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Issue 2 • 2019

The Official Magazine of the Arabian Horse Association


AHA Listings n

CONTENTS Issue #2. 2019

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On the cover: 2018 colt by KM Bugatti and out of Promise the Moon, owned by Lyric Leftkowitz Hersh.

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Photography by Julie Patton, www.juliepatton.com

WHOA Mares Can Have It All It takes more than pedigree to make a great broodmare.

By Patti Schofler EquiShop Featuring excellent products focused on the breeding industry.

GET INVOLVED Arabian Breeders’ Sweepstakes Learn the ins and outs of AHA’s flagship breeders’ incentive program.

30 34 36 38

IN EVERY ISSUE 7

Corporate Partners & Sponsors

8

President’s Letter

10

EVP’s Letter

12

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18 AHYA 20 Praiseworthy 55 Stallion Directory 57 AHA Listings 61 Advertisers’ Index 64 FOCUS Life arabian horse

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Equine Athlete Veterinary Services Combining breeding and showing to achieve the best of both worlds.

By Jessica Bush, DVM, MBA

IMPACT 2018 AHA & APAHA Recognition Awards Highlighting outstanding performances of 2018.

HYPP & HERDA Understanding the potential welfare impact on ArabianQuarter horse crosses.

By Debra Powell, PhD, P.A.S.

23 38 HERITAGE More than Hollywood Magic Made The Black Stallion

Forty years after its release, director Carroll Ballard reflects on making the iconic film.

By Elizabeth Kaye McCall

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PARTNERSHIP

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THE NOW Getting to Know Stallions Ever wonder what it’s like to work with stallions? Five stallion owners share their strategies for managing stallions year-round.

By Katie Navarra US Equestrian’s 2019 Annual Meeting:

The Take-Home Points

US Equestrian members gathered in West Palm Beach, Fla., in January for the organization’s Annual Meeting.

2018 Distance Horse National Championship The Distance Horse National Championships (DHNC), hosted by the Arabian Horse Association, produced stellar winners of the 40-mile Competitive Trail Ride divisions.

By Merri Melde Issue 2. 2019


Johanna Ulstrom Photo

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www.thehatlady.com AHA Corporate Partners and Sponsors support expanded opportunities for all who participate in Arabian horse activities. AHA would like to thank our 2019 Corporate Partners and Sponsors. By purchasing products and services provided by these companies you are supporting the horse you love—the Arabian!

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WWW.ARABIANHORSES.ORG/AFFINITYPARTNERS

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from the president n

Looking Forward and Looking Back

DEAR MEMBERS: I have to come clean and confess something, when it comes to this letter, I am a procrastinator. There. I said it and will own it! But to my defense, there is so much going on with the Association, I sometimes wonder on which subject I should write so I decided to cover a lot of different ones as there is so much happening! My first subject is about change — I have spoken about this previously, and it bears repeating. We are in a fast changing world, and we must adapt. Change for change’s sake is not a reason to change. However, if we change to improve, then it will be positive in the end. As a result, we have quite a few Ad-Hoc committees working on determining what the best direction is to take and subsequently how to get there. We have a group that is looking into how to better serve our exhibitors through our show commissions, including working on a mentoring program for people who would like to get involved in event management. In addition, we have a team looking at our Regional shows and structure and how to make them relevant in this ever-changing landscape. Another Ad-Hoc is looking at our relationship with US Equestrian. And finally, a group is looking at how we can get to that second touch and the development of a continuing relationship with our beloved Arabian horses. This group is currently looking to reconnect with the American Horse Council “Time to Ride” program to get local. I must express my admiration for all of these 6

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Ad-Hoc committee members. They have worked together with a spirit of respect for each other and a desire to make things better. They do not always agree, but they listen to each other’s opinions and work very hard in a logical and thoughtful manner. My next subject continues on a similar theme — change. In order to be more efficient at our board meetings and to allow more time for our board to work on strategic and longer term planning, we have adjusted the way some items are presented. Historically, our staff directors present the status of their departments and some of their short term plans. This takes quite a bit of time at our meeting and, in some cases, our board members have questions for the staff that come after the meeting. To increase efficiency, we have developed online presentations for certain staff reports. The board of directors log in, view the reports prior to the board meeting and come prepared with pertinent questions for the various staff members. This is a work in progress with a goal, later this year, to have all of these reports available to members when they log on to their accounts. The feedback we have received from the board has been positive, and we look forward to the rollout of this to our members. Finally, my last subject is one about memories and remembering those who have come before us. We are an aging population of horse lovers and some of our own have already left us this year. They will be missed, and, in some cases, we have lost an opportunity to learn from them and let them know how much we have appreciated what they have done for the Arabian horse. Let’s face it, we aren’t getting any younger. To that end, I would say, if you have someone you admire — reach out to that person and let him/her know. One such person who would love to hear from you is Peter Cameron. Peter is a giant in this industry and, if you have ever admired him, call him and tell him, or if you just want to hear some great stories, he would love to share them with you. If you want his number, feel free to email me at nancy.harvey@arabianhorses.org. Happy Spring... no more rain or snow. So go and enjoy your horses, no matter what you do.

Regards,

Nancy Harvey AHA President, nancy.harvey@arabianhorses.org


from the EVP n

AHA: Who We Are

• 46% have their

horses boarded at training barns • 100% enjoy recreational activities with their horses • 51% enjoy competitive shows or trail rides

DEAR MEMBERS:

While preparing a presentation for a potential new Corporate Partner, I found the demographics of our membership compiled from past surveys to be quite interesting. So I thought I would share with you, too, to see just who we are and what we do. AHA is an equine association serving 85,000 Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horse owners and 219 clubs across North America. AHA had a membership of 17,590 at the end of 2018, with 63 percent in clubs also and 57 percent also holding a Competition Card. AHA registers and maintains a database of 1.4 million Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses and administers approximately $1 million in annual prize money. AHA produces five championship events, recognizes over 344 Arabian horse shows and distance rides and provides activities, education, and programs that promote breeding, ownership, and membership. AHA presently has 261 judges and 126 stewards licensed. How our 17,590 members break down: • 87% female, 12% male • 91% are over the age of 35 • 71% are married • 46% college graduate • 30% post graduates • 41% professional/manager • 28% business owners • 85% household income $50,000+ • 30% household income $150,000+ • 87% own their own home Our members’ horses: • 35% own more than five horses • 37% own another breed of horse as well • 65% keep their horses at home 8

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AHA is the promoter of five National Championships — Youth Nationals, Sport Horse Nationals, Canadian Nationals, U.S. Nationals, and Distance Nationals. In the Tulsa CVB’s Annual Report, U.S. Nationals is credited with bringing $104 million in spending to Tulsa while the show is there. Arabian Horse Life, the official magazine of AHA, is published bi-monthly and offered in both print and online. The circulation is approximately 17,000 per issue, making it the largest in the Arabian horse industry. According to a recent readership survey: • 96% consider the magazine a benefit of their membership • 83% prefer the magazine in print or with both print and online access • 80% attended a competitive event or AHA Convention in the last 12 months The magazine also has an online blog that posts new articles weekly at www.arabianhorselife.com. AHA Social Media and website continue to grow and provide communication tools for AHA and it members to share pertinent, real time information. • Facebook has 101,242 followers • Instagram has 11,500 followers • Pinterest has 72,500 monthly viewers and 4,261 followers • Website (ArabianHorses.org) averages 6,000 viewers per week While I am sharing demographics, at last count here in the office, our 43 employees answered roughly 55,000 calls per year, processed 60,000 incoming pieces of mail per year and 180,000 outgoing pieces of mail per year and answered thousands of emails. Accounting writes 6,300 checks annually. Customer Service processes about 150,000 transactions per year. So this is a glimpse at who we are and some of our activities. Sincerely, Glenn T. Petty Executive Vice President, glenn.petty@arabianhorses.org


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in memoriam

Richard J. Ames Scottsdale May 4, 1929 - January 30, 2019

RICHARD J. (DICK) AMES, BORN MAY 4, 1929, PASSED AWAY on January 30, 2019, leaving an enduring impact that will echo for generations through his family, business, and community. As founder of Ames Construction, Dick was a driving force to a multitude of successful construction projects in the commercial, energy, transportation, mining, rail and water & wastewater industry sectors. Dick grew up in Farmington, Minn., the eldest of eight children born to Chester and Ruby (Reisinger) Ames. He and his siblings worked the family farm, where they learned the value of hard work, honesty, and a commitment to “family first” that would carry through a lifetime. Dick loved sports and excelled as a competitive athlete, playing football, basketball and track in high school. With an ambition to become a coach, Dick sought a teaching degree — the prerequisite for coaching — and enrolled at Mankato State Teachers College after his high school graduation. However, Dick left school the following year to farm with his grandfather in Farmington. At the age of 22, Dick was married with two sons, and his father encouraged him to find stable work outside of the family farm. Starting as a day laborer for a local highway construction company, Dick dedicated himself to the company and quickly advanced to become the owner’s right-hand man. In 1962, Dick founded Ames Construction, and he considered his thirteen-year-old son Larry — who lent an extra pair of hands after school and on weekends — to be his first employee. Within months, Dick’s brother, Butch, became a partner in the business, and over the next several years, their brothers John, Tom and Ron, along with their nephew Mark Brennan, joined the company. Together they built Ames Construction into one of the premiere heavy civil and industrial general contracting companies in the nation. A proud and dedicated industry advocate, Dick received many industry honors over the years, including the AGC of Minnesota Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006. Dick married twice and had five children. It was with his second wife, Georgeanne “Lollie” Ames, whom he married in 1968, that he pursued an interest in Arabian horses, founding their Cedar Ridge Farms, in Jordan, Minn., 10

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in the early 1970s. They have been prolific breeders, principally of Arabian English Pleasure and Halter horses, and have shown extensively in most divisions, with Dick excelling at amateur driving. In the late 1970s, he was one of the founders of the Minnesota Medallion Futurity, and later, as he enjoyed competing in Reining, he became one of three founders of the Arabian Reining Futurity. A former recipient of the APHA Amateur Showman of the Year, Dick was also a nominee for the 2018 APHA Show Ring Accomplishments. Along with his wife, Lollie, Dick was being recognized as a 2018 leading breeder in the Arabian industry. In the late 1980s, Dick renewed a relationship with raising and showing championship Percheron draft horses — a tradition deeply rooted in the Ames family history. Today the Ames Percheron Farm is located adjacent to Cedar Ridge Farms. As symbols of strength, a strong work ethic and teamwork, the Ames Percherons have served as official ambassadors of Ames Construction since 1993, appearing at countless community events. The stately 4-, 6-, and 8-horse hitch teams deliver award-winning performances in competitions and exhibitions throughout the United States and Canada. Perhaps the only thing that overshadowed Dick’s big personality was his big heart. Dick and the company have given monetary support, countless hours of volunteer time, and pro bono construction work to worthwhile causes in the communities in which it works. In addition to “giving


Howard Schatzberg

back” through the company, Dick’s genuine desire to lend a helping hand led him to invest in local businesses, schools and churches, donating his time and attention to help his community thrive. He brought a world-class draft horse competition to the Scott County Fair in his hometown of Jordan, which rivals some of the best national competitions. He led the revival of the charm and nostalgia of the OK Corral restaurant, which was renamed the Jordan Supper Club. He joined others to bring a locally based business back from the brink of failure, saving countless jobs in the community. Thanks to the loyalty and dedication of its employees who were determined to make it succeed, that company is now a thriving business. Dick valued loyalty and was dedicated to his faith, family, friends — and football. Perhaps imagining himself as the coach he once aspired to be, he was one of the University of Minnesota’s biggest cheerleaders and faithful supporters of the Golden Gophers football team. Dick became the first Director’s Award recipient, presented by the University’s Athletics Department to honor a lifetime of support for Gopher Athletics. Dick was as comfortable in the boardroom as he was on his Green Isle crop farm, where he loved working the land, watching things grow, and maintaining a friendly rivalry with his brother, Butch, to see which of them would bring in the bigger crop each year. Dick stayed physically active until he was hospitalized in early January for a backache and remained sharp as a tack until the day before he passed away from pneumonia. “I’ve lived a fairytale life,” he observed just a few days before. “I’ve surrounded myself with remarkable people and lived a very full life. In fact, I can’t even believe this isn’t a dream.” For all of his accomplishments, Dick was known for simply being Dick — larger than life, well-meaning, fearless in saying what he believed, and supporting causes he cared about with a legendary reputation for his generosity. Dick had a quick smile, infectious laugh, and always extended a warm handshake to everyone he met. We celebrate Dick Ames — an unforgettable character who lived every day of his life to the fullest. Preceded in death by his parents, Chester and Ruby, and his son Bruce, Dick is survived by his wife, Lollie, brothers Butch, Tom, John and Ron, sisters Audrey, Peggy and Mary, sons Larry and Alan, daughters Marilyn and Lara, stepsons Dave and Richard Thomas, and stepdaughter Toni Walsh, 16 grandchildren and 29 great grandchildren. n

Half-arabian wins big The Half-Arabian Kisses By Candlelite, bred and owned by Susan Boyle, made waves outside of the Arabian industry when she was named the 2018 Horse of the Year in Amateur Western Dressage by the Pinto Horse Association of America. Along with her owner, the 2003 mare won two World Championships and one Reserve World Championship in Western Dressage at the 2018 Pinto World Championships in June in Tulsa, Okla. If that wasn’t enough, the mare won five additional World Championships in Western Pleasure with Ann Judge. The bay tobiano is by the National Show Horse stallion QH Calypso Bay out of the purebred Arabian mare Premeers Legacy (by Premeer). n

Three percent Convenience Fee to be Added to AHA Credit Card Payments Effective June 1, 2019, a three percent convenience fee will be added by AHA to payments made by credit card. The convenience fee charge does not apply if the customer submits payment by cash, check or money order. The three percent convenience fee for credit card transactions was voted on and approved by the AHA Board of Directors on March 8, 2019, as part of the budget planning for Fiscal Year 2020. A steady growth in credit card processing fees has occurred over the past 10 years and has elevated to a point of significant impact on AHA’s budget in an amount exceeding $250,000 per year. The three percent convenience fee will cover the cost of rising credit card fees that is applied by the vendor who processes credit card payments for AHA. A three percent convenience fee will not be applied to payments made by cash, check or money order for AHA business transactions.

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Virginia Breeder David Bandy Wins Big at 2018 Canadian Nationals EARLY ON, DAVID BANDY AND HIS WIFE CINDY ENJOYED RIDING and competing saddleseat horses, but Cindy always wanted “a little grey Arabian.” While attending their first Arabian and Half-Arabian U.S. Nationals in Louisville in the 1970’s, the pair found themselves attracted to Crabbet and Polish-line horses, but even they did not anticipate how taken they would be with Arabian horses. “It was an amazing thing,” Bandy said. That “amazing thing” has led to a lifetime with Arabian and Half-Arabian horses. Together the couple own and operate Wiloma Plantation, a 130–acre breeding facility in Fincastle, Va. Not long after attending their first U.S. Nationals, Bandy became a member of the Arabian Horse Association and has been a member ever since. What has kept him in the Arabian business for so long? “It’s an addiction,” he replied chuckling. On a more serious note, he admitted that the Arabian itself has kept them in the business. “They are incredible horses,” he said. “There are some very athletic horses in the breed, and those are the ones we are attracted to. From a breeder’s perspective, we have to keep our gene pool open.” And while he admits to breeding on a limited basis (about six foals per year), he has had tremendous success with their program lately, and he expects it to get even better with the mares he has now. These horses he calls “Super Mares,” which are mostly Half-Arabians, with the other half being Hackneys, Dutch Harness Horses or Saddlebreds. These mares were specifically selected to breed to their current pride-and-joy, WP Corporate Image (Afires Heir x Play Girl MSC). With basically a lifetime involved in breeding Arabian horses, what has Bandy considered his greatest accomplishment as a breeder? He replied, “One of the first great successes we’ve had was WP Rosanna Orana, a 14.2h mare who was out of a $500

Hackney pony by a Crabbet stallion.” They took her to U.S. Nationals in Louisville in 2006, the last year it was held there, and she was named Reserve National Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse. “She was the crowd favorite,” he remembered. “They gave her a standing ovation.” It was very emotional for him and his family. It was the first time he started to be recognized at the shows, and he knew at that point his breeding program was on its way. Bandy acknowledged that WP Corporate Image winning the Arabian English Pleasure National Championship at Canadian Nationals in 2018 a close second. Because of budget constraints, he send the horse to Canada, but they stayed home and watched the live feed. “He was awesome in Canada,” he said. To add to that, Corporate Image’s entire first foal crop were all National Champion English Pleasure horses by the time they were five-years-old (including WP Fashionista, 2018 Canadian National Champion in English Pleasure Junior Horse, English Pleasure JOTR 18 & Under). “We love Arabian horses, and we think we are putting together some of the best horses. We may not win every time, but we’ll at least make them sweat. We have a future,” Bandy commented. It is a bright future indeed. n

TOP WP Corporate Image and David Bandy

LEFT WP Corporate Image

RIGHT WP Rosanna Orana

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Greener Pastures Celebrating the horses we love

Audacious PS The Grand Gentleman of Varian Arabians 4/9/94 – 2/14/19

SHEILA WAS NOT DISCRETIONARY IN THE LOVING RELATIONSHIPS she established with particular horses. They need not have been bred by her for her to love them. They need not have been showered with accolades for her to love them. They need not have been a certain “look” she cherished for her to love them. They only needed to speak to her soul, and then she pledged her care and devotion to them for the rest of their days. No holds barred. No condition attached. Besides a rare few in her life, the likes of Bay-Abi, Ronteza, and Huckleberry Bey, one horse stole her heart in a profound way, as he did nearly every other living being — horse or animal — who ever met him. Audacious PS and Sheila seemed to enter into this wordless, beautiful dance together every time they were in the same ring… Sheila standing in the middle, smiling from ear to ear as the ethereal and soulful white stallion played around her and with her. Audacious was easy to love. Beyond his unforgettable beauty — including those famous tipped-in ears, liquid eyes, and quintessential flagged tail — Audacious oozed with a gentle, otherworldly joy, anointing those around him with a special reminder that the world is just as it should be, that beauty can be seen everywhere around us, and that joy is ours for the taking. It is no wonder Sheila loved him so.

Did you know that when we started his Facebook page in 2014, he amassed a worldwide following of thousands of people in only a matter of months? The world saw this special soul and fell in love with him just as Sheila did. Sheila is nobody’s fool… she found Audacious at the ripe age of fifteen years and gave him the world stage he deserved. He thrived at Varian Arabians for the remainder of his days, just as Sheila had promised. Audacious was lovingly laid to rest on Valentine’s Day — of all days. The irony. On first glance, it seemed to add another layer of pain to a colossal heap of heartbreak. And yet, what did Audacious always communicate to us? Yes, the world is as it should be. Yes, there is beauty all around us. And, yes, joy is ours for the taking. Maybe — just maybe — it was his way of reminding us of these truths on the one day of the year that is dedicated to all that he stood for… Love. And from that place, it suddenly feels just as it should be. There will never be another Audacious PS, just as there will never be another Sheila Varian. But their legacies and their truths will live on in our hearts. And even though he didn’t display the royal “V” on his hip, Audacious will forever be intertwined with the most poignant values represented in the Power of the V. Rest in peace, dear Audacious. We are better because of you.

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Join now!

YOUTH Dates

TO REMEMBER May ~ Arabian Horse Month

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES! • C  heck out ArabianHorses.org/ahyascholarships for club and regional scholarship list. • S  cholarships available through the Arabian Horse Judging and Hippology Contests.

June 1 ~  AHYA Convention Eligibility Deadline

Arabian Horse Hippology Contest

Arabian Horse Judging Contest

Qualifier T-shirt Sponsorships Due (contact a youth board member to sponsor)

Full Team Contest at U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, OK October 24-26

U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, OK October 25-26

June 15 ~  AHYA Officer Candidate Applications Due July 19 ~  AHYA Board Meeting July 20 ~  AHYA Convention July 21-27 ~  Youth Nationals Oklahoma City, OK

Why come to the AHYA Convention? • G  et your Youth National Qualifier T-shirt • M  eet those leading AHYA and vote for new leadership • L  earn about what is happening with AHYA • Meet new friends

Connect at arabianhorses.org/youth/ 14

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• Gain leadership skills


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from the veterinarian n

Breeding the Show Horse

Equine Athlete Veterinary Services SUCCESS IN THE SHOW RING BRINGS GREATER VALUE TO your horse and its lineage, both past and future. Outstanding stallions and mares are sought after to help create and support the future of our industry. Incentivized competitions requiring qualifying bloodlines are a thriving component of nearly every discipline. Breeding and showing can be combined to achieve the best of both worlds. One of the most important factors to consider when breeding the show horse is communicating your plan with your veterinarian. The earliest pieces of information the owner will want to gather is her show schedule and any previous breeding records. Previous trial-and-error information can save valuable time in the current season to help make it more efficient. For example, knowing a mare usually ovulates at a specific size follicle, has a tendency to develop uterine fluid, has uterine cysts, or has failed to carry her foal to term previously are just some examples that could impact your veterinarian’s decisions throughout the process. In place of, or in addition to, a thorough history, a breeding soundness exam can provide valuable insight. This generally includes evaluation of external reproductive anatomy, a reproductive ultrasound, and laboratory tests. Diagnostics to evaluate the health of the mare’s uterus can help direct treatments to maximize success and maintain realistic expectations. This is particularly important for mares that historically have been difficult to breed. Though many people in our industry save breeding for after the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show in February, it is actually best to start the breeding plan and dialog with your veterinarian in November or December of the prior year. The mare’s natural cycle is irregular until late March. To shorten this transitional period, ensure that your mare remains under lights to prematurely and artificially increase the length of her days. This will signal her body to behave like she has reached her natural breeding season sooner, helping her have healthier and more predictable cycles earlier in the year. If that is difficult in your setting, consider purchasing an Equilume mask through your veterinarian to increase light exposure directly. Some mares receive Regu-Mate to suppress their heat cycles while showing, due to pain experienced during ovulation. This medication must be discontinued for several days prior to beginning breeding.

Healthy and normal uterine edema immediately prior to breeding.

A 38cm x 35cm follicle on the right ovary on a mare that has been under lights since November.

Brought to you by:

An Equilume mask helps increase light exposure directly.

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Vaccinations are considered safe during pregnancy, but caution should be exercised during the first 60 days. Starting at 90 days, the mare will need to begin a specific vaccine protocol to protect her future foal. If your show mare will not be carrying her foal, there are additional considerations for embryo transfer. Most embryo transfer facilities prefer to be notified of the plan to breed a mare and ship the resultant embryo well in advance for a variety of reasons. Planning months ahead of time for the use of the embryo transfer facility is vital to ensure the availability of a recipient mare. Another consideration for both the embryo donating and carrying mares are their planes of nutrition and weight. Overall body condition can affect pregnancy rates, with excessively skinny or excessively fat mares having more difficulty establishing a viable pregnancy. In addition, our Arabians and Half-Arabians are predisposed to metabolic disorders, including Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Pars Pituitary Intermedia Dysfunction. Consult with your veterinarian to see if weight management or addressing an underlying disease may be beneficial for your mare. While much consideration is given to the mare, the stallion should not be forgotten. Actively breeding and showing stallions have a tendency to put more stress on the joints and soft tissue structures of their hind limbs when collecting. Your veterinarian may want to conduct serial lameness exams and supportive joint therapies during breeding season to help maintain consistency in the show ring and the breeding shed. Older stallions, stallions with sub-optimal semen quality, or issues affecting their sperm have a slew of options available to them from supplements, to centrifugation of the semen prior to shipping, to highly specialized processing of semen. Regardless of the stallion’s breeding history, it is best to have a veterinarian perform a breeding soundness exam that includes evaluation of the semen. Optimal semen processing practices vary from stallion to stallion and finding what works best for a specific stallion can help improve pregnancy rates. Ideally, training and breeding should be kept separate. Where possible, the trainer should not be the person handling the stallion during collection. The trainer’s expectations for behavior should reflect how the stallion should behave at the show. It can be confusing, and even cause shyness when attempting to collect a stallion, when his routine trainer handles him in the breeding shed. It is even advisable to have a separate halter and stud chain so there is further differentiation from routine work and breeding. These efforts are important to help reduce stud-like behavior in common areas such as wash racks, warm-up pens, and line-up in a class. We wish you the best this breeding and showing season! ~ Jessica Bush, DVM, MBA

Associate, Equine Athlete Veterinary Services


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HYPP & HERDA Understanding the Potential Welfare Impact on ArabianQuarter Horse Crosses

By Dr. Debra Powell, Ph.D., P.A.S. 18

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I

t is foaling season! And with the birth of a foal, the hopes, dreams, and aspirations of the breeder and future owner are that this foal will develop and perform to his utmost genetic potential. Many genetic disorders occur as a result of random mutations that become established within a breed, but in other cases, adverse welfare impacts have arisen as a consequence of the features or characteristics that are being selected. Much of today’s scientific advancements are based on genetic technology. This means that scientists are looking at ways to prevent devastating or career-ending disorders through informed breeding; identifying horses-at-risk; and gaining knowledge on conditions that contribute to the disorder and its severity. There are well over 20 conditions in horses that are either confirmed genetic disorders or may have a genetic contribution towards the disorder. This article will discuss two specific genetic disorders, Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) and Hereditary Equine Regional Asthenia (HERDA) and how these are related to the Arabian horse. So what constitutes a genetic disorder? Genes are the building blocks of heredity. They are passed from parent (stallion and mare) to offspring (foal). All of the physical characteristics a horse expresses are controlled by his/her unique combination of genes — groupings of DNA sequence that code for a specific combination of amino acids, which form unique functional proteins. Proteins do most of the work in cells. They move molecules from one place to another, build structures, break down toxins and do many other maintenance jobs. Many DNA variations in sequences are normal; they just give us different horse colors, sizes, temperaments, reproductive traits, etc. Sometimes there is a mutation, a change in a gene or genes, that cause problems. The horse can inherit a gene mutation from one or both parents. There are three types of genetic disorders, (1) singlegene disorders, mutation of a single gene; (2) chromosomal disorders, where chromosomes or parts of chromosomes are missing or changed; and (3) complex disorders, where mutations occur in two or more genes. All of the equine genetic disorders, fully characterized to date, fall into the single-gene disorder category. You cannot currently cure a genetic disease. However, you can treat the clinical signs, identify the disease via DNA testing, and avoid spreading the disease by removing affected individuals from breeding programs. Therefore, much of the equine genetic research is focused on identifying gene mutations that cause particular diseases and developing tests for them. Other research is focused on ways to improve treatment and management of affected horses so that they may live more comfortable lives. The first genetic disorder that will be discussed was first recognized in the 1980s‌Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis or HYPP. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) is a skeletal muscular disorder resulting in sudden episodes of uncontrollable muscle twitching, paralysis and sometimes


This paint horse is heterozygous for the Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) gene, though has never shown any symptoms.

collapse or death. The cause of death is usually respiratory failure or cardiac arrest. Within the skeletal muscle of affected horses, there is a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. To understand what occurs with a horse that has HYPP, let’s first explain how these sodium channels normally operate within skeletal muscle. We know that most cells are electrically active tissues meaning that there are voltage changes happening over time. Both sodium and potassium (these are considered ions that carry a positive charge) are critical for nerve function, and nerves tell muscle cells to contract. Basically, all cell membranes maintain a voltage difference (a polarization) between the outside and inside of the cell. This is termed the membrane potential, with the typical voltage across the resting cell membrane being -70 mV (negative 70 millivolts). This means that the inside of the cell has a negative voltage relative to the outside of the cell. This membrane potential is maintained as long as nothing disturbs the cell, meaning the membrane has the potential to change if the correct stimulus is applied. This membrane potential controls the state of the ion channels, of which sodium is one, but the ion channels also control the membrane potential. So what will cause the potential change? When the muscle is at rest, sodium is at a higher concentration outside of the muscle cell compared to inside, and potassium is at a higher concentration inside of the muscle cell compared to outside. Sodium channels are controlled openings, or pores, found within the muscle cell membrane, and they initiate the control the contraction of the muscle fibers. These openings are voltage-gated, meaning that they are controlled by a change in the electrical membrane potential along the membrane when activated. Upon activation, the

channel opens and allows sodium to enter into the muscle fiber thus increasing the concentration of positively charged ions. These changes cause the membrane to depolarizize (has changed the polarity of the membrane from being negative inside and positive outside to being positive inside and negative outside) and with other ion changes, the muscle contracts. The sodium channel inactivates, or closes, at the peak of the voltage change (action potential), and the potassium channel opens, allowing potassium ions to flow out of the cell. The continued flow of potassium out of the cell will decrease the membrane potential, and the membrane will eventually repolarize back to its resting state. The sodium channel in horses with HYPP does not completely close or inactivate, and the channel is said to be ‘leaky.’ Therefore, the muscle never really comes to a resting membrane potential (resting voltage point), thus making the muscle overly excitable and contracts involuntarily (sustained depolarization of the muscle membrane). The term hyperkalemic means an excessive amount of potassium in the blood. Increased amounts of blood potassium, in concert with the leaky sodium channel will cause the continuous stimulation of the skeletal muscle fibers and thus manifest itself as a transient or periodic weakness or paralysis, hence the name hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. It is agreed that the original genetic defect causing HYPP was a natural mutation that occurred as part of the evolutionary process. The mutation causing HYPP became widespread when breeders noticed that horses possessing this genetic mutation developed heavy musculature. HYPP has been traced back to one American Quarter Horse named Impressive and to date, confirmed cases of HYPP have been limited to descendants of this horse.

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HYPP is an autosomal dominant trait disorder. This is an important concept to understand because it means this disorder can occur in both males and females, and only one copy of the gene is required to produce disease. Therefore, both homozygous (have two identical alleles of a gene; HH) positive and heterozygous (have two different alleles of a gene; NH) horses will be affected. Only homozygous negative (NN) horses are not affected by HYPP. Because HYPP is a dominant genetic disorder, any other horse can potentially pick up the disorder when intermixing occurs. This trait is inherited from generation to generation with equal frequency, which means it does not skip generations nor does it get diluted. The current genetic test is considered 100 percent accurate for the mutation that causes HYPP. Although muscle weakness is the common characteristic of HYPP, clinical signs among horses carrying the genetic mutation may range from asymptomatic to daily muscle twitches and weakness. Some horses show signs following stressful situations, anesthesia or heavy sedation. In most cases, clinical episodes begin with a brief period of tightness or tension in the muscles. This may be followed by sweating and muscle twitches. Attempts, on the horse’s part, to move may only escalate the muscle tremors. Heart rates and respiratory rates may be elevated and horses may appear anxious yet remain bright and alert. Horses undergoing severe attacks may progress to weakness with swaying, staggering, dog sitting or recumbency within a few minutes. So, can a Half-Arabian carry the HYPP gene? If it has ancestry from affected Quarter Horse linage, then it is certainly possible. Because the HYPP gene will never be diluted across generations, close inspection of your Quarter Horse lines is warranted. If you are in doubt, or have Quarter Horse linage that you

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A horse exhibiting hair loss symptoms of HERDA. The deep layers of the skin are weak and thin, thus separating and tearing easily.

You cannot currently cure a genetic disease. However, you can treat the clinical signs, identify the disease via DNA testing, and avoid spreading the disease by removing affected individuals from breeding programs. Therefore, much of the equine genetic research is focused on identifying gene mutations that cause particular diseases and developing tests for them. n

do not know, the cost for submitting a mane or tail hair sample to a licensed laboratory for DNA testing to identify the specific genetic mutation is minimal compared to the potential chances of producing a foal with HYPP or purchasing a horse with the disorder. n n n The next genetic disorder is Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia or HERDA. This is a rare condition occurring in some Quarter Horse bloodlines and related crosses. Researchers at Mississippi State University and Cornell University believe that the origin of this disorder may be Poco Bueno’s sire line. In affected horses, the deep layers of the skin are weak and thin, thus separating and tearing easily. The signs are most prominent along the areas under the saddle. Wounds along these areas are slow to heal and often leave permanent scars. The genetic defect occurs in the collagen that holds the skin in place. Signs typically appear between one and one and a half years of age, and may be particularly noticeable if the horse is regularly ridden. The clinical signs can range for mild,


with loose, hyper-extensible skin, to severe with spontaneous skin sloughing and scarring. Affected horses may experience discomfort or pain when the skin is touched or manipulated. Sunburn is also an issue with affected horses. Recent research from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University has shown that due to the altered collagen in affected horses, their skin is more susceptible to enzymatic degradation when exposed to sunlight. Normal collagen allows tissue to be stretched, but resists over-stretching and helps the tissue return to its normal shape. In affected horses, the skin is loose and does not return to its original position, leaving a tent-like appearance when pinched or pulled up. The collagen abnormalities are not limited to the skin. They are also properties of the eyes, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. Corneal abnormalities are common in horses affected with HERDA showing signs of increased corneal thickness, increased tearing and the appearance of corneal ulcers. HERDA is autosomal recessive trait disorder. This means that the condition can affect both males and females and that horses require two copies of the genetic mutation responsible for the condition (homozygous positive, Hrd/ Hrd). This means that both the sire and dam must possess at least one copy of the mutated gene in order to pass it to the foal. Horses that carry only one copy of the defective gene (heterozygous, Hrd/N) are unaffected but may produce offspring that are affected or carriers. Because carriers of the gene are not affected by HERDA, it is likely that the practice of breeding a carrier to a non-carrier will continue, allowing the gene to remain in the breeding pool. What does this mean for the Half-Arabian? Because HERDA is thought to be an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, breeding an affected horse will transmit the disease to the next generation. So when an unaffected parent of an affected horse is bred, there is a 50 percent chance of passing on the defective gene associated with HERDA to the offspring. Breeding two unaffected horses (carriers) that have produced an affected offspring in the past will result in a 25 percent chance of another affected foal. When breeding your Arabian to a Quarter Horse that may be a carrier, your Half-Arabian foal has a 50 percent chance of being a carrier. The ultimate goal is to control, treat, and if possible, eliminate genetic disorders in the horse. Testing for and identifying which horse could potentially be affected by genetic conditions is important not only for buyers and breeders but also for the overall health and welfare of the horse itself. Dr. Debra Powell PhD, PAS, CESMT, CCMT, CAC, CAA is the Associate Professor of Equine Studies at Saint Mary-of-theWoods College in Indiana and owner/operator of Powell’s Equine and Canine Therapeutic Services (PECTS) that specializes in non-invasive therapies and nutritional consulting.

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Foal Starter from Buckeye Nutrition An easily digestible milk-based pellet scientifically formulated to meet the intense nutritional demands of the young foal during transition from nursing to solid food. This creep feed is designed to be fed free-choice. It is easily digested, milkbased, mineral dense and contains probiotics to support a healthy gut. Foal Starter also aids in compensating for the natural decrease in production and quality of milk during lactation and has elevated vitamins E, C and selenium levels to help optimize the foal’s natural immune defenses. Contact your local BUCKEYE Nutrition dealer or on-line retailer for availability and pricing: www.buckeyenutrition.com/tools/find-a-dealer.aspx

iSperm from Breeder’s Choice Semen Analysis on the go! In a matter of seconds, iSperm accurately evaluates concentration, motility and progressive motility of stallion semen. iSperm makes it even easier to use by recording its findings and a video of the sperm swimming. iSperm will completely change your work flow and help you save time and money. www.breederschoiceonline.com

Equi$hop

Breeding Edition

Foalert The foalert system by foalert, inc. is a unique and reliable obstetrical device that has been used by veterinarians, universities and breeders for over 30 years. The system was developed by equine veterinarians seeking a safe and accurate method of monitoring mares at parturition. A small transmitter is sutured across the mare’s vulva prior to parturition. When activated by separation of the vulva, the transmitter sends a silent signal to the receiver, which sounds an audible alarm. The security auto dialer simultaneously notifies the attendant(s) via telephone. Do you have a great product that deserves some recognition? Get it featured here! Contact Advertising@ArabianHorses.org 22

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The foalert system helps ensure an attended birth, which is often imperative for the health and well-being of both mare and foal. The cost of the system ranges from, $1175.00 to $2450.00, depending on the range and type of dialer. www.foalert.com or 1.800.237.8861


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ARABIAN

BREEDERS’ SWEEPSTAKES

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f you’ve been in the Arabian horse industry for any length of time, chances are you’ve heard of the incentive program, Breeders Sweepstakes. It has been rewarding excellent breeding for over 30 years. It adds excitement to the show ring by paying prize money to Regional and National events and delivering substantial Breeder Incentives.

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Objectives of the Breeders Sweepstakes program are: • To boost the level of participation in the program as well as to create an incentive to increase breeding and showing participation; • To increase the value and stimulate the marketability of Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses for all levels of competition; • To expand interest and participation from those who compete at the Regional level to those striving to breed a National Champion; • To reward breeders, who are at the core of our industry; • To ensure funds for future payouts and long-term viability. Do you want to participate? The only way to receive the Sweepstakes stamp of approval on your horse’s registration papers is by nominating your foal(s) in-utero. As the Breeder/Nominator, you are the individual(s) who enrolls the foal in the Sweepstakes program as a Breeding Entry. This person will receive 10 percent of all allocated prize money earned by that entry at National and Regional Events provided all Sweepstakes requirements are met. Breeder/Nominator payback is for the lifetime of the horse, and the Breeder/Nominator does not have to be the recorded owner of the mare. Current AHA membership is required in order to receive prize money. But guess what? Even if you don’t have a Breeding Entry horse, you can still participate in the program. There is a Last Chance Buy-In for any horses not entered into the Sweepstakes Program. This Original Entry category is open to any horse which is registered with the Arabian Horse Association or the Canadian Registries. Your horse does not have to be by a Sweepstakes Nominated Sire or out of a Sweepstakes Nominated Dam to enroll, which started January 1, 2019 and runs through October 15, 2019. This is your last chance to buy in to the Sweepstakes Program for those not previously enrolled. Original Entries can show in Regional and National Sweepstakes designated classes. This includes the ABS Dressage Prospect Incentive and ABS Green Working Hunter Derby at Sport Horse Nationals and the Sweepstakes AAO Jackpot classes at U.S. Nationals. The Regional and National Yearling Sweepstakes halter classes are restricted to Breeding Entries only. Visit the AHA website for additional information regarding the Last Chance Buy-In for Sweepstakes. If you purchase a Sweepstakes-nominated horse, as long as it remains in the United States, AHA will automatically transfer all AHA programs when the recorded owner(s) of the horse is transferred. Horses that are imported to Canada from the U.S. or are transferred within the Canadian

Register will need to transfer the Sweepstakes Program in order to receive Sweepstakes Prize Money. To transfer the Sweepstakes Program, submit a copy of the Certificate of Registration listing the current recorded owner(s) along with a $40 (U.S. funds) Program Transfer Fee. AHA will then transfer the program and issue a Sweepstakes Certificate to the new owner(s). An important reminder for breeders is that every fourth Breeding Entry enrolled in the same year by the same owner may be enrolled at one half price. This discount applies to each submission of at least four entries submitted at the same time. Designated Sweepstakes Classes were selected from a standardized class list that makes it easy to identify and verify prize money payouts. Classes were selected to encourage breeders to nominate foals in-utero. At the past year’s annual convention, a historical meeting took place in which the Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes Commission met with the U.S. Show Commission and worked out a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will be in effect for 10 years. This MOU was crafted to provide further relevance to the Sweepstakes Program via the classes and prize money offered and in addition, provide availability of a second Amateur class by opening up the Original Entry category through the Last Chance Buy-In. In addition, here are some big changes to Classes for 2019 and moving forward. They are: • Prize money payout for the Arabian Yearling Sweepstakes Class at U.S. Nationals has increased to $25,000 per class. Champion - $5,000 Reserve Champion - $3,200 Top Ten - $2,100

• Four new AAO Jackpot Classes have been added to U.S. Nationals: Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Jackpot HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR Jackpot Arabian Reining AAOTR Jackpot HA/A Reining AAOTR Jackpot • The Two-Year-Old Arabian and HA/AA Open In-Hand Classes at U.S. Nationals will be paid through 2019. In 2020, these classes will be discontinued as Sweepstakes designated classes. • The HA/AA Yearling Sweepstakes Open In-Hand Classes at U.S. Nationals will be paid through 2020. In 2021, they will be discontinued as a Sweepstakes designated classes.

For more information on the Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes Program, visit ArabianHorses.org or contact AHA Competition Services at 303.696.4500 #4 for any questions.

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Photos Courtesy of Tim Farley

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uck, disasters, people who became household names and one of the most famous horse novels on the planet came together when “The Black Stallion” film debuted in theaters 40 years ago. For all the dramatic, heart-warming scenes of Walter Farley’s 1941 novel, this masterpiece of Hollywood magic clearly came about through a series of events that might double as fiction if published. From a typhoon in the Philippines, to the power and clout of a single person in reaching the silver screen, to the chance mention of a favorite childhood book from a girlfriend to a film producer, the story of the making the timeless film brings a backstage element hard to imagine by even horse-savvy viewers. In a rare interview at his hilltop home in Northern California amongst a vineyard surrounded by 35,000 Bordeaux-blend grapes, director Carroll Ballard shared still vivid memories of the trials and tribulations of a movie that became as much of a journey to bring to the world as the story it told. Starring a two-time

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More Than Hollywood Magic Made

The Black Stallion


American Horse Show Association Horse of the Year, a 1969 Arabian stallion named Cass Ole+ (Al-Marah Casanova++ x LaBahia++), the movie also included a host of doubles, including the black Arabian stallion Fae-Jur (Fadjur x La Fana) and grey geldings from the Carmague in France, dyed black for the role. Ballard began with surprising words. “To me it was always kind of a mystery how the film became successful. When I was making it, I felt it was completely out of control, and I wasn’t going to be able to fix it. But there was enough continuum that kept everything in balance while it was underway.” Ballard confesses, “I didn’t like the book when it was first presented to me. I thought, ‘Oh, come on, what is this?’ I wanted to make War and Peace! I wondered for a long time how is it that this book became such a big hit because I was dwelling on the old trainer and the kid talking. Stuff I thought was totally predictable.” Ballard continued, “But there is this ‘thing,’ and I really didn’t see it for a long time. There is a mythic element in the book. It is every child’s

As timeless today as then. While American movie posters depicted an iconic Black Stallion illustration (left), billboards all over Paris featured a sunset shot of Kelly Reno and Cass Ole when the film was released in France.

desire to have a powerful friend who can do things and who will make him powerful, too. That’s what’s in this film, and it’s mythic and in the form of a black horse. That’s the element. “By dwelling on that concept of the myth, Debbie Fine, who worked for Frances (Ford Coppala) found the story of Alexander the Great and Bucephalus, which isn’t in the book.

In the Beginning How did this movie come to Ballard in the first place? “I went to school with Frances Ford Coppola, and I’d done a few other jobs for him,” he remembered. “Frances called me one night. It’s two in the morning, and it’s Frances calling me from Sicily where he’s filming ‘Godfather 2.’ He thought he would give me a try to make this movie. It took us a long time. We tried to write the script for years. First we tried to combine the two books (‘The Black Stallion’ and ‘The Black Stallion Returns’), but it turned out to be too big of a story so we narrowed it down to one book.

Walter Farley with his mare Al-Marah Athena, whose namesake appears in the author’s 1965 novel “The Horse That Swam Away.”

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RIGHT Kelly Reno with director Carroll Ballard from the scene when Alec was dragged ashore by The Black.

BELOW Director of Photography Caleb Deschanel (left) and director Carroll Ballard (center) on the water with Kelly Reno, who learned how to swim for his role as Alec Ramsey.

Finally, I just threw up my hands. “I could never figure out how we were going to put the two parts of the story together; he (Alec Ramsey) and Henry (played by Mickey Rooney) the old trainer and his (Alec’s) time on the island with the horse. I think it was touch and go all the way through the movie whether we could pull the two halves of the story together.” “We agreed to try to work the thing out. I essentially agreed to make a movie, but it was three years later when we finally got the go ahead,” Ballard said. “I don’t know that we would have if it hadn’t been for this huge typhoon in the Philippines while 28

Frances was shooting ‘Apocalypse Now.’ It wiped out all their sets. It was a catastrophe. They had to cancel the whole production, and they all came back here. He didn’t have any money to finish the movie. A way out for him was to sell the script of ‘The Black Stallion’ to United Artists. So, he made a deal. Frances was a pretty powerful guy in the movie business. Nobody around had the clout that he did. So, he was the mover to move the project. Walter (Murch) and I tried desperately to pull the script together, but nobody liked it. Then, there were other writers who were brought in

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ABOVE A massive pane of glass, invisible to the camera, kept Kelly Reno safe for the scene with Alec and the snake.

RIGHT “The training was good, but both horses were really good. Kelly figured out how to play with them. They hung out,” recalls director Carroll Ballard.


Mickey Rooney (center) going over the script with director Carroll Ballard (right) on set in Canada.

including Bill Whittliff from Texas. We were dead in the water when Frances made the deal with United Artists. He had so much power in the business. It would never have seen the light of day without him. “United Artists green-lighted the movie. There we were with a script nobody was too interested in, and I did not know what this movie was going to be about. I had a few little ideas, and then we’re out there — 150 people and horses and stuff. What do we do now?” recalled Ballard. In the end, they shot an eight hour movie. “That’s why it took us a year and a half to edit it,” he said. “There was so much stuff, and we tried to somehow make sense of it.”

Walter Farley on Set One of the most important people involved in the film was the original author, Walter Farley. About him, Ballard remarked, “He truly was a horse lover. He really was into horses, although he and I were not entirely on the same page. Fae-Jur was not his idea of what the Black Stallion should be. He was small and very feisty, but he was a fantastic mover, and I felt that was the magic horse. You could believe he was a spirit of some kind. Cass was a gorgeous horse and was big. He was very magisterial.” “Both horses were really good,” he continued. “Kelly figured out how to play with them, and that’s what we filmed.”

Behind the Scenes There are some wonderful, now famous scenes from the movie that had fascinating stories behind them. “To me, the hardest, most crucial scene in the whole movie was the scene with Alex’s mom where he tells her about the shipwreck and so forth. Kelly (actor Kelly Reno who was 11 at the time and had no prior acting experience) understood that was an important scene, and he had to express all the things to Teri (actress Teri Garr who played Alex’s mother). He pulled it off. He made it believable.” Another infamous scene was

where Alex and The Black galloped along the beach. “We just wanted a shot of him riding the horse along the beach. It was Cass Ole,” explained Ballard about a pick-up shot filmed at Cannon Beach, Ore. “It was long after we did most the filming. We were just doing pickup shots. I was really worried about the hardness of the sand. I was so worried Kelly might fall. (Ballard shifted into a good rendition of horse trainer Corky Randall’s voice.) ‘Carroll, that little horse can’t outrun a flea.’ So we decided to do the run. We’re shooting along. It was going great, and all the sudden Cass took off. That horse took off down the beach and disappeared into the fog. It was terrifying. All Kelly had was that little wire bridle. It ended up being the footage we used.” “Corky picked up that this wasn’t going to be the kind of movie where the horse is going to walk in here and do this and that. That’s how a lot of movies are shot. This wasn’t (done) that way. Often times, Caleb (Deschanel, cinematographer) and I would just see something and say, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if that happened?’ and we would do it right there on the spot. Corky picked up on that, and he was ready whenever some crazy idea would happen. He could improvise,”

noted Ballard, citing a signature scene in the movie. It was the seaweed scene and dance of getting to know one another that Alec and The Black display. “There’s a scene where Kelly’s going to give him the little piece of seaweed, and they kind of walk back and forth. Nobody said anything about that. We were just shooting on the beach and said, ‘Maybe we’d do something here with Kelly and the leaf and a close-up. Maybe we can get him going back and forth. Corky picked up on it and said, ‘OK, Carroll, where’s the frame line?’ “Corky’s there right out of frame when the horse is backing up and rearing and coming forward. The whole thing was done in one shot, and Corky did it all.” One pick-up scene was where The Black comes to the boy’s rescue and stomps the cobra about to strike Alec. Ballard mentions the reallife scenario that vies with the fictional tale. “We’re back in Sardinia, and we have to do some pick-ups with the snake scene because of the problems we had with the snake. We’d made a deal with a movie snake guy to supply the snakes. They promised me the snakes (real cobras) had been defanged.

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Nature staged a dramatic backdrop for Cass Ole and Kelly Reno with the sudden approach of a storm and rainbow on Costa Smeralda in Sardinia.

The day we were going to shoot, these two guys showed up in a little car, and in the back seat they had these two big baskets. They wanted to show me the snakes. I said, ‘OK’ and out of the basket came this snake. It was the scariest thing you’ve ever seen. I said, ‘Gee, that’s really scary. I’m glad they’re defanged.’ Well, the guy said, ‘They’re not defanged! We don’t do it that way. The way we do it is this,’ and he reached over and had this little refrigerator with a hypodermic needle. He said, ‘If the boy gets bitten by the cobra, we just inject him with this.’” Ballard knew there had to be a safer solution and recounted what followed as if it were yesterday. “A couple hours later, two grips come walking down the beach carrying this gigantic pane of glass. They put the glass on the sand and strapped it up. The cobra is on one side of the glass and the boy (Kelly Reno) is on the other. We filmed some, but we weren’t able to get enough angles on the snakes.” Three months later, when Ballard returned to Sardinia to finish the 30

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Kelly Reno aboard Cass Ole at Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto, Canada, where the scene of Alec riding The Black in a rainstorm was shot.

Corky Randall made his name as a Hollywood horse trainer on “The Black Stallion,” (his dad, Glenn Randall, trained Roy Rogers’ horses). Pictured here in a sunset training session on the set in Sardinia.

scene, the weather at the beach had changed. “The wind is blowing like crazy. It’s so cold that the snakes can hardly move,” Ballard recalled. “So, how are we going to shoot this scene? We’ve got to warm up the snakes. OK, how are we going to do that?” Ballard recounts the impromptu solution. “We’ve got to warm up the snakes. Let’s dig a hole in the sand and put some heaters down there so they heat up the sand, and we’ll put boards on top and put sand on that. Meanwhile, the wind is blowing like crazy, the sheet of glass is moving around, and the sand keeps blowing against the glass and it’s sticking. What we were trying to do was get a shot of the snake being scary, and we had this huge contraption and all the heaters going and the snake trying to warm up. This whole deal for trying to get one ridiculous shot of the snake. We finally got a few shots.”

The Finished Product Incredibly, when the film was edited and completed, Ballard worried


FAR LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM The Black’s big race against two champions was shot at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. Unlike today’s film options, getting race footage then was difficult! No drones for these logistics.

LEFT Behind the scenes with the crew on set in Sardinia.

BELOW Legendary Hollywood horse trainer Corky Randall (right) with wrangler Gene Walker.

“The Black Stallion” took home the Special Achievement Award. At the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards. It won Best Cinematography for Caleb Deschanel, Best Music for Carmine Coppola (Frances Ford Coppola’s father) and the New Generation Award for director Carroll Ballard. Now 40 years old, it is still a beautiful film that captures the hearts of horse lovers everywhere.

LEFT Author Walter Farley (left) and director Carroll Ballard in Sardinia brainstorming about a scene where Kelly Reno conveyed Alec’s emotions and loneliness with no words, through visuals from the boy’s perspective, as he seems to see faces in the rocks.

it was a failure. “The studio guys that came to see it thought it was not releasable. They said, ‘What is this? Some kind of art movie for kids?’” United Artists shelved it. It took the full clout of Francis Ford Coppola to see that the film finally reached theaters. Despite the studio’s impressions, the movie did, in fact, become a time-

An author, journalist and media consultant based in Southern California, Elizabeth Kaye McCall worked as the horse industry liaison for Cavalia on its inaugural North American tour. A contributor to diverse equine and mainstream outlets, she authored “The Tao of Horses: Exploring How Horses Guide Us on Our Spiritual Path” and the young adult tale “RAJALIKA SPEAK.”

less hit. Why? According to Ballard the reason was that “it hit a common chord that a lot of people were feeling at that point.” Named the best film of the year by the late Roger Ebert, the movie quickly became a box-office hit and earned two Oscar® nominations, including one for Mickey Rooney. At the 1980 Academy Awards,

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STALLION DIRECTORY

marketplace

Attention Advertisers:

This advertising section offers you the opportunity to showcase your horses, products and services at an affordable price. For more information about advertising rates and deadlines, please call Arabian Horse Life Magazine at (303) 696-4584 or email Advertising@ArabianHorses.org.

Stallion Directory: This section offers a premium collection of Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian stallions to be found anywhere, plus a select group of Quarter Horse, Paint, Saddlebred, National Show Horse and Thoroughbred stallions. If you’re looking for a stallion to improve your breeding program, this is the place to start.

Horse for Sale: Looking for a good Arabian or Half-Arabian mare, gelding or stallion to buy? Then look at our varied selection of Halter, Performance, endurance and race-bred horses in this section.

Business Classifieds: Got a product or service you need to promote? Look no further than the Arabian Horse Life Business Classifieds. Each full color ad goes to more than 32,000 AHA members and subscribers.

Alkeynos EA

Ibn Raad

(ABHA QATAR X MAISA EL DAKAR) 2012 BAY STALLION

(SCAPA X LPS THUNDERSTRUCK) 2011 BAY STALLION

(MARWAN AL SHAQAB X LA VIDA LLOCA BY CONCENSUS++++//) 2008 ARABIAN STALLION

Alkeynos EA has one of the most exceptional pedigrees for breeding stallions on the market today. His sire ABHA Qatar is one of the most correct Arabian stallions ever bred and carries the genotype to support his phenotype. Alkeynos EA was crowned the 2017 Scottsdale International Champion Stallion 4-5 years old, Top Ten Las Vegas World Cup Champion and will soon take the Western Pleasure arena by storm.

Sapphire Arabians is proud to welcome the exotic Ibn Raad, 2011 Straight Egyptian Stallion to be our senior sire. Ibn Raad has tremendous presence, impressive size and movement, and extreme type. He is siring exotic foals that carry on his style and charisma. His 2016 filly Iraadessa owned by Nancy Janocik, won the 2017 EBC yearling filly championship, following in her illustrious father’s footsteps from his 2016 Egyptian Event Gold Champion Stallion win. 2019 Stud Fee: $2,000 Standing at: Sapphire Arabians LLC, Griffin, GA Contact: Denise Shannon ldshannon@live.com, Tara Carpio taracarpio@gmail.com or Michelle Pinell debeers.prince@gmail.com Owned by: Michelle Pinell Phone: (912) 856-7619 Website: www.sapphirearabians.com CA

2016 Canadian National Champion, Canadian National Champion Futurity Colt, U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Colt and 2016 APAHA Halter Horse of the Year. Majestico is the people’s choice by popular vote. He is passing his type, quality and balance on to his foals, giving them the potential to excel in both halter and performance disciplines. His oldest are four and now in training for the show ring. You don’t have to choose between a halter or performance sire for your mare, Majestico could give you a foal that excels in both. Nominations: Sweepstakes / Minnesota Medallion Stallion 2019 Stud Fee: Private Treaty Standing at: Gordon Training Center Contact/Owned by: Nancy Cowette Seward Phone: (763) 477-5310 Email: csanancycowette@aol.com CA Website: www.majesticostallion.com

2019 Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $1,000 Half Standing at: Culbreth Equine Training & Management Contact: Chris Culbreth Owned by: Esperanza Arabians Phone: (480) 231-5832 Email: cculbreth@aol.com Website: EsperanzaArabians.com

CA CA

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arabian horse

life

Issue 2. 2019

NEW!

Majestico

Scottsdale Signature Stallion

NEW!

Credit Cards Accepted

Sport Horse Payback


NEW!

Notorious BP

NEW!

Zadok HR

NEW!

(*DAKAR EL JAMAAL X CHANCE TO STAR) 2001 BAY STALLION

(MAGIC MAGNIFIQUE X TREVS ONYX) 2016 BLACK STALLION - HOMOZYGOUS BLACK

(ROL INTENCYTY X AMAZING GRACE C) 2014 BAY STALLION

His undeniable beauty and majestic presence earned Maaximus plenty of show ring accolades including two U.S. Top Ten Stallion awards, Regional Championships, and a Scottsdale win. With a pedigree that is equally powerful and genetically prepotent on both his sire and dam side, Maaximus is now proving himself in the breeding arena siring correct, athletic and beautiful foals. By the late, great Brazilian import and National Champion *Ali Jamaal son, *Dakar El Jamaal and out of Chance To Star by CWP Chances Are, this incredible stallion has taken his rightful place among the exemplary breeding stallions of today. Nominations: Arabian Breeders Sweepstake Nominated Scottsdale Signature Stallion Standing At: Hope Reigns Arabians LLC, Franktown, CO Contact: Laura Cronk Owned by: Kenneth Schuessler Phone: (760) 716-2265 CA Email: ldcronk@msn.com Website: www.hopereignsarabians.com

Notorious is the ONLY BLACK SON standing in the U.S., sired by International Multi-Champion, Magic Magnifique, [True Colours, Thee Desperado+] and out of a daughter by PFC Trevallon (Dubai), by Magnum Psyche. The impressive, exotic type that Notorious exhibits will capture your attention, along with his extreme movement, size and presence. We offer excellent fresh cooled semen and multiple mare discounts. He cannot sire any chestnut foals. His first foal crop arrives in 2019, including BLACK foals! This is one stallion to keep an eye on. Nominations: Sweepstakes 2019 Stud Fee: $1500/$100 Half Contact/Owned by: Rich and Karie Herberling Phone: (509) 675-1223 Email: kwinnop@hotmail.com Website: www.meadowstarr-ranch.com CA

Zadok HR is sired by mega producer, ROL Intencyty and out of the Marwan al Magnificoo daughter, Amazing Grace C. True to his heritage, Zadok has a long, upright, shapely neck, laid back shoulder, strong hip and loin and excellent tail carriage. His little ears, deep jowl and wide set eyes are characteristics that we look forward to seeing Zadok pass on. Halter wins include Regional Reserve Champion Stallion and Reserve Champion in his stallion class in Scottsdale 2018.

STALLION DIRECTORY

Maxximus

2019 Stud Fee: Private Treaty Standing at: Hope Reigns Arabians, Franktown, CO Contact: Laura Cronk Owned by: Kenneth Scheussler Email: ldcronk@msn.com Website: www.hopereignsarabians.com

CA

Issue 2. 2019

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Profile for Arabian Horse Association

Arabian Horse Life Magazine; mini issue 2 2019  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the last week of April. Distributed...

Arabian Horse Life Magazine; mini issue 2 2019  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the last week of April. Distributed...