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Issue 1 • 2019

The Official Magazine of the Arabian Horse Association


AHA Listings n

CONTENTS Issue #1. 2019

On the cover: Gary McDonald and Everest IA, owned by Jerry and Margaret Ford. Photographer: Lysa Roman, www.lysaromanstudio.com

WHOA Freeze Frame Hunter Pleasure is examined by Peri Tilghman.

Legs: Lower Limb, Hoof Conformation &

Horse Performance

Explaining how lower limb and hoof conformation may affect a horse’s performance.

By Debra Powell, PhD

GET INVOLVED Therapy Matters Some considerations for becoming a successful therapy horse.

By Hope Ellis-Ashburn 2018 Convention Highlights Listed are just a few of the resolutions passed at this year’s Convention.

IN EVERY ISSUE 8

President’s Letter

9

Corporate Partners & Sponsors

10

EVP’s Letter

33 Jibbah Jabber 38 AHYA 40 Praiseworthy 96 Stallion Directory 98 AHA Listings 103 Advertisers’ Index 104 FOCUS Life 4

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36 44 48 52 58 60 66 70 74 80 88 92

PARTNERSHIP Equine Athlete Veterinary Services This month’s column focuses on the herd approach to equine dentistry.

By Andy Walker, DVM

IMPACT The Magic & Allure of Scottsdale How the popularity of the Scottsdale show has influenced the development of Scottsdale the city.

By Linda Carroll 2018 AHA Recognition Awards Highlighting the accomplishments of the Open Competition winners, Ambassador award winner, Distance Horse of the Year and AERC High Point Horses.

2018 Equestrians of Honor Wendy Potts and Jody Strand were recently recognized by US Equestrian as outstanding in their respective disciplines.

88 74 HERITAGE Foresight & Fortitude:

The Life of Anne McCormick A profile on influential owner and breeder Anne McCormick.

By Tobi Lopez Taylor

THE NOW 2018 U.S. Nationals Highlights and a few insights from U.S. Nationals.

2018 Distance Nationals Results from the Distance Horse National Championships held in Clark State Forest, Indiana.

2018 USDF All-Breed Awards Recognizing the Arabians and Half/Anglo-Arabians that excelled in Dressage.


from the president n

Versatility Defined

DEAR MEMBERS: Welcome to 2019. As I write this letter, I sit here reflecting on 2018 and what comes to my mind is “versatility.” The Arabian Horse is known for its versatility, possibly more so than any other breed. We have horses that can be a friend and a companion and who would love to live in your home with you. Our Arabians and Half/Anglo-Arabians can show In-Hand as well as in performance disciplines including Western, English, Country English, Hunter, Working Western, Dressage, and Hunter/ Jumper. Arabian horses are for you if you like Endurance, Competitive Trail and Racing. Whew, and this is just to name a few of the disciplines in which our breed excels. The Arabian and Half/ Anglo-Arabian horse — the versatile horse and the horse that can be whatever you want it to be! This issue of Arabian Horse Life highlights a section of our membership that gives their heart and soul so we can have the horses we love — the breeders. Without these people, and their dedication to the late nights in the foaling barn, the challenges of determining what the best cross is for the next and future generations, the thrill when a cross is a great success and the absolute sadness when a beloved foal does not survive, we would not have our breed. They say that horse 6

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ownership is not for the faint of heart. Breeding horses is that to a multiple of 10. No matter what size the breeders are, their importance to the Arabian and its future cannot be stressed enough. So welcome to our special 2019 Stallion Showcase. And when you see someone who is breeding our beloved Arabians and Half/Anglo-Arabian horses, thank them for their dedication. As Glenn wrote in his EVP letter, the AHA Convention was a “hot” time. I cannot thank the first responders, our staff, the delegates, the Tulsa Hyatt and Tulsa Doubletree enough for coming through during a very challenging time. The resolutions and elections were dispatched in record time without compromising the discussions that are so important to the process. The 2018 AHA Convention will be one to remember, and it truly showed us that we can adapt to whatever is thrown our way. We know how to work together to get things done for the Arabian and Half/Anglo-Arabian Horse. As they say — Well Done Us! Happy 2019 to you all. Enjoy your horses!

Regards,

Nancy Harvey AHA President nancy.harvey@arabianhorses.org


Johanna Ulstrom Photo

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CORPORATE SPONSOR www.visittulsa.com The Original Designer of Fine Equestrian Jewelry

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AHA Corporate Partners and Sponsors support expanded opportunities for all who participate in Arabian horse activities. AHA would like to thank our 2019 Corporate Partners and Sponsors. By purchasing products and services provided by these companies you are supporting the horse you love—the Arabian!

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www.wrangler.com

www.bennettfinejewelry.com

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AFFINITY PARTNER

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The Arabian Horse Association offers several different levels of sponsorship including fulfillment at National events, in our membership magazine, Arabian Horse Life, on our website, and so much more. For information on how your company can take part in The Arabian Horse Association’s rewarding sponsorship programs, please contact the Arabian Horse Association 303.696.4500 • info@ArabianHorses.org ArabianHorses.org

WWW.ARABIANHORSES.ORG/AFFINITYPARTNERS


from the EVP n

A Convention to Remember

DEAR MEMBERS:

The 2018 AHA Convention is one we will all remember. I cannot begin to express my appreciation to the Tulsa Fire Department as well as all the delegates, guests, and staff for making our fire tragedy not be so tragic. I have to also express gratitude to the staff of both the Hyatt Regency Tulsa and the Downtown Doubletree Tulsa for making Convention wrap-up as smooth as possible. For those of you not present, at 3:30 p.m. Friday afternoon we were in General Session II when we began to smell something burning. Initially it was explained it was the escalator and not to worry. Minutes later it turned into a full-blown fire inside the escalator requiring evacuation of the entire 600 room hotel, the largest in Oklahoma. It could not have gone more smoothly. One wheelchair bound guest was carried down six flights of stairs by a bellman. The entire 15-floor hotel filled with smoke. My room was on the 15th floor, and when I was allowed back in three hours later to collect my clothes, it was full of smoke. The Hyatt Regency assisted in finding rooms around Tulsa for all of our over 300 delegates and guests and paid for all those replacement rooms. Many delegates and guests flew out early that evening; the Hyatt Regency picked up any airline change fees. The Hyatt Regency found me a room down the street at the Downtown Doubletree. As luck would have it as I was checking in, their General Manager was standing next to me so I inquired about a meeting room for about 300 people. Their ball room was available. That was about 8 p.m., and by the next morning at 8 a.m. it was totally set up for us with seating, head table, and AV setup with mics all around the room. General Session III began at 10 a.m. with 237 delegates checked in (quorum required 137). The convention ended at 1 p.m., and with an hour’s notice the hotel was able to feed lunch to 145 delegates prior to heading for the airport. “We landed on our feet well,” I have frequently stated. We were 8

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able to finish debating and voting on all resolutions and hold the officer election for Treasurer, where Dave Corning was elected. I would like to express my appreciation to Bob Nash for all the work he did as our previous Treasurer. The delegates discussed and debated resolutions, including allowing Amateurs to accept remuneration for instruction of individuals who have never participated as an exhibitor at a USEF/EC/AHA recognized competition. Many individuals stated that Amateurs should not receive payment of any kind based on their feelings about the “Amateur” definition. The proponent, along with the Amateur Committee members, lobbied their case and in the end received the majority vote to send this forward to USEF. However, this rule proposal was not approved by the USEF Board of Directors because every USEF committee reviewing it voted it down. The Competition Advisory Committee submitted a resolution to allow concurrent specialty classes to be held at Regionals, which would in effect give two regional championships the chance to combine resources and share expenses. Concern was brought up on the convention floor regarding the amount of Achievement Award points those horses and individuals could amass at one time. This was enough to refer it back to committee for further study. Two resolutions were passed as Extraordinary and implemented with a December 31st effective date. Our Code of Ethics now ensures that all Association representatives, including staff, licensed officials and volunteers, be treated with courtesy and respect, and no person shall direct abusive or threatening conduct toward them. AHA staff and volunteers can now file charges with EPRB when Rules of Conduct are violated. An adhoc Committee to study AHA getting out of USEF was authorized. It will complete a report and present recommendations at the August 2019 AHA Board Meeting. The study will touch on: • Licensing of show officials • Drug testing and enforcement • Rule Book development • Violations, penalties, and rules enforcement • Welfare of the horse issues • Amateur/Professional certification • Award’s Program • Any other aspects effected by AHA’s affiliation with USEF • AHA Bylaw changes necessitated

The AHA Board will then determine if action is warranted and required by the 2019 AHA Convention. Sincerely, Glenn T. Petty Executive Vice President glenn.petty@arabianhorses.org


jibbah jabber n

Greener Pastures Celebrating the horses we love

FIRST CYTE+ (Out Of Cyte x ROL Wild Flower) 3/22/95 – 11/21/18 ON NOVEMBER 21, 2018, MY BEAUTIFUL STALLION laid his head in my lap and quietly went to sleep. He was buried in the pasture he loved, taking a piece of my heart with him. First Cyte+ was a multi-National Champion stallion, winning Championships at Scottsdale, U.S. Nationals and Canadian Nationals. A force to be reckoned with in the show ring, in the barn he was a gentleman, whose soft nickers I was privileged to hear daily during the sixteen years he resided on this farm. No stallion had softer eyes, better legs or a sweeter soul. He was selectively bred, and as a result, 82 percent of his foals have been champions. He is the sire of National Champions in halter and under saddle at both U.S. National and Canadian National shows. Two of his National Champion winning daughters have already produced their own National Champions. “Calvin,” you will be sorely missed, but remembered in the sons and daughters and grandsons and granddaughters you left behind. n ~Donna Hentges, Elko, Minn.

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Remembering Bravado (Huckleberry Bey++ x Bachista V) 1/11/92 – 12/23/18 BRAVADO BEY V WAS THE GREY GENTLEMAN WITH THE BIG, liquid eyes and bold trot that stole hearts in every distinct chapter of his life. Bravado began his legacy as one of the top English Pleasure horses in the country, carrying the torch of his famous father, Huckleberry Bey V. From there, he went on to become a producer of champion show horses (including National Champions in both English Pleasure and Western Pleasure), along with a slew of influential broodmares; many of whom lived out their lives in the acclaimed broodmare pastures of Varian Arabians. In his later years, he was gelded to maintain a predictable quality of life, but it did not diminish his purpose in the least. His new environment? Varian Arabian’s famous Colt Hill. His new job? Babysitter. That’s right. Bravado’s job was to be the horse that generations of weanling colts would emulate. He took his job seriously and created a social foundation that hundreds of young colts would depend on for the rest of their lives. Bravado Bey V was the Grand Gentleman of Varian Arabians. And while others enjoyed a more public stage in recent years than Bravado, he was loved to his core by every staff member of Varian Arabians. Bravado passed away peacefully Sunday, December 23. He led with a quiet authority that will be forever held in our hearts. n​


Breyer Announces New Model

Thunder Allan Ehrlick Member Extraordinaire

At the 2018 Convention, the Volunteer Service Award was presented to Allan and Cheryl Ehrlick for decades of service and volunteer dedication to the Arabian Horse Association. The impact they have had on U.S. Nationals, Canadian Nationals and Sport Horse Nationals is immeasurable. Thanks for all that you do, Allan! Allan was also presented with a 50-year anniversary gift for his participation in the Mexico City 1960 Olympic Games. Congratulations!

SINCE 1993, THE NFL’S DENVER BRONCOS MASCOT has been a grey Arabian horse named Thunder. While three different horses have played Thunder over the years, they’ve all been owned by Sharon Magness Blake and trained by Ann Judge-Wegener. On top of Thunder’s gameday duties of leading the Broncos out of the tunnel and galloping down the field after touchdowns, he also visits schools, makes promotional appearances, and introduces the American flag at events like the National Western Stock Show. The horses who portray Thunder must enjoy people and love performing — both hallmarks of the Arabian breed! Ann takes her time training and earning the trust of each horse, while exposing them to shows, parades, and public events. The current Thunder is Me N MyShadow, a 2000 gelding bred and raised by Sharon who made his debut at Superbowl XLVIII. The amazing partnership between Thunder and his human team is a testament to teamwork and trust! Breyer Animal Creations, founded in 1950, celebrates the horse and other animals, dedicating itself to the creation of authentic and realistic model horses for play and collecting. Join us at BreyerFest, our annual horse festival at the Kentucky Horse Park, July 12-14, 2019, now in it’s 30th anniversary! Visit us at www.breyerhorses.com.

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from the veterinarian n

Managing Equine Dentistry: The Herd Approach

Equine Athlete Veterinary Services IN ORDER TO HAVE THEIR BEST CHANCE AT success, equine athletes need individual care. Winning happens in the details and often times in the mundane. A functional set of teeth is about as mundane as it gets. However, addressing the details of oral health in a timely way, for each individual horse, is an important step toward reaching his full potential. A simple, yet thoughtful version of applied herd management can help achieve that goal. Timely, quality dentistry eliminates many causes that can result in pain in the mouth while aids are being applied, allowing horses to focus and learn quickly. In addition, good teeth assist nutrition by enhancing the digestibility of their feed. To maximize the value of equine dentistry, the timing of care for each individual throughout the year is very important, and flexibility becomes a real benefit in dealing with these needs.

An example of extreme rostral molar hooks. These teeth had been untouched for many years prior to this exam.

This upper right 4th molar had developed improperly and was twice the normal size. There is a deep smooth crater in the center of the occlusal surface, from wearing of abnormally weak dentin material. This tooth was ankylosed to the alveolar bone and required sinus flap surgery to remove it.

Farms often consist of horses at all stages of life. Even dedicated training barns will have youngsters coming up, some broodmares, and a few retired performers on the property as well. Recognizing that fact gives us an advantage in managing dentistry, if we choose to work with it. The herd approach, which accounts for 12

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variation in age and activity, addresses dental care needs that occur naturally at different ages as well as unexpected problems. Importantly, this approach focuses on the needs of each individual that make up the herd, rather than applying a uniform treatment to a large group at the same time. For example, a trainer using the herd approach would choose to time the first farm visit so two-year-olds can be floated before they are taking a snaffle bit for the first time. In some operations, this first visit could even happen before youngsters reach the long-line stage in their training, depending on which method is utilized in starting youngsters. With smooth, comfortable molar edges, young horses enter into (and progress through) training with better focus and overall health. The next visit on the schedule would focus on the finished horses in training, and another later visit would include broodmares and

Issue 1. 2019

The upper first molars on both sides each have a thick rostral hook, and there are unusual, sharp steps elongating the second molars. The second upper molar has a point cutting a deep buccal ulcer into the left cheek (right side of this photo).

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older horses. Additional horses can be added to the worklist on any of these visits, as needed, and any new arrivals to the operation have the opportunity for an oral evaluation without delay. The main benefit in this approach is the ability to identify and address any individual horses that would benefit from more frequent care, as well as any others that may need a more extensive, one-time procedure. Since deciding when it is best not to treat is a more subtle aspect of good medicine, knowing that dentistry is planned for that farm in the relatively near future is the key to being able to postpone dentistry on a horse that is found to still have a perfectly functional mouth. That particular horse may not have been able to remain comfortable for an entire year without more floating, but he certainly can wait to be rechecked in 3-4 months and receive whatever care he needs at that time. This type of

Here are common and naturally occurring sharp points on a previously unfloated mature horse. There are several buccal ulcers adjacent to the upper back right molars (center left in this photo). The dental tool face is oriented almost verticle to reduce buccal points on upper molars.

Successful healing of the rostral upper palate following removal of incisors that had been affected by the resorptive disease called EOTRH. After years of irritability, this aged horse became very comfortable and calm as he healed.

approach also removes pressure to complete all of an individual horse’s dental care during one annual visit. Individual horses can filter into a herd dental care schedule or on an as needed basis, and the value of dentistry is maximized. ~ Andy Walker, DVM

Associate, Equine Athlete Veterinary Services


Startwith it. Staywith it.

For thirty years, Dr. Marvin Beeman, a founder of Littleton Equine Medical Center, has counted on Adequan® i.m. (polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) for his patients. He even uses it on his own horse, Foxy, his beloved third-generation homebred mare. Adequan® has helped keep Foxy perfoming into her teens—so together, they’re still galloping strong. Only Adequan® may help improve joint function by: 1, 2 REVERSING the disease cycle REPAIRING cartilage RESTORING joint lubrication and REDUCING inflammation to help keep joints moving and horses performing.

Thirty years of love and Adequan i.m. says it all.

When you and your veterinarian start with Adequan® i.m. and stay with it, your horse may enjoy greater mobility over a lifetime.3, 4

®

Ask your veterinarian if Adequan® is the right choice for your horse. Visit adequan.com. BRIEF SUMMARY: Prior to use please consult the product insert, a summary of which follows: CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS: Adequan® i.m. is recommended for the intramuscular treatment of non-infectious degenerative and/or traumatic joint dysfunction and associated lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. CONTRAINDICATIONS: There are no known contraindications to the use of intramuscular Polysulfated Glycosaminoglycan. WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption. Not for use in humans. Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children. PRECAUTIONS: The safe use of Adequan® i.m. in horses used for breeding purposes, during pregnancy, or in lactating mares has not been evaluated. For customer care or to obtain product information, visit www.adequan.com. To report an adverse event please contact American Regent, Inc. at (800) 734-9236 or email pv@luitpold.com. Please see Full Prescribing Information at www.adequan.com. 1. Adequan® i.m. [package insert]. Shirley, NY: Luitpold Animal Health; 2008; 2017. 2. Burba DJ, Collier MA, DeBault LE, Hanson-Painton O, Thompson HC, Holder CL: In vivo kinetic study on uptake and distribution of intramuscular tritium-labeled polysulfated glycosaminoglycan in equine body fluid compartments and articular cartilage in an osteochondral defect model. J Equine Vet Sci 1993; 13: 696-703. 3. McIlwraith CW, Frisbie DD, Kawcak CE, van Weeren PR. Joint Disease in the Horse. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, 2016; 33-48. 4. Kim DY, Taylor HW, Moore RM, Paulsen DB, Cho DY. Articular chondrocyte apoptosis in equine osteoarthritis. The Veterinary Journal 2003; 166: 52-57. Adequan and the Horse Head design are registered trademarks of American Regent, Inc. © 2018, American Regent, Inc. PP-AI-US-0184 10/2018

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Join now!

YOUTH Dates

TO REMEMBER April 1 ~  The Arabian Horse Foundation General Scholarship Deadline June 1 ~  AHYA Convention Eligibility Deadline June 15 ~  AHYA Officer Candidate Applications Due

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES! • A  rabian Horse Foundation General Scholarship Application • Due April 1! • A  pplication at thearabianhorsefoundation.org/ apply-on-line • C  heck out www.arabainhorse.org/ ahyascholarships for club and regional scholarship list • S  cholarships available through the Arabian Horse Judging and Hippology Contests

July 20 ~  AHYA Convention Oklahoma City, OK

Why come to the AHYA Convention?

July 21-27 ~  Youth Nationals Oklahoma City, OK

• G  et your Youth National Qualifier T-shirt • M  eet those leading AHYA and vote for new leadership • L  earn about what is happening with AHYA

Connect at arabianhorses.org/youth/ 14

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• Meet new friends


H

2019 Regional Youth Team Tournament Winners Recognized Division RANK

PT. TOTALS REGION TEAM NAME

COACH

Regional Champion

50

Meaghan Shaffer Natalie Zavala, Sage Bassi, Noelle Yandell, Emily Holden, Juliana Buccieri, Jaclyn Thacker

2

R2 Nerd Herd

TEAM MEMBERS

OVERALL 319 3 WHD Shazaam Valerie Baker Margaret Culver, Timothy Moss, Dakota Weinberger, CHAMPIONS Savannah Sheldon, Lauren Genaise, Lucy Bartlett Regional Champion

246

5

N Joy One

Joyce Thomas Tennessee Sanders, Hannah Reynolds, Libby Hollinger, Lily Gamling, Audrey Price, Morgan Overstreet

Regional Champion

227

7

Destructive Divas

Laura Whitehead Sophia Kuder, Aspyn Stanley, Sara Bakhsheshy, Courtney Carlson, McKayla Kanuho, Megan Dunn

Regional Champion

106

8

SVTC Shooting Stars

Gary Matinez Bliss Luedtke, Savanna Luedtke, Morgan Vaughan, Marina Vaughan, Kjessie Jacibucci, Makenna Martinez

Regional Champion

150

9

Team 16

Annalise Himmel Julian Gaidousek, Riley Lallo, Emma Kate McClosky, Brianna Mullen, Drake Mullen, Amelia Trace Nelson

Regional Champion

270

10

Keep Calm and Ride

Amy Schulz Sydney Schulz, Audrey Flakus, Lauryn Riepma, Katelyn Zanderson, Lyric Riepma, Elizabeth Allard

Regional Champion

66

11

Missouri AHA

Mindi Montgomery Madelyn Williams, Maddie Sutton, Caroline Dickinson, Libby Montgomery, Karoline Lewis, Brenna Rose

Regional Champion

65

13

Trot-Tastic

Rosemary Cate Alicia Bondar, Rachele Cate, Holly Stevens, Elianna Martinez, Courtney McLenon, Kayla Masselink

Regional Champion

68

14

Team Firelight

Lorie Henderson Brinley Swears, McCartney Swears, Tabitha Taylor, Grace Garr

Regional Champion

74

15

The Green Machines

Jeffrey Brown Elyse Lescovic, Kristina Pagonis, Keilyn Pagonis, Cianna D'Antoni, Chandler Brown, Riley George

Regional Champion

231

16

RGB 1

Ronald Bartholomew Audrey Bartholomew, Marissa Bartholomew, Alexis Forster, Amelya Drake, Mackenzie Perkins, Brianna Perkins

Regional Champion

215

17

AAHABC Team Four

Allison Morris Phoebe Yu, Maya Ramakrishnan, Ameera Bala, Olivia Olmstead, Grace Schure, Stellamaris Trimingham

Non-Recognized Division Regional Champion

36

2

Nerd Herd 2

Meaghan Shaffer Dorothy Riffenburg, Emily Holden, Sage Bassi, Ireland Nowak, Kate Day, Sophia Hoxworth

Regional Champion

63

3

WHD Shazaam

Valerie Baker Margaret Culver, Timothy Moss, Dakota Weinberger, Savannah Sheldon, Lauren Gervaise, Lucy Bartlett

Regional Champion

124

5

Platinum

Kimberlee Will Miley Defalco, Joelie Touchette, Gianna Roppo, Lillee Pendleton, Charlee Pendleton, Emma Wellman

Regional Champion

126

7

Destructive Divas

Laura Whitehead Sophia Kuder, Aspyn Stanley, Sara Bakhsheshy, Courtney Carlson, McKayla Kanuho, Delaynee Stanley

Regional Champion

49

9

Team 19

Annalise Himmel Jade Cantu, Vivian Post, Illeana Sauls, Madailein Pitts, Sarah Kalyandurg

Regional Champion

226

10

Golden Ridge Starlets

Anna Holicky Hailey Feucht, Lara Hodgens, Addie Maiwurm, Hannah Schwartz, Jillian Treu, Clare Wincentsen

Regional Champion

18

15

The Green Machines Too

Jeffrey Brown Jill Dressler, Jack Meredith, Emily Sedlak, Sabine Hort, Shelby Steinheiser, Katlyn Steinheiser

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impact n

G

reg Knowles vividly remembers his first visit to Scottsdale in February of 1976 when he’d come down to the All Arabian Show from Washington State as a groom for Kale Arabians. Having left a “rainy, dismal Northwest,” he was struck by the profusion of color from the mounds of flowers that bloomed only in late summer back home; the scent of the desert air, the stunning mountain vistas in every direction — and, of course, the warm, dry air. “I was thinking how wonderful it all was,” Knowles says. “It was a magical land where it was sunny in the winter.” After that, Knowles kept coming back each year. He eventually started his own training business, and by 1999 he’d moved the whole operation to the magical place. While there’s no study to prove it, it’s very likely that many who traveled to the Scottsdale show from colder climes were charmed by the same sensations that initially struck Knowles and eventually decided to move to the city. After wiling away hours in the sundrenched stands watching beautiful horses performing against a backdrop of purple mountain ranges, it was hard not to let the mind drift and imagine what it would be like to live in such an enchanting place.

By Linda Carroll

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There’s no question that as the show boomed, Scottsdale did, too. Back in 1975, the city covered about 69 square miles, according to city maps. By the end of the 80s, it had expanded to nearly three times that acreage. Of course when Knowles first saw it, Scottsdale was a very different place from what it is now. Back then it was a quiet, sleepy city with a small town feel and an old-timey Western flavor. Horses were central to the city’s culture and identity then, Susan Wheeler remembers. “People on the city council rode horses and were part of the Scottsdale Charros [a group of horseback-riding businessmen-philanthropists],” says Wheeler, a local real estate agent who rides and specializes in horse properties. “They would all ride in the big parade, the ‘Parada del Sol’.” In those days, much of the area was agricultural, and big Arabian farms were abundant and included the likes of Gainey’s Fountainhead Arabians and the McCormick Ranch, both situated on North Scottsdale Road. The late 70s saw a city “on the cusp of changing,” Wheeler says. The ambiance started to be different, and “you didn’t see that many people riding horses along the canals anymore,” she says. “Most of the horses in Scottsdale by that time were show horses.”

The Magic & Allure of

Scottsdale

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impact n By the early 80s, developers started buying up land, horses, she says. It grew through the 80s and reached its including the Gainey Ranch and the massive McCormick peak year in 1985 when 2,460 horses were entered (and all Ranch. The city started annexing more and more land, but one showed up to collect their numbers), Hegg says. especially to the north, anticipating a migration of people That year “the yearling halter classes were the largest at who had had it with cold weather. The growth did come at any show anywhere for Arabian horses: 212 yearling colts a price: the city started to lose some of its small town feel and 198 yearling fillies,” remembers Hegg, who now lives and western ambiance as big shopping malls populated by in Ireland and still breeds Arabians. The halter classes “ran chain stores started to replace mom and pop establishments. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and then we began the performance Part of the growth may be traced classes, originally scheduled for 1 p.m.” to the explosion of interest driving The total number of halter horses the expansion of the Arabian breed at the show that year was 1,500, Hegg In those days, much of during the 80s. The horses and the says. “Way too many,” she adds. “So Scottsdale show were becoming more the entry fee was doubled the next year, the area was agricultural, glamorous. Movie stars were regularly and we still had over 800 halter horses.” seen wandering the showgrounds. During those years, the show was and big Arabian farms were Hang out long enough and there was held at Paradise Park II up on Bell a chance you might see someone like Road, down the street from Karho and abundant and included Patrick Swayze, Mike Nichols or Lasma. All around Scottsdale during Wayne Newton. horse show evenings, breeding farms, the likes of Gainey’s Scottsdale was becoming “the some tucked right into residential Mecca of the [Arabian] horse world,” neighborhoods, held open house affairs Fountainhead Arabians and Knowles says. “If you want to be a with catered food for those interested movie star, you go to Hollywood. If in watching stallion presentations and the McCormick Ranch, you want to be a star in the Arabian ogling sales and breeding stock. world, you come here.” For many people, the two weeks both situated on The Scottsdale show had been spent thawing in the warming sun’s growing with each passing year, says rays during the Scottsdale show wasn’t North Scottsdale Road. Mickey Hegg, an Arizona native and enough, says Janice McCrea Wight, an Arabian breeder and judge. Back in old-time Scottsdale breeder and judge. n 1977-1978 the show hosted 700-800 Whether they were there to show or to 46

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watch, “they started coming down earlier and earlier,” she says. “Some would take their vacation time to be in Scottsdale during the show.” While all the pretty ponies got people there, the big draw, once people spent a little time in the Scottsdale area, was its natural beauty — and, of course, the sun, Hegg says. There’s no doubt that a lot of people who came to the show and then moved to the Valley of the Sun, did so because of “that ‘Lucky Old Sun’ lolling up there in the sky when other parts of the country and Canada were shoveling snow and shivering,” Hegg says. “I can assure you, from the time the New Year’s Holiday was finished, people were loading up their horses and heading to Arizona. Many began looking at anything and everything for sale and acquired their own places.” Knowles agrees. While the big show may be the Mecca of the Arabian horse world, if it were in Alaska, he wouldn’t have moved nearby, he says. For those passionate about the Arabian horse, it was, and still is, a unique experience. “We have more good horses in one place at our show than any other place in the world,” McCrea Wight says. “We have 2,200 to 2,300 horses every year.” The show moved from its Bell Road location to West World in 1989, which offered cover for horse and human in those years when Scottsdale got its rare February

downpours. WestWorld also offered a venue for those who wanted to shop for something other than horses. Vendors crammed every inch of the big hall serving as the entryway to the Equidome. While a lot of locals bring their horses to the show these days, there are still plenty of “snowbirds” who bring their show horses — or just themselves — for those two magical weeks in February. Currently most of Knowles’s clients are from out of the area. But he fully expects that a certain percentage will hear Scottsdale’s siren call and move permanently to the Valley of the Sun. “I think the percentages are really high,” he says. “There’s just a vibe here. It’s hard to explain. But you want to be part of the sunshine and the nice weather and to be able to wear just a light sweater at night.” Many initially just assume they’re going to spend their two weeks a year and then drive or fly home. But then Scottsdale starts to work its charms. “I think a lot start with a getaway place,” Knowles says. “They buy a condo. And then a bigger house. And pretty soon they’ve moved down here.” Linda Carroll is a Peabody Award winning writer who covers health and medicine for NBC News. She is coauthor of “The Concussion Crises: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic” and “Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing’s Greatest Rivalry.” She is also the owner of Fiery Run Farm and breeder of FR Hercules.

OPPOSITE The iconic Main Street welcome in Old Town. 1950s postcard featuring the Lulu Belle restaurant and bar.

LEFT Through the years, people came for the Scottsdale Show, but stayed for the winter climate.

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AH L FR E E ZE FR AM E :

PERI

Tilghman

The horse pictured is Fashion Diva (Sir Sinclair x Striking Fashion), 2018 Reserve National Champion HA Hunter Pleasure Select. We are pictured here at the 2017 U.S. Nationals HA Open Hunter final. I got very lucky in this photo because it is pretty correct and in my opinion is a great representation of what a main ring hunter should look like. 1. I love how Diva is taking a long, driving stride from behind. She is traveling quite square and will clearly be “covering a lot of ground” as every hunter should. 2. Although you can tell that there is a lot of power propelling her forward from her hind end, her entire frame looks comfortable, confident and relaxed. Her ears are forward, her neck is soft and she has close to the perfect connection from my hands to her mouth - soft but definitely connected. 3. For me, this mare’s stride is ideal for a main ring hunter. She has a lovely roll and some knee action, but she finishes her stride with a long, ground covering step and not too much “up and down” motion.

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4. My upper body is tipped a little further forward than it should be. My shoulders should be directly over top of my hips. 5. I would like to see my heels stretched down a bit further. By stretching down more through my heels, it would move my whole lower leg slightly more forward to be in the ideal position. 6. I am a stickler about elbows, and I am pleased to see that I am practicing what I preach! My elbows are at the correct angle and very close to my sides, allowing for proper placement and width between my hands and a soft, fluid feel for my horse’s mouth. 7. Possibly my favorite part of this photo is that Diva’s profile is 100 percent on the vertical! Her neck is as high as any hunter’s neck should be, and she is softly sitting directly on the vertical. Peri Tilghman found her passion for the Arabian horse at a very young age, and she has never looked back. After graduating from high school in 2003, she started training professionally. Located in central Florida, where she has been her whole life, she trains horses and riders for all main ring performance divisions, from beginner to National level. Just stepping into her new business venture, Peri Lee Show Horses LLC, she couldn’t be more excited about what the future holds. The beautiful facility is a full-service operation offering breeding, training, lessons, marketing and horse showing. www.perileeshowhorses.com

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THERAPY matters

LEFT Angel Bella and purebred Arabian Krystal Annie EN (Annie) bonded within minutes of meeting each other. Angel Heart Farm uses Arabians as their primary breed due to how they connect with people.

OPPOSITE

Tracy Kujawa

Half-Arabian Knight Life and Sophie bond over treats. Kind and gentle spirits make perfect therapy horses.

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By Hope Ellis-Ashburn

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t twenty-five-years old, Diesel was beginning to show signs of arthritis. His current treatment plan that included supplements and NSAIDs kept him comfortable. For many years he had been the perfect mount for his family’s children. He stood a non-intimidating, yet still solid, 15h and was unflappable in most situations. Still, the wear and tear from his extensive show career made it clear that this chapter in his life was coming to a close. His owners, knowing that he enjoyed having a job, were carefully considering the next step. One option was donating Diesel to a local therapy program, but would this be a good fit?

Soundness First “When selecting a therapy horse for our program, the first criteria that must be met is soundness,” says Katie Alderman. Alderman grew up in a United States Pony Club (USPC) program through high school, was a working student in college, and joined the ranks of professional horsemen in 2008. Volunteering at a program located near Auburn University, she first became involved with therapeutic riding programs in 2007 while she was still a student. Her volunteer efforts led her to first seek instructor certification through the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) and now the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International,

or PATH. Currently, she is the sole instructor at Horse Play, Inc., a PATH facility located in Tullahoma, Tenn., where she is also in charge of caring for and training the facility’s horses. “Though I am familiar with some facilities that require soundness at the walk, trot, and canter, at our facility we require it only at the walk and trot since none of our program’s current participants require a horse who is sound at the canter. In addition, evenness of gait is also extremely important since these horses will be working with physically affected riders who may have issues with balance,” Alderman explained. “Scars and blemishes can be overlooked, but lameness is never acceptable, and a visually impaired horse can be a real danger in these situations,” echoes Betsy Chandler. Chandler is currently the manager of Heatherfield Horse Park in Trenton, Ga. and has been a Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) certified instructor for over thirty years. During her career, she has been in charge of selecting horses for a wide variety of careers including camp, lesson, and therapy horses. In addition to soundness, the entire physical package that the horse presents is important when considering whether or not a horse will make a good therapy program mount. “At our farm, we have horses and ponies ranging in size from miniature horses up to 16h that fill a variety of needs including handling and grooming up to riding,”

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LEFT Half-Arabian Knight Life and Angel Amena at their first meeting. Knight Life is always ready to greet and give his love to children and families.

BELOW Purebred Arabian TA Fellini and Angel Savannah were a team for five years until cancer took this sweet girl. She would say she did not have cancer when she rode. Both photos by Tracy Kujawa.

says Tracy Kujawa. Kujawa is a four-time cancer survivor and the founder of Angel Heart Farm in Nashville, Tenn., an equine assisted therapy program for children with chronic and life-threatening illnesses such as cancer. She’s been involved with these types of therapy programs for over thirty years. Serving clients that range in age from small children, to teenagers, to adults, size isn’t a factor for her program. However, “the ideal height for the horses I select is between 14.2 and 15.2h,” Chandler describes. Conformation is a part of this physical package. “We prefer a solid, well-built horse with great legs and great feet as they usually mean they will hold up well with less risk of injury,” Kujawa says. Less than perfect conformation, however, should not necessarily rule a horse out. “Within therapy programs, there are a wide range of rider types and the conformation of a particular horse that may be ideal for one rider might not work well for another,” Alderman explained. Horses that require some form of maintenance for health issues related to illness, injury, or conformation, may or may not work well for a given therapy program. “The cost of maintaining a horse for soundness is expensive, especially for a small non-profit. For example, we do hock injections and have a great team of vets that care for our crew, but that may not be possible for every situation. All things considered, I think the question of what can be overlooked would depend on the horse and the budget of the program,” Kujuwa elaborated.

Background and Training Background and training are other key components in the selection process. Horses being considered for therapy programs should have a solid background of training 24

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Creating lasting memories for Angel Heart Farm’s kids is vital. Here, Angel Alexis was surprised with a glam photoshoot with her favorite horse, Annie (purebred Arabian, Krystal Annie EN). Alexis headed into chemo battle the next day for her cancer relapse.

Jamie Dale Photography

that includes being familiar with being led and ridden, even if the aids aren’t being applied correctly and consistently. Retired or retiring show horses can be good candidates. “I find that being a retired show horse is a positive attribute for a therapy horse,” says Alderman. “They have been exposed to an incredible number of stimuli; they have good brains and are generally non-reactive. As a bonus, they usually load and travel well,” Alderman continued. Kujawa, who has shown Arabian horses for over twenty-five years, has a preference for horses with a background in the show ring. Her program, among other breeds, currently includes five Purebred Arabians and one Half-Arabian horse. She explains, “All of the horses in our program have been show horses or ponies in their lifetimes and have a solid foundation in training. They do continue to show with our children that are able to compete. I think keeping them in top form is vital to their health and wellbeing emotionally and physically.” The discipline for which a horse has been trained isn’t necessarily important. Alderman, for example, has or has had horses in her program that come from a variety of backgrounds, including gaited horses. However, Chandler says, “While horses trained in a variety of disciplines can work well, those having a background in Western training can be especially useful for riders who may initially find the saddle’s horn more of a security measure.”

Temperament is Most Important The final piece of the puzzle is temperament. “I prefer horses with a more settled disposition.” Age can play a role in this. Horses aged fourteen to twenty-five have worked best for me,” Chandler describes. “Because some of our horses still show, I like a horse that has a little spunk to them, but knows when to turn it off. All Angel Heart Farm horses have a certain quality that I love; they are all really giving type horses. They are super sweet, friendly, and quirky. I am fortunate to know where each of our horses came from, not only their breeders, but their trainers, show history, and all medical records, and I ask a lot of questions from their trainers, grooms, farriers, and vets. It might sound like a bit much, but I need to know how they will respond to all situations,” Kujuwa says. Alderman, perhaps, explains the temperament component the best. “It is the most valuable aspect of a therapy horse. Work as a therapy horse is considered, by some, to be easy and that could not be further from the truth. It is a very emotionally challenging job. Horses like a consistent routine. They like having their own person.” “Being a therapy horse requires flexibility. They are constantly being handled by new volunteers who play

the roles of handler, side walker, or leader. They are also sometimes the caregivers. In addition, participants involved in therapy programs are often inconsistent and unpredictable in their behavior and speech patterns and in their riding in terms of the application of their aids. It’s important for the horses to be able to handle these situations without becoming anxious. Even some of our best horses reach a point over a period of time where they are burned out and need to be placed in a new job,” she says. While finding a therapy program that could incorporate his needs could make the process slightly more challenging, Diesel, it seems, was off to a good start as a therapy program candidate. It could be the start of a career that was not only fulfilling to him, but also of great emotional benefit to the riders he would serve. Hope Ellis-Ashburn is a teacher and author living in the Sequatchie Valley of Tennessee. She has been a horse owner for over thirty years and enjoys trail riding and competing in the Sport Horse disciplines with her Half-Arabian mare.

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nlike Sheila Varian or Bazy Tankersley, who got involved with Arabians at a fairly early age, Anne McCormick’s path to Arabian horse ownership took much longer: she was 69 when she bought her first herd sire, Mustafa. However, by the time of McCormick’s death two decades later, she was respected as a breeder of champions, as the importer of the well-known *Naborr, and for helping to found (and host) the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show. As Gladys Brown Edwards wrote, “Scottsdale, the Scottsdale Show, and in fact Arabian breeders everywhere, not just in Arizona, owe quite a debt to the far-sightedness and enterprise of Mrs. Anne McCormick.” Born in New York City in 1879, Anne Urquhart Potter was the daughter of James Brown Potter, a wealthy coffee broker with family connections to the investment firm Brown Brothers Harriman. Anne’s mother, Cora Urquhart Brown Potter, was considered one of the most beautiful women of her era; she even caught the eye of the future King Edward VII. Anne, their only child, was eight years old when Cora embarked on a professional acting career. At that time, married society women like Cora were expected to oversee the running of the household, produce children,

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Foresight Fortitude

The Life of Anne McCormick By Tobi Lopez Taylor

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and take up feminine pursuits. The idea of a society woman forsaking her family for the stage was scandalous. When James demanded that Cora cancel an acting contract she’d signed, she replied, “I am an artist now and can manage my artistic work myself.” Cora’s career, which took her to Great Britain, New Zealand, and South Africa, lasted more than two decades. Although Cora was estranged from both her husband and daughter for many years, the couple did not divorce until 1900, when Anne was 21. The following year, Anne married

James A. Stillman Jr., who went on to become the president and chairman of National City Bank (now Citigroup). They had four children: Anne, James, Alexander, and Guy. Their tumultuous marriage made headlines worldwide, and it ended in divorce in 1931. Anne fared much better in her second marriage, to (Harold) Fowler McCormick Jr., a Chicagoan who later became president and chairman of International Harvester. Fowler was a Stillman family friend who was almost 20 years Anne’s junior and had served as best man at her son James’s wedding. As historian Craig Clinton put it, Anne and Fowler’s wedding “transmogrified the new groom into the stepfather of James, his closest friend and his new wife’s son.” In a

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ABOVE Anne McCormick and son Guy Stillman in 1932. Guy would grow up to import and breed Arabians himself. International News Photos, Inc.

LEFT Actress Cora Brown Potter, mother of Anne McCormick, and her Shetland ponies Tweedledee and Tweedledum, circa 1903.

OPPOSITE Anne and Fowler McCormick in 1931, not long after their marriage. International News Photos, Inc.

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heritage n 1934 Arizona Republic article, Anne remarked, “I’ve got the most attractive husband in Chicago….He’s the nicest and cleverest, too.” In the 1930s, Anne and Fowler bought 440 acres of farmland near Barrington, Ill., where they began to raise Black Angus and Ayrshire cattle. In the 1940s, they purchased land in Scottsdale, Ariz. — the start of what would become the 4,200-acre McCormick Ranch. Initially, the property was used for cattle ranching and as a winter home for the couple. Fowler’s interest in horseback riding served as the catalyst for Anne’s breeding program. Palominos were very popular at that time, and the McCormicks purchased a few, including two mares by Revel’s Cream Of Wheat, a local parade horse and champion stallion. Anne, a student of cattle genetics, initially focused on breeding Palominos. Because there is a higher likelihood of producing a Palomino when one of the parents is a chestnut, Anne sought out an Arabian stallion of that color. In 1949, she purchased the well-known Mustafa (Oriental x Amla), a halter champion bred by Albert Harvey, that had a reputation for siring 100 percent Palominos out of Palomino mares. Like many other breeders who began with Half-Arabians, McCormick soon turned to breeding Purebreds. In 1953, she purchased three horses from Lady Wentworth’s Crabbet Stud: the mares *Iorana (Radi x Namilla) and *Rifilla (Oran x Rissiletta), and the stallion *Sun Royal (Indian Gold x Sharima), who was said to have made a big impression when he won the colt championship at the U.K.’s 1947 Arab Horse Society Show. It is unclear whether Lady Wentworth (age 80 at the time) and Anne McCormick (age 74) had any 28

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personal interactions during this transaction, or if was done solely through intermediaries. While McCormick would certainly have been familiar with Lady Wentworth’s great-grandfather, the poet Lord Byron, as well as the history of Crabbet Stud, neither woman may have known that McCormick’s mother Cora Brown Potter and Wentworth’s father Wilfrid Blunt moved in overlapping social circles in London; their various mutual acquaintances included Oscar Wilde, who dined a number of times with Blunt over the years and promised to write a play for Potter (which never materialized). In addition to her English imports,

McCormick also purchased the mares Kyna (Mahabba x Kishta), bred by R. B. Field; Galigay (Galimar x Scheraff), Gal-Phana (Phantom x Gali Rose), and Garlanda (Phantom x Gajala), bred by Daniel Gainey; Baseem (Bakir x Kholey), bred by Philip Wrigley; Zi Inda (Ga’Zi x Indaieh) and Aabenaya (Aarief x Nejd Benaya), bred by Lasma; and *Wierka (Miecznik x *Wierna), a Polish mare brought to the U.S. as a prize of war in 1946. Mustafa sired 20 purebred foals, including Scottsdale Park champion Arizonakim (x *Rifilla) and Kimfa (x *Iorana), herd sire for Bevans’ Arabians, whose get won National titles in Halter, Trail, Native Costume,


Stock Horse, and Western Pleasure. *Sun Royal sired 24 purebred foals in the U.S., including Legion of Merit winner Royal Paradise++ (x Desert Perfume), and was the grandsire of performers like Sunn Bask++ (*Bask++ x Solay), winner of four U.S. Top Ten awards in Formal Driving and Combination, and Lyerla Silverarow++ (Desert Arrow x Silver Royal), twice U.S. Top Ten Sidesaddle. In 1954, the Arabian Horse Association of Arizona was formed. The following year, the first incarnation of what would become known as the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show was held in Phoenix at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel, owned by the Wrigley

ABOVE Native Costume class, 1958 Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show, at Anne McCormick’s Paradise Park.

RIGHT A 1954 advertisement for the stud services of Mustafa (Oriental x Amla) and *Sun Royal (Indian Gold x Sharima).

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heritage n family. It was sponsored by Anne and Fowler McCormick, Philip and Helen Wrigley, and Ed and Ruth Tweed. In 1957, the show was moved to a former trotting-horse facility purchased by the McCormicks, which they transformed into a top-class horse show facility known as Paradise Park. This venue was home to the Scottsdale Show until 1978. McCormick’s ranch manager Harold Daugherty recalled the first show held at Paradise Park: “Mrs. McCormick said that if we were going to put on a show, to put on the best. She had the barns painted, the tack rooms scrubbed, and Chimayo blankets put up as drapes on the windows in the tack rooms. Water buckets were at every stall with the barn colors and the McCormick ‘hat’ brand on them.” Her son Guy Stillman noted, “She made a major effort to try to accommodate everyone and make them feel at home. The show became one of the high points of the year for 30

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Fifty years after her death, Anne McCormick’s influence on the Arabian horse is still in evidence. Every February, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show continues the tradition that began with her generosity and foresight. n

her, and a good part of its charisma came from the many little personal touches she added.” Anne McCormick’s other lasting contribution to the breed took place in 1963, when she succeeded in doing something others had failed to do: she purchased the legendary stallion *Naborr (Negatiw x Lagodna) from Poland, despite being told the horse was not for sale. Mary Jane Parkinson wrote that when the Poles did finally name a price for him, it was “obviously calculated to discourage the lady in Scottsdale.” McCormick’s response was, “I’ll take him.” During his years in McCormick’s ownership, *Naborr was bred primarily to mares owned by her or her family, as well as few other breeders. McCormick’s broodmares produced a number of National winners by *Naborr, including Riffle (x *Iorana), U.S. and Canadian National Champion Formal Driving and winner of four other National titles; Desert


LEFT Naborr (Negatiw x Lagodna) was “the horse money couldn’t buy” — until Anne McCormick came along and imported him to the U.S. in 1963. Jerry Sparagowski photo.

RIGHT Naborro (*Naborr x *Mimikra), U.S. Top Ten Park, bred by Guy Stillman.

BELOW Multi-National Champion Riffle (*Naborr x *Iorana), bred by Anne Davison, out of a mare imported by her mother.

Arrow (x Kyna), U.S. Top Ten Trail; Nazorba++ (x Arizona Rose), Canadian Top Ten Western Pleasure, and his full brother Ibn Naborr, Canadian National Champion and U.S. Top Ten Stock Horse. In addition, Guy Stillman bred Count Naborr++ (x Delilah), Canadian National Champion Western Pleasure, and Naborro

husband Fowler died in 1973, and the McCormick Ranch property, measuring nearly seven square miles, was sold for development. Fifty years after her death, Anne McCormick’s influence on the Arabian horse is still in evidence. Every February, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show continues the tradition that began with her generosity and foresight. Furthermore, her acumen in importing *Naborr is demonstrated by the fact that he is still well represented in the pedigrees of today’s show, race, and endurance horses. The plaque that marks Anne McCormick’s last resting place reads “Courage, Fortitude, Beauty.” These words, though written in tribute to her, also exemplify the best attributes of the breed she loved — the Arabian.

(x *Mimikra), U.S. Top Ten Park. Anne McCormick died in Scottsdale in May, 1969. Five months later, her horses were auctioned off, in accordance with her will. *Naborr, Lot One at the dispersal sale, brought a world-record price of $150,000 from television magnate Tom Chauncey and singer Wayne Newton. Anne’s

Tobi Lopez Taylor’s most recent book is Orzel: Scottsdale’s Legendary Arabian Stallion (The History Press, 2016). She can be reached at www.tobitaylor.com.

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Profile for Arabian Horse Association

Arabian Horse Life Magazine; mini issue 1 2019  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the first week of February. Distribu...

Arabian Horse Life Magazine; mini issue 1 2019  

The Arabian Horse Association's (AHA) member magazine, Arabian Horse Life (AHL) is due to hit mailboxes the first week of February. Distribu...