley Council sold the majority of its commercial portfolio 20 years ago) budgetary constraints are placing pressure on remaining assets. Residents expressed strong concerns for the loss of both the actual facility - a landmark building with a strong local heritage and ‘London’s oldest working Police Station’ - as well as the loss of continued civic use it represents - building and suggested alternative uses to benefit community Evidence snapshot: • Anerley Library, Anerley - closed in August 2014, and combined with the new Penge Library (photo 1) • Penge Police station, Penge - closed 2010, sold to private developer 2014 with planning permission for a residential development (photo 4) • Citizens Advice Bureau and Youth Hub, Westbury Road, Penge previously council owned and now sold with planning permission for residential development (photo 3) • Recent closure of Penge public toilets on the High Street, Penge. • Barclays and Natwest Bank, Penge, loss to High Street (photo 2) • Paxton Arms Hotel, Upper Norwood - One of a number of pubs granted a change of use to be developed into residential. Subsequently, other closed pubs, (eg The Alexandra, Penge) have been listed as community assets by local residents for their retention (photo 5) • Grape and Grain Pub, Upper Norwood - Highly valued pub that hosts community activities eg letting groups use their kitchen. Local residents reported that it has been bought by Weatherspoons (photo 6) Evidence snapshot: • Anerley Town Hall, Anerley - Bromley Council are currently deciding whether to the sell this building, currently community halls and enterprise space managed by Crystal Palace Community Development Trust, Hall spaces registered as community asset (photo 8) • Upper Norwood Library - Threats related to uncertainty of the independent library funded jointly by both Croyden and Lambeth councils (photo 10) • Antenna Cafe and Haynes Lane, Upper Norwood - Highly valued social meeting place and Food Market, respectively. Like many spaces, the area’s success has put pressure on rental prices and properties (photo 7 & 12) • National Sports Centre and Crystal Palace Park - current consultation work has prompted some local residents to express the important of these spaces and sports facilities, and they express their general concern about future change (photo 9 and 11)

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D7

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CLOSED

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CLOSED

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CLOSED

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CLOSED

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THREATENED


D8

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D9

“Barclays bank has been empty for six months. We could use that to do some of our digital inclusion work from.” - Resident & Amicus Horizon employee Opportunities:

Residents can retain and manage spaces

Councils should look to harness the skills, capacity and enthusiasm of local residents to retain, invigorate, and potentially manage select public assets. Evidence snapshot: • Residents of Upper Norwood have formed a Trust to take over the running of Upper Norwood Library and the latest public meeting attracted 150+ attendees • The Picture Palace website, a campaign to return a cinema to Upper Norwood, reports that it attracted 1,000 people to Queen’s Hotel, Church Road in 2009 • Friends of Crystal Palace Subway have devoted time to restoring and opening the Victorian subway running under the A212 at Crystal Palace Parade, and have received planning permission from Southwark Council to re-instate a gate on the Southwark side of the parade • Crystal ‘Fun’ Palace attracted over 6000 participants, run by local volunteers • In October 2014 Penge Town Team was constituted to bring together Penge Forum, Traders Association, Tourist Board and active local groups under one name, supported by Bromley Council Town Centre Manager • The Crystal Palace Triangle Planning Group are in the process of initiating a Neighbourhood Plan • In Spring 2014 Penge Tourist Board group was established to promote and improve culture, commerce and the environment for residents, visitors and businesses of Penge - in 6 months has grown a following of 1200 plus on facebook

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D10 Implications for councils: • Commitment to support, eg. liaison with local landlords, space audit exercises. • Potentially investment in set-up costs of spaces to be run by local businesses and residents. • Identification of internal ‘pointpeople’ for residents to contact regarding access to spaces

Implications for local residents: • Formal constitution of groups to allow community to manage space • Take an active role in local area, eg. curating community spaces Referral of empty properties to council liaison (if council run) • Sharing information and learning, eg. up-to-date organisation and contact details

Photos on pages D7 & D8 1. Anerley Library, Anerley 2. Closed Barclays Bank, Penge 3. Citizens Advice Bureau and Youth Hub 4. Penge Police station, Penge 5. Paxton Arms Hotel, Upper Norwood 6. Grape and Grain Pub, Upper Norwood 7. Antenna Cafe, Upper Norwood 8. Anerley Town Hall, Anerley 9. National Sports Centre, Crystal Palace Park 10. Upper Norwood Library 11. Crystal Palace Park 12. Haynes Lane, Upper Norwood

For more details, refer to Tactics Section: • • • • • •

Asset Transfer Members Collective Interactive map Shared Directory Councils as Enablers Community-Led Renewal Projects

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D11 Insight:

UTILISATION Making better use of spaces we’ve got

Description: While there is justified concern for dwindling civic spaces, a number of local buildings and civic spaces are not as well utilised as they could be. This is because of resource constraints (reduced funding to cover full-time staff), social boundaries, (where local guardians/key holders potentially discourage additional users) or just due to low awareness of their availability. There is no shortage of ideas for empty spaces, but a key barrier remains around how they might be accessed - ownership, who to contact, or plans for the space. It would be beneficial to consider how existing spaces could be made more accessible, and also how awareness of existing spaces (and potentially further resources) could be raised - encouraging alternative models of spaces to host culture, community and enterprise activity in associated support spaces off the High Street ie. pubs, space above High Street retail, outside of community hall opening hours.

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D12

“Make information of spaces, rates and plans for buildings available!”- Penge resident, conversation Challenges: Low awareness or lack of promotion of existing spaces

There is a general lack of awareness amongst residents of spaces available, and who to contact, with information often passing through word of mouth via existing networks.

Evidence snapshot: • Limited access to Council information on hire details for Council owned spaces. Blenheim Square off Penge High Street has built in power points and can be hired for use - no information made available through Council channels. • Upper Norwood Library service has lost five members of staff and opening hours have been reduced to Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays • Crystal Palace Museum - open to the public on weekends, with weekday school visits able to be arranged by appointment only • St Hughes Community Centre bookable for events via Trustee meeting made 2 times per month (photo 14) • Penge East Community Centre - does not have a website (photo 15) • The green spaces surrounding the Groves social housing (Affinity Sutton stock) are owned by Bromley Council. “It’s hard to have a strategy for the spaces you don’t’ have permission to use” - Business Strategist, Affinity Sutton • Affinity Sutton Community Centres on the Groves are available for community hire but information is not publicised. • Alexandra Cottages Workshop available for community hire through Alexandra Residents association, though not advertised.

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D13

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D14

Opportunities: Expanding the range of activities that underutilised spaces can host There are potential opportunities for under-utilised spaces to support a more sustainable model and host a mix of activities

Evidence snapshot: • Previously disused space on Haynes Lane behind Sainsburys in Upper Norwood was secured in conversations with the landowner to host Transition Town’s weekly food market • Victory Place hosts an outdoor flower market • Barnardos is an under-utilised space behind Westow Street, owned by Croydon on long-term lease • Affinity Sutton’s Hawthorne Centre, Anerley, reports spare capacity of its work suites and is seeking co-residents • Local residents have shown willingness to share their kitchens and under-used gardens for Crystal Palace Transition Town growing projects.

A number of venues have the capacity to host large scale meetings Many of these are under-utilised. Evidence snapshot: • Penge Congregational Church, originally built for a congregation of 500+, contains three halls and reports spare capacity (photo 13) • Anerley Town Hall can host 200+ people • St Hughes Community Centre, Anerley can host 80-100 people • Salvation Army, Upper Norwood, regularly hosts civic town hall style meetings • The Queens Hotel, Westow St, has hosted civic town hall style meetings

Awareness and promotion of existing spaces Evidence snapshot: • Blenheim Centre car park (Penge) offers free 2 hour parking but Penge Traders Association and police report that it is rarely used, with ‘everybody double parking on the streets’ instead (photo 16) • The network of four Affinity Sutton Housing Association community hubs across Anerley and Penge could be more widely publicised

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D15

Encourage more businesses to host civic activities and events

A number of local pubs are already showing how a diversity of uses could be accommodated within single buildings Evidence snapshot: Public Houses: • Westow House regularly hosts live music nights, quizzes and community events • The Grape & Grain pub is a meet-up point for local networks such as Crystal Palace Transition Town’s “Green Drinks”and hosts an patchwork garden in their premises • The Bridge House pub hosts a theatre upstairs as well as yoga and pilates classes • Gipsy Hill Tavern hosts live music, talks and the Picture Palace Film Club • Beer Rebellion hosts regular meet-ups for the wider civic umbrella group in Upper Norwood, such as the Coalition of Doers.’ Retail Spaces: • The Stitching Lounge - local sewing classes are run from a basement space below a retail unit on Church Road, Upper Norwood • A local landlord of a unit above Picture Framers on Westow Street informally lets local freelance artists use the space for their work Tactics for councils: • Review of council-owned sites & lease agreements • Partial resourcing of staff to manage and host the space • Potential finance support •Designing a set of pre-written contracts or access models for property

Tactic for local residents: • Programming of activities in the space. Potential space hosting. • Needs to be locally relevant and desired • Contribute time to collectively run • Support initiatives that use meanwhile space

For more details, refer to Tactics Section: • • • •

Shared Directory Space Booking Meanwhile Licence Resources Network

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D16 Insight:

FIT FOR PURPOSE Inviting new combinations of activities

Description: It’s clear that space alone isn’t what’s missing. There are certain conditions - namely cost, flexibility, and neutrality that seems most valued, as well as a demand for spaces offering the possibility of new combinations of uses. A common thread running across all ideas for new cultural activities, whether a maker space, theatre or live music venue, is a desire for space which can accommodate classes, workshops and meetings and ‘making.’

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D17

“It’s important that events can happen in spaces that are not connected to specific communities or limited by background or beliefs” - Upper Norwood resident Opportunities: Investing in facilities and spaces that enable a variety of uses • A space that supports potential makers, hobbyists, youth groups and school classes. • Adding in external sockets to plug in power for external event, eg Penge Rec (Green)

Build on existing willingness to share resources

Opportunity to grow a more sustainable mix of activities in spaces. Evidence snapshot: • Willingness to share common equipment, such as kitchens, work tools • Westow Pub has previously hosted Jelly Days - co-working and networking days for home-workers and self-employed • 20+ shops in Upper Norwood volunteered window space to showcase the Crystal [Fun] Palace memorabilia Implications for councils: • Recognition and investment in flexible and adaptable spaces to meet local demand • Potential finance support • Acting as broker or guarantee for access to useful spaces and investment in start-up equipment

Implications for local residents: • Contribution ideas for facilities and equipment • Potential contribution to shared resources

For potential tools, refer to Tactics Section:

• • • •

Space booking Collective Investment Council as Enablers Members Collective

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D18

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Access to affordable space and business support emerged as a prominent theme of conversations, with residents expressing demand for spaces and services to support sole traders, startup businesses, home workers and sustained support for general business growth in the area. Conversations revolved around desire to lower or share costs of space amongst new entrepreneurs, but also touched on the fact that third party space management would be needed if landlords are to be encouraged towards participating in shared or co-working models of workspace. A potential opportunity is to broaden and diversify models of enterprise on and around the High Street, potentially mixing civic culture with spaces for local business. In Penge and Upper Norwood, this may mean focusing on diversifying retail models,and establishing business support services for the High Street; in Anerley, this may mean supporting new business or lowering barriers to business by providing test spaces on Anerley Hill; or consolidating the workspace offer around Anerley Station. Getting the enterprise offer ‘right’ with a complimentary ‘mix’ of spaces, costing and services is key to the sustainable growth of these town centres, and awareness of this built into development of planning policies. Joining the dots

Enterprise

ENTERPRISE


Insight:

Collective Working/ start-up spaces Supporting enterprise by lowering risks

Description: An increase in commercial rents across the study area, including a surge in prices in Penge over the past 6 months1 , is impacting on the ability of new businesses to start, as well as supporting existing businesses to grow, while early stage traders and start-ups face barriers in covering costs of renting an exclusive commercial unit.

1 Baxton Lambert Real Estate Agents, Penge High Street

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“A studio recently came up and there were five people on the waiting list to rent the space.” - Artist in Gypsy Hill Workshops, Upper Norwood and contributor to Handmade Palace

Challenges: Meeting demand (and the right conditions) for local workspace Evidence snapshot: • Four workshop/co-working spaces identified in Upper Norwood are at near to or at full occupancy. • Penge has limited shared work space offer, but currently has 8 empty retail units on Maple Road (Nov 2014 survey) • 5 out of 28 units are currently available within Anerley Town Hall’s enterprise space (Nov 2014), even though under inflexible conditions(workspaces are rented out by room, and not by the desk, on a minimum 6 month lease).

“I took 18 months ‘umming and ahing’ about it it took that one networking event to give me the confidence to start my business” - Bromley Councillor Opportunities: Invest in shared workspace • Councils can invest in affordable and flexible models of workspaces for new traders, makers and start-ups to test new ideas and products in a collective space, helping to lower risks

Seek capable space operators • Councils can consider transferring management of existing enterprise spaces to alternative managers - such as that of Anerley town hall to Crystal Palace Development Trust (paired with necessary support from experts)

Invest in accelerator programmes • Councils can seek to strengthen local business skills and networks. For example, Bromley could champion a local business network that might link Penge Traders Association with Capel Manor College, Affinity Sutton Youth Programmes and partnerships with the Duke of Edinburgh Awards and local apprenticeship schemes

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Rate relief for small businesses • Councils could provide business rate relief incentives to attract new businesses and encourage meanwhile or test enterprises locally, particularly in areas experiencing long-term vacancies, such as Maple Road (Bromley) and Church Road (Croydon and Bromley).

“Provide an Opportunity to fail” - Nadine Spencer, Hub Manager at Camden Collective, 2nd December workshop, Anerley Town Hall, spoke about the importance of opportunities for small businesses to test their business models and get it ‘wrong’ in a safe space.

Implications for councils:

Implications for local residents:

• Potentially offer start-up revenue • Potentially offer free or peppercorn rent on any of their own properties • Play enabler - promote, help with connections, access to finance, advice on permissions and legal • Openness to collaborate and participate in new forms of partnership

• Contribute time to collectively run and engage in coproduction process • Participate and support local projects and businesses • Make visible local skills and ideas

For more details, refer to Tactics Section:

• • • • • • •

High Street Incubator Shared Space Ideas Lab Enterprise Accelerator Shared Directory Local Loyalty Scheme Collective Investment

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Communications may not seem like an obvious issue for the area, but it is often cited as a barrier to getting things done both efficiently and fairly. Issues span the way in which top-down channels of communication between Councils, the Greater London Authority and grass roots levels are conducted, through to the way in which many (and sometimes competing) local peer-to-peer forums can sometimes become closed, rather than continue to foster an open dialogue about key issues affecting the areas. Complex channels of communication and responsibility within Councils are often referred to as a key ‘barrier.’ Local communication campaigns grow quickly through community networks within each area, but more can be done to bridge networks across the town centres.

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Networks

Networks


D24 Insight:

public trust Top-down channels

Description: There is a strong sense of ‘consultation fatigue’ uniformly across the study area, with many residents and groups wary of the number, relationship and end results of ongoing consultations. Numerous questions were raised over the intent of this study, its relationship to Crystal Palace Park and to the recent recommendation in the Further Alterations of the London Plan as a Strategic Outer London Development Centre for culture and leisure - indicating that clear, productive channels communication between government and grassroots are both welcome and necessary. Other issues highlighted include the complexity of consultation, where, for instance, large scale developments within one borough directly impact on residents of other boroughs. Frustrations for residents in cross-boundary areas manifests itself on a day-to-day basis in unclear or non-responsive communications channels with multiple boroughs, a widespread perception of disinvestment in shared infrastructures such as libraries and schools, and a plethora of community organisations without the remit to represent their ‘de facto’ community.

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D25

“The only time I get any information through the door is during election time.”- Penge resident “Pathways to Council Officers is not easy, it is all very remote!” - Penge resident Challenges: Extending consulations to those outside statutory requirements, but affected by potential developments

Bromley Council are not required to consult residents of Southwark on potential developments affecting the northwestern corner of Crystal Palace Park1

Opportunities: Proactively publishing Council information, services and development plans on existing forums, social media and local networks • Promote circulation of news or potential developments through local newspapers, online forums and local newspapers • Adopt a more proactive approach to promoting upcoming commissioning and funding opportunities, new resources and ‘good news.’

Implications for councils: • Investing in a commitment to support and connect local businesses, projects • Potential financial investment • Actively disseminate information through open channels • Council officer time, making visible resources. on-going management and curation

Implications for local residents: • Collaborate with other businesses and organisations,and the council(s) • Participate and support local projects and businesses

For more details, refer to Tactics Section: Interactive mapping, Shared Directory, Connections Host 1 Source: Southwark Councillors: Meeting 30th October 2014

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D26 Insight:

proactive relationships Between Councils and residents

"We could not have anticipated what Council obstacles we would face hosting an event." - Friends of Penge Green/Penge Rec procuring an event

Description: There is a gap in transparent, easily navigable channels through which residents can contact their Councils regarding specific proposals, rather than problems - which could be queries related to starting a business improvement district, neighbourhood forum, or designating a property as a community asset. There is also a notable lack of formal mechanisms for inviting and assessing proposals from residents, meaning that boroughs are not currently positioned to tap into the willing networks, skills, ideas, and expertise found across the areas.

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D27

“How do you speak with the council about ideas, without it taking three years?”- Upper Norwood resident “The council service was confusing and complex, with no feedback or central point of reference” - Penge resident on applying to run a community event in a Council owned space

Challenge: Making transparent and accessible who at the Council should be contacted about specific topics and opportunities

How can a ‘little black book’ for accessing key officers be made accessible to residents while remaining manageable for Councils? Evidence base: It is not always clear who holds information or decision-making authority within Councils •“It’s like there’s detective work involved. Sometimes within

the Councils they don’t even know who to pass you on to.”

- Gipsy Hill resident, met at Anerley Town Hall • “If you want to do something, you have to have the

same conversation over and over again with five different Councils.” - Upper Norwood resident

• “We tried to make an enquiry about the National Sports

Centre regarding access to their roofs to try to find out who the decision maker would be...the ‘little black book,’ with who to contact, job title etc, would be so helpful.” - member, Palace Power (local energy project)

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D28

Opportunities: Re-establishing (and improving upon) forums viewed positively by local residents Evidence base: • A Neighbourhood Partnership for Upper Norwood previously existed, run by a committee and chair comprised of local residents and supported by Croydon Council in logistics • The Upper Norwood Improvement Team (UNIT) which looks primarily at public realm improvements and safety concerns, consisted of local Councils, Councillors and representatives of the Metropolitan Police, was positively viewed by residents ‘getting everyone around the table.’ However, resident feedback also suggested that it could have been made ‘more dynamic.’

Explore how existing platforms could be strengthened or added to, rather than re-inventing the wheel The functionality of ‘Bromley Fix my Street,’ a website for identifying problems related to pot-holes, rubbish collection could be further extended invite resident feedback or proposals www.fixmystreet.com/reports/ Bromley/ Evidence snapshot: • Low general awareness of residents in availability of Greater London Authority High Streets funding available via SpaceHive Implications for councils: • Potential financial investment • Actively disseminate information through open channels • Council officer time, making visible resources. on-going management and curation

For more details, refer to Tactics Section: • •

Councils as Enablers, Connections ‘Host’

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D29 Insight:

Local Leadership Opportunities for locally-led vehicles

“No grants, and five boroughs has, in some ways, made us stronger.� -Market Manager, Transition Town

Description: The localism agenda is advocating for greater local determination of planning permissions and management of local assets, and there is plenty of will and capacity of local residents to be involved in shaping regeneration priorities. However, no single community-led vehicle exists in the study area with the mandate to represent communities spanning multiple boroughs, or with the structure or capacity to manage the acquisition of assets - particularly around complex opportunities requiring substantial investment or management (eg Crystal Palace Park, Anerley Town Hall or the National Sports Centre). This issue is more relevant to Upper Norwood, the town centre in the study straddling multiple borough boundaries, than to Anerley or Penge.

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D30

Challenges: Identifying the most appropriate structures for a communityled vehicle In particular, vehicles capable of addressing core resident concerns around long-term area affordability and stewardship of public assets

Developing strategies for area stewardship in a location with few remaining Council assets to potentially leverage Challenges associated with forming a Community Land Trust or raising finance without an asset to leverage

An inclusive ‘election’ process and constitution of executive board Requires buy-in from a representatives of a wide range of demographics across the area for legitimacy, and committing to strategies for genuine dialogue, engagement and participation with the ‘harder to reach’

Evidence snapshot: • 2nd December workshop participants reported difficulties engaging with Central Hill Resident TRAs • Common reference to the Groves estates as ‘social islands’ and hard to engage residents

Opportunities: Public sector acting as local ‘enablers’

Exploration of alternative options for the ongoing management of remaining Council or Greater London Authority assets in the area, and potential assistance preparing viable business plans for local leadership; acting in the role of guarantor to help raise finance

Learning from London-based precedents

Such as the viability of Queens Park, the first urban (London-based) Parish Council

Evidence snapshot: • An annual levy of £40 annual cost per household is raised from 12,000+ residents, providing an anticipated £100k per year, to pay for two members of staff and one office. There are over 16,000 residents in Upper Norwood ward alone (Croydon). With powers equivalent to a Neighbourhood Forum, the council has a focus on neighbourhood planning and remit spanning activities for youth, elderly and unemployed, coordination of community events, management of allotments and now the potential management of its local park as source of income. • Evidence of local interest, as demonstrated by Locality-backed Neighbourhood Forum currently in development

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D31 Implications for councils: Assessment of possibilities for asset transfer; assistance preparing jointly agreed viable business plans; acting as guarantors behind a community backed vehicle, securing the strength of covenant for finance to be raised

Implications for local residents: Leaders should be highly networked and engaging local individuals rather than recruited from the outside. Possibly sourced via democratic nomination Expertise in legal and governance structures Time and skills reaching out to raise members and host consultations; engagement with area landlords and stakeholders (eg housing associations)

For additional details, refer to Tactics Section: • • • •

Councils as Enablers Asset Transfer Community-Led Renewal Projects Prototyping Projects

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D32 Insight:

Co-ordination Borough to Borough - Policy & Investment

“The situation is… we all have a stake in [the area]… but not enough of one to do anything about it.” - Housing Officer, Lewisham Council

Description: Cross-borough coordination has been stop-start and ad-hoc in nature, while partnerships around shared investments have been insecure. As an area at the confluence of several borough boundaries, Upper Norwood is the area centre most affected by cross-boundary issues, namely investment in infrastructures shared by residents across boroughs, from schools, (open to pupils from neighbouring boroughs due to the Greenwich Judgement), to parks and libraries used by residents spanning Lambeth, Croydon, Southwark and Bromley.

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D33

“ A Joint Area Action Plan existed, but it lost energy...”- Planning Officer, Croydon Council Challenges: Sustaining cross-borough working partnerships Evidence snapshot: • Discontinuation of Joint Area Action Plan for Upper Norwood, between Lambeth and Croydon Councils • Funding commitments to Upper Norwood Library have been stop-start in nature, recently jointly agreed until 2017

Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge are not clearly prioritised or dealt with in existing Council strategy Evidence snapshot: • Upper Norwood is named in Croydon policy as a contender to host one of four centres for creative enterprise in the borough, though commitments from core budgets have not been made • Southwark have minimal ownership of land or housing stock and interviews indicate this is not an area that is or will be prioritised in policy or investment • While acknowledged as a ‘Renewal Area’ in the London Plan, Bromley’s ‘Core Strategies Issues Consultation’ document provides little indication of future plans or investments in Anerley

Opportunities Learning from cross-borough collaborations in similar contexts

Involving coordination of investment, planning policy and resources across multiple borough boundaries Evidence snapshot: The Finsbury Park Accord, adopted in 2012 According to an Islington Officer, the most successful element of the Finsbury Park Accord, between Islington, Hackney and Haringey Councils, is the focus on a narrow set of deliverable action points (including a joint spatial strategy for the area), for which the delivery is steered by a triborough Member-led board. www.islington.gov.uk/finsburypark

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D34 Insight:

PEER-TO-PEER Bridging networks more effectively

"There is no central point to find out about local group activities" - Penge Resident

Description: There is a richness of peer-to-peer and community-led forums within Upper Norwood and Penge. Upper Norwood contains a density of well and long-established civic and activist networks, while Penge seems to contain a combination of well-established groups with perhaps limited flexibility to new ideas, while new networks are quickly getting started, such as the Penge Tourist Board, Made in Penge, and Makers Network. Of the three, Anerley has the least evidence of well developed networks or communities of shared interest. St. Hughes Community Centre, while vital to its immediate surroundings, has weaker links with the wider neighbourhood in which it sits.

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D35

Challenges: Raising awareness of ‘what is out there’

Organisations that have been working independently and often in isolated ways would benefit greatly from complementary organisations and potential partners in the area but do not know they exist. Evidence snapshot: • Three youth programmes in Anerley (Mixtape Project Anerley Town Hall, Crystal Palace Development Trust youth provision, Streetwise) host complementary programmes in music production and could potentially pool equipment

“Do organisations know what each other do or have?” - Affinity Sutton Community Investment Team

“I have the [skills to run workshops] but I don’t have the networks in place.” - Penge resident and craft-based entrepreneur Ensuring that local forums stay relevant

Forums fade in and out of relevance as and when a political issue arises, and are at times presided over by groups with narrow interests - great for campaigns, but less productive for vision or interest-led discussions or proposals for an area • The number of defunct or websites hosted by local organisations in Upper Norwood demonstrate that websites can be too narrow in either content or functionality

“I often find out about a local event after it has happened”

- Penge resident

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D36

Opportunities: Open existing meetups to groups further afield Meeting face to face was mentioned by residents as the best way to build local trust and repore, and exchange ideas across Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge Evidence snapshot: • Transition Town network hosts monthly ‘Green Drinks’ - an open event inviting in people from across the area • ‘Coalition of Doers’ - a loose network of wider area groups in Upper Norwood, meets periodically to discuss local projects and project sustainability • Penge Partners - a non-political, non-partisan group of professional and retired business people who share a common commitment to Penge and Anerley • The Information Project - a central place housing information + hosting debates related the potential sale of Metropolitan Open Land to facilitate the proposed development in Crystal Palace Park by ZhongRong Group has hosted debates attracting over 100 participants

Use each others networks and communication channels to promote ideas, events or partnership opportunities Evidence snapshot: • Penge Tourist Board facebook page has over 1200 members on facebook • Transition Town facebook page has approximately 1300 members and a mailing list of 850+ • Crystal Palace Life - an online portal for those who live and work in and around Crystal Palace • Virtual Norwood (online news and events forum covering Upper Norwood, Anerley, Penge and Sydenham) • Crystal Palace Triangle Planning Group • Crystal Palace Facebook page • Penge Tourist Board facebook group (1200 members • News and stories from Crystal Palace, London SE19 ( local journalist) • The Triangle SE19 - blog about Upper Norwood Triangle • Friends of the Crystal Palace Subway • Crystal Palace Campaign

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D37 Implications for councils:

Implications for local residents:

• Potential financial and officer time, especially to support start-up of a programme, making available networks and resources, • Host: Low level (joint) investment in part-time funded role (s) officers • Build on local knowledge

• Hosts should be highly networked and engaging local individuals rather than recruited from the outside. Possibly sourced via democratic nomination • Commit time and energy • Committed leaders, using their networks to build a community of participants. • Participates share resources and act in a collaborative matter • Potential of taking on-going management and curation (potentially without funding)

For more details, refer to Tactics Section:

• • • • • • •

Open Workshop Meet-ups Resources Network Shared Directory Members Collective Ideas Initiator Connections Host

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D38

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Capacity

Over the course of several months we mapped an amazing number of ideas, skills, and networks already here getting amazing things done - volunteering their time to coordinate campaigns around key issues (such as neighbourhood planning, and protection of cherished local spaces) volunteer networks, as well as running spaces and hosting events. At the same time, even the most enterprising organisations have been subject to sticking points around missing critical capacity and expertise.

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Local Capacity

Local


D40 Insight:

local Capacity Bridging and supplementing local skills

Description: Even the most capable organisations we connected with are held back by specific capacity constraints or skill limitations. Many felt they could use critical capacity to solve particular challenges mainly around forward and business planning, project management and finance savyness - or simply knowing who else in their area shares similar interests and skills.

“We’re a do-acracy. We operate on a default ‘yes’ principle if someone comes up with a new idea; but nothing is going to happen unless they form a team.”

- Transition Town Steering Group meeting, October 15th 2014

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D41

Challenges: Civic organisations have limited ability to chase resources, coordinate volunteers time, and communicate with one another •

Most productive phase of development in local energy cooperative Palace Power was when one of its members became unemployed and took on the project management of the cooperative full-time

Even the most proactive and ‘able’ organisations could use outside expertise to strengthen what they do •

The Upper Norwood Library Trust is recruiting a Director to leverage external resources and provide leadership and networking skills to help the Library meet revenue requirements

Opportunities: There are opportunities to share equipment and resources across networks and between groups with synergies • • • •

Age UK Bromley and Greenwich have created the Trusted Traders network, an online directory verifying traders providing services and products tailored to the needs of older people and their carers Transition Town has produced a Local and Fair Guide and makes investment in local peoples knowledge, skills and capacity. Alexandra Cottages’s Resident’s Association has created ‘The Shed,’ online directory of shared equipment available to residents Learning from Transition Town’s patchwork farms or Palace Pint networks, where people with space connect with those who wish to use them Learning from Men’s Shed’s as a shared local community resource.

Implications for councils: • Low level (joint) investment in part-time funded role(s) • Commitment to support and connect to emergent projects and groups

Implications for local residents: • Participants share resources and act in a collaborative matter • General interest and commitment to take part

For additional details, refer to Tactics Section: ‘Ideas Initiator’, Resources Network, ‘How to’ Template, Shared Directory, Connections ‘Host’

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D42

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ta

E

ct ic s The following section introduces tactics for implementing recommendations and ideas contained within the previous section, alongside examples of how they can be applied. Tactics relate to a comprehensive approach that goes beyond physical interventions to include investment in programmes, infrastructure, finance, governance, asset management and people.

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E1

Tactic Types Physical Intervention Spaces and interventions that create the conditions for the desired activities and behaviours.

Collective Workspace / High Street Incubator / Ideas Lab / Shared Space

Programme Use of programme, from informal meet-ups to structured networks, to bring people together, create commonality, nurture and support, and develop shared visions. Open Workshops / Meet-ups / Network / Enterprise Accelerator / Prototyping Projects / Collective Branding

Infrastructure Physical and digital platforms that enable people, for example, providing pathway to contributing in new ways to accessing information that enables their projects and ideas. Interactive Map / Shared Directory / Space Booking System / ‘How to’ Template / ‘Meanwhile’ Licensing

Governance & Asset Management Tools allowing people and councils to make collaborative decisions and work together to realise projects Asset transfer / Council as enablers / Accords / Community-led vehicles / Business Improvement Districts

Finance Strategies to increase access to finance and support.

Match-fund redesign / Collective investment / Local loyalty scheme

People Specific roles to facilitate connections and host spaces and networks Ideas initiator / Local ‘Connector’

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E2

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E3

Physical Intervention

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E4

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Tool type: Physical Intervention E5

Collective WOrkspace

Collective workspace on a membership model that combines deskspace, meeting space, events, community infrastructure and support programme. Stronger if brought together around a shared focus. EG: Anerley Works Local organisations and passionate entrepreneurs could come together to create a space to learn, be creative, stimulated, and use their talents. The space would support new businesses through affordable, collective rent models, peer support, skills development workshops and a growth fund. Linking with local youth organisations, it could actively support youth enterprise projects and training.

Precedents: Cockpits Arts A combination of affordable managed studios and office services and a continuous incubator programme, including onsite one-to-one business development coaching. Cofounded by local business owners – ventures have been developed from within community, not imposed from the outside. Recently transitioned from charity to social enterprise.

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E6

Collective workspace (cont’)

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Anerley Envisioning potential future use of Anerley Town Hall, disused library space

Entrepreneurs, small businesses and business networks from across the area as well as local landlords and workspace providers eg • Antenna studios, Cooper’s Yard, Affinity Sutton, Crystal Palace Development Trust

Future workspace provision within redevelopments or estate renewal programmes in the study area

Applicable to: Penge Vacant units in the town centre, eg on Maple Road, Penge High Street, eg closed bank Within planned redevelopment eg‘The Hub’ /Citizens Advice Bureau, Westbury Road

Applicable to: Upper Norwood Future redevelopments and potential redevelopments eg • Virgo Fidelis Convent School, Central Hill (Croydon); Potential redevelopment, Bowley Close (Southwark); Central Hill estate (Lambeth) Spare capacity in existing community facilities eg • Barnardo’s, Salvation Army, Phoenix Centre

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Potential synergies: Local landlords, space operators and craft-based enterprise networks in the area eg •

Create SE20, The Stitch Club, Made in Penge, Affinity Sutton

Potential synergies: Local landlords & space operators, business and civic networks eg • Gipsy Hill workshops, Antenna Studios, Cooper’s Yard • Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce • The Stitching Lounge • Crystal Palace Triangle Planning Group • Hub Impact Brixton • Members, ‘Coalition of Doers’


Tool type: Physical Intervention E7

high street Incubator INCUBATOR

A High street space that allows new traders, makers and existing businesses to test new ideas and products in a low-risk environment through lowered costs of shared rental and collective marketing, alongside enterprise support. EG: Penge Makerspace A local resident’s idea to start a high street craft-based retail space that provides a location for local makers to test trade, benefitting from shared space and equipment to make and run classes.

Precedents: Hub Shop A collaborative boutique helping small entrepreneurs bring their sustainable products to the market in a combined retail store and small café/ gallery /makerspace run by 2 local entrepreneurs. Members of the shop can rent a ‘box’ of varying sizes to showcase and sell their products with a minimum 3 months contract. The HUB Shop has approximately 60 members who pay for boxes.

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E8

High Street Incubator (cont’)

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood Vacant units including spaces above or below retail units eg • Stitching Lounge on Westow Street, vacant police station (Crystal Palace Triangle Ward unit)

Local landlords & host spaces for trial entrepreneurs and potentially ‘meanwhile’ space operators eg • Handmade, Transition Town Market, Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce, 3Space, Meanwhile Space

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge Vacant or at-risk local units/ assets eg • Exploring a new community use for Maple Road library space, utilising vacant units on High Street such as Barclay’s Bank, and NatWest, Penge public toilets (closing in January 2015)

Local landlords, Bromley Council and a wide range of community organisations interested in alternative use and High Street improvements eg • Penge Town Team, Makerhood, Made in Penge, Create SE20

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Tool type: Physical Intervention E9

Ideas Lab

A facility supporting the development of local residents, businesses and organisation’s ideas and projects EG: Ideas Lab Councils could invest in staffed space(s) capable of supporting a wide range of locally-hosted activities and programmes to cross-subsidise its overheads. An ‘incubator’ for local ideas, the facility could provide inspiration, advice, help negotiating space, permissions, networks and funding, as well help residents connect with local partners, including the potential to connect with their local councils.

Precedents: Open Works, West Norwood, London The Open Works is a Lambeth-council funded space in West Norwood where people can join as members for free and receive help starting new projects or initiatives in their area. It hosts locally-led workshops, talks and activities, and aims to test new civic models and services, from collective impact bonds to neighbourhood commissioning. www.theopenworks.org

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E10

Ideas Lab (cont’)

Applicable to: Upper Norwood Vacant or available units where residents would benefit from increased networking, acrossborough boundaries eg • Vacant retail units, top of Anerley Hill, Church Road

Potential synergies: New and existing resident networks, Councils and unaffiliated residents eg • Transition Town, members, ‘Coalition of Doers’, Central Hill TRA, Lambeth Living, • Lambeth, Croydon and Bromley, Southwark Councils

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge • Maple Road unit, library space • Planned redevelopment, ‘The Hub’ /Citizens Advice Bureau, Westbury Road

• • • • • • •

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Penge Partners Penge Town Team Penge Tourist Board Mens Shed Made in Penge Affinity Sutton Community Investment Team Meanwhile Space group, 3Space


Tool type: Physical Intervention E11

Shared space

A new type of shared space, made and shaped collectively by the community. Resident members could access the space, to meet people, host events, experiment with ideas and start new projects. EG: Common Room Council could co-invest in a shared space that supports a wide range of locally-hosted activities and programmes, potentially sustained through local membership, with many people contributing a small amount; the hosting of additional programmes could potentially cross-subsidise overhead costs such as electricity and water.

Precedents: The Living Room, Rotterdam The Living Room is a former shop which residents joined together to redecorate, creating a welcoming space where people from the neighbourhood share meals, hold events and look after their children together, in a shared and open atmosphere. Its operation costs are covered by resident membership fees - everyone contributing 3 euros/month.

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E12

Shared Space (cont’)

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood • Empty retail units, Westow Street, Church Road

• • • • • •

Crystal [Fun]Palace organisers Transition Town Members, ‘Coalition of Doers’ Local landlords Crystal Palace Triangle Planning Group Paxton Green Timebank

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Anerley • Anerley Town Hall library space • Vacant post office unit, Anerley • Spare capacity of Affinity Sutton’s Hawthorne Centre, Hawthorne Grove

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• • • • •

Crystal Palace Community Development Trust Anerley Regeneration Project Affinity Sutton MWAH intergenerational The Mixtape project Streetwise


E13

Programme

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E14

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Tool type: Programme E15

Open Workshop

Open workshops inviting crowd-sourced solutions for at-risk local assets, ideas generation for High street improvements, for example, while strengthening and bridging local networks. EG: Open Space Workshop A series of site-specific open workshops inviting crowd-sourced solutions for sustainable management of at-risk space assets. Inviting local residents, together with professionals in planning, finance, architecture, design and others to identify desired uses and users, as well as outline sustainable revenue streams.

Lambeth - Future Town Hall Exploration Invitation to a day of collaborative imagining and making.

Precedents: Future Town Hall Exploration In 2012, Lambeth Council hosted a workshop bringing local residents and additional professionals to start to brainstorm what a self-sustaining future Town Hall could be like. The one day event, facilitated by Good for Nothing, brought proposals for the Town Hall forward to Councillors and the Cabinet, informing the provision of a new coworking space for Brixton. www.spaciousapp.com

Thursday December 6th 9.00-5.30

The Electric Social 40 Acre Lane Brixton, London, SW2 5SP, 44 (0) 20 3588 1111

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E16

Open Workshop (cont’) Applicable to: Anerley • Future use/re-development of Anerley Town Hall • Future use of vacant post office • Future use/re-development of Hawthorne Centre • Strengthening shared resources, equipment across local organisations Applicable to: Penge • Future use and/or development of Maple Road library, Barclays and Natwest Banks

Potential synergies •

Crystal Palace Community Development Trust, future Community Land Trusts, Anerley Regeneration Project, Affinity Sutton, Streetwise

Potential synergies: •

Penge Town Team, SE20 Arts Group, Queen Adelaide’s Court Residents Associations

High Street maker or incubation space

Makerhood network, Create SE20, Made in Penge

Connecting youth to enterprise to local traders and apprenticeship opportunities

Penge Traders Association, CPCDT Youth provision, Streetwise, Affinity Sutton

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge and Upper Norwood • The route and content of heritage walks

Friends of Penge Green, Capel Manor College, Penge Partners, Alexandra Cottages, St John’s Primary School, Friends of Parks, Crystal Palace Foundation, Norwood Society

Crystal Palace Sports Partnership, Crystal Palace Triangle Planning Group, Future Crystal Palace Neighbourhood Forum

Future management and funding of Crystal Palace Park

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Tool type: Programme E17

Meet-ups

A programme of events focused on bridging and nurturing links between groups and individuals. A useful tool to gather around a shared interest, curating activities to encourage interaction, and setting around a social event. EG: Green Drinks Residents meet monthly at the Grape and Grain in Upper Norwood for ‘Green Drinks,’ a networking evening for those interested in local sustainability hosted by Transition Town.

Precedents: High Tea At collaborative membership space Impact Hub Westminster, one of the tactics for nurturing interactions and connections between members is through regular social events that encourage people to develop shared interests. High Tea is an open event hosted at the same time every Thursday. around free tea and cakes for members in the space. Applicable to: Penge and Upper Norwood • Linking the newly forming Town Team with newly forming Crystal Palace Neighbourhood Forum, as well, bridging networks around shared interests spanning cultural events programming, skills share, and enterprise.

Potential synergies: • • • • • • • •

Penge Partners SE20 Arts Create SE20 Antenna Studios Transition Town Crystal Palace Facebook page Crystal [Fun Palace] network The Information Project

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Tool type: Programme

E18

Resources Network

Pooling local assets, such as resident’s tools and equipment through sharing systems, such as DIY tools, cargo bikes, cameras, etc EG: Crystal Palace Makers Network Response to shortage of artist studio spaces locally for creative enterprise with suitable equipment. A network to share spaces, resources and skills amongst small creative businesses and self-employed individuals.

Precedents: Library of Things A shop set-up and run by local residents, where people can borrow items that they don’t need everyday - from camping equipment and power tools to tea urns for events. Members can borrow for free but must contribute items to the library. Currently it being run out of the old library in West Norwood.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Anerley and Penge

• • • • • •

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St Hugh’s Community Centre The Hawthorne Centre Penge East Community Centre Bromley Active Living Centre, Queen Adelaide’s Estate Men’s Shed Penge Public Library


Tool type: Programme E19

Enterprise Accelerator

A intensive programme specifically designed to test and support early-stage business ideas, nurture relevant skills, links to mentoring, and investment opportunities. EG: Food Accelerator Lambeth’s CREATE enterprise support programme for individuals looking to start a food-based enterprise could be extended to the area across the boroughs.

Precedents: Lambeth CREATE A programme working with approximately 30 budding food entrepreneurs with programmes touching on marketing, premises, sourcing ingredients, sustainability as well as hosting network and ‘pitching’ events for feedback and advice. www.lambethfood.org.uk/projects/create-start-your-ownfood-business/ Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide

• • • • • • •

Affinity Sutton Antenna Studios Cooper’s Yard Crystal Palace Development Trust West Norwood Business Improvement District Lambeth CREATE Transition Town market

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Tool type: Programme

E20

Prototyping Projects

Programmes and spaces enabling local residents to trial ideas (or allow for failure) before making a long-term commitment in the form of space rental or investment in equipment. A tactic also for using a space to attract partners and additional interest in a concept. EG: Alexandra Pop-up Cafe, Penge Pop-up cafe in Alexandra Recreation Ground to test the viability of a longer-time cafe. The lodge is currently closed, and there has been interest from a local coffee shop. Precedents: Street Feast Street Feast is the overarching title of a series of nighttime street food markets hosted in Dalston, Lewisham and Battersea. Operated by KERB, the markets help food entrepreneurs participate in new street food markets business opportunities, handling logistics and coordination of traders. Kerb members get advice about structure and stall fit-out, health and safety regulations, but incubation programmes for beginners are lacking. Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge Areas experiencing perpetual vacancies, or with changing demographics eg • Bringing back Maple Road market; Supporting new forms of food-based enterprise and networks

Local entrepreneurs, traders and apprentices, potentially eg • Community Canteen

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Delivers on: Programme E21

Collective bRANDING Identity

An identity and brand campaign to distinguish the town centre, create materials that local businesses can employ to help market themselves, to create a unified identity across the town centre as a whole. EG: I ‘Heart’ Penge Penge Tourist Board have been carrying out an exercise of rebranding Penge with the aim of changing people’s perceptions of the area. An issue of the current process is that some people have not felt included: however, a more inclusive, co-design approach could develop a shared, narrative brand that is used both in council public realm improvement, such as signage, and by local business and groups. Precedents: Shropshire Council A ‘collaborative branding’ exercise was commissioned by Shropshire Council in an effort to promote Shrewsbury as a prime location to live, work, visit and invest in. The strap line and graphic stamp device can be adapted by local businesses in maps, brochures, and advertising to help them market themselves.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge Revitalising Penge High Street and its retail offer and identity

Local organisations, youth groups, and services interested in improving the town centre appeal eg Penge Traders Association; Penge Tourist Board, Made in Penge, SE20 Arts Group, Penge Partners and others

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E22

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E23

Infrastructure

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E24

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Tool type: Infrastructure E25

Interactive Map

An online interactive resource capturing a wider scope of useful local information than currently available, and helping raise awareness of the resources and networks in the area. EG: An interactive website enabling the mapping of local projects and ideas, paired with tools to facilitate interaction, feedback and pledging the of support (skills, time, finance etc) that can help support their realisation.

Precedents: The Civic Crowd The Civic Crowd is a community action platform- a website that allows people to share projects they are working on, discuss ideas for improvements, get feedback or offer skills and support to help realise projects. www.theciviccrowd.org

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E26

Interactive map (cont’)

Applicable to:

Potential synergies

Area-wide Sharing expensive equipment and expertise

Local youth groups, hobbyists or aspiring entrepreneurs, eg • The Mixtape Project, Streetwise, St Hughes, Made in Penge

Testing appetite for a maker space within the study area

Antenna Studios, Create SE20, Makerhood; The Stitch Club; Handmade; Made in Penge

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

More easily identifying land available for community gardens and growing networks

Area wide: draw across active local community groups and networks

Identifying additional uses and garnering support for public assets, such as accessing rooftops for installation of solar voltaic on Council-owned rooftops

Palace Power, Local Housing Associations (Hyde, Amicus Horizon, Lambeth Living, Family Mosaic, Affinity Sutton), Kingswood Primary School, Paxwood Primary School, Rockmount Primary School, Harris Academy (secondary), Norwood School (secondary)

Building networks and skills to host wider use of activities and cultural programmes in parks

Penge Green Cycle Cinema, Friends of Penge Green, Friends of Royston Field, Penge Partners, Crystal Palace Film Festival, Crystal Palace Overground Festival, Sydenham Arts Festival organisers, Friends of Crystal Palace Subway

Joining the dots


Tool type: Infrastructure E27

Shared Directory

A single, easily accessible master document making interests, expertise and organisations/networks across the areas more visible and contactable. EG: People Directory An online database containing contact details, skills and interests for residents, organisations to which they belong, businesses and relevant Council officers to contact about specific topics.

Precedents: Fish Island & Hackney Wick online directory The Cultural Interest Group (CIG) and online directory website was founded in 2008 following an urban study of Hackney Wick. The directory contains a spread of local community groups, businesses and people operating in and around Hackney Wick and Fish Island as well as local representative Boroughs of Hackney, Tower Hamlets and LLDC. www.hackneywick.org/directory Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide

Potentially hosted or disseminated through wellutilised forums eg • Transition Town; Crystal Palace facebook page; Virtual Norwood or The Transmitter magazine

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Tool type: Infrastructure

E28

SPACE Booking

Platform for searching for and booking local venues and resources. EG: ‘Palace Booking’ An online booking system that enables residents to search for and book available spaces and equipment; the website could contain all associated information, such as licensing agreements, rent and rate information.

Precedents: Spacious Spacious is a website that works with workspace operators, start-ups and spare capacity, property developers, office providers, local councils to provide an overview of spare capacity in areas with characteristics (high speed internet, access to bikes). www.spaciousapp.com Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide Where spaces available for hosting meeting or events could be added to a central system

Organisations with under utilised spaces, event programmers or hobby networks eg • local churches, Crystal [Fun] Palace organisers, Housing Associations

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Tool type: Infrastructure E29

‘hOW TO’ Template

Protocol encouraging people to create ‘how to use’ template forms, in order to pass on their knowledge to aid further projects and activities, such as how barriers to accessing pubic parks or spaces can be lowered, for example. EG: Yes Space A ‘default yes’ principle adopted by Councils and enabled by pre-written document sharing protocols and criteria for hosting events in public parks or spaces. This could be an online form that additional information is added to (like a wikipedia page). Precedents: Palace Pint pro-forma Founders of Palace Pint, a hop-growing and beer brewing network in Crystal Palace, have created an open-source ‘how-to’ template containing step-by-step chapters on setting up a hop growing network and becoming financially self sustainable. www.growbeer.city-farmers.co.uk Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide Where residents could benefit from insigts gained from comparable projects

Organisations with potentially similar business models eg • Transition Town projects eg Patchwork Farms; Palace Power and Brixton Power, Associations

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Tool type: Infrastructure

E30

Meanwhile Licensing t Hos e c Spa

License and associated physical ‘tagging’ system that lowers barriers to accessing empty or available spaces. EG: Open Space License A pre-written contract ‘stamp’ covering health and safety, legal liability, pricing standards to lower barriers for landlords and space seekers; a physical sticker sign-posting empty properties in the scheme.

Precedents: The ‘Coming Soon’ Club, Wembley The Coming Soon Club, commissioned by Brent Council, helps people in Wembley find out how to start their own “meanwhile” projects in the area. Club members join for free in return for submitting their idea for using empty space and in return receive support and mentoring for their project, use of the Club headquarters for meetings, events and to trial their project. www.comingsoonclub.co.uk

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide Where there is a persistence of vacant units, such as Maple Road Penge, Church Road, Upper Norwood, and Anerley Hill

Local organisations seeking outside expertise to secure leases and licenses for temporary use, landlords interested in rate relief, eg • Penge Traders Association, 3 Space, Meanwhile Space, local Housing Associations

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E31

Governance & Asset Management

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Tool type: Governance

E32

Asset Transfer

Transfer of ownership or management of publicly owned assets to community groups, such as community centres, police stations, parks and town halls at less than market value EG: Anerley Town Hall The Crystal Palace Development Trust are applying for Bromley Council to transfer the long-time management of Anerley Town to them. They would carry on using the building to run community activities and an enterprise centre but a longer lease would allow them to run the space with more independence, including greater flexibility of offer for business space -catering for start-ups. Precedents: St Clements Community Land Trust East London Community Land Trust partnered with Igloo, Maccreanor Lavington and Popla Harca to take over a derelict site and provide ‘permanently affordable homes’ as well as an interim cultural programme of events (eg film festival). www.eastlondonclt.co.uk/#/st-clements Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Penge Assets such as Anerley Town Hall, adjacent parking lot, underutilised public land

Local organisations, future community-led vehicles and national organisations with useful knowledge or expertise, eg

Area-wide The future of assets such as the National Sports Centre or Crystal Palace Park

Joining the dots

Crystal Palace Development Trust, Crystal Palace Sports Partnership, Locality


Tool type: Governance E33

Councils as Enablers

Underwriting role of Councils to enable projects, such as guarantor for properties or funding. EG: High Street Project Space Bromley Council taking on the leases of available commercial units in exchange for revenue share with interested occupants or projects. For example, a local organisation securing a lease or funding need a guarantor.

Precedents: Camden Collective A network of low-cost workspaces for the creative industries, managed by a council and BID-backed charity, subsidising free co-working space with a skill sharing obligation for tenants. Funded by Mayor of London (MRF), Camden Council, Camden Town Unlimited (BID) for Camden Town. www.camdencollective.co.uk Applicable to:

Potential synergies

Penge Potential for Bromley Council to take on multiple leases on Penge High Street to support new uses and revenue share

• • • •

Council officers from town centre and asset management, Community Canteen project Penge Traders Association Penge Partners Friends of Penge Green Friends of Royston

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Tool type: Governance

E34

Area Accord

Agreement between multiple boroughs sharing a town centre or key area which spans multiple borders. An accord should state shared principles, ambitions, and actions, and may address issues such as stakeholder engagement, town centre economy, future development, service delivery, deprivation and crime. The process is overseen by a board consisting of lead members of Councils in regeneration, with attendance at meetings by local MPs and GLA officer.

ENDIX A

RY PARK SPD: TED BOUNDARY FOR CROSS-BOROUGH MENTARY PLANNING DOCUMENT

Suggested SPD Boundary

Unadopted (2007) Area Action Plan Boundary

Borough Boundary

Ward Boundary

London Borough of Haringey: Stroud Green Ward Harringey Ward

London Borough of Islington: Finsbury Park Ward Highbury West Ward

London Borough of Hackney: Brownswood Ward

EG: A Crystal Palace Accord A renewed effort could be put into an Accord focusing on key issues of school provision, libraries, health facilities and shared investment in start-up or enterprise spaces or new roles within town centre management. Precedents: Finsbury Park Accord According to an Islington Officer, the most successful element of the Finsbury Park Accord, between Islington, Hackney and Haringey Councils, is the focus on a narrow set of deliverable action points (including a joint spatial strategy for the area), for which the delivery is steered by a tri-borough Member-led board. www.islington.gov.uk/finsburypark Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood town centre

• •

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Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce Local workshops (Antenna Studios, Cooper’s Yard, Gipsy Hill workshops)


Tool type: Governance E35

Community-led Vehicle

A body with the formal mandate of representing local residents, formulating vision-led planning stipulations and proposals for areas as well as assets spanning multiple boroughs. EG: A Neighbourhood Forum, Parish Council or Development Trust Responsible for devising tactics to retain the area’s local character, including issues such as affordability and area stewardship, as well as acting as a platform for delivering on local aspirations.

Precedents: Chatsworth Road Residents and traders worked together to reopen the street market in Chatsworth Road - and then embarked on creating a neighbourhood plan and projects to continue to transform the community. The plan includes the introduction of a loyalty card, security scheme between shop owners, local growing and composting, pop-up arts venues, bike bays and a cashpoint for the community. Applicable to:

Potential synergies

Upper Norwood The town centre with multiple borough boundaries affecting social infrastructure

Ideally a wide consortium of representatives from the local area potentially growing from existing coalitions and campaigns eg Coalition of Doers, Transition Town, Crystal Palace Planning Group

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Tool type: Governance

E36

BIDS

A Business Improvement District (BID) is a consortium of self-selected business traders within a defined area paying a compulsory levy towards programmes to promote trade and commerce in their area. EG: Crystal Palace Business Improvement District A partnership between local traders operating in Upper Norwood, where traders with shops spanning borough boundaries (Westow Hill, Church Road) could collaborate to invest in street improvements, security, or even engaging landlords to take on leases for long-term test spaces for new entrepreneurs. Precedents: Camden Town Unlimited Camden Town Unlimited is a business improvement district paired with a sister charity managing subsidised workspace. The BID focuses on street improvements and takes on leases to help enable a network of trial spaces for new entrepreneurs. http://www.camdentownunlimited.com/

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood, Penge Distinct town centres with ample businesses and fundraising capacity

Existing traders associations, business networks and potentially local police, eg • Penge Traders Association, Penge Town Team, Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce

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E37

Finance

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Tool type: Finance

E38

Match Fund Re-design

The re-design of all existing (council) match funds and grants within the area to recognise in-kind contributions from applicants across borough boundaries. EG: Palace Match Fund A match-fund across local authorities that allows cross-borough applications and shared outcomes, alongside in-kind match funding to suit the needs of applicants.

Precedents: Seattle Match Fund A fund available to Seattle residents, matching in-kind contributions from residents with grant support from the city towards neighbourhood improvement projects. Administered via Seattle Department of Neighborhoods available in tiers of $1K, $25K, $100K.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood, Anerley,Penge, Gipsy Hill, Sydenham

• • • •

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Croydon Match Fund Bromley Community Fund Housing Associations - eg Affinity Sutton’s Cultiv8 grant programme Lewisham, Southwark, Bromley, Lambeth and Croydon Councils


Tool type: Finance E39

Collective Investment

New forms of collective investment from members of the community to support businesses, organisation and projects in their area. EG: Palace Crowd Fund Micro-investment and crowd funding campaign that links local residents to local businesses, organisation and projects that require funding in return for either shares, rewards or pre-sales of goods.

Precedents: Loaf Loaf is a community supported bakery. People join the bread club and pay a set amount each month. This creates a guaranteed income for the baker to invest in equipment, supplies and labour. In return, you get fresh, locally made, bread each week. To open their bakery, Loaf crowd-funded investment from the bread club members and pays back dividends in bread. www.loafonline.co.uk Application to:

Potential synergies:

Upper Norwood, Penge

• • • • • •

Penge Traders Association Community Canteen Future Maple Road market traders Upper Norwood workshops and studios Transition Town food market Create SE20

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Tool type: Finance

E40

Local Loyalty scheme

Local shopping incentives, such as reward & loyalty scheme or local currency, with the aim to support local businesses and the local economy. EG: I ‘Heart’ Penge Card Loyalty and discount card to encourage people to support local businesses, in addition to simple discounts and offers, more creative incentives could be offered such as, rewards for promoting local businesses though social media. EG: Palace Pound Local currency encouraging local shopping at participating local businesses. Could be linked to the Brixton Pound, which is run by a local resident and local organisation leader. As with the Brixton Pound, local businesses can use the currency to pay their business rates to the council.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies

Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge • Potential for interest group to develop the ‘boundary’ of a new currency for Crystal Palace, to encourage trade between the centres, retain money in local circulation

• • • • • •

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Brixton Pound Penge Traders Association Penge Town Team Made in Penge SEE3 Pilot (Sydenham) Crystal Palace Neighbourhood Forum


E41

People

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Tool type: People

E42

Ideas Initiator

A roving role whose purpose is to ‘fill the gaps’ in knowledge or expertise of local organisations by providing advice and bridging helpful connections; someone with the ability to take an entrepreneurial approach to making projects viable. EG: ‘Entrepreneur in Residence’ A paid role for an individual to connect with local organisations and individuals, providing advice, expertise, precedents, and ready-made business model templates / licensing and available funding resources.

Precedents: Apple Genius Bar Apple stores have a model where they are staffed by roving experts that answer questions from customers about particular products and technical challenge. If they don’t’ know the answer, they lead you to someone who does.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

All areas

• • • •

Joining the dots

Local Councillors London Overground Festival organiser network Crystal [Fun] Palace organiser network Transition network


Tool type: People E43

Connections ‘Host’

A non-political role with the remit of acting as a single point of contact, or conduit, linking residents with appropriate officers within the five boroughs as well as actively cultivating communities of shared interests spanning the areas. A living sign-post, or ‘people connector.’ EG: Area ‘Host’ A stewardship role, potentially expanding beyond the traditional ‘Town Centre Manager’ by being ‘out and about’ across the town centres, connecting communities of shared interest and directing them to the relevant Officers within each borough to connect with on their topic. Precedents: Workspace Host A number of creative co-working spaces, such as Impact Hubs and The Trampery, have community hosts that connect members and actively build interactions and networks through curation of events and online resources.

Applicable to:

Potential synergies:

Area-wide: A role to link communities of interest across the town centres, and to the contacts or information they need

A collaboration between local Councillors, traders, organisations, potentially initially led by existing groups with extensive networks eg • Crystal Palace Transition Town • Crystal [Fun] Palace • Locality • Penge Town Team

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E44

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dy areg rwat fo r st

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Forward Strategy Together, Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge face common challenges around barriers to joined up networks between councils and in the community, and retaining valued civic and commercial spaces. There are opportunities for the five Boroughs to strategically invest in a range of tools and resources shared across the area, such as a shared local directory, a structured programme of networking events, space booking system covering a wider range of community and public assets, to ‘Resident Host’ and ‘Resident Entrepreneur’ roles focused on bridging networks and lending additional capacity to civic organisations. This section details recommendations that respond to the particular challenges and opportunities of each town centre context: Upper Norwood being widely perceived as a thriving community hub concerned with protecting and growing its independent nature, Anerley lacking a central core and identity, and Penge remaining a useful commercial centre in need of imaginative re-invigoration of its public realm and High Street. An approach to the coordination of investment and commissioning based on the distinct character of the centres is summarised as:

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Retain & Grow (Upper Norwood) Seek multi-Council cooperation in: supporting the development and growth of a community-led vehicle with the mandate to represent a community spanning Borough boundaries up to Council and potentially city-government level, devise tactics for retaining the area’s unique character, and act as a platform for delivery of local aspirations; providing shared investment into new roles focused on increasing the capacity of local organisations through specialist expertise and by acting as single point of contact sign-posting new projects to relevant officers within multiple Boroughs. Redefine (Anerley) Seek support in addressing Anerley’s lack of distinct core or identity by investing in an ‘anchor’ space for the area, potentially in the form of co-working or ‘maker space’ building off the current enterprise activities locally, and the light-industrial and workshop heritage of Upper Norwood to serve as a flagship for a more general work-focussed renaissance. Re-invigorate (Penge) Develop Community –Council partnerships to deliver: a series of programmatic investments easing access to spaces on Penge High Street, including potential investment in a High Street business incubator; an “Open Space” license for local landlords easing access to available spaces; networking events for businesses and community; public space enhancements potentially including heritage-based way-finding and orientation schemes.

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SOUTHWARK

LAMBETH

CRYSTAL

UPPER NORWOOD RETAIN & GROW ANERLEY HILL

CROYDON

Legend Borough boundary Indicates Town Centre (non-residential buildings shaded to distinguish extent)


N

LEWISHAM

PALACE PARK

PENGE REINVIGORATE

ANERLEY REDEFINE ANERLEY REDEFINE BROMLEY

ANERLEY ROAD


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Norwood

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Upper Norwood

Upper


F8

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Upper Norwood The quality of Upper Norwood’s public realm, variety of day and night-time commercial activity, combined with feedback of local residents, suggest that coordinated Council action focused on area management and governance, rather than public realm investments, could be of greater strategic benefit to the long-term viability of the area, notably facilitating greater ease of cross-borough working for both Councils and residents, and strengthening local skills and resources to work towards long-term area stewardship. Key recommended interventions for Upper Norwood include: • Community-led vehicles: Councils supporting the development and growth of a community-led vehicle to represent communities (including existing business and trading networks such as the Crystal Palace Chamber of Commerce) across borough boundaries • Shared civic infrastructure: joint council investment into new roles for area stewardship to boost local capacity • Councils as enablers: facilitating ease of access of community organisations to council-owned assets to help leverage external investment or community benefit

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Upper Norwood:

Community-led Vehicle A multi-Council cooperation to support the development and growth of a community-led vehicle with the mandate to represent a community spanning borough boundaries up to Council and potentially city-government level; devise tactics for retaining the area’s unique character and act as a platform for the delivery of local aspirations. Why Upper Norwood: As the town centre spanning four borough boundaries, Upper Norwood is a centre of de facto shared resources and amenities such as libraries, schools and parks, as well as numerous civic networks and organisations necessarily spanning Lambeth, Croydon, Southwark and Bromley borough lines. The area has been subject to varying crossborough council forums and working groups over the years (see Section D), but reported by Council officers as ad-hoc and at risk of budgetary reductions. As such, Councils should invest in boosting the civic capacity more broadly, with particular support for the development of a community-led vehicle capable of addressing the key concerns highlighted in the study: retention of (affordable) host space; planning priorities; and leveraging public-sector assets for community benefit. Demand: There is a density of highly networked civic interest groups experienced in campaigning, fundraising and planning, including a Neighbourhood Forum being formed with official support from Locality.

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SOUTHWARK

LAMBETH

UPPER NORWOOD TRIANGLE

CROYDON

BROMLEY

N

Legend Borough boundary Indicates Town Centre (non-residential buildings shaded to distinguish extent)

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Community Vehicle Types: Rather than seeking to form a new group, councils should support and strengthen existing or nascent vehicles in the area. Given the limited availability of public assets for transfer, the most topical community-led vehicles include the following: Business Improvement District BID membership is comprised of local traders who voluntarily contribute levies aimed at improving trade in the area. While BIDs may span borough boundaries, and may be structured to acquire properties (Section E p33), higher business rents and rates in Upper Norwood, combined with limited scope of member types (traders only) and inability to address planning considerations suggest that a BID may not be the most appropriate vehicle. Neighbourhood Forum or Parish Council A Neighbourhood Forum is a legally recognised planning body constituted of local residents. While a Neighbourhood Forum is appropriate for cross-borough working, it is somewhat limited in its operations, unable to raise levies or acquire or manage assets. A Parish Council structure, however, would enable the collection of a levy which would provide income to meet administrative costs, and potentially provide additional income which, if twinned with an ‘executive arm’ (such as a Development Trust) could undertake wider scope of activities, including potential and banking and regeneration activities such as the acquisition or management of assets, raising finance. Note: An executive arm would be strengthened by ability to fundraise and leverage external funds Potential Partner Organisations: • Existing Upper Norwood Neighbourhood Forum • Crystal Palace Development Trust

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Community Land Trust

Neighbourhood Forum

Parish Council

Business Improvement District

VEHICLE

Elderly and youth services Community events Public realm management Community asset designation/management

Land use and planning Permitted development (homes and offices)

A type of neighbourhood or ward level governing body consisting of elected community members and raising a levy parallel to council tax in support of community initiatives and priorities

A legally recognised planning body and constitution comprised of local residents

Housing Workspace (ongoing affordability) Community asset designation/management

Public realm Publicity/Promotion Security Waste and Recycling

A consortium of selfselected traders and organisations within a defined area paying a levy towards programmes to promote trade and commerce in their area

Non-profit, communitybased organisation acquiring and managing land and other assets for the long-term benefit of a local community

SPHERES OF INFLUENCE

DESCRIPTION

Comparison of community vehicle types

Publicly owned assets Asset transfer Will of Local Authority

Local leadership Minimum of 21 members Alignment with national and local policy and priorities Approval via local referendum

Local leadership and capacity Majority support in a referendum Approval of Local Authority

Local leadership capacity Willingness of traders to contribute levy

DEPENDENCIES

Area stewardship and affordability central to purpose

Appropriate for cross borough contexts Reliant on grant aid and volunteer time

Generally applies to wards within a single borough Potentially selfsustaining (generates revenue)

Appropriate for cross borough contexts Primary focus is commercial success of traders

NOTES

LOW Challenge given few publicly owned assets in area

MEDIUM A pro-growth mechanism inappropriate for conserrvation agendas or ‘freezing’ local conditions

Could provide some fiscal autonomy and vision for a community straddling boroughs

HIGH

LOW Already thriving as a commercial centre

RELEVANCE TO LOCAL AREA

Local residents are exploring the potential of a CLT with councils and GLA

Local residents are looking at starting a Neighbourhood Forum

Not currently being explored as a local group are focusing on the potential of a Neighbourhood Forum

Not being explored by local traders

EVIDENCE OF LOCALINTEREST

F13

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Upper Norwood:

Shared Civic Infra-structure Multi-Council cooperation would see Croydon, Lambeth, Southwark and Bromley jointly invest into two new types of role facilitating area stewardship, by aiding local organisations to undertake a range of activites and projects more effectively and confidently. Recommended roles include: A) Area Host An extension of the traditional town centre manager role, actively initiating connections between residents, projects and organisations with shared interests or potential synergies; a single point of contact linked with relevant officers within the multiple boroughs; the role would suit an individual already highly enmeshed in the local community, possibly recruited by local democratic nomination, rather than external recruitment. B) Entrepreneur in Residence A roving role spanning with the remit of working with multiple orgnaisations across the study area, providing fresh thinking and specialist expertise in areas such as fundraising, business planning, and devising alternative models of operating spaces, assets and business. Demand: Anecdotal evidence from engagement activities and conversations with Bromley Councillors suggest that new roles to help bridge and connect communities of interest across the study area would be welcome and valued; this was corroborated at the 2nd December workshop held at Anerley Town Hall, and with Bromley Councillors. Potential Partner Organisations: • Crystal Palace Transition Town • Crystal Palace Overground organisers Joining the dots


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AREA HOST &

RESIDENT ENTREPRENEUR LINKS: local projects, networks and councils

Components:

Link with other local stakeholders, eg housing associations

‘Little Black Book’ Conduit to Council officers, local traders, interest groups

Cross fertilisation of local interest groups

Programme & Events

Business templates, funding assistance, forward planning

Support

Meet-ups

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F16

Upper Norwood:

Councils as ENablers The efficacy of community-led vehicles and shared civic infrastructures relies on a wider culture shift of local authorities towards ‘enabling.’ In addition to investing in new protocols and capacity-building programmes and resources (see previous pages) this means using existing resources at their disposal to unlock maximum community benefit, and proactively engaging residents with information and commissioning opportunities. Examples may include: Adopting a default ‘yes principle’ Such as supporting access for future local energy cooperatives (such as Palace Power) to rooftops of remaining Council-stock in the area, as part of negotiations with current and future operators and leaseholders: the current transfer of Lambeth and Croydon Council-owned Upper Norwood Library to the Upper Norwood Library Trust (1a), Estates in Gatestone Court (1b) and Barnardo’s Centre (1c), for example. Trialling or prototyping projects Committing to invest in programmes, spaces or equipment that incubate civic and enterprise activities, such as Open Works, West Norwood (Section E p 9) in Council-owned commercial units in high visibility locations or inviting residents to participate in open workshops envisioning alternative use and management of at-risk public assets, such as the Phoenix Centre (2).1 Seeding new economic opportunities Taking on leases of available commercial properties in less successful commercial areas, such as Church Road or upper Anerley Hill, waiving business rates in exchange for revenue share (4). Joining the dots


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1a

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Upper Norwood: Potential scenarios for ‘Councils as enablers’

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1 The Phoenix Centre was sold in 1994 together with the adjacent shopping centre in 1994 and took a leaseback for 125 years of the Centre and public toilets.

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Anerley

Anerley

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Anerley Anerley’s location between Upper Norwood Triangle and Penge, divided into two parades/ concentrations of shops and businesses at either end of Anerley Road and Anerley Hill, make it inviable as a distinct, town centre. However, there are other strategic visions that build on what is already there and take advantage of this location with very good transport links. Anerley includes designated renewal areas so is recommended for investment. From our observations and local conversations, three distinct opportunities have emerged: • • •

Housing – Strategic intensification of housing Enterprise – Consolidating Anerley’s identity to start and grow businesses Retail Link - Strengthening Anerley Hill as a retail link between Crystal Palace Overground Station and Upper Norwood Triangle

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Anerley Road Current Land Use

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Civic / community asset

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GP / Dentist Chemists

Hospitality Pub Cafe Take-away

Workspace Enterprise Centre

Retail Shopping Convenience Store / cornershop

A yR rle ne

Service Hairdressers Printers / graphic

d oa

Light Industrial Housing

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Anerley:

Housing Intensification Growing housing demands in the area and good transport links mean there is potential for strategic housing intensification in Anerley, as highlighted by the Design for London (now part of the GLA) commissioned ‘Housing Intensification in Seven South London Town Centres’ study.1 There is existing housing stock that could be redeveloped (such as proposed in the Housing Intensification report); undeveloped sites such as the Orchard Sports Field; looking further to the future industrial land that could be released for housing, such as off Oakfield Road. If Oakfield Road was developed there would be potential for a strengthened links between Anerley Road and Penge, incorporating provision for new business and community uses at ground floor, pedestrian routes and public spaces, and better interfer with exiting housing opposite and the Groves Estate.

1 Available via http://www.lda.gov.uk/server.php?show=ConWebDoc.3407

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F25 Crystal Palace Park

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Legend Scenarios from the ‘Housing Intensification in Seven South London Town Centres’: 1. Transformation of Victorian shopping parades to workspace and residential 2. Intensification of two residential estates behind Crystal Palace station 3. Mixed use buildings Example new development site: 4. Orchards Sports Field Example release of industrial site: 5. Oakfield Road Example intensification of social housing estates: 6. The Groves 7. Robinia Close

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Anerley Road:

Enterprise & Community Hub Enterprise and Community Hub nurturing start-ups and local businesses alongside shared community amenities, especially poignant in the context of widening social and economic gaps. Acting as a focus for a wide reaching enterprise and workspace identity for Anerley, the project could link up other civic organisations and initiatives. Why in Anerley: Enterprise-led Regeneration: Supporting enterprise to stimulate jobs and local economic growth, especially relevant in this area that suffers from pockets of deprivation in the lowest 10 percent in the country. Demand: The existing Enterprise Centre at Anerley Town Hall and wider residents anecdotal evidence supports demand for start-up workspace, with a concentration of homeworkers in the area (further research would be required). Location: The close proximity of Anerley Road between Penge and Upper Norwood Triangle makes Anerley a good location to serve both town centres. Transport: Strong transport links locally and to central London. Where: • Anerley Town Hall could continue to make a good location for an enterprise space, strengthening the potential of this well-located, civic space. This would require LBB retaining ownership of the building. • Alternatively, enterprise space should be included in any reprovision of space for the Crystal Palace Community Development Trust or as part of any other developments in the proximity. Joining the dots


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ENTERPRISE &

COMMUNITY HUB

LINK: local organisations & youth projects

Components:

Link to other local enterprise spcaes

Collective Workspace

Cross fertilisation with other community projects

Program & Events

External programs & partners

Support

Potential Partner Organisations: • Crystal Palace Development Trust • Affinity Sutton Employment & Training programme • St Hughes youth provision • MWAH Intergenerational Joining the dots


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Anerley Road:

Consolidated Loci Anerley Town Hall and the cluster of ‘useful everyday’ shops and services opposite, with close proximity to Anerley station, offer a consolidated Anerley Road for a future identity of enterprise and community space. In focusing here, the parade of shops to the south-east of Anerley station (approximately half vacant) could be released into residential use. There are a number of development potentials including two vacant small buildings either side of the train bridge, and a vacant former post office and former bank. For a larger scale redevelopment that could broaden the scope of this Community Hall/ area as a community and enterprise node, the and carpark Youthnursery Facility to the north-west of the Town Hall could be utilised. N

Development Potential (b)

Pub GP

Graphics Development Potential (a)

Youth Centre

Chemist

An erl ey

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Anerley Station

Post Office (closed)

Development Potential (c)

Anerley Town Hall Development Potential (d)

Council Ownered

Potential Release Units

CONSOLIDATED LOCI Primary School

Vacant unit (b)

Vacant bridge building (c)

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F29

Anerley Hill:

Retail Link On Anerley Hill, shops and businesses run from just north of the junction with Crystal Palace Station Road to the bridge over the Overground. Whilst there are a number of empty units and some shops perceived as low-quality, there is viability for an extended, and strengthened shopping parade as increasing commercial pressure is put on Upper Norwood. Local residents discussed existing opportunity for lower rates on Anerley Hill offering the chance for businesses to test trade before growing on to a shop in Upper Norwood, such as Violet Betty’s clothes shop now located on Church Road, Upper Norwood. Investing into Anerley Hill as a strengthened retail parade linking Crystal Palace Overground and Upper Norwood Triangle should be considered in any future developments or applications for changes of use. N

Ch urc h

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t

Westow Hill

RETAIL LINK

Crystal Palace Station

ANERLEY HILL TEST SPACE

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Penge

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F33

Penge Penge is a useful retail district and High Street in need of revitalisation. The reduced capacity of Bromley Council to actively manage (enforce planning as well as curate) this district centre,1 combined with the availability of new funding streams via the New Homes Bonus and High Street Fund provides an opportunity for Bromley to test and nurture new uses and models of operation for spaces on the High Street, building on what is already here: available units and ‘slack space’, rich ‘hidden’ local heritage, and networks of knowledgeable local residents. Three distinct opportunities have emerged around curating the High Street and improving pride in Penge’s identity: • Enterprise space and support: strengthening and diversifying enterprise activities on the High Street through investment in incubation units, networking programmes and public realm improvements • Public realm and wayfinding: enhancing the pedestrian and visitor experience and creating new ‘desire lines’ linking enterprise spaces with planting, signage and street furniture • Identity and Culture: delivering a range of activities enabling wider access and use of public parks and squares; partnerships to extend existing cultural event programming, and the implementation of a heritage trail highlighting key sites across the town centre and beyond

1Bromley Council has had to identify savings of £5.7m per annum from 2014/15. in addition to savings of over £57m of the past 3 years. London Borough of Bromley Budget 2014/15 . Available via http://www.bromley. gov.uk/download/downloads/id/1901/lb_bromley_budget_201415

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Penge High Street Current Land Use

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Vacant Unit Civic / community asset Community Services & Hall Place of Worship Police

Health Chemists Opticians/ Eyecare

Hospitality Pub Cafe Take-away Restaurant

Retail Shopping Convenience Store / Offlicence

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Service Hairdressers / Beauty Salon Drycleaners / Laundrette / Cobblers

Charity Everyday ‘Useful’ Shops Butcher Fishmonger Bakery/ Confectionary Post Office Greengroccer

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Specialist Retailers Music Shop, Hardware, Curtains/ fabrics, Cycle Store, electrical, Jewellers

Money Services Building Society Pawnbroker / Cash Loans/ Gambling / Betting Shops

Housing

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Penge:

Enterprise Space & Support While Penge is widely perceived by residents as a ‘useful’ commercial centre, more could be done to support a culture of ‘test enterprise’-investing in new forms of enterprise support ranging from programmes to strengthen networks for business and skill exchange, collaborative branding tools to boost local commerce, to investment in the physical, such as low-cost units for test trading, ‘maker spaces’ and investments to encourage the re-establishment of Maple Road market. Recommendations include: Public realm and branding improvements Installation of power points in Blenheim forecourt and Arpley Square (1) to enable future development of food market and other trading activity; Commissioning collaborative branding for local shops in partnership with local artists and Penge traders Incubation spaces Acquisition of leases on vacant units on Maple Road (2a) and the High Street to establish a network of low-cost units for local test traders and ‘meanwhile projects,’potentially on the basis of a revenue share with tenants; with potential to convert the public WC’s in Arperly Square (2b) into test trading units used by start-ups to trial products while benefitting from presence of market traders in the square Market re-instatement Assess the re-instatement of market at Maple Road (3) including prior and future management and price points Maker Space Investment into a dedicated ‘Maker Space’ for craft-based enterprise, networking and skills exchange in a visibly Joining the dots


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prominent locations eg Maple Road Library (4a) prior Barclays bank building (4b) or future redevelopments of the Arpley Square public toilets (2b) or the Hub (previously Citizens Advice Bureau, Westbury Road (4c) Supportive programming Earmark funding or revenue shares from incubation units towards supporting regular networking events and meetups Directly undertake or commission the development of meanwhile space licensing and landlord engagement in tandem with rate relief to encourage access and to and use of remaining vacant units (2a, and see Section C p65 for additional sites). Potential Partner organisations: Penge Traders Association, Penge Tourist Board, Penge Town Team local artists and entrepreneurs, Makerhood. Joining the dots


F38

Penge:

Public Realm & Wayfinding Penge has a significant number of useful amenities, services and hidden assets on and near the High Street. The overall identity and perception of Penge could be enhanced by bringing these to a fore, with a progamme of public realm and wayfinding interventions aimed at improving the legibility of the area, highlighting points of interest, improving shop-fronts and easing movement along intended ‘desire’ lines linked with Enterprise and Culture related interventions. Recommendations include the following: Ease of movement along desire lines A general decluttering of Penge High Street, including the removal of unused telephone boxes, bollards, particularly at points that could host activities, such as Blenheim Square (1a) and Arpley Square (1b). The widening of pavements at key areas of high footfall, such as outside Sainsbury’s on Penge High Street (2b) enabling greater ease of movement and sites in anticipation of new market activities, such as Maple Road (2a). Potential re-routing of traffic on Penge Lane to pedestrianise the ‘island’ meeting Penge High Street (3). Implementing crossing at the junction of Maple Road and Penge High Street (4). Enhanced signage A series of local commissions for the design of signage highlighting specialist retailers, cultural venues and host spaces, including spaces that are currently hard to locate such as the Crooked Billet (5a) Royston Field (5b), Penge East Community Centre, potentially including a welcome sign at Penge Bridge (5c).

Joining the dots


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Environmental improvements Investment in street furniture, such as seating, landscaping and street planters and bike racks on Maple Road (6a) and at planned improvements such as junction of Croydon Road and Penge High Street (6b) and potentially including the greening of ‘Green Lane’ with trees (6c) Potential Partner organisations: Penge Tourist Board, Penge Town Team, Penge Traders Association, shop traders and local landlords, Penge Community Canteen, St John’s School, Crystal Palace Transition Town Patchwork Farm

Joining the dots


F40

Penge:

Identity & Culture Strengthen local pride in Penge by drawing attention to its rich (though somewhat hidden) historical assets and activities through new interpretive signage, lighting and trails, and support the development of a thriving cultural and leisure economy that draws upon hidden heritage in Penge and strength of community networks. Recommendations include: Highlighting local history Commissioning the delivery of a local heritage trail highlighting historic assets including sites such as Alexandra Estate Cottages (1a), King William IV cottages (1b) Waterman’s Cottages (1c) potentially incorporating landscaped features in Penge’s green spaces which celebrate famous past Penge residents such as the poet Walter de la Mare and British stage actor Ira Aldridge. Promotion of new activities on the High Street Promote and make available host spaces on the High Street for community use, for example, a portion of the leases of vacant units acquired on Maple Road (2a,b,c), again, potentially on the basis of a revenue share with occupants - seeking partners to host cultural activities, workshops or shared equipment. Making public spaces work harder Investing in power points in public parks such as Penge Recreation Ground (3a) and Royston Field (3b) to enable a wider array of event types and cultural activities to take place, while designing pro-forma ‘Templates’ to make access and permissions easier to access.

Joining the dots


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A distinct shared visual identity Commissioning collaborative branding for local shops and signage in partnership with local artists and Penge traders, which builds on local knowledge and expertise and incorporates elements of Penge history. Leverage existing cultural networks and strengths Explore opportunities for joint investment in extending established cultural programmes (eg Sydenham Arts Festival) to Penge. Potential Partner organisations: Alexandra Residents Association, Friends of Royston Field, Friends of Penge Rec, Sydenham Society, Penge Tourist Board, Capel Manor College (landscape design and planting).

Joining the dots


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Contents: - Starting your project - Inspiration - People Directory - Spaces & Networks Directory - Funding sources - Reference

Joining the dots


Starting your

Project Skills and expertise

Accessing space

Forming a group

Bridging networks

Curating a project

Funding

Joining the dots

Starting your project

G1


G2

Lessons for Residents

Skills and expertise • Audit of the skills you have and identify the skills you need. Try to use existing channels to fill in the gaps - a lot already exists in your local area. • Try to identify organisations or groups that might be complementary to your own and explore where you might share resources or expertise. Again, this involves being open to external ideas. • Consider different ways in which members or participants of your project can contribute to your project: can your members contribute their skills and expertise? • If you’re delivering services, think about the opportunities you provide for ‘active learning’ – learning about skill building or entrepreneurship, for instance through practice, rather than in isolation from the ‘real world’ experience. • Consider how you’ll develop metrics to illustrate the social impact you’re looking to bring about • When you’ve considered these elements, you’ll stand a better chance of securing funding

Joining the dots


G3

Accessing space • Start off by identifying landlords through agents or find out about plans for a specific site by contacting a local planning officer, including what planning use classes the building might have. For a small fee you can also access the same information on the Land Registry. Consider contacting your local Chamber of Commerce • Contact the Valuation Officer to calculate what the business rates will be. Check to see if you are eligible for Small Business Rates relief, and consider partnering with a Charity to get 80% relief on business rates. You may also be eligible for rate relief if you register as a Community Interest Company (CIC). • In addition to renovation, don’t forget to calculate the ongoing costs needed for rates, insurance, water, electricity and any salaries you have to pay. Consider whether there are any eligible grants or crowd-funding platforms that might fit your project. •

Consider a third management company or Meanwhile organisation to assist in management and coordination of an empty unit.

Joining the dots


G4

Forming a group • Having a core of principles that people can get behind – particularly if these are positive - is a good way of generating loyal members. • Funding rushes can be problematic. Take your time to make sure the group is formed in a way that is transparent, inclusive and balanced. • The strength of a civic gorup might lie in its ability to act as a neutral channel for any local groups and individuals to feed through ideas and crowd source support. A key to a groups structure is to act as a platform to facilitate; not to drive a narrow view. • Don’t underestimate the role of a level-headed, neutral person in keeping the group cohesive, and drawing the best out of its members. This might be in the role of a Chair or Trustee. • Design openness into the governance of your organisation, making sure you define the length of incumbency for a Chair or Director; on working groups consisting of more than one organisation, it is particularly important that this role is neutral and accomodating to members from groups different form her own. • Be open: give people a chance to see what it is that you do, so that they’re attracted to be part of it, rather than asking for their commitment straight away. Joining the dots


G5

Bridging networks • Communication platforms – be they websites or directories – need to dynamic. Online platforms like Facebook can be really helpful in aiding groups gather momentum, membership, and most importantly - to host dialogue and conversations, while ‘tagging’ people to let them know they’ve been invited to conversation. • If forming a directory, or other shared resource for people to access, it needs to be intuitive, and provide positive feedback. Ideally, it might be linked up with an events programme that also provides an opportunity to meet face to face to share an overview of what they’re up to - this is crucial to building trust, and developing relationships • To appeal to or engage younger audiences, this might include having ‘taster’ sessions for them to see what you do. Try offering volunteering opportunities or building structured mentoring opportunities into what you do

Joining the dots


G6

Curating a project • Identify who it is that you’re trying to reach, and the different ways to invite your intended users (and perhaps a wider mix) to the space. • How might your project host multiple activities and revenue streams, and how could commercial activities help support community use? • Identify reasons your space might not work, or what could go wrong and how you could prevent this. • Sometimes having a useful resource on offer – whether a copy machine, or a tool library, is a good way to drive traffic into the space and encourage people to check out what else is on offer. Are there opportunities to share equipment or facilities? • Consider opportunities to grow and extend your network; look for organisations or partners that might be complementary and invite them to host activities or programes as part of your project. This might mean be willingness to let go of control a bit and see what comes out. • Try to put targets or ‘key milestones’ in place to help measure and monitor the direction of project • Seek outside expertise to advise on growth at stages

Joining the dots


Lessons for Councils

Beyond ‘consultation’ Communicate your intentions within ‘the big picture’ of your strategy, and avoid offering fragmented, or closed set of solutions for residents to choose from. Try to design commissions as opportunities to invite genuine engagement with the local community. Beyond commenting on proposed physical realm works or developments, think about how they might be involved in local management or programmes.

Get comfortable with the unknown In order to identify what the most useful resources might be, you will need to get comfortable in investing in openended processes that explore what’s most relevant for your local area. In some cases, this means being comfortable with admitting uncertainty: you might raise expectations if you host an open workshop envisioning how an at-risk space could be sustainably managed, for instance - but your residents will thank you for it, and you might even identify those with the skills and networks to take the idea forward.

Joining the dots

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Be Enablers Look for opportunities to stimulate networks, and to make your own internal channels clearer, and transparent to the public. This means making contact information of specific officers and departments readily available. What channels (and decision making protocols) are in place for receiving grassroots ideas or proposals? Make it a priority to put them in place. Get to the bottom of why past collaborations may have fallen short or fizzled out: identify and commit to shared resources. This might mean investing in new protocols or capacity building, such as seconding individuals to lend you the skills or confidence to try new approaches to partnership, commissioning, or managing your assets, for instance.

It’s in your interest Local resilience means building local skills and capabilities, accelerating potential, driving cohesion, and using opportunities to generate multiple outcomes and create the conditions for shared prosperity.

Joining the dots


G9

Inspiration

Inspiration

Joining the dots


G10

crystal palace overground festival

A free family-friendly community arts and music festival in Crystal Palace, launched in 2007 by the Upper Norwood Triangle traders, attracting over 6,000 visitors in 2013. A mix of Council funding, sponsorship and time from 200 volunteer coordinators

The project has utilised skills in fundraising, communications/publicity, volunteer and events coordination and knowledge of arts/performers The festival is entirely led and organised by volunteers, who gave 6,000 man hours - the equivalent of ÂŁ100,000 at a living wage of ÂŁ15 per hour and ÂŁ37,000 at the minimum wage. Joining the dots


G11

SUSTRANS DIY STREETS

The redesign of eight streets of mainly Victorian homes (around 1,000 households) in Haringey, North London, using soft design tactics tested and co-designed together with residents. The infrastructure budget was ÂŁ400,000, but relied on maintenance tactics such as adoption of flower beds by local households. Local project managers to connect with local households and coordinate volunteer time Local residents to identify potential artists to commission The project was delivered in extensive public engagement led by the sustainability charity Sustrans Joining the dots


G12

crystal palace transition town

A network of residents passionate about sustainability, fairtrade, and local resilience, structured as a ‘do-acracy’: anyone can join the group or initiate a project, provided it follows the network’s wider principles Members have led a range of projects gaining access to vacant or unloved spaces via Patchwork Farms, an area-wide growing network, gained access to including public bus stops (Edible bust stop) and people’s front gardens to grow hops for brewing communal beer (Palace Pint). Last but not least, they have negotiated access to space at the rear of Sainsbury’s (Westow Street) to establish a local market which enables the sale of local produce and provides 2 community stalls -zero risk market stalls for budding artisans and craft people. CP Transition Town are members of a national network and are loosely affiliated with the ‘Coalition of Doers’ ; they have sought links with Brixton Power on their energy project, and host a monthly Green Drinks meet-up at the Grape and Grain. Joining the dots


G13

Sunday soup

A grassroots model for funding small to medium sized projects through community meals. Groups host a meal and invite neighbours to enjoy a social event, and everyone decides together how to spend the money left over from ticket sales. Micro-grant funding by selling soup

A passionate cook A good organiser Promotions person (ticket seller) A treasurer Finding a space to host you An open call for local community projects looking for funding; generally seeded by an existing community of people Joining the dots


G14

St Clements community land trust

Takeover a derelict site by a Community Land Trust providing ‘permanently affordable homes’’

Fundraising Meanwhile events programmes Partnership with residential developers Campaign skills and patience (An 8 year process) Meanwhile events coordinator Exploring partnerships with local housing providers Chefs and traders East London Community Land Trust partnered with Igloo, Maccreanor Lavington and Popla Harca on the scheme, while building a cultural programme of events (a film festival) bolstered by local star power Joining the dots


G15

People

This is the first step towards the creation of a People’s Directory, an idea that came about in conversation with many of you across Upper Norwood, Anerley and Penge who felt that making the skills, ideas and individuals within each area more visible would be highly beneficial, and aid the forming of new connections, help you find partners for projects, or discover networks you were not previously aware of. This version can be built upon following the Join the Dots commission, to create a useful resource for the local area. Ideally, the People’s Directory would be live and digital, and searchable by key words or phrases.

Joining the dots

People Directory

Directory


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people DIRECTORY -RESIDENTS Lucy Barlow Area: SE20 Penge Interest: Community and family events, culture and film festivals, Penge Green Skill: Organising film, community connector Group: Friends of Penge Green, Penge Green Cycle Campaign (founder)

Tom Chance Area: SE20 Interest: Works with Darren Johnson, Green Party Member of the London Assembly Group: Transition Town, Green Party Contact: @tom_chance (skype) tom@acrewoods.net (email)

Cosima Dinkel Area: SE19 Interest: Graphic design, Exhibition Design, Typography, image making Skill: All kinds of print graphics, posters, leaflets logos, exhibition and display graphics for web and ecoms. Contact: cosimadinkel@gmail.com www.cosimadinkel.co.uk

Joining the dots


G17

Joe Duggan Area: SE19 Interest: Liason with Crystal Palace Transition Town Skill: Facilitation, chairing , connecting. Encouraging cohesive practice. Some project management. Performance poet. Teacher. Group: Crystal Palace Transition Town Contact: joeduggan215@hotmail.com

Jay Etienne Area: SE19 Interest: Jewellery design. group work, Disability and business, Crystal Palace and Space for Sole traders Skill: Jewellery making, project development, facilitation of groups, general trail blazer Group: Crystal palace Handmade market Contact: Ej Ventures (FB), jaytab65@gmail.com

Yolanta Gawlik Area: SE20 Penge Interest: Planning to open Hatome Studio and Gallery in Maple Road Skill: Fine art and selling handmade products by local designer makers in Hatome Gallery. Facilitating art and craft workshops Group: member of SE20 Art Group Contact: y.gawlik@gmail.com

Joining the dots


G18

Melvyn Harrison Area: CR0 Interest: History of the Crystal Palace 1851 present day Skill: 40 years gained knowledge of the history of the Crystal Palace and par Group: Crystal Palace Foundation Contact: crystalpalacefoundation@hotmail.com

Karen Jones Area: SE19 Interest: Sustainable food Skill: Run the weekly Transition Town Food Market in Haynes Lane Group: Crystal Palace Food Market - Crystal Palace Transition Town Contact: info@crystalpalacefoodmarket.co.uk

Martin Kirvan Area: SE20 Penge High Street Interest: Promoting Penge and local area as a good place to live and work Skill: Solicitor Group: Penge Traders, Penge Town Centre Team Contact: martin@kirvanbond.co.uk

Joining the dots


G19

Noreen Meehan Area: SE19 Interest: Director of Crystal Palace Overground Festival - arts, cultural development, economic development, community cohesion Skill: Fundraising, programming, event management, volunteer recruitment and management Group: Crystal Palace Overground Festival Contact: info@crystalpalacefestival.org

Judie Obeya Area: SE20 Interest: Supporting community groups and communities, engaging and supporting building of communities vis project development Skill: Neighbourhood Investment Manager Group: Affinity Sutton Contact: judie.obeya@affinitysutton.com

Rodney Oxbrow Area: SE19 Interest: Cooking with organic ingredients Skill: Sales,Manufacturing my own range of vinaigrettes, marinades, dips and spreads Group: Crystal palace foodmarket and handmade craft Contact: rodneyoxbrow@hotmail.com

Joining the dots


G20

Chris O’Shaunessy Area: SE20 7LL Interest: Heritage/History of Penge; Parks and green spaces of Penge; former chair of FOCAAR; associate member of Encompass Theatre Company. Skill: Chairing meetings; arranging conferences, poetry recitals and presentations; leading guided walks; event management and programming. Group: Penge Partners; Friends of Cator and Alexandra; Penge Forum; Penge Festival; Encompass Theatre Company. Contact: coshaughnessy@tiscali.co.uk

Sheena Patel Area: SE19 Interest: Art, events, skill share Skill: Drawing, sculpture, community engagement Contact: sheenapatel27@hotmail.com

Neil Scott-Sills Area: SE19 Interest: Film-making Skill: Film making, editing, scripting promotional ideas to help businesses attract funds and customer Contact: neilscottsills@gmail.com www.lastredlight.com

Joining the dots


G21

Stephen Tickner Area: BR13 Interest: Works for Bromley Parks and open spaces Skill: Bromley Parks Friends Forum/ Parks Partnership Officer Contact: stephen.tickner@bromley.gov.uk

Jasper Wight Area: SE20 Interest: Project managing 2015 launch of Penge Community Canteen, putting local home cooking on the high street, cooked by local teens and young adults, bought from local traders Skill: Business development, project management, presentation, advocacy Group: LBB Regeneration Team; Penge Tourist Board; Friends of Penge Green Contact: pengecanteen@gmail.com

William Wyld Area: SE19 (Gipsy Hill) Interest: Painting and visual art, Literary events, Poetry and spoken word, preserving our open spaces Skill: Fine artist: oil paintings, picture framing. Interior decorator and carpenter. Poet and spoken word performer. Group: Lambeth Open: Open Arts Project Contact: email: william_wyld@yahoo.co.uk twitter: @william_wyld website: williamwyld.com

Joining the dots


G22

people DIRECTORY -Councils Alistair Huggett Council: Southwark Role: Planning Projects Manager Department: Chief Executives Department Contact about: Planning, links with Environmental Services, Housing & Community Services Contact: Alistair.Huggett@southwark.gov.uk

Philip Ashford Council: Lewisham Role: Design and Conservation Manager Department: Lewisham Planning Service Contact about: Planning and heritage based issues or ideas Contact: rodneyoxbrow@hotmail.com

Steve Wingrave Council: Croydon Role: Head of Asset Management and Estates Department: Finance & Assets Division Chief Executives Department Contact about: Access to Council assets Contact: Stephen.Wingrave@croydon.gov.uk

Joining the dots


G23

Vincent LaCovara Council: Croydon Role: Team Leader, Placemaking Department: Placemaking, Spatial Planning Services, Development & Environment department Contact about: Local Plan, North Croydon Conservation Area issues Contact: Vincent.Lacovara@croydon.gov.uk

Jivko Hristov Council: Croydon Role: Economic Strategy Manager Department: Economic Development service, Development and Environment department Contact about: Starting a business improvement district (BID) Contact: Jivko.Hristov@croydon.gov.uk

Jonathan Martin Council: Croydon Role: Executive Director, Development and Environment Department: Housing Development & Regeneration Service, Development and Environment department Contact about: the Local Growth Plan, designating a community asset Contact: Jonathan.Martin@croydon.gov.uk

Joining the dots


G24

Michael Close Council: Croydon Role: Estates and Asset Manager Department: Corporate Property, Interim Chief Executive’s Department Contact about: Council-owned property and lease status Contact: Michael.Close@croydon.gov.uk

Dominic Mennie Council: Croydon Role: Deputy Team Leader, Principle Planner Department: Placemaking, Spatial Planning Services, Development & Environment department Contact about: Interest in establishing a Neighbourhood Forum or Plan Contact: Dominick.Mennie@croydon.gov.uk

Cheryl Churr Council: Bromley Role: Town Centre Manager Department: Town Centre Management (Environment & Leisure) Contact about: Setting up a business improvement district (BID), Access to Council assets Contact: Cheryl.Curr@bromley.gov.uk

Joining the dots


G25

Heather Hosking Council: Bromley Role: Head of Strategic Property Services Department: Property and Services Contact about: Plans for specific council-owned properties Contact: heather.hosking@bromley.gov.uk

Catherine Pimm Council: Bromley Role: Head of Asset Management and Strategic Projects Department: Resources Contact about: Designating a community asset, discussing asset transfer Contact catherine.pimm@bromley.gov.uk.

Neil Thompson Council Bromley Role: Principle Valuer Department: Regeneration & Transformation Contact about: Council ownership, status of leases Contact: Jonathan.Martin@croydon.gov.uk

Joining the dots


G26

Mary Manuel Council: Bromley Role: Head of Planning Strategy and Projects Department: Regeneration & Transformation Contact about: Strategic Outer London Development Centre status/boundary for Crystal Palace Contact: Mary.Manuel@bromley.gov.uk

Virgil Rappa Council: Bromley Role: Project Planner, Town Centre Renewal Department: Renewal and Recreation Contact about: Things to do with your town centre, Strategic Assistance Team help with bids Contact: Virgil.Rappa@bromley.gov.uk

Donna Wiggins Council: Lambeth Role: Community Programme Manager Department: Active Communities Team Contact about: Potential asset transfers from council to community Contact: dwiggins@lambeth.gov.uk

Joining the dots


G27

Jeremy Keates Council: Lambeth Role: Brixton and Clapham Town Centre Manager Department: Planning and Regeneration Contact about: Starting a business improvement district (BID) Contact: jkeates@lambeth.gov.uk

Valuation and Asset Management Services Council: Lambeth Role: N/A Department: Valuation and Asset Management Services (VAMS) Contact about: Gaining access to rooftops of Council-owned properties

Joining the dots


G28

Joining the dots


Space & Networks

Directory

Joining the dots

Spaces & Networks Directory

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LEGEND Themes:

Categories: Community Spaces & Organisations Identified Issues Connectivity & Movement Valued riches Public Realm / Outdoor spaces Opportunities Opportunity Sites (long-term)

Opportunity Sites

Governance Heritage & History

Business & Enterprise

Housing & Living Education & Learning

Culture

Sport & Leisure

Energy and Sustainability

Joining the dots


G31

code:

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Cooper’s Yard

description:

Workspaces & studios, dubbed Creative Quarter. 17 businesses including Graphic designers, tailor, jeweller, book binder, architect, theatre director. key points:

> Active landlord, one of the resident businesses. > Hosts space of creative/culture activities, eg cinema for Crystal Palace Overground Festival.

Joining the dots


G32

code:

name:

WS N 02

Haynes Lane Courtyard

description:

Historical works now used for workspace/ studios, antiques market, secondhand books. key points:

> Affordable workspace. > Croydon maintained ‘use class’ as enterprise. > Landlord’s son has a resident business.

Joining the dots


G33

code:

WS N 03

name:

Westow Hill Officespace

description:

Serviced office space offering furnished private offices and desk space. 24/7 access, from ÂŁ195 a month inclusive. key points:

> Offering desk rental.

Joining the dots


G34

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WS N 04

name:

Westow Pub Co-working

description:

NO LONGER RUNNING - Crystal Palace Jelly ran a monthly co-working day for freelancers & small businesses in the pub’s upstairs room. key points:

> Responded to demand for co-working space for home-based freelancers combining working, networking and socialising.

Joining the dots


G35

code:

name:

WS N 05

Antenna Studios

description:

Creative workspaces & studios, offers affordable music/ production/ film studio space. Antenna Cafe host space. key points:

> Active landlord, one of the resident businesses. > Hosts space of creative/culture activities, eg. dance classes, live music performance.

Joining the dots


G36

code:

name:

WS N 08

Gipsy Hill Workshops

description:

Collective creative workspace shared by 15 local artists, including designers, ceramics, sculptures. key points:

> Affordable workspace. > Demand for affordable artist studio space. Long waiting list.

Joining the dots


G37

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WS P 01

CreateSE20

description:

Light industrial unit divided into 8 affordable studio spaces, eg. ÂŁ153 per month for 64 square feet. key points:

> Demand for affordable workspace. > Potential to expand?

Joining the dots


G38

code:

name:

WS P 02

63 Croydon Road

description:

Ex-Bromley Council officers now a mix of offices, car showroom, hotel and council offices/ services. key points:

> Offices to let ranging from 275 - 2,695 sq ft. > Disposal of council asset.

Joining the dots


G39

code:

WS A 01

name:

Anerley Business Centre

description:

28 offices (1-6 desks), with hireable meeting room. Crystal Palace Development Trust is contracted to management without incentive to innovate or increase revenue. key points:

> Potentially CPCDT to take over Town Hall. > Min 6 month break clause puts off start-ups. > Opportunity for co-working space.

Joining the dots


G40

code:

RT N 01

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Church St: Start-up Space

description:

Current market and street stalls provide testtrading opportunities. key points:

> Potential to build on as a test-trading location in the Triangle - number of empty shops and pavement space.

Joining the dots


G41

code:

RT P 05

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Penge Post Office

description:

Residents highlight to potential for improvements to the post office and shop as a key component of the High Street. key points:

> Business model development potential? > Needs further investigation.

Joining the dots


G42

code:

RT P 07

name:

Change of Use

description:

Number of applications for change of use from retail to dwelling on Maple Road. key points:

> 10 application for change of use to 150 Maple Rd, currently an application pending decisions.

Joining the dots


G43

code:

RT A 01

name:

Anerley High: Start-up Space

description:

A number of businesses have started up in cheaper Anerley Hill shop units and then progressed to areas such as Westow Street. key points:

> Potential to build on empty shops and take advantage of the train station location.

Joining the dots


G44

code:

name:

LS P 02

Franklin Road

description:

Light industrial units, including engineers, metal workers, car dealers. key points:

> Includes Create SE20.

Joining the dots


G45

code:

CO W 01

name:

Crystal Palace Community Development Trust

description:

Vision: Provides a means for communities to play an active part in area’s regeneration - increasing opportunities & enhance quality of life. key points:

> 5 boroughs restrict mission & restricting work to boroughs with funding: Anerley Business Centre, Bromley & Kingsland Estate, Southwark.

Joining the dots


G46

code:

name:

CO P 01

Mens Shed

description:

Two workshops, kitchen and garden with tools and materials for building and making for men aged 55+. key points:

> A space for men to gather, to get involved in their community and retain a sense of dignity and self-worth through practical projects.

Joining the dots


G47

code:

name:

CO P 02

Shraw Trust

description:

Specialist support, training &employment for people with existing barriers into work, eg in recycling and delivering papers. key points:

Joining the dots


G48

code:

name:

CO P 05

Penge Mosque

description:

Religious institution expressed interested in being involved in the future of the town centre. key points:

> Locally active institution.

Joining the dots


G49

code:

name:

CO P 06

Penge Library

description:

Bromley Library building closed on Maple Road. Council resources being centralised. key points:

> Registered community asset April 2014. > Currently closed. > Opportunity to use building for community use.

Joining the dots


G50

code:

name:

CO P 07

New Penge Library

description:

Bromley new Penge Library opended Green Lane Sept 2014. Council resources being centralised. key points:

> Mixed Community Facility,space and services. > Opportunity to use building for community use.

Joining the dots


G51

code:

name:

CO P 08

Living Well Food Bank

description:

Food bank and shared meals service operating out of Holy Trinity Church in Lennard Road. key points:

> The biggest group of food bank users (38%) come from SE20. (Compiled on usage figures given 6 months June to Nov 2013.)

Joining the dots


G52

code:

name:

CO P 09

The Salvation Army

description:

A local Christian church with community based activities. key points:

> A well used voluntary run community host space.

Joining the dots


G53

code:

name:

CO P 10

Melvin Hall

description:

Community facility building that hosts Penge and Anerly Age Concern service. Support and rehabilitation for older people in the community key points:

> Community events and services for older people. > Threat of closure to service/ building.

Joining the dots


G54

code:

name:

CO N 01

Public Library

description:

The only remaining independent public library in the country. The first Joint Library Agreement between Croydon and Lambeth Councils key points:

> Join funding and jointly managed community asset. 113 years old. > Facilitates programmes and learning.

Joining the dots


G55

code:

CO A 01

name:

St. Hugh’s Community Centre

description:

New community built facility, facilitating range of free and low cost classes and a space to host events. key points:

> St. Hugh’s Youth Club. Weekly youth club runs form facility.

Joining the dots


G56

code:

name:

CO N 03

St John the Evangelis

description:

Large church used for a wide variety of community activities beyond religious related uses, such as film festival, music gig. key points:

> Wants to increase use and engagement locally. > Grounds used for Transition Town edible garden. > Potential plans for new community space.

Joining the dots


G57

code:

name:

CO N 04

Salvation Army Hall

description:

Salvation Army Hall used a community hall.

key points:

> Well used as a community gathering space, such as Transition Town meetings.

Joining the dots


G58

code:

name:

BU N 04

Cyclists Gym

description:

Cadence Cycling Performance Centre - Bike shop and repairs with training bikes and yoga studio & cafĂŠ. key points:

> Interesting business model innovation. > Very popular with cyclist that use the area.

Joining the dots


G59

code:

name:

BU N 05

The Grain Grocer

description:

Collective sourcing organic, non GM & fair trade wholefoods & ecological household products, sold on-line & at CP Food Market. key points:

> Premise and market stall at Haynes Lane. > Potentially pat of local food network.

Joining the dots


G60

code:

name:

BU P 01

SE20 Cycles

description:

Independent cycle shop which also works as a social space and shopowner started and hosts Penge Cycle Club. key points:

> Local trader adding civic value.

Joining the dots


G61

code:

name:

BU P 02

Designer Draper

description:

Successful independent business that has been on Penge High Street for 27 years. key points:

> Destination shop that attracts people to the High Street. > Actively involved owners, chair of PTA.

Joining the dots


G62

code:

name:

BU P 03

Alexandra Nurseries

description:

Plants nursery that is also a cafe, shop and hosts workshop classes. key points:

> Interesting use of space & business model cafe, shop & classes added to core model. > Use of historic building in disrepair.

Joining the dots


G63

code:

name:

BU P 04

Pop-up Restaurant

description:

Monkey & Molasses catering company run a popup restaurant at Blue Mountain cafe. key points:

> Potential to use for other new and start-up companies to test new ideas.

Joining the dots


G64

code:

name:

BU P 05

Made in Penge

description:

Website to celebrate, promote and sell products of local craftmakers & artists, as well as supporting local charities & causes. key points:

> Potential to expand into training, networking, seminars, craft fairs. > Potentially link into High Street innovation.

Joining the dots


G65

code:

name:

BU P 06

Makerhood

description:

Online stalls for local makers to promote their goods; and hosts workshops and activities to help people develop new skills and connections. key points:

> Provides important pathway from hobbyist to entrepreneur.

Joining the dots


G66

code:

name:

BU P 07

Jack’s Newsagent

description:

Jack’s Newsagent stocks Made in Penge produces. key points:

> Potential to be part of bigger retail incubator of Penge High Street.

Joining the dots


G67

code:

WS A 01

name:

Anerley Business Centre

description:

28 offices (1-6 desks), with hireable meeting room. CPCDT contracted to management without incentive to innovate or increase revenue. key points:

> Potentially CPCDT to take over Town Hall. > Min 6 month break clause puts off start-ups. > Opportunity for co-working space.

Joining the dots


G68

code:

name:

BU P 08

Late Knights Brewery

description:

Micro brewery.

key points:

> Brews a yearly Palace Pint. > Strong local following.

Joining the dots


G69

code:

name:

BU P 09

Rachel’s Florist Stall

description:

Only remaining stall on Maple Road, Saturday mornings. key points:

> Loyal local clientele. > Potential to build on.

Joining the dots


G70

code:

name:

CU P 01

The Bridge House

description:

Pub that also offers classes (yoga and pilates) and a theatre. key points:

> Cultural offer.

Joining the dots


G71

code:

name:

CU C 01

Amphitheatre

description:

15,000 capacity natural amphitheatre

key points:

Joining the dots


G72

code:

name:

PH N 01

The Paxton Arms

description:

Public House being turned into residential. Located opposite Crystal Palace Station Road. key points:

> Loss of a commuinty space.

Joining the dots


G73

code:

name:

PN N 05

The Alexandra Pub

description:

Local Pub kept by community.

key points:

> Nominated Community Asset: Alexandra Residents’ Association. > Community Asset

Joining the dots


G74

code:

name:

PH P 01

Goldsmith Arms

description:

Public House leverage.

key points:

> Opening under new management.

Joining the dots


G75

code:

name:

PH N 05

Grape & Grain Pub

description:

Community function of pub - the landlady is very involved and runs as a community pub. key points:

> Used by local groups such as CPTT holding events for 300 people, letting people use the kitchen to make jam and cookery classes and the edible garden in the beer garden, the Tipsy Garden. > Lease runs out in 2 years

Joining the dots


G76

code:

name:

MK N 01

CP Food Market

description:

Transition Town project, not-for-profit food market. Locally sourced, low-carbon food. Every saturday. key points:

> A stall each week that sells local products/ crafts. > Higher cost produces?

Joining the dots


G77

code:

name:

MK N 02

Antique Market

description:

Antiques market at Haynes Lane every friday, saturday and sunday. key points:

Joining the dots


G78

code:

name:

GR N 01

Patchwork Farms

description:

Network of local growing spaces. Encourages local community to sell, swap or donate produce at food market stall and local restaurants. key points:

> Transition Town project. > Connects food surplus with demand. > Friday Framers harvest for the Saturday Market

Joining the dots


G79

code:

name:

GR N 02

St. John’s Community Garden

description:

Largest community garden in St Johns Church grounds key points:

> Edible garden and growing space sharing St Johns Church land. > Building a strong relationship with the Church.

Joining the dots


G80

code:

name:

GR N 03

Edible Bus Stop

description:

Transition Town joined forces with Edible Bus stops. key points:

> Strip of of land alongside Crystal Palace bus station utilised for growing community produce. to sell on the market stall.

Joining the dots


G81

code:

name:

GR N 04

Tipsy Garden

description:

Community garden within Grape and Grain grounds. key points:

> Transition Town project. > Small community garden within pub.

Joining the dots


G82

code:

name:

GR A 01

Greening Anerley Rd

description:

Potential for greening to the street, as Forest Hill.

key points:

> Width of street would require removal each day - design to be easily wheeled in and out. > Requires shopkeepers buy-in.

Joining the dots


G83

code:

name:

GN N 01

Stambourne Woodland Walk

description:

Quite green route through between Church Road and Auckland Road. key points:

Joining the dots


G84

code:

GN N 02

name:

Auckland Road Garden

description:

Green space adjoining housing, not utilised.

key points:

> Opportunity top optimise land for community use/ community host space.

Joining the dots


G85

code:

name:

DS N 01

Victory Place

description:

One landlord brought together a number of industrial buildings, along with their historic planning permissions to gain permission for redevelopment into housing. key points:

> Large scale could be an issue. > Proposes market/business space on GF. > Potentially aid permeability. > Potentially create blank walled faced space.

Joining the dots


G86

code:

name:

DS P 01

Penge Police Room

description:

The former Police Station was sold by the Met to a private individual (local landlord). Currently thought to be up for sell again. key points:

> Potential for meanwhile use. > Obtained housing change of use.

Joining the dots


G87

code:

name:

DS P 02

Vacant Shops: Maple Rd

description:

Units 144-146 and 152-162 on Maple Road are vacant and unregistered. key points:

>What is the potential?

Joining the dots


G88

code:

name:

DS P 03

Vacant Former Bank

description:

Vacent former bank on Penge HIgh Street.

key points:

> Investigate further.

Joining the dots


G89

code:

DS P 10

name:

Forecourt: Croydon Rd

description:

Forecourts owned by corresponding shops, used to differing extents. key points:

> Potential to enhance use, create continuity & support new opportunities.

Joining the dots


G90

code:

DS P 10

name:

Forecourt: Penge High St

description:

Forecourts owned by corresponding shops, used to differing extents. key points:

> Potential to enhance use, create continuity & support new opportunities.

Joining the dots


G91

code:

name:

DS A 01

Anerley Town Hall

description:

CPCDT manage business centre, hire out hall facilities and run community services. key points:

> Potential for transfer to CPCDT. > Potential part of development of Anerley loci. > Library was located here & recently closed.

Joining the dots


G92

code:

name:

SP PK 01

National Sports Centre

description:

key points:

> Valued locally > Perceived as threatened in development plans for the Park.

Joining the dots


G93

code:

name:

PI P 03

Royston Field

description:

Potential to invest into the improvements of the park as there are security issues related to lack of passive surveillence and not used to full potential. key points:

> Used to link to CAB/ Hub. > Used for Penge Festival.

Joining the dots


G94

code:

HT N 05

name:

Historic loss of workshops

1933 OS Map description:

Many of the workshops and yards, including the former Woodman Inn stable yard, were lost when much of the inner Triangle was re-developed with housing between 1975 and 1981 key points:

> Link to current potential loss of Victory Place?

Joining the dots


G95

code:

name:

HT W 01

Great North Wood

description:

The Great North Wood was a natural oak forest that covered the Sydenham Ridge and the southern reaches of the River Effra and its tributaries. At its full extent, the wood’s boundaries stretched almost as far as Croydon and as far north as Camberwell.

Joining the dots


G96

code:

name:

description:

key points:

Joining the dots


G97

code:

name:

description:

key points:

Joining the dots


G98

Joining the dots


G99

Sources

Joining the dots

Funding Sources

Funding


G100

National The Architectural Heritage Fund is current accepting applications for assistance to support options appraisals for historic buildings at risk in both physical and financial terms. Between £7.5k and £10k to assist organisations undertaking an appraisal to identify the most beneficial use for the building; demonstrate potential financial viability or reasons why there is no viable use; to establish the buildings importance in conservation terms; and assess the social and public benefits of the proposed scheme. 11 February for March 2015 http://www.ahfund.org.uk/docs/OA_Guide_App_ Form_2011.pdf Esmee Fairbairn Trust Social Change, Arts, Education and Learning and Food sustainable food production and consumption policies and practices. Since its inception in 2008 the Food Stand has awarded £7.1 milliion of grants, of which £2.2 was given in 2013. The Strand is open to both large-scale strategic interventions and innovative local work. http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/what-we-fund/ Fidelity UK Foundation A charitable grant programme supporting arts and culture, (including heritage), community development, education and health, with grants supporting capital improvements, technology upgrades and organisational development http://www.fidelityukfoundation.org/guidelines.html

Joining the dots


G101

The Henry Smith Charity A grant making charity. We make grants totalling approximately ÂŁ25 million each year to up to 1,000 organisations and charities throughout the UK for initiatives and projects that address social inequality and economic disadvantage. http://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk/ Heritage Lottery Fund Funds a wide range of activities related to the built environment, landscapes, townscapes. London deadlines for Townscape Heritage Grants under ÂŁ2m. -9 March 2015 for a decision in June 2015 -8 June 2015 for a decision in September 2015 -14 September 2015 for a decision in December 2015 -30 November 2015 for a decision in March 2016 http://www.hlf.org.uk/looking-funding/our-grant-programmes http://www.hlf.org.uk/apply/application-deadlines-andfunding-decisions Paul Hamlyn Foundation An independent grant-making foundation supporting themes in art, education and social justice. http://www.phf.org.uk/ The Rank Foundation The Rank Foundation is a grant-giving charitable trust focusing on development of leadership among young people; supporting disadvantaged people and those isolated in the community through ill-health or age. http://www.rankfoundation.com/

Joining the dots


G102

SIB Funding Social Investment Business (SIB) is now open to community interest groups looking to make use of the ‘Community Right to Bid’ where a building or land has been registered as an asset of community value or to bring empty buildings or land back into use. Capital grants of between £100,000 and £500,000 are available to community interest groups who can show they have good local connections, established for charitable, benevolent or philanthropic purposes or a Parish or Town Council. http://www.sibgroup.org.uk/our-funds/ The Tudor Trust Works directly with people who are at the margins of society: organisations which support positive changes in people’s lives and in their communities. An independent grant maker which supports work which is untried and with uncertain outcomes. http://tudortrust.org.uk/

Joining the dots


G103

Regional The City Parochial Foundation & Trust for London Exists to reduce poverty and inequality in London by funding the voluntary and community sector and others, as well as by using our own expertise and knowledge to support work that tackles poverty and its root causes. http://www. trustforlondon.org.uk/ City Bridge Trust The grant-making arm of Bridge House Estate, provides grants totalling around £15m per year towards charitable activity benefitting Greater London. http://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/ London Community Foundation Is a grant-making foundation dedicated to improving the lives of London’s most disadvantaged. Child poverty, unemployment, isolation, homelessness, domestic violence and gang crime. http://www.londoncf.org.uk/ Greater London Authority - High Street Fund The latest in a series of Greater London Authority funding rounds, which started in 2011 with Round One of the Outer London Fund, aimed specifically at helping London’s high streets to grow and become more vibrant. The fund is making up to £9m available until March 2016 to support projects that help deliver his ambition. For grants of up to £20,000, any organisation can apply online via http://spacehive.com/initiatives/mayoroflondon

Joining the dots


G104

Local Affinity Sutton Cultiv8 A small grants programme managed by Affinity Sutton housing association, supporting residents to undertake a range of green projects, from establishing a shared planting or food growing space, to starting a growing club. Up to £300 is available per grant towards tools, materials, plants or green activities. http://www.affinitysutton.com/for-residents/advice-andsupport/cultiv8/ Bromley Community Fund Bromley Community Fund (BCF) is a charitable Fund supporting charities and community groups that work ‘under the radar’ to improve life for Bromley’s most in-need.channel their resources and talents to help people in the borough. Croydon Match Fund A small grants fund available to residents of Croydon Council, the focus of which is to encourage local pride, improve advice and support networks to local individuals affected by welfare reforms; health and well-being; young people; manage publically owned assets for community benefit, promote new ways of working with young people to help them make their voices heard. Applicants will need to show how their project meets at least one of these priorities. Any funds awarded from the Small Grants Fund will only be paid when the match funding has been secured. £385,000 available between 2013 until March 2015 for local projects in Croydon wards, with the maximum grant will be

Joining the dots


G105

ÂŁ5,000 for an individual group and ÂŁ15,000 where three or more groups come together in a partnership to run similar services in different areas of Croydon. http://www.croydon.gov.uk/contents/departments/ community/pdf/975946/smllgrnt6prspcts Lambeth Giving Donations to the Lambeth Giving fund are divided between six local groups who are providing opportunities for young people at risk, improving quality of life for older people and supporting people with mental health issues. http://www.lambethgivingfund.org.uk/

Joining the dots


G106

Crowd-FUnding Online platforms that aid individuals and projects to form campaigns around their projects, raise awareness from a global community of potential investors, in the form of donations (grants) or micro-investment. Kickstarter - www.kickstarter.com/ Crowd-cube - www.crowdcube.com/ Indiegogo - www.indiegogo.com/

Joining the dots


G107

References

References

Joining the dots


G108

Bird E (2009) Heritage Appraisal for the report on housing intensification in seven south London town centres and their edges. London: Greater London Authority. Available via Bromley Council. Bromley Streetscape Manual. Available via http://www. bromley.gov.uk/downloads/file/971/streetscape_manual Bromley Council. Core Issues document. Available via http://bromleyconsult.objective.co.uk/portal/cs/csissues?pointId=1742151 Bromley Council. Penge Town Centre Draft Renewal Strategy. Available via http://cds.bromley.gov.uk/mgIssueHistoryHome.aspx?IId=13701&Opt=0 Bromley Council (2008) Adopted Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Document. Available via http://www.bromley.gov.uk/info/1004/ planning_policy/158/affordable_housing_supplementary_planning_ document Bromley Council (2013) Local Development Scheme Version 5. Available via http://cds.bromley.gov.uk/ieIssueDetails.aspx?IId=25129&Opt=3 Crystal Palace Community Association - Planning (2011) Crystal Palace Community Association comments on the Crystal Palace Area ‘Pen Portraits’ and ‘Issues’ section. Available via http://www.cpca.org.uk/ documents/CPCA_comments_LBB_Core_Strategy.pdf Croydon Council (2013) Upper Norwood Conservation Are Appraisal and Management Plan. Available via http://www.croydon.gov.uk/contents/ departments/democracy/pdf/949725/caamps/upper-norwood-triangle.pdf Croydon Council (2012) Croydon Public Realm Design Guide. Available via http://www.croydon.gov.uk/contents/departments/ planningandregeneration/pdf/publicrealm-design.pdf Croydon Council (2013) Economic Development Plan 2013-2018. Available via http://www.croydon.gov.uk/business/support/ecodevplan Croydon Council (2013) Infrastructure Delivery Plan Interim Update December 2013. Available via http://www.croydon.gov.uk/contents/ departments/planningandregeneration/pdf/868213/1114530/idpaug11.pdf Croydon Council (2009) Local Housing Land Availability Assessment Draft for Consultation. Available via http://www.croydon.gov.uk/contents/ documents/meetings/806358/609905/2008/2008-09-25/localhousingi1.pdf

Joining the dots


G109

Croydon Council (2013) Opportunity Area Planning Framework. Available via https://www.london.gov.uk/priorities/planning/publications/croydontown-centre-opportunity-area-planning-framework GVA Grimley (2010) Bromley Economic Development and Employment Land Study. Available via file:///C:/Users/Olivia/Downloads/ BTCAAP025BromleyEconomicDevelopmentEmploymentLandStudy%20(3). pdf Lambeth Council (2011) Lambeth Local Development Framework. Available via http://lambeth.gov.uk/sites/default/files/pl-ldf-core-strategy. pdf Lambeth Council (2007) Lambeth Unitary Development Plan. Available via http://lambeth.gov.uk/planning-and-building-control/unitarydevelopment-plan-udp-policy LDA (2009) Housing Intensification in seven South London Town Centres. Available via https://www.walthamforest.gov.uk/documents/ke51-housingintensification-in-seven-south-london-town-centres.pdf Lewisham Council (2011) Lewisham Core Strategy document. Available via http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/planning/policy/LDF/corestrategy/Pages/default.aspx Lewisham Council Lewisham Business Growth Strategy 2013-2023. Available via http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/ mayorandcouncil/aboutthecouncil/strategies/Documents/ LewishamBusinessGrowthStrategy2013-2023.pdf Lewisham Council (2014) Development Management Local Plan Further Options Report. Available via http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/ planning/policy/LDF/development-policies/Pages/Developmentmanagement-local-plan-examination.aspx Lewisham Council (2014) People, Prosperity, Place Lewisham Regeneration Strategy 2008-2020 Available via http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/inmyarea/regeneration/Pages/ People-Prosperity-Place.aspx Lewisham Strategic Partnership (2008) Shaping our future. Lewisham’s Sustainable Community Strategy 2008-2020. Available via http:// www.lewisham.gov.uk/mayorandcouncil/aboutthecouncil/strategies/ Documents/Sustainable%20Community%20Strategy%202008-2020.pdf

Joining the dots


G110

Greater London Authority (2012) Cross-boundary cooperation on strategic planning for London and the wider metropolitan area. Mayor of London Discussion Paper. Available via https://www.london.gov.uk/sites/default/ files/Cross%20boundary%20discussion%20paper%20October%202102_0. pdf O’Rourke T (2008) Cross-boundary working. Spatial Plans in Practice: Supporting the Reform of local planning. Wetherby: Department for Communities and Local Government Planning Advisory Service (2014) Good Plan Making Guide: Plan making principles for practitioners. London: PAS. Available via http://www.pas. gov.uk/documents/332612/6363137/FINAL+PAS+Good+Plan+Making+. pdf/2916aa6b-8cec-4fba-8684-08aa36c4b1e0 Planning in London Yearbook 2013: A guide to planning, policies, and opportunities in London’s 33 boroughs. Available via http://www.planninginlondon.com/assets/pil84%20uploads/ pil84%20BOROUGHS%2034%20pp.pdf Southwark Council (2007) The Southwark Plan. Available via http://www. southwark.gov.uk/info/856/planning_policy/1241/the_southwark_plan Southwark Council (2013) Section 106 Planning Obligations and Community Infrastructure Levy Draft Supplementary Planning Document. Available via http://www.southwark.gov.uk/info/200151/supplementary_ planning_documents_and_guidance/3243/section_106_planning_ obligationscil_spd Southwark Council (2013) Open Space Strategy. Available via http://www. southwark.gov.uk/info/856/planning_policy/2535/open_space_strategy

Joining the dots

Profile for 00 [zero zero]

Joining the Dots in Crystal Palace  

Joining the Dots in Crystal Palace 00 were commissioned by the Greater London Authority to undertake a study of the Crystal Palace area, inc...

Joining the Dots in Crystal Palace  

Joining the Dots in Crystal Palace 00 were commissioned by the Greater London Authority to undertake a study of the Crystal Palace area, inc...