Page 1

APHRODITE ANCIENT ART ANCIENT PORTRAITS  VOLUME VI 2018

1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A


APHRODITE ANCIENT ART ANCIENT PORTRAITS VOLUME VI 2018 Why is it that the most famous and popularly enduring pieces to survive from antiquity are portraits? From Phidias’  legendary colossi and Praxiteles’ softly youthful contrapposti, to frescoes of Pompeii couples and symbolically rich  Egyptian  funerary  masks,  portraiture  marked  by  powerful  facial  features  and  unique  expressions  has  captivated  viewers and collectors for millennia. At  its  outset,  Egyptian  portrait  art  was  primarily  meant  to  be  viewed  from  the  front,  with  a  large  majority  of  works  decorating  royally  commissioned  locations  or  being  placed  in  tombs,  and  concurrently,  throughout  the  Archaic  period,  Ancient  Greeks  uniquely  emulated  this  frontal  aesthetic  with  their  own  kouroi  and  korai.  It  wasn’t  until  the  Greek Classical period that a profoundly unique change in portrait art began, producing some of the strongest initial  examples of three dimensional portraits, or depictions meant to be thoroughly observed “in the round.” As  time  passed,  the  Ancient  Greeks  continued  to  move  toward  greater  realism  in  both  mythological  and  historical  portraits,  and  the  idea  of  individualized  portraiture  continued  to  develop.  The  Greeks  believed  that,  when  an  individual died, their soul would leave the body on a journey through the afterlife, retaining a memory of its former  existence  and  just  a  fraction  of  its  physical  vitality.  This  conception  of  an  afterlife  didn’t  necessarily  promise  paradise, and imprinted the living with a strong respect and reverence for those who had passed: for the quality of  their life in addition to what may transpire after. As a result of this, funerary portrait art, though true­to life in many  features  of  facial  depictions,  had  an  idealizing  aspect  in  its  bodily  depictions  (heroic  nudity,  power  stances,  etc.).  The  growing  influence  of  the  latter  was  augmented  by  religious  views,  and  depictions  of  people  held  to  be  exemplary drew on divine inspiration. Through this idealizing respect for specially regarded people and the deceased, in addition to changing political and  social values, as well as the soul concept’s continued development, a new view toward portraiture grew into fruition.  Classical  severity  began  to  thaw  as  artists  put  more  emotion  into  their  creations;  portraits  started  taking  on  more  individualized personalities. Later on toward the beginnings of the Roman Empire, impressed by the wealth, culture, and beauty of Greek cities,  victorious  Roman  generals  claimed  and  brought  home  Greek  portraiture  in  varied  media.  Soon  after,  wealthy  Romans  desired  works  of  art  that  evoked  Greek  culture  and  visual  qualities  (poikilia,  etc.).  To  meet  this  demand,  Greek and Roman artists made numerous copies of Greek portraits in marble and bronze. By the 2nd Century A.D.,  the demand for copies of Greek works was enormous, with the latter being sought out to decorate public areas, like  theaters and public baths, in addition to private residences. This  catalog  seeks  to  evoke  the  splendor  of  ancient  portraiture.  The  sample  of  works  illustrated  here  –  large  and  small,  mythological  and  historical  –  spans  eras  of  Egyptian,  Classical  Greek,  and  Roman  dominance,  and  is  depicted through a variety of media, including marble, terracotta, glass, wood, faience, and silver. We  sincerely  hope  that  readers  enjoy  looking  at  the  pieces,  and  feel  a  connection  with  at  least  one  of  the  idiosyncratic expressions imploringly looking out at the viewer for a response. Happy holidays! J. Rifai

1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A


1.

ROMAN EGYPTIAN GESSO MASK

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Egyptian 30 B.C. – 300 A.D. Plaster/gesso Intact, with some minor restoration. Ex American private  collection, New York, purchase  from  New York art  market, 1997. Dimensions: H. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm.) A  fine  cast  face  of  a  Romano­Egyptian  funerary  mask  depicting  a  youthful  woman  with  tender facial features. The eyes are painted white, with stark black pupils and borders. An  aquiline  nose  gently  arches  over  thin  pursed  lips.  The  black  hair  is  close­cropped,  but  remains of a fibrous overlay, representing actual black strands depicting hair, are present.  An ocher wreath of laurel leaves adorns the head.

1


2


2. EGYPTIAN CARTONNAGE MUMMY MASK Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian 664 – 30 B.C. (Late Period – Ptolemaic Period) Linen Intact, preserving most of its original gilding Ex private American collection, acquired early 1970s H. 8 3/4 in. (22 cm.)

3


4


3.

EGYPTIAN WOOD AND STUCCO FACE MASK

EGYPTIAN WOOD AND STUCCO FACE MASK

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Egyptian 1st Century B.C. (Late Ptolemaic Period) Wood/stucco Intact, very good Ex collection of  Professor Alcibiades N. Oikonomides (d.1988), Chicago  (Classics professor at  Loyola University), acquired in the 1970s; ex M.B.  Collection, Westlake Village, California Dimensions: H. 13 3/4 in. (34.9 cm.)

Funerary masks were extremely important in ancient Egyptian culture. It was believed that  once an individual died, his/her soul would exit the body and journey through the afterlife.  A funerary mask was utilized to convey the deceased’s living features. In capturing these  qualities, the masks gave the individuals they represented faces in the afterlife, thus  allowing the soul to recognize the body and re­orient itself within it, allowing the former to  live on in death. This mask is in excellent condition. The wooden frame plays host to the stucco­composed  shape. Wide, eager eyes dominate the face, with the beautifully molded mouth and nose  being delicately defined. The mask wears a black and yellow striped headcloth.

5


6


4.

ROMAN EGYPTIAN FEMALE HEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian 1st  Century B.C. – 1st Century A.D. (Roman Period) Bone Complete, rejoined from two pieces Ex early American collection, acquired in 1981 H. 1 1/4 in. (3.2 cm.)

6


7


5.

EGYPTIAN FAIENCE HEAD OF A FEMALE

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian Ca. 1070 B.C.  (3rd Intermediate Period) Faience Intact Ex Haddad collection, acquired in 1972; ex American collection, 1980 H. 1 1/2 in. (3.8 cm.)

8


9


6.

EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE HEAD OF HARPOKRATES

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian Ca. 1100 B.C. (18th Dynasty) Limestone Intact, very good overall, mounted on a custom base display stand Ex C. Martin Collection, Florida; Bonham’s London in the early 1990s H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.)

Harpokrates, or Horus the Child, was portrayed as a small boy with a finger held to his  lips, an Egyptian gesture symbolizing childhood. The Greeks mis­interpreted this gesture  as silence, and they called Harpokrates the god of silence.  To the ancient Egyptians, Horus represented the newborn sun rising at dawn each day.  The full­grown Horus was considered the victorious god of the sun who overcame  darkness each day.

10


11


7.

EASTERN ROMAN STONE HEAD OF A FEMALE

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Near East Ca. 2nd – 3rd Century A.D. Stone Intact, with soil deposits, mounted on a custom base display stand Ex early European private collection, 1960s H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.)

12


13


8.

ROMAN FRESCO ROUNDEL OF DIONYSUS, MAENAD, AND SILENUS

Culture Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. 1st Century A.D. Stucco/plaster Intact, custom­framed Ex American collection, W. Froelich, 1970s 14 ½ x 14 in. (36.8 x 35.5 cm.)

14


15


9.

ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A YOUTH

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. 2nd Century A.D. Marble Intact, mounted on a custom base display stand Ex European private collection, 1980s, with Art Loss Register certificate H. 6 ¾ in. (17.2 cm.)

The head, carved of marble, is slightly smaller than life­size and preserved down to the  shoulders. It is sensitively rendered, with lightly chubby and soft shapes distinctive of a  child's head. The contour of the face is in the round, with almond­shaped eyes and incised  irises. Hair envelops the head, furrowing over with wavy lines, framing a face  characterized by a somewhat melancholic gaze. In Greco­Roman art, children's images hold a significant place. Initially, bodies were  depicted like those of adults, but in miniature size; it is only from the 4th Century B.C.  onward, and especially during the Hellenistic and Roman periods, that artists became  interested in children's proportions and began to produce them accurately in many  attitudes. The archetypical small boy in Ancient Greek art is Eros, Aphrodite’s beloved  child and faithful companion, who can be identified with certainty by the presence of wings  and a bow, his attributes. As evidenced by the numerous statues and murals portraying Eros or other children  excavated from Pompeii, early childhood was among the favorite subjects for the  decoration of the wealthy Roman villas, gardens, and walls; they are illustrated in  extremely varied activities, often represented in pairs or groups together with different  animals (birds, rabbits, dolphins, etc.), playing, working, and acting, among other playful  scenes.

16


17


10.

ROMAN FLOOR MOSAIC DEPICTING THE HEAD OF MEDUSA

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Roman Ca. 2nd Century A.D. Stone tesserae Intact, mounted on a lightweight background for easier wall mounting Ex Swiss private collection, 1970s, with U.S. import document ca. 1989 49 ½ x 48 1/2 in. (125.7 x 123.2 cm.)

The expressive visage of Medusa occupies the center of this powerful image. At the heart,  a head anchors ten dynamically undulating snakes sprawling out from the Gorgon’s hair;  the portrait is framed by a circular wreath and four tendrils, one on each corner. Floor mosaics were called lithastrata to distinguish them from the wall or vault mosaics,  which were referred to as opuses musivae. The tesserae (latin for cubes or dice) are the  pieces that make up the mosaic’s surface; stone was cut into regular, consistent shapes  perfectly situated for fitting into the cube grid. The main requisite of the material, aside  from colors, was its natural resistance to wear. Stone and marble, and their natural colors,  determined the color schemes of mosaics in Roman times (though later, glass was also  used). Two or three layers of mortar served as the setting bed, which carried the tesserae  facing up; the first layer rests on a thick foundation that prevents the settling of the mortar  bed and crack formation. Visual unity in mosaics depends on how close­set the surface  texture is, with this mosaic excelling. Regarding subject matter, while the earliest Greek representations of Medusa depicted  her as a beautiful woman, later depictions emphasize a hideous and monstrous  appearance. Later, in the Hellenistic period, the human­like face of Medusa resurfaced  and flourished – the mosaic dates back to this time. This piece was most likely excavated from Daphne, near Antioch, in the Eastern Roman  Empire, an important trading caravan, cultural crossroads, and financial center as well as  one of the four great metropolitan centers of the late classical world. One of Antioch’s  most luxurious neighbors, Daphne was excavated in 1930 by American and French  archeologists, who unearthed floor mosaics as large as thirty feet. Many of these mosaics  are now housed in museum collections, such as the Dumbarton Oaks Museum in  Washington D.C., the Brooklyn Museum, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the Princeton  University Museum. Cf. a closely similar floor mosaic depicting Medusa’s head in a circular frame, from the  “Villa of Dionysus”, is now in the Archeological Museum of Dion in Macedonia.

18


19


11.

ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Eastern Roman Ca. 2nd Century A.D. Marble Intact, mounted on a lightweight background for easier wall mounting Ex German  private collection, 1970s; ex New York collection;  Aphrodite  Gallery exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 5 ½ in. (14 cm.) One of the greatest generals and rulers in history, Alexander the Great was considered a  demigod after his untimely death. From the time of his death, the image and powerful  associations of Alexander pervaded nearly every facet of Greek and Roman culture in at  least some minimal way. Roman emperors (Caracalla chief among them) even adopted  him as an ideal, and represented themselves in his guise. He is typically depicted with a  vaguely dreamy expression and distinctively wavy hair, falling at his brow and the nape of  his neck – called a leonine anastale – as witnessed in our example.

20


21


12.

ROMAN SILVER HEAD OF SERAPIS

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Roman Ca. 2nd Century A.D. Silver Intact, offered with a custom base display stand Ex European collection, acquired in1996; ex New York collection, 1998 H. 4 1/8 in. (10.4 cm.)

The cult of Serapis peaked in popularity throughout the Roman Empire during the 2nd  Century A.D. Many images of the god took the form of portable busts, meant for  dedication or private worship, as we can infer was the case with our present example.

22


23


13.

HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A YOUTH

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. 3rd – 2nd Century B.C. Marble Intact, some pitting; mounted on a custom base display stand Ex Swiss European collection, 1970s; ex East Coast American collection H. 8 ¼ in. (21 cm.)

This youth is depicted with a rounded ovular face anchored by a small mouth of full lips,  his wavy locks brushed and bound in a diadem covering the tops of his ears, with an  upturned fringe along his forehead; the personage expressively gazes through slightly  convex and heavy­lidded, almond­shaped eyes. Forward­facing, gently arching brows  merge with the bridge of his nose to unify the sober expression.

24


25


14.

GREEK TERRACOTTA THEATRICAL MASK

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 3rd – 2nd Century B.C. Terracotta Intact, offered with custom base display stand Ex New York collection, acquired in 1992 H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm.)

26


27


15.

GREEK TERRACOTTA SILENUS THEATER MASK

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 4th Century B.C. Terracotta Intact, excellent overall condition Ex American collection, acquired in the 1960s H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.), W. 7 in. (17.8 cm.)

28


29


16.

GREEK BRONZE ROUNDEL OF MEDUSA

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition:

Greek Ca. 3rd – 2nd Century B.C. Bronze Intact, parts of inner circumferential edge missing, mounted on a custom display stand Provenance: Ex Swiss collection, A.W., acquired in the 1970s from Swiss art market Dimensions: Diam. 2 ½ in. (6.4 cm.)

30


25 31


17.

GREEK RING INTAGLIO OF TYCHE WITH INSCRIPTION

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 3rd Century B.C. Red jasper/bronze Intaglio intact, mounted on a fragmentary bronze ring Ex New York private collection, acquired in 1998 ¾ x ½  in. (1.9 x 1.3 cm.)

32


33


18.

EGYPTIAN FLAT FACE GLASS BEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian Ca. 1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 5/8 x ½ in. (15 x 13 mm.)

Cf. Early Glass of the Ancient World, Wolfe Collection, nos. 149­54

34


35


19.

EGYPTIAN FEMALE PORTRAIT GLASS INLAY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Roman Ca. 2nd Century B.C. – 1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 3/8 x ¼ in. (10 x 6 mm.)

Seemingly wearing a flat­topped black headdress tied under chin and neck; opaque red,  white, and black, in blue matrix. Cf. Goldstein, no. 497; Corning Museum of Glass no. 55.1.82 for a similar bust inserted in  a patella cup; Ancient Egyptian Glass and Faience Part III, Christie’s London, 1993, Lot 46.

36


37


20.

EGYPTIAN FLAT FACE GLASS BEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:  

Egyptian Ca. 1st  Century A.D. Glass Intact. Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 H. 5/8 x 1/2 in. (15 x 13 mm.)

Cf. Ancient Egyptian Glass and Faience Part III, Christie’s London, 1993, Lots 42­44.

38


39


21.

ROMAN BLUE GLASS MEDUSA/GORGON FACE INLAY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. 1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 Diam. 3/4 in. (19 mm.)

40


41


22.

ROMAN EGYPTIAN SPHERICAL MOSAIC GLASS FACE BEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Egyptian Ca. 1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 Diam. ½ in. (13 mm.)

The face depicted on this bead alludes to a Gorgon basis, perhaps Medusa. Similar beads  have been found to the North of the Black Sea as well as in Ras el Tin, Egypt, where their  context suggests the dating adopted here.  Cf. Ancient Glass from the Borowski Collection, 149, no. EG­34a­n.

42


43


23.

ROMAN EGYPTIAN SPHERICAL MOSAIC GLASS FACE BEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Egyptian Ca. 1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 Diam. ½ in. (13 mm.)

An almost circular bead uniquely branded with a two­faced inlay, embedded in dark blue,  yellow, white, black, and red. Cf. Lot 22 in this catalog; Ancient Glass from the Borowski Collection, 149, no. EG­34a­n.

44


45


24.

ROMAN EGYPTIAN SPHERICAL MOSAIC GLASS FACE BEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Egyptian Ca.1st Century A.D. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 Diam. ½ in. (13 mm.)

Cf. Lots 22 and 23 in this catalog; Ancient Glass from the Borowski Collection, 149, no.  EG­34a­n.

46


47


25.

PHOENICIAN OR CARTHAGINIAN ROD­FORMED GLASS HEAD PENDANT

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Phoenician or Carthaginian Ca. 6th – 5th Century B.C. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 H. 1 in. (2.5 cm.)

Representing the head of an African, with a pointed chin, dark blue face and suspension  loop; the turban, eyes, and mouth are in yellow. Cf. Toledo, Early Ancient Glass, no. 42; Sotheby’s New York, December 1993, Lot 219.

48


49


26.

PHOENICIAN OR CARTHAGINIAN ROD­FORMED GLASS HEAD PENDANT

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Phoenician or Carthaginian Ca. 3rd Century B.C. Glass Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 H. ¾ in. (1.9 cm.)

In the form of a blue­and­yellow turbaned male head, with opaque brown face, applied  blue eyes, and suspension loop in blue. Cf. Ancient Egyptian Glass and Faience Part III, Christie’s London, 1993, Lot 159.

50


51


27.

PHOENICIAN OR CARTHAGINIAN ROD­FORMED JANIFORM GLASS HEAD  PENDANT

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Phoenician or Carthaginian Ca. 6th – 5th  Century B.C. Marble Intact Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 H. ½ in. (1.3 cm.)

Janus­headed pendant, with hair, beard, and eyes in dark blue, face in light blue and  white, and suspension loop in light blue. Cf. Corning no. 213; Toledo no. 41; Wolkenberg collection, Christie’s London, 1991, Lot  160; Ancient Egyptian Glass and Faience Part III, Christie’s, 1993, Lot 158.

52


53


28.

PHOENICIAN OR CARTHAGINIAN ROD­FORMED GLASS HEAD PENDANT

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Phoenician or Carthaginian Ca. 5th – 4th  Century B.C. Marble Intact, but for right temple missing Ex European collection, acquired 1960s; Aphrodite Gallery exhibition, 1915 H. 1 in. (2.5 cm.)

Beige/yellowish head, with beard, eyes, hair, and suspension loop in cobalt blue; the  turban alternates in white and blue. Cf. Ancient Glass from the Borowski Collection, pp. 196­98, nos. P­33­35.

54


55


29.

CANOSAN TERRACOTTA RELIEF FACE

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Apulia Ca. 3rd Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex  Munzen und  Medaillen AG Basel, Swiss  collection A.W., acquired in  1987 Dimensions: H. 8 ¼ in. (21.5 cm.) Published in Munzen und Medaillen AG 1987, Sonderliste W., no. 32, p. 59.

56


57


30.

TARENTUM GORGON TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:  

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Elsa Bloch­Diener, Bern, A.W. collection, Switzerland, acquired in 1982 6 ¼ x 5 in. (16 x 12.9 cm.) 

58


59


31.

TARENTUM MEDUSSA TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:  

Tarentum Ca. 5th Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Galerie Elsa Bloch­Diener, Bern, A.W. Collection, Switzerland  7 ¾ x 9 1/2  in. (19.9 X 24.2 cm.) 

60


61


32.

CANOSAN TERRACOTTA FACE RELIEF

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Apulian Ca. 4th – 3rd Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Elsa Bloch­Diener, Bern, A.W. collection, Switzerland, acquired in 1981 H. 6.7 x 7 in. (17 x 18 cm.) 

62


63


33.

ATTIC GREEK RED­FIGURE POTTERY PLATE OF GORGON HEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Greek Ca. 6th Century B.C. Pottery Complete, re­attached from several fragments Ex  A.W. Collection, Switzerland, Ernest  Brummer, 1976; Sotheby Parke  Bernet, 1949 Dimensions: Diam. 5 ¼ in. (13.3 cm.)     Published in D. Kallipolitis­Feytmans, Les plats attique a figures noires (1974), no. 359, A  III 50, Table 66, Figure 50.

64


65


34.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 2 in. (5 cm.)

66


67


35.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 5/8 in. (4 cm.)  

68


69


36.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 ½ in. (3.8 cm.)

70


71


37.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN 

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 ½ in. (3.8 cm.)

72


73


38.

GREEK TERRACOTTA FEMALE HEAD

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 ¼ in. (3.2 cm.)

74


75


39.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Tarentum Ca. 6th – 4th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 ½ in. (3.8 cm.)

76


77


40.

GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A MINIATURE KORE

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Greek Ca. 6th – 5th  Century B.C. Terracotta Intact Ex Swiss collection, 1970s, New York collection; Aphrodite Gallery  exhibition, 1918 Dimensions: H. 1 ¾ in. (4.5 cm.)

78


79 59


TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE Each object offered is subject to prior sale and is unconditionally guaranteed genuine.  Sale is for cash payable in U.S. Dollars. All prices are subject to change without notice.  International clients must submit payments in U.S. Dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank, or  can wire payment directly to our bank account. New York residents must add the  appropriate sales tax (currently 8.875%). Every object we offer has been legally acquired  and, if imported by us, we have done so in accordance with international laws concerning  the trade in antiquities. Each object offered has been carefully selected for its eye appeal  and upside investment potential, and comes with a clear title of ownership. Detailed  condition reports for all objects are available upon request. Shipping and packing charges  are additional. Title remains with us until payment is made in full.

                                                                     


1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A

Art of the Ancients Ancient Portraits Volume VI 2018  

Why is it that the most famous and popularly enduring pieces to survive from antiquity are portraits? From Phidias’ legendary colossi and Pr...

Art of the Ancients Ancient Portraits Volume VI 2018  

Why is it that the most famous and popularly enduring pieces to survive from antiquity are portraits? From Phidias’ legendary colossi and Pr...

Advertisement