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APHRODITE ANCIENT ART ART OF THE ANCIENTS VOLUME III 2016

1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A


APHRODITE ANCIENT ART ART OF THE ANCIENTS VOLUME III- 2016 I frequently marvel at the range of pieces featured in thematically, culturally broad antiquities catalogs. Different objects of varying cultures–some at war, some allied, hundreds and thousands of years between them–just pages apart from each other. While these unique objects served different people in various ways, they all share one thing in common: their differences. In fact, the very qualities that mark a piece as unique unite with those discerning qualities of other works to distinguish their commonality. They are all beautiful, fragile testaments to human achievement in both practicality and artistry, regardless of their age, medium, or purpose. Thus, this catalog is a celebration of inter-millennial multiculturalism. From Roman marble figures to Islamic ceramics, diversity is celebrated in a rich compendium of ancient crafting traditions. The objects presented here–in the higher brackets of quality craftsmanship, complete with great provenance, and continuously appreciating in value–have survived thousands of years and are still standing. They were all made by people, and these works bridge the legacy of those individuals to appreciative, inspired individuals today. This year marks our fifteenth anniversary dealing in ancient art. We are proud of what we have accomplished and hope to continue offering our veteran clients and newcomers alike with quality pieces, expert guidance and advice on acquiring investment-grade objects, and appraisal services for tax or insurance purposes. Thank you for a wonderful fifteen years! Enjoy! -Julian J. Rifai

1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A


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ARCHAIC GREEK BRONZE CORINTHIAN HELMET, CIRCA 6TH CENTURY B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 6th century B.C. Bronze Intact, some restoration Ex-French private collection, 1980s; American private collection, New York, 1998. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.)

Modeled from a single, thin sheet of bronze that has been cast and hammered, this type belongs to the latest of three groups presently established for the classification of Corinthian helmets. The front represents a stylized face with wide, horizontal almond-shaped openings for the eyes, divided in the middle by the nose protector and a long slit that separates the paragnathides (riveted side pieces made for the protection of the cheeks). Above the eyes a ridge draws two arches imitating eyebrows, extending further to both sides in the forms of snake-stylized lateral volutes. Small holes are pierced all around the cheek protectors and the edge of the rear rim, and would have been attached to an inner lining made of leather. At the center of the head is a palmette made of nine leaves in relief. The presence of the central palmette, as well as the snake-like bodies, enables us to link this piece to a subgroup of Corinthian helmets produced in Magna Graecia, which chronologically belong to the second half of the late 6th century B.C. and are limited in number. The structure and pattern represented highlight features of the later Chalcidian helmet, popular in the 5th–4th centuries, namely in Magna Graecia. Cf. Antike Helme: Sammlung Lipperhiede und Andre Bestande des Antikenmuseums, Berlin, Mainz/Rhine, 1988, pp. 96-99; pp. 412-415; M. Comstock and C. Vermeule, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1971, pp. 404-407, no. 582; H. Pflug. Schultz und Zier, Helme aus dem Antikenmuseums Berlin und Waffen Anderer, Sammlungen, Basel, 1989, p. 21, p. 59, no. 22.

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HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF APOLLO, 2ND–1ST CENTURY B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek 2nd–1st century B.C. Marble Intact, minor damage to the nose, in fine style Ex-French private collection; Sotheby’s London, May 1992; A. von S. Collection, New York. H. 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm.)

Marble bust of a youth, likely Apollo, his head turning to the right; the oval face’s chin is slightly lifted and the youth’s gaze is steadfast. His centrally parted hair is pulled back, the partition on his forehead gently contrasting with the smoothed hair of his head’s top and crown; a tress falls down each side of the neck. Thick bands of hair partially cover his delicately delineated ears.

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ROMAN MARBLE FIGURE OF MERCURY, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. A.D. 2nd century Marble Intact Ex-Japanese private collection, 1980s; Christie’s auction, New York, December 2002, Lot 251; American private collection. H. 28 1/8 in. (71.4 cm.)

Sculpted marble depiction of the god; thick rectangular base, sculpted as one with the statue. The weight of his body is supported by his right leg and the ram, looking up, below his slightly bent right arm, which stands on an integral plinth of irregular oval form. His left leg is gently bent and stepping forward. The deity is nude but for a chlamys pinned at his right shoulder and worn diagonally across his chest, with winged sandals and wings in his center-parted hair; he holds a caduceus in his left hand and a money bag in his right. There are traces of red pigment over the chlamys pin, as well as the base knob of the caduceus.

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ROMAN DRAPED MARBLE FIGURE OF A MUSE, CIRCA A.D. 1ST–2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. A.D. 1st–2nd century Marble Intact, some restoration to lower arm and base, head re-attached Ex-American East Coast private collection, 1980s. H. 20 3/4 in. (52.5 cm.), with base

The muse of tragedy, Melpomene, standing atop a thick, rounded base; she supports her weight with the left leg, bending the right in a way indicative of turning to the left. She wears a peplos with an overfold wrapped around her lower body, the ends tossed over her left shoulder; a stephane adorns her centrally parted, wavy hair. The muse holds her characteristic tragic mask in her left hand; the right arm was restored in antiquity with an incorrect attribute, an aulos characteristic of Euterpe, the muse of lyric poetry, placed in that hand. Cf. a similar marble statue, of Thalia, the muse of comedy, in the Museo Archeologico, Napoli.

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ROMAN BRONZE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR DOMITIAN, CIRCA A.D. 81–96

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. A.D. 81–96. Bronze Intact, reddish patina, mounted on a custom base display stand Ex-European art market; New York private collection (with Art Loss Register certificate). H. 1 3/4 in. (4.5 cm.)

Roman bronze portrait head of the emperor Domitian. The hollow cast head reflects Domitian’s third portrait type, created for his ascension, with the hair around his face in the upswept, so-called “coma in gradus formata” style. Small-scale heads of emperors like this one were suitable for display in the household shrine of a Roman dwelling, along with images of the family ancestors and patron gods. Cf. a bronze head of similar size for Emperor Gaius (Caligula), at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, inv. # 25.78.35 (on view in Gallery 165).

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ROMAN BRONZE BUST OF PAPPOSILENUS, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. A.D. 2nd century Bronze Intact, with pleasing greenish/bluish patina Ex-European private collection, 1980s H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.)

A bronze bust, with head turned slightly rightÍž he has a beard of thick, curling locks, with stamped circles for his hair, deeply set eyes with furrowed brows, and a creased forehead. An animal skin, perhaps a nebris, covers the left shoulder, with the right bare, and a bare chest with large nipples. Extending from the back is an iron attachment pinÍž this bust was perhaps a furniture attachment. In Greek mythology, Silenus is the foster father and eternal companion of Dionysus. Typically depicted as the oldest satyr of the Dionysian retinue, he is often referred to as Papposilenus. Cf. Christie's Antiquities, New York,, December 1999, Lot 336.

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7. GREEK GOLD NECKLACE WITH A GOLD AND GARNATE LUNATE PENDANT, CIRCA 2ND–1ST CENTURY B.C. Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Hellenistic Ca. 2nd–1st century B.C. Bronze The entire necklace and its components are of an exceptional, museum-quality state of preservation; wearable Ex-Swiss private collection, acquired in 1996. L. 22 in. (56 cm.), chain, W. 1 1/2 in. (3.8 cm.), pendant

Formed of a length of double wire, loop-in-loop, terminating in tubular collars and a hook-and-loop closure. The pendant is of a crescent shape, ornamented with filigree spirals and petals and centered by a large cabochon garnet, in a dog-tooth setting and framed by double volutes; the ends are each of a tulip shape, ornamented with filigrees and two dangling grape bunches, one on each side. Dangling from the center is another drop-shaped garnet cabochon, set in a gold oval of filigrees.

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EGYPTIAN WEDJAT EYE AND BEAD NECKACE, CIRCA 1550–1070 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian Ca. 1550–1070 B.C. (New Kingdom, Dynasty XVIII-XX) Blue faience and gold Intact, exceptional state of preservation; wearable Ex-New York private collection, acquired in 1976. L. 16 1/2 in. (42 cm.)

A re-strung Egyptian turquoise necklace of blue beads, centered by a turquoise-blue-detailed wedjat eye and strung together with modern 22 carat gold, fluted, barrel-shaped beads; the hook clasp is modern 24 carat gold.

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GREEK GOLD, GARNET AND AGATE NECKLACE, CIRCA 3RD–2ND CENTURY B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 3rd–2nd century B.C. Gold Intact, excellent state of preservation; wearable Ex-Francesca Artuner Collection, Brussels 1992; New York private collection. Published in Christie’s Sale 2771, December 2013, Lot 261. L. 16 1/4 in. (42.5 cm.)

Composed of links of gold wire, every other link threaded through a spherical garnet bead. The ends each with a barrel-shaped, banded agate bead, the caps fringed with tongues of filigree, twisted gold wire. Back-to-back tongues at the outer end, the tongues preserving some white enamel, with agate terminals in the forms of goat heads. Threaded through a hook-and-loop closure.

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ROMAN GLASS RING WITH CARNELIAN INTAGLIO, CIRCA A.D. 1ST CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Roman Ca. A.D. 1st century Glass and carnelian stone Intact, wearable Ex-American private collection, 1994. L. 1 1/8 in. (2.9 cm.), Inside Diam. 14 mms. (Size-7, European, Size-3, American)

With oval shank and concave bezel; set with a carnelian intaglio engraved with a female head wearing a himation drawn over in profile, to the left. Cf. similar pieces in British Museum, Catalogue of Finger Rings, Greek Etruscan Roman in the Department of Antiquities, British Museum, London 1997, pl. XXXIX, no. 1562; Christie’s London Sale 7207, October 2012, Lot 184 (for similar intaglio); Sotheby’s London, July 1994, The Benzian Collection of Ancient and Islamic Glass, Lot 216, p. 112 (for a similar glass ring).

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11.

EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME PAINTED WOODEN FALCON, 525–30 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian 525–30 B.C. Wood Intact, with original polychromy Ex-English private collection; Royal-Athena Galleries. H. 4 1/2 in. (11 cm.)

A small, wooden falcon; painted blue lotus petals decorate the white-background collar, segmenting the red back and golden-yellow throat. A counterpoise is suspended from the back and a large loop pendant hangs at the front. The finely carved falcon rests on an integral rectangular base. Falcons were symbolic of Horus as hunter. This may have acted as a charm to bless its owner with a fruitful hunt.

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EGYPTIAN UPPER PART OF A WOODEN ANTHROPOID SARCOPHAGUS, 664–525 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Egyptian 664–525 B.C. Wood Intact, very good Ex-European private collection (with export record from the Directorate General of Antiquities, Lebanon, 1975, and Art Loss Register certificate). H. 43 1/4 in. (110 cm.), W. 23 1/2 in. (60 cm.)

Upper part of an Egyptian wooden anthropoid sarcophagus; polychrome over gesso, bronze inlay for the eyeliners and brows. The grinning, bronze-colored mask wears an elaborate wig and painted collar of long and round beads alternating in color; with a prominent scarab on the forehead and false beard. Cf. Sotheby’s Antiquities, London, July 1987, Lot 132, p. 42.

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13.

ROMAN MOSAIC WITH GEOMETRIC DESIGNS, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Roman Ca. A.D. 2nd century Tesserae Intact, complete with minimal restoration, mounted on a lightweight frame Ex-European private collectionÍž Swiss private collection, 1980s. 75 1/8 x 43 3/8 in. (191 x 110 cm.)

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ROMAN MOSAIC WITH ANIMALS, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Roman Ca. A.D. 2nd century Tesserae Intact, complete with minimal restoration, mounted on a lightweight frame Ex-European private collectionÍž Swiss private collection, 1980s. 52 3/8 x 109 1/2 in. (134 x 278 cm.)

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15.

CORINTHIAN BLACK-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER, CIRCA 530 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 530 B.C. Pottery Complete, reassembled from large fragments Ex-British private collection, D.D., London, acquired 1978. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.), W. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm.)

Obverse decorated with a bird, perhaps a black swan, in between two sirens, with ridge design on upper border of positive spaceÍž reverse decorated with a goat.

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16.

GREEK BOEOTIAN DECORATED POTTERY KANTHAROS, CIRCA 440–420 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Greek Ca. 440–420 B.C. Pottery Intact Ex-European private collection, 1980s. H. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm.)

With a band of floral motifs and wavy tendrils.

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LARGE APULIAN RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATER BY THE WHITE SAKKOS PAINTER, CIRCA 310 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Apulian Ca. 310 B.C. Pottery Intact Ex-West German private collection, H.W., purchased for Dr. St. Drier, acquired in 1997. H. 29 5/9 in. (75.2 cm.)

The obverse portion of the neck is decorated with a woman’s head between elaborate floral patterns, the body on both sides decorated with a large woman’s head wearing a sakkos. A vinetendril in Gnathian technique encompasses the base stand. The two handles terminate in volutes decorated with female relief heads. Four swan heads decorate the shoulders.

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18.

CORE FORMED GLASS ARYBALLOS, CIRCA 6TH–5TH CENTURY B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance:

Dimensions:

Phoenician Ca. 6th–5th century B.C. Glass Intact, excellent condition Ex-The Breitbart Collection of Ancient Glass, 1970s; American private collection, acquired in 1978 from Safani Gallery, New York; Sotheby’s auction, New York, June 1990, Lot 65. H. 2 9/16 in. (6.5 cm.)

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19.

CORE FORMED GLASS ALABASTRON, CIRCA 5TH CENTURY B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Phoenician Ca. 5th century B.C. Glass Intact, preserving its original fire polish Ex-German private collection, acquired from Maxburg Galerie Antiken, Munich, in 1985. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.)

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LARGE SPHERICAL GLASS FLASK, CIRCA A.D. 3RD CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 3rd century Glass Intact, with iridescence and some deposits Ex-European private collection; American private collection, 1980s. H. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm.)

Pale green glass. This attractive flask has a large spherical body extending into a long, tubular neck, which blooms into an elaborate lip with a thick-collared rim. The piece is slightly flattened at the bottom. Cf. The Constable-Maxwell Collection of Ancient Glass, Sotheby’s Parke-Bernet, London, June 1979, no. 125, p. 77; Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum, John Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 146, pp. 58-59.

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FOUR-HANDLED GLASS FLASK, CIRCA A.D. 3RD–4TH CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 3rd–4th century Glass Intact, preserving its original fire polish Ex-New York private collection, New York art market, 1980s. H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.)

Tall piriform body with flaring neck, decorated with applied turquoise bands and double handles descending in crimped trails to each side of the body. Resting on a flared foot.

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LARGE GLASS JAR WITH ZIGZAG TRAIL DECORATION, CIRCA A.D. 4TH CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Easter Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 4th century Glass Intact, excellent state of preservation Ex-German private collection, acquired in 1992. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.2 cm.)

Turquoise green, with emerald green glass trailing. Exhibits a spherical body and broad neck, with collared rim; joined by a pair of applied trailed handles, which extend from the vessel’s shoulders and pull up to the rim. The zigzag trail decoration runs around the middle of the body. Cf. Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, Nina Kunina, St. Petersburg, 1997, no. 406, p. 333; Ancient Glass at the Newark Museum, Susan Auth, Newark, 1976, no. 180, p. 142.

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LARGE MARBLED GLASS UNGUENTARIUM, CIRCA A.D. 1ST CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 1st century Glass Complete, reassembled from several fragments with weathering and iridescence Ex-European private collection, acquired in the 1980s. H. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm.)

Translucent amber glass with white marvered bands. A very elegant vessel, this impressive unguentarium has a small, ovoid lower body with a long, thin strand of glass drawn out from its bottom. The tall neck tapers gently inward toward the top and the lip has a flattened rim. Trails of opaque, white glass are applied in a festoon pattern over the body. This piece is one of the largest known of its type. Cf. Ancient Glass At The Newark Museum, Susan Auth, Newark 1976, no. 54, p. 59 (but smaller and colored differently); Roman Glass From Dated Finds, C. Isings, Croningen 1957, form 9; Glaser der Antike, Sammlung Erwin Oppenlander, Hamburg 1974, no. 380; Ancient Glass in The Yale University Art Gallery, Susan Matheson, Meriden 1980, no. 65, p. 25.

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LARGE FREE-BLOWN TUBULAR GLASS FLASK, CIRCA A.D. 3RD–4TH CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Gallo-Rheinish Ca. A.D. 3rd–4th century Glass Intact, excellent state of preservation, with deposits Ex-American private collection, 1980s. H. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.)

Colorless glass with deposits. The long body flares outward at the base of the neck, tapering inward gradually toward the bottom. This particular piece is a very large example of the form. Cf. Roman Glass From Dated Finds, C. Isings, Croningen 1957, form 105; Yogoslavia, no. 232, p. 196, fig. on p. 210.

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LARGE GLOBULAR SINGLE-HANDLED GLASS JUG, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 2nd century Glass Intact, preserving its original fire polish, excellent iridescence throughout Ex-German private collection, acquired in 1985. H. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm.)

Pale green glass. Free-blown, with everted rim and tubular cut-out below; broad-ribbed handle. Cf. The Bomford Collection of Pre-Roman & Roman Glass, no. 13; Roman Glass From Dated Finds, C. Isings, Groningen 1957, form 50a; The Constable Maxwell Collection of Ancient Glass, Sotheby’s Parke-Bernet, London, June 1979, no. 214.

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TALL SINGLE-HANDLED JUG, CIRCA A.D. 2ND CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Eastern Mediterranean Ca. A.D. 2nd century Glass Intact, excellent iridescence throughout Ex-American private collection, acquired in the 1980s. H. 7 in. (17.8 cm.)

Translucent green glass. Mold-blown; square-sided with short cylindrical neck, wide, everted rim, and applied, verticallyribbed handle. The base has a circular stamp and four small, rounded knobs. Cf. Roman Glass From Dated Finds, C. Isings, Groningen 1957, form 50b; 3000 Jahre Glaskunst von der Antike bis zum Jugendstil, Lucerne 1981, no. 309; The Constable Maxwell Collection of Ancient Glass, Sotheby’s Parke-Bernet, London, June 1979, nos. 126-131.

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SASSANIAN FACET-CUT GLASS BOWL, CIRCA A.D. 5TH –7TH CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Persian Ca. A.D. 5th–7th century Glass Intact, excellent weathering and iridescence throughout Ex-American private collection, acquired in the 1980s. H. 7 in. (17.8 cm.)

Pale green glass. Mold-blown; exhibits a hemispherical body with wheel-cut, hexagonal and round facets. Cf. Glaser der Antike, Sammlung Erwin Oppenlander, Axel von Saldern et. al. Hamburg 1974, no. 758, p. 248; Achaemenid and Sassanian Cut Glass, Saldern, p. 10, fig. 6; 7000 Ans d’Art en Iran, Paris 1961, no. 842.

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LARGE CANAANITE POTTERY STORAGE AMPHORA, CIRCA 1200–800 B.C.

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Levantine Ca. 1200–800 B.C. Pottery Intact, preserving some of its original pigment, with some deposits Ex-European private collection, acquired in 1982. H. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm.)

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LARGE ISLAMIC KASHAN DECORATED BOTTLE, CIRCA A.D. 1170–1199

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Islamic Ca. A.D. 1170–1199 (Seljuk Period) Ceramic Intact, excellent state of preservation Ex-early Middle Eastern private collection, 1980s. H. 14 1/2 in. (36.8 cm.)

The spherical body exhibits Chinese motifs and a dotted rope pattern. It rests on a short foot rising, converging into a tubular neck crowned with a flaring, prominently sexpartitioned mouth that ends in an everted lip. Decorating the mouth are six uniquely styled Chinese faces. Richly colored in cream and brown. The bottle’s luster pigment contains silver oxide, ochre, and either vinegar or grape juice, which were painted onto the pottery over the fired glaze and fired again at a low temperature. During this firing, the oxygen in the kiln would have been reduced by stoking the fire to produce a smoky atmosphere, causing these metals to adhere to its surface. After this firing process, the bottle was cleaned to reveal the splendid iridescence of the luster. The dark, brassy color, typical of lusterware pieces from Kashan, indicates that silver rather than copper oxide was used in the manufacture of this particular luster glaze. This piece is a fine example of fritware, which revolutionized pottery manufacture in 12th-century Iran, with its strength facilitating the creation of larger ceramic pieces. As frit is rather stiff and not very pliable, fritware vessels were generally molded rather than thrown on the potter’s wheel. The fritware paste would be rolled out, pressed into a mold, and later scraped down when almost dry to achieve the required thinness for ceramic production. It seems likely that a large amount of Islamic lusterware production took place in Kashan, Iran, where several potters signed or dated lustered pottery and tiles. Manufacture was at its peak during the second half of the 12th century and well into the 13th century. Cf. a similar example in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, C 119-135.

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LARGE ISLAMIC KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED BOTTLE, CIRCA A.D. 12TH CENTURY

Culture: Date: Medium: Condition: Provenance: Dimensions:

Islamic Ca. A.D. 12th century Ceramic Intact, very good condition with underlying iridescence Ex-early Middle Eastern private collection, 1980s. H. 12 1/4 in. (31cm.)

With spherical body on short foot risingÍž the body converges into a tubular neck, topped with a flaring, deep-cusped mouth with an everted lip. Under the glaze, the body is painted with four vertical black bands of reserved naskh inscriptions. A similar band around the shoulder divides the base of the neck into panels, each showing leaf-shaped patterns. Cf. a similar example that sold at a Christie's London auction in April 1999.

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE All objects offered in this catalog are subject to prior sale, and are unconditionally guaranteed genuine. A certificate of guarantee will accompany every sold object. Sale is for cash payable in U.S. Dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank, or payment can be wired directly to our bank account. New York state residents must add the appropriate sales tax. Every object we offer has a clear title and has been legally acquired. If imported by us, the importation was done in accordance with international laws concerning the trade in antiquities. Condition reports are available upon request. Packing and shipping charges are additional. Title remains with us until payment is made in full.

Research: Jamal Rifai, Julian Rifai.

Editing: Julian Rifai


1200 Fifth Avenue New York, New York 10029, U.S.A

Aphrodite ancient art art of the ancients volume iii 2016  

Aphrodite ancient art art of the ancients volume III - 2016 - Our latest catalogue of exquisite works.

Aphrodite ancient art art of the ancients volume iii 2016  

Aphrodite ancient art art of the ancients volume III - 2016 - Our latest catalogue of exquisite works.

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