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OUR VISION IS TO BE THE NATION’S MOST DYNAMIC CULTURAL RESOURCE, ENRICHING LIVES B Y PROMOTING KNOWLEDGE AND ENJOYMENT OF AUSTRALIA’S RELATIONSHIP WITH ITS WATERWAYS AND THE SEA

australian national maritime museum annual report 2004-2005

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A u s t r a l ia n N A T IO N A L M A R IT IM E Museum


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© Commonwealth of Australia 2005 ISSN 1034-5019 This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Australian National Maritime Museum The Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) at Darling Harbour, Sydney, opens 9.30 am -5 .0 0 pm every day (open 9.30 a m -6 .0 0 pm January) Closed 25 December

Entry at 30 June 2005 Museum Ticket (including museum galleries, special exhibitions, lighthouse and W harf 7): FREE Big Ticket (including Vampire, Onslow; James Craig, Endeavour and audio guide): adult $30, child/concession $16, family $65 Big Ticket (including Vampire, Ons/owand EITHER James Craig or Endeavour and audio guide): adult $25, child/concession $13, family $55 Navy Ticket (includes Vampire, Onslow and audio guide): adult $18, child/concession $9, fam ily $40 James Craig Ticket: adult $10, child/concession $6, family $20 Endeavour Ticket: adult $15, child/concession $8, family $30 2 Murray Street Darling Harbour NSW: Executive, commercial & visitor services, building services, security, fleet W harf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre Pyrmont NSW: Vaughan Evans Library, curators, registration, conservation, design, volunteers and ANMM administration, Sydney Heritage Fleet: Mailing address GPO Box 5131 Sydney NSW 2001 telephone (02) 9298 3777 facsimile (02)9298 3780

cover: Seahorse stern ornament from the royal launch of King Louis Philippe, carved at Cherbourg

Website (including this annual report) www.anmm.gov.au

dockyard, 1830-1848. It’s one of the magnificent sculptures the museum has borrowed from the

CO N TACT O FFICER For enquiries about this report please contact the editor telephone (02) 9298 3647 facsimile (02) 9298 3670 emailjmellefont@anmm.gov.au Editor Jeffrey Mellefont ANMM

Musee National de la Marine, Paris, for this year’s outstanding exhibition Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces o f French Naval Sculpture. Photographer A Frolows/ANMM title page: HM Bark Endeavour at anchor, watercolour (1989) by

Assistant editor Dr Wendy Wilkins ANMM Photography Andrew Frolows (staff photographer), Jeffrey Mellefont ANMM, unless otherwise credited Graphic designer Jeremy Austen, austenkaupe Layout and production Vanda Graphics Printed in Australia by Focus Press

Western Australian artist Ross Shardlow. ANMM collection


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C H AIR M AN ’S MESSAGE

It gives me great pleasure to present the Australian National Maritime Museum's Annual Report for the period 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005. We are now midway through the museum’s Strategic Plan for 2003 to 2006, and I’m pleased to report we’re achieving the goals and outcomes which we set ourselves. There have been some exciting and challenging milestones during the year under report. None were higher profile than the arrival of the Endeavour replica at the museum. The spectacular ship was transferred to the Australian Government by the HM Bark Endeavour Foundation which had operated it over the last decade and a half. The replica was then gifted to the museum by the Australian Government, along with additional funds for its operation. The eyes of Australia are on us as the museum takes on stewardship of this extraordinary artefact which has been acclaimed world wide, and which for so many Australians is a powerful symbol of their history. This year, too, the museum’s Council has endorsed the bold step of making entry to the museum’s galleries free to all visitors. This initiative has undergone intitial trials with impressive success, and in making it a continuing feature we are acknowledging the paramount importance of increasing public access to this, the nation’s leading maritime heritage resource. We are confident that subsequent reviews will reinforce the value of this arrangement. The year’s outstanding exhibitions, educational programs and public events build the museum's reputation for continually renewing, expanding and elaborating the concepts of maritime history and heritage. I’d like to pay special tribute to all who worked to bring the spectacular Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture a\\ the way from Paris. It’s an exhibition that has, for many people, redefined the notion of what a maritime museum is about. I would like once again to offer thanks to all who have made these achievements Chairman Mark Bethwaite with

possible: the Australian Government and the Minister for the Arts and Sport Senator

the figurehead from Queen Marie-

the Hon Rod Kemp - in particular for his enthusiasm and financial support for bringing

Antoinette’s ceremonial launch, at the opening of Genies de la Mer

the Endeavour replica to the museum; corporate and individual sponsors, donors

- Masterpieces o f French Naval

and supporters; my fellow Council members; and a dedicated management, staff and

Sculpture

volunteers.

Mark Bethwaite, Chairman Australian National Maritime Museum


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CONTENTS

Vision statement

1

Contact officer

2

Chairman’s message

3

Mission statement

6

Values

7

S E C T IO N 1 Y E A R IN R E V IE W

Highlights 2004-2005

10

Director's overview

12

Exhibitions and major events

20

Statutory information requirements:

26

Effectiveness in managing human resources, joint consultative council, occupational health and safety, workplace diversity, access and equity, Commonwealth disability strategy, disability action plan, environmental performance, insurance and indemnity, risk management, developments in external scrutiny, reports by the Auditor General, fraud control, advertising and market research, corporate governance, freedom of information, judicial decisions, ministerial directions

S E C T IO N 2 P E R F O R M A N C E R E P O R T IN G

Key Result Area 1 Engaging our audiences

30

Strategies and performance reporting: a modern maritime museum; education and visitor programs; market research; venue hire and catering; The Store; Sydney by Sail Key Result Area 2 Maritime heritage

36

Strategies and performance reporting: maritime heritage and material culture, Australian Register of Historic Vessels, Blackmore’s First Lady, Tu Do, maritime archaeology program, maritime history book prize, acquisitions, registration and conservation, USA Gallery, Indigenous affairs, fleet, Vaughan Evans Library, outreach and collaboration Key Result Area 3 Infrastructure development

46

Strategies and performance reporting: early loan repayment, capital works, building services, security, communications and information management services, human resource management and OHS, staffing overview, volunteers Key Result Area 4 Reputation and recognition

52

Strategies and performance reporting: customer feedback, marketing, media, publications and website, design, corporate support, The Welcome Wall, Members Performance overview

57


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S E C T IO N 3 F IN A N C IA L S T A T E M E N T S

Statement by Council members

58

Independent audit report

60

Statement of financial performance

62

Statement of financial position

63

Statement of cash flows

64

Schedule of commitments and contingencies

65

Notes

66

S E C T IO N 4 A P P E N D IC E S

01. Visitors and Members programs

Images from the exhibition Les

98

02. Selected acquisitions to the National Maritime Colllection

102

03. Donors to the National Maritime Colllection

105

04. MMAPSS grants

112

05. ANMM publications

114

06. Staff publications

115

07. Staff conference papers and lectures

116

08. Staff media appearances

118

09. Staff professional appointments

120

10. Staff overseas travel

121

11. Organisation chart at 30 June 2005

122

12. APS staff at 30 June 2005

123

13. Council members

126

14. Council meetings and committees

128

15. Australian National Maritime Foundation

129

16. Sponsors, patrons and supporters

130

17. Corporate and supporting members

131

18. Volunteers

132

19. Volunteer speakers panel

135

20. Consultants

136

21. Customer service charter

137

22. List of Acts administered

138

23. Functions and powers of the minister

139

24. Functions and powers of the museum

140

25. Director’s statement

141

26. Index

142

Genies de la M er - Masterpieces o f French Naval Sculpture. Photographs Š Musee National de la Marine, Paris


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OUR MISSION IS TO BRING MARITIME HERITAGE TO LIFE AND PRESERVE IT FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS THROUGH...

programs and

national

fostering

research,

products that are

leadership and

traditional skills

acquisition,

creative, inclusive,

international

and practices

conservation,

enjoyable and

collaboration

memorable

interpretation, outreach and education

T he best o f all was the N ational M aritim e Museum. I had a lovely w ander there. And it’s a g o o d thing to do on a w et day, beautiful. G ee, they

top: More than 60 members of

d o it well. H ad a w alk around

the Zamprogno family from Italy

Endeavour, the Captain C oo k

of the Welcome Wall, in October

replica ship, ju st fabulous.

left: Replica of Lt James Cook’s

attended the unveiling of panel 36 2004.

Endeavour sails home. Mike Carlton Sydney 2UE


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OUR VALUES

we focus on the

we promote a broad

we value

we strive for the

interpretation of

partnership and

highest standards

lives of people

maritime heritage

collaboration

of service

as the core of our products and

and culture

programs

we champion

we regard

we encourage

integrity and ethical

engagement,

commitment,

practice

innovation and

application and

creativity as the

achievement

keystones of our work

top: Decorated powder horn from a whale ship, Boston, USA, circa 1840, on display in Scrimshaw - A r t o f the Whaler. left: Esther and Evie RolfeDouglass dressed sailor-style for the school holiday About Time program in Sailor Street


left: Transom of a model of the 100-gun, 17th-century flagship of Louis XIV, Le Soleil Royal. Reconstruction byJean-Baptiste Tanneron, Paris, 1839 Š Musee Nationale de la Marine, Paris. opposite: Detail from Tanneron’s model of walnut, boxwood and ebony.


SECTION ONE

...no one should be excused from seeing Les Genies de la Mer. It is unlikely there

will be a more amazing exhibition held anywhere in Australia this year. The craftsmanship that has gone into these sculptures that ornamented the ships o f the French navy... is simply breathtaking... John McDonald Spectrum, Sydney Morning Herald


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HIGHLIGHTS 2 0 0 4 -2 0 0 5

Attracted 1,602,315 interactions

Opened Blackmores First Lady

with the museum (including

and an installation of Kay Cottee’s

411,340 museum visitors) and

shipboard effects to the public

raised $5.5 million gross revenue

(above)

Celebrated the return of the

Hosted the third Australian visit of

Endeavour replica to Australia (left),

the steel-hulled yachts of the Global

to make her home at the ANMM

Challenge round-the-world race

Brought Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture from Paris to Australia - a spectacular display of artworks spanning 1660 to 1860 (left)

Designed and installed About

Unveiled three new Welcome Wall

Time (left) which drew on major

panels (above), with a total of 1,119

international collections of historical

names, one ceremony coinciding

timepieces and chronometers

with Refugee Week and another with the Greek Festival

Established American Friends of ANMM to supportthe USA Gallery


TH E YEAR IN R EV IEW | H IG H LIG H T S 2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

Provided 12 grants worth a total of $30,000 underthe Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS) and two regional museums internships

Organised and led a unique history

Completed a disability action plan

and culture tour of the coasts of southern India, marketed to museum Members and the public (above)

Added 1,708 items to the

Congratulated museum apprentice

Australian National Maritime

shipwright Manny Ariel on winning

Collection

the NSW Medal for best shipwright apprentice of the year

Implemented Phase I of Australian Register of Historic Vessels

Supported maritime archaeological programs (right) of various organisations including the NSW Heritage Office

Produced an Indigenous protocols document, developed by a working party with the aim of raising awareness of Indigenous issues in programs and procedures

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DIRECTOR’S OVERVIEW

Interactions, visits and visitor profile The number of people who visited our exhibitions and historic vessels, and took tours of the Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre this year, was 411,340. If we compare this with visitation just two years ago, it's an increase of nearly 40%. School visitors this year totalled a pleasing 34,897. Some 40,500 guests or clients attended functions held at the museum as part of our venue hire operation, while 3,145 museum Members attended events organised for them. Overall for the year 2004-2005 there were 1,616,015 interactions with the museum. This is our measure of all who availed themselves of ourservices and facilities in one way or another. In addition to the visitations already noted, this includes categories such as enquiries assisted and users of our research and information services.

Free admission The museum’s Council has endorsed the continuation of our initiative of making entry to the museum galleries free of charge. When we decided to trial free entry in late 2003 we were the first of Sydney’s major museums to do so. The initiative was to make our exhibitions more accessible than ever before, and it has worked. Over the initial trial period we saw a substantial increase in our visitation over a comparable period in the previous year, and the numbers have remained encouraging. The challenge for us was always to ensure that the loss of ticket revenue was offset by increased patronage of our other facilities, and ticketed attractions such as the replica of HM Bark Endeavour, by those larger numbers of visitors, so we could continue to provide the full range of attractions and services that our public expects of us. Our confidence that we will be able to do so is reflected in Council's decision to approve free entry as a continuing feature of the museum. Australian maritime history will be one of the beneficiaries, as even more people come through our doors and learn about our fascinating past and present.

above: Director Mary-Louise Williams with Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator Rod Kemp, at the opening of Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture. left: Detail from Napoleon Ps ceremonial launch. Gilded lime wood, Van Petersen, 1810.


TH E YE AR IN R EV IE W | D I R E C T O R ’S OV E R VIE W

The Endeavour replica One of the most significant additions to the museum in many years took place, when the internationally acclaimed replica of James Cook’s legendary Whitby collier, HM Bark Endeavour, was transferred into the museum’s care. Endeavour will be based here, managed and operated by our own staff, after more than a decade of world voyaging. The ship had been operated by the HM Bark Endeavour Foundation, created in 1991 to complete construction in Fremantle WA, and to manage it as a voyaging museum after it was launched in 1993. Senator the Hon Rod Kemp, Minister for the Artsand Sport, received the replica on behalf of the Australian Government from the Foundation’s chairman Dr Michael Sharpe AO, in order to gift it to the museum. Managing Endeavour as a high-profile heritage icon and an exceptional educational asset, and maintaining the replica in sailing survey, is a huge commitmentforthe museum. It takes us into operational areas previously outside our core business. We commenced immediately by building a team comprising the most experienced square rig and replica managers and shipkeeperstodothejob. We have been generously aided in this by additional annual funding from the Australian Government, which will allow us to keep the ship in the best condition possible and to be fully operational on Sydney Harbour. Long-distance offshore voyaging is extremely expensive and for that we will seek corporate sponsorship, in order to extend the ship’s ambassadorial role. Managing the Endeavour replica opens up many superb opportunities for the museum. For many, many Australians Endeavour has an almost mystical status as a symbol of the nation’s colonisation history; operating such an iconic ship demands of us a sensitivity to all Australians' view of history. As the new custodians of this vessel, the eyes of Australia will be on us. top: Endeavour replica moored at Museum Quay, the museum’s historic vessel basin. above: Endeavour’s great cabin set

Exhibitions It’s been a bumper year for exhibitions, which have been colourful and hugely diverse

up in museum mode for visitors, with replicas illustrating life as

in nature and style, as we strive to attract new and wider audiences.

it was when Cook, Banks and Solander worked there duringthe

The highlight of our year - some might say decade! - was the truly wonderful

voyage.

exhibition Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture.


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These magnificent sculptures, figureheads and other works of art decorated French warships and vessels of state from 1660 to 1860. The artworks represent a fascinating period and some of the most powerful and intriguing characters of history, the likes of the Sun King (Louis XIV), Marie-Antoinette and Napoleon. Their grand scale, epic subject matter, sensuous colour and forms have bowled over our audiences. The exhibition came about through a collaboration between the Musee National de la Marine, Paris, owner of the sculptures, the Musee des beaux-arts du Quebec in Canada, and ourselves. It’s a great accolade for us that these French national treasures were allowed to come here - they may never leave Paris again - and a great satisfaction that our energy made it happen. It cements a closer alliance with important French cultural institutions and has boosted our connections with the French community in Australia too. Special mention must be made of our sponsors SDV International Logistics, Cathay Pacific Cargo and ANL Container Line Pty Ltd, since moving priceless items on this scale is a gargantuan undertaking. Other exhibition highlights of the year included: About Time - a brief history of timekeeping on sea and land - drew on major international collections of historical timepieces and chronometers, made possible by our growing links to important overseas and Australian collections. Just one example: the British National Maritime Museum lent its extraordinary working copy of the Flarrison 1 chronometer. The exhibition enjoyed the major support of sponsor IWC International Watch Co Schaffhausen, the Swiss watchmaker. Gina’s Journey - from Istria to Australia, a series of intensely personal paintings in a vibrant style by 74-year-old Croatian migrant Gina Sinozich, captured her family’s 1957 voyage from Istria in Croatia to Australia. Most were commissioned by us from the selftaught artist who has burst upon the gallery scene in recent years. Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film continued its run until February, a cheeky and irreverent history of the sailor suit and its place in popular culture.

above: Winged mermaid figurehead in maritime pine, from the sloop L’A ustralie, carver unknown, 1844. right: Louis XIV’s royal galley La Reale, oil on canvas, artist unknown, circa 1694. Both images © Musee National de la Marine, Paris


TH E YE AR IN R EV IEW | D IR E C T O R 'S O V ER VIEW

Among the year's other exhibition’s were Children of the Crocodile, an examination of East Timor’s recent history and links with Australia; displays of works by documentary photographers and Indigenous artists - and in an entirely new approach for us, an exhibition of classic speedboat photographs selected from our collection by a guest curator who bid for the privilege at a fundraising dinner held by our Australian National Maritime Foundation! We also saluted our founding Chairman who died late last year with Peter Doyle am, Fisherman (1932-2004), a display of personal effects in memory of the contributions to this museum made by this legendary Sydney restaurateur and environmentalist. Staff overcame considerable logistical and conservation hurdles to realise a cherished goal: making the famous yacht Blackmores First Lady accessible to visitors in our Watermarks exhibition where it’s the centerpiece. They can now board, enter the cabin and view an installation of Kay Cottee’s shipboard effects from the historic 1987-88 solo circumnavigation that made her Australia’s best-known sailor.

Travelling exhibitions An additional 13,700 visitors to the South Australian Maritime Museum saw a travelling exhibition, Siglas de Pescadores - Signs of fishermen, which was nearing the end of its Australian tour. We imported this appealing ethnographic study of an Atlantic fishing community in Portugal in mid-2003, and after appearing here for seven months it travelled to venues all around Australia. Since importing and touring exhibitions is an important but complex and demanding part of our outreach activities, staff have this year developed a Temporary and Travelling Exhibitions Production Guide for exhibitions developed, hosted and toured by the museum.

Major events For the third time we hosted the Australian visit of the steel-hulled yachts of the Global Challenge round-the-world race which moored at our wharves, pausing during their punishing circumnavigation which takes them the wrong way, against prevailing winds and tides. The race was conceived of by the famous British yachtsman Sir Chay Blythe as a character-building event for non-professional sailors, who are sponsored to sail the fleet of rugged, identical yachts. One of the most popular museum events ever, Wetworld, returned this year over the summer school holiday to encourage children to experiment with the many enjoyable properties of water. This year, a new wet lab was added to increase the fun and learning, with an emphasis on conservation and avoiding water wastage. top: Gina Sinozich with one of her paintings from Gina’s Journey

We unveiled three new Welcome Wall panels, with a total of 1,119 names cast in

- from Istria to Australia

bronze, on the museum’s tribute to migrants who have journeyed to Australia to make

above: Estanislau da Silva

new homes. The unveilings once again attracted thousands of family and friends of

(centre), East Timor’s Minister for Agriculture, Forests and Fisheries,

Welcome Wall subscribers, one ceremony coinciding with Refugee Week and another

visited the exhibition Children of

with a national festival celebrating Greek culture.

the Crocodile - the Australia-East Timor Story with son Sahe and daughter Nairana


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Demonstratingthe museum’s engagement with the wider Asian and Indian Ocean region, a unique maritime-themed history and cultural tour of the coasts of southern India was developed and marketed to museum Members and the public. The threeweek tour, led by a staff member who specialises in Asian maritime history, took in spice ports of antiquity and colonial periods, contemporary fishing communities and traditional boatbuilding, and a host of littoral cultural sites. Our seminar and lecture program is developing an impressive depth and diversity. Many are commissioned to support current exhibitions - for example a seminar in conjunction with the exhibition About Time which featured stellar academics Professor Paul Davies, Peter Ekin and Professor Marilyn Mitchell. Others keep our audiences up to date with developments in maritime history and related topics, with thoughtprovoking and sometimes controversial topics such as Navy historian Dr Tom Frame’s Anzac Day lecture ‘The Gallipoli campaign and FIMAS Voyager, a tale of two tragedies’. Still others reflect our multidisciplinary approach, for example culinary academic Dr Barbara Santich’s ‘Australian cuisine in the golden age of windjammers’, delivered in the galley of the 1874 barque James Craig.

Collections The National Maritime Collection’s profile is growing among other Australian exhibiting institutions, with a sharp rise in the number of items we have out on loan. Items were on display in National Archives of Australia's Beacons by the Sea travelling exhibition and the Powerhouse Museum’s Sport more than heroes and legends travelling exhibition. Others were on loan to the Supreme Court of Queensland for their Lucinda exhibition, the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia to celebrate their centenary, the South Australian Maritime Museum for their dolphin display and the National Museum of Australia fortheir Encounters exhibition. The number of objects registered in the National Maritime Collection this year was 1,708, among which were 95 groups or collections. The diversity of our collecting activity never ceases to astound and entertain, as we acquired artworks and photographs, ship models and surfboards, tools and instruments, books, stamps, coins, programs, memorabilia, baleen, banners, textiles, ceramics, Olympians’ swim­ wear, cloth sailor dolls, a bottle of brandy that once belonged to Sir Francis Chichester, a can of butter from Kay Cottee’s world voyage, and a whale penis fitted as a lamp. Several collection areas grew in strength, with a very strong showing of maritime art and ship portraiture entering the collection. And we built on our extensive holdings of material relating to Australia’s most famous boatbuilding dynasty, the Halvorsens, with a collection of scrapbooks, plans and clothing relating to the ocean racing and sporting interests of Trygve and Magnus Flalvorsen, and drafting tools used by Trygve and Lars Halvorsen. Among these plans of Halvorsen-designed and crewed yachts that dominated Australian ocean racing in the post-WW2 period are those of the legendary top: Scrimshaw - A rt o f the Whaler

Freya, three-time winner of the Sydney-Flobart yacht race in 1963-65. A number of

highlighted ANM M ’s extensive

these items will be displayed next year.

collection of these sailorly arts and crafts. above: Photograph, 1938, from ANMM’s Sam Hood collection, in the exhibition Sydney - Working Harbour


T H E Y E AR IN R EV IE W | D I R E C T O R ’S OV E R VIE W

Partnerships and collaborations Phase I of our Australian Register of Historic Vessels got underway with the appointment of contract yacht designer and heritage vessel specialist, David Payne, to develop a data base and methodologies, and to research and enter the first tranche of significant vessels. The register will become an important national research tool for maritime heritage and an outreach program extendingthe network of maritime museums in this country. We developed strategies for the official launch and promotion of a new organisation, American Friends of the Australian National Maritime Museum, which has been incorporated to raise knowledge of and support for the museum's USA Gallery. The USA Gallery is the enduring product of a generous endowment which was the United States' bicentennial gift to Australia in 1988. American Friends will facilitate fundraising and promotional activities, and has gained the support of Australian diplomatic missions in the USA. A museum working party produced and published an Indigenous protocols document, with the aim of raising awareness of Indigenous issues as they impact upon museum programsand procedures. Doing so enhanced ourlinkswith bodies such as the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission and the Australia Council, by taking their own protocols as a starting point to develop specifics for material in our collection. Producing this document is a strong statement that we will promote respectful treatment of Indigenous materials, cultures and forms of expression. Twelve grants worth atotal of $30,000 were provided underthe Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS) to non-profit maritime museums top: Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden visits the museum to open the exhibition Swedish Style.

and historical societies, most of them community-based and run by volunteers, to conserve and display their maritime heritage. Projects range from boat restorations

Photographer E Maloney/ANMM

to conservation of exquisite artworks. The scheme was initiated in 1995 and since

above: ANMM Members whale-

then, 113 projects across all Australian states and most of its territories have been

watching off Sydney Heads

supported. It's our most important cultural outreach program, administered by us and jointly funded by the museum and the Australian Government through the Distributed National Collection Program of the Department of Communications, Information

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Technology and the Arts. This year we secured a substantial increase in the Australian Government’s contribution, which will enable us to more than double the number of grants commencing with the 2005-2006 round of grants. We also awarded two regional museums internships which allow people from smaller museums who are managing maritime heritage collections to spend up to four weeks with our staff, developing skills. This year’s interns were Ray Robinson from the Port Broughton Sailing and Boat Club Inc of South Australia, and Marie Nunan, a volunteer from the Geelong Heritage Centre in Victoria. A second staff exchange was undertaken with the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, UK. This important program develops relations with what is arguably the world’s pre-eminent maritime museum - certainly one with critical strategic links to Australian maritime history. Dominic Mackintosh, ANMM marketing services manager, spent two months with the Greenwich museum’s marketing arm. Liz Campbell, a display technician at Greenwich, spent six weeks with our exhibition designers and preparators. Trained underwater archaeologists and divers on staff contributed to the maritime archaeology programs of various organisations including the NSW Heritage Office. Our involvement in the search for remains of James Cook’s Endeavour continues, in Newport, Rhode Island, in the USA. This year Nigel Erskine, ANMM’s new curator of exploration and acting senior maritime archaeologist, was sent to assist the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (RIMAP, led by American archaeologist Dr Kathy Abbass) with its underwater surveys and test excavations. I was recently invited to join the board of the Foundation forthe Preservation of Captain Cook’s Ships, a US organisation which provides administrative and fund­ raising support for Rl MAP’s work. We’re happy to be working with the Foundation and RIMAP to establish a strategic approach for our forthcoming involvement with the wreck site. It’s a project of great significance to us all. I have been appointed acting President of the International Congress of Maritime Museums, continuingthis museum's tradition of close involvement with, and executive membership of, this world body which does important work on standards and policies that relate to our discipline.

above: In the Navy exhibition, right: Director Mary-Louise Williams welcomes the Endeavour replica. Behind (Lto R): ship’s former master, Chris Blake; Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator Rod Kemp; chairman of the HM Bark Endeavour Foundation, Dr Michael Sharpe AO.


TH E Y E AR IN R EV IE W | D I R E C T O R ’S O V E R V IE W

Issues and outlook Our continuation of free museum entry is a keystone of our marketing that now positions us to maximise our audience share. With the right mix of attractions we’re confident that we can do this, and resist the now well-documented, worldwide decline in museum audiences. Sailing over our horizon is the long-awaited Vikings exhibition, to open in November 2005 ready for the summer crowds. Treasures of the Viking world, artefacts and replicas, have been sourced from great European collections, to dig beneath the legend and myth and reveal the truth about these incredible navigators, explorers, warriors, traders and artists. Next year we’ll also open Dreamboats and workboats - the Halvorsen story. It showcases our extensive collection documenting the lives and work of this Norwegian migrant family which became a household name with their popular Hawkesbury hire fleet and finely crafted vessels. Work on several long-term projects which will improve our infrastructure and services made excellent progress during the year. The very complex task of developing the new, state-of-the-art Collection Management Information System neared completion. We began planning for the redevelopment of the Commerce exhibition theme, and we selected a consultant and tenderer to redevelop the museum website, among other things to align it more closely with our business process. And we continued the ongoing process of developing the comprehensive site masterpian, to provide for future growth and to grapple with the challenges posed by our site and the wider precinct. Our neighbourhood gets busier and busier as the rapid development of Pyrmont and Darling Harbour continues, with a number of major construction projects underway that will increase residential and commercial activity on our doorstep. Closer to home we face the demands of maintaining an 18-year-old building and wharfage which needs upgrading. Our attention is now focusing on the building’s eastern fagade and how it can be redeveloped to provide better public amenities and facilities. While we have an outstanding track record in importing and touring exceptional international exhibitions - part of our role as the nation's leading maritime heritage organisation - one constant hurdle that we face is the rarity of suitable, major exhibitions with universal appeal. Another is the escalating costs of moving exhibition material and obtaining insurance coverage, exacerbated by international security concerns and procedures. Along with increased costs of our own security operations, we share with many organisations a growing list of compliance issues from governance to occupational health and safety, risk management, equity and access, on-line standards and copyright compliances. Working in the Australian Government sector, the standards and consequently costs of compliance are high, accompanied by increasing needs to ----------------------------------------------- monitor developments and make submissions. top: Staff organised their own viewing of the 2004 transit of Venus, 235 years after Cook observed a transit in Tahiti above: Entertainers at a Caribbean-themed corporate event held at the museum. Photographer L Faye/ANMM

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EXHIBITIONS AND MAJOR EVENTS

Sydney - Working Harbour

Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film

Sydney’s working harbour has a major

From the manliness of Jack Tar to the

role in Australian industry, trade,

sauciness of ‘hello sailor!’, the sailor

national profile and tourism. The

suit has always seduced. This cheeky,

exhibition showed how developers and

flamboyant and theatrical exhibition

governments are making changes to

traced the evolution in nautical wear

this working harbour. Included were

from around 1748 when it was purely

photographs from the museum’s

functional, to its fashionable and

outstanding collection of Sam Hood's

fetishised forms, exploring ‘sailor style'

work - a fine record of ships, seamen,

as a contemporary cultural phenomenon

work on the wharves and leisure boating.

and celebrating the iconic sailor suit and

Sponsored by Sydney Ports Corporation Coordinator

Daina Fletcher

Curator

Shar Jones

Designers

Adrienne Kabos Eszter Matheson

below: Tug Heroic and Queen Mary, 1942, Sam Hood photograph,

its influence on popular culture. Coordinator

Mariea Fisher

Curator

Rosie Nice

Designers

Johanna Nettleton Daniel Ormella

N ortel N etw orks G a llery

ANMM collection.

South G a llery

below right: Greta Garbo 1929,

24 September 2003-18 July 2004

courtesy Austral Press

Visitors 354,683

3 June 2004-20 February 2005 Visitors 202,784


TH E YE AR IN R EV IEW | E X H IB ITIO N S AND M AJO R EVEN TS

NAID0C2004 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Refugee Women - Heroines and Survivors of War

people’s work from the museum

Featuringthe striking images of several

collection went on display to celebrate

noted Australian photographers of

NAIDOC Week and the theme of Self-

international conflict, this exhibition

determination - Our Community - Our

focused on the special problems faced by

Future - Our Responsibility. NAIDOC

refugee women and their children.

is the National Aboriginal Islander Day Observance Committee. Coordinator

BlissJensen

Curator

John Waight

Designer

Adrienne Kabos

Coordinator

BlissJensen

Curator

Lindl Lawton

Designer

Adrienne Kabos

T a sm a n Light

23 September-5 December 2004 T a sm a n Light

Visitors 57,341

30 June-12 September 2004 Visitors 86,198

Aquatic Paralympians 2004 Photographs by Robert Prezioso, official photographer to the 2004 Australian Paralympic team of Australian swimmers competing at the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games. The exhibition was held in conjunction with International Day of People with a DisAbility to celebrate the achievements and athleticism of the swimmers. Coordinator

BlissJensen

Curator

Penny Cuthbert

Designer

Adrienne Kabos

T a sm a n Light

2 December 2004-13 February 2005 top: The Crossing, Nauru 2001, Renee Nowytarger, courtesy of the photographer and The Australian left: Victory is sweet, 2004, paralympian Ben Austen by Robert Prezioso.

Visitors 103,381

21


22

Peter Doyle am, Fisherman

Wetworld One of the most popular museum events

(1932-2004)

ever, Wetworld returned this year to

Peter Doyle, fisherman, restaurateur

encourage children to experiment with

and founding chairman of the Australian

the many enjoyable properties of water.

National Maritime Museum, died on

This year, a new wet lab was added to

12 December 2004. He was saluted with

increase the fun and learning.

a small display of eloquent reminders of

North W h a rf

his flamboyant but down-to-earth life.

27 December 2004-25 January 2005 Entry ra m p

Visitors 29,213

17 January-27 June 2005 Visitors 188,539

About Time The quest to determine longitude and the

Gina's Journey - from Istria to

development of the marine chronometer

Australia

were important components of this exhibition about the ways humans have

A series of intensely personal paintings

sought to measure and control time. A

in a vibrant naive style by 74-year-old

brilliant display of historic, contemporary

Croatian migrant Gina Sinozich captured

and eccentric timepieces traced the

the Sinozich family’s 1957 journey

development of timepiece technology

aboard the Neptunia from Istria in

and its impact on our lives.

Croatia to Australia. Most of the paintings

Sponsored by IWC Schaffhausen Coordinators Lindsey Shaw Michelle Linder Curators

BlissJensen

Designer

Carola Salazar

Nigel Erskine

on display were commissioned from the artist by the museum. Coordinator

BlissJensen

Curator

Lindl Lawton

Designer

Adrienne Kabos

T a sm a n Light

15 February-May2005 South G a llery

28 September 2004-6 March 2005

Visitors 82,126

Visitors 168,012 above right: Cross section o f the vessel Neptunia, Gina Sinozitch, oil on board, 2001 right: Reproduction of Harrison 1 chronometer, lent by National Maritime Museum, Greenwich UK.


TH E YEAR IN R EV IEW

| E X H IB ITIO N S AND MAJOR EVEN TS

far left: Assemblage of figureheads below: Henri IV, figurehead from ship Le Henri IV, stripped Swiss stone pine, anonymous carver, Cherbourg dockyard, 1848. Both images © Musee National de la Marine, Paris

Les Genies de la Mer

Speed and Grace - Classic

- Masterpieces of French Naval

Wooden Speedboats

Sculpture

The exhibition was curated by David

A co-production between the Musee

Thompson, successful bidder at the

National de la Marine, Paris, and the

Australian Maritime Foundation auction

Musee des beaux-arts du Quebec,

in 2004. The reproduced archive

Canada, this was a stunning selection of

photographs and glass plate negatives

wooden sculptures that adorned ships

from ANMM’s collection presented

of the French Navy as well as vessels of

images that evoked speedboats’ sense of

state from 1660 to 1860. The carved

style and pursuit of speed.

figureheads and other sculptures from

Coordinator

the workshops of the French dockyards

Curator

David Thompson

were presented as works of art, and

Designer

Adrienne Kabos

BlissJensen

not just as documentary elements of shipbuilding. Also on display were

T asm an Light

paintings, prints, drawings and models

18 M ay-3 July 2005

which enlarge our understanding of this

Visitors 35,170

important period. Sponsored bySDV International Logistics, Cathay Pacific Cargo and ANL Container Line Pty Ltd Coordinator

Mariea Fisher

Curators

Marjolaine Mourot Mario Beland Daina Fletcher

Designers

David Gaucher Tanguy leMoing Daniel Ormella

Nortel N etw orks an d N orth Galleries

As the king’s formidable

7 A p ril-9 October 2005

fleet trawled the oceans

Visitors 72,820 (to 30 June 2005)

on the way to war, these ostentatious sculptures symbolised the might and majesty o f the French navy... Gary Smith The Daily Telegraph

23


24

ON THE WATER

Global Challenge The museum hosted a spectacular fleet

Sail Expo and Classic & Working Boat Challenge 2005

of 12 Global Challenge ocean-racing

In a Sydney Flarbour Week celebration,

yachts stopping over in Sydney as they

the museum displayed over 30 state-of-

raced from east to west around the world,

the-art yachts and graceful old sailing

against the prevailing winds.

boats - the classic and contemporary

It was the third time this race had made

side-by-side. The traditional Classic

the museum its Sydney stopover.

Working Boat Challenge was hosted from

Festival pontoon

the museum on Sunday 6 March.

11 February-27 February 2005

M useum Quay, Festival Pontoon

5 -6 March 2005

RV Southern Surveyor The CSIRO research vessel is used by marine scientists to explore and study Australia’s oceans. In the ship's laboratories the chemistry of sea water is analysed, the ocean floor mapped and fish populations acoustically tracked. Special tours of the visiting vessel and other events were organized by our visitor services, schools and Members sections. N orth W h a rf

16-30 August 2004 Visitors 13,329


TH E YE AR IN R EV IE W | ON TH E WATER

HM B EN D EAVOU R

Replica of HM Bark Endeavour

James Craig

On 17 April 2005 Sydney welcomed

Sydney Heritage Fleet's magnificent

the replica of James Cook’s Endeavour

1874 barque James Craig was

back to her home port, and the HM Bark

recommissioned in 2000 after her epic

Endeavour Foundation handed the ship

30-year restoration and is sailing again

over to the Australian Government. The

- one of only four such barques in the

magnificent replica of this famous vessel

world that are still sailing.

of discovery, on which Cook made his first circumnavigation (1769-71), is now on display at the museum's south wharf, where visitors can see and understand the life of an 18th-century sailor.

W h a rf 7 M aritim e Heritage Centre

Visitors 98,325

25


26

STATUTORY INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS

A sse ssm e n t o f effectivene ss in m a n a g in g h um a n

C o m m o n w e a lth disability strategy

resources

The museum provides facilities to help disabled people

In addition to the three items below, ‘Human resource

to access its programs, exhibitions and publications.

management and OHS’ in Section 2, Key Result Area 3 - Infrastructure Development (page 48 ff).

T h e disa bility action plan

The Workplace Diversity Committee developed a

Joint consultative council

disability action plan in 2003-04 with an external

The museum’s joint consultative council comprising

consultant, together with performance measures, in

the director, assistant director corporate services, the

accordance with the Commonwealth Disability Strategy.

human resources manager and three elected staff

A number of targets in this plan were met in 2004-05.

representatives met four times this year. The council

See ‘Disability action plan' (page 50).

discusses a wide range of issues including financial and human resource planning, workplace diversity, occupational health and safety, and work and organisa­ tion structures.

Environ m en ta l p e rfo rm a nce

Management of energy consumption, for which the museum has won awards in the past, was ongoing, and significant energy savings are expected to be made

O ccupational health and safety

over the next reporting period. The museum’s property

See page 49 under ‘Human resource management and

services section is responsible for these and other

OHS' in Section 2, Key Result Area 3.

issues of improved performance such as targeted waste disposal.

W o rk p la c e d iv e rs ity

A workplace diversity policy was endorsed by the

Insurance & in d e m n ity

museum executive and distributed to all staff in

Comcover provides professional indemnity cover in

2 0 0 3 -0 4 ; its implementation has continued

accordance with statutory requirements. Liability cover

throughout the past year. For 2 0 0 4 -0 5 staff

is provided for the director and staff.

breakdown by gender see table under the heading ‘Human resource management and OHS’ in Section 2, Key Result Area 3 - Infrastructure Development (page 50).

Risk m a n a g e m e n t

In order to develop a risk-management policy and plan, the museum has taken advantage of Comcover’s offer of assistance in risk management and commenced

Access & equity

work with them to establish a schedule of production

In line with the Charter for Public Service in a Culturally

and scale of work. Preliminary sessions were convened

Diverse Society the museum creates programs and

with managers from across the museum to identify,

products that reflect the diversity of Australian society.

assess and grade risks.


TH E YE AR IN R EV IEW | STA TU TO RY IN FO R M A TION R E Q U IR E M E N T S

D e ve lo p m e n ts in external scrutiny

Freedom of in fo rm a tion

There were no developments in external scrutiny.

There was one request under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. The request was granted.

R e po rts by the A u d itor G eneral

None undertaken during the period other than for financial statements.

The museum’s FOI officer is Russell Smylie, tel 02 9298 3619 email rsmylie@anmm.gov.au. Judicial decisions

Fraud control

The museum is developing a fraud control plan with appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation,

No judicial decisions affected the museum during the period under report.

reporting and data collection procedures and processes

M inisterial directions

to meet the specific needs of the museum and the

There were no new ministerial directions made under

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2002.

Section 28 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Corporations Act.

A d v e rtisin g & m a rk e t re se arch

2002-03

2 003-04

2004-05

Advertising agency

$91,259

$82,028

$87,394

Market research organisations

$13,636

$0

$9,640

$763

$505

$402

Direct mail

Corporate governance

The museum council met six times during the year. Council business is facilitated through five committees (Finance & Audit; Major Capital Works; Collections Development and Exhibitions; Marketing, Programs & Sponsorship; and Fleet) which generally meet in advance of each full council meeting and additionally if required. The committees are charged with provid­ ing specific advice to council and management. Each committee comprises the director and a minimum of two other councilors, one of whom acts as chair. All councillors are welcome to attend any committee meeting in an ex-officio capacity (refer Appendix 14). Triennial strategic plans and annual operating plans are prepared in accordance with the Act. Section 2 of this report outlines performance against the current 2003-2006 Strategic Plan. The chairman and the director have biannual meetings with the Minister to review governance and strategic issues.

opposite: The Members Lounge, sponsored by Freedom Group, above: Triton blowing in a conch, stern ornament from La Reale Gilded walnut, attributed to Frangois Caravaque, Marseilles dockyard, 1694. Š Musee National de la Marine, Paris


28

above: Mermaid figurehead from the ceremonial launch of Queen Marie-Antoinette, carver anonymous, 1777. Š Musee National de la Marine, Paris opposite: Bust of a young naval officer, from the sloop La Bayonnaise, carved at Brest dockyard, 1846.


SECTION TWO

The exhibition looked breath-taking... and I have spent more than 50 years mucking about in boats o f every size and shape... D.D. McNicoll The Australian

PERFORMANCE REPORTING


30

KEY RESULT AR E A 1 ENGAGING OUR AUDIENCES

Understand our audiences and interpret Australia’s maritime heritage in exciting and informative ways

create a mix of entertaining,

explore new and developing

scholarly, educational, topical and

directions through scholarship,

relevant programs and products for

research, innovation and

greatest value to our audiences

experimentation in the development of programs and products

conduct research and create

build our capabilities through our

dialogue with our audiences to

staff and volunteers and the best

understand their changing needs

use of our infrastructure

and wants

pursue excellence in the quality of our programs and services through monitoring, evaluation and management systems that support good practice in all that we do

above: Professor Paul Davies (left), keynote speaker at a Members seminar for About Time, with one of the exhibition’s curators, Dr Nigel Erskine. left: Young visitors on a guided tour of the museum's 1874 Cape Bowling Green lighthouse.


31

The very model of a modern maritime museum ANMM occupies a unique place in the cultural life of our nation. Throughout all sections of the museum there exists a powerful charge of enthusiastic commitment to the things it represents, exploring the meaning of maritime history in a thoroughly modern way. Through research and astute curatorial choices, collection management expertise, media and marketing skills, and the energies and imaginations of exhibition, program and event managers, museum visitors are discovering and rediscovering the richness of our maritime heritage. We continue to extend our core field of maritime history and heritage in new and surprising ways. Our exhibition About Time was about chronometers and longitude, certainly, but it also entered the metaphysical realm to explore the ways humans have sought to control and manipulate time. In the acclaimed Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, the carved figureheads and other sculptures from the workshops of the French dockyards were presented not just as documentary elements of shipbuilding, but as the incomparable works of art that they are. The display of Gina Sinozich's paintings, Gina’s Journey - from Istria to Australia, brought more extraordinary artworks to our audiences, while exemplifying some of our core concerns, journeys by sea and the experience of migration.

Education and visitor programs By means of wide-ranging and imaginative programming, the museum not only maintains its patronage but engages new audiences and introduces them to Australia’s abundant maritime heritage. Our education programs extend to the wider community, making the museum an active participant in lifelong learning. A va st range of events complements our exhibitions. This year, About Time provided opportunities fortim erelated activities, such as the successful About Time Second-hand Sunday, compered by Dr Deane Flutton from The Curiosity Show anti Hey Hey It’s Saturday. At this popular event, horologistsfrom the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors gave expert opinions of watches and clocks brought in by visitors. For Les Genies de la Mer, a lecture series featured the exhibition's original curators from Paris and Quebec, local art history specialists and the ANMM's own curators and designers. Theatre and music are compelling ways to engage audiences both young and old, and Les Genies programs included a light-hearted contemporary production of Sinbad the Sailor (in French) by Le Temps de Vivre theatre company; exhibition-inspired fashions created and modelled by young design students; and an evening of French literature and arias. Another popular success this year was Wetworld, an activity installation that lets children experience first hand the properties and pleasures of water. New tours, programs and workshops were developed for schools, community and interest groups (such as WEA). They added to the existing program of science workshops, the annual marine careers day for senior students, cruise forums, and special teacher previews of all major exhibitions. The tables of school visitation overleaf show a relative decline over this reporting period, coming off a peak of school visits to a previous year’s exhibition with highly targeted curriculum relevance that proved irresistible to schools: Oceans of Stories - Illustrations from Australian children's books. The visitor programs section is a collaborative partner with the Australian National University and the Australian Research Council in researchingand developing interpretative material for our Saltwater collection of bark paintings from Yirrkala, East Arnhem Land, NT. Staff from this and other sections made a highly productive visit to the region in May this year, to interview artists and community leaders. As in previous years, visitor programs staff were closely involved with visiting vessels and associated on-thewater events. These included the stopover of the 12 yachts in the Global Challenge; the Sail Expo and Classic & Working Boat Challenge; and the visit of the CSIRO ocean research vessel Southern Surveyor. The latter was a tremendous opportunity - fully exploited - fortours and talks about marine science. A number of briefings were also held for the return of the Endeavour replica. During the year the department hosted personnel from the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and from Questacon (ACT), who wished to discuss the range and types of programs offered by ANMM. In addition, staff from the section participated in the Darling Flarbour educators' group which meets quarterly to discuss issues of mutual interest and maximise the educational value of the precinct for schools and local groups.


Market research In an increasingly competitive tourist and leisure sector, market research continues to inform and influence this museum’s interaction with its audiences and the broader community, and is firmly part of the planning and decision-making process. In partnership with the University of Technology and the Powerhouse Museum, market research staff completed the qualitative stage of a major strategic study investigating museums and leisure choices. The museum’s evaluation researcher supervised a university student research project whose report has provided a useful comparative analysis between international and domestic tourists. Consultant Stollznow Research conducted research that explored public awareness and attitudes about the ANMM and evaluated the level of interest in six exhibition proposals. An exit survey tested visitor responses to our temporary exhibition, Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film and gathered valuable demographic information about our audiences. A remedial tracking study of visitors to Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture resulted in the installation of a gallery map. Another remedial tracking study of visitors to Scrimshaw - A r t of the Whaler provided valuable information about gallery design and its effect on visitation. Evaluation of The Welcome Wall provided useful information about registrations. Currently underway is a research study exploring family leisure. This is expected to provide useful insights into this important ANMM audience. Also underway is research examining how the storage, work and preparation spaces in our Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre can be improved so as to enhance visitor satisfaction.

Venue hire and catering As a venue operation ANMM possesses a winning combination of unique museum atmosphere, Darling Harbour backdrop, diversity and flexibility of spaces for hire, and award-winning catering by the MODE Group. Revenue from venues continues to rise, with the year’s total ahead of the projected budget figures (see table page 33). A major contribution to this year’s success was the client Global Challenge, with its 12 competing yachts using the museum as a base for the famous round-the-world race’s two-week stopover in February 2005. The welcome reception was held here, along with associated Members events, open day activities, corporate sailing days and the Challenge management’s daily business and office requirements on site. The venue department’s strongest marketing alliance has been with SUVA (Sydney’s Unique Venues Association). This year, the assistant venue manager worked in a marketing role with the SUVA committee of seven. Our presence in ‘SUVA Boulevard’ at the new industry tradeshow RSVP in June added to the museum’s exposure as a venue for corporate events. Marketing to the corporate and government sectors has been strengthened by alliances with precinct partners for referral business. The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre and the Accors, Avillion and Star City hotels have all conducted site inspections with a view to conference business and related events. Brochures and links on related web sites have raised our profile in the lucrative wedding market, and we are in increasing demand in the film and advertising industry as an unusual location for film and photo shoots. Business has increased too from our improved on-site facilities: the new Festival pontoons provide landing for vessels for Terrace Room functions and the permanent South Wharf structure enables us to offer dinners with pre-dinner drinks on Vampire. A considerable side-effect of the venue operation is the creation, through clients, of new audiences for ANMM: public events this year included the international design exhibition Swedish Style and Australian Voices in Print the 2005 Popular Australian Readers’ and Writers’ Festival which attracted large crowds. ANMM was chosen as the Sydney venue for a number of national and international museum-related events, including Museums Australia's star-studded Museums Australia Publication Design Awards 2005.

The Store In recent years The Store has built up a reputation - through originality, authenticity, wit and marketing flair - as one of the best museum stores in Australia, gaining wider recognition too through staff participation in


KEY RES ULT A R E A 1 | EN GAG ING OUR A U D IE N C E S

international conferences and other activities in the museum retail world. In September The Store hosted the 2004 conference of the Museum Shops Association of Australia. Product development made popular gains with new stock sourced and created for the exhibitions About Time, Sailor Style and Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, selected items relating to Cook and Endeavour, and ANMM’s own merchandise. One of the year's successful initiatives was trade with book remaindered, increasing profits further. In addition, more museums wholesaled ANMM products. The Store is promoted to Members through advertisements and inserts in Signals, the museum’s quarterly colour magazine, offering special deals on new books and other purchases; this continues to be a worthwhile and cost-effective method of increasing business. In the financial year under report, The Store recorded its highest sales to date, and increased its gross profit margin percentage to 49%. Overall, it's a flourishing trade adding considerably to the museum’s revenue and to the ‘take-away’ museum experience.

Sydney By Sail Sydney By Sail is a successful commercial enterprise operated from the museum waterfront by former Olympian Matt Hayes. His yacht charter company is highly regarded in the tourism industry and offers short sails on the harbour and overnight cruises as well as sailing courses, giving visitors the opportunity to extend their museum experience with sport and play on the water. Our sponsorship manager has successfully negotiated attractive Sydney By Sail sailing days for potential and existing sponsors, some of whom are introduced in this way to yachting, Sydney Harbour by sail, the breathtaking sight of our Philip Cox building and the world of maritime adventure for the first time, and are encouraged to consider corporate support.

Visitors and interactions ............. - .........- ........... - ......................... ■..... ............

2002-03

20 03-04

2004-05

Visitors to the museum

304,394

431,536

411,350

Travelling exhibitions

110,023

183,996

13,700

1,131,617

1,638,732

1,602,315

Interactions

Major visitor revenue sources

Visitor entry revenue The Store gross revenue

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

$1,770,178

$1,466,876

$1,340,950 $577,033

$503,881

$570,907

The Store net revenue

$22,238

$87,768

$84,236

Yots Cafe rental revenue

$89,928

$92,317

$104,749

Visitor Services revenue TOTAL

$170,168

$233,747

$230,996

$2,556,393

$2,451,615

$2,327,972

2002-03

2 0 03-04

2004-05

192

234

252

Venue hire performance

Number of functions Guests

31,252

38,175

40,531

Turnover

$615,814

$734,983

*$894,994

Net revenue

$368,708

$481,912

*$625,812

* Includes 2005 Global Challenge Yacht Race revenue $62,664


34

Education groups 2 0 0 2-0 3

2 0 03-04

2004-05

Primary schools

433

310

296

Secondary schools

275

349

372

108

214

61

816

873

729

20 02-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

24,728

17,393

14,634

Secondary students

9,938

12,048

12,106

Adult students

1,738

994

1,244

Teachers

4,904

4,186

4,004

Vacation care

4,753

3,328

2,909

Mini Mariners

1,265

na

na

3,175

3,048

2,257

GROUPS TOTAL

49,873

40,970

37,154

Kids Deck

21,230

10,734

*9,928

58,331

69,172

47,082

2004-05 j

Tertiary/adult groups GROUPS TOTAL

Visitor numbers Primary students

; Other groups

ALL PROGRAMS TOTAL * Dec 2004 - June 2005 only

Schools booked with teacher guides 2 00 2-03

2 0 0 3-04

Navigators gallery/early explorers/history

67

70

53

Transport

43

42

36

The Sea

10

11

1

Watermarks

11

na

na

Migration

na

na

Shipwreck Stories

na

na

Museum Highlights

na

na

56

Dipping into History

na

na

12

114

na

na

Brunei - Treasures of Darussalam

na

31

na

Antarctic Heroes

-

2J 2

Oceans of Stories

na

26

na

Sydney Working Harbour

na

10

na :

Southern Surveyor

na

na

2

Sailor Style

na

na

6

About Time

na

na

7

Les Genies de la Mer

na

na

13

Other tours

26

21

na

Sinbad le Marin performance

na

na

22 5

The Dean Hutton Show

na

na

Tours & performance*

30

10

3

TOTAL SCHOOLS ON TOURS

300

211

220

Percentage of schools taking a guided tour

65%

32%

36%

*2002-03 Navigators & Mapmaker's Brother; 2 0 03-04 Stormy Grey (Oceans of Stories)


KEY RESULT A R E A 1 | EN GAG IN G OUR A U D IE N C ES

School workshops 2002-03

20 0 3-04

2004-05

Archaeology - junior

6

21

12

Archaeology - senior

10

19

Submarine Adventure

10

2

Ship Shape & Life aboard a Tall Ship (James Craig)

16

21

5 25

Pirate School (James Craig, Bounty in 2002-03)

31

22

23

Bounty programs

na

24

na

4

8

4

70

85

99

Science and other workshops Shipwreck, Conservation & Corrosion Shipwreck Sleuths Technology of Gold workshop

91

2

5

7

30

24

15

History workshops

17

9

12

Pyrmont walk

15

37

43

Sailors and Superstition workshop

na

na

2

Splash Workshop

na

na

12

Don't Mess with the Junksons TOTAL SCHOOLS IN WORKSHOPS Percentage of schools participating in a workshop

na

na

2

134

364

360

20%

56%

57%

Schools booked on vessels 2002-03

2 0 03-04

2004-05

Schools on cruises

42

40

20

Schools on Bounty

9

na

na

Schools on Onslow (including workshops)

na

245

208

James Craig (includes Ship Shape and Sleuths programs)

25

50

57

Schools on Endeavour

na

na

51

TOTAL SCHOOLS ON VESSELS

76

335

336

2002-03

2 0 03-04

2004-05 |

354

na

na |

Oceans of Stories teacher preview

80

na

na

Oceans of Stories teacher conference

na

70

na

Sydney Working Harbour teacher preview

na

60

na

About Time

na

na

35

Les Genies de la M er/ Endeavour

na

na

150

Brunei - Treasures of Darussalam teacher preview

na

300

na

489

304

313

Legal studies lecture - Saltwater

35

na

na

Public program - Amundsen anniversary

60

na

na

Public program - Antarctic lecture

83

na

na

187

220

136

97

Other

Antarctic Heroes teacher preview

Marine careers day, senior students

Public programs - Cruise forums Public programs - WEA program Public programs - Harbour Week cruises Public program - Night in the Navy TOTAL

25

77

127

na

na

60

na

na

1,572

979

711


36

KEY RESULT AR EA 2 MARITIME HERITAGE

Foster the care and research of Australia’s maritime heritage and material culture

develop the national maritime

facilitate research into maritime

collection

heritage and material culture

manage and preserve the

preserve and foster traditional

art of wood carving during the

maritime historical material in

maritime skills and practices

exhibition Les Genies de la Mer

our care

above: ANMM preparator Adam Laerkesen demonstrated the fine

- Masterpieces o f French Naval Sculpture left: Carving on one of the Endeavour replica's windlass bitts.

maximise access to the national maritime collection and other maritime heritage material in our care

work with national and international communities to foster best practice in the promotion of maritime history


KEY RESULT A R E A 2 | M A R IT IM E HE RITA GE

Caring for Australia’s maritime heritage and material culture Through research, acquisition and conservation, we continue to build the national maritime collection - the accumulated records and stories, knowledge and narratives of Australians’ past and present experience of the sea and its waterways. And through ingenuity, resourcefulness and wit in its interpretation, we elicit active participation and enjoyment from our visitors. One of the most significant additions to our heritage assets occurred in June 2005 when the acclaimed replica of Lieutenant James Cook's Bark Endeavour was gifted to the museum, along with additional financial assistance, by the Australian Government, after the ship's transfer from the foundation which formerly operated it (see the director’s report, page 12). In order to best manage this spectacular icon the museum recruited an experienced square-rig master, Ross Mattson - formerly master of the Bounty replica - as ship manager, and an additional shipwright and ship keepers. We were fortunate to retain the expertise of the replica's historian-researcher Antonia Macarthuron a consultancy basis. Planning commenced immediatelyfora major refit of the vessel. Management of the floating collection took significant strides with the completion of vessel management plans for the World War Two commando raider MV Krait and the pearling lugger John Louis, both very important representatives of the nation’s maritime history. The publication of a Temporary and Travelling Exhibitions Production Guide will improve planning for the development and production of exhibitions. Other significant projects are mentioned below.

Australian Register of Historic Vessels A major achievement this year was the implementation of a pilot program to select and test software for the first phase of a descriptive list of vessels of significance to Australian history. The pilot includes vessels from ANMM, Sydney Heritage Fleet and private records already on file. This ambitious project aims to record details of a range of vessels (from commercial to leisure craft, large to small), owners, builders, designers, events, sites and geographical areas, to place the vessels in the context of maritime and cultural history. We hope to build a national picture of the distribution and use of surviving historic craft to encourage interpretation, promotion and best practice in preservation and management, whetherthe vessels are in private ownership, floating, in use or out of the water, or in museums. The first phase, including research and assessment of information on historic vessels to be included, has involved community and institutional liaison and the employment of a part-time project officer.

Blackmores First Lady Another important achievement this year was providing public access into the cockpit and cabin of Blackmores First Lady, the yacht in which Kay CotteeAO sailed to fame in a record-breaking solo, non-stop and unassisted voyage around the world. A centrepiece in the ANZ Tall Gallery, the yacht has been fitted out with a selection of artefacts to represent some of the experiences and technical challenges of the circumnavigation. The installation uses a special interactive camera feed inside the cabin and gives the sense and sound of being at sea. The project included extensive volunteer training to address the challenge of flowing visitors through the limited spaces, and development of a maintenance manual and monitoring program.

The Tu Do project Work commenced on a project to complement the restoration of our Vietnamese refugee boat Tu Do (see also Fleet section report, below). Lindl Lawton, curator of post-Federation migration history, interviewed five surviving members of the Lu family which fled Vietnam in this vessel, arriving in Darwin in 1977. The film and recordings will be used in interpreting the vessel and future exhibitions on Vietnamese migration. Associated photographic material has been collected for the project.


38

Maritime archaeology program The maritime archaeology project team - staff members Dr Nigel Erskine, Lee Graham, Paul Hundley and Stirling Smith - undertook a number of Sydney Harbour dives in collaboration with the NSW Heritage Office, including the search for evidence of a sunken barge in Little Whiting Bay and an anchor in Grotto Point, and a survey of the underwater landscape of Fort Denison. Our maritime archaeologists assisted the Department of the Environment in preparingthe first draft of the National Maritime Heritage Strategy; participated in the exhibition production guide referred to above; and provided the script, content and production of the video Preserving the Bounty cannon for ANMM chemistry workshops. Dr Nigel Erskine took partin the museum’s fifth season with the Rhode Island Maritime Archaeology Project in the continuing search for the remains of HMB Endeavour. Stirling Smith took part in a non-disturbance survey for signs of Philip Parker King’s survey vessel Mermaid, wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef. He also successfully tendered for the project management of the Sydney Ports Corporation archaeological survey of White Bay. Recommendations were made regardingthe anchor and propeller located in the shipping channel.

Maritime history book prize The second Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Book Prize was awarded this year. Funded jointly by ANMM and the Australian Association for Maritime History (AAMH), the $2,000 prize was awarded to Encountering Terra Australis: the voyages of Nicolas Baudin and Matthew Flinders, by prominent South Australian academics Jean Fornasiero, Peter Monteath and John West-Sooby, published by Wakefield Press. The prize was awarded during the five-yearly conference of the International Commission of Maritime History in Sydney. The Australian Association for Maritime History is the Australian affiliate of this body; this year both the president and vice president of AAMH are museum staff members (senior curator Lindsey Shaw holds the former position, publications manager Jeffrey Mellefont the latter).

Acquisitions The museum’s collections were enriched this year by the purchases and gifts listed in Appendixes 2 and 3. All our acquisitions are prized, but some can be singled out for particular interest or rarity. This year, for example, with the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar coming up in October 2005, we were pleased to receive a piece of timber (in a fragile condition) from Vice Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson's flagship HMS Victory. Among the objects falling within the ‘crafts and curios’ classification this year we acquired a whale penis fitted as a lamp mounted on a square plinth with a standard electric light bulb, cord and plug. Three watercolour paintings by Captain George W R Bourne, a topographical artist and ship portrait painter active in the colonial ports of South and Western Australia from the 1880s to 1910, are fine examples of the oeuvre of a professional maritime artist of the day. A bold painted surfboard titled Bra Boys, by artist James Dodd, was acquired from Christies to add to our sport and lifestyle collection. Gina Sinozich donated another oil painting in her poignant series depicting her family's voyage from Croatia to Australia on board Neptune. This work completes the series commissioned from the artist in 2003 and contributes to our small but significant collection of works by first-generation migrants who have documented their journeys through art.

Registration and conservation A major project of the registration section has been the continued development of a new Collection Management Information System, which is nearing completion at the end of the period under report. An Australian Research Council Linkage Grant partnership formed this year with Wollongong University and the National Museum of Australia will assist us to develop a collection software methodology suitable to our specific needs.


KEY RES ULT A R E A 2 | MA R IT IM E HERITAGE

Our registrars are closely involved in ANMM’s work with national and international communities. This year we lent objects to the National Archives of Australia's Beacons by the Sea travelling exhibition and the Powerhouse Museum's Sport - More than Heroes and Legends travelling exhibition. We also have items on loan to the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia to celebrate their centenary, the South Australian Museum for their dolphin display and the National Museum of Australia for their Encounters exhibition. A painting by Gordon Syron, a screenprint by Gilbert Kevin and a Torres Strait Islander dance machine were lent to the Powerhouse Museum’s Our Place: Indigenous Australia travelling exhibition which was displayed at Athens forthe 2004 Olympics and at the National Museum of China. Registrars developed and implemented a management plan for material not part of the National Maritime Collection. This includes props or facsimiles acquired or made by the museum’s preparators specifically for exhibition dressing. The new plan will ensure efficient use of our storage and documentation resources for both NMC material and non-NMC material. Our conservation department works closely with the curatorial and registration sections of the museum, providing expertise to all projects and exhibitions. They continue to provide conservation guidelines for ANMM’s collection development policies and collection management systems. This year, conservation of the 88 bark paintings of the important Saltwater collection, by Yirkkala artists from Arnhem Land, was completed, together with their travelling and handling documentation. This painstaking project which has taken place over several years will allow the environmentally-sensitive works to travel securely for display in venues here and overseas. The same processes will be applied to 34 non-Saltwater barks in the collection.

USA Gallery The USA Gallery is the enduring legacy of a generous endowment which was the USA's bicentennial gift to Australia. Its purpose is to showcase the longstanding maritime links between the two nations on either side of the Pacific rim. The gallery occupies a unique place in the international museum world as a gallery in a national museum funded by another nation. Final documentation forthe USA Gallery five-year masterplan was in preparation this year to enhance this tangible tribute to the close political and cultural ties between our two nations. The fledgling American Friends of ANMM, formed to further these relationships and support the gallery, will raise funds and acquire collections to supplement our exhibitions, research and other programs. In his capacity as an affiliate member of the Council of American Maritime Museums, senior curator of the gallery, Paul Flundley, visited Norfolk, Virginia in October 2004. The long-running Scrimshaw - Art of the Whaler continues to excite interest in this near-forgotten craft from the recent past. Among several significant acquisitions this year were three maritime paintings of considerable historic and aesthetic value (including one of the Cecilia Sudden by Arthur Gregory, from the family of illustrious ship portraitists) and a wooden sea-chest (with iron handles) from the clipper Chariot of Fame. Curatorial research was conducted for two proposed exhibitions - Magnificent voyages and Clipper ships.

Indigenous Affairs An Indigenous protocol document, Connections: Indigenous Cultures and the Australian National Maritime Museum, was developed to guide ANMM staff in their relationships with Indigenous cultures and people. It is also a public resource helping to build understandingand encourage interaction with Indigenous communities, artists and organisations. Its publication will reaffirm the museum’s longstanding commitment to these goals. Michael Crayford, assistant director, collections and exhibitions, and education officer Jeffrey Fletcher travelled with the Indigenous curator and liaison officer John W aightto North East Arnhem Land to continue important collaborative work (with the Australian National University and Australian Research Council) on the Turtle Tracks Indigenous Science Curriculum Project. As in previous years, the section was involved in celebrations for NAIDOC week, when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ work from the museum collection went on display to complement this year’s NAIDOC themes of self determination - ‘our community, ourfuture, our responsibility'.


40

In a spirit of international cooperation, and with the aim of increasing access to our collection as well as raising the profile of Indigenous cultural heritage and its representation at ANMM, the Indigenous curator arranged for the loan of objects created by John Mawurndjul to the Tinguely Museum in Basel, Switzerland. Exceptional acquisitions this year included a number of lovely woven sculptures from Maningrida, including fish traps, with their distinctive and organic form.

Fleet Fleet section facilitated a seamless handover of Endeavourfrom the FIM Bark Endeavour Foundation to the museum, by providing staff and ensuring the continuity and integrity of the ship’s operation systems. New signage forthe historic vessels at Museum Quay was installed in September 2004, after research, rewriting and editing of the vessel label system. This included the addition of plans and images to the weatherproof signage system. The conservation of the Vietnamese refugee boat Tu Do has been a major undertakingfor the section. Working from a conservation management plan which identified specific treatments for every component of the vessel, fleet staff have restored the ship using innovative techniques to replicate the traditional shipbuilding practices of South-East Asia, retaining more than 80% of the historic fabric. In addition, all major spars on the Colin Archer-type ketch Kathleen Gillett(a veteran of the first Sydney-Flobart yacht race) were removed for maintenance including the treatment of rot in the bowsprit. Two apprentices worked with staff throughout the year, part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the traditional skills and artisanship associated with the conservation of historic craft are maintained. Apprentice Immanuel (Manny) Ariel was awarded a distinction for his Certificate in Boat and Ship Building and took the NSW Medal awarded by the Boating Industry Association, and a TAFE merit award, for the highest pass. Another apprentice commenced the four-year course. In our sailing program our early 20th-century open sloop Thistle, a Victorian 'couta fishing boat, won the Nick Masterman Trophy in the race for historic yachts at the Balmain regatta, as well as the Pyrmont Cup for best boat in the regatta. Fleet staff sailed Kathleen Gillett in the parade of historic yachts prior to the start of the 2004 Rolex Sydney-to-Flobart Race and provided the pearling lugger John Louis forthe dedication of the Centurion plaque, at the site of the 19th-century wreck off Cannae Point, North Flead. The former naval patrol boat Advance cruised on a number of occasions for sponsors, and to welcome Endeavour home to the museum. Fleet staff contributed further to the museum’s outreach program by continuing to provide advice on a daily basis to the public and in particular to other organisations on the management of floating craft. This included advice for a project involving the restoration of a 500-ton fire float in Hong Kong. The section hosted an intern, Mr Koven Kai-mingLo, assistant curator in conservation from the Central Conservation Section of the Hong Kong Department of Leisure and Cultural Services.

Vaughan Evans Library Library staff focused this year on several collection maintenance and documentation projects which included working on the cataloguing backlog, particularly of oral histories. The first in a planned series of stock-takes involvingthe main library stack and the reference collection was completed without any disruption to services. Library staff also commenced a project to document the collection of books housed on the Endeavour replica. The preservation microfilming and digitisation of back issues of the museum’s quarterly Signals magazine was completed. Rehousing serials, which is to be part of the library collection preservation project, will be undertaken when resources become available. Library acquisitions centred on staff information needs for future exhibitions and research projects including Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture and Vikings, as well as on professional development in areas such as museology and conservation. Other acquisitions included the Mercantile Navy List (1853-189) on microfilm from the Library of Congress and another instalment of the Daily Commercial News 1929-1945 on microfilm. We continue to build up the library's holdings of microfilm relating to vessels registered


KEY RES ULT A R E A 2 | M A R IT IM E HERITAGE

in Australia, with purchases this year of microfilms of the Register of Colonial Vessels Port o f Hobart 1830-1855 and the Colonial Secretary return of all vessels registered Sydney 1817-1827. The public enquiry service offered by the library remains popular; numbers are slightly down on last year but on a par with previous years. The public as ever were enthusiastic in expressing their appreciation of this important service. Other outreach activities included hosting visits from outside groups such as the Art Libraries Society, family history groups and librarianship students. Inter-library loan requests for material from the library collection remain at levels similar to previous years. Our librarians continued to offer information and guidance to other museums, maritime museums and maritime-related organisations, state and public libraries and archives. We continue to contribute to the national bibliographic database Libraries Australia, with a total of 15,180 titles. In addition the library has undertaken to add cataloguing records for National Maritime Collection material such as rare books, and information about our archival and photographic collections, as a long-term project to facilitate access to the museum’s collection.

Outreach and collaborations Collaborative projects and outreach programs provide opportunities to share the expertise and experience of staff with the wider maritime heritage community. The museum’s most important outreach program, the MMAPSS grants scheme, is detailed in Appendix 14. Collaborations take many forms. Museum staff worked with the South Australian Maritime Museum, Albury Museum and Museum of the Riverina on the development of a travelling exhibition about the Murray and Darling Rivers and their communities, called The River. Senior curator Daina Fletcher supervised the study tour of Oriel Williams, former curator at the museum in Docklands, London, who visited us on a Churchill Fellowship. Other instances were project management and shipwright skills provided to Sydney City Council to rebuild the gun carriage for HMSS/'r/us displayed at Macquarie Place; assistance to the Townsville Museum with information on convicttransports and to the Norfolk Island Museum with the design of their new Sirius exhibition; advice to the RAN on developingthe Navy Heritage Centre at Garden Island; work with the NSW volunteer coastal patrol collecting memorabilia forthe museum; developingthe script, content and production of a video on the battle between HMAS Sydney and HMAS Emden for the Pulau Keeling National Park (featuring items from the collection and some impressive underwater footage); and the annual Remembrance Day service in conjunction with Z Special Unit Association. Staff participated in the 12th biennial national conference of the Australian Historical Association at Newcastle. Liaison with the Chinese Australian Historical Society has been ongoing over the NSW Chinese Australian Cultural Heritage Project, which will culminate when the museum hosts the 2005 conference The dragon's journey to Australia. Work continued with the Western Australian Museum and the State Library of NSW to coordinate a major international symposium celebrating 400 years of Australian-Dutch maritime links Australia on the Map 1606-2006 - to be held here in May 2006.


Objects registered 2 0 02-03

2003-04

2004-05

Documents

258

470

148

Clothing and accessories

188

41

114

Photographs

944

206

495 643

86

344

Models and model parts

7

0

0

Vessels, vessel parts and accessories

0

21

155

350

380

146

Tools and equipment

Other

Totals of enquiries assisted organisations

public/private SECTION

2002-03

2003-04

2 004-05

20 02-03

2003-04

2004-05

Technology

507

478

523

115

107

121

Communities

510

620

480

150

175

130

USA Gallery

143

138

152

114

127

103

40

50

120

70

40

70

1,200

1,286

1,275

449

449

424

Indigenous TOTAL

Project profile - temporary exhibitions (% staff time) SECTION

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

Technology

45

40

40

Communities

55

50

55

USA Gallery

70

70

25

Indigenous

50

70

35

Project profile - core exhibitions (%staff time) SECTION

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

Technology

45

50

30

Communities

40

50

25

USA Gallery

10

5

60

Indigenous

10

10

30

Project profile - public programs, media relations, outreach (% staff time) SECTION

2002-03

2 00 3-04

Technology

5

5

2004-05 15

Communities

5

7

20

USA Gallery

10

15

10

Indigenous

40

20

15


KEY RESULT A R E A 2 | M A R IT IM E HE RITA GE

Project profile - maritime archaeology (%staff time) SECTION

2002-03

2 003-04

2004-05

Technology

5

5

15

Communities

0

0

0

10

10

5

o

0

o

USA Gallery Indigenous

Acquisitions to National Maritime Collection SECTION

2002-03

2 003-04

2004-05

Technology

98

16

60

Communities

96

15

75

USA Gallery

25

2

5

4

6. 38

28

Indigenous TOTAL

233

168

Donations to National Maritime Collection SECTION

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

368

21

123

54

34

57

USA Gallery

0

0

0

Indigenous

0

1

0

422

56

180

SECTION

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Technology

$110,346

$40,141

$44,691

$34,943

$152,675

$61,762

0

0

0

Indigenous

$127,123

$29,524

$14,746

Total

$272,412

$222,340

$121,199

Technology Communities

TOTAL

Acquisition funding - by appropriation

Communities USA Gallery

2002-03 includes $59,159 purchased through director's fund 20 03-04 includes $14,332 purchased through director’s fund 20 04-05 includes $15,000 purchased through director’s fund

Acquisition funding - by trust fund SECTION

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

Technology

0

0

0

Communities

0

0

0

$24,658

$25,808

$13,661

USA Gallery Indigenous TOTAL

0

0

0

$24,657

$25,808

$13,661

43


44

Conservation | Conservation hours (preparation,

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

4,918

6,116

4,493 356

examination, treatments) Preventative conservation hours

658.5

5 02

Collection objects examined, treated

1,062

1,437

773

Loan objects examined, treated

1,355

1,149

920

Maritime archaeology project hours

na

20

na

Public enquiries serviced

77

15

28

Special projects (Hood Collection, Tu Do, Saltwater barks)

378

750

644

High school student workshop hours (maritime archaeology,

776

32

25

shipwrecks & salvage)

Registration 2002-03 I

2003-04

2004-05

1,925

1,462

1,707

Collections registered

114

52

95

Collections remaining unregistered

119

90

135

Objects registered (NMC)

Objects on display in core exhibitions (NMC, loans)

1,750

2,314

2,583

Objects on temporary display

701

1,260

655

Objects borrowed

484

521

202

43

67

104

3

3

10

11

689

100

Objects loaned (includes ANMM travelling exhibitions) Institutions borrowing from NMC Core exhibition objects changed over (NMC, loans) Collections donated Registration photographs Other photographic services

54

55

87

1,925

108

1,707

451

462

204

Fleet projects profile (% staff time) 2002-03

20 03-04

2004-05

Maintenance/conservation

61

58

64

General tasks/shipkeeping

28

28

28

Routine vessel operations

7

5

2

Special events (vessels)

1

3

Other

3

4 5

na

85

50

2004-05

Public enquiries serviced

3

Vaughan Evans Library 2002-03

20 03-04

Monographs/AV titles accessioned

1,272

733

816

Internal loans processed

1,618

1,645

2,097

Inter-library loans processed

506

291

327

Public research requests

4,180

4,353

4,139

External research requests

3,298

3,339

3,356

Total research requests

4,180

4,353

4,139

782

704

1,089

$4,467

$7,683

$5,253

Items catalogued Revenue


KEY RESULT A R E A 2 | M A R IT IM E HE RITA GE


46

KEY RESULT A R E A 3

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

Develop our facilities and assets to provide the most effective and efficient infrastructure for programs, services, collections management and professional work

develop the masterplan for our

coordinate infrastructure

Darling Harbour site, including

development to provide maximum

sustainability and precinct

value for our programs,

partnership considerations

collections and administrative needs, including vessel upkeep and skills display within a ‘working harbour’ model

undertake major capital works set out in the masterplan

maintain the value of the national investment in capital assets

Views across the museum and Darling Harbour. The lower picture shows some of the historic vessels at Museum Quay, and Sydney By Sail hire boats at Festival Pontoon. Photographer Bill Richards/ANMM


KEY RESULT A R E A 3 | IN F R A S T R U C T U R E D E V E L O P M E N T

Early loan repayment In June 2005 the museum was able to repay $10,000,000 of the principal outstanding and accrued interest on the Commonwealth Bank loan taken out to finance the design and construction of the Wharf 7 Maritime Fleritage Centre in the late 1990s, and proposes repaying the balance in the followingfinancial year. These payments are made without detriment to the existing program of capital works and, in addition, relieve the capital budget of the burden of funding loan repayments in future years.

Capital works The maritime heritage precinct in which the museum is located continues to change and develop rapidly, this growth itself presenting challenges. Our building and property services section spent the past year further revising and refining the site masterplan to ensure it meets the unique needs of a museum with a fleet of historic vessels. A significant challenge lay in the ongoing pursuit of rectifications to the retractable pontoon which allows vessels access and egress from Museum Quay, the historic vessel marina with its unique pontoon system commissioned to ameliorate wash from Darling Flarbour water traffic. This year the resources of the section were successfully directed chiefly towards the completion of the second stage of repair to the sub-structure supporting the Wharf 7 Maritime Fleritage Centre.

Building services

Capital works

2002-03

2 00 3-04

2004-05

$5,358,000

$7,604,000

$3,047,970 $834,699

Maintenance & minor works

$749,545

$734,988

Energy costs

$354,735

$369,962

$368,075

Energy (kilowatt hours)

5,126,729

5,370,043

5,339,453

Security The security section of the museum provides frontline support to our customers, staff and volunteers. In 2004 the security and front-of-house contracts were re-tendered. The successful tenderer, Wilsons Security, took up the contract in October 2004, with the majority of our security and FOH personnel who were previously employed by the former service provider opting to remain atthe museum. The security manager Peter Flaggarty was elected president of the Museums Australia security and emergency operations special interest group. This timely new group has been formed with the aim of raising security awareness in museums around Australia. The section continues to work with otherfederal and state agencies in training programs. Regular meetings are also held with commercial and residential security managers in the Darling Flarbour area, focusing on local issues.

Communications and information management services This section provides often unseen, essential services to ensure that visitors experience museum displays of technological sophistication. Forthe popular exhibition Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film, the section maintained audiovisuals and exhibition lighting rig. For/About T/meCIMS staff negotiated with Telstra to provide a free instant hotline to the time 1194. For Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture they plotted, installed and focused exhibition lighting. In addition, they produced audiovisuals delivered by the museum’s Media and Venue Management System (MVMS). The opening of Blackmores First Lady and the installation of Kay Cottee’s shipboard effects provided a


48

technical challenge. The museum's MVMS was extended to First Lady so that visitors are able to see inside the yacht via cameras controlled from the Kay Cottee interactive screen; the same system automates lightingfor on­ board tours. CIM Salso provided technical advice for the request for tender to develop the Australian Register of Historic Vessels database, and staff are part of the working team for that project. Likewise Cl MS staff are represented on the website redevelopment team. They took part in selectingthe website redevelopment coordinator, evaluated tenders and presentations of proposed solutions, and ensured that all briefs reflected the museum’s technical environment. The museum's maritime archaeology program used the underwater expertise of Mike Meyer during surveys of the waters around Fort Denison and in Little Whiting Bay in the search for a cannon. With Stirling Smith, Mike edited and produced a short video about the wreck of the SMS Emden, sunk during battle with HMAS Sydney in World War I on the Cocos Keeling Islands. With Dr Nigel Erskine and Lindsey Shaw, he produced the video Preserving the Bounty cannon - forthe museum’s chemistry workshops.

Other projects in a busy year included: • Records management created 1,222 files and expedited 7,675 file movements. • Records management has had over 1,250 inactive files approved for destruction and approximately 2,000 inactive files identified for transfer to National Archives. • Replaced the Finance Netware file server with a Windows 2000 file server to facilitate the upgrade of SunSystemsfrom the ISAM database platform to the Microsoft SQL version of SunSystems. • Specified, procured and installed a new file server and workstations to facilitate the upgrade of the museum’s ticketing system to ProVenueMax. • Upgraded network hubs to Cisco managed switches for enhanced network performance. • Implemented Nsure Identity Manager to allow Windows and Netware users to synchronise multiple passwords into a single login. • Installed the Tickit Enterprise Risk Management System to ensure that management systems meet good practice requirements. • Upgraded the museum computer room physical environment.

Human resource management and OHS Certified agreement and A W As As at 30 June 2005 there were 113 APS employees covered by a certified agreement and AWAs. The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification structure (as at 30 June 2005) are as follows: APS 1

$30,450-34,328

APS 2

$34,460-38,979

APS 3

$39,254-43,214

APS 4

$43,748-48,449

APS 5

$48,796-52,673

APS 6

$52,702-61,750

EL 1

$67,562-74,414

EL 2

$77,923-91,296

The range of non-salary benefits provided by the agency to employees includes access to a confidential professional counselling service through Employee Assistance Program; reimbursement of costs to APS staff for vaccinations; eyesight testingfor APS staff and reimbursement for spectacles; studies assistance to ongoing APS staff; access to a Purchased Leave Scheme for ongoing APS staff; health awareness program for APS staff; flexible working hours and a range of family-friendly initiatives such as childcare advisory service and payment of childcare fees if staff are required to travel for work. All Australian workplace agreements offered in the museum link pay to performance. As at 30 June 2005, eight


KEY RESULT A R E A 3 | IN FR AS TR U C TU R E D EV ELO P M EN T

staff received performance payments totalling $41,920. Information on performance pay - the number of APS employees at each classification level who received performance pay; aggregated amount of payments at each classification level; and average and range of bonus payment at each classification level - is available but only on request, since publishingthis information would allow amounts paid to individuals to be identified. As reported in the Annual Report 2003-2004, negotiations for the 2004-2006 Certified Agreement were completed but awaiting a hearing at the Australian Industrial Relations Commission. The Agreement was certified on 23 July 2004. Its main features are: • Pay increase of 4% from date of certification and a 4% increase effective from 1 July 2005. • Agreement to link all progression through the pay scale to the museum performance scheme. Staff will need to be rated as at least an ‘achiever’ to progress through the pay scale. To move to the top salary staff must be rated at least as a ‘high achiever’. • In conjunction with staff the museum will develop a health awareness program aimed at increasingstaff’s health and fitness. • The museum has agreed to ‘family-friendly’ initiatives such as not arranging meetings before 9.30 am whenever possible and providing employees with extra dependent-care costs when they are required to travel for work or work additional hours and/or where they are required to pay for additional child care arrangements. The museum has also agreed to two additional weeks maternity leave. • A community language allowance will be paid to staff where there is an identified need for particular language skills, and the staff member has the appropriate qualifications.

Assessment of effectiveness in managing human resources The museum performance scheme was reviewed and a revised scheme implemented. Regular human resource management statistics are provided to management to enable them to assess workforce need and apply workforce planning strategies. Staff turnover was 13.1% in the last financial year compared to 10.7% in the previous year. Secondment to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, UK, was undertaken by a museum staff member as part of an exchange program between the two organisations. This was the second highly satisfactory secondment. Again this year, relevant staff attended an in-house program management workshop. The volunteer program (recruitment and training) was increased in response to increased needs following the return of the Endeavour replica. Productivity gains as negotiated in the 2004-2006 Certified Agreement for the 2004-05 financial year centred round staff and other resource efficiencies relating to closure of Berrys Bay; improvements in the use of information technology; review of the museum performance scheme; and commitment to obtaining lowest airfares when travelling on behalf of ANMM.

Occupational health and safety It is ANMM policy to provide and maintain a working environment that is safe for employees, is without risk to their health and provides adequate facilities for their welfare at work. The Occupational Health and Safety committee charged with overseeing this policy met five times during the year. The museum has a range of procedures in place to manage 0H&S including a staff 0H&S induction booklet, accident investigation guidelines, confined-space entry guidelines, a hot-work permit system and a system of workplace inspections. A number of initiatives related to health surveillance included hearing tests and flu and hepatitis vaccinations. The new health awareness program provides health checks such as blood pressure, back and posture, and lung function testing. This year we successfully met a number of performance targets. There was a reduction of reported accidents of 10%; we had capture information on 100% of accidents or incidents which occur on the museum site; and regular inspections of all work areas were conducted. There were 60 reported incidents in the 2004-05 financial year - a reduction from 73 in 2003-04. There were five compensation claims from staff and volunteers.


50

Disability action plan The plan was developed by a consultant and endorsed by the executive group in the previous year. Targets met this year include a review of the service charter; incorporation of protocols for designing and building exhibitions into core exhibition guides and 3D guidelines; training for relevant staff on meeting the needs of sight-impaired visitors; and the review of human resource management policies commenced. The marketing section worked with the Deaf Society of NSW and the Royal Blind Society to develop tours of the Endeavour replica for aurally and visually impaired visitors.

Industrial democracy The museum’s Joint Consultative Council of three management and three employee-elected representatives meets to discuss a wide range of issues including financial and human resource planning, workplace diversity, occupational health and safety, work organisation and structures and general employee issues. The committee met on four occasions in the last financial year.

Workplace diversity policy The policy was endorsed by the executive group and distributed to staff last year. Its implementation has continued through the year.

Staffing overview As at 30 June 2005, staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999 totalled 101 (77 ongoing full-time, 12 ongoing part-time, 11 non-ongoing full-time and 1 non-ongoing part-time).

STAFFING Staff years(actual)

2003-04

2004-05

96.9 1

99.55

102.65

2002-03

Staff by gender Senior Management (EL 2)

2002-03 |

........

male ...... 4

â–

2 0 0 3 -0 4 [

female

male

0

4

0

2004-05

female

male

female

4

0

7

12

8

11

10 :

14

Others

38

47

39

39

38

47

Totals

49

59

51

50 I

52 |

61

Middle Management (Sect Head)

Branch staff

2002-03

2003-04

Executive/Secretariat

20

18

18

Collections & Exhibitions

45

44

48

Commercial & Visitor Services

20

18

26

Corporate Services

23

21

21

108

101

113

Total Salaries Executive/Secretariat

2004-05

20 02-03

20 03-04

2004-05

$1,128,578

$1,328,876

$1,383,627 $2,665,152

Collections & Exhibitions

$2,387,352

$2,665,561

Commercial & Visitor Services

$1,090,035

$1,197,932

$1,319,140

Corporate Services

$1,323,417

$1,410,710

$1,456,100

Total

$5,929,382

$6,603,079

$6,824,019


KEY R ESU LT A R E A 3 | IN FR A S TR U C TU R E D EV ELO P M EN T

Volunteers Volunteers help deliver the museum’s services in many and diverse ways, working in most sections, as the following table shows. Volunteers might be called ‘the human face’ of ANMM. They are knowledgeable, hardworking and loyal, with a passionate commitment to what the museum represents. This enthusiasm is deeply persuasive and many visitors have become frequent visitors or Members after experiencing a volunteer-guided tour. At 30 June 2005, the 335 registered volunteers at the museum had contributed 52,070 hours - 5,890 hours more than for the same period last year and 12.8% above the museum's target of 46,000 hours. There was an increase in the volunteer program of recruitment and training this year to support arrival of FIMB Endeavour replica. Altogether, since the museum’s volunteer program began, volunteers have contributed 420,978 hours to the museum. At an estimated $15 per hour this equates to $6.31 million of donated support and effort.

Volunteers service summary

Number of volunteers at 30 June Volunteer hours for year General museum tours led Visitors taking general museum tour Vampire tours led Visitors taking Vampire tour Wharf 7 tours led Visitors taking Wharf 7 tour

2002-03

20 0 3-04

2004-05

333

335

441

43,040

46,180

52,070

3,176

2,944

2,524

13,243

11,927

9,930

3,786

3,678

3,222

27,475

29,216

22,166

532

606

255

1,182

999

635

Lighthouse tours led

na

242

591

Visitors taking lighthouse tour

na

5,247

14,052

Blackmores First Lady tours led

na

na

2,164

Visitors to Blackmores First Lady

na

na

3,565

Volunteers service profile (% of service time) 2002-03

20 0 3-04

2004-05

Guides

60.4

63.7

68.5

Fleet

13.2

11.6

10.6

Members

7.6

7.2

6.6

Others*

6.4

5.1

4.5

Public programs

2.8

3.5

3.0

Volunteer office

1.3

1.3

0.9

Conservation

2.4

1.8

1.4

Registration

2.3

2.6

2.0

Marketing/External relations

3.4

3.2

2.5

Curatorial

0.2

0.0

0.0

in c lu d e s Library, Records, Design and Secretariat and miscellaneous task hours


52

KEY RESULT A R E A 4

REPUTATION AND RECOGNITION

Be acknowledged as a pre-eminent and innovative cultural institution

increase awareness of what the

below: Thousands attend the unveiling of new panels of the Welcome Wall. Behind is the

extend and enhance the

museum is and does through

museum’s corporate and

innovative marketing and promotion

government relationships

encourage involvement in

develop programs to encourage

professional and community forums

wider involvement by members,

museum’s W harf 7 Maritime

volunteers, interest groups and

Heritage Centre.

other individuals

above: Students from the Whitehouse Institute of Design modelled their creations inspired by Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces o f French Naval Sculpture. Photographer S Andrews/ANMM


KEY R ESU LT A R E A 4 | R EPUTATIO N AN D R EC O G N ITIO N

A popular public institution The museum continues to enjoy high and indeed growing levels of support and appreciation from its public, as the followingtables illustrate.

Customer feedback Visitors' comments book Number of entries Complimentary or positive Neutral or indecipherable Criticism/suggested improvements Letters and emails

2002-03

2 0 03-04

2004-05

1,517

1,023

1,499

88%

86%

91%

1%

0%

0%

11%

14%

9% 2004-05

2002-03

2003-04

Complaint

18

26

11

Complimentary

76

89

220

Marketing Major promotional and advertising campaigns accompanied the exhibitions About Time, and Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, both immensely popular with the general public as well as special interest groups. Promotions of About Time focused on the replica Harrison One chronometer on loan from the National Maritime Museum of the UK, the most famous artefact in mankind’s quest to determine longitude. It proved a star attraction. Capitalising on the rarity and exceptional beauty of the works in Les Genies, a national campaign was conducted with advertising in the Melbourne Age, The Australian, national art magazines and regional press. These were complemented by high-profile advertisements in the Sydney Morning Herald. The keynote of our Christmas 2004 advertising campaign was ‘Join a Journey of Discovery’. This theme extended across all media including television, metropolitan poster media and print. Combining both indoor and outdoor activities with equal emphasis, it promoted the museum as a full day out for families. Wetworld, the popular children's water activity, featured in selected children’s publications and school holiday supplements of newspapers and magazines. The Endeavour replica arrived at the museum on 17 April to assume its position as flagship of the museum fleet. An advertising campaign was undertaken to welcome the vessel home and inform the public of this momentous development. The museum introduced Endeavour tours for the hearing-impaired and visuallyimpaired in conjunction with The Deaf Society of NSW and the Royal Blind society. The tours were enormously popular, and the museum plans to include similar introductory tours in programs for all new temporary exhibitions. The marketing services manager, Dominic Mackintosh, was seconded to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich UK, fora period of work and study of practices in the marketingdepartment there. Duringthis period he was able to observe and report on their policy and methods of providing improved access to the disabled, disadvantaged and ethnic communities.

Media The museum was well represented in the media in the 12 months to 30 June 2005, featuring in almost 1,000 stories in press, radio and TV across Australia. The monitored total was 939 stories, 15% more than in the previous year. In a broader sense, this means the museum in two years comfortably reached the 25% increase in media coverage it aimed to achieve in the triennium to 30 June 2006. The number of stories on television rose from 37 to 62 (or 67%), an increase due partly to the enormous TV interest in the Endeavour replica’s home­ coming and its presence at the museum. ABC T V ’s 7.30 Report, with a million viewers Australia-wide, reported on the exhibition Gina’s Journey. Channel


54

7’s high-rating Sunrise program and Channel 9’s Today both carried an increased number of valuable live crosses promoting exhibitions, and there was an increase in the number of museum stories on children’s TV programs. The most publicised museum activities were Endeavour's arrival (134 stories), Sailor Style (97), Les Genies de la Mer (81), Gina's Journey (36) and Blackmores First Lady being open for inspection (22). Sailor Style was clearly important for the museum in the media. It produced 149 stories over the two years July 2003 to June 2005, and carried the museum into the ‘glossy’ fashion and design media for the first time. In contrast, Les Genies de la Mer significantly drew high praise from ‘arthouse’ press, being acclaimed by art critics in national and metropolitan publications.

Publications and website A working group to overseethe redevelopment of the museum’s first-generation website was established in October 2004 with members drawn from a range of museum departments. The aim is to develop an innovative, standardscompliant website with enhanced functionality to facilitate business process across a number of sections, in a product that will be nationally and internationally regarded as the online authority on Australian maritime heritage and culture. A consultant was engaged to draft the redevelopment brief and to assist the working group to select and contract the website developer. A website redevelopment coordinator was appointed in April 2005 to consult with museum departments and website audiences, to develop the website information architecture, navigation, usability and content, to implement content management and publishing guidelines, and to oversee the website development work. The new website is expected to be on-line by the end of 2005. Signals, the museum’s quarterlyjournal, has been upgraded with additional pages and a heavier wrap-around cover, to give a more substantial magazine ‘feel’ and accommodate more articles. In line with the findings of a survey of readership last year, design changes have been made to the important members events and visitor information pages, to make them easier to navigate. These changes are intended to increase the Members’ sense of value for money spent on their memberships. Last year’s successful hardcover venture, Wooden Boats, Iron Men - the Halvorsen Story, by Randi Svensen, published by the museum in association with Halstead Press, sold out. In response to demand, the book was reprinted this year. The work documents this important Norwegian-Australian maritime family’s achievements as gifted designers and boatbuilders, astute marketers and champion sailors. The commitment of this museum to telling the Halvorsen story will continue into the coming year with the launch of an exhibition Dreamboats and Workboats - the Halvorsen story. The section managed a steady demand for images from museum archives and collections and provided editorial services to a number of museum projects including development of the pathbreaking Connections: Indigenous Cultures and the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Design Visitors’ engagement with the intellectual content of an exhibition is maximised through visual, tactile and aural experiences, making innovation and experiment in the design and preparation of displays a regular feature. ANMM exhibitions and programs, promotional and other material includingexhibition brochures aim to achieve a unique style and identity, which is reinvigorated or reinvented each year. Design staff employed their skills on the temporary exhibitions Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture and Vikings. They also worked on display and access for Blackmores First Lady, the changeover exhibition Children of the Crocodile - the Australia-East Timor Story, and the fourth successful Wetworld. The exhibitions About Time was designed by Five Spaces Design under the supervision of the in-house design team. The preparation section was closely involved with the challenge of installing the large, old and fragile sculptures in Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces o f French Naval Sculpture, as well as in the presentation of objects for temporary exhibitions and loans. The volunteer who makes models for our designers clocked up 157 hours this year. The publication Connections: Indigenous Cultures and the Australian National Maritime Museum was


KEY RESULT A R E A 4 | R EPUTATION AN D R ECO G N ITIO N

designed in-house; and the department also contributed to interpretive signage for our historic vessels and the lighthouse. The percentage of time spent on exhibition projects by the designers was approximately 67%. Preparators spent around 74% of their time working on exhibitions and public programs; graphic designers also spent approximately 28% of theirtim e designingforthe many public programs produced by the museum includingthose complementing exhibitions. The figures are consistent with previous years. The design manager and graphic designers worked with various sections to ensure thatthe museum identity is applied appropriately and consistently, as well as spending about 25% of theirtim e working on non-exhibition related material. A style guide has been developed forthe use of the corporate image in different mediums, including the website. Staff expertise is called on by other organisations. This year our graphic designers produced the plaque commemorating the Sydney Harbour wreck, Centurion, forthe NSW Heritage Office; they also helped the Norfolk Island Museum prepare an exhibition about Sirius. A ‘highly commended’ award was given to designer Daniel Ormella in the prestigious, national Museums Australia Publications Design Awards, for his Sailor Style dinner invitation.

Corporate support The museum is increasingly successful in forming and maintaining sponsor partnerships for special exhibitions. The exhibition Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture required equally extraordinary efforts to bring this priceless collection of 17th-to 19th-century French naval sculptural artefacts - all 20 tonnes of them - from Paris to Darling Harbour. Three sea and airfreight logistics companies - SDV (Australia), Cathay Pacific Cargo and AN L Container Line - supported the museum in this risky but wholly successful enterprise. The prestigious Swiss company IWC International Watch Co Schaffhausen sponsored the exhibition About Time, an appropriate and rewarding partnership.

Sponsorship performance

Number of new sponsorships Cash committed In-kind committed

2002-03

2 0 03-04

6

8

2004-05 5

na*

$280,000

$282,800

na*

$32,700

$15,400

Received in financial year (cash & in-kind)

$299,832

$158,104

$430,350

TOTAL

$299,832

$470,804

$728,550

*Change in reporting methodology

The Welcome Wall This year we unveiled three new panels of the Welcome Wall, the museum’s lasting tribute to the six million people who have migrated across the seas to make their homes in Australia. National Director of Australia forthe United Nations High Commission for Refugees, Naomi Steer, unveiled 806 new names on panels 36 and 37 at an event held during Refugee Week in October 2004. An estimated 1,200 guests participated in the ceremony in which a number of people who arrived in Australia as refugees shared their unique stories of migration. Panel 38, with another 393 names, was unveiled in April during the Greek Festival of Sydney. His Excellency, Fotios-Jean Xydas, the Greek Ambassador to Australia, addressed a crowd of 900; the President of the Greek Orthodox Community, George Angelopoulos, also delivered a speech. In the past year 1,281 Welcome Wall names were registered which brings the total to just over 14,500 for the project. There are now 126 countries of origin, the top ten countries registered being England, Italy, Ireland (including Northern Ireland), Netherlands, Scotland, Germany, Greece, Poland, Hungary and Malta.


56

Promotional activities for this period included advertising and editorials in a wide range of print media including regional and ethnic newspapers, specialist group publications, and wide-circuiation metropolitan newspapers. The October unveiling attracted positive coverage from the commercial network Channel 7, including a piece about the event in the evening news. This generated a high number of inquiries about the project from a broad cross-section of the community in the weeks that followed.

Members Membership is a loyalty program that rewards both the museum and Members. Membership is a source of revenue and a guarantee of enthusiastic advocacy. Our program of special Members events and additional benefits such as the Members Lounge provide Members with a sense of ownership and a deeper relationship with our maritime heritage than that experienced by the casual museum visitor. The past financial year was a period of relatively stable membership compared to the previous year when the introduction of free entry caused a drop in numbers. Membership at the end of the period was the highest since April 2004, mostly due to a popular program. We are confident that we can build on this year’s gains, capitalising on the continuing presence of the ever-popular Endeavour replica and the exciting exhibitions on the way. Details of Member numbers and activities appear in a table below. Administrative changes included new membership cards - a smart looking credit card style card sporting an image of the museum. It’s a more cost effective and durable card and will allow us to offer multiple-year memberships. Ultimately, the cards will contain all membership details on their magnetic strip, enabling us to use swipe terminals for easy and quick access to the museum, and providing us with data about the frequency of Members’ visits. We launched a new format email newsletter for Members. The new design has a more professional appearance with colour images and museum branding. The email package allows us to communicate more effectively with Members, who have welcomed this initiative. The Membership manager and staff continually strive to present imaginative and stimulating events, frequently themed to complement exhibitions. Many Members events this year featured well-known international and local speakers: popular programs included the one-day seminar Ancient Fleets of the Mediterranean, with three distinguished maritime archaeologists from the USA; a talk by Dianne Preston on her acclaimed new book about William Dampier, and a one-day seminar relating to the About Time exhibition with Professor Paul Davies as keynote speaker. This event was one of the best attended of the year, and attracted a great deal of media attention. An international Members cultural tour to southern India, run successfully last November-December, was the latest of a series of unique maritime-themed itineraries to Asia developed exclusively by this museum.

Members program 2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

3,764

2,970

3,083

Members at 30 June

10,043

7,751

8,391

Percentage renewing

71%

63%

73%

29

31

28

Gross revenue

$293,875

$311,518

$293,458

Net revenue

$127,316

$176,416

$153,813

$15,566

$16,571

$16,873

66

62

54

Memberships at 30 June

Corporate memberships

Donations Exclusive Members functions held* Members attending functions Members & guests visiting museum *Listed in Appendix 1

2,96 5

3,164

3,145

21,615

17,073

15,739


KEY RESULT A R E A 4 | R EPUTATION AN D R EC O G N ITIO N

PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW Key Performance Indicators of the Australian National Maritime Museum Strategic Plan 2003-2006.

KEY RESULT AREA 1 Engaging our audiences U n d e rsta n d o u r a u d ie n c e s an d in te rp re t A u s tra lia ’s m a ritim e h eritag e in e xciting an d in fo rm a tive w ays K ey P e rfo rm a n c e In d ica to r 1 .1 V is ito r s a tisfa ctio n

Percentage of ANMM visitors who express overall satisfaction: 99 (2003-04:95) Key P e rfo rm a n c e Ind ica to r 1 .2 N u m b e r o f in tera ctio ns

Total number of interactions: 1,616,015 (2003-04:1,668,503) Key P e rfo rm a n c e Ind ica to r 1 .3 A c c u ra c y o f vis ito r p re d ic tio n s

Percentage above or below predicted total museum visitors annually: 0.6 above (2003-04:31) K ey P e rfo rm a n c e In d ica to r 1 . 4 A n n ual in co m e net o f g o v e rn m e n t so u rc e s

$5.5 million income from all non-government sources (2003-04: $5.3)

KEY RESULT AREA 2 Maritime Heritage Foster the care a n d re se arc h of A u s tra lia ’s m a ritim e h eritag e an d m a te ria l culture Key P e rfo rm a n c e Ind ica to r 2 .1 S ta te o f the colle ctio n

Collection Management Information System (CIMS) development nearing completion Key P e rform anc e Indicator 2.2 Research profile

Number of published articles/papers by museum staff: 59 articles, 75 papers (2003-04: 43 articles, 34 papers) Key P e rform anc e Indicator 2.3 Reach into m a ritim e heritage c o m m u n ity

Number of collaborative projects related to maritime heritage: 46 (2003-04:30) Key P e rform a n c e Indicator 2.4 Profile of A ustralian m a ritim e history

Organisations assisted nationally by ANMM: 437 (2003-04: 424)

KEY RESULT AREA 3 Infrastructure Development D e ve lo p o u r fa cilitie s an d a s se ts to p ro vid e the m o st e ffe c tive an d e ffic ie n t in fra stru c tu re fo r o u r p ro g ra m s , s e rv ic e s , c o lle ctio n s m a n a g e m e n t a n d p ro fe ss io n a l w ork Key P e rform anc e Indicator 3 .1 S ta k e h o ld e r satisfaction with infrastructure

Percentage of external users/stakeholders who express overall satisfaction with infrastructure: 96 (2003-04:85) Key P e rform anc e Indicator 3.2 Relative cost o f infrastructure

Percentage of major infrastructure projects completed within budget: 100 (2003-04:100) Key P e rform anc e Indicator 3 .3 B usiness excellence

Management systems meet Standards Australia criteria for business excellence: working towards 2006 deadline

KEY RESULT AREA 4 Reputation and Recognition Be a c k n o w le d g e d as a p re -e m in e n t an d in n o va tive cultural in stitu tion Key P e rfo rm a n c e Indicator 4 .1 Reputation

Focus group panels consensus rating of ANMM reputation: high to very high (2003-04: high to very high) Key P e rfo rm a n c e Indicator 4.2 AN M M in vo lve m en t in c om m u n ity, national & international policy/practices

Formal advice requests received/provided on museum issues: 5,609 (2003-04: 2,665) Key P e rfo rm a n c e Indicator 4.3 S p o n so rsh ip

$ value of sponsorships $728,550 in cash & kind (2003-04: $470,804)


58

left: Winged Spirit, gilded walnut stern ornament from La Reale, attributed to Frangois Caravaque, Marseilles dockyard, 1694. Š Musee National de la Marine, Paris opposite: Seahorse stern ornament from the launch of King Louis Philippe, carved at Cherbourg dockyard, 1830-1848

Australian National Maritime Museum Statement by Council Members In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2005 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister’s Orders made underthe Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997. In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian National Maritime Museum will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of Councillors. Signed

Signed

Mark Bethwaite, Chairman

Mary-Louise Williams, Director

7 September 2005

7 September 2005


SECTION THREE

Like fairytales, marine figureheads are things that every child recognises even though they scarcely exist in our contemporary world... Adults and children will he equally fascinated by the Maritime Museum’s new exhibition... Christopher Allen Australian Financial Review

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT To the M inister for the Arts and Sport Scope The finan cial statements and Council’s responsibilities The financial statements comprise: • • • •

Statement by Council Members; Statements o f Financial Performance, Financial Position and Cash Flows; Schedules o f Commitments and Contingencies; and Notes to and forming part o f the Financial Statements

o f the Australian National M aritime M useum for the year ended 30 June 2005. The Council Members o f the Australian National M aritime Museum (the Museum) are responsible for preparing the financial statements that give a true and fair view o f the financial position and performance o f the Museum, and that comply with Finance M inister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997, accounting standards and other mandatory financial reporting requirements in Australia. The Council Members o f the M useum are also responsible for the maintenance o f adequate accounting records and internal controls that are designed to prevent and detect fraud and error, and for the accounting policies and accounting estimates inherent in the financial statements. A udit approach 1 have conducted an independent audit o f the financial statements in order to express an opinion on them to you. M y audit has been conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing and Assurance Standards, in order to provide reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statements are free o f material misstatement. The nature o f an audit is influenced by factors such as the use o f professional judgement, selective testing, the inherent limitations of internal control, and the availability o f persuasive, rather than conclusive, evidence. Therefore, an audit cannot guarantee that all material misstatements have been detected. While the effectiveness o f m anagem ent’s internal controls over financial reporting was considered when determining the nature and extent o f audit procedures, the audit was not designed to provide assurance on internal controls.


61

I have performed procedures to assess whether, in all material respects, the financial statements present fairly, in accordance with Finance M inister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies A ct 1997, accounting standards and other mandatory financial reporting requirements in Australia, a view which is consistent with my understanding o f the M useum ’s financial position, and o f its performance as represented by the statements o f financial performance and cash flows. The audit opinion is formed on the basis o f these procedures, which included: • •

examining, on a test basis, information to provide evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements; and assessing the appropriateness o f the accounting policies and disclosures used, and the reasonableness o f significant accounting estimates made by the Council Members.

Independence In conducting the audit, I have followed the independence requirements o f the Australian National Audit Office, which incorporate the ethical requirements o f the Australian accounting profession. Audit Opinion In my opinion, the financial statements o f the Australian National Maritime Museum: (a) (b)

have been prepared in accordance with Finance M inister’s Orders made under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997; and give a true and fair view o f the Australian National M aritime M useum ’s financial position as at 30 June 2005 and o f its performance and cash flows for the year then ended, in accordance with: (i) the matters required by the Finance M inister’s Orders; and (ii) applicable accounting standards and other mandatory financial reporting requirements in Australia.

Australian National Audit Office

P Hinchey Senior Director Delegate o f the Auditor-General Sydney 7 September 2005


62

SECTION 3 - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AU S TR A LIA N N A TIO N A L M ARITIM E MUSEUM STATEM EN T OF F IN A N C IA L PE R FO R M A N C E fo r the y e a r e nded 3 0 Ju n e 2 0 0 5

N otes

2005

2004

$’000

$ ’000

REVENUE

Revenues from ordinary activities Revenue from Government

5(a)

2 2,775

19,930

Goods and services

5(b)

4,727

4,760

Interest

5(c)

442

336

Revenue from sale of assets

5(d)

37

6

Other revenues

5(e)

1 ,829

1,361

29310

26,393

Total revenues from ordinary activities EXPEN SES

Expenses from ordinary activities (excluding borrowing costs expense) Employees

6(a)

9,119

8,704

Suppliers

6(b)

9,689

9,593

Grants

6(c)

28

36

Depreciation and amortisation

6(d)

9,007

8,442

Write-down of assets

6(e)

62

122

Value of assets sold

5(d)

32

3

27,937

26,900

827

973

Operating surplus (deficit) from ordinary activities

1,0 4 6

(1,480)

Net profit (loss)

1 ,046

(1,480)

19 ,4 5 6

92,971

19 ,4 5 6

92,971

20 ,5 0 2

91,491

Total expenses from ordinary activities (excluding borrowing costs expense) Borrowing costs expense

Net credit to asset revaluation reserve

13

Total revenues, expenses and valuation adjustments recognised directly in equity Total changes in equity other than those resulting from transactions with the Australian Government as owner The above statem ent should be read in conjunction with the accom panying notes.


63

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2005 N otes A S S E TS

2005

2004

$’000

$’000 6,047

Financial assets Cash

14(b)

1 ,6 6 0

Receivables

8(a)

491

557

Investments

14(b)

______ 33

886

2 ,1 8 4

7,490

162,027

Total financial assets Non-financial assets Land and buildings

9(a),9(e)

1 5 8 ,1 3 2

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

9(b),9(e)

4 2 ,5 1 9

24,517

National Maritime Collection

9(c),9(e)

2 4 ,2 2 5

24,104

Intangibles

9(d),9(e)

40 9

116

Inventories

9(f)

94

74

Other

9(g)

2 10

218

Total non-financial assets

2 2 5 ,5 8 9

211,056

Total assets

227,773

218,546

2.5 1 1

15.007

2.5 1 1

15.007

1.9 8 3

1.871

1.9 8 3

1.871

878

LIAB ILITIES

Interest bearing liabilities Loans

10(a)

Total interest bearing liabilities Provisions Employees

11(a)

Total provisions Payables Suppliers

12(a)

7 91

Other

12(b)

150

72

Total payables

9 41

950

Total liabilities

5,4 3 5

17,828

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

200,718

N ET A S S E TS

E Q U ITY

Contributed equity

13

2,1 1 8

1,000

Reserves

13

1 5 2 ,5 9 6

133,140

Accumulated surplus

13

Total equity

Current assets Non-current assets

67,624

66,578

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

200,718

2 ,341

7,635

2 2 5 ,4 3 2

210,911

Current liabilities

4 ,291

4,488

Non-current liabilities

1,1 4 4

13,340

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.


64

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS for the year ended 30 June 2005 Notes

20 0 5

2004

$’000

$ ’0 0 0

22,775

20,064

5 ,118

4,951

O P ER A TIN G AC TIVITIES

Cash received Appropriations Goods and services Interest

46 3

346

GST received from ATO

660

1,581

Other Total cash received

456

332

29,472

27,274

Cash used Employees Suppliers Borrowing costs

(7,817)

(7,554)

(1 0 ,2 9 9 )

(12,664)

(1 ,0 6 2 )

(997)

Grants

___ (28)

(36)

Total cash used

(1 9 ,2 0 6 )

(21,251)

10 ,2 6 6

6,023

37

______ 6

37

6

Net cash from operating activities

14(a)

IN VESTIN G AC TIVITIES

Cash received Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment Total cash received Cash used (3 .0 4 8 )

(7,604)

Total cash used

(3 .0 4 8 )

(7.598)

Net cash (used by) investing activities

(3 ,0 1 1 )

(7.598)

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

FIN AN CIN G AC TIVITIES

Cash used (1 2 ,4 9 5 )

(1.503)

Total cash used

(1 2 ,4 9 5 )

(1.503)

N et cash (used by) financing activities

(1 2 ,4 9 5 )

(1.503)

(5 ,2 4 0 )

(3,078)

6,933

10,011

1 ,693

6,933

Repayment of debt

Net (decrease) in cash held Cash at the beginning of the reporting period Cash at the end o f the reporting period

14(b)

The above statem ent should be read in conjunction with the accom panying notes.


65

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS and CONTINGENCIES as at 30 June 2005 2005

2004

Notes

$'000

$ '0 0 0

78

290

(1)

283

982

361

1,272

(3 ,8 3 3 )

(4,995)

(3,472 )

(3,723)

S C H E D U L E O F C O M M ITM E N T S B Y T Y P E

Commitments Operating leases Other commitments Total commitments Commitments (receivable)

(2)

Net commitments (receivable) BY M ATU R ITY

Operating lease commitments

(3)

One year or less

78

From one to five years

Total operating lease commitments

208 82 78 290

Other commitments One year or less From one to five years

823 28 3 _______ —

Total other commitments

28 3

________ 159 982

Commitments (receivable)

(3 ,8 3 3 )

(4,995)

Net commitments (receivable)

(3,4 7 2 )

(3,723)

N.B: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. (1) Other commitments include service contracts in respect of the Museum’s buildings (2) Commitments receivable under the sublease of Level 3, Wharf 7 (3) Operating lease commitments payable include a lease for storage facilities on which there are no contingent rentals SC H ED U LE O F C O N TIN G E N C IE S

There were no contingent losses or gains as at 30 June 2005. The above schedules should be read in conjunction with the accom panying notes.


66

A U S TR A LIA N N A TIO N A L M ARITIM E MUSEUM N O TES TO A N D FOR M IN G PA R T O F TH E FIN A N C IA L S TA TEM EN TS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D ED 30 JU N E 2 0 0 5

Note

Description

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

2

Adoption of AASB Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards from 2005-2006

3

Economic Dependency

4

Events Occurring After Reporting Date

5

Operating Revenues

6

Operating Expenses

7

BorrowingCost Expense

8

Financial Assets

9

Non-Financial Assets

10

Interest Bearing Liabilities

11

Provisions

12

Payables

13

Equity

14

Cash Flow Reconciliation

15

Contingent Liabilities and Assets

16

Remuneration of Council Members

17

Related Party Disclosures

18

Remuneration of Officers

19

Remuneration of Auditors

20

Average Staffing Levels

21

Financial Instruments

22

Appropriations

23

Assets Held in Trust

24

Reporting of Outcomes

25

Australian National Maritime Foundation


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 1.

S U M M A R Y O F S IG N IF IC A N T A C C O U N TIN G P O LIC IE S

1 .1

Basis of A ccounting

The financial statements are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and are a general purpose financial report. The statements have been prepared in accordance with: •

Finance Minister’s Orders (being the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Orders (Financial Statements for reporting period ending on or after 30 June 2005));

Australian Accounting Standards and Accounting Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board; and

Urgent Issues Group Abstracts.

The Statements of Financial Performance and Financial Position have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets which, as noted, are at valuation. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. Assets and liabilities are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. Assets and liabilities arising under agreements equally proportionately unperformed are however not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the Schedule of Commitments and the Schedule of Contingencies. Revenues and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance when and only when the flow or consumption or loss of economic benefit has occurred and can be reliably measured. C onsolidation and associated c om pa ny. The financial statements show information for the economic entity only;

this reflects the consolidated results for the parent entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum, and its wholly owned controlled entity, The Australian National Maritime Foundation. The results of the parent entity do not differ materially from the economic entity and have therefore not been separately disclosed. The Australian National Maritime Foundation is a company limited by guarantee, with an initial contribution of $385,620. See note 25. The accounting policies of The Australian National Maritime Foundation are consistent with those of the Museum and its assets, liabilities and results have been consolidated with the parent entity accounts in accordance with AAS24 - Consolidated Financial Reports. All internal transactions and balances have been eliminated on consolidation. 1.2 C ha ng es in A cco unting Policies

The accounting policies used in the preparation of these financial statements are consistent with those used in 2003-2004, except in respect of: the initial revaluation of property, plant and equipment on a fair value basis (see note 1.12); and the imposition of an impairment test for non-current assets carried at cost (see note 1.19). 1.3

R evenue

The revenues described in this Note are revenues relatingto the core operating activities of the Museum.


68

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers. Interest revenue is recognised on a time proportionate basis that takes into account the effective yield on the relevant asset. Revenue from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer. Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the contract to provide the service. The stage of completion is determined according to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction. Receivables for goods and services are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any provision for bad and doubtful debts. Collectability of debts is reviewed at balance date. Provisions are made when collectability of the debt is judged to be less rather than more likely. Revenues from Government — Output Appropriations The full amount of the appropriation for departmental outputs for the year is recognised as revenue. Resources Received Free o f Charge Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as revenue at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition. 1.4 Transactions by the G o ve rn m e n t as O w ner

Equity Injections Net assets received other than under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are treated as contributions by owners. 1 .5

E m p lo ye e B enefits

Benefits Liabilities for services rendered by employees are recognised at the reporting date to the extent that they have not been settled. Liabilities for wages and salaries (including non-monetary benefits), and annual leave are measured at their nominal amounts. Other employee benefits expected to be settled within 12 months of their reporting date are also measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal am ount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlem ent of the liability.


69

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 All other employee benefit liabilities are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration, including employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. The non-current portion of the liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2005. In determining the present value of the liability, the Museum has taken into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation. Superannuation Employees contribute to the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme and Public Sector Superannuation Scheme. The liability for their superannuation benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. The Museum makes employer contributions to the Australian Government at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the Museum’s employees. 1.6

Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases, which effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets, and operating leases, under which the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. The Museum has no finance leases. Operating lease payments are expensed on a basis that is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. 1.7

B orrow ing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred. 1 .8

G rants

The Museum recognises grant liabilities as follows. Most grant agreements require the grantee to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. In these cases, liabilities are recognised only to the extent that the services required have been performed or the eligibility criteria have been satisfied by the grantee.


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers. Interest revenue is recognised on a time proportionate basis that takes into account the effective yield on the relevant asset. Revenue from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer. Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the contract to provide the service. The stage of completion is determined according to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction. Receivables for goods and services are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any provision for bad and doubtful debts. Collectability of debts is reviewed at balance date. Provisions are made when collectability of the debt is judged to be less rather than more likely. Revenues from Government— Output Appropriations The full amount of the appropriation for departmental outputs for the year is recognised as revenue. Resources Received Free of Charge Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as revenue at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition. 1.4 Transactio ns by the G o ve rn m e n t as O w ne r

Equity Injections Net assets received other than under a restructuring of administrative arrangements are treated as contributions by owners. 1 .5

E m p lo ye e B enefits

Benefits Liabilities for services rendered by employees are recognised at the reporting date to the extent that they have not been settled. Liabilities for wages and salaries (including non-monetary benefits), and annual leave are measured at their nominal amounts. Other employee benefits expected to be settled within 12 months of their reporting date are also measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal am ount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlem ent of the liability.


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 All other employee benefit liabilities are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration, including employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. The non-current portion of the liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2005. In determining the present value of the liability, the Museum has taken into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation. Superannuation Employees contribute to the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme and Public Sector Superannuation Scheme. The liability for their superannuation benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. The Museum makes employer contributions to the Australian Government at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the Museum’s employees. 1.6

Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases, which effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets, and operating leases, under which the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. The Museum has no finance leases. Operating lease payments are expensed on a basis that is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. 1.7

B orrow ing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred. 1.8

G rants

The Museum recognises grant liabilities as follows. Most grant agreements require the grantee to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. In these cases, liabilities are recognised only to the extent that the services required have been performed or the eligibility criteria have been satisfied by the grantee.


70

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005

In cases where grant agreements are made without conditions to be monitored, liabilities are recognised on signing of the agreement. 1.9

Cash

Cash means notes and coins held and any deposits held at call with a bank or financial institution. Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Interest is credited to revenue as it accrues. 1.10

O th er Financial Liabilities

Bills of exchange are carried atthe amount of their initial proceeds plus accrued interest. Trade creditors and accruals are recognised at their nominal amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods and services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Interest payable is accrued overtime. 1.11

Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and revenues, at their fairvalue atthe date of acquisition. 1 .1 2

P rope rty (Land and Buildings), an d Infrastructure, Plant and E q u ip m e n t

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). Revaluations Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and the National Maritime Collection are carried at valuation. Revaluations undertaken up to 30 June 2002 were done on a deprival basis; revaluations since that date are at fairvalue. This change in accounting policy is required by Australian Accounting Standard AASB 1041 Revaluation of Non-Current Assets. Fair and deprival values for each class of assets are determined as shown below. Asset Class

Fair Value Measured at:

Deprival Value Measured at:

Land

Market selling price

Market selling price

Buildings

Market selling price

Depreciated replacement cost

Leasehold Improvements

Depreciated replacement cost

Depreciated replacement cost

Exhibition Fitouts

Market selling price

Depreciated replacement cost

Plant & Equipment

Market selling price

Depreciated replacement cost

National Maritime Collection

Market selling price

Market selling price


71

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 Under both deprival and fair value, assets which are surplus to requirements are measured at their net realisable value. At 30 June 2005, there were no assets in this situation (2004: nil). Frequency Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and the National Maritime Collection are revalued progressively in successive three-year cycles, so that no asset has a value greater than three years old. The Museum completed its asset revaluation cycle in 2004-05, with asset groups updated as follows: • •

exhibition fitouts have been revalued by type of asset in 2004-05; plant and equipment, including information technology equipment, have been revalued by type of asset in 2004-05;

leasehold improvements have been revalued in 2004-05;

leasehold land and buildings were revalued in 2003-04;

the National Maritime Collection has been revalued in 2002-03.

Assets in each class acquired after the commencement of a progressive revaluation cycle are not captured by the progressive revaluation then in progress. The Finance Minister’s Orders require that all property, plant and equipment assets be measured at up-to-date fair values from 30 June 2005 onwards. The current year is therefore the last year in which the Museum will undertake progressive revaluations. Conduct All valuations are conducted by an independent qualified valuer and take effect on 1 July each year. Depreciation and Amortisation Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Museum using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements orthe unexpired period of the lease. Depreciation/amortisation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate. Residual values are re-estimated for a change in prices only when assets are revalued. Depreciation and amortisation rates applyingto each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives: 2 0 0 4 -0 5

2003-04

Leasehold land

Lease term (1 0 5 yea rs)

Lease term (105 years)

Buildings

22 yea rs

22 years

Capitalised loan interest

22 years

22 years

Leasehold improvements

Lease term or 10 yea rs

Lease term or 10 years

Exhibition fitouts

7 - 2 0 yea rs

7-20 years

Plant & equipment

3 - 2 0 yea rs

3 -2 0 years

Intangibles

5 - 1 0 ye a rs

5-10 years

The Collection is not depreciated because of its longterm nature and the expected appreciation of its historical value.


72

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005

The aggregate amount of depreciation allowed for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in Note 6(d). Intangibles The Museum's intangibles comprise software for internal use and are carried at cost. Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Museum's software is 5 -1 0 years (2003-04: 5 -1 0 years). 1.13

Inventories

Inventories held for resale by the Museum store are valued atthe lower of cost and net realisable value. 1.14

Taxation

The Museum is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and the goods and services tax (GST). Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST: •

except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

except for receivables and payables.

1.15

Foreign Currency

Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. Foreign currency receivables and payables (if any) are translated atthe exchange rates current as at balance date. Associated currency gains and losses are not material. 1.16

Insurance

The Museum has insured for risks through the Government's insurable risk managed fund, called ‘Comcover’. Workers compensation is insured through Comcare Australia. 1.17

Com parative Figures

Comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation in these financial statements where required. 1.18

Rounding

Amounts are rounded to the nearest $1,000 except in relation to: •

remuneration of Council Members (note 16);

remuneration of officers (note 18);

remuneration of auditors (note 19);

assets held in trust (note 23); and

Australian National Maritime Foundation (note 25).


73

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 1.19

Impairment of Non-Current Assets

Non-current assets carried at up-to-date fair value atthe reporting date are not subject to impairment testing. Non-current assets carried at cost or deprival value and held to generate net cash inflows have been tested for their recoverable amounts at the reporting date. The test compared the carrying amounts against the net present value of future net cash inflows. No write-down to recoverable amount was required (2004: nil). The non-current assets carried at cost or deprival value, which are not held to generate net cash inflows, have been assessed for indications of impairment. Where indications of impairment exist, the carrying amount of the asset is compared to its net selling price and depreciated replacement costand is written down to its higher of the two amounts, if necessary. 2.

A D O P TIO N OF A U S TR A LIA N E Q U IVA LE N TS TO IN TE R N A TIO N A L FIN A N C IA L R E P O R TIN G S TA N D A R D S FROM 2 0 0 5 -2 0 0 6

The Australian Accounting Standards Board has issued replacement Australian Accounting Standards to apply from 2005-06. The new standards are the Australian Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS) and cannot be adopted early. The Australian Equivalents contain certain additional provisions which will apply to not-for-profit entities, including the Australian National Maritime Museum. Some of these provisions are in conflict with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and therefore the Museum will only be able to assert compliance with the Australian Equivalents to the IFRS. Existing Australian Standards that have no IFRS equivalent will continue to apply. Accounting Standard AASB 1047 Disclosing the Impact of Adopting Australian Equivalents to International Financial ReportingStandards requires thatthe financial statements for 2004-05 disclose: • •

an explanation of how the transition to AIFRS is being managed; narrative explanations of the key differences in accounting policies arising from the adoption of AIFRS; any known or reliably estimable information about the impacts on the financial report had it been prepared using AIFRS; and

if the impacts of the above are not known or reliably estimable, a statement to that effect.

Management o f the transition to Australian Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards The Museum has taken the following steps in preparation towards the implementation of AIFRS: •

The Museum’s Finance and Audit Committee is tasked with oversight of the transition to and implementation of AIFRS. The Chief Finance Officer is formally responsible forthe project and reports regularly to the Finance and Audit Committee on progress against the formal plan approved by the Committee.

The plan requires the following key steps to be undertaken and sets deadlines for their achievement: —

All major accounting policy differences between current AASB standards and AIFRS were identified by 30 June 2004;

Identification of system changes necessary to be able to report under AIFRS, including those necessary to enable capture of data under both sets of rules for 2004-05 have been completed;

A transitional balance sheet as at 1 July 2004, under AIFRS was completed;


74

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 —

An AIFRS compliant balance sheet was also prepared during the preparation of the 2004-05 statutory financial reports; and

The 2004-05 Balance Sheet under AIFRS will be reported to the Department of Finance and Administration in line with their reporting deadlines.

The plan also addresses the risks to successful achievement of the above objectives and includes strategies to keep implementation on track to meet deadlines.

Major changes in accounting policy Changes in accounting policies under Australian Equivalents are applied retrospectively i.e. as if the new policy had always applied. This rule means that a balance sheet prepared under AIFRS must be made as at 1 July 2004 to allow the opening (IFRS’s) balances to be prepared for the 2004/05 comparatives, except as permitted in particular circumstances by AASB 1 First-time Adoption of Australian Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards. This will enable the 2 0 0 5-06 financial statements to report comparatives under AIFRS. Changes to major accounting policies are discussed in the following paragraphs. Impairment of Non-Current Assets The Museum's policy on impairment of non-current assets is at note 1.18. Under AIFRS these assets will be subject to assessment for impairment and, if there are indications of impairment, measurement of any impairment (impairment measurement must also be done, irrespective of any indications of impairment, for intangible assets not yet available for use). The impairment test is that the carrying amount of an asset must not exceed the greater of (a) its fair value less costs to sell and (b) its value in use. ‘Value in use' is the net present value of net cash inflows for for-profit assets of the Museum and depreciated replacement cost for other assets which would be replaced if the Museum were deprived of them. The most significant changes are that, for the Museum’s for-profit assets, the recoverable amount is only generally to be measured where there is an indication of impairment and that assets carried at up-to-date fair value, whether for-profit or not, may nevertheless be required to be written down if costs to sell are significant. Capitalised Interest Borrowing costs related to qualifying assets are currently capitalised. It is expected that the Finance Minister’s Orders for 2005-06 will elect to expense all borrowing costs under AIFRS. Accordingly, borrowing costs capitalised as at 1 July 2005 will be written-off to accumulated results.


75

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 Reconciliation o f Impacts AGAAP

A IFR S

30 -Ju n -0 5

3 0 -Ju n -0 5

$ ’0 0 0

$000

Difference

$ ’0 00

A S S E TS

Financial assets Cash

1 ,6 6 0

1 ,660

Receivables

4 91

491

Investments

33

33

2 ,1 8 4

2 ,1 8 4

-

Total financial assets Non-financial assets Land and buildings

15 8 ,1 3 2

157,237

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

4 2 ,5 1 9

4 2 ,5 1 9

-

National Maritime Collection

24 ,2 2 5

2 4 ,2 2 5

-

Intangibles

409

409

-

Inventories

94

94

-

210

210

Total non-financial assets

2 2 5 ,5 8 9

2 2 4 ,6 9 4

(8 9 5 )

Total assets

227,773

2 2 6 ,8 7 8

(8 9 5 )

Loans

2 ,511

2 ,5 1 1

Total interest bearing liabilities

2 ,5 1 1

2,5 1 1

-

Employees

1 ,983

1,9 8 3

-

Total provisions

1 ,983

1,9 8 3

-

Other

(8 9 5 )(:

LIAB ILITIES

Interest bearing liabilities

Provisions

Payables Suppliers

791

791

-

Other

150

150

Total payables

94 1

94 1

-

Total liabilities

5,4 3 5

5 ,4 3 5

-

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

2 2 1 ,4 4 3

Net Assets

(8 9 5 )

EQ U ITY

Contributed equity Reserves Accumulated surplus Total equity

-

2 ,1 1 8

2 ,1 1 8

1 5 2 ,5 9 6

1 5 2 ,5 9 6

67,624

66 ,7 2 9

(8 9 5 )

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

2 2 1 ,4 4 3

(8 9 5 )

-

Note (1) On transition to AIFRS Write-off of Capitalised Interest

$ 8 9 4 ,6 6 0


76

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 3.

EC ON O M IC D E P E N D E N C Y

The Australian National Maritime Museum is controlled by the Commonwealth of Australia. The Museum is dependent on appropriations from the Parliament of the Commonwealth for its continued existence and ability to carryout its normal activities. 4.

EVE N TS OC CU R R IN G A FTER R E P O R TIN G DATE

In July 2005, the Museum fully repaid its loan with the Commonwealth Bank of Australia which financed the construction of the Wharf 7 building. 2005

2004

$ ’000

$’000

Appropriations for outputs

2 2,775

19,930

Total revenues fro m G o vern m en t

2 2,775

19,930

5.

O P ER A TIN G REVENUES

5 (a ) R evenues fro m G o vern m en t

5(b ) S a le s of g oo ds and services

Goods

580

577

Services

4,147

4,183

Total sales of g oods an d services

4,727

4,760

Provision of goods to: Related entities

1

2

External entities

579

575

580

577

Total sales of g oods

Rendering of services to: Related entities

35

37

External entities

4 ,112

4,146

4,147

4,183

294

298

Deposits

442

336

Total interest revenue

442

3 36

Total rendering of services

Costs of sales of goods 5(c) Interest Revenue

5 (d ) R e ven u e fro m S a le o f A s se ts

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Proceeds from sale Less: Net book value at sale Net gain fro m disposal of infrastructure, plant an d e q u ip m e n t

37

6

(3 2 )

(3)

5

3


77

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D ED 30 JU N E 20 0 5

5 (e ) O th er R evenues

Industry contributions Other- Donations and bequests Grants Total other revenues

2005

2004

$ ’000

$’000

458

159

1 ,356

1,187

15

15

1,829

1,361

Industry contributions and donations include $1,372,390 (2003-04: $1,028,700) for service-related donationsin-kind from a range of donors. 6.

O P ER A TIN G E XPEN SES

6 (a ) E m ploye e Expenses 5,345

5,102

Superannuation

852

846

Leave and other entitlements

667

696

Other employee expenses

2,157

1,972

Total e m p lo ye e benefits e xpenses

9 ,021

8,616

Workers compensation premiums

98

88

9,119

8,704

Goods and services from related entities

1 ,085

1,066

Goods and services from external entities

8,371

8,251

Wages and Salaries

Total e m p lo ye e expenses

6(b ) S u p p lie r Expenses

Operating lease rentals

233

276

Total s upplie r expenses

9,689

9,593

28

36

6(c) G rants Expense

Non-profit institutions

The Museum makes grants to support the involvement of community groups in maritime heritage projects. 6 (d ) Depreciation an d A m o rtisatio n

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment Amortisation of capitalised interest Amortisation of leasehold assets Amortisation of intangibles Total depreciation an d am ortisatio n

7,899

7,347

68

68

975

978

65

49

9,007

8,442

The aggregate amounts of depreciation or amortisation expensed duringthe reporting period, for each class of depreciable asset are as follows: Land and Buildings Capitalised interest Leasehold improvements Exhibition fitouts, plant and equipment Intangibles Total depreciation an d am ortisatio n

4,993

4,947

68

68

8

11

3,873

3,367

65

49

9,007

8,442


78

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D E D 3 0 JU N E 2 0 0 5

2005

2004

$ ’0 00

$’000

Plant & equipment - write-off on disposal

62

122

Total w rite-dow n o f assets

62

122

Loan

827

973

Total borrow in g costs expense

827

973

Goods and services

175

206

Interest receivable

27

21

Receivable from Trust

31

12

GST receivable

25 8

318

Total receivables (net)

4 91

557

469

552

6

3

6 (e ) W rite-D ow n of A ssets

7.

8.

B O R R O W IN G C O S T E XPEN SE

FIN A N C IA L A S S E TS

8 (a ) Receivables

Receivables (gross) are aged as follows: Not overdue Overdue by: Less than 30 days 30 to 60 days

7

2

60 to 90 days

9

-

-

-

More than 90 days Total receivables (gross)

22

5

49 1

557

6 0 ,0 0 0

60,000

All receivables are current assets. 9.

N O N -F IN A N C IA L A S S E TS

9 (a ) Land and Buildings

Leasehold land - at valuation (2003-04) Accumulated amortisation Total leasehold land

(3 1 6 )

(158)

5 9 ,6 8 4

59,842

3,478

2,274

Buildings - at valuation (2003-04)

1 0 5 ,0 0 0

105,000

Accumulated depreciation

(1 0 ,0 5 7 )

(5,154)

9 8 ,4 2 1

102,120

Buildings - at cost


79

N O TE S TO A N D FO R M IN G PA R T O F T H E F IN A N C IA L S TA TEM EN TS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D E D 3 0 JU N E 20 0 5

9 (a )

La nd an d B uilding s (c o n tin u e d )

2005

2004

$ '0 0 0

$'000 17

Leasehold improvements — at cost Leasehold improvements — at valuation (2004-05)

38

128

Leasehold improvements - at valuation (2001-02) Accumulated Amortisation

Total buildings Total Land and Buildings

(11 )

(80)

27

65

9 8 ,4 4 8

102,185

1 5 8 ,1 3 2

162,027

2 95

808

9 (b ) Infrastructure, Plant and E q uipm en t

Plantand equipment — at cost Plantand equipment - at valuation (2004-05)

2,733

2,079

Plant and equipment - at valuation (2001-02) Accumulated depreciation

Exhibits fitouts - at cost Exhibits fitouts — at valuation (2004-05)

(1 ,6 5 0 )

(1,675)

1,378

1,212

3 ,427

10,129

75,274

34,772

Exhibits fitouts — at valuation (2001-02) Accumulated depreciation

Total Infrastructure, Plant and E q uipm en t

(37 ,56 0)

(21,596)

4 1 ,1 4 1

23,305

4 2 ,5 1 9

24,517

9(c) N ational M aritim e Collection

National Maritime Collection — at cost National Maritime Collection — at valuation (2002-03)

516

395

2 3 ,7 0 9

23,709

2 4 ,2 2 5

24,104

All revaluations are independent and are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in Note 1. In 2004-05, a revaluation of Infrastructure Plantand Equipment was completed by the Australian Valuation Office. The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia transferred the ownership of the Endeavour to the Museum at its capitalisation at the time of transfer, 27 June 2005. The first revaluation of the Endeavour by the Museum was undertaken in 2004-05. 9 (d ) Intangibles

Computer software: Internally developed in progress - at cost

188

In use - at cost

509

440

(2 8 8 )

(324)

409

116

Accumulated amortisation Total Intangibles


00

O

A n a lysis o f Property, Plant and E q u ip m en t

o

Item

Land

B uildings

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ '0 0 0 s

-i

Total Land

Infrastructure,

National M aritim e

& B uildings

Plant & E q uipm en t

Collection

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ ’0 0 0 s

Intangibles

Total

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ ’0 0 0 s

As at 1 Ju ly 2 0 0 4

Net book value

60,000

107,419

167,419

47,789

(158)

(5,234)

(5,392)

(23,272)

59,842

102,185

162,027

24,517

1,204

1,204

1,363

24,104

440

239,752

(324)

(23,988)

24,104

116

210,764

121

36 1

3,0 4 8

-

Additions By purchase Net revaluation increment

-

16

16

19,440

-

-

Assets transferred in

-

1,118

-

-

(158)

(4,911)

(5,069)

(3,873)

(46)

(46)

(45)

6 0 ,0 0 0

1 08 ,51 6

16 8 ,5 1 6

8 1 ,7 2 9

Depreciation/amortisation expense

1 9 ,4 5 6 1 ,118

(65 )

(9 ,0 0 7 )

(4 )

(95 )

Disposals Other disposals

-

A s at 30 Ju n e 2 0 0 5

Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation Net b ook value

(3 1 6 )

(1 0 ,0 6 9 )

(1 0 ,3 8 4 )

(3 9 ,2 1 0 )

5 9 ,6 8 4

9 8 ,4 4 8

1 5 8 ,1 3 2

4 2 ,5 1 9

2 4 ,2 2 5 2 4 ,2 2 5

697

275 ,16 7

(2 8 8 )

(4 9 ,8 8 3 )

40 9

2 2 5 ,2 8 4

PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEM EN TS

Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation

NOTES TO AND FORMING

9 (e )

TAB LE A R econciliation o f the o p en in g an d closing balances o f property, plant and e q u ip m e n t


Land

B uilding s

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ '0 0 0 s

Total La n d &

In fra s tru ctu re

N a tio n a l M aritim e

B uilding s

P lan t & E q u ip m e n t

C olle ctio n

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ ’0 0 0 s

$ ’0 0 0 s

Total

$ ’0 0 0 s

A s at 3 0 Ju n e 2 0 0 5

Gross value Net b ook value

60 ,0 0 0

1 0 5 ,0 3 8

1 6 5 ,0 3 8

78,007

(31 6)

(9 ,5 1 8 )

(9 ,8 3 4 )

(3 9 ,1 4 1 )

5 9 ,6 8 4

9 5 ,5 2 0

1 5 5 ,2 0 4

3 8 ,8 6 6

2 3 ,7 0 9

217,779

60,000

105,128

165,128

36,852

23,709

225,689

(158)

(4,832)

(4,990)

(22,742)

59,842

100,296

160,138

14,110

2 3 ,7 0 9 —

2 6 6 ,7 5 4 (4 8 ,9 7 5 )

A s at 30 J u n e 2 0 0 4

Gross value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation Net book value

23,709

(27,732) 197,957

PART OF THE FINANCIAL STA TEM EN TS

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation

NOTES TO AND FORMING

Item

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2 0 0 5

TA B LE B A s s e ts at v a lu a tio n a s at 3 0 J u n e 2 0 0 5

00


82

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005

9 (f) Inventory

Store inventory held for sale - at cost

2005

2004

$ '0 0 0

$'000

94

74

210

218

2 ,5 1 1

15,007

All inventories are current assets. 9(g ) O ther non-financial assets

Prepayments 10.

IN TE R E S T B EARIN G LIA B ILITIES

1 0 (a) Loans

Bill of exchange

In July 2005, the Museum fully repaid its loan with the Commonwealth Banl- of Australia which financed the construction of the Wharf 7 building. 11.

P R O VISIO N S

1 1 (a) E m ploye e Provisions

Salary

28

Leave

1,787

Superannuation Aggregate employee benefit liability Workers' compensation Aggregate e m p lo ye e benefit liability and related on costs

1,698

168

173

1 ,9 8 3

1,871

1 ,9 8 3

1,871

839

656

1 ,144

1,215

1 ,983

1,871

791

878

Advance revenue - Venue hire

93

65

Prepayments received

57

7

150

72

Current Non-current

12.

PAYABLES

1 2 (a) S u pp lie r Payables

Trade creditors All supplier payables are current. Settlement is usually made net 30 days. 1 2 (b) O th er Payables

Total o th er payables

All other payables are current.


Item

O p e n in g b alance as at 1 Ju ly

Contributions by owner - asset

A ccum ula ted

A sse t Revaluation

Equity

Results

R eserve

T O TA L E Q U ITY

2005

2004

2005

2004

2005

2004

2005

2004

$ '0 0 0

$ ’0 0 0

$ ’00 0

$ '0 0 0

$ ’0 0 0

$ ’0 0 0

$ ’00 0

$ ’0 0 0

1 ,0 0 0

1,0 0 0

66,578

6 8 ,0 5 8

1 3 3 ,1 4 0

4 0 ,1 6 9

1 ,0 4 6

(1 ,4 8 0 )

-

1 ,1 1 8

-

-

-

-

2 0 0 ,7 1 8

1 0 9 ,2 2 7

-

1 ,0 4 6

(1 ,4 8 0 )

-

-

1,1 1 8

transferred in Net revaluation increment C losing b alance as at 3 0 Ju n e

-

-

-

-

1 9 ,4 5 6

92 ,9 7 1

19 ,4 5 6

9 2 ,9 7 1

2 ,1 1 8

1 ,0 0 0

67,624

6 6 ,5 7 8

1 5 2 ,5 9 6

1 3 3 ,1 4 0

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

2 0 0 ,7 1 8

2 ,1 1 8

1 ,0 0 0

67,624

66 ,5 7 8

1 5 2 ,5 9 6

1 3 3 ,1 4 0

2 2 2 ,3 3 8

20 0 ,7 1 8

Total e qu ity a ttrib u ta ble to the Australian G o vern m en t

PART OF THE FINANCIAL STA TEM EN TS

Net surplus (deficit)

C ontributed

NOTES TO AND FORMING

EQUITY

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2 0 0 5

13.

00 OJ


84

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D ED 30 JU N E 2 0 0 5

20 0 5

2004

$ ’0 0 0

$’000

1,0 4 6

(1,480)

9,007

8,442

57

120

(lncrease)/decrease in receivables

66

130

(lncrease)/decrease in inventories

(19 )

17

7

85

14. C ASH FLO W R ECO N C ILIATIO N

14(a) R econciliation of O p e ra tin g S u rp lu s to N et C ash fro m O p e ra tin g Activities

R econciliation of o pera ting s urp lu s to net cash fro m o pera ting activities

Operating surplus (deficit) Non-Cash Items Depreciation and amortisation Net write down of non-current assets Changes in A sse ts and Liabilities

(lncrease)/decrease in other assets lncrease/(decrease) in employee provisions

112

84

lncrease/(decrease) in liability to suppliers, deposits and accrued interest

(10 )

(1,375)

10,266

6,023

Net cash from operating activities 14(b) R econciliation of Cash

Cash balance comprises: Cash at bank and on hand Deposits at call Total cash

1 ,560

1,078

100

4,969

1,660

6,047

Cash investments - bank bills

33

886

Total investments

33

886

1,693

6,933

1,1 1 8

10

Balance of cash as at 30 June shown in the Statement of Cash Flows 14(c) N on-C ash Financing and Investing Activities

Non-cash financing and investing activities

The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia transferred the ownership of the Endeavour to the Museum at its capitalisation atthe time of transfer, 27 June 2005. During 2003-04, equipment of $10,000 was received from a sponsor.

15.

C O N TIN G E N T LIA B ILITIES A N D A S S E TS

The Museum has given notice of termination of a contract in respectto consulting services provided and will defend any counter-claim should one arise.


85

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 16.

REM U N ER ATIO N OF C O U N C IL M EM BERS

The number of Council Members of the Museum included in these figures are shown below in the relevant remuneration bands

2005

2004

$ N il-$ 9 ,9 9 9

_

2

$10,000-$19,999

9

7

$20 ,0 0 0-$2 9 ,9 9 9

1

1

$210,000-$219,999

$230,000-$239,999

1

Total number of Council Members of the Museum

Remuneration received or due and receivable by Council Members of the Museum

11

$

1 11

$

36 1 ,6 5 7

331,078

Aggregate amount of superannuation payments in connection with the retirement of Council Members of the Museum

304

Total remuneration received or due and receivable by Council Members of the Museum 17.

R E LA TED P A R T Y D ISC LO SU R ES

Council Members of the Museum during the year were: Mr Mark Bethwaite (Chairman) Ms Mary-Louise Williams (Director) Mr Marcus Blackmore AM Mr John Simpson The Hon Brian Gibson AM Ms Eda Ritchie Ms Nerolie Withnall MsGaye Hart AM Dr Andrew Sutherland Dr John Penrose CDRE Geoff Geraghty AM, RAN Mr John Rothwell AO The aggregate remuneration of Council Members is disclosed in Note 16.

3 6 1 ,6 5 7

331,382


86

N O TE S T O A N D FO R M IN G PA R T O F T H E FIN A N C IA L STATEM EN TS FOR TH E Y E A R EN D E D 3 0 JU N E 2 0 0 5

18.

R EM U N ERATIO N OF OFFICER S

The number of officers who received or were due to receive total remuneration of $100,000 or more: 2005

2004 2

$ 130,000-$139,999

-

$ 140,000-$149,999

1

1

$150,000-$159,999

2

-

Total

3

3

$

$

4 5 5 ,8 4 8

403,945

The aggregate amount of total remuneration of officers shown above.

The officer remuneration includes all officers concerned with or taking part in the management of the Museum during 2004-05 except the Director. Details in relation to the Director have been incorporated into Note 16: Remuneration of Council Members. 19.

R EM U N ERATION OF A U D ITO R S

Remuneration to the Auditor-General for auditing thefinancialstatem entsforthereportingperiod

3 7,000

34,000

102

100

No other services were provided by the Auditor-General duringthe reporting period. 20. A VE R A G E S TA FFIN G LE VE LS

The average staffing levels forthe Museum duringthe year were


Financial

Notes

Nature of underlying instrum ent (including significant term s and

criteria an d m e a s u re m e n t basis)

conditions affecting the am ount, tim ing and certainty of cash flows)

Financial Assets

Financial assets are recognised when control over future economic benefits is established and the amount of the benefit can be reliably measured. 14b

Deposits are recognised at their nominal anounts. Interest is credited to revenue as it accrues.

Temporarily surplus funds, mainly from monthly drawdowns of appropriation, are placed on deposit at call with the ANZ Bank and the Commonwealth Bank. Interest is earned on the daily balance at the prevailing daily rate for money at call and is paid monthly.

Investments

Receivables

14(b)

8(a)

The bills are recognised at cost. Interest is accrued as it is

The bills are funds with the ANZ Bank, in 30 day accounts. Interest

earned.

is earned atthe prevailing rate and is paid monthly.

Receivables are recognised atthe nominal amounts due

Credit terms are net 30 days (2 00 3 -0 4 :30 days)

less any provision for bad and doubtful debts. Provision is made when collection of the debt is judged to be unlikely. Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are recognised when a present obligation to another party is entered into and the amount of the liability can

PART OF THE FINANCIAL STA TEM EN TS

Cash

ENDED 30 JUNE 2 0 0 5

A c co unting Policies an d M ethods (in clu d in g recognition

Instru m en t

NOTES TO AND FORMING

F IN A N C IA L IN STR U M EN TS

2 1 (a) T erm s, C onditions an d A c co unting p olicies

FOR THE YEAR

21.

be reliably measured. Loans

10(a)

Bills are carried atthe amount of their initial proceeds plus

Bills were issued at a discount reflecting market yields. They have

accrued interest. Interest is expensed as it accrues.

an average maturity of 90 days and an effective interest rate of

Trade creditors are recognised at their nominal amounts, being

Settlement is usually made net 30 days (20 03 -04 :3 0 days)

6.9%. The final bill was fully repaid in July 2005. Trade Creditors

12(a)

the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Other Payables

12(b)

Deposits for advance services are recognised at their

Service revenue is recognised as it is earned, atthe date the

nominal amounts.

service is provided.

CO


00 00

Notes

Floating

Fixed Interest Rate

Interest Rate

1 year or less

1 — 5 years

> 5 years

Non-Interest

Total

W eighted Avg Effective

Bearing

Interest Rate

04-05

03-04

04-05

03-04

04-05

03-04

04-05

03-04

04-05

03-04

04-05

0 3-04

04-05

03-04

$000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$000

$'000

$ ’000

$’000

$ ’000

$’000

$ ’000

$ ’000

%

%

Financial Assets Cash

14(b)

1,560

1,078

_

Investments

14(b)

100

4,969

33

Receivables

8(a)

Total financial assets

1,660

886

-

_

-

-

-

_

1,560

1,078

4.50

3.30

-

_

-

-

-

_

133

5,855

5.24

4.50

n/a

n/a

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

491

557

491

557

6,047

33

886

-

-

-

-

491

557

2,184

7,490

227,773

218,546

_

2,511

15,007

6.9

6.9

878

791

878

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

recognised Total Assets Financial Liabilities Loans

10(a)

-

-

Trade creditors

12(a)

-

_

Other Payables

12(b)

-

_

-

Total financial liabilities

2,511 2,511

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

15,007 -

791

-

150

72

150

72

941

950

3,452

15,957

5,435

17,828

15,007

recognised Total Liabilities Unrecognised Instruments Other

Schedule of

commitments

Comm itm ents

-

-

-

-

Total financial assets (Unrecognised) Other

Schedule of

com mitments

Com m itm ents

Tota l fin a n cia l lia b ilitie s (U n recog n ise d )

|

3,833

4,995

3,833

4,995

3,833

4,995

3,833

4,995

361

1,272

361

1,272

361

1,272

361

1,272

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Financial Instrument

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005

21(b) Financial Instruments: Interest Rate Risk


89

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 21

FIN A N C IA L IN STR U M EN TS

21(c) N et Fair Va lue s of Financial A sse ts and Liabilities

2003-04

2 0 0 4 -0 5 Total

Aggregate

Total

carrying

net fa ir

carrying

Aggregate net fair

am ount

value

amount

value

Financial A ssets

Note

$ '0 0 0

$ ’00 0

$’000

$’000

Cash

14(b)

1,660

1,660

6,047

6,047

Investments

14(b)

33

33

886

886

Receivables

8(a)

49 1

49 1

557

557

2 ,1 8 4

2 ,1 8 4

7,490

7,490

Total Financial A ssets

Financial Liabilities (R ecognised)

Loans

10(a)

2 ,511

2 ,5 1 1

15,007

15,412

Trade creditors

12(a)

79 1

79 1

878

878

Other payables

12(b)

150

150

72

72

3 ,452

3 ,452

15,957

16,362

Total Financial Liabilities (R ecog nised)

Financial Assets The net fair values of cash, deposits on call and receivables approximate their carrying amounts. The net fair values of bank bills are based on discounted cash flows using current interest rates for assets with similar risk profiles. Financial Liabilities The net fair value of trade creditors are approximated by their carrying amounts. The net fair value of the bills of exchange were based on discounted cash flows using current interest rates for liabilities with similar risk profiles. The final bill was fully repaid in July 2005. 2 1 (d) Credit Risk Exposures

The Museum’s maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Financial Position. The Museum has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk. All figures for credit risk referred to do not take into account the value of any collateral or other security.


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 22.

A P P R O P R IA T IO N S

The Museum received the following appropriations for Departmental Outputs during the year out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund: Y ea r e n de d 30 J u n e 2 0 0 5

2005

2004

$ ’00 0

$’000

Balance carried forward from previous year Annual Appropriation Bill No 1 - Basic Appropriation

20 ,3 8 6

19,728

2 ,3 8 9

202

Available for payment of CRF

22,775

19,930

Payments made out of CRF

22 ,7 7 5

19,930

Annual Appropriation Bill No 3 - Basic Appropriation

B alance carried forw ard to next yea r

23.

-

A S S E TS H ELD IN TR U S T

The Museum has established a number of Trust accounts which are detailed below. Donations and bequests are received for specified purposes under formal trust arrangements. Moneys received are placed in a special bank account and expended on the specified projects in accordance with the terms of the trusts. These moneys are not available for other purposes of the Museum and are not recognised in the financial statements. 2 3 (a ) USA B icentennial Gift Fund

In December 1987 a gift of US$5 million was received to develop and maintain the USA Gallery atthe Museum. Upon completion of the fitout the assets were transferred to the Museum. The financial position of the Fund is as follows: 20 0 5

$ Opening balance at 1 July

2004 $

3 ,5 6 3 ,7 7 8

3,255,310

216 ,16 8

181,326

2 5 ,3 6 1

19,978

Receipts: Distributions Tax Credits Exhibitions

3 ,8 0 5 ,3 0 7

3,456,614

Less payments: Acquisitions

13 ,6 6 1

25,808

Other expenses

24 ,6 0 1

130,300

33 6 ,7 7 5

263,272

4 ,1 0 3 ,8 2 0

3,563,778

3 ,9 6 6 ,9 3 6

3,486,874

1 4 3 ,1 1 1

70,230

lncrease/(decrease) in value of Managed Fund Closing balance at 30 June Represented by: Managed Funds Distributions Receivable Tax credits receivable Liability to Museum

2 5 ,3 5 3

19,978

(3 1 ,5 8 0 )

(13,304)

4 ,1 0 3 ,8 2 0

3,563,778

The USA Gallery funds are deposited into a long-term investment with Merrill Lynch Mercury Wholesale Balanced Fund. Ongoing operational expenses are financed from distributions payable from this Fund.


91

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 2 3 (b ) NZ B icentennial Gift Fund

A fund was created to research and develop educational material and undertake maintenance relating to the yacht Akarana. The financial position of the Fund is as follows: 2005

Opening balance at 1 July Receipts: Interest Closing balance at 30 June

2004

$

$

50 ,4 9 6

48,029

2 ,715

2,467

5 3 ,2 1 1

50,496

5 3 ,0 8 6

50,432

Represented by: Investment Interest Receivable

12 5

64

5 3 ,2 1 1

50,496

2 3 (c) M aritim e M useum B equest Fund

In March 2003, a fund was created to accommodate non-specific bequests made to the Museum. The financial position of the Fund isasfollows: Opening balance at 1 July

1 0 9 ,6 4 3

101,318

15 ,2 6 1

3,000

Receipts: Donations Interest

6,0 8 2

5,325

1 3 0 ,9 8 6

109,643

13 0 ,6 7 9

109,503

Represented by: Investment Interest Receivable

307

140

1 3 0 ,9 8 6

101,643

2 3 (d ) Louis Vuitton Fund

In November 1988 Louis Vuitton Pty Ltd donated $30,000 to set up the Louis Vuitton Collection for the acquisition of material relating to the early French exploration voyages to the Pacific, as well as later maritime association between France and Australia. The financial position of the Fund isasfollows: Opening balance at 1 July Receipts: Interest

13 ,9 9 6

13,312

752

684

14,748

13,996

14,714

13,978

Represented by: Investment Interest Receivable

34

18

14,748

13,996


92

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 24.

R E P O R TIN G OF O U TC OM ES

2 4 (a) O u tc o m e s of the M useum

The Museum is structured to meet one outcome, being increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s relationship with its waterways and the sea. Only one Output Group is identified forthe Outcome. 24(b) Net C ost of O u tc o m e D elivery 2005

2004

$ ’0 0 0

$’000

Departmental expenses

28 ,7 6 5

27,874

Total expenses

28,765

27,874

Departmental

4,691

4,721

Total costs recovered

4,691

4,721

Costs recovered from provision of goods and services to the non-government sector

Other external revenues Departmental Sale of goods and services - to related entities Interest Revenue from sale of assets Donation and bequests Industry contributions Total Departmental Total other external revenues Net cost of outcome

36

39

44 2

336

37

6

1,356

1,187

45 8

159

2,329

1,727

2 ,329

1,727

21,745

21,426


93

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 24(c) D e p a rtm e n ta l R evenues and Expense by O u tp u t G roup O u tc o m e 1 O u tp u t 1 O pe ratin g e xpenses

2005

2004

$000

$'000

Employees

9,1 1 9

8,704

Suppliers

9,6 9 0

9,593

28

36

9,007

8,442

Write-down of assets

62

122

Value of assets sold

32

3

Borrowi ng costs expense

827

974

Total operating expenses

28 ,7 6 5

27,874

22 ,7 7 5

19,930

4,727

4,760

442

336

Grants Depreciation and amortisation

Funded by:

Revenues from Government Sale of goods and services Interest Revenue from sales of assets Donations and bequests Industry contributions Other Total operating revenues

37

6

1 ,356

1,187

458

159

15

15

2 9 ,8 1 0

26,393

All the Museum's revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities are attributable to the one Output Group.


94

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2005 25. TH E A U S TR A LIA N N A TIO N A L M ARITIM E FO U N DATION

The Australian National Maritime Foundation, a Company Limited by Guarantee, was established in December 2000 and is controlled by the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum. Funds in the amount of $385,620 were transferred to the Foundation from the Patrons Fund. The Foundation's objects are to create a capital fund, through gifts, bequests and fund-raising activities, for the purposes of: •

Acquiring major additional items or collections of items to develop the National Maritime Collection;

Conservingthe National Maritime Collection;

Other activities which enhance the National Maritime Collection.

The financial position ofthe Foundation isasfollows: 2005

$ Opening balance at 1 July

2004 $

38 4 ,3 5 3

378,630

Interest

8 ,666

7,490

Donations

4,110

Revenues:

Sales of goods and services

43,475

-

4 4 0 ,6 0 4

386,120

31 ,5 5 0

1,767

4 0 9 ,0 5 4

384,353

407,947

383,615

Less expenses: Suppliers Closing balance at 30 June Represented by: Cash at bank Receivables

1,107

738

4 0 9 ,0 5 4

384,353


above: Siren mermaid, stern decoration from frigate La Na'iade. Carver unknown, after a design by Antoine Gibert, Toulon dockyard, 1779. Š Musee National de la Marine, Paris opposite: L'Afrique, detail of a display case stand carved in limewood by Victor Aimone, Paris, 1896.


SECTION FOUR

Massive figureheads in the form o f mythical sea creatures, French war heroes and voluptuous women from a pre-anorexia age, magnificently carved and covered in gold ... radiate wealth and authority, hut carvings o f slaves in shackles and subjugated indigenous people show the dark side o f colonial p o w er... Tracey Clement Metro, Sydney Morning Herald

Bill;


98

APPEN D IX 1 VISITOR AND MEMBER PROGRAM S

Seminars

03/03/05: ‘After the Bounty mutineer: Mr Christian on

01/08/04: ‘Ancient fleets of the Mediterranean’, international maritime archaeology seminar with

Pitcairn Island’, talk by curator of exploration Dr Nigel Erskine

Dr John R Hale, University of Louisville; Prof Robert

10/03/05: ‘The history, restoration and return of

Hohlfelder, University of Colarado; A/Prof Shelley

Barranjoey’ - the 3rd Phil Renouf memorial lecture,

Wachsman, Texas A&M University

given by Michael York and Bill Solomons

12/02/05: About Time: seminar with Professor Paul

24/04/05: ‘The Gallipoli campaign and HMAS Voyager,

Davies, Peter Ekin and Professor Marilyn Mitchell

a tale of two tragedies’, Annual Anzac Day lecture by Dr Tom Frame

Lectures and talks

15/05/05: ‘Bluewater Bushmen - the colourful history

01/07/04: Windjammers - the final story, book launch and talk by Robert Carter 15/07/04: ‘Antarctica - the director’s cut’, talk by MaryLouise Williams about the Members' Antarctic tour 29/07/04: ‘Australian cuisine in the golden age of windjammers’, talk by Dr Barbara Santich in the galley of James Craig

of the great open boats of Sydney Harbour’, with author Bruce Stannard 15/05/05: ‘Indian maritime history, ancient to contemporary', lecture by Jeffrey Mellefont, leader of Members tour to southern India 18/05/05: ‘Power, extravagance, revolution: France from 1660 to I8 6 0 ’, talk by Professor Ross Steele for the exhibition Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of

15/09/04: ‘The life of William Dampier’, talk by Diana and Michael Preston, authors of A Pirate of Exquisite Mind

French Naval Sculpture 10/06/05: First in a series of special Members lunchtime curator’s tours of Les Genies de la Mer

29/09/04: Members’ viewing of About Time with talk by

- Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, led by Daina

astronomer Dr Nick Lomb and ANMM curator

Fletcher

Dr Nigel Erskine

22/06/05: ‘Splice the mainbrace on HM Bark

31/10/04: ‘Time and charting the Pacific’, talk by Peter

Endeavour replica', special Members evening tour with

Poland, author of Travels of the Timekeepers

talks and 18th-century-style refreshments

07/11/2004: ‘The history of time’, discussion about clocks and watches led by Doug Minty from the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors

17/07/04: 'The Rocks and the docks', history walk in The Rocks area with Brian and Colleen Harrison

11/11/04: ‘Heroes of the Australian Navy' Remembrance Day lecture by Lt Tom Lewis o a m

Walks and excursions

ran

13/11/04: ‘Brunei: engineering genius’, talk by Cliff Emerson

22/09/04: Tour of new water police headquarters at Balmain

02/12/04: 'The Nulka: a rocket that thinks it’s a ship’,

17/10/04: ‘What keeps Sydney ticking?’, tour of the city’s

talk by inventor and designer Mai Crozier

clocks with the National Association of Watch and Clock

12/01/05: Upon a painted ocean: Sir Oswald Brierly, exhibition viewing at the NSW State Library, with talk by curator Warwick Hirst

Collectors 24/10/04: La Perouse discovery walkingtour


A P P E N D IX 1 | V IS ITOR A N D MEMBE R P R OGR A M S

23/01/05: Goat Island picnic and tour with NPWS guides 08/02/05: Spectacle Island and the RAN repository, tour led by Lieutenant Commander Moore 04/05/05: James Squire: beer lovers’ tour and tasting

29/05/05: Industrial heritage harbour cruise - the harbourthatworked, with Michael Clarkeand Don Fraser, Sydney Engineering Heritage Committee 26/06/05: Whale watch cruise off the coast of Sydney

at Malt Shovel Brewery

Special Members events Tours

30/07/04: South Pacific - sailor songs and

08-10/10/04: Eden whaling and maritime heritage

discussions with cast from the hit musical

tour, NSW south coast

16/08/04: South Pac/f/c theatre party for Members

16/11-07/12/04: ‘Where three seas meet - the

29/11/04: Members 13th anniversary lunch

coasts of Southern India’, led by ANMM specialist in Asian history and seafaring Jeffrey Mellefont

12/12/04: Members Christmas party 26/01/05: Australia Day BYO family picnic party

On the water

07/04/05: Members viewing of Les Genies de la Mer

18/08/04: RVSouthern Sun/eyortour of CSIRO

- Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, with guest

research vessel and lecture

curators Marjolaine Mourot and Mario Beland and ANMM curator Daina Fletcher

22/08/04: Annual autumn winter jazz cruise on board classic wooden ferry Fiesta

10/04/05: Members preview screening of Dear Frankie, Palace Verona, Paddington

29/09/04: Sail on Silver Spray, classic timber ketch 22/04/05: New Members welcome party 30/10/04: ‘Spring, spray & jacarandas’, Lane Cove River cruise with Adam Woodhams, from Better Homes

26/04/05: Members special viewing of The

and Gardens

Lightkeeper at the SBW Stables Theatre, with a forum comprisingthe play’s director, writerand actors

20/11/04: HMAV Bounty sail to demonstrate timekeeping instruments 18/12/04: Sail STV Windeward Bound, sunset cruise on a brigantine 26/12/04: Sydney-Hobart yacht race - champagne cruise on heritage ferry Lithgow to watch the start of the race 26/01/05: Australia Day family ferry cruise on MVEve

Other public and Members programs 03-4/09/04: Free concerts by Northern Territory school bands: Yirrkala Community Education Centre band and Darwin High School band Sydney Harbour Cruise Forums (in association with WEA) 17/10/04: ‘Past pleasure grounds of Sydney Harbour',

17/02/05: Global Challenge yacht race stopover,

with Mary Shelley Clarke and Ian Hoskins

exclusive Members viewing

07/11/04: ‘A literary look at Sydney Harbour’, with

27/02/05: Members ferry cruise to follow the Global Challenge race start 06/03/05: Harbour Week on board Lady Wakehurst, competing in the annual Ferry and Work Boat Challenge 17/04/05: HM Bark Endeavour welcome home parade, Watsons Bay to ANMM 07/05/05: Autumn leaves annual garden cruise on Lane Cove River, with Adam Woodhams, Better Homes and Gardens

Associate Professor Peter Kirkpatrick and Rick Pool 11/05/05: ‘FuellingSydneyfrom the harbour’, with historian John McClymont and author Greg Blaxell 31/10/04: Welcome Wall unveiling of panels 36 and 37, with 806 names 11/11/04: Special Z Special Force Remembrance Day ceremony, focusing on ANMM vessel Krait 07/12/04: John Louis and ANMM maritime archaeologists take part in the ceremony placing a plaque on the wreck of the Centurion


100

26/12/04: Kathleen Gillett participates in a parade of sail to mark the 60th anniversary oftheSydney-Hobart race 11-27/02/05: 2004-05 Global Challenge yacht race stopover 04-06/03/05: Sail Expo

27/12/04-25/01/05: Sailor Street 03-21/01/05: The Last Drop theatre show 11-25/04/05: Kids Deck, including ‘Sculptor on show' forthe exhibition Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture

16/03/05: Walk around Pyrmont for Seniors Week 02/04/05: Discovery after Dark, 30 Sydney museums including ANMM open late

Exhibition film programs 28/09/04-06/03/05: Movies on Sundays - The Time Machine and Ice Age

10/04/05: Unveiling of Welcome Wall panel 38, with 393 names 09-17/04/05: special viewings of Les Genies de la

Themed programs for visiting schools

Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture for

About Time workshop and science show with Dr Deane

Heritage Week

Hutton, years 2-10 maths, science, HSIE, geography

14/04/05: An evening of French opera with mezzo

SailorStyle -A rtFa sh ion Film for years 5 -1 2 visual arts

soprano Annette Tesoriero and pianist Nigel Kellaway,

& design, textiles & design, history, HSIE

and special Members viewing of Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture

Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture foryears 3 -1 2 history, visual arts and

Special program for Les Genies de la Mer -

French, and Sailors & Superstitions - a game on the

Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, three lectures

exhibition’s mythical themes for primary years

and a theatre performance: 31/03/05: David Gaucher, exhibition designer 07/04/05: Marjolaine Mourot, chief curator and head

Permanent programs for schools

of collections at Musee national de la Marine, Paris

Replica of Cook’s Endeavour, tours for all years

05/05/05: Robert Forgacs, Louis Pratt and ANMM curators Daina Fletcher and Mariea Fisher 07 & 08/05/05: Le Temps de Vivre theatre company

Investigating Pyrmont, years 9 -1 2 history and geography

performances in French of Sinbad the Sailor

Maritime archaeology, foryears 5-12 history, HSIE,

23/05/05: Performance by the Dili Allstars during talks

science

related to the exhibition Children of the Crocodile - the

Navigators, years 3 -6 HSIE

Australia-East Timor Story Pirate School, years K -3 maths, English, HSIE, PE, PD 01/06/05: Sydney at war: the untold story, film and

& health

presentation for Members with director Claude Gonzalez Science atthe National Maritime Museum, years 3 -12 science

Children’s programs Shipshape on James Craig, years 3 -6 HSIE 07/08/04: Sa/7or Style family fun day for Members Shipwrecks, Corrosion & Conservation, year 12 05/09/04: Sailor Style Super Sassy Sunday

chemistry

27/09-08/10/04: Vampire activity tours

Submarine Venture, years 3 -6 science, HSIE

28/09-10/10/04: Watch time go by from Sailor Street

Transport, years 1-2 HSIE

07/11/04: About Time Second-hand Sunday

What is history? years 9 -10 history

27/12/04-25/01/05: Wetworld


A P P E N D IX 1 | V IS ITOR A ND MEM BE R P ROGR A M S

Visiting speakers programs Throughout the year, lunchtime talks and seminars are given to museum staff and volunteers by visiting curators and specialists. 23/09/04: ‘Endeavour's “other” history and the part ANMM is playing in the search for Endeavour’s last resting place’, by Dr Nigel Erskine, curator of exploration and European settlement 29/10/04: ‘The Docklands Museum - exploring waterfront developments and interpretation of dockland and port histories’, by Oriel Williams, visiting Churchill Fellowship scholar, interpretive consultant and former curator atthe Docklands Museum, London 21/01/05: ‘Report on secondment to the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, 2004’, by Dominic Macintosh, marketing services manager 11/03/05: ‘The role of a display care manager in the collections care department’, by Mary Jane Holton, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, and courierfor ANMM’s exhibitions About Time and Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film 09/05/05: ‘Notes on life at sea aboard the replica of HM Bark Endeavour on the last leg of herfinal voyage from England to Australia, April 2005’, by Dr Nigel Erskine, curator of exploration and European settlement

101


102

APPENDIX 2 SELECTED ACQUISITIONS TO THE NATIONAL MARITIME COLLECTION

Artworks & prints

a 19th-century voyage alludingto a special relationship between the captain and one of his charges. Purchased

T h re e w atercolour paintings by C aptain G eorge W R

from Frances Lowndes.

B ourne (active in W estern A ustralia and South A ustralia 1 8 8 7 -1 9 1 0 ): Dartford 1910, Albany Harbour circa

W a tercolou r painting of S S O o nah signed and dated

1 90 0, Rob Roy circa 1 8 8 5 -1 9 0 0

A V G rego ry, 190 8

Captain George W R Bourne was a topographical artist

SS Oonah (1888-1934) was built for the Tasmanian

and ship portrait painter working in the colonial ports of

Steam Navigation Company but operated from 1912

Western and South Australia from the 1880s to 1910.

for the Bass Strait trade. The painting represents the

He painted sailing ships, steamships, lighthouses

importance of shipping in developing colonial and

and port scenes of the settlements alongthe coastal

Australian economies. Purchased from Marani Fine Art.

shipping route between the south-western colonies. The three watercolours are significant as examples of the oeuvre of a professional maritime artist pre- and post-Federation and as an artistic record of the burgeoning coastal shipping trade servicingthe developing Australian economies. Purchased from

A w aterc o lo ur painting titled Mosman’s Bay Sydney

Harbour, signed G H Brow n and dated 1875 The painting is significant as a careful depiction of the type of ship carrying cargo and emigrants to Australia in the 19th century, and as the impressions of a seaman on the ship. Purchased from Marani Fine Art.

McKenzie Fine Art. Oil painting o f the yacht Fairlie II by C aptain J a m e s H aughton Forrest, circa 19 0 0

Oil on canvas portrait, in gilded timber and composition frame, the painting gives a broadside view of the gaff-rigged cutter yacht Fairlie II racing offshore in the early 1900s. The yacht Fairlie II was a high profile yacht owned by an equally high profile ‘gentleman’ yachtsman, Frederick N Clarke, from Tasmania. The acquisition represents an important piece of Australian

W a terc olou r painting, a s h ip 's portrait of the Cecilia

Sudden, by A rth u r G reg o ry The Cecilia Sudden was a four-masted schooner built in California in 1902 by the Bendixsen Shipbuilding Co. for Sudden & Christenson of San Francisco; she was sold in 1915 to a company in Tasmania where she was used in the timber, coal and kerosene trade between America and Australia. Purchased atSothebys. S k e tc h b o ok conta ining 24 pencil sketches by

yachting history. Purchased from Richard Schmidt and

M id sh ipm a n G M un dy RN, HM S Blanche, South

Jane Bluett.

A m e ric a n Station, 1 8 2 4 -2 6

Painted s urfbo ard Bra Boys by a rtist J a m e s D odd for the Clean O cean Foundation

The surfboard, painted with bold, tattoo-like brands in blue on both sides, represents a contemporary interpretation of a surfing subculture, showing the iconography of the Bra Boys, a group of surfers at

The South American Station protected shipping routes to Asia and the Pacific, its work extending to protection of routes to the colony of NSW. The sketchbook contains sketches of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Horn, Chile and Columbia in the period 1824-26. Purchased from Christies, London.

Maroubra Beach, by an artist whose work explores

Engravings a fte r W e b b e r fro m the atlas - A Voyage

brands and identities. Purchased from Christies Art

to the South Pacific ...fo r making discoveries in the

Auctioneers.

Northern Hemisphere, pu blishe d b y S tra h a n , Nicol and C aldw ell, Lo nd on 1784

Fram ed oil painting o f S S S o ph ocle s b erthed at Circular Q uay in 188 4

The painting is a charming depiction of a 19th-century passenger ship to Australia and an unusual souvenir of

John Webber was the official expedition artist during Cook’s third Pacific voyage. Purchased from Christies, London.


APPENDIX 2 | SELECTED ACQUISITIONS TO THE NATIONAL MARITIME COLLECTION

T h re e w atercolours by Robert M cCrae

and services provided for travellers, exporters and

Depictingthe RAN patrol boat HMAS Geraldton, Darwin

importers. Purchased from Horden House Rare Books

Harbour, 2003; Italian Navy amphibious assault ship

and Prints.

S an Giusto preparingto transport supplies to East Timor, Darwin Harbour, 2000; Royal Canadian Navy supply ship HMCS Protecteur and Royal Australian landing ship HMAS Tobruk, preparingto transport supplies to East Timor, Darwin Harbour, 1999. Purchased from Robert McCrae.

A Narrative of the Briton’s Voyage to Pitcairn’s Island by Lieutenant J Shillibeer, with 15 illustrations, published by Law & W hittaker, London, 1818

HMS Briton was voyaging in the Pacific in 1814, accompanied by HMS Tagus, visiting Chile, Peru, Galapagos and other Pacific islands. They ‘discovered’

Oil painting by M aude G u m , American Red Cross ship

Pitcairn’s Island -o n ly the second ship to visit the island

near Gabo Island memorial

since the Bounty mutiny in 1790. Shillibeer's account is

Maude E Gum (1885-1973) was a versatile South

thus the second description of Pitcairn and the situation

Australian artist who worked in a wide range of media

of the mutineer settlement - 24 years after its inception.

and also as a teacher of drawing and design.

Purchased from Hordern House Rare Books and Prints.

Photographs

Tools & equipment

18 colour slides of the p a sseng e r liner Orsova

A V ictorian tw o -d ay c hro no m e te r by Hew itt & Sons,

de partin g S yd n e y on 28 M ay 1957

London, a b o ut 18 6 0

The images capture the crowds and excitement of

Contained within a mahogany box with glass protective

ship departures from Sydney’s wharves duringthe

inner lid, the chronometer complements the museum’s

1950s. The slides provide a personal perspective of a

collection of navigational instruments of the 17th to

passenger journey and dockside farewell. Purchased

19th centuries. Purchased from Australian Association

from Lois Kuip.

of Watch and Clock Collectors.

N ine digital im ag es o f A ustralian P a ralym pic team

A pair of base-m ounted optical gunsight binoculars, about

m e m b e rs training in R o m e and co m p e tin g at 20 0 4

1944, m ade by Ross of London

A the ns P a ra lym p ic G a m e s in s w im m in g and sailing

Used on Royal Australian Naval ships for observation,

events

range and angle measurement from the bridge when

Robert Prezioso was official photographerto the

training the ship’sguns for firing; original mahogany case.

Australian Paralympic Committee. These images are significant in documenting the feats of disabled Australian aquatic athletes duringtrainingand

Clothing & accessories

competition atthe 2004 Paralympic Games.

S w im w ea r an d leisurew ear fro m the collection of

Purchased from Prezioso Photography.

S o ph ie Van Rood, fro m the 1 8 8 0 s to 195 0s

Two c olou r prints by Rene N ow ytarg er titled The

Crossing, 2 0 0 2 Prints depict Afghan refugee women crossing the ship’s loading ramp off the coast of Nauru. Purchased from The Australian.

Books & documents A ustralasian United S te a m N avigation Co Ltd

Handbook o f Information forthe Colonies and India, 1 2th edition, 1 8 9 9 -1 9 0 0

Published as a guide to the Australasian colonies

The material, including straw boaters, a rare Edwardian bathing cap, men’s swimmingtrunks from the 1940s, and a 1920s beach pyjama suit, adds to our understanding of beach culture and swimming, water sports and popular culture. Purchased from Lawson Menzies Pty Ltd. W o m e n 's 1 9 6 0 s sw im su it related to beach culture and beach fash ion

Purchased from Mr Michael Whiteside. A n A ustralian H o m e Journ al d re ss m a k in g pattern fo r a playsuit fro m the 1 9 4 0 s or 1 95 0s

Purchased from Ms Janis Ferguson.

103


Crafts & curios W h a le penis fitted as a la m p m o un te d on a square plinth w ith a sta ndard electric light bulb, cord and plug installed a tth e base

Hawaii in 1779 the Royal Society produced medals in gold, silver and bronze - gold costing 20 guineas. Over 500 bronze medals were struck. Purchased from Noble Numismatics Pty Ltd.

This electric whale penis lamp, provenance unknown,

C o m m e m o ra tiv e m e dallion fo r the 1 9 0 8 visit o f the

is significant as an example of material souvenired by

A m e ric a n Great W h ite Fleet

the Australian whaling industry duringthe 18th, 19th

The visit of the American Fleet in 1908 was an event of

and 20th centuries. It shows how parts of the whale

enormous proportions. It is estimated that over 25%

were fetishised and collected by whalers themselves

of the Australian population participated in some way

and others in the industry. It is also a rare example

in the celebrations in Sydney, Melbourne and Albany,

of a whale penis preserved and mounted into a

WA. The medallion has been pierced at the top for

contemporary electric lamp. Purchased from Dalia

suspension from a necklace.

Stanley. W o o den sea chest with iron h and le s and latch

Indigenous acquisitons

The chest, from the Chariot of Fame, is painted on the front with three passengers’ names, the name of the ship, and ‘Not Wanted on the Voyage’. Chariot

T h re e striking, w oven p a n d a n u s fish traps, one sm a ller fish tra p and a dilly bag

of Fame was a three-masted, square-rigged clipper,

The fish traps - from Maningrida in the Northern

built at Massachusetts and launched in 1853. Initially

Territory - highlight the diversity of methods used

she sailed out of American ports, then made many

by Aboriginal people to catch fish. Maningrida is well

passages between England and Australia before being

known for conical fish traps such as these, traditionally

abandoned at sea in 1876.

made by men. The dilly bag is beautifully woven. Such bags were

Medals & coins B ronze m e dal c o m m e m o ra tin g C aptain Ja m e s Cook

once common throughout Australia, and were used for carrying or storing objects, and for ceremonial purposes.

(1 7 2 8 -1 7 7 9 ), struck by the Royal Society, engraver Lew is Pingo of the Royal Mint

Fibre objects are linked to all aspects of Indigenous life:

The obverse features a bust of Cook with the inscription

as well as for everyday use, they personify ancestral

Cook Oceani Investigator Acerrimus (the most intrepid

events and reinforce connections to the land.

investigator of the seas). Following Cook’s death in


A P P E N D IX 3 | D ON ORS TO TH E N A TI ONA L MA R IT IM E MUSEUM

APPENDIX 3 DONORS TO THE NATIONAL MARITIME COLLECTION

Mr Ja m e s A llison

Ms Ruth Boydell

A white cotton-fringed scarf with HMAS Tobruk ship’s

Collection of banners, flags, gifts, leaflets, t-shirts and

badge embroidered in bottom corner

posters connected with the 'Flotilla of Hope’ to Nauru,

Badge consists of castle flying St George flag from left

2004

tower, within rope circle, surmounted by naval crown

The flotilla was a seaborne protest involving two

and Tobruk on a scroll. Boomerang, nulla nulla and

Australian sailing boats, the Eureka and the One Off,

stone axe appear beneath rope circle, and ship’s motto

and seven crew. The expedition sailed from Sydney and

Fidelis et Fortis is embroidered below.

arrived in Nauru on 20 June (World Refugee Day) with

Mr Russ A m e s

Five paintings, in acrylic on canvas board, of Royal Australian Navy ships by Russ Ames, 2000, member of the Australian Society of Marine Artists

educational and recreational items and messages of support for the 260 asylum seekers detained in Nauru. The vessels were not allowed to dock. The actions sought to draw media attention to the government’s ‘Pacific Solution' to unauthorised asylum seekers.

Mr G rant A rb uth no t

Handbook for Masters and Seagoing Officers - The Australian National Line (Australian Coastal Shipping Commission), first edition, 1962 Handbook adds to the collection of ANL material already held by the museum and represents the lives of merchant seamen.

Mr Dart an d Indigo B raeder

Regatta program, single folio, NSW 2ft Model Sailing Council-State Open-Water Championship held on Sunday 31 August 1947, a rule book 2 foot Model Sailing Club and a flyer for the Sydney Ship Model Club circa 1973 seeking members to revive the sport of model skiff racing in Sydney

Ms Jean Beckett

The program lists regatta entrants with details of

Commemorative medalet from the arrival of the First

skippers, model boat names, post position, mainsail

Australian Fleet Unit in 1913

colours etc. The rule book contains 59 rules including

Ms H anja Bicknell

Two canvas standard life jackets made by Harry West, sailmakers of Balmain, probably 1950s, used on the motor-sailor boat Wyaree in Sydney Mr G ordon an d M rs Carole Billet

A collection of power boating memorabilia relating to the powerboat racing careers of Mr Jack and Mrs Valerie Lewitz, in NSW in the 1950s and 1960s The collection includes racing certificates; albums of photographs and racing ephemera; news and magazine articles; and nine silver-plate powerboat racingtrophies.

objectives, registration, subscription details, codes of conduct for members, handicapping rules and race rules. Printed by Frederick E Dearing. Mr David B rom ley

Framed assemblage of wooden cut-outs titled The Collection by Adelaide-based artist David Bromley (5 of edition of 40) Signed lower right, exhibited with other works by David Bromley in 2003 at Tim Olsen Gallery, Sydney. The work depicts wooden cut-out profiles of commercial ships and paintings of several yachts with black pen details; it presents a playful vision of commercial ship profiles

Mr M arcus B lackm ore

and reflects the artist’s interest in reinterpreting 1930s

A tin ofQBB butter concentrate taken with Kay

‘boys-own’ adventure story book imagery.

Cottee on board Blackmores First Lady on her circumnavigation of the world in 1987-1988. The tin is signed by Kay Cottee.

Mr Neil Brough

Two Christmas cards One card from HMS Vampire, with paper insert and black & white photograph of Vampire; one from

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HMS Shrops/i/re with paper insert and black & white

Australian whaling history. Davidson Whaling Station

photograph of Shropshire.

at Eden in New South Wales was the longest-operating whaling station in Australia and the last shore-based

Ms R achella C hidgey

A framed black and white photographic panorama of

operation. The engraving by Rene Davidson is also an unusual example of contemporary scrimshaw.

Bantry Bay Public Magazine The site pictured is listed on the Australian heritage

M rs N an cy de A lm e id a

database for its significance as a preserved industrial

Calico handkerchief painted with a map of the island of

site; it is also an important maritime heritage site.

Timor and the words 'East Timor Freedom' Used by dancers from the East Timorese Cultural

T h e H ono rab le Peter C ollins QC

Metal waterline models o f merchant and naval vessels As well as 51 models, donation includes 21 naval books from 1918 to 2001 and a framed topographic map of Gallipoli, reproduced atthe survey department, Egypt, 1915.

Centre (Sydney) during performances in the 1990s. The handkerchief reflects the meshing of cultural traditions with political objectives that characterised the East Timorese community in Australia. Ms S arah Elliott

A crossing-the-line certificate from the HMAS Sydney Ms Kay Cottee

Eighteen dyeline plans of a Tasman Seabird yacht design by Alan Payne KayCottee’sfatherJim McLaren built the Tasman Seabird yacht Joy Too in 1961 from these plans. The yacht was raced on Sydney Harbourand crewed by the

coronation cruise 1953, presented to Malcolm Elliott; a certificate stating that Malcolm Elliott was serving in HMAS Sydney on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II's review at Spithead on 15 June 1953; and a souvenir program

McLaren family including Kay, who gained her early

Mrs Halcyon Evans

sailing experiences on this yacht. The Tasman Seabird,

One piece of wood from the hold of Vice-Admiral Lord

designed by Payne in 1956, is one of Australia’s classic

Horatio Nelson's flagship HMS Victory

ocean racers, heavily built for extra safety in rough seas.

The piece of wood, in fragile condition, is contained in an envelope with the handwritten pencil note ‘From the

Mr G ra e m e Cox

A cream silk pennant with gold-fringed tassel and

Victory’s hold’.

blue embroidered lettering ‘Hai-Quan Viet-Nam/

Georges Hall Public School

Thantang/1962’, surrounding two crossed fouled

An adjuster's report of the assessment of insurance

anchors. The republic o f Vietnam’s flag, o f three

claims resulting from an accident to the SS Narrung in

red bars on a golden background, is embroidered

December 1912

diagonally in one corner

The report documents the damage, repairs, valuations of ship and cargo, seamen’s pay etc and is significant in

Mrs V era Crage

Ferry token - a brown metal disc with the inscription

revealing details of cargo shipping in the period.

‘For use in Ferry Turnstiles/Sydney Harbour Ferries Pty

M rs Pat Gillard

Ltd' - in use between 1900 and 1951

A leather autograph book with a hand-painted sketch of the MV Duntroon on the cover; contains the

Mr A n d y Curran

A 1980 America's Cup team jumper from the Australian

signature of Captain Lloyd dated 24th Nov 39

challenger Australia worn by grinder John Longley; also

Mr Ray G o dda rd

a collection of souvenirs relating to the Royal Australian

Cardboard-mounted black & white photograph of White

Navy helicopter flight - Vietnam (RANHFV), 2005

Star Line vessel Af ric in Sydney Harbour, about 1907 The image shows Sydney’s cityscape in the

Mr Rene D avidson

Two pieces of baleen, one engraved by the donor in 2004 with an image o f his grandfather, Eden’s master whaler George Davidson (1863-1952) The pieces provide links to an important family in

background. The photo belonged to the Reverend Herbert Egerton Hulme who migrated from London to Australia on the Afric in 1907. He has written ‘Torpedoed by Germans July 1917’ atthe bottom and the top is covered with signatures of fellow passengers.


A P P E N D IX 3 | D ON ORS TO TH E N A TI ONA L M A R IT IM E MU SE UM

Mr Lance G ow la nd

M rs M eredith H inchliffe

Collection of prayer flags covered in messages flown

Bottle of brandy presented to the Secretary of the

from yachts participating in the ‘Flotilla of Hope’

Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron, Capt Leslie Maxwell

expedition to Nauru in 2004 (relates to donation by

Hinchliffe DSC RAN, by Francis Chichester in 1966

Ms R Boydell, above)

during his stopover in Sydney in Gipsy Moth IV; eight silver gelatin photographs taken by Em McQuillan

M rs Je a n Hale

Two black & white photographs o f the Royal Australian Navy hospital ship Manunda leaving Darling Harbour, Sydney, in April 1945 bound for Morotai to pick up wounded personnel and return to Australia for treatment; photographer unknown Mr Trygve an d M rs N oreen H alvorsen

at the start of the 1968 Sydney-Hobart Yacht Race; correspondence and two novelty advertising booklets for Rothmans cigarettes entitled 'Queries in Seamanship No 1 and No 2 ’, 1920s-1930s The brandy is a rare memento of Chichester’s circumnavigation in Gipsy Moth /V in 1966-7, the first true single-handed circumnavigation where the track

Collection of ocean racing memorabilia including

passes overtwo diametrically opposite points on the

scrapbooks, plans and clothing, relating to the ocean

globe. The photographs add to our documentation of

racing and sporting interests of Trygve and Magnus

Australia’s best-known blue water classic; the booklets

Halvorsen

reflect the nautical imagery in advertising of the 1920s

Collection includes 31 scrapbooks relating to the

and 1930s.

Sydney-Hobart, Trans Tasman, Admiral’s Cup, Montague Island, America's Cup and other races; Gretel account book listing modifications to this yacht; shell from the starter’s gun fired at the start of the 50th Sydney-Hobart yacht race; and various rolled plans of Solveig, Anitra V, PeerGynt, and Norla designed by Trygve Halvorsen and plans by Lars Halvorsen.

Mr G erald Hurst

A Victorian naval forces certificate of service of Charles Hurst in the Victorian Navy; a reference letter written b yW G Colquhoun, gunnery lieutenant, aboard HMVS Nelson in Port Melbourne, 1896, to recommend Charles Hurst to any employer Mr Peter H uxley

H alvorsen B oats Pty Ltd

Life buoy from Kathleen Giliett and a diverse collection o f wooden patterns, mandrel boxes and Halvorsen boat fittings dating from the 1940s to the 1960s

Souvenir t-shirt of Oberon class submarine HMAS Onslow's involvement in RIMPAC 78 The t-shirt dates commemorate Australia's commitment to Pacific rim naval exercises around

Mr Peter Hellm rich

Hawaii in April 1978. During RIMPAC exercises (held

Anniversary regatta program, 26 January 1844, on

every two years) nations that border the Pacific

embossed paper and supported on layers of linen and

join together to hone their battle skills. RIMPAC 78

coated paper

was made up of 47 ships, 252 aircraft and 22,000

Printed by Daniel Lovett Welch, Sydney, the program

personnel from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and

is the earliest regatta program to be offered to the

the USA.

museum and is a valuable document of recreational rowing and sailing and details of a colonial regatta in the 1840s. Mrs Freda H enderson

Model o f ship Archibald Russell, flanked by sm aller models o f the Star and the Gaelic displayed in wooden box The diorama is significant for its depiction of key vessels in the Australian grain race fleets and for capturing the romance of this last era of sail, when wheat-bearing windjammers raced round Cape Horn in an effort to record the fastest voyage.

M rs Jo a n K illingsw orth

A dark-blue triangular felt Women's Royal Australian Naval Service (WRANS) pennant with two suspension loops on the hoist Mr N e ls o n M an uel Lay

Wooden model Uma Lulik (East Timorese sacred house) Made by carpenter Nelson Lay, the model’s thatched roof is fashioned from broom bristles; the windows are glazed with plastic; a paper Fretilin flag flies from the wooden finial and a larger cloth East Timorese flag is mounted outside the house.

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Mr R a y m o n d Le un g

Mr G ra e m e M cN a m ara

Dragon boat racing memorabilia from 1999 to 2001

A black & white photograph of HMAS Voyager in Sydney

including programs, shirts and processional lanterns

Harbour, with the bridge in the background; caps of two sailors are visible in the foreground

Mr Vincent Leyden

A stringerless foam 9 foot 6 inch (2.9 m) Gordon and Smith long board, custom-shaped by Cronulla surfer Bobby Brown circa 1967 One of the last works of this skilled surfer and board

The Royal Navy vessel was transferred to the RAN and spent long periods in Sydney. She was wrecked and scuttled while disembarkingtroops on Betano Beach, Timor in 1942.

shaper, regarded as a major surfing talent in the 1960s

Mr D o ug las M urray

when he was killed, aged 22.

A wooden tray with raised silver-plated rail around the outside and silver plated handles at either end. A

Mr Phil Logan

Two pairs of men's swimming trunks worn by members of the Tamarama Surf Life Saving Club

presentation plaque in the centre is inscribed ‘To Mr C.C. Cox from Victualling Staff of SS Katoomba 27.6.25’ Mr Keith M urray

M rsT u ye t Lu

Fry pan and plastic dishes decorated with Chinese designs, brought from Vietnam to Australia in 1977 by Tuyet Luon the vessel Tu Do (owned by the museum) Mr B ernado M achado

Jersey, t-shirt, medals and caps relating to the annual Timor Cup soccer competition in Australia, (one of the few events that regularly unite East Timorese from all over Australia) and highlighting the importance of maintaining cultural traditions in the East Timorese community

A collection of marine surveyor's instruments, including a rope gauge used by Keith Murray as marine surveyor and superintendent of shipping from the 1940s to the 1980s Two photograph albums o fM V Maheno and other Union Steam Ship Company ships built in the 1960s Albums compiled by Keith Murray during his career as shipbuilder, surveyor and construction engineer in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific. One album features black & white photographic prints of the maiden voyage and sea trials of the Union Steamship

M rs Doris M arshall

Company of New Zealand RoRo (Roll on Roll off) ship

A framed oil painting o f the passengersteamer

MV Maheno, 1969.

Westralia operated by the Huddart Parker Line. Signed and dated by crew member Hugo Lupi 17.4.1915 Mr Joh n M atheson

Mr C hris Nixon

Selected papers and newsletters from the Hood 23 Association archives 1970s-1980s; two copies of the

Fourteen 19th-century prints depicting Macquarie

Hood Association constitution 1973-4

Lighthouse, the Hornby Light and South Head coastline

The Hood 23 was designed as a family day sailer by

of Sydney

Warwick Hood in October 1966; the first boats were

The images document the changing face of Sydney

produced by the Hood Boating Company in late 1967.

Harbour over the century, shipping changes and the aesthetic appeal of lighthouses for tourists of the period. Ms Gillian M atthew s

M r Bill Olson

Framed poster (designed by William Olson) was issued as a limited edition by P&O welcoming Francis

Machine-stitched submariner's cream pure wool polo

Chichester to Australia on the occasion of a 19 68

neck jumper

promotional tour of his book about the 1967- 68

Manufactured in 1998 by the Elegant Knitting

single-handed circumnavigation in Gipsy Moth IV

Company of Penrith, New South Wales to Royal Australian Navy pattern, issued to submariners only.

M r R oland O sbo rne

Two shipboard newspapers from HMAS Vampire

Mrs Janice M cllree

- titled AUDAMUS - written and published on board,

Carved wooden commemorative triptych featuring

August 1967, containing details of shipboard and

HMS Victory, Admiral Lord Nelson and the battleship

shore activities, cartoons, poems, and Australian and

HMS Nelson, all surmounted by a naval crown, with a

world news during Vampire's cruise to Korea and the

facsimile of a handwritten letter by Nelson dated 1782

South China Sea forSEATO exercises in 1967


A P P E N D IX 3 | DO N ORS TO TH E N A TI ONA L M A R IT IM E MUSEUM

P& O Nedlloyd

particularthegold medal success of Noel Robins, Jamie

A Marconi Alert type 1119/B emergency receiver

Dunross and Graeme Martin in the Sonar class event.

with instruction manual published by the Technical Information Department - The Marconi International Marine Company Ltd

Captain K H Ross

Gunter scale rule, 610 mm long and 47 mm wide, made of boxwood with brass inserts for compass points

Ms Erika Peile

Invented by Edmund Gunter, Professor of Astronomy

Three cloth souvenir sailor dolls acquired on voyages

at Gresham College, London, in 1620, the Gunter

between London and Australia in the 1950s onboard

scale was a forerunner of the slide-rule and was

SS Stratheden and SS Southern Cross Ms A m a n d a Penrose Hart

Oil painting on canvas by Amanda Penrose Hart titled Mirror of the sea - the Krait2004 depicts a seascape with MVKrait, veteran of Operation Jaywick

used by navigators until about 1900. The Gunter scale exemplifies the technical achievement of mathematicians and instrument makers in the 17th century and augments the museum's collection of navigation instruments. Estate of W Sch rod er

Mr Joh n P e rrym a n

RAN petty officer coxswain navy blue double-breasted dress jacket, manufactured by ADI in 1990; RAN petty officer yeoman of signals navy blue double-breasted dress jacket, manufactured by Otele Mfg Pty Ltd in 1988 Mr Bob Poole

Collection of personal and shipping memorabilia belonging to Wim Schroder, a captain in the merchant navy (1953-1982) Collection includes material from the Straat Auckland; ephemera relating to launch of Nedlloyd, Royal Interocean and othershipping lines; navigational charts and tables; black & white photographs; plaque

Diary & scrapbook in ink, illustrated with photographs

commemorating Schroder’s retirement from the Straat

and magazine clippings, recording the experiences

Auckland; and delftware souvenir jug from the Straat

of Raymond Oswald Poole, a seaman on the barque

Fukuoka.

Archibald Russell on a voyage from South Australia to England in 1933 Mr David Porter

Ms Lindsey S h a w

First day cover issued to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Captain Cook’s landing in Hawaii in

Seven dyeline copies of design drawings by Bruce Farr

1778. Two USA 13-cent stamps depict Cook in a formal

from 1972-3 of the 18-foot skiff KB (in the museum’s

portrait and HMS Resolution in Hawaii in 1779

collection); and a reel of film showing KB under construction

Two Naval Brigade and Naval Reserve cupro-nickel commemorative medallions issued in 2000 by the

M rs M arjorie Q uick

Reserve Forces Day Council Inc to celebrate 100 years

P&O Pocket Book published in 1899 providing

service by naval brigade and naval reserve forces in

information on the customs, climate, currencyand

the Defence of Australia

culture of foreign ports of call. Stamped H E Quick, it includes handwritten notes on weather conditions etc during a trip on the Prinz Regent Luitpold Mr Bob Reid

Mr M arcus S h a w

Rip Curl Pro Sunsmart Classic 2000 program; Australian Surf riders Association Victorian Championship trophy 1970 awarded to Marcus Shaw;

Large colour map of Sydney C B D 1910 attached

other Marcus Shaw surfing memorabilia including

to a calico sheet, showing wharves in Pyrmont,

silver gelatin photographs by Barrie Sutherland

Woolloomooloo and Circular Quay and the shipping

Shaw was a pioneer of big-wave surfing in Victoria and

companies affiliated with them

one of the first to surf at Bells Beach, one of Australia’s

Estate of Noel Robins

Medal uniform accessories worn by gold medallist sailor

most famous surfing beaches and location of the world's longest-running surf contest.

Noel Robins at the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games

Mrs Gina Sinozich

The material is significant in documentingthe

Oil painting titled Our Story (2004), by Croatian

achievements of Australian Paralympians and in

migrant Gina Sinozich who is shown at the bow of the

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vessel Neptunia in 1957 stretching towards a map of

races, hydroplanes and motor-boats. Garrard was a

Australia, depicted upside-down under a night sky; her

Melbourne yachtsman who owned the William Fife-

husband Eugene and two children Jenny and Michael

designed yacht Sayonara, considered the finest yacht

are seated behind her

in Australian waters in the 1890s.

Child's woollen jacket, wooden donkey and souvenir

Mr Philip Stevens

belonging to Gina Sinozich, treasured by her for

Ralston indicator (used for weighing and balancing a

50 years as almost the only link with her Croatian

ship loading and discharging cargo) from SS Act 1, built

homeland

1968-9

Mrs V alerie Sloan

T h e Sw atch G roup

A red canvas Australian merchant flag waved by six-

Boxed Swatch Sydney 2000 Olympic Pin Collection in

year-old Valerie Sloan at a procession of men from

original packaging produced as an official souvenir for

HMAS Sydney through Sydney city streets in the first

the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The Swatch Group

half of 1941

was official timekeeper for the Games

Mr Joh n S m ith

T a m a ra m a S u rf Life S a vin g Club

A painted HMAS Vampire ship's badge consisting of

Two pairs of men’s swimming trunks worn by members

vampire bat within rope circle, surmounted by naval

of the Tamarama Surf Life Saving Club circa 1950

crown and Vampire in blue name scroll

Ms Petria T h o m a s

Mr Trevor S m ith

A selection of competition swimming and training

A framed black & white photograph of Titan crane

apparel worn by Olympic gold medallist Petria Thomas

lifting another crane at Vickers Cockatoo Dockyard Pty

The selection includes swimwear, caps, goggles,

Ltd, Cockatoo Island

traininggear, an alarm clock and a shoulder brace

Cockatoo Island was the site of the first major naval

and represents Petria Thomas's career from her first

shipbuilding program in Australia, important to the

Olympic Games in 1996 to her retirement after Athens in

development of the Royal Australian Navy and the

2004. The material is significant because it reveals the

maintenance of the allied navies during two world wars.

development of swimming gear in the decade from the mid-1990s, and the tenacity of a champion swimmer.

M rs Lesley S m o ld e rs

A crossing-the-line certificate for HMAS Sydney III

T h e Trixie W h a lin g estate

presented to Peter Mcgarry in 1967; a telegram dated

Rowing memorabilia consisting of pennants, ribbons,

2 August 1967 from Malcolm Fraser, Minister for

badges, scrap book and photograph album relating to

the Army, to Lesley Brabbins advising that her fiance

the career of Trixie Whaling (nee Forest) with the YWCA

Private Peter Shaun Mcgarry was killed in action on 1

rowing club 1929-1939

August 1967 in Phuoc Tuy Province, Vietnam

M rs C airo W a lk er

Ms Daw n Springett

The Corrigan collection comprises three oil paintings

A pair of dark-green cotton overalls with zippered

signed G Edwards, depicting steamships owned b yB M

pocket on front embroidered with red Naval Dockyard

Corrigan in the early 20th century: SS Friendship, SS

Williamstown insignia, consisting of text in oval,

Kiltobranks and SS Mokau; and a naive model of three-

surrounding fouled anchor

masted ship Shieldaic, in a glass and timber case with shelves above for ornaments

M s Paula Stafford

Corrigan’s was a small coastal shipping company

Diary written by George Garrard of his voyage on the

serving the north coast of NSW from about 1880 to

steamer Ville de Metz 1924-25

1920. The collection represents a virtually forgotten

The handwritten diary records Garrard's arrival in

minor coastal company.

Sydney from Melbourne in 1924 and his embarkation on the steamer Ville de Metz forthe voyage to Europe. The diary records his observations of shipboard life, other vessels, ports, weather and travels in France, including the Riviera, where he describes yacht

Ms W e n d y W illia m s

King George Jacks Day badge, 1940s Duringthe reign of King George VI, small silver and enamel badges such as this were sold as mementoes and to raise funds for the war effort or the navy.


A P P E N D IX 3 | DONOR S TO TH E N A TI ONA L M A R IT IM E M U SE U M

W e stpa c B anking C orporation

designed by Australian naval architect Alan Payne. The

Promotional Westpac ephemera relating to the

manuscript Wind and Water is an unpublished account

Australian Olympic swimming squad competing in the

of this challenge. Other documents reveal valuable

Sydney 2000 Olympics

information about the organisational structure of the

Collection includes posters featuring black & white

Australian syndicate headed by Sir Frank Packer.

photographs of swimmers Matt Dunn, Susie O’Neill,

Unknow n

Grant Hackett and Ian Thorpe; Westpac financial year

Spiral-bound 1993 Australian Rowing calendar

calendars titled 500 Days of Dreams and Count Down

produced by the Australian Rowing Council

to History showing aquatic athletes. W o m e n ’s P ion ee r So cie ty of Australia

The calendar, which features Australian Olympic and World Champion teams including the ‘Oarsome

A wooden coffee table constructed b yS H Ravenscroft

Foursome’, is an example of elite sports promotion and

using souvenir pieces from historic vessels; wooden

gives contextual images for the men’s double scull and

bookshelf made by Ravenscroft in 1934 with timber

men’s coxless four which both won gold atthe 1992

from Burdekin House and HMAS Sydney.

Barcelona Olympics. U nknow n

A n o n ym o u s

Papers relating to the 1962 America's Cup Challenge including plans of 12-Metre yacht Gretel Various items relating to yacht racing with particular reference to the early history of Australia’s involvement in the America's Cup. The plans provide documentation of Australia’s first America’s Cup challenger Gretel,

Souvenir vinyl sound recording with Super Duck, the theme of the America's Cup Challenge 1987, performed by Galapagos Duck and friends, EMI Records 1986 The sound recording reflects the influence of major sporting events on Australian popular culture.

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APPENDIX 4 MMAPSS GRANTS 2004-2005

One of the museum's most important cutural outreach

and seamanship training - in the vicinity, and on

programs is the Maritime Museums of Australia

completion of restoration it will be the only working

Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS), administered

example in South Australia.

by us and jointly funded by the museum and the

C airns M aritim e M useu m , C airns Qld

Australian Government through the Distributed National Collections Program of the Department of

A grant of $2,000 will assist the museum to conserve

Communications, Information Technology and the

the Hayles Green Island glass bottom boat. It’s the

Arts. The grants are awarded to non-profit maritime

only known example remaining in Cairns of the once

museums and historical societies, most of them

ubiquitous type designed and built in the early 1950s

community-based and run by volunteers, to fund

by the Hayles family, an important tool in marketing

restoration, conservation, collection management

and developing tourism in tropical Australia. It allowed

and exhibition development projects. The scheme

thousands of mainly Australian tourists, visiting Cairns

was initiated in 1995 and since then 113 projects

up to the 1980s, to view coral reefs off Green Island.

across all Australian states and most of its territories have been supported. For the year 2004-2005,12

M aritim e M useum o f Tow nsville, Qld

grants totalling $30,000 were awarded to the following

A grant of $2,000 will fund the assessment,

organisations.

development and implementation of a management program forthe museum’s important photographic

A lb a n y M aritim e F oundation Inc, A lb a n y W A

collection. The program will include a complete audit,

A grant of $4,400 will fund the development of a

cataloguing, preventative conservation appraisal,

maritime heritage gallery within the Albany Boat Shed.

volunteerand curatortraining.

As part of the fitting-out process, displays will be created

Echuca Historical Society, Echuca Vic

recording the history of several prominent boating and/or fishing families from this famous southern-ocean

A grant of $3,500 was made to conserve a collection

port of Western Australia, best-known as the home of

of maritime photographs believed to be unique. The

Australia’s last whaling-hunting industry.

images, dated from 1890, include the Echuca Wharf, paddlesteamers and boats built in the town, the rail

B roo m e Historical Society, B roo m e W A

bridge and street scenes, children and adults outside

An award of $3,000 will contribute towards the

The Sawmill Sunday School, and PS Marion passing

conservation work and digitisation of the Pearling

through Torrumbarry Loch in 1939. Most were donated

Master's Register N -Z . This important historical

by community members.

document, a key primary resource relating to Broome’s pearling history, will be taken to Perth where

G e e lo n g Heritage Centre, Vic

each page will be copied, conserved, and returned

An award of $2,000 will assist the Geelong Heritage

as close as possible to its original form. The original

Centre to preserve and catalogue their W G Volum

will then be stored safely away and the copy made

Collection, donated in 2000. The estimated 12,000

available to the public.

photographs of 19th and 20th-century British and Australian-built ships illustrate changes in Australian

Axel Ste nro ss M aritim e M useu m Inc, Port Lincoln S A

shipping, trade, naval history and migration from the

Funding of $3,000 will enable the museum to restore

1860s to 1980s. They include 600 photographs from

anex-RAN Montague whaler to working order, both

the second half of the 19th century, of early steam

for display and demonstration sailing use. This is

ships in the Port of Geelong - once the wool capital of

the only ex-navy whaler - a cutter used for transport

Australia and a busier port than Melbourne.


A P P E N D IX 4 | MM AP SS GR AN TS 2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

C larence R iver Historical So cie ty Inc, Grafton N S W

Tw eed H e ads Historical So cie ty Inc, NSW

Funding of $2,500 will enable the society to preserve

Funding of $2,000 will allow Tweed Heads Historical

the remnants of a skiff that belonged to world sculling

Societyto design and construct a mount forthe display

champion, Henry Searle. Sculling developed in the 19th

of a pre-1936 carvel-built river skiff. Boats such as

century into a popular professional sport with mass

this were used from the time of early settlement on the

appeal, and Searle was one of several heroes bred on

Tweed and surrounding rivers as work boats to move

the northern rivers of NSW. Champion of the world in

family, transport provisions, and for fishing, at a time

1889, he made headlines as ‘The Invincible Oarsman’

when there were no roads.

and ‘The Clarence Comet’, but died offeveratage 23. Lane Cove 12-Foot S a ilin g S k iff Club, Lane Cove N S W

A grant of $2,400 will contribute towards the club’s

M aritim e M useu m of T a s m a n ia , H o b art Tas

A grant of $2,000 will fund registration and conservation of a collection of 77 silk regatta

efforts to research and document its history and its

programs. Hobart's regatta was inaugurated in 1838

connection with the challenging 12-foot skiff class, a

with racing whale boats, and by the early 1900s was

distinctive racing type which has evolved into a high-tech

‘the greatest aquatic carnival South of the Line’. It

two-hander raced competitively today. The club traces

celebrated the local anniversary of Abel Tasman’s

its origins back to the 1890s. The project involves

discovery of the island in 1642. Ornate silk programs

collecting oral history stories from club members,

dating back to the mid-19th century detailed the

assembling a digital collection of images related to the

equally elaborate program of events that were a

club, and will culminate in the publication of a book.

theatrical feature of Hobart’s regattas.

Port of Y a m b a Historical So cie ty Inc, N SW

Internships

An award of $2,000 will assist in conserving and

The Australian National Maritime Museum also

displaying a collection of 223 watercolour paintings

operates a partnership or internship program allowing

of marine life with notes on their appearance, habitat

people from smaller regional museums who are

and feeding habits. Dated 1899,1905 and 1908, the

managing maritime heritage collections to spend up

delightful watercolours in a fresh and appealing style are

to four weeks here developing their skills. This year’s

the work of an unknown artist (‘J TP’), and were made in

interns were Ray Robinson from the Port Broughton

Queensland, NSW and some Pacific islands. They were

Sailing and Boat Club Inc of South Australia, and Marie

found in the estate of the late Frank O’Grady, owner of

Nunan, a volunteerfrom the Geelong Heritage Centre

Yamba's Pacific Hotel, and donated to the society.

in Victoria.

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114

APPENDIX 5 ANMM PUBLICATIONS

B ooks

Educational R esources

Voluteers Handbook 2003-04, annual volunteer

About Time school activity book

handbook of the Australian National Maritime

About Time maths competition workbook

Museum, 40pp, editor Gillian Matthews. Free to ANMM volunteers. Serials

Signals, quarterly colour magazine of the Australian National Maritime Museum. Numbers 68-71. ISSN 1033-4688,36pp, editor Jeffrey Mellefont. Published

About Time school workshop activity sheets Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture activity trail School holiday brochures 2004-05 (four) W o rld W ide W eb

September, December, March, June. Free to Members. Australian National Maritime Museum Web Site Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2003-2004. ISSN 1034-5019,151pp, editor Jeffrey Mellefont. All Hands, magazine of the Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers. Issues 48-51, 28pp, published quarterly. Free to ANMM volunteers. Newsletter, monthly newsletter of the Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers. Issues 122-133, lO pp, editor Peter Wood. Published monthly. Free to ANMM volunteers. D o cu m en ts

Connections: Indigenous Cultures and the Australian

http://www.anmm.gov.au. Updated continually. 556,118 w ebsite visits this year. Webmaster Jeffrey Mellefont, publications manager. The Welcome Wall http://www.anmm.gov.au/ww Searchable database of all Welcome Wall registrations including personal histories. Online registration for intending participants. ANMM Image Library - searchable database of selected ship images from the collection (http://www. anmm.gov.au/pics/search/index.cfm). This is the museum’s contribution to the national heritage portal coordinated by the National

National Maritime Museum. ISBN 0-9751428-2-8,

Library of Australia PictureAustralia (http://www.

authors Michael Crayford and John Waight, editor

pictureaustralia.org/).

Dr Wendy Wilkins.


A P P E N D IX 6 | STA FF PU B L IC A TIO N S

APPENDIX 6 STAFF PUBLICATIONS

Penny CUTHBERT, ‘50,000 km by kayak’ article, New

Bliss JENSEN, ‘Regulating time in the colony', feature

Zealand Kayak Magazine 2 7 2 00 4 :1 6 -2 1 (reprint)

article, Signals 69 2 0 0 4 -0 5 :9 -1 1

Max DINGLE, ‘A brief guide to strategic planning’,

Lindl LAWTON, ‘Refugee women - heroes and

Friends Review (newsletter of the Australian Federation

survivors’, feature article, Signals 69 2 0 0 4 -0 5 :1 2 -1 3

of Friends of Museums), April 2005 Dr Nigel ERSKINE, ‘Time and longitude', feature article, Signals 68 20 0 4 :2 -5 - & Bill Richards, ‘About Time', article, Signals 68 2004: 6 -7

- ‘Known to the unknown - Gina's journey’, feature article, Signals 70 2005:8-10 - ‘Ships, scenery and society', review of Waterline: Images from the Golden Age o f cruising by John Graves, Signals 712005:32

- ‘Be Excellent to Each Other’, feature article, Signals

Antonia MACARTHUR, ‘Dressing Encfeavour-style’,

7 1 2 0 0 5 :8 -9

feature article, Signals 68 2004: 28-30

- 'Time and longitude’, article, The World of Antiques

- ‘A Scandinavian skirmish’, feature article, Signals 69

and Art, August 2004-February 2 0 05 :59-62

2 0 0 4 -0 5 :3 0 -3 1

Maria Jose FERNANDEZ, ‘Our Welcome Wall is awash with stories’, feature article, Signals 712005:10-11 Daina FLETCHER, ‘KayCottee’s great adventure brought to life’, feature article, Signals 70 2005:12-13 - & Natasha WHYTE, 'Sydney Harbour - workingor not?' feature article, Signals 68 2004 :8-11 Elizabeth HADLOW, ‘Snapshot - howto keep your photos safe', feature article, Signals 68 2004: 24-27

- ‘The transit of Panama’, feature article, Signals 70 2005: 34-35 Ewen McPHEE, ‘Sailing a century’, review of Redbill From Pearls to Peace - the life and times of a remarkable lugger, by Kate Lance, Signals 68 2004: 31 Jeffrey MELLEFONT, ‘Museum Quay, Festival Pontoon', feature article, Signals 69 2 0 0 4 -0 5 :1 4 -1 6 - & Paul Hundley, 'Log of the barque Terror’, feature article, Signals 69 2 0 0 4 -0 5 :6 -8

Michael HEDGER, ‘Southern Surveyor: ocean research

- ‘Memories of maritime India', feature article, Signals

flagship’, article, Signals 69 2004-05: 38

70 2 0 05 :26-30

Kieran HOSTY, ‘Shipwrecks on our doorstep’, feature article, Signals 68 2004:12-14 Paul HUNDLEY, 'Captain Mickleburgh and the barque

- & Dr Wendy Wilkins & Bob Matchett, ‘Rivals at sea’, feature article, Signals 712005: 2 -4 - & Simon Morris, ‘Around the world on Sirius', feature article, Signals 712005: 27-31

Terror’, feature article, Signals 69 2004-05: 2 -5

- ‘Fishmarket aromas’, Letters to the Editor, Sydney

- & Jeffrey Mellefont, 'Log of the barque Terror’, feature

Morning Herald 18/02/05

article, Signals 69 2004-05: 6 -8

- ‘Pre-and post-Tampa immigration policies’, Letters to

- ‘Whalebone art, whaler’s log open window on 19th

the Editor, Sydney Morning Herald 11/05/05

century maritime adventure’, article in Antiques in New

- Cited in ‘What the Fuck’, Language Most Foul, Ruth

South Wales, December 2 004-M ay 2005

Wajnryb, Allen & Unwin, Sydney 2004

- ‘Acquisition - Henry Downes, Log of the Terror, 1846-1847', article in World of Antiques and Art, February-August 2005

Kimberly O’SULLIVAN STEWARD, ‘Meeting Gina', article, Signals 70 2005:11

- ‘Acquisition- scrimshaw panbone of Benjamin

David PAYNE, ‘Chalk and cheese', feature article,

Boyd', article in World of Antiques and Art, February-

Signals 712005:12-14

August 2005

Bill RICHARDS, ‘Feedingthe mind’, feature article, Signals 70 2005:14-16

115


116

- & Dr Nigel Erskine, 'About Time’, article, Signals 68 2004: 6 -7 - About Time, article, Collectable Trader, SeptemberOctober 2 0 0 4:5 0-53 Karen SCHAMBERGER & Lindl LAWTON, ‘Fretilin calling feature article, Signals 70 2005:31-33 Lindsey SHAW, ‘A raggle-taggle flotilla’, review of Forgotten Fleet 2: an updated and expanded history of the part played by Australian men and ships in the US Army Small Ships in New Guinea 1942-1945 by Bill

1788-1963 by Peter Oppenheim, Signals 712005:33 Gaynor STANLEY, ‘Steady hand at the helm’, article, Signals 68 2004:32-33 - ‘Tasmania's resurgent Aboriginal crafts’, article, Signals 69 2 00 4 -0 5 :3 5 Jo THOMSON, ‘Understanding our audiences’, article, Signals 7 1 2005: 23 Natasha WHYTE & Daina Fletcher, Sydney Harbour - working or not?’, feature article, Signals 68 2004:8-11

and Ruth Lunney, Signals 69 2 00 4 -0 5 :2 9

Dr Wendy WILKINS, ‘Bienvenue Baudin’, article, Signals

- ‘Voyages to Vietnam’, review of Photographs by

68 2004: 34

Australian naval and military veterans of the Vietnam

- ‘Handle with care’, article, Signals 70 2005: 38-39

conflict by Stephen Lewis, Signals 70 2005:36

- & Jeffrey Mellefont & Bob Matchett, ‘Rivals at sea’,

Stirling SMITH, ‘Sentinels on sandstone’, review of The Fragile Forts - the fixed defences of Sydney Harbour

feature article, Signals 7 1 2 0 05 :2 -4 - ‘Scandinavians at the museum’, article, Signals 71 2005: 34

AP PEN D IX 7 STAFF CONFERENCE PAPERS & LECTURES

Neil BROUGH, ‘Care of floating maritime objects',

region', paper, Museums Australia conference, Sydney,

paper at Big Stuff conference - Caring for Large

03/05/05

Technology, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 29/10-01/11/2004 Zara COLLINS, ‘All that g li t t e r s t a l k , International Glass Art Society conference, JamFactory Centre for Craft and Design, Adelaide, 01/09/04 - lecture on contemporary glass and jewellery designs, visiting artists’ program, Sydney College of the Arts, 16/03/05 Michael CRAYFORD, ‘Maritime heritage - a museum perspective’, paper and two workshop presentations on museum management, International Symposium on the Preservation of Cultural Heritage, Yangon, Myanmar, 24/08/04-25/08/04 and Bagan, Myanmar, 26-28/08/04 - ‘Australian National Maritime Museum’, lecture and participation in discussion on broader museology issues, National Museum of Brunei, Bandar Seri Bagwan, Brunei Darussalam, 01-03/09/04 - & V Daniel, H Mansell, K Fernandez and I Cook, 'The politics of international engagement in the Asia-Pacific

Max DINGLE, ‘Does your museum know you exist?', paper at Museum Shops Association of Australia conference, 15-17/09/04 Penny CUTHBERT, ‘The enigmatic Oskar Speck’, paper, 12 Biennial National Conference of the Australian Historical Association, 06/07/04 - Watermarks volunteer guide training 27/07/04 and 24/02/05 Dr Nigel ERSKINE, ‘After the Bounty: Mr Christian’s settlement at Pitcairn Island’, lecture at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, USA, 02/09/04 - ‘The Newport connection’, ANMM staff lecture, 23/09/04 - ‘About Time’, exhibition tour and talk to ANMM Members, 29/09 & 28/10/04 - ‘About Time’, exhibition tour and talk to FOH and security, 27/09 & 01/10/04 - ‘A bout Time’, exhibition tour and talk to teacher guides, 12/10/04


APPENDIX 7 | STAFF CONFERENCE PAPERS & LECTURES

- ‘A bout Time’, exhibition tour and talk to volunteer

- ‘Les Genies de la Mer for Australian visitors’, talk and

guides, 13/10/04

tourfor ANMM Members, with Marjolaine Mourotand

- ‘A bout Time’, exhibition tour and lecture to WEA,

Mario Beland, 07/04/05

10/02/05

- ‘The iconography of empire and Les Genies de la

- ‘After the Bounty mutiny’, lecture to Members,

Mer’, talk to partners of Heads of Mission, French

03/03/05

Embassy, Canberra, 19/04/05

- Endeavour replica volunteer guide training, 11,12, &

- Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces o f French Naval

21/03/05; 22/04/05; 13/05/05; 14 & 18/06/05

Sculpture, teacher guide training, 27/04/05

- Navigators gallery volunteer guide training,

- 'The development of Les Genies de la Mer

15/02/05 & 11/05/05

- Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture', paper

- Four onboard lectures to Endeavour replica crew

to delegates at Museums Australia conference,

duringthe voyage from NZ to Australia, 01-17/04/05,

30/04/05

comprising: ‘Historical archaeology of Pitcairn Island’,

- ‘A report on the scope and program forthe Australian

‘Search for Endeavour’, ‘The development of the

Register of Historic Vessels’, Australian Maritime

Pacific in the late-18th and 19th centuries’, ‘Maritime

Museums Association conference, 02/05/05

archaeology in Australia’

- ‘France and Australia: recontextualising Les Genies

- ‘A brief history of navigation', lecture at University of

de la Mer at the ANMM’, a WEA course, 05/05/05

NSW, 04/05/05

- Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces o f French Naval

- ‘Voyaging on the Endeavour replica’, lecture to ANMM

Sculpture, teachers preview, 10/05/05

staff, 09/05/05

- ‘Watermarks and Blackmores First Lady', volunteer

- ‘Preservingthe Bounty cannon’, lecture in ANMM

guide training, 19/05/05

chemistry workshops, 1 0,1 3,18 ,19 & 20/05/05

- ‘Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French

- ‘Shipwrecks and maritime archaeology’, lecture to

Naval Sculpture in Australia’, talk to Art Gallery of New

the Royal Australian Historical Society, 01/06/05

South Wales and Alliance Francaise members, with

Mariea FISHER, Sailor Style - Art Fashion Film, lecture to College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, 25/08/04 - ‘There’s no place like home - museum management of the repatriation of cultural material', paperto Museums Australia conference, 03/05/05 - ‘Exhibition critique - toys, science and play', paper, Museums Australia conference, 04/05/05 Daina FLETCHER, ‘Les Genies dela Mer in Australia', lecture to ANMM Members, 12/12/04 - ‘Interpreting Blackmores First Lady - viewing artefacts on board an artefact', lecture to volunteer guides, 13/12/04 - 'Les Genies de la Mer - art and empire’, talk to

Associate Professor Ross Steele, 18/05/05 - ‘Les Genies de la Mer - treasures and masterpieces', talk and tourfor Institute of Australian Tourist Guides, 30/06/05 - ‘Les Genies de la Mer - France at sea', talk at a recital of French songs held at Women’s College, University of Sydney, 31/03/05 - & David PAYNE, ‘Afresh initiative - the Australian Register of Historic Vessels’, presentation to ANMM council, 29/06/06 Michael HEDGER, ‘Characteristics and the positioning of a contemporary maritime museum’, lecture and walking tour to Sydney University Museum Studies students, 05/04/05

teacher focus group, 15/02/05

Paul HUNDLEY, ‘The Wreck of the Julia Ann - from

- ‘As if you are unlocking a showcase and stepping

acquisition to exhibition’, paper, Pacific Maritime

inside - Blackmores First Lady', talk at volunteers

History and Archaeology conference, Honolulu, Hawaii,

forum, ANMM, 17/02/05

February 2005

- ‘A preview of Les Genies de la Mer', talk at volunteers

- ‘Trans-Pacific trade duringthe American and

forum, 17/02/05

Australian gold rushes’ and 'Maritime cultural

- Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval

landscapes’, guest lectures in the maritime

Sculpture volunteer guide training, 05 & 08/04/05

archaeology program, James Cook University,

- Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval

Townsville, Queensland, 07-08/03/05

Sculpture, museum security training, 05 & 06/04/05

Lindl LAWTON, Passengers, volunteer guide training, 22/03/05

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118

- ‘Children o f the Crocodile at the ANMM', talk at

Julie STACKER, ‘The interpretation program for

the East Timorese Independence Day celebrations,

Btackmores First Lady', lecture to volunteer guides,

Chippendale, 20/05/05

13/12/05

Matt LEE, host, Museum Shops Association of

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, speaker, unveiling of Baudin

Australia conference, ANMM, 15-17/09/04

Bust, 05/07/04

Dominic MACKINTOSH, ‘In the Meantime’, presentation to ANMM staff, 21/01/05 - & Elizabeth Zammit-Estrada, presentation to visiting TAFE students, 08/06/05 - & Elizabeth Zammit-Estrada, presentation to members of the Institute of Australian Tourist Guides, 30/06/05

- ‘Antarctica: the director's cut', lecture to ANMM Members, 15/07/04 - ‘Antarctica: the director’s cut', lecture to Newcastle Women’s Business Club, 06/09/05 - Host, Welcome Wall unveilings, 31/10/04 & 10/04/05 - speaker, launch of Aquatic Paralympic exhibition,

Jeffrey MELLEFONT, 'Southern Indian maritime history’,

03/12/04

lecture to ANMM Members, 15/05/05

- speaker and MC, launch of exhibition Gina’s Journey,

Patricia MILES, Commerce volunteer guide training, 07/10/04 & 09/06/05 - ‘The Sydney wharfies mural', presentation to Maritime Union of Australia retired members group, 08/02/05 - Vikings, talk to teacher focus groups, 15/02/05

15/2/05 - speaker, Swiss Consulate 150th Anniversary, ANMM 2/3/05 - speaker and presenter, Ferry and Workboat Challenge, Darling Harbour 06/03/04 - speaker, World Presidents Organisation, ANMM, 22/03/05

David PAYNE & Daina FLETCHER, ‘Afresh initiative

- speaker and MC, opening of Les Genies de la Mer

- the Australian Register of Historic Vessels’,

- Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture, 06/04/05

presentation to ANMM council, 29/06/06

- speaker and MC, Endeavour welcome home,

Lindsey SHAW, ‘The pitfalls (and pleasures) of

17/04/05

contemporary collecting - case studies from ANMM’,

Elizabeth ZAMMIT-ESTRADA & Dominic Mackintosh,

paper at the 12th Biennial Conference of the Australian

presentation to visiting TAFE students, 08/06/05

Historical Association, Newcastle, NSW, 06/07/04

- & Dominic Mackintosh, presentation to members of the Institute of Australian Tourist Guides, 30/06/05

APPENDIX 8 STAFF MEDIA APPEARANCES

This appendix lists appearances by museum staff

- ‘Endeavour replica', interview with John Condon,

communicatingtheir research and special expertise to

Television Asia/Pacific, 13/05/05

a wideraudience. Scott ANDREW, ‘Sail Expo’, interview with Alan Borg, Radio 2RDJ, 05/03/05 Dr Nigel ERSKINE, ‘Being a maritime archaeologist’, interview with James O'Loghlin, Radio 2BL, 26/07/04 - ‘A bout Time’, interview, Radio 2SM, 27/09/04

- ‘La Perouse’s ships’, interview with Brendan Trembath, Radio National, 11/05/05 Daina FLETCHER, ‘Les Genies de la Mer Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture in Australia’, talk at media preview, 06/04/05 Paul HUNDLEY, ‘Captain Mickleburgh and the Terror

- ‘Endeavour replica’, interview with Alan Borg, Radio

panbone', interview with Steve Meacham, Sydney

2RDJ, 30/04/05

Morning Herald, 22/11/04


A P P E N D IX 8 | STA FF M E DIA A P P E A R A N C E S

- ‘Captain Mickleburgh and the Terror panbone',

- ‘Museum’s call for volunteers', interview, Radio

interview with Louise Maher, ABC Radio, Canberra,

FM 99.3,17/02/2005

23/11/04

- ‘Global Challenge yachts arrive', news interview,

- 'Captain Mickleburgh and the Terror panbone’,

Radio 2SM, 20/02/2005

interview with Nick Reinburger, ABC Regional

- ‘Museum visitor programs’, interview, Radio 2RDJ,

(Southwest) Radio, 23/11/04

02/04/2005

- interview with Sally Loaneon listener confusion

- ‘School holiday program’, interview, Radio 2SM,

about the difference between the prowand bow of a

09/04/2005

ship, ABC Radio, Sydney, 24/03/05

- ‘Endeavour’s homecoming', interview, Radio WS FM,

Bliss JENSEN, ‘A boutTim e’, interview with Mark

17/04/2005

Kennedy, 2RDJ, 08/02/05

Lindsey SHAW, ‘HMAS Onslow', TV interview, HR Live

- ‘A bout Time’, interview with Alan Borg, Radio 2NSB,

(Foxtel), 09/05/05

12/02/05

- ‘Dutch connections at ANMM’, guest lecture, reunion

- ‘What is time?’, interview with Jack Yabsley, Totally

of ex-Netherlands merchant shipping, 28/05/05

Wild, Network 10,18/05/05 - ‘Howto masterthe arts', interview,Sunday Telegraph, 24/04/2005 Lindl LAWTON, ‘Gina’s Journey', interview with Elizabeth Fortescue, The Telegraph, 8/02/2005 - ‘Gina’s Journey', 7.30 Report, 24/02/05 - ‘Gina's Journey’, SBS Croatian Radio, 09/03/05 - ‘Children of the Crocodile', interview with Portuguese radio station, SBS Radio, 23/04/05 Matt LEE, quoted in Retail Trader April-M ay 2005 Jeffrey MELLEFONT, ‘SekarAman, Indonesian perahu in ANMM collection’, interview with Grant Denyer, Sunrise, Channel 7,24/10/2004

StirlingSMITH, ‘Gone but not forgotten - maritime archaeology in Australia’, interview, ANC Radio, 05/06/05 Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, ‘What’s on - exhibitions at ANMM’, interview with Simon Marnie, Sunday, 04/07/04 - ‘Welcome Wall’, interview on George and Paul, 2UE radio, 08/08/04 - ‘Sailor Style', interview with Grant Denyer, Channel 7 S unrise, 27/07/04 - ‘Welcome Wall’, interview with Tim Bolt, ABC Southern Regional Radio, 29/10/04 - ‘Welcome Wall', interview on SBS Radio, news, 31/10/04

Bill RICHARDS, 'Australian National Maritime Museum’,

- ‘The Endeavour replica', interview, Channel 9,

interview, Radio 2CH, 24/10/2004

09/11/04

- ‘Welcome Wall unveiling’, news interview, Radio 2SM,

- ‘The Endeavour replica’, interview, NBN, news,

29/10/2004

09/11/04

- 'Museum visitor programs', interview, Radio SBS,

- ‘The Enc/eavour replica’ interview, Sky News

11/11/2004

Australia, 09/11/04

- ‘Summer holiday program’, interview, Radio 666,

- ‘The Endeavour replica' interview, TCN 9 National 6

27/11/2004

news, 09/11/04

- ‘Summer holiday program’, interview, Radio Indian

- interview with Aletha Mays in ‘Up Close and Personal’,

Link, 29/11/2004

MAG magazine February 2005,14/12/04

- ‘Australian National Maritime Museum, its

- Les Genies de la Mer, profile in France Australie,

exhibitions and activities’, discussion, Radio 2RRR,

M arch-M ay 2005: p 7

18/12/2005

- ‘Endeavour’, letters to the editor, Sydney Afloat, May 05

- ‘Australia Day atthe museum’, interview, Radio FM99.3, 24/01/2005

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120

AP PEN D IX 9 STAFF PROFESSIONAL APPOINTM ENTS

Steven ADAMS, auditor, Australian Registrars

Bliss JENSEN, member, conference programming

Committee

subcommittee, Museums Australia conference 2005

Susan BRIDIE, member, Marketing Managers

- Politics and Positioning

Committee, Darling Harbour Business Association

Matt LEE, president, Museum Shops Association of

- member, executive committee, Australian Federation

Australia

of Friends of Museums

- consultant to retail & product development staff,

- member, committee, Friends and Volunteers Special

National Wool Museum, Geelong, Victoria

Interest Group, Museums Australia

- consultant to retail & product development staff,

Michael CRAYFORD, member, board of directors, AusHeritage: Australia’s network for Cultural Heritage Services Max DINGLE, Australian delegate, World Federation of Friends of Museums council - World Federation of Friends of Museums representative, Australian Federation of Friends of

Museum of Flight, Nowra, NSW - consultant to retail & product development staff, Australian Aviation Museum, Bankstown, NSW - consultant to new visitor centre at Old Quarantine Station, North Head, Sydney Jeffrey MELLEFONT, vice-president, Australian Association for Maritime History

Museums council

Denise MACKENZIE, honorary secretar, Australian

- vice-president, Friends and Volunteers Special

Registrars Committee

Interest Group, Museums Australia - board member, Darling Harbour Business Association - board member, Royal Australian Navy Heritage Centre - member, Adelaide University Research Centre for the History of Food and Drink Dr Nigel ERSKINE, member, NSW Maritime Archaeology advisory panel - member, Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Delegates advisory panel Mariea FISHER, national committee member,

Lindsey SHAW, president, Australian Association for Maritime History - newsletter editor, Australian Assn for Maritime History Stirling SMITH, member, NSW Maritime Archaeology advisory panel - Commonwealth representative, Australian Institute of Maritime Archaeology council Jo THOMSON, president, Evaluation and Visitor Research Special Interest Group, Museums Australia

Museums Australia

Dr Wendy WILKINS, editor, Friends Review, newsletter

- vice-president, Temporary and Travelling Exhibitions

of the Australian Federation of Friends of Museums

Special Interest Group, Museums Australia

- foundation member, Sydney Society of Literature and

- board member, ICOM (International Council of

Aesthetics, Sydney University

Museums) Jeffrey FLETCHER, editor, newsletter of the Australian

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, member, Museums and Galleries Foundation of New South Wales

Maritime Museums Council

- vice-president and president of International

- treasurer, Australian Maritime Museums Council,

Congress of Maritime Museums

Special Interest Group, Museums Australia

- board member, Council of Australian Museum Directors

Michael HEDGER, panel judge, University of Western Sydney inaugural sculpture prize, 11/04 - member, Woollahra council small sculpture award committee

- board member, Foundation for the Preservation of Captain Cook’s Ships - peer reviewer, Museum Management and Curatorship, 2004-05


APPENDIX 10 | STAFF OVERSEAS TRAVEL

APPENDIX 10 STAFF OVERSEAS TRAVEL

Steven ADAMS, fleet manager: Gisborne, NZ, 28/03-

- Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2005. Presented

01/04/2004. Assess Endeavour replica as part of

paper ‘The wreck of the Julia Ann - from acquisition

project planning for the handover of the vessel to ANMM.

to exhibition’ at the Pacific Maritime History and

Zara COLLINS, volunteers’ assistant: Beijing, China,

Archaeology conference.

01/11-01/12/2004. Awarded an Australia-China

Dominic MACKINTOSH, marketing services manager:

Council artist-in-residency to research traditional

Greenwich, UK, 06/09-29/10/2004. Secondment to

textile designs and inspire new jewellery designs.

the National Maritime Museum.

Michael CRAYFORD, assistant director, Collections and

Jeffrey MELLEFONT, publications manager: Tamil Nadu

Exhibitions: Singapore, Myanmar, Brunei, 20/08-

and Kerala, India, 16/11-07/12/04. Led a maritime-

04/09/2004. Attended International Symposium on

themed tour of coastal southern India, for 12 museum

Preservation of Cultural Heritage and participated in

Members and public subscribers.

discussions on broader museological issues. - USA, Newark, New York, 06-14/06/2005. Visited Newark museums to establish interest in Saltwater exhibition and negotiated donation for American Friends of ANMM.

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, director: Rhode Island, USA, 04-05/10/04. Rhode Island Archaeological Maritime Museum Project, participated in discussion on the search for Cook's ships. - New York, USA, 05-07/10/04. Met with consular

Dr Nigel ERSKINE, curator, Exploration: Newport, Rhode

and trade organisations regarding American Friends

Island, USA, 21/08-06/09/04. Assisted Rhode Island

of Australian National Maritime Museum (AFANMM),

Marine Archaeology Project in survey of wrecks in

gallery systems, site visit to Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Newport Harbour, seeking remains of HMB Endeavour.

- Washington, USA, 08-11/10/04. Met with embassy

- crew member, the Endeavour replica, New Zealand-

officials and trade organisations regarding AFANMM;

Australia voyage, 01-17/05/05.

visits to American Natural History Museum, Museum

Daina FLETCHER, senior curator, Maritime Communities: Paris, London, 10-18/09/04. Selected material and negotiated development of Les Genies de la Mer -M asterpieces of French Naval Sculpture; meetings with Paula Austin, project manager and Simon Stephens, curator of the National Register of Historic Vessels at Greenwich, to discuss a comparative model for ANMM’s Australian Register of Historic Vessels.

of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institute, USS Sequoia. - Bilbao, Spain, 13-17/10/04. Attended meeting of ICMM executive, visit to Bilbao Maritime Museum. - Paris, France, 18-20/10/04. Musee national de la Marine for negotiations for Les Genies de la Mer - Masterpieces of French Naval Sculpture; Musee Jacquemart-Andre. - Auckland, NZ, 25-26/10/04. Meetings at NZ National Maritime Museum.

Paul HUNDLEY, senior curator, USA Gallery: Norfolk,

- Wellington, NZ, 26-28/10/04. Attended Council of

Virginia USA, October 2004. For Council of American

Australian Museum Directors meeting, Te Papa.

Maritime Museums.


APPENDIX 11 ORGANISATION CHART AT 30 JUNE 2005


A P P E N D IX 12 | STAFF AS AT 30 JUN E 2005

AP PEN D IX 12 STAFF AS AT 30 JUNE 2005

This appendix lists only APS staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999 EXECUTIVE Mary-Louise Williams MA Inger Sheil BA Russell Smylie BBus

Director Executive Assistant Manager, Secretariat & Fleet Services

Fleet Steven Adams Eng C12 BBus CertMusStud CertMarEng CertlndElect ASA Neil Brough Eng C l l DipNavArch DipMarEng CertMusStud Robert Parish JP Coxswain CertElect Lee Graham Coxswain CertShpbldg Todd Maiden CertBlrmkg Matthew Spillard CertFitMchng Michael Whetters CertShpbldg Vince McGuire Christine Finlay Peter Lightbody Coxswain CertBlrmkg George Hannaford JP CertShpbldg ASTC Noel Burgess Matthew Dunn Cert Shpbldg Robert Townsend Cert Shpbldg

Fleet Manager Fleet Engineer Superintendent Fleet Foreman (On Leave) Shipwright Shipwright Shipwright Shipwright A/Fleet Foreman Shipkeeper Shipkeeper Shipkeeper Shipkeeper Shipkeeper Shipwright Shipwright

External relations unit Bill Richards JP BA DipJourn DipPubAdmin Samantha McDonough BACom

Media & Communications Manager Promotions Assistant (On Leave)

COLLECTIONS & EXHIBITIONS Michael Crayford MA(CultSt&Comm) BA(VisArts) DipMusStud Jade Lor-Chan BA

Assistant Director, Collections & Exhibitions Project Assistant

Special Projects Unit Mariea Fisher BA(Hons) MM Bliss Jensen BA BSc DipPR John Waight CertEd Paul Hundley MA Maritime communities Daina Fletcher BA(Hons) Patricia Miles BA Penny Cuthbert BA DipMusStud Lindl Lawton MA BA(Hons) David Payne BA (ID) Maritime Technology, Exploration & Navy Lindsey Shaw BA DipMusStud Stirling Smith BA PGradDipMarArch Nigel Erskine PhD BA GradDipMarArch CertMusStud

Manager, Temporary & Travelling Exhibitions Curator, Temporary & Travelling Exhibitions Indigenous Curator & Liaison Officer Senior Curator, USA Gallery

Senior Curator Curator, Commerce Curator, Sport & Leisure Curator Post Federation Immigration Project Officer, Australian Register of Historic Vessels Senior Curator, Maritime Technology, Exploration & Naval History Curator, Maritime Technology & Maritime Archeology Curator, Exploration

123


124

Kim Tao MA Kieran Hosty BA DipMarArch Michelle Linder MA DipMusStud Design Johanna Nettleton BA Adrienne Kabos MDes DiplndDes CertCompGraphics Daniel Ormella MDes AssDipGraphDes Tanguy Le Moing Heidi Riederer Degree Industrial Design Cameron Krone BCommMedia AdvDipProductDesign Stephen Crane MVisArts Kevin Bray DipVisArts Adam Laerkesen BVisArts Peter Buckley BVisArts DipVisArts Eszter Matheson AdvDiplntDes Shame Fielder BDes CertProjMgt

Assistant Curator, Special Projects Curator, Ship Technology & Maritime Archaeology, (On Leave) Curator (On Leave) A/Manager Graphic Designer/Coordinator Graphic Designer Exhibition Designer Graphic Designer Exhibition Designer Senior Preparator Team Leader Preparation Preparator Preparator Exhibition Designer (On Leave) Manager (On Leave)

Registration Sally Fletcher BA DipMusStud Denise Mackenzie MA DipMusStud Anupa Shah Bcom Will Mather BA(Hons) DipMusStud Andrew Frolows CertPhoto Elizabeth Maloney BFA Sabine Escobar-Jaramillo MAMusStud BASocSc Melinda Smith BA GradDipAppSc Myffanwy Bryant Conservation Sue Frost AssocDipMatCon Ian Miles BAppSc Hons

SeniorRegistrar Registrar, Information Management & Loans Registration Assistant Assistant Registrar Documentation Photographer Photographic Librarian Registration Assistant Registration Assistant Registration Assistant

Karina Acton BAppScCon Jolanta Grzedzielska

Senior Conservator Senior Conservator, Objects/Mixed Collections A/Head of Conservation Conservator, Preventive Conservation/ Mixed Collections Conservator, Objects/Mixed Collecltions/Metals Conservator, Objects/Mixed Collections/Metals

Library Services Frances Prentice BA(LibSc) Jan Harbison BA GradDipLib Gillian Simpson BA DipLib Karen Pymble DipLib AssocDipCommunityWel Kathryn Vandine BSc GradDipLib

Manager Technical Services Librarian Public Enquiries Library Technician Library Technician

COMMERCIAL & VISITOR SERVICES Max Dingle

Assistant Director Commercial & Visitor Services

Marfa Jose Fernandez MA Antonia Macarthur BA Helen Skewes BlnfoSci

Project Assistant Ship Consultant Website Coordinator

The Endeavour replica Ross Mattson MasterlV Anthony Longhurst CertBoatbidg Clare Randall David Lewis

Ship Manager Shipwright Ship Keeper Ship Keeper

Tasha Brown BAppScCon BA Arch


A P P E N D IX 12 | STAFF AS AT 30 JUN E 2005

Customer Service Peter Haggarty JP

Manager

Marketing Susan Bridie Dominic Mackintosh BA(Hons) Elizabeth Zammit-Estrada BATourism MA(int'IRelns) Jo Thomson BA(Hons) Amanda Graham Adrian Adam BBus Claire Palmer BA Lisa Faye AssocDipHospMgt Liz Tomkinson BCA Jan Mclnnies

Manager Marketing Services Manager Marketing Assistant Market Research and Evaluation Officer Sponsorhip Members Manager Members Service Coordinator Venue Hire Manager Visitor Services Officer Receptionist

Publications Jeffrey Mellefont BA DipEd

Publications Manager

Visitor Programs Michael Hedger MA MA(Arts Adm) DipEd Dip Fine Arts Dallas Bicknell BA(Hons) DipEd Jeannie Douglass MA DipEd Jeffrey Fletcher DipTeach Carolyn Allen BA MPS Scott Andrew MTeach(Hons) BA Anita Toft MA BVisArts

Manager, Visitor Services Public Programs Officer School Programs Coordinator K-6 School & Programs Coordinator Education Project Officer Events Coordinator Visitor Programs Officer

CORPORATE SERVICES Quentin Howarth Marie Nunan

Assistant Director, Corporate Services Project Assistant, Corporate Services

Communications & Information Management Services Dianne Churchill BA(Hons) DipEd DiplM Fifi Brown Dip Teach BEd Robyn Gurney BA DipEd MIM

Manager Records Officer Records Manager (On Leave)

Financial Services Joan Miller BCom ACA CPA GradCertArtsMan William Good BA James Egan Tina Lee Tony Ridgway BA

Chief Financial Manager Assistant Finance Manager Accounts Supervisor Accounts Officer Accounts Officer

Human Resources Gillian Matthews BAppSc GradCertPubSectorMgt John Miranda BA JP Cindy Fung DipHRM Joan Cheung Peter Wood MasterMariner MAqua DipVolMg Zara Collins BVisArts Emma Cant GradDipArts BA

Manager Manager Personnel Services Personnel Officer Assistant Personnel Officer Volunteers Manager Volunteers Assistant Volunteers Assistant (Thur, Fri, Sat)

Building Services Ray McMaster DipEng AssocDipConMaint Ian McKellar AssocDipConMaint Keith Buckman

Building Services Manager Maintenance Manager Assets Coordinator

Property Liaison Greg Edmondson

Property Liaison Manager

125


126

APPENDIX 13 COUNCIL MEMBERS

C ha irm a n

Brian Gibson is a director of Talent 2 International Ltd and Australian Stem Cell Centre Ltd as well as

Mr M ark Bethw aite BE (Civil), M BIdSc, M BA

Term: 30 June 2001-29 June 2004 30 June 2 0 04-29 June 2007 Attended all Council meetings Mark Bethwaite is managing director and CEO of the leading industry organisation, Australian Business Limited. An engineer by profession, he has been chief eecutive of two major listed Australian mining and manufacturing companies. His current non­ executive directorships, in addition to the museum, include the Reserve Bank’s Note Printing Australia Limited, Deacons - Lawyers, the Foundation for Rural

chairman of two private companies. He was a Liberal senatorfor Tasmania from 1993 until February 2002. In 1996, he was parliamentary secretary to the treasurer and responsible for corporations law and the Australian Securities Commission. Before entering parliament, he was managing director of Australian Newsprint Mills Ltd during the 1980s, chairman of the Hydro-Electric Commission of Tasmania 1988-1992, chairman of Unitas Consulting Ltd, and a director of several other companies. Ms G aye Hart AM , BA, M Ed, DEd, FACE, FAICD (N S W )

and Regional Renewal and the Australian Institute

Term: 14 May 2003-13 May 2006

of Management NSW & ACT Limited. As a member

Attended five Council meetings

of the Australian yachtingteam sforthe 1972,1976

Gaye Hart is director of the Hunter Institute of TAFE

and 1980 Olympic Games, and a world champion in a

NSW, a director of the Newcastle Port Corporation and

number of international classes, Mark Bethwaite has a

president of the Australian Council for International

strong affinity with Australia’s maritime heritage.

Development. She is a Fellow of the Australian College of Education and of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. In June 1989 she was awarded membership

M em bers Mr M arcus B la ck m ore AM (N S W )

of the Order of Australia (AM) for her services to the community and to Australia’s Bicentenary. In 1999 she

Term: 22 November 2000-21 November 2003

was awarded an honorary doctorate in Education by

22 November 2003-21 November 2006

the University of Newcastle.

Attended five Council meetings Executive chairman of Blackmores Ltd, Mr Blackmore is the founding president and a board member of the Complementary Healthcare Council of Australia. He is a director of the Young Endeavour Youth Scheme, a council member of both NSW Maritime and Westmead Children’s Hospital and honorary trustee of the Committee for the Economic Development of Australia. He is chairman of both the Industry Advisory Panel of the National Marine Safety Committee and the Board of Governors of the Heart Research Institute. Mr Blackmore is an experienced yachtsman whose company sponsored Kay Cottee's solo voyage in 1988. The Hon Brian Gibson AM , BScF, BA, FAICD (Tas)

Em e ritus P rofesso r Joh n P enrose A ssA ppS c (PTC ), PhD (C ity, L o n d o n ) (W A )

Term: 18 December 2003-17 Decem ber2006 Attended five Council meetings Professor Penrose was the founding director of Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology. He is currently project manager for the National Coastal Water Habitat Mapping Program of the Cooperative Research Centre for Coastal Zone, Estuary and Waterway Management. His research interests are in marine science and technology; particularly marine acoustics, oceanography, remote sensing and maritime archaeology. He is an honorary associate of the Western Australian Museum and thefounder

Term: 26 June 2002-25 June 2005

in 1970 of the Perth welfare association volunteer

26 June 2005-25 June 2008

task force. He has been an active diver and sailor in

Attended all Council meetings

Australian waters for over four decades.


A P P E N D IX 13 | C O U N C IL ME M BE RS

M rs Eda Ritchie A M usA , G ra d D ip B u s (Vic)

in 2000. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons

Term: 26 June 2002-25 June 2005

of Canada as well as a Fellow and treasurer of the Royal

26 June 2005-25 June 2008

Australasian College of Surgeons. He is a keen amateur

Attended all Council meetings

maritime historian and yachtsman.

Comingfrom a farmingand business background, Mrs Ritchie has had a strong community commitment mainly through local government, the arts and as trustee of the R E Ross Philanthropic Trust. She is a member of the council of Melbourne University and has worked in natural resource management and coastal strategic planning for the Victorian government for over ten years. She is a member of the Victorian Environmental Assessment Council.

Ms M ary-Lo uise W illia m s (N S W )

Term: 9 November2 0 0 0 -8 November 2003 9 November 2 0 0 3 -8 November 2006 Attended five Council meetings Ms Williams began her career atthe Australian National Maritime Museum as senior curator in 1988, then became assistant director responsible forthe Collections and Exhibitions branch two years later. She was appointed director in November 2000. She is

Mr Joh n Rothw ell A O (W A )

currently vice president of the International Congress

Term: 24 June 2004-23 June 2007

of Maritime Museums and chair of the Museums and

Attended four Council meetings

Galleries Foundation of NSW.

With over 30 years shipbuilding experience Mr Rothwell is executive chairman and founder of Austal Ships Pty Ltd, a world leader in the construction of aluminium vessels. In January 2004 he was appointed an Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to the Australian shipbuilding industry through the development of trade links and for contributions to vocational education and training. Mr Rothwell is a member of the Bureau Veritas Classification Society and past chairman of both the Australian Shipbuilders Association and the State Training Board of Western Australia. He is a keen sailor and diver in his leisure time and has a strong interest in maritime history.

Mrs Nerolie W ithnall BA, LLB, M AICD (Q ld)

Term: 26 June 2002-25 June 2005 26 June 2005-25 June 2008 Attended all Council meetings Mrs Withnall is a former partner in corporate law with Minter Ellison Lawyers. She is a past chair of the Queensland Museum board and a director with Campbell Brothers Group, Pan Australian Resources Ltd, Alchemia Ltd, the Brisbane Institute and the Major Sports Facilities Authority. She is also a member of the Takeovers Panel. Naval m e m b e r: C D R E G e o ff G e ra gh ty AM RAN (ACT)

Term: 1 May 20 0 4 Mr Joh n S im p s o n BA, M AICD, FPRIA (VIC)

Term: 22 November 2000-21 November 2003 22 November 2003-21 November 2006 Attended four Council meetings Mr Simpson is a director of Shell Australia Limited and Shell Energy Holdings (Australia) Ltd. He is director of External and Corporate Affairs for Shell and a director of several community and educational organisations. These include the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Scotch College Melbourne, the NGV Foundation and the Hitchin Foundation focusing on men’s health.

Attended five Council meetings The naval member holds office atthe pleasure of the Chief of Navy. Commodore Geraghty joined the RAN in 1969 as a seaman officer. After gaining his Bridge Watch Keeping Certificate he specialised in hydrography. In addition to ship and shore postings CDRE Geraghty has commanded HMAS Flinders and HMNZS Monowai. He has had appointments to other foreign navies, serving with the United States Navy, the PNG Defence Force, the Royal Navy and Royal New Zealand Navy. In 1998 he was appointed director of

Dr Andrew Sutherland MB, BS, FRCSC, FRACS, GradDip BA

the RAN Staff College. Duringthis period Commodore

Term: 14 May 2003-13 May 2006

Geraghty completed his Graduate Certificate in

Attended five Council meetings

Business Administration. In late 1999 he was

Dr Andrew Sutherland is chief of the division of Surgery

appointed Australian Hydrographer and Hydrographic

and head of the Orthopaedic Department atthe

Force Element Group Commander, then Head of the

Adelaide Women’s and Children’s Hospital. He was

Australian Defence Staff, London, from 2001 to 2004.

educated at St Peter’s College and the University of

CDRE Geraghty assumed Command of Australian Navy

Adelaide, graduating MB, BS in 1967 and Grad Dip BA

Systems Command on 30 April 2004.

127


128

APPENDIX 14 COUNCIL MEETINGS & COMMITTEES

2 0 0 4 -2 0 0 5 m eetings

Meeting No 74

28 July 2004

Meeting No 75

29 September 2004

Meeting No 76

8 December 2004

Meeting No 77

23 February 2005

Meeting No 78

27 April 2005

Meeting No 79

29 June 2005

Finance & A ud it C om m itte e

Met six times.* Mem bers/attendance: Mr Brian Gibson/ 6 Mrs Eda Ritchie/ 5 Ms Mary-Louise W illiams/ 5 Others/attendance: Mr Quentin Flowarth, ANMM (Secretary)/ 6 Ms Joan Miller, AN M M /6 Mr Max Dingle, ANMM / 1 Mr Graham Johnson, Australian National Audit Office / 4 Ms Sue Rowan, Australian National Audit Office / 1 Mr Aziz Dindar, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu / 2 * The Committee also convened two teleconference meetings M ajor C apital W o rk s C om m itte e

Met five times. * Members/ attendance: Mr Mark Bethwaite/ 5 Mr John Rothwell/ 4 Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 5 Mrs Nerolie Withnall / 3 Others / attendance: Mr Quentin Flowarth, ANMM (Secretary) / 5 Mr Greg Edmondson, A N M M /5 Ms Joan Miller, A N M M /5 Mr Max Dingle, ANMM / 1

* The Committee also convened a number of teleconference meetings M arketing, P rog ra m s & S p o n so rsh ip C om m itte e

Met six times. Mem bers/attendance: Mr John S im pson/4 Ms Gaye H a rt/ 4 Mr Marcus Blackmore/ 4 Ms Mary-Louise Williams/5 Others/attendance: Mr Max Dingle, ANMM (Secretary) / 5 Mr Peter Haggarty, ANMM / 1 Mr Michael Hedger, A N M M /I Collections & Exhibitions C om m itte e

Met five times. Members / attendance: Mrs Nerolie W ithnall/ 3 Prof. John Penrose/ 5 Dr Andrew Sutherland / 4 Ms Mary-Louise W illiams/ 4 Others / attendance: Mr Michael Crayford, ANMM (Secretary)/ 5 Mr Max Dingle, ANMM / 1 Mr James Englebert, ANMM 1 Ms Shame Fielder, ANM M / 1 Fleet C om m itte e

Met five times. Members/ attendance: Mrs Eda R itchie/4 CDRE Geoff Geraghty / 5 Mr Marcus Blackmore/ 2 Ms Mary-Louise W illiam s/ 4 Others/attendance: Mr Russell Smylie, ANMM (Secretary) / 5 Mr Steven Adams, ANMM / 1


A P P E N D IX 15 | A U S T R A L IA N M A R IT IM E FOUNDATION

APPENDIX 15 AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME FOUNDATION

C hairm an

A ustralian N ational M aritim e Foundation D inner

Mr Bill Cutbush

The Australian National Maritime Foundation held a

Company director

fund-raising dinner on 7 December 2004, to assist with

Directors Mr M ark Bethwaite

Managing director & CEO, Australian Business Limited; chairman, Australian National Maritime Museum

its aims to create a capital fund to develop, conserve and enhance the museum and its collection. The event, which took Sailor Style as its theme, was hosted by Mark Bethwaite and Mary-Louise Williams. The entertainment was provided by The Rats Pack

T h e Hon Peter C ollins RFD QC

Back who proved popular with the 120 guests dressed

Former State Opposition Leader and Commander in

to the theme of ‘sailor’.

the Naval Reserve

Pre-dinner cocktails were served in Nortel Networks

M iss Kay C ottee AO

Gallery to allow guests to view the Sailor Style

Record-making solo sailor; former chairman, Australian

exhibition, and the three-course dinner was held

National Maritime Museum Mr Peter Dexter AM

Regional director, Wallenius Wilhelmsen C aptain Trevor H aw orth AM

Executive chairman, Captain Cook Cruises

in the terrace room. An elegant and witty invitation was designed inhouse and was commended in the Museums Australia Publications Design Awards. The net surplus forthe 2004 Foundation Dinner was $13,600, the funds being raised through sale of entry tickets, silent auction bids and raffle tickets. Corporate

Mr Rob M undle

sponsorship and donations were sought and we

Author and journalist

received a substantial level of support for the event. A

Ms M ary-Lo uise W illia m s

Director, Australian National Maritime Museum Se cretary Mr Russell S m ylie

Australian National Maritime Museum

number of key sponsors provided in-kind assistance in stagingthe event, includingSpotless, Moreton Exhibition & Events (Sydney) and Videoplus Pty Ltd.

129


APPENDIX 16 SPONSORS, PATRONS & SUPPORTERS

Principal S p on so r

ANZ Australian Customs Service State Forest of NSW M ajor S p on so rs

Blackmores Ltd Raytheon Australia Pty Ltd Spotless Tenix Pty Ltd S p on so rs

Australian Maritime Safety Authority Abloy Security Bill and Jean Lane Blackmores Ltd BT Australasia Centenary of Federation Institution of Engineers Australia Louis Vuitton Speedo Australia Spotless Wallenius Wilhelmsen Project S p on so rs

3M

ABLOY Australia ANL Container Line Pty Ltd Cathay Pacific Cargo CGEA Transport Sydney Commonwealth Bank Crawford Partners Architects CSIRO Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade EnviroDoctor Finnair Forrest Training Harbourside Darling Harbour

IWC Schaffhausen KLM Lloyd's Register of Shipping Maritime Union of Australia Martinair Cargo Maxwell Optical Industries Mercantile Mutual Holdings Olympics Arts Festival Penrith Lakes Development Corp Philips Electronics Australia SBS Scandinavian Airlines SDV (Australia) Pty Ltd Sydney by Sail Visions of Australia - Commonwealth Government Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation F ounding Patrons

Alcatel Australia ANL Limited Ansett Airfreight Bovis Lend Lease BP Australia Bruce & Joy Reid Foundation Doyle's Seafood Restaurant Howard Smith Limited James Hardie Industries PG, TG & MG Kailis National Australia Bank P&O Nedlloyd Telstra Westpac Banking Corporation Wallenius Wilhelmsen Zim Shipping Australasia Donors

GrantPirrie Gallery State Street Australia


APPENDIX 17 | CORPORATE & SUPPORTING MEMBERS

APPENDIX 17 CORPORATE & SUPPORTING MEMBERS

Corporate M em b e rs as 3 0 Ju n e 2 0 0 5

Adsteam Marine Art Exhibitions Australia Limited Asiaworld Shipping Service Bulk Consultants Pty Ltd CP Ships (UK) Ltd DSTO - Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory HMAS A/batross World Fund HMAS Harman Welfare Fund HMAS Kuttabul HMAS Newcastle HMAS Vampire Association HMAS Waterhen HMAS Watson Welfare Fund - RAN LOPAC Pty Ltd Maritime Union of Australia CNSW Branch Maritime Workers Credit Union Middle Harbour Yacht Club Naval Association of Australia PMI Mortgage Insurance Ltd Royal Caribbean & Celebrity Cruises Seawise Australia Pty Ltd Shell Australia Ltd SME Regimental Trust Fund Submarine Association of Australia Sydney Pilot Service Pty Ltd Symrise Pty Ltd Thales Underwater Systems Pty Ltd Zim Shipping Australasia Pty Ltd S u p p o rtin g M em b e rs (d o n a tion s $ 1 0 0 and over)

Anderson, Mr Barry

$100.00

Asmus, Mr Rodney & Jackie

$100.00

Bailey, Mr Peter

$100.00

Blackburne, Mr Greg

$100.00

Blackmore, Mr Marcus

$200.00

Brown, Mr Raymond

$100.00

Burnside, Cdre Ian

$100.00

Calmyre, Mr David

$100.00

Carlton, Mr Mike

$100.00

Carritt, Mr Martin

$125.00

Chandler, Mr Rodney Stuart

$200.00

Chapman, Mr Ken

$200.00

Collins, MrStephen

$100.00

Davis, Mr & Mrs John & Pat

$200.00

Dickinson, Mr Harry

$200.00

Doyle, Mr Murray

$100.00

Farquhar-Smith, Mr & Mrs Ian & Hilda

$100.00

Flanagan, Mr Michael

$100.00

Fleming, Mr Paul

$145.00

Flick, Mr & Mrs Peter & Robyn

$200.00

French, Mr & Mrs Sidney & Margaret

$100.00

Garlan, Mr & Mrs Ross & Paddy

$100.00

Gibson, Mr John

$200.00

Glass, Captain John Alexander

$100.00

Glover, Mr John

$200.00

Grasso, Ms Margaret & Antonio

$100.00

Greenwood, Mr Damian

$200.00

Griffiths, Mr David

$100.00

Hall, Mr Harry

$150.00

Hart, Captain Ronald

$100.00

Hart, Ms Gaye

$100.00

Henderson, Mr Bill

$100.00

Herman, Mr Harold

$100.00

Herrmann, Mr Brian

$100.00

Hoekstra, Rev William

$100.00

Howie, M r& Mrs William D & Barbara G

$100.00

Hughes, Prof Clifford

$200.00

Jones, Mr Mervyn

$100.00

Jones, Mr Rhys

$100.00

Jones, Mr Sydney

$100.00

Karlsson-Lillas, Ms Maria

$100.00

Keys, Mr & Mrs Paul & Valerie

$200.00

Kiley-Balas, Mrs Margaret

$100.00

Kilmore, Mr Ken Stewart

$100.00

Kondratenko, Mrs Christine

$100.00

Lindsay, Dr & Mrs Ian & Nadine

$100.00

MacMahon, Mr Gregory

$100.00

Minter, Mr Campbell

$200.00

Monfries, Mr & Mrs William & Marilyn

$100.00

Neasbey, Mr Mark

$100.00

Norfor, Mr John

$155.00

O’Loughlin, Mr Peter

$200.00

Pardoe, Mr Keith

$100.00

131


132

Parry, Ms Ann

$100.00

Southwell, Mr John

$150.00

Quayle, MrG

$150.00

Stangey, Mr John

$100.00

Ramage, M r& MrsJohn & Beverly

$125.00

Sturgess, Mr Allan

$100.00

Rathbone, Mr Martin

$200.00

Thew, Mr Colin

$200.00

Reynolds, Mrs Kathrine

$100.00

Thompson, Mr Bill

$200.00

Robson, Mr Paul

$100.00

Thomson-Pearse, Ms Christine

$100.00

Rogers, Mr & Mrs Douglas & Trudie

$100.00

Van Blargan, Mr Joseph

$100.00

Sakker, Dr Samuel

$100.00

David Waghorn & Helen Nickson

$200.00

Sampson, Mr & Mrs Mark & Ruth

$1,000.00

Wallis, Mr Robert

$100.00

$100.00

Watts, Mr Phillip John

$150.00

Scardifield, Mr Edward

$150.00

Winkworth, Dr Alan C S

$125.00

Seaton, Mr Don

$100.00

Witte, Mr Jack

$100.00

Seymour, Dr John

$200.00

Witten, Mr Arthur Charles

$100.00

Sanders, Mr David

APPENDIX 18 VOLUNTEERS 2004-2005 Warwick Abadee

Estelle Billing

Ian Campbell

Arnold Abicht

John Blanchfield

John Campbell

Margaret Cowan

Steve Adamantidis

Wim Blome

Lisa Campbell

Ken Cox

Steven Affleck

David Bloom

Brian Carney

Ron Coyle

Don Aggar

Gwen Bonnefin

Marion Carter

Reg Craft

Ena Alcorn

Jim Bonnefin

Mary Champion

Shirlea Crook

Jessica Allen

Alex Books

Janice Chan

Patricia Cullen

Alan Anderson

David Boult

Peter Chan

Andrew Custodio

Jim Cowan

Del Anderson

David Boulton

Andrew Chang

Tom Dalton

Geoff Anderson

Colin Bowes

Paul Cheng

Bert Danon

Lilian Andrew

Ron Bowrey

Victor Chiang

Peter Davey

Grant Arbuth not

Frank Boyd

Fung Chow

Michael Davis

Gordon Armstrong

Kel Boyd

Leslie Church

Caroline Davy

Matthew Ashby

Gus Braun

Helen Churven

Ken Deere

Gwen Ashcroft

Ian Bray

Bob Clampett

Jim Dennis

Barry Astle

Merv Bray

Charles Clancy

Terry Dickson

Pat Austin

Bob Bright

Geoff Clarke

Jim Dillon

Noha Azzi

John Brooke

Murray Claydon

Patrick Dodd

Naysa Balcazar

Mary Brookes

Helen Clift

Chirayu Dongre

Vivian Balmer

Norm Brooks

Brian Clough

Max Donnellan

Colin Barnes

Bernie Brown

Alan Collins

Vincent Dorahy

Judy Barnes

Deanne Brown

Michael Collyer

Roy Dow

Howard Bate

George Brown

Jim Colvin

Ron Downie

Wendy Bate

Merv Brown

Lyn Comber

Les Draper

Lyndyl Beard

Tony Brown

John Connor

John Duckworth

Ian Beckett

John Buckland

Sylvia Cordiner

Michael Duffett

Carey Bell

Greg Buddie

Mary Correa

Anthony Duignan

Colin Bel!

Pam Burden

John Corry

Jean Dunworth

David Bell

Sue Bush

Barry Costa

John Eager

Valerie Berg

John L Butler

Don Coulter

John Ebner


A P P E N D IX 18 | V O L U N T E E R S 2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

Doug Edwards

Keith Harrison

Colin Kline

Danielle Mitchell

Andrew Ellis

Chris Harry

Lewis Klipin

Tony Mockler

John Elphick

Mark Hawryluk

Alfred Knight

Linda Moffatt

John Emdin

Jennifer Heap

Olivia Lanchester

Clare Moloney

Jeff Evans

Bob Hetherington

Alex Lange

Therese Moloney

Rob Everett

Ken Heylbut

Roger Langsworth

Myles Mooney

Virginia Everingham

Shirley Heywood

Laurie Larcombe

David C Moore

Bill Eykman

Bill Hill

Brock Lawes

David H Moore

Ken Fair

Beverley Hillsdon

Shane Lawrie

Elizabeth More

David Farlow

Kevin Hilton

Owen Laws

Peter Mote

Barry Fegan

Frank Hines

David Leach

Brian Moules

Joe Felice

Tiaki Hita

Derek Lewis

David Mueller

Jeanette Felton

John Hodges

Les Lockyer

Jill Mueller

Diane Finlay

Clive Hoffman

Roslyn Lockyer

Ross Muller

Tony Fisher

Phil Hogan

Adele Lucas

Valda Muller

Geoffrey Francis

Michelle Holland

Jacqueline Mackaway

Alwyn Murray

Ted Franken

Raymond Horsey

Ross Mackinnon

Hugh Murray

Roy Freere

Mai Horsfall

Valerie Magee

Keith Murray

Barry Fregon

Ziggy Hort

Bruce Magnusson

Brian Nash

Peter French

Warwick Howse

Paul Maile

Barry Nesbitt

Chanel Friend

Geoff Hudspeth

Peter Maile

John Newlyn

Brian Frizell

Charles Hughes

Rex Malin

Susan Newman

Lou Fuller

Don Humphrey

Terry Manning

Grant Newton

Jim Furlong

Ethel Humphreys

Derek Mansfield

Chiu Ng

Bryan Gale

Peter Hunt

Stephen Martin

Frank Nimmett

Aileen-Lee Gardner

Jack Hutchinson

Robert Matchett

Clem O'Donoghue

Noreen-Lee Gardner

Penny Hyde

Casimiro Mattea

John O’Grady

Allan Garrick

Warren Hyslop

Roy Matthews

Clint Oliver

Karen Gaynor-Sperring

Lynne Jacobson

John Maxwell

Eric Olufson

Peter Gerrey

Derek James

Jack McBurney

Arthur Ongley

John Gibbins

Jim Jeans

Phil McColl

Barry O’Regan

Tony Gibbs

Ian Jenkins

Hugh McCormack

Henno Orro

Col Gibson

Peter Jennings

Colleen McDonell

Ron Osborn

Len Glover

John Jewell

Robert McGeorge

Bob Osborne

Peter Goertz

Alf Johnson

Frank McHale

Len Oudenryn

Brad Golding

D’Arcy Johnson

Lyn McHale

Delia Page

David Golding

Jenny Johnson

Robert Mclnally

John Palmer John Papenhuyzen

Leslie Gulliver

John Jones

Ron McJannett

Joy Halstead

Heidi Jreige

Ken McKenzie

Bob Parker

George Hancock

Jeanette Kaestner

Sheila McLean

Jenny Patel

Gordon Hannam

Gabriella Kaldy

Kate McLoughlin

Warren Peachman

Shirley Hannam

David Kane

Ken McRorie

Arthur Pearce

Ted Hannon

Salley Kelly

Lynn McWilliams

Gervase Pearce

Brian Hansford

Keith Kennedy

Allan Meddings

Jamie Pearce

Joy Hanson-Acason

John Kent

John Mees

George Pepperall

Wendy Hardiman

Richard Keyes

Peter Mellor

Win Pereira

Peter Hardy

Bob Killingsworth

Andy Michel

George Perin 0AM

Dorothy Harpley

Joan Killingsworth

Harry Miller

Patrick Perry-Bolt

Evelyn Harris

John King

Ron Miller

Brian Peters

Jane Harris

Kev King

Byron Mitchell

Trevor Pickering

133


134

Trevor Pike

Janet Robinson

M. Ruth Smith

Imeldo Ventura

Paul Pisani

Don Robson

Ray Spinks

Alf Vincent

Shirley Pitman

Henry Roda

RossSpirou

RietVroegh

Anne Plater

Helen Rodewijk

Barry Squires

Allan Walker John Walker

Richard Pocock

Graham Roe

John Steel

George Porthouse

Nikolai Rofe

Barbara Stein

Derek Walsh

Judy Powell

Ab Rootliep

Heather Stevens

Graham Walton

Len Price

John Rosenblum

John Stevens

Ken Ward

Cathy Pryor

Barney Ross

Michael Stevens

John Weekes

Peter Puckeridge

Peter Rossiter

Verlie Stevenson

John Weston

Helen Puddick

Gwyn Rothwell

Norm Stowe

Jeannette Wheildon

Ike Quinn

Terry Ryan

MaxSurman-Smith

Berman White

Fran Rabbitts

JoySalvetti

Janice Taylor

Dennis Whitton

Alexandra Ralston

Casey Schreuder

Vera Taylor

Eric Willcock

Judith Randall

Keith Schwartz

Caroline ten Bruggen Cate

Herman Willemsen

Bill Ratcliffe

Peter Scutts

Eric Tilt

David Williams

Philip Rattray

John Shaw

Sonia Tokyurek

David E Williams

Ken Raven

Colleen Sheerin

Geoffrey Tonkin

Peter Williams

Greg Rawson

Ken Sherwell

Andrew Topp

Sarid Williams

Russell Rea

Herb Shields

Van Tram

Bill Wilson

Leonard Regan

Margaret Simpson

Victor Treleaven

Norman Wilson

Alfred Reitano

Richard Sims

Madilina Tresca

Peter Wilson

Phil Rennie

John Skidmore

Maxine Troop

John Withers

Mayra Restgo

Brian Skingsley

GuyTuplin

Ian Wood

Judith Roach

Colin Small

David Turner

John Worth

Barry Robbins

Joy Smart

Jan van den Broek

Tom Wright

Mick Roberts

Gerry Smith

David van Kool

John York James Zhao

Jay Robertson

Ian Smith

Frank Van Roosmalen

Dorothy Robinson

J T Smith

Mia Van Roosmalen

Celina Zhou

Gordon Robinson

Kevin Smith

Bill Vanneck

Victor Zonca GregZyner


APPENDIX 19 | VOLUNTEER SPEAKERS PANEL

APPENDIX 19 VOLUNTEER SPEAKERS PANEL

A panel of experienced and enthusiastic volunteer speakers, working with manager of External Relations Bill Richards, continues to visit service clubs and similar organisations to promote the museum. Many of these speaking engagements result in group bookings for museum visits. In the year under review the panel developed several new PowerPoint presentations to enable members to talk on a wider range of museum topics. This is expected to generate increasing numbers of speaking opportunities in future years. There were 24 visits in the last financial year, four fewer than in the previous year.

McQuoin Park Day Centre

Lewis Klipin

05/07/04

Miranda Golden A Club

John Blanchfield

20/07/04

Coogee/Randwick RSL Club

Bert Danon

05/08/04

Ku-Ring-Gai Rotary Club

David Boult

16/08/04

St Mary's Rotary Club

David Moore

17/08/04

Richmond Rotary Club

John Emdin

23/08/04

Rose Bay War Widows Guild

Warwick Abadee

21/09/04

Forestville Probus Club

John Blanchfield

12/10/04

Epping SHHH Group

Alex Books

19/10/04

Chester Hill Probus Club

Bob Matchett

17/11/04

Five Dock Mens Probus Club

David Boult

07/02/05

Castlereagh Probus Club

Warwick Abadee

08/02/05

Ashfield Catholic & Community Club

David Moore

09/02/05

Hornsby Probus Club

David Boult

09/02/05

St George National Seniors Club

Bob Matchett

15/02/05

Vaucluse Probus Club

John Blanchfield

20/03/05

Friends of Hurstville Library

Bob Matchett

24/03/05

Chatswood Rotary Club

Warwick Abadee

06/05/05

U3A Liverpool

Judith Roach

12/05/05

Pymble Uniting Church

David Moore

19/05/05

Rodd Point Ladies Probus Club

Lewis Klipin

23/05/05

Past Matrons Association, OES

Judith Roach

17/06/05

Eastwood Rotary Club

Jeff Tonkin

21/06/05

Probus Club of Bureener

David Moore

27/06/05

135


136

APPENDIX 20 CONSULTANTS

169 consultants, contractors and providers delivered services to the museum to a total value of $12,588,455. Of this total, 76 were consultants providing services to a total value of $1,463,724. Consultants who were paid in excess of $10,000 in 2004-2005, and the areas in which they provided services, appear below. The details of consultants providing services below $10,000, a summary of the museum’s policy on the selection and engagement of consultants, and the basis of selection of consultants engaged duringthe year, are available on request.

AHA Management

Engineering

$29,184.65

Amanda Graham PtyLtd

Sponsorship services

$40,447.53

Australian Govt Solicitor

Legal services

$37,347.65

Australian National AuditOffice

Financial services

$39,600.00

Barham Computer Services

Software support

$54,945.00

Blake Dawson Waldron

Legal services

$45,087.54

Changing Enterprises

Human Resources Workshop

$17,820.00

Cox Richardson

Design

$76,835.10

Crawford Architects Pty Ltd

Design

$10,800.90

David Gaucher

Design

$26,856.76

Deepend Sydney

Design

$27,500.00

Five Spaces Design

Design

$19,318.70

Inspire Risk Management

OH&S

$39,193.00

International Conservation Services

Conservation services

$11,660.00

Low & Hooke (Aust) Pty Ltd

Engineering

$47,580.00

Mike Meyer

IT services

$87,656.25

PeakFitnessManagement(Aust)P/L

OH&S

$11,666.69

Rubicon Technology

Audio Visual/Lighting

$72,797.45

Sigma Management Science

Project Management Workshop

$11,275.00

Spherion Group Ltd

Human Resources

Starfish Advertising & Design

Advertising

$143,301.18

Synapsys

IT and Project Management

$302,026.50

Taylor Lauder Bersten P/L

Engineering

$29,475.89

The University of New South Wales

Engineeringand Science

$14,300.00

United Focus Pty Ltd

Web development

$52,530.86

Van der Meer Consulting

Engineering

$63,052.72

Subtotal

$20,322.81

$1,332,850.03


APPENDIX 21 | CUSTOMER SERVICE CHARTER

APPENDIX 21 CUSTOMER SERVICE CHARTER

The Customer Service Charter is available to visitors on arrival at the museum foyers and is available on the museum website at http://www.anmm.gov.au/ customer.htm. Staff and volunteers are made aware of the charter and its objectives through their induction and training. Our primary focus is to our visitors and other users of the museum and we aim at all times to provide highquality external and internal service.

W h a t w e provide

• An accessible maritime cultural heritage resource, developed and maintained to the highest professional standards. • Relevant exhibitions and programs that educate, entertain, and reflect community needs and values. • Services extended as widely as possible throughout Australia and abroad.

W h o w e are

O ur service sta ndards

We aim to be the prime cultural resource for developing

The museum is committed to providing services to

the community's knowledge, appreciation and

all its customers, both external and internal, in a way

enjoyment of Australia’s relationship with its waterways

that is courteous, equitable, prompt, professional and

and the sea. We will achieve this by:

ethical. To the fullest extent our resources allow, we will

• Providing the highest standards of service • Generating the widest understanding and enjoyment of maritime history by creating exciting products and programs that inform and entertain • Fosteringthe care and research of Australia’s cultural and material maritime heritage, in particularthe National Maritime Collection • Enhancingthe level of recognition of the museum as a dynamic cultural institution. W h o are o u r c usto m ers?

As a national museum we serve the whole Australian community, but in particular ourvisitors, schools,

provide: • Courteous, well-trained and knowledgable staff at all levels • A safe, clean and accessible environment • Quality services to all segments of our community • Up-to-date information about our products and services • Prompt, efficient and accurate responses to enquiries • Opening hours that reflect community needs. Tell us w h a t you think

researchers and historians, other cultural, government

We welcome your suggestions for improving our

and commercial organisations, community groups,

services, and provide a variety of ways for you to

Members, sponsors, users of our venues and other

communicate with us. We will pass your message

services.

to the person who can act on it, and aim to resolve

We also represent Australia internationally, and welcome many overseas visitors. Our internal ‘customers’ include volunteers, colleagues, contractors and service providers.

any problems promptly. We are committed to regular museum user surveys and research to ensure we are meetingyour needs.

137


138

Here are som e o f the w ays you can com m unicate with us:

• Speak to a staff member in person. All staff, including the director and senior management, take turns attending the information desk • Complete the comments book in the museum foyer which is reviewed regularly and responded to where possible • Expressyourview sonthesubjectsw efeature in exhibitions at a discussion point in our galleries from time to time • Fill in a formal complaint form at our information desk • Contact our Customer Services manager on (02) 9298 3777 fax (02) 9298 3780 • Write to us at GPO Box 5131 Sydney NSW 2000. We strive to reply within 14 days • Contact staff directly by phone, fax or email. Details from (02) 9298 3777, or visit us at 2 Murray St, Darling Harbour. Our website at http://www.anmm. gov.au has direct email links to key staff.

APPENDIX 22 LIST OF ACTS ADMINISTERED The museum was established b yth e Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 (No 90 of 1990), where its functions and powers are set out. The Act was amended in the Arts, Sport, Environment, Tourism and Territories Legislation Amendment (No 2) Act 1991 (No 179 of 1991), principally to provide for a Naval member of Council. The Australian National Maritime Museum Regulations (Statutory Rules 1991 No 10) underSection 54 of the Act were signed by the Governor-General on 29 January 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 5 February 1991. The Regulations were amended (Statutory Rules 1991 No 220) by the Governor-General on 27 June 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 5 July 1991 and revised again (Statutory Rules 1991 No 348) on 4 November 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 12 November 1991.


A P P E N D IX 23 | FU N C TIO N S AND P OWER S OF TH E M IN IS TE R

APPENDIX 23 FUNCTIONS AND POWERS OF THE MINISTER

The ministers responsible for the Australian National

• Appointa membertoactaschairpersonoftheCouncil

Maritime Museum during 20 0 4-05 were Senator the

or appoint a member of Council (for no more than 12

Hon Helen Coonan, Minister for Communications,

months) where there is a vacancy (Section 18)

Information Technology and the Arts, and Senator the Hon Rod Kemp, M inisterforthe Arts and Sport. Key ministerial powers under the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 include the minister’s ability to: • Transfer property, real or personal, held on lease or otherwise by the Commonwealth, to the museum for its use or for inclusion in the National Maritime Collection (Section 8) • Approve criteria and guidelines for the National Maritime Collection (Section 8) • Approve the disposal of material in the National Maritime Collection with value exceeding $20,000 (Section 10(4)(b), amended 1991) • Give direction to the Council with respecttothe performance of the functions or the exercise of the powers of the museum (Section 14)

• Convenea meetingof the Council at any time (Section 23) • Approve and table in Parliament Strategic and Annual Operational Plansand variations to them (Sections 25-28) • Approve leave of absence to the director on such terms or conditions as she or he determines (Section 34) • Be advised in writing by the director of director indirect pecuniary interest (Section 37) • Appoint a person (not a member of Council) to act as director during a vacancy with such appointment not to exceed 12 months (Section 38) • Approve the form of the museum’s estimates and the estimates (Section 46), and • Approve contracts exceeding $1,000,000 (Section 47, amended 1991).

139


140

APPENDIX 24 FUNCTIONS AND POWERS OF THE MUSEUM

The functions and powers of the museum are defined

Powers of the museum (Section 7)

in Sections 6 and 7 of the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990.

• To purchase, commission the creation of, lend, borrow or hire maritime historical material either in

Functions of the museum (Section 6) • To exhibit, or make available for exhibition by others,

its own right or jointly with others • To collect material relating to Australian maritime

in Australia or elsewhere, material included in the

historyand dispose of that material under certain

National Maritime Collection or maritime historical

conditions

material that is otherwise in the possession of the museum

• To recover or arrange for or assist in the recovery of maritime historical material from the Australian

• To cooperate with other institutions (whether public

marine environment and from other areas

or private) in exhibiting, or in making available for exhibition, such material

• Accept gifts, devises, bequests and assignments of money or property whether as trustee or otherwise

• To develop, preserve and maintain the National Maritime Collection

• Acquire and operate vessels anywhere, whether or notthe vessels are maritime historical material

• To disseminate information relating to Australian maritime historyand information relating to the museum and its functions

• Disseminate information relatingto Australian maritime history and sell replicas or reproductions of maritime historical material

• To conduct, arrange for and assist research into matters relating to Australian maritime history

• Enter contracts, acquire, hold and dispose of real or personal property, charge fees (in addition to

• To develop sponsorship, marketing and other

the charges fixed by regulation) appoint agents and

commercial activities relating to the museum’s

attorneys and act as an agent for other persons, as

functions

well as raise money, by appropriate means for the purpose of the museum.


A P P E N D IX 25 | D IR E C TO R 'S STATE MENT

APPENDIX 25 DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT

The Australian National Maritime Museum is a

Authorities and Companies (CAC) Act 1997 for the

Statutory Authority set up under the Australian

preparation and content of the report. The report

National Maritime Museum Act 1990 and responsible

was prepared in accordance with the Commonwealth

to the Minister for the Arts and Sport, Senator the

Authorities and Companies (Report of Operations)

Hon Rod Kemp within the portfolio of the Ministerfor

Orders 2002 made under section 48 of the

Communications, Information Technology and the Arts

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997.

(Senator the Hon Helen Coonan). Certain categories of information do not appear in This Annual Report is a report of operations for the

full but are available to Members of Parliament and

second financial year of the Australian National

Senators on request.

Maritime Museum’s 2003-2006 Strategic Plan. It has been made in accordance with a resolution of the directors of the Australian National Maritime Museum on 17 September 2005, those directors being responsible underSection 9 of the Commonwealth

Mary-Louise Williams

141


142

APPEN D IX 26 INDEX

Accounting policies

67

Acts administered Acquisitions

67,74

Advertising APS staff Assets and liabilities Assets held in trust Auditor General Auditors, remuneration of Australian National Maritime Foundation Australian register of historic vessels Appropriations Blackmores First Lady

Director’s overview Director's statement

11,16, 38, 43,102-111

Admission charges

Design

2 27,53

Donations Donors

54 12 141 43 105, 130, 131

123 63, 78 90 27,68 86

Energy management Environmental performance Equity Exhibitions (ANMM) Expenses

64,94,129 37

External relations unit

90

External scrutiny

10,15, 37

26,47 26 26,75 10,20,31 62,77 123 27

Financial assets

78 87 62-65

Borrowing cost expense

78

Financial instruments

Building services

47

Financial statements Financial performance, statement of

66

98

Financial position, statement of

67

Capital works

47

Financing activities

68

Cash flow reconciliation

84

Fleet services

64

Fraud control

27

Freedom of information

27

Calendar of events

Cash flows, statement of Chairman Collaborations Collections and exhibitions branch Commercial and visitor services branch Commitments, schedule of Committees of Council Compliance with requirements

3,126 41

Functions of the minister

139

37,123

Functions of the museum

140

124 65 128

management services Consultants Contact officer Contingencies, schedule of Corporate governance Corporate Members

112 48

47 38 136 2

Independent audit report

60

Indigenous affairs

39

Industrial democracy

50

65

Information technology

47

27

Internal and external scrutiny

27

Investing activities

64

131 12

Corporate support

55

Corporate services branch

125

Council

126

Customer Service Charter

Grants Human resources

Corporate overview

Council members, remuneration of

Glossary N/A

26,141

Communications and information Conservation

40,44

85 137

Key result areas Liabilities

30-56 63


APPENDIX 26 | INDEX

11,18,38

Maritime archaeology Maritime communities Maritime history book prize Maritime technology, exploration and navy Market research

Salaries Schedule of commitments

65

38

Schedule of contingencies

66

123 32

Security

47

Social justice and equity

26

Marketing

53

Special projects unit

Media

53

Sponsors

Members

56

Staffing levels, average

Mission Statement MMAPSS National Maritime Collection

6 112 11,16, 36, 44,102

Non-financial assets

78

Non-Government funding

33

Notes (Financial Statements)

66

Occupational health and safety

48,50

123

27,49

Staff list

123 14, 55,130 50 123

Staffing overview

50

Staffing resources summary

50

Statement by Council members

58

Statutory information requirements

27

Trust monies

93

USA Gallery

39

Operating activities

64

Operating expenses

77

Vampire

Operating revenues

76

Vaughan Evans Library

40,44

Venue hire

32,33

Organisational chart

122

51

1

Outcomes

92

Vision statement

Outreach

41

Visitor services

31

Overseas travel

121

Volunteers

51

Patrons

130

Website

54

Payables

82

Welcome Wall

Photographic services

124

Wharf 7

Post-Federation migration history

123

Workplace Diversity

Powers of the minister

139

Powers of the museum

140

Preparation Professional appointments (staff)

54 120

Provisions

82

Program performance reporting

28

Publications

54

Records management

48

Registration

38

Reports by Auditor General

27

Retail and merchandise (The Store)

32

Revenues

33,62

55 11, 25, 47 26, 50

143


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Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2004-2005  

Australian National Maritime Museum Report on Activities for the year ending 30 June 2005

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