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Issue 1 • 2018


CONTENTS Issue #1. 2018 On the cover: Congratulations to Jennifer Wilson and Majus and Majician — The BOGO Arabian colts — on winning the cover contest for Issue 1, 2018. A big thank you to everyone that submitted their photos. We had some great contenders!

GET INVOLVED 2017 AHA Convention The awards that were given and the decisions that were made at this important, annual event.

Certified Gold The Certified Horsemanship Association offers opportunities and education to AHA members.

By Sarah Evers Conrad

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IN EVERY ISSUE 7 Corporate Partners 8 President’s Letter 10 EVP Letter 12 Jibbah Jabber 14 AHYA 54 Stallion Directory 57 AHA Listings 61 Advertisers Index 62 FOCUS Life 4

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IMPACT Artist Profile: Suzanne Sturgill Capturing the spirit of Arabian horses is as much a part of photographer Suzanne Sturgill’s existence as the air she breathes.

By Katie Navarra USEF Nominees Two respected members of the Arabian industry are among this year’s nominees for this prestigious award.

WHOA 4 Faves: Cara Blanchard A section covering products used by our National-level trainers in the Arabian horse community. This month’s list comes from trainer Cara Blanchard of Eustis, Fla.

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32 HERITAGE A Man Beyond Ordinary: Ed Tweed & the Brusally Ranch A look at the man who helped start the Scottsdale horse show along with a breeding program that is still influential today.

By Tobi Lopez Taylor Domestic-Bred Arabians: Some ABCs for CMK Part 1 of a year-long review of the historical Arabian strains that make up the modern day Arabian. This first article focuses on the domestic U.S. lines.

By Janet de Acevado Macdonald

THE NOW Experience Scottsdale As many things to do as grains of sand in the desert… well, almost.

By Judy Colbert USDF All-Breed Awards A listing of the Purebred and Half-Arabians that excelled in the sport of dressage in 2017.

The Young & the Focused The stories of three young trainers who are emerging onto the local and national scene, establishing careers that may influence future generations.

By Tiffany Meites, Ph.D


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Heroes Abound During Recent Natural Disasters DEAR MEMBERS:

As I write this letter on January 1, 2018; I sit here reflecting on 2017 and what comes to my mind is “natural disaster”. There were so many natural disasters that affected most every section of the country. If it wasn’t hurricanes, it was flooding or fires. The destruction has been incredible, but the response of the emergency personnel was equally incredible. We have so many selfless horsemen who are willing to risk their lives and limbs to save a horse, or many horses no matter what! These are people you probably will never meet in our Arabian horse circle as they might not be Arabian horse owners. They are just horsemen. I had a limited exposure to the California Equine Emergency Evacuation group, and it was truly amazing to see how these people worked together as efficient units to save animals (horses, dogs, cats, emus, chickens and even reindeer … yes reindeer). Why do I bring this up, you ask? First to say a heartfelt thank you to the first responders, both those whose job it is to fight the fires, rescue people and animals from floods and hurricanes, and to those who have stepped up and just helped. They helped with housing the displaced horses, finding the equipment, feed, bedding, and fulfilling the needs of those who have suffered the most devastating losses. When the floods hit Houston from hurricane Harvey, the Arabian horse community stepped up, and (most specifically coordinated by Kathie Williams) these selfless people asked “what can I do”? I spoke with Kathie, and she said whenever she asked, people said “yes”. Whenever people had needs, there were so many horsemen ready to give. Trucks came from all over the country with supplies for people that most of the volunteers would never actually meet. It is the true meaning of giving. When the fires hit in Southern California, there were numerous groups of people who stepped up to help those in need. So many people were out helping rescue the horses and then helping distribute equipment and gift cards for the horses who were displaced and the grooms who saved their beloved animals but lost their homes in the process. One thing that sets the Arabian horse community apart from the others is our Arabian Horseman’s Distress Fund. This fund has been instrumental in the quick support of both the hurricane and fire victims, and 6

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words cannot express what it means to have this group just a phone call away when help is needed. The use of social media has also changed the way responses are activated. I have lived in Southern California all of my life and have been impacted by fires and earthquakes. It is fascinating to me how the process of evacuation and support for the displaced has changed with the advent of social media. When there is a disaster, social media can be the best tool for communication. It is impressive to see how it can be used to reach out to an audience ready to help and then channel those desires into action. In this situation, social media actually has become the neighbors and friends who, in previous generations, helped you rebuild your home and barn after a disaster hit. The second reason I bring this up is that it is the beginning of a new year, and it’s the perfect time to get together an emergency plan. Do you have an evacuation plan for your horses? Do you have a way to identify your horse in case someone else evacuates it to a different location? If you board your horse, does your boarding facility have an evacuation plan and/or emergency plan for a disaster? Can you even get to your boarding facility in an emergency? I have learned through experience that first responders are going to save human lives first, and it can be very difficult to gain access to a disaster area if there has not been previous planning and contact with the local authorities. Many areas require specific credentials for access — credentials that cannot be procured quickly or after the event has happened. Disasters happen IN A FLASH, and even with pre-planning, things happen fast, but the more prepared you are, the more likely you will have a positive outcome. So, what should you do? Find a local emergency evacuation program to attend to see what the requirements are to evacuate your horses. Many State Universities have sample plans and recommendations for an evacuation kit to have on hand. In addition, the USDA and the AAEP have sample emergency plans and directions for developing a plan for your situation. Most importantly, make contact with your local fire department and first responders. They can help you with the requirements for your city, county and state. Happy 2018 to you all — enjoy your horses! Sincerely,

Nancy Harvey, AHA President nancy.harvey@arabianhorses.org


FROM THE EVP

State of AHA: Excerpts from the EVP Convention Speech DEAR MEMBERS:

AHA’s current staff census is steady from last year, consisting of 45 employees; 43 full-time with two part-time. Turnover has been normal. Our only turnover in Senior Managers was in the Director of Marketing, and Mikayla Boge was promoted from within to that position. In the Competitions Department, 343 shows were recognized by AHA in 2016, which is virtually flat. I would like to say “Thank You” to two AHA of Arizona shows, Scottsdale Breeders Final and their February Halter, for re-sanctioning with AHA. Distance Rides increased from 55 to 71 recognized rides. Distance Nationals had a great year, which included Appaloosas and Paso Finos competing. Our Registry contains over 674,000 Purebred Arabian horses, making it the largest Arabian horse registry in the world. Outside the United States, Arabian horse registries in 69 countries have registered an additional 401,800 Arabian horses, so AHA maintains a comprehensive database that connects the pedigrees of almost one-million Purebred Arabian horses throughout the world. There are approximately 351,400 Half-Arabians and 9,950 Anglo-Arabians registered in total. AHA has contracted with CAHR, which continues to be the Arabian Registry of Canada, to service its registry work in the Denver office. Debbie Fuentes, AHA’s Registrar, and I traveled in the spring to China to meet with industry and government leaders there to advise and assist as they develop their own registry services. The U.S. and China have now signed an agreement to again allow exporting of horses from here to China. A big “Thank You” goes to Dynasty Arabians in China for hosting us and covering all our expenses. China is a definite new market for Arabian horses. The Arabian Breeders’ Sweepstakes Program has seen a 14 percent increase in the number of Breeding Entries enrolled compared to our lowest point in 2014. The Halter Futurities prize money program continues to highlight the best Purebred and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabians three-year-old fillies, colts and geldings in U.S. and Canadian National competitions. The Performance Futurity program is for three-year-old Purebred and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian performance horses and fiveyear-old and under Purebred and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian Reining, Working Cow, Trail and Cutting horses that compete 8

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for prize money in 16 classes at the U.S. Nationals. The Performance Maturity AAOTR Program is for four- or fiveyear-old Purebred and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian in Western and Hunter performance classes and five- or six-year-old Purebred and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian English and Country English performance classes. Membership continues to be a challenge for sister organizations — all of which are experiencing declines, and unfortunately AHA continues to follow this trend too. AHA presently consists of 18,990 members. Compared to 19,925 at this time last year, this is a decline of 4.7 percent. Many of these join via one of our 218 affiliate clubs with just over half of our members affiliated with clubs. We need to increase club membership as they provide our local contact to the community. Our Marketing Department has worked diligently to provide marketing and technical services for the entire Association, ranging from National show promotion and coverage, to program promotion and advertising, to association sponsorship development and retention, to retaining and increasing membership benefits, to creating relationships with our Youth and growing the Youth Association side of our organization, to community outreach projects, to DataSource monitoring. Electronic communications go to more than 40,000 contacts, Arabian Horse Life includes six issues going to all AHA members, and social media has over 160,000 followers. Marketing works with our Market Development and Promotion (MDP) Committee on promotions, but with a shortage of funding, promotions have become a difficult job that critically needs funding. After the merger, much of that funding came from the Purebred Arabian Trust (PAT) as based on the merger agreement for Purebred funding, while the Half-Arabian fund supplied a portion as well. Over the last few years, the PAT contribution has been minimal. As a result, the Half-Arabian fund has carried the load, which isn’t adequate. It is clear our breed needs to be spending money on promotion. Our future may depend on it. Sincerely,

Glenn T. Petty, Executive Vice President glenn.petty@arabianhorses.org


Arabian Horse Association

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JIBBAH JABBER

AN EGYPTIAN TREASURE

Jean Pierre

The Elixir 1992 - 2017

The Elixir came into our lives 10 years ago. We had lost a stallion and placed a wanted ad. The owner of The Elixir, Susan Watson, called and asked if I would be interested in leasing him from her. I had never had a Straight Egyptian and had only heard rumors of them being “hot.” His accomplishments in the show ring were impressive: Canadian National Top Ten Stallion 1998, Scottsdale Top Ten Stallion 1996, Egyptian Event Reserve Supreme Champion Stallion 1996 among many other titles. He also had numerous progeny winning and showing all over the world. How could we say no? The Elixir arrived at the farm, and we were in awe. He had the kindest temperament and was so easy to work with. He quickly put our fears to rest about Straight Egyptians. His pasture overlooked the mares in another field which he loved and he got along so well with a weanling colt we had, we decided to let them keep each other company. “Lix” and this young colt became the best of friends, playing and rearing in the pasture. It was so much fun to watch them together. My husband sums it up all too well. “Admittedly I’m not a ‘horse person’ even though I take care of 15 of them daily. That number was reduced to 14 today as we had to say goodbye to our good friend, The Elixir. You came to our farm some 10 years ago from Texas after a very successful show career. A true world class stallion, admittedly I was a little concerned at first, this high-octane stallion at our farm… some hot-headed horse who impressed so many in the show ring. He was anything but, a true gentleman, easy to handle and work with. He knew when it was time to show off, a true professional. Easy to breed and very good with the mares. Elixir has many sons and daughters all over the world and countless grand-get that have earned their own accolades in the ring.” Very special thank yous go out to Dr. Jim Schwisow for all his care over the years and Dr. Andy Schmidt and his staff at Wisconsin equine for all his breeding commitments. Believe me he really loved his visits with Dr. Andy. Elixir will truly be missed by his buddy and pasture mate Robby. They have been together almost his entire time here at Northwind Arabians. He was a definite world class stallion both in the show ring and relaxing here in Whitewater, Wis. It was an honor taking care of you. I only hope you enjoyed your time here! The time has come my friend. I’ll miss you. It will not be the same without you. RIP “Lix.” Goodbye The Elixir, ~Northwind Arabians, Steve & Chris Johnson 10

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“Lix” frolicking with his pasture mate, Robbie in 2009. The Elixir was arguably one of the most influential Straight Egyptian sires of our time and can be found in many of today’s most decorated pedigrees.

BARBARA ZELLNER passed away on October 4, 2017, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend in Springfield, Ore. She suffered a brain aneurysm the day before. Barbara was born on August 17, 1942, to George and Emily Zellner in Eugene, Ore. Barbara had horses all her life. She showed mostly Quarter Horses, Arabians and Half-Arabians. On her passing, she had two horses and a miniature donkey, all have found new homes. With the interest in horses came her other career, stewarding horse shows all over the U.S. She gained her stewardship certification with the American Horse Shows Association in 1964 and continued with the United States Equestrian Federation as it became the governing body in 2003. She had a big “R” Registered, Category 1 and Category 2 steward’s card, stewarding shows in seven states over the last five years. Barbara is remembered also for her caring ways with an Oregon Arabian Youth Organization. She was a NW icon to all equestrians who knew her.


TO REMEMBER

YOU RYTT

February 1 – Regional Youth Team Tournament Entries Due

March 9-11 – AHYA Board Meeting May – Arabian Horse Month

June 1 – AHYA Convention Eligibility Deadline June 15 – AHYA Officer Candidate Applications Due

2017

RECOGNIZED DIVISION

RANK

REGION

TEAM NAME

TEAM MEMBERS

Regional Champion

3

WHD Shazaam

Timothy Moss, Savannah Sheldon, Lucy Bartlett, Margaret Culver, Tahlia Tveten, Dakota Weinberger

Regional Champion

5

N Joy One

Tennessee Sanders, Hannah Reynolds, Ashley Holinger, Libby Hollinger, Kate Wimans, Lily Gramling

OVERALL CHAMPIONS Regional Champion Regional Champion

7

Destructive Divas

8

Rocky Mountain Six Pack ARAB Youth Champions ‘A’

Sophia Kuder, Sara Bakhsheshy, Aspyn Stanley, Courtney Carlson, Jillian Dumont, Megan Dunn Mia Peterson, Francesca Weiter, Grace Forbes, Jessie Jacobucci, Jessie Burton, Alexa Gilbert Delaney Blanchard, Jade Cantu

Regional Champion Regional Champion Regional Champion Regional Champion Regional Champion Regional Champion

10

Keep Calm & Ride

11

RSTC Girls

12

Bay View Varsity

13

The Hexad

16

Real Horse Show Fam Aurora Pink

9

17

Audrey Flakus, Sydney Schultz, Thaddeus Knigge, Lauryn Riepma, Cassie Hartman, Lyric Riepma Rachel Powell, Averie Innes, Rebecca Bloome, Ashley Lounsberry, Lauren Weichold, Reagan Weichold Haley Jenkins, Victoria Barr, Paige Johnson, Lily McDonald, Daniel Zeliski, Sadie Honeyman Rachele Cate, Sophia Treder, Holly Stevens, Courtney McLenon, Kayla Masselink, Elianna Martinez Rebekah Andes, Alicia Bergeron, Mary Grace Martin, Brooks Menard, Caroline Morin, Gabriella Santaneillo Kalyn Leatherdale, Isabella Fortier, Arianna Bell, Rachel Solari, Grace Kruger, Shaelyn Sheehan


UTH W

in a FREE membership!

It’s easy! Just send us a photo of you and your Arabian or Half-Arabian horse showing community involvement, education or outreach by January, 31, 2018. One Youth winner will be chosen. For complete rules and entry

details, email sales@arabianhorses.org

RYTT

2017 RANK

SWEARS

WHAT’S IN YOUR

BARN?

My three favorite tack/barn items are: my purple lead rope that was a gift and I saved it until my first Youth Nationals. I lead a Reserve National Champion around all week with that purple lead rope! Also my purple leg wraps that are a great security to a horse (and also a great way to be stylish)! Lastly, when I go to the barn I always use my purple helmet because safety is important.

NON-RECOGNIZED DIVISION

REGION

TEAM NAME

TEAM MEMBERS

~AHYA Region 14 Director, Brinley Swears

Regional Champion

3

WHD Shazaam

Timothy Moss, Savannah Sheldon, Tahlia Tveten, Lucy Bartlett, Margaret Culver, Dakota Weinberger

Regional Champion

5

Team Platinum

Miley Defalco, Lilee Pendleton, CharLee Pendleton, Presley Conover

Overall Champions Regional Champion Regional Champion

7

Destructive Divas

9 10

ARAB Youth Champions ‘A’ Shining Stars

Sophia Kuder, Sara Bakhsheshy, Aspyn Stanley, Courtney Carlson, Jillian Dumont, Megan Dunn Delaney Blanchard, Jade Cantu, Rebecca Davis, Madailein Pitts, Lillian Higgs Rachel Bohlen, Jessica Bohlen, Katie Treadwell, Maddy Greengard, Nicole Mrozinski, Amber Mrozinski

17

Honey Bees

Regional Champion

Cassandra Spans, Shaylin Sharpe, Shaelyn Sheehan, Rachel Colari, Maya Stinart


n whoa

faves

By Cara Blanchard Kilbourne A section covering products used by our National-level trainers in the Arabian horse community.

Cara Blanchard Kilbourne is an FEI dressage rider, trainer and instructor located in Central Fla. She runs her own riding school and is the Stetson University Dressage Team Coach. Cara and her students show on the AHA, USDF/USEF and IDA circuits and have acquired countless Class A, Regional and National titles. www.carablanchardtraining.com/

OVATION RIDING HELMETS Safety is always first, and we never ride without a helmet! Ovation helmets are my absolute favorite. They come in a variety of styles and colors fit for any rider or occasion. I have an entire collection of them. I recommend them to all of my students, and it’s always fun to see what style they each choose. Ovation helmets are affordable, ventilated, lightweight and adjustable. A bonus is that the interlining is removable and washable — perfect for our Florida heat and humidity. www.ovationriding.com

ROMA SADDLE PADS Just like every other horse loving girl, I love saddle pads! I have always been thrilled with the quality of the Roma pads. They come in a variety of sizes, colors, designs and thicknesses. Most of them have a fantastic wicking feature on the underside which is perfect for our never ending Florida summers. I love the reversible wither relief pads because they’re a little bit thicker and give my upper level horses just an extra bit of comfort. I use the Roma Crescent pads for showing because they are beautiful with a sleek, unique piping and there is still room to embroider a logo to give it a little something extra.

FIOR ANAM NATURAL & HOLISTIC PRODUCTS As a rider and trainer, my most important investment is the health and wellness of the horses. An all natural approach to their care is of utmost importance. Just like us, all systems of the horse affect each other. My go to favorite products are Fior Anam’s amazing equine product line. Fior Anam prides itself in researching, understanding and formulating natural alternatives for all equine needs; from hoof to tail I can trust their products are chemical free and won’t create an imbalance in their delicate systems. I can bathe, condition hooves, treat common skin aliments, ease sore muscles and keep those pesky files away all with natural and holistic products that are USEF and FEI SAFE and, equally important, work! Fior Anam is a natural fit in my equine care program. www.fioranam.com

PURINA ULTIUM FEED Over the years we have tried a handful of different horse feeds. There hasn’t been a feed that has come close to matching the quality and consistency of Purina Ultium. All of my horses have been eating Ultium for nearly six years now, and I have never had an issue of any sort or a bad bag. Everyone is in good weight and health from older to young to schoolmasters to competitive FEI dressage horses. Every bag looks and smells just as delicious as the last! www.purinamills.com/horse-feed/

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n heritage

By Tobi Lopez Taylor Photos Courtesy of Shelley Groom Trevor

B

ack in the mid-1940s, a Chicago businessman named Ed Tweed was visiting a ranch owned by Merle Cheney, a realtor in Scottsdale, Ariz., who owned some Arabians. Ed was in his fifties at the time, and Cheney’s horses were the first Arabians he’d seen up close. He was immediately enchanted by these beautiful equines. “They were a sort of magic,” Tweed later recalled. Although Ed didn’t realize it at the time, this incident would be a major turning point, not only in his own life but in Arabian horse history. For, without Ed Tweed, there would be no Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show and no legacy of champions from his Brusally Ranch breeding program. As the late Bazy Tankersley, of Al-Marah Arabians, told me, Ed Tweed “was probably more responsible than any other one person for making Scottsdale the Arabian horse capital of the world. He painted with a big brush.” Tweed’s granddaughter, Shelley Groom Trevor— who lived and worked with him at Brusally Ranch — calls him “a man beyond ordinary.” Edwin James Tweed was born in 1893, the third son of Chicagoans Fred and Emma Tweed. It seems fitting that Ed was born the same

summer as the Chicago World’s Fair, which featured a Bedouin encampment, known as the Wild East Show, that displayed 40 Purebred Arabian horses from the Ottoman Empire. This was the first time that millions of Americans, including a number of men who would later become Arabian breeders, such as Homer Davenport and Henry Babson, saw Purebred Arabian horses up close. In fact, one of Ed’s earliest equine purchases, from breeder Albert W. Harris, was the champion mare Kiral (Alcazar x Kirin, by *Nuri Pasha), who had some Davenport breeding and also traced to horses that had appeared in the Wild East Show. During his formative years, Ed didn’t evince any particular interest in horses, though he harbored a dream of having a home in the country and raising livestock. He attended Chicago’s Lewis Institute, where he was trained as an architect. After marrying Ruth Phillips in 1917, he became a partner in Lane & Tweed, a Kansas City, Mo., company that specialized in bank design. Life was going well for Ed, Ruth and their two children (Bruce and Marjorie, who was known as Sally) — and then came the Great Depression. At a time when banks were simply trying to stay open, there was no need to build new ones,

so the now-unemployed Tweed and his family relocated to Independence, Mo., where a bank that Ed had designed was renting out space to pay its expenses. Ed hit on the idea to convert part of the bank into a diner, which he loftily named the Moderne Sweet Shoppe and Tea Room. The diner was a success and counted among its regular customers a future president, Harry Truman. Around this time, Ed’s father Fred had become the manager of a refrigerating company in Chicago. By 1935, the company had fallen on hard times, and Fred asked his son to move home and help close down the firm. Ed and family relocated to Chicago, but instead of shuttering the business, Ed made it profitable. Within a few years, he was the company’s president and major stockholder. Now making a very comfortable living, Ed moved his wife and children to a house with acreage in Lake Forest, Ill. Ed named their new home “Brusally” after his son and daughter. There they kept some riding horses (not Arabians), cattle and pigs. In the early 1940s, Ruth and Ed began spending winters in Arizona, at resorts near Tucson and Phoenix. It was during this time that Ed had his fateful meeting with Cheney’s horses. In fact, Ed’s first two Arabians were

The Tweed home and six acres are all that remain of Brusally Ranch. 16

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Left — Ed Tweed, center, and his favorite horse, Skorage, ridden by Earl Craig, about 1955. Below — The program cover for the first “Scottsdale Show”— which was actually held in Phoenix, Ariz., in 1955. In 1967, Brusally Ranch was the site of the first Scottsdale auction. An advertisement from 1969 shows four of Tweed’s champion Polish stallions.

A Man Beyond Ordinary

Ed Tweed & Brusally Ranch Issue 1. 2018

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Left —

*Orzel++ frolics in front of the ranch’s iconic barn. Right top—

Brusally Gwiazdor+, 1974 U.S. National Champion English Pleasure AOTR. MIddle —

Brusally Zbruina, 1973 U.S. Top Ten Mare. Below —

Brusally Orzetyn, 1980 U.S. National Champion Third Level Dressage.

purchased from Cheney. They were the full siblings Malachi, a gelding, and Nineveh, a mare (Rabiyas x Rifnada, by Rifnas), bred from stock that Cheney acquired from cereal magnate W.K. Kellogg. In 1949, at age 56, Ed semi-retired. He and Ruth bought a second home in Scottsdale, on Cheney Road. Ever gregarious, Ed soon joined the El-Zaribah Shrine, Masonic Temple, Rotary Club and Sheriff’s Posse. His next endeavor was to buy land for a sizeable ranch. He paid $8,000 for 160 acres of Scottsdale desert and drew up plans for a Spanish Colonialstyle home and barn, irrigated pastures, an aviary, a five-acre lake and other amenities. The support beams for the barn and home were of old-growth redwood, and all of the fittings, whether in his home or in the stable, embodied Tweed’s aesthetic. “He had an eye for design, beauty and quality in everything he bought or created,” says Trevor. Not content with having a couple of Arabians as riding horses, Ed decided to breed his own Arabians — horses that would embody his artistic vision. He reached out to various well-known breeders, including Robert B. Field and L. Wayne 18

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Van Vleet, and his broodmare band soon comprised of daughters of *Zarife, Hallany Mistanny, *Raseyn and other well-known stallions of that time. He bought his first herd sire, the flashy chestnut Skorage (Gaysar x Rageyma, by *Mirage), from breeder Daniel C. Gainey. Even though Ed would go on to breed and own hundreds of horses, Skorage was always his avowed favorite. Already a Halter Champion when Tweed purchased him, Skorage become “Mr. Versatility”— he was ridden in numerous parades; he appeared in advertisements for Porter’s Western Wear and Ford Motor Company; and he was shown throughout the U.S. in many different classes, including English and Western Pleasure, Native Costume, Pairs, Three-Gaited and Driving. In 1956, Skorage was the high-scoring horse among all breeds. He crossed well with the mares that Tweed chose, and he compiled an enviable record as a breeding stallion, siring 20 champions and five National winners. “Skorage was remarkably prepotent in passing on his rich chestnut color, athletic ability, trainability and charisma,” recalls Trevor. “My granddad was very proud of him and his offspring. But, always looking to the future as he did, he saw the need

for new blood, for horses that were bigger but still athletic and beautiful. Skorage, however, had set a high bar.” In 1954, California breeder Earle E. Hurlbutt contacted Ed and suggested that he establish an Arabian horse club in Arizona, so Tweed and about 20 other local breeders formed the Arabian Horse Association of Arizona, with Ed as its first president. Also in 1954, the association exhibited some Arabians in the arena of the Arizona Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix. This event, featuring horses and riders participating in parade, Polo and Cutting horse


activities, proved to be quite popular; even Arizona’s governor, Howard Pyle, attended. The association’s first All-Arabian Horse Show, held in February 1955 and sponsored by Ed and Ruth Tweed, Anne and Fowler McCormick, and Philip and Helen Wrigley, again took place at the Arizona Biltmore. The two-day show featured 135 horses from six states. The Tweeds also began a tradition of hosting an exhibitors’ luncheon on the Brusally Ranch lawn. Over the decades, Ed had the opportunity to see the show grow steadily in size, scope and importance. Today, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show draws more than 2,400 show horses, spans 11 days and attracts tens of thousands of spectators from around the globe. In 1963, Ed turned 70 years old. For many people, that milestone would suggest cutting back on some activities. Ed, however, was embarking on the most productive decade of his life. He and other breeders in Scottsdale admired the athletic Polish Arabians lately acquired by their neighbor Robert Aste, and they heard through the grapevine about highquality Polish horses that had been shipped recently to California. One of those California imports, *Muzulmanin++ (Doktryner x Mufta, by Mlech Pelkinski), was the champion stallion of the 1963 Scottsdale Show. Tweed was quite taken with this 15.1hand chestnut, and booked some mares to him. It dawned on Ed that Polish mares would be good outcross for his champion, Skorage, and a Polish stallion or two could sire athletic foals from Skorage’s daughters. In March 1963, Tweed sent his trainer Steve Spalding on a buying junket to Europe. By May, Spalding had purchased 14 Polish horses and three Russian horses. The 14 Polish horses were shipped to the U.S. on a plane, the first time that Polish Arabians arrived in this country by air. Like

his employer, Spalding proved that he had the proverbial “eye for a horse,” since this contingent included standouts such as *Czester++ (Comet x Cerekiew, by Wielki Szlem), who was named 1965 U.S. and Canadian Top Ten Stallion; *Gwiazdor (*Naborr x Gwadiana, by Amurath Sahib), 1964 Canadian Top Ten Stallion; and a host of excellent, well-bred mares, including *Chlosta (Faher x *Carissima, by Witraz) and *Genua (Grand x Gwara, by Wielki Szlem), both elected to the Arabian Racing Hall of Fame for their contributions as broodmares. Tweed’s next two “firsts” were intertwined: his ranch was the first in Scottsdale to construct an indoor riding arena, and in 1967 he employed that arena during Scottsdale’s very first Arabian horse auction, which was timed to coincide with the Scottsdale Show in February. As historian Mary Jane Parkinson wrote, “Ed reasoned that some of those thousands of visitors in town [for the show] just might want to buy an Arabian horse….Ed did nothing in a small way.” He was proved correct, and the sale was a success. Later in 1967, Brusally welcomed a second shipment of horses from Poland. A reporter for the Phoenix Gazette wrote that “The iron curtain Top —

Ed Tweed with his friend Gladys Brown Edwards, Arabian horse historian and artist. Middle —

Ed’s daughter Sally Tweed Groom on Brusally Orzelyna+, twice U.S. Top Ten Western Pleasure. Right —

Brusally Ranch scored five Top Tens at the 1966 U.S. Nationals.

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S. Gail Miller

n heritage

S. Gail Miller

Three foals by *Zbrucz.

Three of Tweed’s five Comet offspring: *Salinaa, *Basta and *Zbrucz.

parted slightly and 11 Purebred Arabian horses were flown out of Poland and trailered to their new home at Ed Tweed’s Brusally Ranch in Scottsdale…where they joined more than 100 other Brusally Arabians.” The two stallions in this importation — *Zbrucz (Comet x Znachorka, by Rozmaryn) and *Orzel++ (*Pietuszok x Ofirka, by Ofir) would go on to have a major impact on Tweed’s breeding program. *Zbrucz was crowned 1970 U.S. Reserve National Champion Park Horse and became a noted sire of champions, National winners, and 20

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race winners. Having recently become interested in Arabian horse racing, Tweed purchased *Orzel++ on the strength of his race wins in Poland and the fact that he was the betting favorite for the Polish Derby. Ed built a half-mile training track on the ranch to condition *Orzel++, and then sent him to the races. The horse didn’t disappoint, being named 1967 U.S. National Champion Racehorse and later beating the previously undefeated Kontiki. *Orzel++ then went on to a splendid show career— he was the 1970 Champion stallion at Ed’s beloved Scottsdale Show, 1969 U.S. Top Ten Stallion, 1971 Canadian Top Ten Stallion, 1973 U.S. Top Ten English Pleasure and, in 1974, the first U.S. National Champion Ladies’ Sidesaddle. In addition to siring National winners,*Orzel++ became an important sire of racehorses, and his name is highly valued in the pedigrees of today’s stakes winners. In 1995, he was inducted into the Arabian Racing Hall of Fame along with his rival Kontiki. About the same time Ed’s vision for the success of Brusally Ranch was nearing its peak, his beloved wife Ruth died in 1971, and he began to experience his own health problems. Ed handed over more of the day-today management to his granddaughter and to the ranch manager, Lee Staheli. He also mentored a younger couple from Texas, Joe and Martha Ann Cassel, who went on to establish their own successful breeding program, Casa Cassel Arabians, based on Brusally’s Polish bloodlines. When his favorite horse, Skorage, died in 1975, Tweed was inconsolable. The next year, Ed — now 83 — publicly announced his retirement. Then, in 1977, he suffered a stroke that paralyzed him on one side. Refusing to accept his doctors’ grim prognosis, Ed lived comfortably at home for another six years. He died in June 1983, a few weeks before his 90th birthday. With his passing, the ranch was

closed, and it was now up to others, including Tweed’s granddaughter, to perpetuate the ranch’s legacy. In the nearly 35 years since his death, Ed Tweed’s breeding acumen and accomplishments have come to be appreciated by a new generation of Arabian fanciers, especially those who focus on Racing, Endurance and the Sport Horse disciplines. “Tweed’s two importations of Polish Arabians were noteworthy for the quality of and depth of the bloodlines represented,” says John Schiewe, Polish Arabian breeder and historian. “He imported two very important breeding stallions, *Zbrucz and *Orzel++, ensuring that the first-rate broodmares of Brusally would contribute greatly to future generations.” Some recent descendants of the Brusally Ranch breeding program include: Spin Doctor, 2016 U.S. National Champion Training Level Dressage and successful racehorse; Beymoon Zela+//, 2016 USDF All-Breeds Arabian Division Reserve Champion in Grand Prix dressage; Paddys Day, 2015 and 2016 Darley Horse of the Year; Manark, 2015 $1 million Kahayla Classic winner; and KJR Lexington+//, 2016 U.S. National Top Ten Western Pleasure AAOTR 19–35. It’s fitting that the Arabian Jockey Club chose the Scottsdale Show as the venue at which to induct Ed Tweed into the Racing Tent of Honor, recognizing him for his character, significant impact and dedication to Arabian breeding. “Brusally Ranch was the fulfillment of a lifetime of dreams,” says Trevor, “and here my grandfather’s remarkable insight, foresight and abilities made substantial contributions not only to the ranch and people involved, but to the whole Arabian industry.” Tobi Lopez Taylor’s most recent book is Orzel: Scottsdale’s Legendary Arabian Stallion (The History Press, 2016). She can be reached at www.tobitaylor.com.


n the now

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very industry is defined by its history, the people and events that have influenced it. Leaders are studied to understand the evolution of the current day and predict future developments. Much has been written about the legends in the breed, *Bask, Khemosabi, Lady Wentworth, and Gene LaCroix to name but a few. Before they were household names, they had their beginnings, times when they were honing their skills. Today a number of young trainers are emerging onto the local and national scene, establishing careers that may influence future generations. A few were willing to share their stories as follows.

Colby Powell COLBY POWELL PERFORMANCE HORSES SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA Raised in the Arabian industry, Colby Powell is the son of trainer LaRae Fletcher Powell of Silver Aspen Ranch. His father also trained horses prior to pursuing a career as a school teacher. Although his family’s barn focused primarily on Western, working western, and hunter disciplines, Colby also sought experience with the English division. He began taking saddleseat lessons at the age of five on a pinto pony with Mike

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Colby Powell showing his skills in the Working Western disciplines.


Lamb, progressing to riding American Saddlebreds and Arabians. He began showing in the National Reining Horse Association (NRHA) when he was eight with a Quarter Horse. Colby’s experiences with training began soon thereafter; he started his first two-year- old colt under his parents’ guidance when he was 10-11 years old and started colts for Mike Lamb as an older youth rider. Cowhorse trainer Mike Helson provided Colby with experience in additional working western divisions and the knowledge that “you’ll find out quickly how well trained your horse is when you go to work a cow.” Early successes included wins with Arktik CAHR in the Western division with Colby and his father. In his youth career with Mike Lamb, Colby noted enjoying riding WCF Mata Hari to the 2008 Youth National Championship in Half-Arabian English Pleasure JTR 13 & Under and Joe Fabulous WP to the 2011 Youth National Championship in the JTR 14-17 Half-Arabian English Pleasure division. One of the most memorable moments in his early career involved a Half-Arabian/Quarter Horse gelding, Whata Doc Bar TR. Colby found the three-year-old green-broke gelding in an ad for an online Addis sale his senior year. The gelding progressed quickly under Colby’s guidance. Shown in the Non-Pro division the following year, he was third at Youth Nationals behind two of Colby’s other reiners and was Top Ten in the U.S. National Reining Futurity. Subsequently the gelding won additional National titles, including the 2014 U.S. National Championship in the Half-Arabian Reining Futurity, as well as the 2015 Scottsdale Non-Pro Half-Arabian Reining Derby with Colby’s father. “To have identified a young horse as a youth and take him through my initial training career is pretty special.” Pursuing a professional career was natural after he graduated from his time as a youth. He sought additional training experiences, including six months focusing on English with Stachowski farms and nearly two years with Gordon Potts. In November 2015, Colby moved to Scottsdale to start his own training business. Although he worked part-time at Rae-Dawn Arabians initially, he transitioned to working solely with client horses. Colby noted that he enjoys the nuances of every discipline, although he tends to train mostly Western and Working Western. He recently won the U.S. National Championship in Half-Arabian Western Pleasure with Out West. “Whatever is in the best interest of the horse is what we do, as long

Annie Boylan riding Hinged In Heaven. as the horse is soft, round, and limber.” Consultation with fellow trainers continues, as Colby noted that “you never stop learning…Although a great horse is a great horse regardless of breed, Arabians are always where my heart is.”

Annie Boylan ANKAT TRAINING NEWBURY, OHIO A lifelong equestrian, Annie Boylan began riding when she was three years old. Her sister was taking lessons when Annie realized that she wanted to ride. Her mother allowed her to sit on a black and white Shetland pony, and “I’ve never looked back since.” She continued with lessons, becoming involved with the industry as her first trainer worked with and bred Arabians. Supported by her family, Annie competed as a youth rider in multiple disciplines. “Ever since I can remember, I’ve always been interested in the whole process of training a horse, not just riding.” In her youth, she showed such horses as Nifty Nathan (2006 Youth National Reserve Champion Show Hack JTR 14-17), CBS Dazzle (2005 Canadian Issue 1. 2018

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National Champion Hunter Pleasure JOTR 17 & Under), and Memory Maker (2003 Youth National Reserve Champion Half-Arabian Hunter JTR 13 & Under). After graduating from college, Annie decided to pursue a career training horses. Prior to starting her own training barn, Annie worked for such trainers as Christine Johnson, Tish Kondas, and Jimmy and Peter Stachowski. One of the first horses she showed for Stachowski’s was an American Saddlebred she took to the American Royal Show. “Competing at a Saddlebred show was a different ballgame, and it really taught me more about horsemanship in a show ring.” One of her most memorable moments to date was showing Not For Nothin AK to a Top Ten in last year’s U.S. National Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity. He was the first horse Annie showed who she both bred and trained. “Nothing makes me happier or feel more accomplished than seeing a horse that I broke or trained having a successful career.” She also showed Hinged in Heaven to a Top Ten in the 2016 Arabian English Pleasure Association (AEPA) Half-Arabian Futurity (the duo was Reserve Champion in 2015 in the HalfArabian Country English Pleasure Futurity). Today she focuses on the Saddleseat, Hunt Seat, Western, and Driving divisions. Citing her philosophy of being patient and making a program that fits a horse, Annie continues to train in addition to giving weekly lessons to a variety of students. Although she plans to continue to pursue her training career, Annie also noted that she also hopes to increase her local community’s involvement with the Arabian breed. “I also want to start an Exceptional Riders program for our rated [class A] shows for individuals with mental and/or physical disabilities.”

Kassidy Herbst Tiefenauer TIEFENAUER DRESSAGE & SPORT HORSE TRAINING FARMINGTON, MISSOURI From the time that she was six months old, riding on the front of her mother’s saddle, Kassidy Tiefenauer has been involved with horses. A second generation Arabian horse lover, Kassidy noted that she “loved everything about Arabians, the community, the people, the connection with the horses.” In her youth career, Kassidy rode Hunter Pleasure, Western Pleasure, and Trail. One of her earliest national titles came at age 11 on a horse she and her mother trained in the JTR 17 & under trail division, at that time the youngest rider to win a title in that division. At 13, she started riding with Kim Berkley of Desire 24

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Kassidy Tiefenauer and her daughter Kordelia. Arabians, making the one and a half hour drive three to four times per week. “We couldn’t afford to keep horses in training, but Kim trained me to train our horses.” Kassidy’s first set of roses — and first exposure to National-level Dressage — came with CH Brushfire+//, then one of Kim’s clients’ horses. In the class, Kassidy and Brushfire were named 2000 Youth National Reserve Champions in First Level Dressage JTR 13 & under. “We bought him the next year; he later became a jumper for my sister and was in my wedding.” Her youth career spanned multiple divisions, with numerous Top Ten awards. She also enjoyed Foxhunting with her horses and was exposed to Mounted Shooting events through her uncle. In 2008, Kassidy moved to Texas to work with some Cutting horse trainers, including Craig Thompson. From Thompson she learned that “the best thing you can do when you get on a horse is never to have a grudge or a memory but to move forward into the positive moment.” Kassidy also worked with Pete Rasmussen and subsequently trained for Toskhara Arabians before returning home to Missouri in 2010. After the birth of her daughter two years ago, Kassidy fully transitioned her hobby into her career, first by giving lessons and clinics and recently by taking on outside training horses. Specializing in


Kassidy Tiefenauer riding Gehrhearts Magic. Dressage and Sport Horse Under Saddle, she continues to trail ride her horses and foxhunt on their 300 acre farm. Describing herself as a “horse therapist,” Kassidy identified her philosophy as “figuring out each individual, mentally and physically, and bring it to harmony.” She also enjoys mentoring five students who ride with her three days per week and breeding horses with her family. Kassidy

noted the importance of networking and relying on other young trainers in helping each other with developing their careers. “My passion is working with youth and young horses, just like Kim Berkley did with me.” While at Toskhara, she started TA Monet+/, who her sister rode to a Reserve Youth National championship in Training Level Dressage as a four-year-old in 2008. This year at Sport Horse Nationals, Kassidy won her first National Championship on A Ring Of Fyre, a horse her mother bred. “My dreams were made winning the Training Level Dressage Junior Horse class at Sport Horse Nationals.” Horses and riders under her guidance took home an additional three National Championships, one Reserve National Championship, and multiple Top Tens between Youth and Sport Horse Nationals. Future goals include working towards her Bronze Medal in Dressage and continuing to train her young horses and riders to further their career. With these young trainers, and a number of others, the future of the Arabian horse is in good hands. A lifelong Arabian horse enthusiast, Tiffany Meites has shown her family’s Arabians for over 20 years. She is a rehabilitation psychologist in Phoenix, Ariz., and is owned by two Papillons.

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Profile for Arabian Horse Association

Arabian Horse Life Magazine Mini-Issue: Issue 1, 2018  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the third week of January. Now going...

Arabian Horse Life Magazine Mini-Issue: Issue 1, 2018  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the third week of January. Now going...