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SEPTEMBER 2013

Cross-Country Dream Tour

Photo Bryan Mitchell

Working For A Sensible Ethanol Solution In Washington, D.C.

THE JOURNAL OF THE


AMA REWARDS

Watch this space for updates about your valuable benefits as an AMA member.

FEATURED BENEFITS

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STAYING INFORMED

on Harley-Davidson, Honda, BMW and Polaris rentals and tours. Call (888) 9009901 or book at AmericanMotorcyclist. com/Membership/EagleRider.aspx, using discount code AMA014.

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American Motorcyclist

Each month, you receive the best magazine covering the motorcycle lifestyle with two versions to choose from: street or dirt.

THE ESSENTIALS AMA Roadside Assistance

The Best Deal In Towing Get peace of mind with AMA Roadside Assistance, which covers all your vehicles, as well as those of your family members living with you. Best of all, you can get this coverage at no additional charge. For details, call (800) 262-5646.

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Save At Choice Hotels, Motel 6, Red Roof Inn At Choice hotels, save15 percent off the best available rates at participating Comfort Inn, Comfort Suites, Quality Inn, Sleep Inn, Clarion, MainStay Suites, Suburban Extended Stay, Rodeway Inn and Econo Lodge hotels. Use the Member Discount code #00947556. Special discounts at Motel 6 are also available up to 10 percent off. Use the Member Discount code CP540176.

A full-time staff in Washington D.C., California and Ohio protects your right to ride.

Motorcycle Shipping

Ride Where You Want In the United States, call Federal Companies, an agent for Specialized Transportation, Inc., at (877) 518-7376 for at least $60 off standard rates. For international shipments, call Motorcycle Express at (800) 245-8726. To get your discount, be sure to have your AMA number handy. Motorcycle Express also offers temporary international insurance.

Car Rentals

Save Money When You Drive Get up to 25 percent off prevailing rates at any Avis or Budget car rental agency. For Avis, enter discount code: D388100. For Budget, enter code: Z942000.

AMA Gear

Buy AMA Stuff Online Find unique patches, pins, posters, T-shirts and books at AmericanMotorcyclist.com and at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. Details at MotorcycleMuseum.org.

Plus, get a 20 percent discount off available rates at Red Roof Inn. For discounts, call (800) RED-ROOF and use the code VP+ 503343. You can also make reservations online at www.redroof.com. Just enter the code VP+ 503343 in the field labeled “VP+/ID#” when making reservations. The discount will be automatically applied.

PRODUCT DISCOUNTS

EagleRider Motorcycle Rentals

Save $5 on admission to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio.

Arrive And Ride EagleRider offers a 15 percent discount

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Parts And Gear

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

The Best Deal In Towing For All Your Vehicles Maximize your riding time and minimize the inconvenience of a mechanical breakdown with AMA Roadside Assistance, which offers peace of mind for you and all your family members.

AMA tically se to (800) member renew yo ship ur AM to ad A-JOIN —call d it t toda o y mem bers your hip!

AMA Roadside Assistance Offers: • Coverage for bikes, cars, pickups, motorhomes and trailers (excluding utility trailers) registered to you, your spouse, and dependent children under the age of 24, living at home or away at college. • Coverage in all 50 states and Canada. • Towing up to 35 miles, with all dispatch and hook-up fees. • Flat tire, lockout, battery and minor-mechanical assistance. • Emergency fuel, oil, water, fluid delivery. • No exclusions for older motorcycles. • Toll-free assistance available 24/7/365. • AMA Roadside Assistance pays first. No need to pay and wait for reimbursement. AMA/Sprocketlist Online Classifieds

AMA members can place free ads in the AMA member classifieds at AMA.Sprocketlist.com or AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Shop > Classifieds.

AMA Supercross And AMA Arenacross Tickets

Save on advanced tickets; AMA members can get $5 off. Call (800) 2625646 for details.

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Bill’s Sport Motor RV Parts & Accessories

Bill’s Sport Motor Offers up to 20 percent off to AMA Members. Order your RV Parts & Accessories catalog at www. BillsSportMotor.com or call Bill’s Sport Motor at (518) 487-9569 to order a catalog, or place an order and receive your discount.

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Save 15 percent on brake pads and 10 percent on brake discs at GiForUSA.com.

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Save 10 percent. Enter code TYES4AMA at checkout from www. powertye.com/ama

Race Tech

Get 15 percent off your order at www. racetech.com by calling Race Tech directly at (951) 279-6655 and providing your AMA number.

RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel magazine

RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel magazine offers a 20 percent subscription discount to AMA members. RoadRUNNER is the touring expert of North America, providing info on the best places to ride. AMA discount code is CRIAMA at www. roadrunner.travel/promo/ama.

Schampa Cold-Weather Gear Save 15 percent. Enter SCHAMA during checkout at Schampa.com.

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! s e k a t s p e e w S

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2013

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Or a

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One lucky winner will take home this Tucker Rocky Custom Road Glide with high-end components from S&S, Progressive Suspension, Arlen Ness, PIAA and many other Tucker Rocky partner companies.

Plus

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NAVIGATION

Navigation Photo

The 2013 AMA Dirt Track Grand Championships in Springfield, Ill., saw dozens of national champions crowned in a variety of dirt-track racing disciplines. Topping the field was AMA Dirt Track Horizon Award Winner Jeffery Lowery from Newark, Ohio. Photo by Yve Assad

10. LETTERS

You write, we read.

12. MAGGIE MCNALLY Join the fun.

14. RIGHTS

Vehicle-2-vehicle communication: What’s the future for motorcycles? American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2013. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.

September 2013 Volume 67, Number 9 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) www.americanmotorcyclist.com

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

22. RIDING

Dual-sport riders raise money for cancer research, and we ride two-up with Chris Ulrich.

36. HALL OF FAME

1962 Matchless G80CS, Hall of Famer Jeff Stanton.

40. FUEL FOR THOUGHT

AMA rallies with motorcyclists in Washington, D.C., to urge testing of E15 fuel blend.

45. GO RIDE

What to do, where to go.

54. JOHN LANDSTROM

Once more in a Blue Moon.


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Editorial Offices

High Adventure. No Hassle.

The best  routes,  roads  and  twotrack,  mapped  by  local  experts.  A  great  challenge  with  like-minded  riders. A full weekend’s activities, with  camping, campfires, food and prizes.  For more information visit  AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Riding. 

THE ADVENTURE is out there

comteit Ge

Maggie McNally, Chair Albany, N.Y. Russ Brenan, Vice Chair Irvine, Calif. Ken Ford, Assistant Treasurer Bartow, Fla.

Advertising Steve Gotoski, Advertising Director (Western States) (951) 566-5068, sgotoski@ama-cycle.org

Perry King, Executive Committee Member Northern California John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Zach Stevens, National Sales Manager (626) 298-3854, zstevens@ama-cycle.org

Sean Hilbert, Hillsdale, Mich. All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2013.

Scott Miller, Milwaukee Art More, Sun City West, Ariz. Stan Simpson, Cibolo, Texas Jim Viverito, Chicago

(800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

AMA Staff EXECUTIVE

AMA RACING/ORGANIZER SERVICES (continued)

Rob Dingman, President/CEO Rhonda Hixon, Administrative Asst./Litigation Manager Bruce Moffat, Chief Financial Officer Sen. Wayne Allard, Vice President, Government Relations Bob Chaddock, Vice President, Administration Jeff Massey, Vice President, Operations Renee Bock, Receptionist Jim Williams, Vice President, Industry Relations & Corporate Member Programs Grant Parsons, Director of Communications & Marketing Rob Rasor, Director of International Affairs

Ken Saillant, Track Racing Manager Cherie Schlatter, Organizer Services Manager D’Andra Schwabel, Organizer Services Coordinator Serena Van Dyke, Organizer Services Coordinator Chuck Weir, Off Road Racing Manager Conrad Young, Timing & Scoring Manager

Dawn Becker, Accounting Manager Melanie Hise, HR Assistant/Payroll Coordinator Ed Madden, System Support Specialist Peg Tuvell, Member Fulfillment Specialist ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Sean Maher, Director AMHF/MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME Connie Fleming, Manager of Events and AMHF Operations Beth Myers, Donor Relations Specialist Paula Schremser, Program Specialist Katy Wood, Collections Manager AMA RACING/ORGANIZER SERVICES

www.yamaha-motor.com

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ about/board

James Holter, Managing Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Jen Muecke, Designer Jeff Guciardo, Production Manager/Designer Kaitlyn Sesco, Marketing/Communications Specialist

ACCOUNTING

Sponsored by Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A.

AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Kip Bigelow, Amateur MX Manager Joe Bromley, District Relations Manager Jacki Burris, Organizer Services Coordinator Jane Caston, Racing Coordinator Lana Cox, Administrative Assistant Kevin Crowther, Director SX & Pro Racing Relations Bill Cumbow, Director of Special Projects Sandi Dunphy, Road Riding Coordinator Dave Hembroff, Road Riding Manager Alex Hunter, MX Operational Coordinator Tamra Jones, Racing Coordinator

DISTRIBUTION/FACILITIES SERVICES John Bricker, Mailroom Manager Heida Drake, Copy Center Operator Bill Frasch, Mailroom Clerk GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Marie Esselstein, Government Affairs Assistant Danielle Fowles, Grassroots Coordinator Nick Haris, Western States Representative Sean Hutson, Legislative Assistant Sharon Long, Legislative Coordinator Rick Podliska, Deputy Director Imre Szauter, Government Affairs Manager - On-Highway INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Rob Baughman, Network Administrator John Boker, Developer Dave Coleman, Network Architect Amy Hyman, Senior Programmer/Analyst Bill Miller, Enterprise Architect MEMBER SERVICES/DATA ENTRY Lori Cavucci, Member Services Representative Deb D’Andrea, Member Services Representative Linda Hembroff, Member Services Representative Darcel Higgins, Member Services Manager Kimberly Jude, Member Services Representative Tiffany Pound, Member Services Representative Jessica Robinson, Member Services Representative Angela Warren, Member Services Representative

2013Memb


Year Member

Member #

Expiration

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Scoo 2013MembershipCard_

U.S. ARMED FO RCES

Year Member

Member #

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Year Member

AM 4/17/13 11:07

bershipCard_A

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No matter what or how you ride, the AMA has a special card for you. Want one? Just let us know by renewing early, or telling us when you renew via our online signup form at AmericanMotorcyclist.com, or calling (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646).

Member #

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MEMBER LETTERS

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147. I wouldn’t ride without ATGATT (All The Gear All The Time).

LETTER OF THE MONTH SIDECARS RULE

I just finished reading the August issue Guest Column by Bill Brokaw. I Each month, a lucky AMA member wins a Bike too have a Velorex sidecar mounted Bandit gift card worth $100. Didn’t win? No on a Honda Shadow, except mine is worries. You can still take advantage of your a 750 A.C.E. I 10% AMA member discount at BikeBandit.com. bought it so my wife would be able to ride with me on occasion. I had originally bought a Nomad but as she tires quickly, this proved to be the best solution. I have found that with 100 pounds of passenger, the rig is very stable and able to handle the back roads of New Hampshire with ease. As a plus, my grand daughters love it and as they are a little lighter, I can “fly the car” now and them. Just don’t tell their mother. Herb Edwards Manchester, N.H.

LAW AND ORDER I wanted to address Bill Pollack’s letter regarding headlight modulators in the July issue of American Motorcyclist. As the person who was responsible for the state of Maryland “getting with the (Federal) program” nearly 15 years ago, I would recommend that those interested in making sure that their state complies with the federal rule on headlight modulator use covered by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 108 (Title 49 CFR Part 571.108 S7.9.4), start by getting in touch with their local authorities. You can’t fix the problem until you know its source. First, get in touch with whomever is responsible for automotive safety enforcement in your state. I’m sure if you call your state department of motor vehicles or search for the information online, you’ll have your starting point. In Maryland, that was the state police (remarkably, it’s called the Automotive Safety Enforcement Division!). Talk to the person who is in charge and find out what the state’s position is on headlight modulators. If your state thinks—as Maryland did—that modulated lights are illegal and the federal code doesn’t pertain to them, you can move on with that knowledge. You don’t have to go through the trouble of having the state get a new law, which

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

as we all know, can take years. Federal regulations in this case, pre-empt state law. The next step is reasonably simple: Write a letter to the chief counsel of the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) at 400 7th St., SW, Washington, DC 20590, and explain the situation. Be sure to explain who you talked to and what office they work in. Ask the chief counsel’s office to explain to the state that the preemption provision makes modulators legal—just like a set of headlights on any car sold in the United States. Then sit back and wait. In my case, it took nine months. But after that time, the state will be compliant and you, as a modulator user, will be that much safer. I have ridden across many of our Midwestern states in the last 10 years, and I’ve never had a problem anywhere but in Maryland, but since about 1999 even that’s not been a problem. I am a big proponent of modulators. There is nothing in my view—sorry for the pun—that can enhance one’s safety while on a powered-two-wheeler from the front, more than a modulator. It stops drivers in their tracks and prevents them from making that right-of-way-violatingleft-turn which causes so many crashes. You as a rider, still have to be ready because it’s not foolproof, but it’s pretty good. I wouldn’t ride without one—just as

Henry S. Winokur, AMA Life Member West Bethesda, Md. ROADSIDE ADVICE In response to Gerald Sloan’s (“Still America?” August issue letters) reply about police officers listening to someone whom they have pulled over, another case in point was followed very well by the AMA several years ago about a female rider who was ticketed for riding in the HOV lane. Her case went all the way to court before she was found not guilty. She had to cover the cost of all of her court fees and possible loss of wages for time off of work. How many officers are going to take the advice of someone they have just pulled over for a road violation? Not many. Paul Kerckhoff Surprise, Ariz. QUIET WORKS I had to respond to the “Sound Issue” letter from Mathew Bowman in the August issue. He says he has been riding 37 years and has learned loud pipes save lives. That’s a darn shame. I thought that wishful dream was dead years ago. I’ve been riding 46 years, have raced for many of those years, and I’ve been paying attention! All loud pipes do is annoy people, even fellow riders like myself, let alone the non-riding public. What is important and critical is what is in front of you. Guess where the sound of your loud pipes is directed? If it’s in front of you, you indeed have a very unusual exhaust system! I have to echo the sentiment I’ve been seeing on some t-shirts that say, “If loud pipes save lives, imagine what learning to ride that thing would do!” Let’s stop kidding ourselves and stop with the harassing noise already. Anyone counting on a safety margin provided by straight pipes is surely asking for a wreck to come their way. Bob Leseberg Walnutport, Pa. HELMET DISPOSAL I am not a “tree hugger” but do strongly believe in proper disposal of used items in an effort to keep them out of our landfills. Four used helmets sit in my cabinet wasting space. Plus, I use a fifth that is in dire need of replacement. My dilemma is I prefer not to place any of these in the trash and am wondering if there is a way to


responsibly dispose of these. My guess is that the composition of a helmet consists of 90 percent petroleum in the plastic, foam and fabric of the helmet. It is a shame to waste this in a landfill. I did a search on the web and while finding similar concerns, the answers were either “trash ’em—helmets have a finite use period” or silly comments on blogs and forums such as “paint ’em then they are art” or “hang ’em on your gate post.” The bottom line is this was a futile search, though I did see one site in Hong Kong that had photos of enormous piles of used helmets concurring with my concern… I’d buy a new helmet, maybe two, today if I knew the store would accept the old helmets for responsible recycling. Harold H. Adams Jr. Columbia, S.C.

especially if the program administrator or site coordinator cuts the helmet in half to show its construction. Two, you could donate the helmet to a local fire department. Paramedics may use old helmets for demonstration purposes or training classes (especially to practice proper helmet removal). If can’t locate either of these programs in your locale, or if they are not in need of a helmet donation, consider destroying the helmet before disposal. A few whacks with a hammer should damage the shell enough so someone will not be tempted to fish it out of the trash and wear it. TOURING TYPE I’m strictly a touring type. I used to cover all my vehicles with a towing policy. Since you now cover us with AMA Roadside Assistance, I have dropped the others. Thanks. Also, I really enjoy the touring articles we are seeing in the magazine more now. Thanks, again.

Thanks for the note, Harold. We can recommend two programs to which someone might donate an old helmet. One, consider a state rider education program. An old helmet is a good item 13DBA158_AMERICAN_MOTORCYCLIST_JULY15_PRESS.pdf for use in the classroom as an example,

BIGGER

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MILLIE HORKY PASSES In Memoriam

Millie Horky, the wife of AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Jules Horky, passed away. She was 96. Jules Horky was AMA competition director from 1946 until 1974. Millie Horky was a longtime supporter of the AMA. She received an AMA Most Valuable Person Award in 1995 for her years of dedication to motorcycling. Long after her husband’s death in 1986, she continued to support the rights of motorcyclists, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame and efforts to recognize past racers. The family requests any memorial donations go to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147.


TRIM SAFETY

VIEWPOINT

Join the Fun…

Become Part Of An AMA Club. After returning home to New York from the AMA E15: Fuel for Thought rally and lobbying day in Washington, D.C. (see page 40), I did a lot of thinking—not only about the E15 fuel issue, but also about the fun I had meeting and riding with other AMA members. I always have fun when I get together with other motorcyclists. I find that AMA members are the most passionate and enthusiastic riders in the country and, I dare say, the most By Maggie fun to be around. McNally Whether I’m attending an AMA club event, an AMA-sanctioned mega-rally or a lobbying day at a state capitol or in Washington, D.C., I’m surrounded by some of the greatest people you could ever hope to meet. That’s what makes the AMA such an outstanding organization— You! Some of the best ways for AMA members to get the most fun out of their riding is through interacting with other AMA members, and there’s no better way to do this than by joining AMA clubs and taking part in AMA events, activities and—if you race—AMAsanctioned competition. Since the AMA’s founding in 1924, AMA clubs have been very important for social activities for motorcyclists. Today, there are 1,200 AMA clubs, which means there are plenty of opportunities to have fun. Personally, I’m a member of the AMA-chartered Roamers MC in Schenectady, N.Y. It holds one of the oldest charters in New York state. Club members feel they are part of a local family of riders and know they are part of the family of AMA riders nationwide. There is a special camaraderie that exists between members of an AMA club because they share their enthusiasm for motorcycling and they are happy to share it, and their wisdom, with new riders as well, whether it involves street or dirt riding. Street clubs host a variety of events, ranging from bike shows and field meets to gypsy tours and toy runs. Off-road clubs also host their own flavor of events, including trail rides and poker runs. No matter what type of riding a motorcyclist likes to do, there is probably an AMA club that hosts a related event. For example, Team Strange Airheads is hosting a road run in Tucker, Ga., on Sept. 21 (www.teamstrange.com); the Bluegrass Beemers are hosting a road rally in Frankfort, Ky., on Sept. 13 (www.bluegrassbeemers.org); and the Metro Triumph Riders club is hard at work to host a fabulous bike show in Milford, Mich., on Sept. 8 (www.metrotriumphriders.com). For dirt riders, the Athens Motorcycle Club is hosting an enduro in Athens, Ohio, on Sept. 22 (www.athensmotorcycleclub.com); the Black Mountain Enduro Riders are holding a two-day hare scrambles event in Plymouth Township, Pa., Sept. 21-22 (www. bmer.org); and the Beaver Cycle Club is hosting a scrambles in Burnett, Wis., on Sept. 15 (www.beavercycleclub.com). These are just a sample of the events you can catch this month. There are many more listed in the back of this magazine, as well as online at www.americanmotorcyclist.com. So there’s plenty to choose from around the country.

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Motorcyclists also give back to the community, and AMA clubs are involved in many charitable activities. Examples are the Ride for Kids that raises money for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, the Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders’ Ride for Research that raises funds for cancer research and the Ride Reno 200 hosted by the Dust Devils Motorcycle Club (www.dustdevilsmc. com) that raises funds for a variety of charities. Besides being the hub for social activity, an AMA club provides the foundation for the political and community relations activities that will help ensure the future of motorcycling. Opponents of motorcycling are trying to take away our riding and racing freedoms. By joining AMA clubs, riders are doing their part to fight back, giving the AMA more political clout through strength in numbers to defeat bad legislation and laws, and taking political action using various AMA tools. Plus, clubs spearhead political efforts by organizing members to communicate with elected and government officials on issues that are important to motorcyclists, help elect and re-elect politicians friendly to motorcycling and serve as a resource for the local news media when there are questions related to motorcycling. Last year we launched a new initiative I am excited about: AMA State Chapters. Our goal with state chapters is to strengthen the voice of on- and off-road motorcyclists at the local and state level, and create an even stronger network through which AMA clubs and AMA members across the country can stand together to protect their freedoms while enjoying the motorcycling lifestyle. We’re in the pilot phase now in several states. As you can see, the AMA, AMA clubs (and soon AMA State Chapters) are involved in a lot of different activities that are sure to have something of interest for just about everyone. It’s easy to find a club in your area: Go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com, click on “Clubs & Promoters” and then click on “Find a Club.” If you can’t find an AMA club in your area, consider starting one. The AMA stands ready to help. You can get started by going to the “Clubs & Promoters” section of the website and then clicking on “Start a Club.” For information on state chapters, go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/AMAStateChapters. There’s a lot of fun to be had in an AMA club. Join now. You’ll be glad you did. Maggie McNally is chair of the AMA Board of Directors.

AmericanMotorcyclist.com SAFETY


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V2V equipment

VEHICLE-TO-VEHICLE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY What Is the Future For Motorcycles?

By Rick Podliska, AMA Deputy Director Of Government Relations Vehicle-to-vehicle communication technology, known as V2V, is coming. What does that mean for motorcyclists? In June, AMA staff—myself, Grassroots Coordinator Danielle Fowles and Legislative Assistant Sean Hutson— met with engineers at a V2V vehicle demonstration event in Washington, D.C., to learn more about how this emerging technology will work with motorcycles. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and eight automobile manufacturers currently researching, developing and testing the technologies that form the framework for V2V systems. Called the Crash Avoidance Metrics Partnership Vehicle Safety Communications 3, the group includes car makers Ford, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai-Kia Motors, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan, Toyota and Volkswagen. How does V2V work? It uses dedicated short-range communications similar to internet Wi-Fi that is combined with the global positioning system (GPS). This V2V system provides a vehicle with a 360-degree view of similarly equipped vehicles within communication range. Nine indicators are used by the system to help prevent crashes: GPS position, speed, acceleration, heading, transmission state, brake status, steering wheel angle, path history and path prediction.

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According to the U.S. Transportation Department, information transmitted by every vehicle would be anonymous and would not include personal identifiers, such as a name and license plate number. Additionally, a sophisticated security system would be in place to ensure communication between vehicles is authentic and can be trusted. When a crash is predicted by the V2V system, the vehicle will provide a warning to the driver with a seat vibration, visual display or a combination of these indicators. Automobile manufacturer will have different interfaces on how the driver and passengers will be alerted. So how do motorcycles fit into this emerging technology? As envisioned, motorcycles would have the same equipment as other motor vehicles, such as an antennae and a module to store the short-range communication device and GPS. The rider would remain in full control of the motorcycle. The technology would make it possible for other similarly equipped vehicles to “see” the motorcycle and its rider. At the demonstration event, AMA staff participated in two scenarios involving a vehicle and motorcycle. Those scenarios involved blind-spot warning and intersection-movement assist technologies.

The “Blind Spot Warning” alerted the car driver when the motorcycle entered the car’s blind spot with an indicator on the car’s side-view mirror, a seat vibration and an audible alarm. If the driver activates the car’s turn signal, the indicator flashes with an audible alarm to let the driver know there is a bike in the car’s path. The “Intersection Movement Assist” allows vehicles to be aware of each other even if the drivers’ views are obstructed. The system works similarly to the Blind Spot Warning system. The only difference is the location of the indicator lights. With the Intersection Movement Assist, LED lights flash on the car windshield in the direction of the approaching vehicle. What about radar? The engineers claim that current technology using radar can’t be trusted in this scenario because it can’t see around curves and can’t see if the view is obstructed. With privacy and safety our utmost priorities, the AMA still has some areas of concern with this new technology. The U.S. Transportation Department has stated that privacy and system security are secure. We aren’t convinced. So the AMA has provided comments to the Federal Communication Commission to note that the V2V technology may be compromised with unlicensed devices, such as other Wi-Fi networks. Therefore, we asked the FCC for further testing to ensure vehicles using advanced crashavoidance and V2V technologies aren’t compromised. V2V technology presents another potential problem. With street intersections already a well-documented concern for motorcyclists in avoiding crashes, can you imagine the false sense of security that drivers may have who are relying on advanced safety technologies? They may listen and look for the bells and whistles in their cars rather than look out the windows to actually see motorcycles. Also, drivers may believe these technologies will protect them and other road users, and may not be aware that these technologies could possibly malfunction at a critical moment. As these new technologies emerge, the AMA will continue its vigilance to ensure that motorcyclists, and motorcyclists’ rights, are protected. The AMA is at the forefront in this effort and we will continue to inform our members and motorcyclists about our concerns and possible solutions.

Photo: USDOT

V2V equipment


BIKE SMOG TESTING ENDS IN PHOENIX U.S. Agency Gives OK

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY GROUP ISSUES CHILDREN’S ACTIVITY BOOK Teaches Kids How To Be Safe While Riding

A Georgia motorcycle safety group has issued a children’s activities book that teaches kids about motorcycle safety. Produced by the Kevin Phillip Mahurin Motorcycle Awareness Foundation, named after a fallen rider, using a grant from the

Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety, the 18-page booklet features an informative narrative, pictures to color, word games and more. The Kevin Phillip Mahurin Motorcycle Awareness Foundation is a nonprofit organization created to bring awareness to car drivers about motorcycles on the road. The foundation is also committed to helping young riders be safe and teaching young drivers to watch for motorcycles. For more information about this, go to www.kevinsmotorcyclefoundation.org.

Maricopa County, Ariz., motorcyclists are no longer required to undergo smog testing. This was the last place in the state where the testing was required. State lawmakers passed a bill in 2008 to do away with state smog testing for motorcycles but officials had to wait for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approval before the program could end. That approval came recently. It marked the end of a decade-long fight by motorcyclists to stop the smog testing for their vehicles.


38,000 ACRES MAY REOPEN AT GLAMIS IN CALIFORNIA Land Managers Release Final Decisions On Land Use

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LAWSUIT FILED TO STOP OPEN RIDING AT CALIFORNIA’S OCOTILLO WELLS Groups Want Riding Only On Designated Trails

Off-highway vehicles users would be forced to follow designated routes at the popular Ocotillo Wells State Vehicle Recreation Area in California under a lawsuit filed by anti-OHV groups. Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility and the Desert Protective Council filed the lawsuit, alleging the state Department of Parks and Recreation has failed to protect cultural and natural resources at Ocotillo Wells. Ocotillo Wells offers more than 85,000 acres of desert for riding. The state had until mid-July to respond to the suit. “We know that the California Department of Parks and Recreation is taking this lawsuit very seriously and is acting appropriately,” says AMA Western States Representative Nick Haris.

Association, the San Diego Off-Road Coalition and others. “Under the terms of the California Desert Conservation Area Plan, which has been in effect for decades, open motorized recreation was restricted to less than 2 percent of the California desert,” Haris says. “And since then, opponents of motorized recreation have continued to whittle away at the riding areas that remained, forcing more off-highway vehicle users onto smaller areas of land. “This action by the BLM restores some of this vitally important recreational land, preserving responsible riding opportunities for the Southern California population,” he says. For more information, go to www.blm. gov/ca/st/en/fo/elcentro/recreation/ohvs/ isdra.html.

CALIFORNIA’S JOHNSON VALLEY MAY EARN PROTECTION U.S. Senate Considering Proposal

The National Defense Authorization Act, which includes language to create the Johnson Valley National Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area in California to protect it from a military takeover, has cleared the U.S. House and is now being considered in the Senate. On June 14, the House approved the authorization bill, H.R. 1960, and sent it to the Senate for consideration. The legislation includes language written by Rep. Paul Cook (R-Calif.) to protect Johnson Valley from a takeover by the U.S. Navy. Such a takeover would virtually end

riding there. The Navy wants to expand the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms into the 189,000-acre Johnson Valley area, which is a longstanding and popular riding area across the San Bernardino Mountains from Los Angeles. “This legislation has cleared an important hurdle,” Cook said when the proposal cleared a House committee earlier. “Support for it was overwhelmingly bipartisan. My concern has always been about public safety. The Johnson Valley is one of the few places left for off-highway vehicle recreation. This is a balanced approach which protects public safety while still allowing for recreational use.” Cook is a member of the House Armed Services and Veterans’ Affairs Committees. He served as an infantry officer and retired after 26 years as a colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps. During his time in combat, he was awarded the Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts. Several years ago, the U.S. Department of the Navy began the formal process to take over some 365,906 acres of public land near San Bernardino to use for live-fire training for the Marines. Cook’s proposal would designate the Johnson Valley OHV area as the Johnson Valley National OHV Recreation Area. The area would be designated specifically for recreational uses, including, but not limited to, OHV use, camping and hiking. Marine Corps activities would be allowed twice a year and they could not use any explosives that could be inadvertently left behind.

©iStockphoto.com/ayzek

Barring any legal action, about 38,000 acres would be reopened to off-highway riding in late September in the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area in California, which is known as Glamis. The federal Bureau of Land Management released a final Recreation Area Management Plan and Amendments to the California Desert Conservation Area in June to guide the management of more than 160,000 acres of public land in the recreation area and another 50,000 acres surrounding the recreation area in the California Desert Conservation Area. The entire area is 40 miles long and averages 5 miles wide. Once released, these final decisions started a 90-day clock ticking for the reopening of land for riding that had been closed under a court order. Opponents of off-highway riding have indicated they will go to court to block the reopening of the public land. If the decisions stand, riders will have access to about 180,000 acres for riding: 127,416 acres are designated as Open OHV area and 52,370 acres are designated as Limited OHV area, meaning the number of riders allowed is restricted. Another 35,144 acres are closed to OHVs. In 2000, the BLM announced it would close 49,000 acres of the Southern California riding area as part of an out-ofcourt settlement of a lawsuit filed by groups that alleged the BLM violated the federal Endangered Species Act. That closure became part of a 2006 federal court order. The suit alleged the BLM failed to consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the effects of the BLM-administered California Desert Conservation Area Plan on a number of threatened and endangered species. Since then, the BLM has taken steps to try to satisfy critics of the decision and a U.S. District judge ruled that a plant at the heart of the controversy—the Peirson’s milkvetch—was being protected appropriately. Under these new BLM decisions, about 12,000 acres remain closed to protect the Peirson’s milk-vetch, and about 38,000 acres will reopen. The 50,000 acres is located in the Algodones Dunes area. Nick Haris, AMA Western states representative, applauds the BLM for its hard work and decision to reopen the acreage. He also praises local groups that have helped the AMA fight anti-OHV organizations that are trying to ban riders. Groups advocating to keep the land open for off-highway use include AMA District 37 (Southern California), the Off-Road Business Association, the American Sand


S TAT E WAT CH CALIFORNIA Eldorado National Forest Supervisor Kathy Hardy has designated 24 popular high-country off-highway vehicle routes for public motorized vehicle use. Another 18 will be designated after trail repairs are made. The routes were closed to public motorized vehicle use in 2012 by court order until their impacts on water flow in meadows were analyzed. IDAHO The federal Bureau of Land Management has announced new restrictions that apply to public land next to Big Willow Creek in Payette County to protect the Packard’s Milk-vetch. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated the plant a candidate for Endangered Species Act protection. Under the new restrictions, about 5,620 acres are closed to motorized travel and an additional 1,620 acres allow motorized travel only on designated trails. KANSAS A new law specifically authorizes the use of FMVSS-compliant motorcycle headlamp modulation systems and permits the addition, and use of, body or wheel lamps of any color that are visible from the sides of the motorcycle but not the front

or rear. The law is the result of House Bill 2318, offered by the House Transportation Committee, and took effect July 1. MISSOURI Motorcycle-only checkpoints are now banned thanks to the signing of Senate Bill 282 into law. Under the new law, no law enforcement agency may establish a roadside checkpoint or roadblock pattern based upon a particular vehicle type, including the establishment of motorcycleonly checkpoints. Another new law, the result of House Bill 715, allows the use of a device that varies the brightness of a motorcycle’s brake light for no more than five seconds upon application of the motorcycle’s brakes. NEVADA U.S. Sens. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) have introduced the Elko Motocross and Tribal Conveyance Act. This legislation conveys 275 acres of Bureau of Land Management land to Elko County, Nev., and requires the land be used only as a motocross, bicycle, off-highway vehicle or stock car racing area. RHODE ISLAND House Bill 5061, sponsored by Rep.

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Arthur Corvese (D-North Providence), would create additional penalties for motor vehicle violations at intersections and rights-of-way that cause serious bodily injury or death. The bill passed the Senate and is now eligible for the governor’s consideration. WASHINGTON A Discover Pass is no longer required to ride or drive on roads managed by the Department of Natural Resources or Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife under a new law that’s the result of Senate Bill 5897. WISCONSIN An off-road vehicle council will be created in the Department of Natural Resources under a new law resulting from the passage of Senate Bill 29. The council will consist of seven members appointed by the governor to serve three-year terms. The duties of the council include providing advice and making recommendations to the governor, the DNR, the Wisconsin Transportation Department and the Legislature regarding trails, routes, and grants for the landowner incentive program.

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6 Questions With…

U.S. REP. TIM GRIFFIN Fight For Your Rights

U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin (R-Ark.) is cochairman of the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus, which is made up of members of Congress who are passionate about motorcycling and who work to promote the interests of motorcyclists. We decided to ask Griffin a few questions to get his take on some of the issues facing motorcyclists today, and what motorcyclists can do to help protect their rights. American Motorcyclist: What do you ride? U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin: My first motorcycle was a minibike. In the 1970s, I got a Honda Z50. Since then, I’ve had approximately 15 motorcycles: street, dirt and dual-purpose. I’m always in the market for a new motorcycle. I raced motocross in the early 1980s, during the days of [AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers] Mark Barnett and Jeff Ward. They are still my favorites today. I currently have a Suzuki 1981 TS250 and a 1981 TS100 that is identical to the one I had in junior high. I found it on eBay. I ride that one occasionally, but the motorcycle that I primarily use is my 2006 Suzuki two-stroke RM250 Ricky Carmichael replica. I bought it brand new, and I ride that more than anything else. AM: What is your favorite place to ride? TG: I enjoy riding my motocross bikes on motocross tracks, although I occasionally ride trails, especially on Ross Foundation property, which is just south of Hot Springs, Ark. Our state has many beautiful highways winding through the Ozarks and Ouachita Mountains that are

great for riding. AM: What are the biggest issues facing on- and offhighway motorcyclists and all-terrain vehicle users today? TG: I support legislation that would stop the federal government from spending money on roadside checkpoints that target motorcyclists (H.R. 1861). Checkpoints such as these do not increase the safety of riders and are an unnecessary and ineffective use of taxpayer dollars. Even as a conservationist who strongly supports protecting the environment, I’m concerned that the U.S. Department of the Interior is using Wilderness designations to stop responsible off-roading. Preventing accidents and protecting the environment should start with rider education and increased awareness, not more government regulations. I’ll continue to stand up for motorcyclists, improve our access to public lands, and ensure our interests aren’t forgotten in Washington. AM: What are the biggest issues in Congress now confronting riders? TG: I joined the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus to help protect and support motorcycling because I fully understand the concerns of enthusiasts today. For example, using 15 percent ethanol blend (E15) gasoline may cause motorcycle engines to burn hotter, speeding up wear and tear and even voiding the manufacturer’s warranty. I’ve cosponsored H.R. 875, which would require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to seek independent scientific

“My first motorcycle was a minibike. In the 1970s, I got a Honda Z50. Since then, I’ve had approximately 15 motorcycles: street, dirt and dual-purpose. I’m always in the market for a new motorcycle.”

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analysis on the effects of E15 gasoline. AM: How can on- and off-highway motorcyclists and ATV users get more involved with the members of their congressional delegations to influence their decisions on issues? TG: As someone who started riding dirtbikes in the 1970s, racing motocross in the 1980s, and who currently owns motorcycles, I recognize the challenges facing riders today, but not every member [of Congress] does. Part of my effort as co-chair of the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus is to grow it into the voice in Congress for America’s more than 25 million motorcyclists. I’d encourage everyone to reach out to their representative to urge them to join the caucus. AM: Is there anything else you would like to add? TG: I am always looking for ways to serve better the folks I represent, and a key part of that is hearing what’s on people’s minds and updating them on the issues they care about. I’ve held teletown halls, “Sweet Tea with Tim” listening events and even have a Pinterest account. So when a constituent suggested holding a motorcycle event, I thought it was a great idea. We called it “Ridin’ with Your Rep” and the first one we held was for off-road riders. Despite a day of rain, it was better attended that any of the town halls I’ve held. I want to thank the AMA staff for attending the event and look forward to holding another one later this year.


For more than 25 years, Al Holtsberry has supported the AMA. Now we’re offering something special for him and all other AMA Life Members. Welcome to Life Member Plus! We designed the new Life Member Plus program to stay connected with our Life Members and reward them for their years of dedication to the AMA. Offering up a package that includes American Motorcyclist magazine and AMA Roadside Assistance at a special discounted rate, Life Member Plus is a money-saving value. The new program is 100 percent optional, so if you choose not to enroll, you still receive all the current benefits of life membership—a voice on behalf of motorcycling in the halls of government, the ability to sign up for AMA-sanctioned events, money-saving benefits and more. With Life Member Plus, you get all that, plus AMA Roadside Assistance and American Motorcyclist magazine. And stay tuned for additional Life Member benefits to come. AMA Life Member Plus Includes: • FREE AMA Roadside Assistance • 12 issues of American Motorcyclist magazine • AMA Life Member Plus Membership card, pin, and decal every year • A voice protecting motorcyclists’ rights at the federal, state and local levels • Continued access to AMA Rights, Riding, Racing and Rewards—including money-saving discounts

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Ricky Carmichael

Ricky Carmichael won a total of 15 AMA Supercross and AMA Motocross titles during his illustrious pro career, and has more combined AMA Supercross and AMA Motocross National wins than any other rider in history. From 1997 to 2006, Carmichael won a championship series title each year. In 2002, he recorded the first perfect season in AMA motocross history by earning 24 straight moto victories for 12 overall wins in the premier class—a feat he repeated in 2004. Carmichael, who at presstime was traveling in Europe, said through a text relayed via his mother, Jeanie, “This is for all of the people who helped me get to where I am, and the sponsors that gave me the support to do the job I needed to do. And also, this is for all my fans who supported me through the journey.” Jeanie added: “This is very honorable for Ricky. He has devoted his life to this sport and now he is recognized for all this achievement. To think that he is being recognized by his peers for this special respect, it is amazing and frankly, emotionally, very moving.”

AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Class Of 2013 Ricky Carmichael, Danny Hamel, Norm McDonald, Randy Renfrow, Mike And Diane Traynor

The American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation has announced an esteemed class of inductees for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame that will be honored Oct. 18-19 at the Green Valley Ranch in Las Vegas, Nev. This year’s class includes multi-time AMA Supercross and AMA Motocross champion Ricky Carmichael, multi-time desert racing champion Danny Hamel, K&N co-founder Norm McDonald, multitime roadracing champion Randy Renfrow and Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation founders Mike and Dianne Traynor. “The Greatest of All Time, an AMA and Baja racing standout, a well-known industry business veteran, a multi-talented AMA roadracer and a visionary couple of motorcyclists who started the Ride for Kids program and raised millions of dollars from fellow riders—I can’t think of a more wide-ranging and well-deserving class of inductees,” says Jeffrey V. Heininger, chairman of the AMHF, which oversees the Hall of Fame. “Each member of the Class of 2013 has made a lasting impact on the world of motorcycling, rising to the highest levels in their endeavors, whether in competition, business or helping others less fortunate,” Heininger adds. “It’s an honor to welcome them to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame family, and we look forward to celebrating

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their achievements at this year’s induction ceremony, Oct. 18-19, in Las Vegas.” Potential AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers are considered in eight categories, each focused on a specific area of achievement: Ambassadors & Industry, Design & Engineering, Dirt Track, Leadership & Motorcycle Rights, Motocross & Supercross, Off-Road, Roadracing and Specialty Competition. The Class of 2013 was selected by a voting procedure that included ballots cast by living Hall of Fame members, members of the AMA and AMHF boards of directors, and members of, and advisers to, Hall of Fame category committees. The number of eligible voters is more than 250. The selection of the 2013 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame inductees is the culmination of a comprehensive review of the procedures and make up of the Hall of Fame nominating processes and committees. The revisions institutionalize the integrity of the nominating process, from application through induction, into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. The class of 2013 will be officially inducted on Friday, Oct. 18, during the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Legends Weekend in a star-studded gala at Las Vegas’ Green Valley Resort & Casino. Also featured at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony are

two Hall of Fame Legends—existing members of the Hall of Fame whose lifetime accomplishments are highlighted. The 2013 Legends are: Mark Blackwell, a pioneering racer in American motocross, a six-time AMA championship race team manager and a well-respected executive in the motorcycle industry; and Torsten Hallman, a four-time World Motocross champion who was instrumental in introducing the sport of motocross to America and founded the Thor brand. Also part of the weekend’s activities is the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Dave Mungenast Memorial Legends Reception on Saturday, Oct. 19, where the class of 2013, the 2013 Legends and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers from previous years will be honored and interviewed onstage in a relaxed setting that allows fans and friends to get up close and personal with motorcycling’s heroes. Tickets are available now at www.motorcyclemuseum.org, and the public is encouraged to attend. Price is $140 for Friday night’s induction ceremony, and $20 for Saturday’s reception, which includes a continental breakfast. Additionally, rooms at the Green Valley Ranch can be reserved now for a special rate by calling (866) 782-9487 and referencing the code GCIAMHF. The AMA Legends Weekend is a fundraiser for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. The mission of the AMHF is to celebrate, elucidate and preserve the rich tradition of motorcycling in America. For more, see www.motorcyclemuseum.org.


Randy Renfrow

Randy Renfrow began his pro roadracing career in 1981. He won the AMA 250 Grand Prix championship in 1983, the AMA Formula One title in 1986 and the AMA Pro Twins Series championship in 1989. He was known for his ability to be competitive on any type of machinery, from diminutive 250 Grand Prix bikes all the way up to AMA Superbikes, and he excelled in nearly every class of professional motorcycle roadracing. In all, he won 17 AMA Nationals in four different classes. Renfrow died in 2002 in a non-racing accident. Said his brother, Shawn: “My brother was a lifelong supporter of the AMA and AMA Pro Racing. If he were here today he’d say this is his highest honor.”

Norm McDonald

Norm McDonald has been an ambassador for motorcycling his entire life as a racer, promoter, teacher, sponsor and advocate for motorcyclists’ rights and safety. In 1957 he opened K&N Motorcycles—a motorcycle shop—with Ken Johnson. By 1965, they created K&N Engineering and in 1966 the K&N Air Filter was introduced. Over the years, McDonald sponsored hundreds of racers, with more than 30 of them going on to the national level. McDonald was at a loss for words when he heard the news: “When AMA Board Member John Ulrich told me I was nominated, I was shocked,” McDonald said. “Now, with this news, I am honored and numb.”

Mike And Diane Traynor

Danny Hamel

Danny Hamel accomplished much as an off-road racer: five-time AMA Hare and Hound national champion, Baja 1000 and 500 overall winner and more. Between 1977 and 1995, Hamel was the only rider ever named both as the AMA Amateur Athlete of the Year and AMA Amateur Sportsman of the Year in the same year. He died in June 1995 while racing the Baja 500 when he collided with a car that strayed onto the course. “Danny would be speechless with this news,” said Hamel’s friend, Mike Hodges. “He’d walk away, give a very loud ‘HooRay’ and he’d savor the moment.”

Mike and Dianne Traynor co-founded the Ride for Kids motorcycle charity program and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. They began the Ride for Kids in 1984 to raise funds for childhood brain tumor research. With tens of millions of dollars raised since 1984, motorcyclists have helped the PBTF become the world’s largest non-governmental source of funding for childhood brain tumor research. Mike Traynor died in 2009 and Dianne Traynor died in 2012. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation board member Larry Little, vice president and general manager of the Marketplace Events Motorcycle Group, said the organization was touched by the news. “Like so many, I am overjoyed that Mike and Dianne Traynor have been recognized for their immeasurable impact on both the medical and motorcycling communities,” Little said. “They committed their lives to eliminating children’s brain tumors, and along the way they simultaneously raised positive awareness about motorcyclists and motorcycling. Their legacy will long live on as the foundation they created grows ever closer to finding a cure for one of the deadliest forms of childhood cancer. On behalf of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, Ride for Kids volunteers and the young brain tumor patients we serve, our thanks to the Hall of Fame members for recognizing Mike and Dianne’s contributions and for selecting them to join the Hall of Fame.”

September 2013

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Coffee Tales

The Bialetti Or The Rain Suit? By Jeff Buchanan Photos By Alfonse Palaima And Jeff Buchanan

Why is there such a mischievous allure in stealing away, breaking from the tether of the day to day? Those of us in the two-wheeled realm seem to be more inclined to these frivolous—yet hugely recharging—detours and escapes from routine than the Average Joe. A motorcycle will do that to you. Who can blame us? Since their earliest inception, motorcycles have offered a deeply romantic aura of freedom, of escape. Aside from the base fun of it all there’s also the calming, psychological restorative benefits. I’ve often said that money spent on a motorcycle road trip will produce richer—if not as significant— results than the same amount spent on visits to a shrink. As far as road trips are concerned, we motorcyclists seem to need only the

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slightest whiff of an excuse to pack up and depart. It’s point A to point B, and back to point A, with point B rarely being of any true consequence, save the excuse to go. The magic is in the going, the gobbling up of those miles in between. In the broad canon of motorcycle road trip themes, perhaps the most indulgent is when it entails riding a motorcycle to go look at a collection of other motorcycles. Enter the Quail Lodge Motorcycle Gathering. The Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley, Calif., that bastion of retired net worth, has, somewhat unexpectedly, endeared itself to the world of motorcycles by hosting the annual Quail Lodge Motorcycle Gathering. Now in its fifth year, the event has the same kind of rarefied air as that of the nearby Pebble Beach Concours

d’Elegance entwined with the residue of Half Moon Bay’s now-defunct (or some say merely hibernating) Legend of the Motorcycle. The upscale Quail Lodge seemed a fitting stage to showcase the level of vintage machines rumored to be showing up on the clubhouse’s finely manicured lawn. And so, off we went. My friend and I begged off from our various responsibilities and headed north to indulge our two-wheeled passions, to escape into that magic of “the going.” We were aided and abetted in the escape by a pair of BMW’s new F800GTs (Gran Turismo). We had done our usual evening prior to departure in strategic planning, hovering over a map of California. Despite the advent of GPS, I still savor the act of unfolding a map and charting a ride. The goal is always the same: To find as many small, winding back roads as possible regardless of the miles added, to see if we could avoid setting tire to a Continued on page 24


AS E D I EST ATION B E H T FILTR IN

major highway. I was weighing out the space left in the GT’s side bags between what I should take (essential) and what I wanted to take (luxury). One choice was between a rain suit (essential) or my mini-propane burner and my cherished Italian Bialetti coffee maker (luxury). I asked my buddy if he was bringing rain gear. “Dude, this is California!” he reminded me. The Bialetti got the upgrade to first class and the rain suit was tossed back in the closet. Departure was from Los Angeles, a place that needs departing from on regular intervals in order to retain sanity. The path between point A (L.A.) and point B (Carmel Valley) can easily be executed with great efficiency on major thoroughfares, the downside being you don’t see anything. The motorcycle way offers a variety of twisting back roads that will dissolve months of accumulated stress. Being caught in morning commuter

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traffic gave us a better appreciation for the open road ahead, wonderfully devoid of autos on a weekday. Highway 33 washed away the initial layer of city as we got the GTs humming through the pine-treebordered road that carried us up and over the mountains above Ojai. As we crossed the flats leading to curvaceous Highway 58, I got to thinking about Carmel and its geographical relation to Hollister. Sleepy little Hollister, just a scant 46 miles from the Quail, became famous in 1947 when it was chosen as the locale of the Gypsy Tour Motorcycle Rally on July 4th weekend. A reported 4,000 bikers descended on the small agricultural town to party. What little trouble there was with the local law became artful embellishment and the resulting news story, entitled “BIKERS TAKE OVER TOWN” scared decent Americans out of their wits. (The incident went onto inspire the movie “The Wild One.”) Motorcyclists have spent several decades trying to win back public approval from that infamous Fourth of


July party. We’ve come a long way in 66 years. Imagine trying to get permission to roll a few bikes onto the grass of an upscale resort back in 1947 when LIFE magazine carried the now infamous photo of a slovenly biker at the Hollister rally on a Harley-Davidson with a beer in each hand. By early afternoon, after threading our way through some of California’s sweeping back roads, we reached the gateway to motorcycling heaven: Highway 1, specifically San Simeon, home of

William Randolph Hearst’s Zanadu, Hearst Castle. The 74 serpentine miles that snake up the rugged Pacific Coastline from here to Carmel remain one of—if not the single best—motorcycle rides in the world. After all, this is the coastline poet Robinson Jeffers called, “the greatest meeting of land and water on earth.” Numerous stops to take in the endless views of the Central Coast had us entering Carmel Valley well after dark. We pulled into Saddle Mountain Ranch Campground

guided by the headlight beams of the BMWs, found our site, and assembled our tents in the dark. Rolling into a place after hours presents the surprise of morning when daylight allows you to see what couldn’t be seen in the dark. Saddle Mountain Ranch is a tranquil setting part way up a mountain in beautiful Carmel Valley. In our case, it was just a mile from the Quail Lodge. As we dragged ourselves out of our respective tents I pulled the prized

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5/13/13 11:33:09 AM

L-R: Kenny Roberts, Jeff Buchanan, Mert Lawwill

Bialetti out and brewed up a pot of coffee. I like my coffee the way John Steinbeck liked his: “Thick enough to float a nail.” After packing up we trekked the few minutes down the hill and into a two-wheel, metallurgical equivalent to a stroll through Amsterdam’s red light district—a beautiful spectacle of two-wheel indulgence spilling out over the immaculately kept lawn of the Quail Lodge. Entering the event, I was immediately stopped in my tracks by sight of a 1971 Honda CB350. It was a memory-inducing replica of the bike I spent riding the summer of 1972, tooling around the Santa Monica Mountains with a newly acquired motorcycle permit (at the tender age of 15 and a half). That was the first of many such visits to my youth courtesy of the bikes on display. Everywhere the eye went, there was something of intrinsic, visceral value to the enthusiast. I was able to trace my entire love affair with motorcycles as I perused the bikes, from my earliest desires, such as the Honda Mini-Trail 50 and subsequent Yamaha Mini-Enduro, to a Hodaka 100cc and a DKW 125. There was a rare Maico 400 square barrel, a Bultaco Pursang and a pristine Ossa Phantom 125cc. A Honda Elsinore 250 (just like the one I had in 1973) took me back to my motocross championship aspirations. There was a Yamaha RD350 like the one I owned in 1975. On and on it went, a cadre of beautifully restored motorcycles that have been imprinted on my mind and not seen in person for some 30 years—as well as a horde of beauties from before my time. My wandering brought me head to head with the biggest single influence from my motorcycle youth: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Mert Lawwill, standing next to his 1970 Harley XR750 flattracker. When I was 13, I sat through five consecutive showings of the movie “On Any Sunday,” instantly acquiring Lawwill as my hero and cementing an already rabid infatuation with motorcycles. It’s hard to believe it’s been 40 years.

Amid a broad array of racing motorcycles from multiple decades was the ultimate show stopper: Wayne Rainey’s 1991 Yamaha YZR 500. The machine, brought to the Quail by local resident and legendary three-time MotoGP World Champion Wayne Rainey, recalled a by-gone era when men raced irascible 500cc two-stroke fire breathers that delivered gargantuan snaps of power sans the luxury of computer-aided modulation. In this era of anti-lock brakes, traction control and advanced, on-the-fly, electronic suspension adjustment, there is something disarmingly charming about motorcycles that are primarily two wheels, a chassis and a carburetor-fed engine operated by a throttle cable. There was a simplicity of mechanical operation in the machines on display that touched on the sublime. We stayed well past our intended 1 p.m. departure from the Quail event, lured by the beautiful polished steel of motorcycle history. By the time Wayne Rainey and Kenny Roberts, the event’s special guests, had spoken and the bikes started being returned to trailers and into the beds of pick-up trucks, it was 5 p.m. We reluctantly pulled ourselves away from the gleaming parade of restorations from my youth and headed home. The weather on the return trip seemed to want to punish us for not waiting to watch every last gem of two-wheel invention be rolled off the Quail’s grass— or for not having planned better to spend a second night in the campground. As we headed back down Highway 1, the evening clouds and dark moved in with that nasty, biting Central Coast chilling wind—strong enough to push a bike around—and pounded us relentlessly with a fine drizzle. As it got later, and we got wetter, and the sky got darker, my traveling buddy’s words kept ringing through my head, which I had allowed to make up my mind for me about my rain suit: “Dude, it’s California.” I was thinking, I could sure use a coffee right about now.


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Chad Berger

Putting Charity To Work By Dr. Avtar Roopra

DUAL-SPORT RIDING FOR RESEARCH IN WISCONSIN Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders’ John Newton

In 1998, AMA Life Member John Newton from Fall River, Wis., was a member of the Madison Motorcycle Club and racing enduros. A knee injury ended his racing days, but he wasn’t done riding. He bought a 1996 ATK 605, the lightest dual-sport with electric start he could find. “The problem was none of the guys I rode with wanted to ride logging roads, two-track and gravel roads with me,” he says. The next year, he proposed an organized dual-sport ride to the Wabeno, Wis., town board, drafted some friends and put on the first Big Woods 200 dual sport. The ride attracted 68 riders, and the club was thrilled.

“From the very beginning, the standard I wanted to hold up was that the events would be good for the local community and good for motorcycling. As long as the club made enough to keep putting on the next event, that was all we could ask for,” Newton remembers. After doing five of these annual rides, however, Newton says, “I felt the need to step it up and give back on a larger scale.” The group decided to start donating event proceeds to charity. Cancer research was selected and the club adopted the tagline “Ride for Research.” “The funds raised were to go to research and not an entity,” Newton says. “We wanted it to go to boots in the

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We met John Newton and his friends in 2009 after they called the lab out of the blue having seen Matt Wagoner, a graduate student at the time, on TV. Since then, the lab has travelled up to support their annual Ride for Research in Wabeno, Wis., and it is a high point for us every year. The funds the riders raise are used to support the cancer research performed in the lab. Given the dire state of research funding at the moment, the Ride for Research funds are a lifeline for our work on breast cancer. Since hooking up with the riders, we have been able to publish three major papers on cancer that carry the statement, “This work was funded by the Dual Sport Riders of Wisconsin.” This is a testament to their commitment and dedication to the cause. As important as their funds are to our work, seeing the riders up in Wabeno and sharing with them our findings is so inspirational to us researchers. Their energy and enthusiasm drive us to make a difference to breast cancer research. And after all, who would want to let down 200 guys on motorbikes! Avtar Roopra, Ph.D., is an associate professor in neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin (Madison). trenches—people, in labs, doing stuff. That idea, and getting folks from labs on the University of Wisconsin and the Carbone Cancer Center to the event to talk to the riders and the locals has made all the difference.” Today, the Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, an AMA club, runs the Ride for Research in the spring and the Big Woods 200 in the fall. The Ride for Research was June 8-9. The Big Woods 200, Sept. 28-29, is a round of the AMA Husqvarna National Dual Sport Series. Shortly after this year’s Ride for Research, we caught up with Newton for more background on the rides. American Motorcyclist: What’s the background on the club? John Newton: The Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders club was formed in the year


Brian Mullane

or so prior to the first ride in May 2007, with its initial purpose being to start this charity ride. Over all, the primary goal of the club is to promote good will through motorcycling. AM: How much money have you raised this year? All together? Newton: This year’s total is still being tallied, but should be a little over $18,000 when all is said and done. To date, with seven rides under our belt, we have surpassed the $108,000 mark. It was quite a milestone for us to pass $100,000 this year! AM: Why did the club decide to support cancer research? Newton: Everyone has been touched by cancer in some way. We feel helpless against it—this was one way to fight back. Just as important was our decision to support the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center because they are a comprehensive center that helps people from around the entire Great Lakes region with treatment, support and research. We know we are getting the best bang for the buck because their administrative cost is less than 5 percent, so we know our funds support research rather than some executive’s new office. AM: How does having a charitable element to the ride help in terms of local community support? Are landowners and communities more receptive? Newton: The landowners and the people of Wabeno and surrounding communities are very gracious. They welcomed us with reservations for the first couple of years with the Big Woods 200 ride that was held in the fall. After they saw how much of a positive impact this ride has on their town, how much fun these riders have, and how appreciative the riders are in return, they have welcomed us back each year with open arms. The first ride we started there was not a charity ride, so contacts were in place before that aspect came into play. However, charity or not, our rides have always worked hard to give back to the community above and beyond the

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Jersey, Florida, Texas, California and Washington. We even had one who came home on leave from Iraq and rode with his family during his leave. AM: What’s the highlight of the ride? Does it have a distinctive feature, such as scenic back roads, tough trail, etc.? Newton: Like any dual-sport ride, the Ride for Research and Bigwoods 200 have a mix of road, gravel and two-track. One of the outstanding features is the singletrack hero sections that are included on private property. The quality and variety of these are due to the large number of landowners who open their properties to us for our events. Northern Wisconsin is a beautiful area, and deep in the forest, it’s even better. Our trails vary in technical difficulty, but there is something for everyone. We’ve got elevation changes, soil differences, dry, wet, sandy, clay, rocks—you name it, we try to find it and work it in! In addition, this is a two-day event and it includes three meals and overnight camping accommodations. The camaraderie is second to none. We have riders who have been coming long enough that it’s almost like a family reunion twice a year. AM: How do riders express their appreciation for the charitable nature of the ride? Newton: First, they come back year after year! More importantly, they keep bringing friends, as well as larger and larger donations. Their generosity is mind numbing. We have a limited number of entrants that we can allow due to U.S. Forest Service agreements, so the number of people coming is not getting any larger. Yet, each year the total donation amount increases. Seriously, I hope we never find the bottom of that barrel!

Chad Berger

economic effect that they have by making donations to local needs, and by utilizing local fundraising groups to do things like serve the meals, etc. AM: How many riders do you typically get a year? Where do they come from? Newton: Each ride pulls about 150 to 200 riders. Most of our riders are from the Great Lakes area a state or two away, but they come from all over the country. We’ve had riders from every corner—New

John Newton

We also hear many comments from our riders regarding the fact that they hear directly from the research labs benefitting from their donations. I think that it works in reverse as well. The research scientists get a boost from us. They get that reminder that it’s not just science in a lab—it’s people depending on them and taking an interest in seeing that they can continue their important work. Find out more about the Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders and the organization’s rides at www.widualsportriders.org.

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Chad Berger

~ A JC Motors Company ~


Tracy Doyle

and white road sign (followed by many more signs in the town itself). Theodore proper appeared to be mostly a bedroom community. The goal of riding to three towns named Theodore may seem trivial, but that isn’t the point and it never was. There is no mundane on two-wheels. “Theodore” led us to adventures we’d otherwise never experience, roads and sights we wouldn’t have seen and people we wouldn’t have met. The Fourth Theodore (me) was the better for it. There are much bigger motorcycle goals I have done or have yet to do. Oddly, the goal of riding through every state west of the Mississippi was completed during the same trip as Theodore, Ala., but Theodore itself felt more momentous. Back home and dreaming about future motorcycle adventures, I notice that there is a Melissa in Texas. And about 1,000 miles of new experiences away... Theo Verbrugge is an AMA member from Oxford, Ohio, who, if he ever sets wheels in Theodore, Queensland, Australia, will hopefully write about it for this magazine.

The Fourth Theodore

Enjoying The Hidden Gems By Theo Verbrugge We all need to have goals in our lives. These may be significant (achieving a career milestone, buying a house in the country) or trivial (getting the lawn mowed before it rains). As an AMA member and reader of American Motorcyclist, I have an everchanging list of motorcycle goals that continues to grow. I’ve been to Daytona Bike Week, ridden the Black Hills of South Dakota and done many other things that are on a motorcyclist’s dream list, but the ideas that keep my motorcycle list exciting to me are the things that may seem insignificant, yet pull me off the more typical route. In 2008, my wife Melissa and I were on a trip that took us across much of Canada. We had reached a proverbial fork in the road and after consulting the small map we had, took a more northerly route across Manitoba and Saskatchewan. As the wind pelted the rain sideways through frigid Canadian air, we entered the rural town of Theodore, Saskatchewan, several hours later. Despite the weather, I had to stop to have my picture taken. “When,” I pondered aloud, “would I be

back in a town named Theodore?” Motorcycle trips allow for many contemplative hours and later during the same trip I started wondering how many other towns were named after me? I found two more. Theodore, Mich., no longer exists. The physical locale still exists in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, but the town has been absorbed by the more oddly named community of Felch. In 2010, we flagged down a road construction worker getting started for his morning who could hopefully point us to a defined remnant of Theodore: “This was it, it’s gone.” His incredulous look wondered what two people on a strictly roadbike were doing on a mud-caked rural road. We might as well have been riding through the fog looking for the Amazonian Lost City of Z. With a few days of vacation to burn early in 2013, Melissa and I made a beeline south to Alabama. As we rode around Mobile Bay, a sign proudly proclaimed our goal of Theodore, Ala.— the third Theodore. I was almost giddy, a many-year goal was in sight with a green

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From The Road

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I’ve got friends whose idea of planning a trip is to make sure their bike is gassed up and they remember where they left the keys. This approach is admirably adventurous, but By Rick Wheaton poor preparation makes it more likely you’ll experience Things-That-Go-Wrong. TTGW can be trivial (a missed turn), commonplace (it rains), stop you in your tracks (an international border with no visa), or life threatening (a skid on a mountain road). Of course these things can happen whenever, but if you’ve got a nice map, proper rain gear, accurate paperwork and good tires, there are four things that are less likely to go wrong, and you’ve got more time and energy to enjoy your trip. The great Ted Simon (who rode around the world in four years on a Triumph) once said “It’s the interruptions that make the journey” and I think he’s telling you to prepare for TTGW, try to learn from them, and possibly even enjoy them. His account of his 64,000 mile ride “Jupiter’s Travels” is a wonderful read. In half a page here, I can only touch on the basics, so if you’re planning to ride across a continent or two, I also strongly recommend the 288 pages of Chris Scott’s “Adventure Motorcycling Handbook” (Trailblazer Publications $19.95). Start with your route and distances. About 200-300 miles per day is a decent average, and have alternate routes too, in case of problems. You’ll need insurance (vehicle, travel and health), and think about camping versus motels, a decision largely governed by your route, your finances and the climate you’ll be riding through. Fuel can be an unexpected problem; in some countries it’ll be lower grade than your bike is used to. It may need filtering, and gas stations might be routinely further apart than your range. Expect to use 30% more gas when your bike is heavily loaded, and 50% more on rough terrain. Accurate documents (plus photocopies) are vital: passport, visas, ownership papers and without a Carnet de Douane— basically, a passport for your bike—some customs may demand a deposit of three times the value of your bike! Ask your doctor about inoculations, keep prescriptions with you and carry enough medication plus spares.

AmericanMotorcyclist.com AMA_Husqvarna_Natl_Dual_Sport_Series_SeatConcepts_rev.indd 7/16/13 1 3:02 PM

I have learned from experience. My girlfriend and I were once stranded at the Algerian border with bad paperwork. We couldn’t turn back because our Tunisian visas had been cancelled; our ride across North Africa and the Sahara was at a complete standstill. Fortunately a hefty “purchase” of local currency opened the border, but the fact is our trip almost died for want of a rubber stamp. Our emergency cash came in handy then, but money is a constant headache on the road, less so now credit cards are accepted almost everywhere. Before you set off have your bike serviced, talk to your dealership about spares, and know there’s enough life in your tires plus where to get new ones. Climate will dictate your clothing; take some common sense first aid; and don’t forget a flashlight, WD 40 and duct tape! Do you plan to ride alone, with a buddy or in a group? There’s much to be said for riding with a pillion, but the extra weight will limit your options to explore rough tracks. If two of you ride a bike each, having the same make and model is a huge plus for spares and shared technical knowhow. In a group you’ll feel safer, but personal dynamics can be a problem. Riding solo gives you an enviable freedom to ride where you like and at your pace. You’re also more likely to socialize with locals and other travelers, but there will be times you’ll feel more vulnerable. However you decide to ride, do take every opportunity of talking to riders coming the other way. Roadside cafes, campsites and even turn-offs are good meeting places, and people you meet there are often the best sources of information on what lies ahead. Equally, of course, you’ll be able to pass on what you know about the route you’ve just travelled. Rick Wheaton is an AMA member who covers issues important for street riders from his home in Devon, England.


JET POWER BY WAY OF MOTO POWER

General Electric Employees Ride To Work Photo By Gene McAllister Up to the ATV Safety Institute for providing the Boy Scouts of America with ATV safety training at the 2013 National Scout Jamboree, July 15-24 in Piney View, W.Va. Up to Lightning Motorcycles and racer Carlin Dunne, who won Pikes Peak on an electricpowered bike, conquering the 12.42-mile, 156-turn course in 10:00.694, just short of the course record.

Nestled in foothills near Peebles, Ohio, is General Electric Aviation’s Premier Jet Engine Testing Facility. Surrounded by nearly 8,000 acres, this facility employs about 300 workers who perform a wide range of jet aircraft engine testing from early development stages to final production assembly. It sounds like a great place to work, but

what’s really cool is around 50 of those employees are motorcyclists and many of them are AMA members who ride to the office daily. This photo was taken on June 17, Ride to Work Day, this year. The large round object is a turbulence control sphere that, we’re told, is used to measure incoming air into jet engines.

Down to an Oneida, N.Y., man who popped a wheelie on a public road, lost control of his bike and struck another motorcycle making that motorcycle crash into a car. Up to AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Chris Carr who announced on his Facebook page that he’s making another run at the outright land-speed record this Aug. 24-29 at the BUB Motorcycle Speed Trials on the Bonneville Salt Flats. Down to a man in Chickasha, Okla., who police say ignored ATGATT and instead opted to wear nothing but a strategically placed shoe as he rode his bike around town. Reportedly, the man’s antics won him a $50 bet, but it cost him a $650 fine…

! this guy Don’t be

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TWO-MONTH MOTORCYCLE TOUR… …37 Years In The Making By Karl Kuss

It started in 1974. My buddy and I were on a two-week trip around Michigan, the two of us on our 750 Hondas, riding with our sleeping bags, tents and clothes strapped on. While sitting on a picnic table overlooking Lake Michigan and the Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes, we talked about how cool it would be to ride to the West Coast and back. Well, that idea came to fruition, but it wasn’t until 37 years later. A couple years ago, we set out on our Harley-Davidson Road Kings (no tents or sleeping bags this time) for what would be one of the most memorable trips that either of us have taken. This was more than just a cross-country ride. We lived on the road for about two months. We covered about 8,000 miles, and rode through 20 states. We started our journey south through Indiana, Kentucky and into Missouri before ending up in Heber Springs, Ark. There, we met up with an old high school chum who rides. He showed us some of the most beautiful riding that his state has to offer. After a few days, we headed down Interstate 40 west toward Oklahoma City where we rode bits and pieces of Route 66. From there, we continued west through Texas and into New Mexico. We then cut northwest out of Tucumcari. After spending the night in

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Taos, we headed into Durango, Colo., where we encountered our only close call of the entire trip. As we crossed through the San Juan National Forest, my buddy was nearly taken off his bike by a freerange cow. Fortunately, he was able to avoid the cow. I later blamed it on the Firefighter Red edition of the Road King he was riding. Our next stop was Moab, Utah, where we spent some time traveling around possibly the most beautiful state in the Union. The list of places we saw is one highlight after another—Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Dixie National Forest, the Wasatch Mountain Range, Canyonlands National Park and a gorgeous ride through a canyon that followed the Colorado River before ending up in the small town of Kanab about 80 miles north of the Grand Canyon. From the north rim of the Grand Canyon, we headed southeast to Lake Powell and a tour of the Glen Canyon Dam. Our trip then took us west to Kingman, Ariz., where we picked up Rt. 66 again through Oatman before heading south the Lake Havasu to check out the London Bridge. With the temperatures hovering around 100-110 degrees, we did most of our riding before noon. Once we hit Yuma, Ariz., we headed west to San Diego.

Karl Kuss is an AMA member from Commerce Township, Mich.

Photos Portrait: Bryan Mitchell; Inset: Provided by Theo Verbrugge

Karl Kuss, left, and Dean Masser

When we got to San Diego, we met up with our better halves. They had flown out to spend the next two weeks riding the coast to Seattle. After staying in San Diego (another drop-dead gorgeous area of the country), we headed north. While my buddy’s wife was content to ride with him, I rented a Heritage Softtail for my wife so she could enjoy the ride herself. Our journey up the coast of California was full of beautiful scenery: Santa Barbara, San Simeon, Monterey, Carmel By The Sea, San Francisco, Napa Valley, the California Redwoods. We then crossed over into Oregon and rode that state’s version of the Pacific Coast Highway, Highway 101. In Oregon, we rode through towns like Gold Beach, Coos Bay, Newport, Pacific City, Oceanside and Cannon Beach before landing in Astoria—the “little San Francisco” of the Northwest. Founded by John Jacob Astor, this town is rich in history. We spent a couple days sightseeing before moving inland. We then headed toward Mount St. Helens before meeting up with another high school friend who rides in Tacoma, Wash. We stayed in Puyallup, a Tacoma suburb, and from there saw Seattle, Mount Rainer and eventually swapped the two wheels for propellers for a trip up the Puget Sound to Victoria Island, British Columbia. We spent the day touring the island before returning to Puyallup so the wives could fly home and leave us to finish the journey. We headed east out of Washington on I-90. It’s scenic for an interstate, but I couldn’t wait to get back on the secondary roads. We picked up Highway 12 in Montana just west of Helena. This is a beautiful road with little traffic. We dropped through the Dakotas and followed Highway 12 into Minneapolis and on to Green Bay, Wis., then headed south on I-43 to Manitowoc. We took the ferry for a Lake Michigan crossing to Ludington, Mich. Our trip ended the next day after a three-and-a-half-hour ride home. This was a trip of a lifetime for me, and one I won’t forget. I can’t thank my good friend Dean enough for tolerating me for two months, or my wife for allowing me the opportunity to go.


TWO-UP AND FULL THROTTLE

The GEICO Honda Two-Seat Superbike Program Experience is the best teacher. That’s the idea behind the GEICO Honda Two-Seat Superbike Program, on track the Thursdays before GEICO Motorcycle AMA Pro Road Racing Championship weekends. The goal? “It’s two-wheeled evangelism,” says GEICO Honda team owner Chris Ulrich. “We want to expose media types—general media, mainstream media—to what the sport of road racing is all about.” Expose, they do. Using a specially equipped Honda CBR1000RR, Ulrich—a seasoned pro racer himself—circulates professional road courses at extreme speed, using his national-caliber skills to lean the bike through twisties, break

Kaitlyn Sesco and Chris Ulrich

extremely hard for corners and hit speeds of 140 mph or more. Ulrich explains that the best clients are local radio, newspaper and television representatives—those who can experience the ride on Thursday morning and talk about it or write about it in local media that evening and Friday. The hype is a great way to get more local fans out to the track. The team started giving the rides in 2001 when Chris’ father, John Ulrich, wanted to both promote the sport and convey to non-racers the high physical demands, super-fast reflexes and intense concentration required of professional motorcycle racing. “When you take them down the back straightaway, hitting 140 mph and hit the breaks and turn it in, your passenger gets a taste of what you experience,” Ulrich says. “There’s no better way to understand what we do.” AMA Communications and Marketing Specialist Kaitlyn Sesco would agree.

Sesco went for a two-up ride with Ulrich the Thursday before the Buckeye SuperBike Weekend at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, part of the 2013 AMA Pro Racing tour. Read her thoughts in the sidebar. In addition to media rides before AMA Pro Racing Superbike events, the GEICO Honda team puts on a ride that raises money for the Roadracing World Action Fund. The Roadracing World Action Fund promotes racing safety, most notably by advocating for and funding soft barriers for road race courses. Individuals who donate to the charity during the fundraising event can take a ride with Ulrich. Ulrich estimates that he has given about 600 rides on the two-seat Superbike, and although every ride is different, one thing is always the same. The passengers walk away with a new appreciation for the world-class athletes in professional road racing and a new understanding of the thrills of the sport. —James Holter

Riding With Chris By Kaitlyn Sesco

After years of anticipation, I finally got to experience what it is like to ride a Superbike around a racetrack at (almost) full race speed. It was everything I expected it to be and more! The entire program was well organized and executed from beginning to end. Leathers, boots, gloves and helmet were provided. A short safety briefing was provided (no waving to the crowd) and I was told I would be the third person to ride. As Chris Ulrich took off with the second rider, the excitement really kicked in. I slipped on my gloves, put on my helmet and waited as calmly as I could for my turn. Climbing on the bike behind Chris, I had full confidence in his ability. The turns were thrilling, just as I expected them to be, but the real surprise was the straightaways. Hitting 140 mph and feeling the front tire come off the track was one of the most exhilarating things I have ever done. If my experience is any indication, Chris and his team are bringing a whole new appreciation to the sport of roadracing by making new fans in local media. I can’t imagine a better way to teach someone about the sport—well, maybe two-seat rides handlebar to handlebar during a Superbike main event. How about it, Chris? I’m ready when you are!

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1962 MATCHLESS G80CS Brian Slark Works His Magic AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and motorcycle restorer extraordinaire Brian Slark has a history with this 1962 Matchless G80CS—probably riding one like it in 1962 and certainly restoring it in the present day. In the early 1960s, Slark worked at Associated Motorcycles in England producing AJS and Matchless motorcycles. He tested and evaluated bikes, and could have been the test rider for this machine when it came off the assembly line in 1962. Now, more than 50 years later, Slark has restored this Matchless for the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Leeds, Ala., where he works. The G80CS was a purpose-built bike for motocross use. But Americans wanted

to ride these bikes both on the street and in the dirt so the factory supplied a street-legal version to the United States. This G80CS features a single-cylinder 498cc engine that pumps out 40 horsepower. The bike has an Amal carb, Lucas magneto and weighs just 385 pounds. The transmission is a four-speed, the brakes are drum and the rear shocks are Girling. This bike is on loan to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame from the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum. To learn more about Slark and the other men, women and machines featured in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, go to www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, features the people and machines that have defined the sport, lifestyle and business of motorcycling in America. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from the motorcycling community. For info and directions, visit www.motorcyclemuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222. Photo Jeff Guciardo


Hall of Famer

Jeff Stanton

Multi-time AMA Supercross And Motocross Champ Jeff Stanton was a six-time AMA Supercross and motocross champion in the 1980s and 1990s. In all, the quietly determined Michigan rider tallied 37 National wins with victories in AMA Supercross and AMA 250cc and 500cc motocross. In 1989, 1990 and 1992, he won both AMA 250cc motocross championships and AMA Supercross Series titles. Stanton rode for Honda for most of his career and earned all of his titles on Hondas. He became a racing legend overseas by way of his outstanding performances in the Motocross des Nations. He also won the 250cc U.S. Grand Prix of Motocross three years in a row. Stanton was born in Coldwater, Mich., in 1968. He was raised on a farm in the nearby community of Sherwood. The entire Stanton family rode motorcycles. Stanton made his professional debut at the end of 1986. By 1987, with backing from Yamaha, Stanton hit the pro circuit full time. In one of the more impressive rookie seasons in AMA racing, Stanton finished inside the top 10 in the 1987 AMA 250cc and 500cc National Motocross Championships and the AMA Supercross Series. He was named AMA Rookie of the Year.

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Stanton backed up his attentiongrabbing rookie campaign with another solid season in 1988, again reaching the top 10 in the same three classes. Honda was impressed and signed the young up-and-comer for 1989. Stanton was slated to learn the ropes while backing up Honda’s star, Future AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Rick Johnson, but a twist of fate would result in Honda’s hopes resting on its young first-year factory recruit. Johnson was injured in the first AMA Motocross National of the year. Stanton responded to the pressure of suddenly being Honda’s No. 1 rider by winning five of the seven AMA 250 Motocross Nationals that year and earning his first national motocross title. He capped off the stunning 1989 season by leading the American squad to victory in the prestigious Motocross des Nations in Germany. In 1990, Stanton defended his titles in both AMA 250cc Motocross and Supercross and was named AMA Pro Athlete of the Year. Stanton lost both championships to Honda teammate and future AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Jean-Michel Bayle in 1991. In 1992, Stanton prepared with singular

focus and triumphantly won back both the AMA 250cc Motocross and Supercross titles. The ’92 AMA Supercross Series title was won in the final race when he took the victory in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and Damon Bradshaw, who held a commanding lead going into the final, inexplicably faltered under the pressure. Stanton’s 37th and final AMA National win came in the 500cc National at Millville, Minn., in August of 1993. Still one of the top riders, Stanton hung up his helmet at the end of the 1994 season at age 26. Stanton was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2000. To read more about Hall of Famers, go to www.motorcyclemuseum.org.


YOU CAN HAVE IT BOTH WAYS.

AMA members do it all—long-distance rides, offroad races, cruising main street, vintage dirt track... To better serve our broad membership base, American Motorcyclist magazine is now published in two versions. The dirt version includes more off-highway and racing content. The street version includes more articles for road riders. Want to switch? Just call (800) 262-5646, ask for membership services and tell them which version you want. Want to read both versions? Call the above number to get both delivered to your home for just $10 more a year. Members can read both online at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/magazine for free.

Put yourself in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum

YOUR NAME HERE

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is YOUR hall of fame—we couldn’t exist without the generous support of our donors. Now there’s a new way for you to show that support in a very visible way: My Hall of Fame. The idea is simple: A $20 donation gets you a 3-inch-square space on the wall in the Hall of Fame entrance foyer that hangs during the campaign year. Want a bigger space? A 6-inch square is an $80 donation, and a 9-inch square is a $180 donation. You also get an official certificate noting that your picture is on display in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. Hang your picture, your kid’s picture, your company logo, almost anything. It’s up to you! Get in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame today!

9” 6” 3” 3”

6”

$20

$80

donation

donation

www.motorcyclemuseum.org/myhalloffame or call 1-800-342-5464 for assistance

9”

$180

donation


FUEL FOR THOUGHT AMA Rallies With Motorcyclists In Washington, D.C., To Urge Testing Of E15 Fuel Blend Photos by Jay Westcott

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he message was delivered loud and clear by more than 100 motorcyclists, AMA members, federal lawmakers and supporters on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.: E15 fuel is untested, potentially bad for motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle engines and should not be rushed to market.

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The AMA E15: Fuel for Thought rally and lobby day was held on June 19 just blocks from the U.S. Capitol on the National Mall, with riders gathering to urge their senators and representatives to call for independent testing of the E15 ethanol fuel blend on motorcycle and ATV engines before it is allowed for sale at retail gas stations. Those riders represented millions of motorcycle and ATV owners who are concerned about the potential for misfueling with E15 and the poor performance, low fuel mileage and possible engine damage that could occur. Several U.S. senators and representatives joined the AMA in questioning the EPA’s decision to allow the sale of E15, calling it “not good to put in anyone’s gas tank,” “a disaster in the making” and “bad policy.” “When you have a type of fuel that, if inadvertently used, has the potential to damage engines and fuel systems and void a manufacturer’s new-vehicle warranty, you really should move with caution when it comes to putting that fuel in the marketplace,” AMA Board Chair Maggie McNally told the assembled crowd. “Issuing rules that allow the sale of E15 at gas stations without

adequate testing to be sure it’s safe in motorcycles and ATVs, not to mention engines in boats and power equipment, just isn’t wise,” McNally said. “We’re here today to deliver that message to our legislators, so that the right safeguards can be put in place.” E15 is a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume, a higher percentage of ethanol than in E10 fuel blends now on sale. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved E15 use in 2001-and-newer light-duty vehicles, which include cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles, none of the estimated 22 million motorcycles and ATVs currently in use are on the EPA approved list, and no manufacturer has approved E15 for use in its motorcycles and ATVs. Since 2011, the AMA has repeatedly expressed concerns to government officials and federal lawmakers about possible damage to motorcycles and ATVs from the inadvertent use of E15, which is now becoming available at gas stations. That could happen if a rider selects E15 on a fuel blender pump thinking it is E10 or E0 (no ethanol) fuel. Riders are also concerned about misfueling with E15 left over in the pump hose or in portable containers. The EPA is merely telling alarmed consumers not to use E15, downplaying the possibility of inadvertent misfueling. Proponents of E15 go a step further, noting that the EPA has specifically prohibited its use in motorcycles and other small engines and stating that it would be illegal for motorcyclists to use E15. “Telling riders that E15 use is illegal completely misses the point, because motorcycle and ATV riders don’t want to use it in the first place, unless independent testing confirms it is safe,” said AMA Vice President for Government Relations Wayne Allard. “One of our concerns has always been that we might unintentionally put E15 in our tanks, due to confusing or poor implementation of the EPA’s misfueling mitigation plan.”

"That means the loser in all of this is the riders. The AMA stands behind not only its members but all riders in calling for more extensive testing for E15, and more thorough misfueling safeguards." Wayne Allard, AMA Vice President For Government Relations

September 2013

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U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin, AMA’s Maggie McNally

The Fuel for Thought event began with a motorcycle ride around the U.S. Capitol, followed by a rally with numerous federal lawmakers speaking. Participants then visited their congressional delegations’ offices to ask for support for legislation that calls for independent research into the effects of E15 fuel on motorcycles and ATVs. Lawmakers speaking at the rally included: U.S. Reps. Jim Sensenbrenner

(R-Wis.), Chris Stewart (R-Utah), Tim Griffin (R-Ark.), David Valadao (R-Calif.), Tom Petri (R-Wis.) and Bill Posey (R-Fla). Sensenbrenner noted that the EPA simply is not listening when it comes to E15 fuel. “When they started going on this push for E15, I sent out a letter to all the auto manufacturers, and every last one of them said that using E15 in automobiles manufactured after 2001 would wreck the engines and void the warranties. They didn’t listen to that. So an EPA mandate [for E15] would mean that a lot of people would end up having very expensive repairs that are not covered by the warranty. “Corn with a lot of butter is really good to eat,” Sensenbrenner added. “But what is good to eat is not good to put in anybody’s gas tank.” The risk is just too great for E15 fuel to be sold at the pump, said Rep. Stewart. “The federal government does silly things from time to time, and this is one of them,” Rep. Stewart said. “You have these beautiful machines out here, and if you put one of these blends in there, you’re going to burn up those engines, and the manufacturers won’t honor the warranty. It’s just not a good idea of have this blend… We’re going to challenge the EPA, and I think we’re going to have some success.” Rep. Griffin noted that E15 isn’t fully tested, and should be, before it is allowed to be sold. “E15 is a disaster in the making,” Rep. Griffin said. “The research isn’t done on whether it’s safe. Ethanol is just bad for engines generally, and to take it to E15, which puts at risk a bunch of equipment, as well as your motors, it’s

just ridiculous.” Rep. Valadao said it was important for people to speak out on the issue. “It’s just bad policy in general,” Rep. Valadao said. “For me to be a part of this, and to have the opportunity to support you, it’s an honor, because it’s an issue I feel deeply about. You stepping up here means a lot.” Rep. Posey agreed that E15 will cause issues for vehicle owners. “There are three things you need to know about E15: It’s bad. It’s bad. And it’s bad,” Rep. Posey said. “We all know what it can do to cars. We know what it does to bikes. We know what it does to racecars. We know what it does to motorboats. We know what it does to lawnmowers. It’s not good for anything.” Rep. Petri noted that several manufacturers had told him of the potential dangers of E15. “E15 will cause big problems,” Rep. Petri said. “I say this as someone who comes from a corn-producing state. But we also make Harley-Davidsons in our part of the world. We make Mercury outboard motors in our part of the world. We make an awful lot of small engines for Briggs & Stratton. And the manufacturers of all this equipment tell me [E15] will not work. It will cause a lot of problems, and involve unnecessary expense.” U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner speaks.

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U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner

Taking the time to lobby for testing of E15 fuels were scores of AMA members who rode their motorcycles to Washington, D.C., from points near and far. The AMA’s Washington, D.C.-based staff assisted the riders in making their visits to their elected representatives. In addition to the beautiful weather that greeted riders were dozens of members from the Antique Automobile Club of America, who parked classic cars alongside motorcycles on the National Mall. Tom Cox, AACA national president, spoke to the motorcyclists in the audience, telling them that E15 is a serious concern for their members, as well as thanking the AMA for organizing the event. The AMA’s Allard observed that the AMA E15: Fuel For Thought event was a success in raising the visibility of the serious concerns related to E15 fuel. “The bottom line here is simple,” Allard said. “There’s no proof for riders that E15 is safe, and given the realities of the marketplace, anywhere it is sold, there will likely be inadvertent misfueling problems, which could lead to expensive repairs and void a new vehicle’s warranty. “That means the loser in all of this is the riders,” Allard said. “The AMA stands behind not only its members but all riders in calling for more extensive testing for E15, and more thorough misfueling safeguards.” Supporters of the lobby day include EagleRider of Falls Church, Va.; Coleman PowerSports of Falls Church, Va., and Woodbridge, Va.; the National Turkey Federation; National Chicken Council; National Pork Producers Council; American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers; Specialty Equipment Market Association; and the Antique Automobile Club of America.

U.S. Rep. Chris Stewart

L-R: AMA’s Wayne Allard and Maggie McNally, congressional staffer, U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg.

September 2013

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E15 AND MOTORCYCLES Common Questions What is E15 fuel? E15 fuel is a blended fuel that includes up to 15 percent ethanol. It is a new fuel approved for sale by the EPA, and can be sold alongside more common E10 fuels and gasoline at fueling stations. What is the American Motorcyclist Association position on E15? Currently, there are no studies that show E15 is safe in the engines used in street and off-highway motorcycles and ATVs. In fact, E15 fuel use in motorcycles not only is illegal, but has the potential to void a manufacturer’s warranty. Considering the all-too-easy chances of misfueling, the AMA believes that the sale of E15 fuel should come with more extensive testing, and more thorough misfueling safeguards. That way, AMA members—and all riders—can avoid possible damage and voided warranties. What vehicles can use E15? According to the American Automobile Association, about 12 million of more than 240 million cars, trucks and SUVs now in use have manufacturers’ approval for E15. For motorcycles and ATVs, no manufacturer has approved E15 use. In addition to motorcycle and ATV engines, the motors potentially most at risk from E15 use include marine boat motors and poweredequipment engines. Additionally, older vehicles in the vintage and classic categories are not approved for E15. Why is E15 not approved for motorcycles? Many modern motorcycles are designed for a maximum ethanol blend of 10 percent, or E10. In many cases, the use of E15 fuels has the potential to void a manufacturer’s warranty on a motorcycle or ATV. Older vintage motorcycles, many of which are still on the road and highly prized by owners and collectors, potentially could have problems with any amount of ethanol in the fuel. What are the dangers of E15 in motorcycle engines? E15 has the potential to burn hotter than regular gasoline or E10, resulting in potential engine damage, especially in air-cooled motors and high-performance watercooled motors used in street and off-road motorcycles and ATVs. Additionally, ethanolbased fuels are hygroscopic, and can hold more water than traditional fuels, which contributes to fuel system corrosion.

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Why not just avoid using E15? Motorcyclists should do just that, but in the real world, it’s not that simple. Once E15 is in the marketplace, inadvertent misfueling will occur. Studies show that the majority of motorists even now do not know the difference between E10 and regular gasoline. The problem is potentially worse with E15. Additionally, a National Marine Manufacturers Association study has shown that inadvertent misfueling is already occurring where E15 is sold. How do “blender pumps” make the possible confusion worse? “Blender pumps,” where multiple grades of gasoline are sold through a single hose at a single pump, make it much easier to not only inadvertently misfuel, but to experience crosscontamination with residual E15 in the hose dispensed by a previous user. Why not require a minimum purchase to dilute any possible E15? The EPA initially proposed a 4-gallon minimum purchase as a possible solution. However, the AMA objected because many motorcycle and ATV fuel tanks do not hold 4 gallons, meaning it would be impossible for riders to legally fuel their tanks. The EPA has since withdrawn this proposal. Why is testing important? The AMA strongly urges riders to avoid E15 until it can be tested and proven to be safe for motorcycles and ATVs. So far, that testing has not been done, and the very strong chance of inadvertent misfueling means that we need more information on the possible dangers of E15 for motorcycle and ATV engines. What’s the bottom line? The AMA wants access to safe fuels for motorcycles and ATVs. Given marketplace realities, wherever E15 is sold, there will very likely be inadvertent misfueling issues. Motorcycles and ATVs are not approved for E15 use, and inadvertently misfueling one has the potential to void a rider’s manufacturer’s warranty. The loser of any inadvertent misfueling is the rider. The AMA stands behind not only its members, but all riders, in calling for more extensive testing for E15, and more thorough misfueling safeguards.


go ride

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

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Check out one of the wildest sports on two wheels when the AMA EnduroCross National Championship Series arrives at the Citizens Bank Arena in Ontario, Calif., on Sept. 21. EnduroCross takes the race format of motocross and combines it with the challenging obstacles of an enduro, all packed into the tight confines of a fan-friendly stadium setting. For the full schedule, see page 50.

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The next exciting round of the AMA Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series, presented by Moose Racing, is Sept. 15 in Lynnville, Ind.— the LA Black Coal National Enduro hosted by the Lynnville Area Dirt Riders and the IN IL KY Enduro Riders Association. For the full schedule, see page 50.

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One of the top events on the riding schedule in the AMA Premier Touring Series is the AspenCash Rally, which is an AMA National Convention set for Sept. 18-23 in Ruidoso, N.M. Ideal fall temperatures, great roads and good company combine to make this rally worth attending. Info: www.motorcyclerally.org.

The steel-shoe crowd heads to Springfield, Ill., for the famed Springfield Mile on Sept. 1 as part of the AMA Pro Flat Track Championship. They then go to Santa Rosa, Calif., for a Mile on Sept. 29 and close out the season in Pomona, Calif., with a half-mile race on Oct. 12. Info: amaproracing.com.

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Catch the last round of the AMA Pro Road Racing Championship Sept. 2729 at the world-class Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, Calif. More info: www.amaproracing.com.

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Want some fast-moving excitement? Check out the action in the AMA Pro Hillclimb Championship Sept. 8 in Freemansburg, Pa., Sept. 29 in Jefferson, Pa., and Oct. 13 at the Devil’s Staircase in Oregonia, Ohio. Info: www.amaproracing.com.

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It’s midway though the season for the Virginia Championship Hare Scrambles Series, which is an AMA Featured Series. Catch the action Sept. 22 in Spring Grove, Va., and Sept. 29 in Chatham, Va. For the full schedule, see page 50.

COMING UP

Make your reservations now for one of the greatest motorcycling events of the year: the AMA Legends Weekend Oct. 18-19 in Las Vegas, Nev. The gala features the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame induction Ceremony and the Dave Mungenast Memorial Legends Reception. Get more info: www.motorcyclemuseum. org.


SEPTEMBER EVENTS ALABAMA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 8: LEEDS: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG ARIZONA RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 21-22: TUSCON: 2-DAY EVENT, TUCSON DUAL SPORT, LLC, (520) 979-8398 COMPETITION OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 1: CLINTS WELL: CENTRAL ARIZONA TRIALS INC, (602) 840-3640, CENTRALARIZONATRIALS.ORG SEP 22: FLAGSTAFF: CENTRAL ARIZONA TRIALS INC, (602) 840-3640, CENTRALARIZONATRIALS.ORG CALIFORNIA RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 21-22: MOJAVE: 2-DAY EVENT, CHAPARRALS MC, (562) 627-9693 SEP 28-29: BUCK MEADOWS: 2-DAY EVENT, FAMILY OFF-ROAD ADVENTURES, (209) 6493633, FAMILYOFFROADADVENTURES.COM SEP 28: DOWNIEVILLE: NEVADA COUNTY WOODS RIDERS, INC., RECREATION.GOV-CAL-IDA COMPETITION

(815) 379-9534, SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM

SEP 6: BUENA VISTA: EXIT TOURS M/C, (719) 207-1189, COLORADO2DAY.COM

OBSERVED TRIALS

DUAL SPORT-OFF ROAD SEP 7: SOUTH FORK: SIDEWINDERS M/C, (210) 861-4993, COLORADO600.ORG ROAD RUN SEP 18: BOULDER: MOTOMARATHON ASSOCIATION, (303) 641-1062, MOTOMARATHON.COM COMPETITION MOTOCROSS SEP 1: STERLING: MILE HIGH MX, (303) 748-9417, PAWNEECYCLECLUB.COM SEP 29: BRUSH: CACTUS PROMOTIONS LLC, (970) 768-0519, BRUSHMX.COM DELAWARE COMPETITION

SEP 21: HOLLISTER: TIMEKEEPERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (408) 739-5762 ENDUROCROSS SEP 21: ONTARIO: SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, (909) 244-5500, CBBANKARENA.COM HARE & HOUND SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) LUCERNE VALLEY : ROVERS MC, (559) 936-2937 SPEEDWAY SEP 6: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM

SEP 28-29: PEORIA: 2-DAY EVENT, NORTHERN ILLINOIS TRAILS RIDERS ORGANIZATION, (815) 335-2749 TT SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, (217) 317-9278, CENTRALILLIONOISMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG SEP 2: (Includes ATVs) NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, (217) 317-9278, CENTRALILLIONOISMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG INDIANA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 8: INDIANAPOLIS: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG SEP 15: COLUMBIA CITY: OLD FORT MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (260) 402-1580

MOTOCROSS SEP 7: NEW CASTLE: BLUE DIAMOND MX, (302) 834-5867, BDMXPARK.COM

COMPETITION

SEP 21: NEW CASTLE: BLUE DIAMOND MX, (302) 834-5867, BDMXPARK.COM

SEP 15: LYNNVILLE: IN IL KY ENDURO RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (812) 624-0344, BLACKCOAL.ORG

SEP 22: NEW CASTLE: BLUE DIAMOND MX, (302) 834-5867, BDMXPARK.COM GEORGIA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 21: TUCKER: TEAM STRANGE AIRHEADS, (678) 772-8945, TEAMSTRANGE.COM ILLINOIS

ENDURO

RECREATIONAL TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 434-3669, VARIETYRIDERS.COM COMPETITION HILLCLIMB SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, (217) 317-9278, CENTRALILLIONOISMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG MOTOCROSS

ENDURO

HILLCLIMB SEP 14: (Includes ATVs) CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 247-2216, PLEASURERIDERS.NET SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 247-2216, PLEASURERIDERS.NET HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 1: COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 342-4411, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM MOTOCROSS SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) PARIS CROSSING: HOOSIER HILLTOPPERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (812) 873-1178, HOOSIERHILLTOPPERSMX.COM SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) LAOTTO: G & S RACING, (260) 637-5416, GANDSRACING.COM SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (309) 838-5062, PLEASURERIDERS.NET SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

SEP 20: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM

SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) BYRON: MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD, (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM

SEP 27: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM

SEP 8: KANE: GREENE ACRES MX PARK, (217) 942-6444

SEP 21: COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 342-4411, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

SHORT TRACK

SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) MASON: CROSSROADS MX AND OFF-ROAD PARK, LLC, (618) 686-2769, CROSSROADSMX.COM

SEP 22: COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 342-4411, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) MASON: CROSSROADS MX AND OFF-ROAD PARK, LLC, (618) 686-2769, CROSSROADSMX.COM

COMPETITION

SEP 27: (Includes ATVs) WOODSTOCK: WOODSTOCK RACING LLC, (815) 337-3511, WOODSTOCK-KTM.COM

SEP 8: ANAMOSA: MIDWEST HILLCLIMBERS ASSOCIATION, (319) 489-2361

SEP 21: LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-7182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM SEP 27-28: SANTA ROSA: 2-DAY EVENT, CIRCLE BELL MOTORSPORTS, (707) 703-3633, CIRCLEBELLMOTORSPORTS.COM TT SEP 7: LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-7182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM COLORADO RECREATIONAL

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SEP 28: WALNUT: 4P PROMOTIONS INC, (815) 379-9534, SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM SEP 29: WALNUT: 4P PROMOTIONS INC,

OBSERVED TRIALS

IOWA HILLCLIMB

HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 15: SHELLROCK: NEW HARTFORD RACING INC, (319) 885-6469, NEWHARTFORDRACING.COM


SEPTEMBER EVENTS MOTOCROSS SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM SEP 7: (Includes ATVs) CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 775-0893, CVTR.ORG SEP 14: (ATV only) CHARITON: IOWA ATV HARE SCRAMBLE SERIES, (515) 971-3136, IASCS.COM SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) SHELLROCK: NEW HARTFORD RACING INC, (319) 885-6469, NEWHARTFORDRACING.COM SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) SHELLROCK: NEW HARTFORD RACING INC, (319) 885-6469, NEWHARTFORDRACING.COM

SEP 8: MARTIN: MARCH OF DIMES-MI, (800) 968-3463 COMPETITION SEP 20-21: (Includes ATVs) BRIDGETON TWP: 2-DAY EVENT, MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (231) 733-9856, MUSKEGONMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HILLCLIMB SEP 21-22: BRIDGETON TWP: 2-DAY EVENT, MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (231) 7339856, MUSKEGONMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 15: BENTLEY: VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, (989) 846-4401, THEVALLEYTRAILRIDERS.ORG

SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM

SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) BATTLE CREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (269) 729-9691

TT

SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) PORTLAND: PORTLAND TRAIL RIDERS, (517) 647-7045, PORTLANDTRAILRIDERS.COM

KANSAS RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 22: KANSAS CITY: MARCH OF DIMES-KS, (913) 469-3611, BIKERSFORBABIESKC.ORG KENTUCKY RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 7-8: GOLDEN POND: 2-DAY EVENT, K T RIDERS, (270) 522-3703, LBL200.COM ROAD RALLY SEP 13: FRANKFORT: BLUEGRASS BEEMERS, (859) 229-4546, BLUEGRASSBEEMERS.ORG MAINE

MOTOCROSS SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) CADILLAC: CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (231) 884-3729, CADILLACMC.COM SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) PORTLAND: PORTLAND TRAIL RIDERS, (517) 647-7045, PORTLANDTRAILRIDERS.COM SEP 22: MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, (989) 8328284, POLKADOTSMC.NET SEP 28: (Includes ATVs) BELDING : GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, (616) 691-7221, GRATTANMX.COM SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, (616) 691-7221, GRATTANMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS

MOTOGIRO

SEP 8: METAMORA: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (248) 634-2184, MOTATRIALS.COM

SEP 20: NEWRY: UNITED STATES CLASSIC RACING ASSOCIATION, (413) 498-4433, MOTOGIRO-USA

SEP 15: WHITMORE LAKE: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (517) 849-9231, MOTATRIALS.COM

RECREATIONAL

MARYLAND COMPETITION MOTOCROSS SEP 28-29: MECHANICSVILLE: 2-DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM MASSACHUSETTS RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 15: TOLLAND: BERKSHIRE TRAIL RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (860) 993-4462, MUDSLINGER. ORG MICHIGAN RECREATIONAL BIKE SHOW SEP 8: MILFORD: METRO TRIUMPH RIDERS, (586) 944-7456, METROTRIUMPHRIDERS.COM ROAD RUN

HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 15: MILLVILLE: HI-WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM

DIRT DRAG

SEP 28: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOTX.COM

SEP 14: (ATV only) CHARITON: IOWA ATV HARE SCRAMBLE SERIES, (515) 971-3136, IASCS.COM

COMPETITION

SEP 29: FLUSHING: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (248) 583-1437, MOTATRIALS.COM SHORT TRACK SEP 7: (Includes ATVs) DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

MOTOCROSS SEP 1: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 244-9996, MOTOKAZIE.COM SEP 1: BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, (320) 679-2582, BERMBENDERS.COM SEP 2: BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, (320) 679-2582, BERMBENDERS.COM SEP 2: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 244-9996, MOTOKAZIE.COM SEP 8: MILLVILLE: HI-WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) BROWERVILLE: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (218) 894-2826, MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM SEP 15: BROOKSTON: ECHO VALLEY MOTOCROSS PARK, (218) 348-4754, ECHOVALLEYMOTOCROSS.COM SEP 15: MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX, (507) 843-5154, HURRICANEHILLS.COM SEP 22: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 244-9996, MOTOKAZIE.COM SEP 22: LITTLE FALLS: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (218) 894-2826, MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) BROWERVILLE: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (218) 894-2826, MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM SEP 29: MILLVILLE: HI-WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 14: THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG SEP 15: THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG SHORT TRACK SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) NEW ULM: FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLUB, (507) 354-2306, FLYINGDUTCHMENMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) NEW ULM: FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLUB, (507) 354-2306, FLYINGDUTCHMENMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM TT SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) CAMBRIDGE : NORSEMEN MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (612) 865-2661, FLATTRACKMN.COM

TT

MISSOURI

SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MINNESOTA RECREATIONAL TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL SEP 7-8: THEILMAN: 2-DAY EVENT, GOLDEN EAGLES CYCLE CLUB, GOLDENEAGELES.ORG SEP 21-22: HUNTERSVILLE: 2-DAY EVENT, TWIN CITIES TRAIL RIDERS, (612) 965-8618, TCTRAILRIDERS.ORG

RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 14: ST. JOSEPH: MARCH OF DIMES-MO, (816) 238-8707, BIKERSFORBABIESMO.ORG SEP 22: W. FRIENDSHIP: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG ROAD RALLY SEP 4: CHEROKEE PASS: ROAD RIDERS FOR JESUS, (636) 285-9005, ROADRIDERSFORJESUS.ORG

September 2013

47


SEPTEMBER EVENTS SEP 6: THEODOSEA: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION COMPETITION MOTOCROSS SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) COLE CAMP: HWY 65 MX, (660) 668-2453, HWY65MX.COM NEVADA RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 13: RENO: DUST DEVILS MC/CHAPTER 36, (775) 224-0361, DUSTDEVILSMC.COM ROAD RUN SEP 29: LAS VEGAS: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG NEW HAMPSHIRE RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 29: PENACOOK: UNITED STATES CLASSIC RACING ASSOCIATION, (413) 498-4433, PEWTERRUN.COM COMPETITION ROADRACE SEP 2: LOUDON: UNITED STATES CLASSIC RACING ASSOCIATION, (413) 498-4433, RACE-USCRA.COM NEW JERSEY RECREATIONAL POKER RUN SEP 21: PENNSVILLE: MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT VICTIMS FOUNDATION, (856) 514-3725 ROAD RUN SEP 21: PARSIPPANY: IRONHORSE CALVARY MC, (973) 715-3359, IRONHORSECALVARY.COM COMPETITION MOTOCROSS SEP 1: ENGLISHTOWN: RACEWAY PARK, (732) 446-7800, RACEWAYPARK.COM ROADRACE SEP 8: MILLVILLE: AMERICAN SPORTBIKE RACING ASSOCIATION, (817) 246-1127, CCSRACING.US NEW MEXICO RECREATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDE SEP 26: SANTA FE: ROCKY MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE RIDERS, RMARIDERS.ORG COMPETITION OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 7-8: JEMEZ SPRINGS: 2-DAY EVENT, NEW MEXICO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (505) 780-2551, NEWMEXICOTRIALS.COM

SEP 15: FAIRVILLE: WAYNE COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (315) 331-4764, WAYNECOUNTYMC.COM FIELD MEET SEP 21-22: BALDWIN: 2-DAY EVENT, QUEENSBORO MC, (718) 350-9856, QUEENSBOROMC.COM POKER RUN SEP 15: CARMEL: LOST WHEELS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, LOSTWHEELS.COM ROAD RALLY SEP 13: 2-DAY EVENT, AMERICADE, (518) 798-7888, ROLLINGTHRUAMERICA.COM TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL SEP 8: EAST QUOGUE: LONG ISLAND RECREATIONAL TRAILS CONSERVANCY, (631) 928-1153, LIRTC.ORG COMPETITION MOTOCROSS SEP 1: HANCOCK: BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, (732) 271-1616, bearcreeksportsmen.com SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS INC, (315) 784-5466, FROZEN-OCEAN.COM SEP 14-15: (Includes ATVs) RICHFORD: 2-DAY EVENT, BROOME TIOGA SPORTS CENTER INC, (607) 849-4438, BROOME-TIOGA.COM SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) MAPLEVIEW: SMX ASSOCIATES LLC, (315) 480-7733, MOTOMASTERS.COM SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) RICHFORD: BROOME TIOGA SPORTS CENTER INC, (607) 849-4438, BROOME-TIOGA.COM OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 8: CAYUTA: DISTRICT 4 TRIALS COMMITTEE, (607) 227-6468, DISTRICT4TRIALS.ORG SEP 22: CAYUTA: DISTRICT 4 TRIALS COMMITTEE, (607) 796-0560, DISTRICT4TRIALS.ORG SHORT TRACK SEP 14: (Includes ATVs) PORT CRANE: SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, (607) 693-2634, SQUAREDEALRIDERS.COM NORTH CAROLINA COMPETITION SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) ELLERBE: WINDY HILL SPORTS, (910) 895-4387, WINDYHILLSPORTS.COM OHIO RECREATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDE

RECREATIONAL CONVENTIONS

DUAL-SPORT RIDE

SEP 18: MESCALERO: CP6 SOLUTIONS, LLC., (575) 973-4977, MOTORCYCLERALLY.COM

SEP 21: LOGAN: BUCKEYE DUAL SPORTERS, (740) 380-3050, KAEPPNERSWOODS.COM

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

SEP 22: ATHENS: ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (740) 593-7459, ATHENSMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM ROAD RUN SEP 15: ORIENT: CAPITAL CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (614) 877-1777 SEP 15: NAPOLEON: OHIO CHAPTER MARCH OF DIMES FOUNDATION, (419) 534-3600, MARCHOFDIMES.COM/OHIO ROAD RALLY SEP 20: POMEROY: FUR PEACE MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (303) 358-0172, FURPEACERANCH.COM COMPETITION ENDURO SEP 22: ATHENS: ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (740) 593-7459, ATHENSMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM GRAND PRIX SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) ATHENS : ACTION SPORTS PROMOTIONS INC., (740) 591-7223, ACTIONSPORTSRACING.COM HILLCLIMB SEP 14: (Includes ATVs) WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) LOGAN: HOCKING VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (740) 385-7695, HOCKINGVALLEYMC.COM MOTOCROSS SEP 8: (Includes ATVs) SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937 SEP 15: GREENVILLE: TREATY CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (937) 548-7197, TREATYCITYMC.COM SEP 18: (Includes ATVs) DELAWARE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937 SEP 29: BLANCHESTER: DIRT COUNTRY, (513) 625-7350, DIRTCOUNTRYMX.COM OKLAHOMA

MOTOCROSS

SEP 21-22: LOGAN: 2-DAY EVENT, BUCKEYE DUAL SPORTERS, (740) 380-3050, KAEPPNERSWOODS.COM

NEW YORK

48

DUAL-SPORT RIDE

RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 15: TULSA: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG PENNSYLVANIA RECREATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDE SEP 22: SPRING MILLS: XPLOR-INT LLC, (610) 470-8897, XPLOR-INT.COM BIKE SHOW SEP 7: LANSDALE: BLUE COMET MOTORCYCLE


SEPTEMBER EVENTS CLUB, (267) 261-3580, BLUECOMETMC.COM DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 8: LAWTON: BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDERS, (570) 675-1814, BMER.ORG POKER RUN SEP 8: MARIETTA: AMERICAN LEGION RIDERS PA POST CHAPTER #466, (717) 898-0871 SEP 15: SCHUYLKILL: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (570) 385-1460, SCHUYLKILLMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM SEP 29: LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 270-9797, LEBANONVALLEYMC.COM ROAD RUN

SEP 29: NEW ALEXANDRIA: 8 SEVEN MX, LLC, (412) 736-1225, PRPMX.COM SEP 29: ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, (570) 418-2260, MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 15: FARRANDSVILLE: DURTY DABBERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (570) 748-9456, DURTYDABBERS.COM SEP 28-29: MONTOURSVILLE: 2-DAY EVENT, PENNSYLVANIA TRAIL RIDERS, (570) 435-0591

COMPETITION HILLCLIMB SEP 1: (Includes ATVs) BAY CITY: VALLEY SPRINGS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (715) 5943726, VALLEYSPRINGSHILLCLIMB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 29: NEKOOSA: RAPID ANGELS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (715) 451-1168, RAPIDANGLES.COM

SHORT TRACK

MOTOCROSS

SEP 14: (Includes ATVs) HANOVER: TRAILWAY SPEEDWAY, (717) 359-4310, TRAILWAYSPEEDWAY.COM

SEP 1: ATHELSTANE: PINE RIDGE RACEWAY, LLC, (715) 856-6612, PINERIDGERACEWAY.COM

TT

SEP 7: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 256-1582, AZTALANMX.COM

SEP 8: PARKESBURG: E PA PISTON POPPERS MC INC, (484) 336-9160

SEP 15: PHOENIXVILLE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

SEP 8: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM

RHODE ISLAND OBSERVED TRIALS

SEP 15: TIGERTON: FANTASY MOTO LLC, (920) 419-2863, FANTASYMOTO.COM

SEP 22: LINE LEXINGTON: BIKERS FOR JC, (215) 234-8611, BIKERSUNDAY.COM

SEP 15: EXETER: RHODE ISLAND TRAILS CLUB, (508) 285-6074, RITRIALSCLUB.COM

SEP 21: ATHELSTANE: PINE RIDGE RACEWAY, LLC, (715) 856-6612, PINERIDGERACEWAY.COM

SEP 7: LEESPORT: CLASSIC HARLEYDAVIDSON, (610) 916-7777, CLASSICHARLEY.COM

COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) POTTSVILLE: SHIPPENSBURG MC, (717) 796-0294, BAERMOTORSPORTS.COM ENDURO SEP 8: SHIPPENSBURG: SOUTH PENN ENDURO RIDERS, (717) 712-0804, ECEA.ORG SEP 15: BRANDONVILLE: VALLEY FORGE TRAIL RIDERS, (484) 948-5361, VFTR.ORG HARE SCRAMBLES SEP 21-22: PLYMOUTH TWP: 2-DAY EVENT, BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDERS, (570) 675-1814, BMER.ORG SEP 28: THREE SPRINGS: 2-DAY EVENT, GREEN MARBLE ENDURO RIDERS, (301) 865-0779, GMER.US MOTOCROSS SEP 1: ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, (570) 418-2260, MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM SEP 1: DELMONT: BELLCO INC., (304) 284-0084, RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM SEP 7-8: BIRDSBORO: 2-DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM SEP 7: THREE SPRINGS: ROCKET RACEWAY, (717) 574-6590, ROCKETRACEWAY.COM SEP 8: CLIFFORD: HURRICANE HILLS MOTORSPORTS LLC, (570) 222-9290, HHMOTOCROSS.COM SEP 15: BIRDSBORO: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (610) 582-3717, PAGODAMC.ORG SEP 15: DELMONT: BELLCO INC., (304) 284-0084, RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM SEP 15: THREE SPRINGS: ROCKET RACEWAY, ROCKETRACEWAY.COM SEP 28: MT. MORRIS: RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM

VIRGINIA COMPETITION GRAND PRIX SEP 22: SPRING GROVE: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (757) 365-0347, VCHSS.ORG SEP 29: SANDY LEVEL: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (540) 420-2906, VCHSS.ORG MOTOCROSS

SEP 22: GRANTSBURG: STRAIGHT ARROW ENDURO RIDERS, (651) 587-4435, STRAIGHTARROWS.ORG SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 393-5812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS SEP 7: MAUSTON: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (319) 624-2003, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG

SEP 14-15: (Includes ATVs) DISPUTANTA: 2-DAY EVENT, SOUTH FORK MX CLUB, (804) 339-8565, SOUTHFORKMX.COM

SEP 8: MAUSTON: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (319) 624-2003, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG

SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) SUTHERLIN: BIRCH CREEK PROMOTIONS, LLC, (434) 836-7629, BIRCHCREEKMXPARK.COM

SEP 21: BLACK RIVER FALLS: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (319) 624-2003, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG

WASHINGTON RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN SEP 8: CARNATION: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE UNITED STATES, (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG COMPETITION

SEP 22: BLACK RIVER FALLS: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (319) 624-2003, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG SCRAMBLES SEP 15: (Includes ATVs) BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM SHORT TRACK

MOTOCROSS SEP 28: (Includes ATVs) WEST RICHLAND: HRMC, INC., (509) 953-5242, HORNRAPIDSMX.COM SEP 29: (Includes ATVs) WEST RICHLAND: HRMC, INC., (509) 953-5242, HORNRAPIDSMX.COM WISCONSIN RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE SEP 28-29: WABENO: 2-DAY EVENT, WISCONSIN DUAL SPORT RIDERS, (920) 350-2030, WIDUALSPORTRIDERS.ORG SEP 28: DANBURY: NORSEMEN MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (612) 554-1083, NORSEMENMC.ORG

SEP 14: (Includes ATVs) BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM SEP 21: (Includes ATVs) LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM SEP 22: (Includes ATVs) LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM TT SEP 28: (Includes ATVs) CHILTON: GRAVITY PARK USA, (920) 849-7223, GRAVITYPARKUSA.COM DUAL-SPORT RIDE AUG 3: BIG BEAR CITY: BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS, INC., (818) 391-3031

September 2013

49


2013 EVENTS HALL OF FAME EXHIBITS AND EVENTS

AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame MotorcycleMuseum.org The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Main Hall: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Dirt-Track! All-American Motorcycle Racing: Celebrating the storied history of the men and machines who battle on the dirt oval. 2 Wheels + Motor, A Fine Art Exhibition: More than two dozen artists celebrate the spirit, excitement and adventure of motorcycling through fine art. Founder’s Hall: Honoring the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame’s generous contributors. Oct. 18-19, Las Vegas, Nev.: AMA Legends Weekend. Information: www. motorcyclemuseum.org. AMA PRO RACIng

AMA MOTOcross championship MXSPORTSPRORACING.com

July 13-14: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla July 27-28: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud Aug. 10-11: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: Loretta Lynn’s Ranch AMA national championship series

AMA ENDUROcross ENDUROcross.com

Sept. 21: Ontario, Calif.: Citizens Business Bank Arena Oct. 12: Denver: National Western Complex Oct. 26: Everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena Nov. 9: Boise, Idaho: Idaho Center Nov. 23: Las Vegas, Nev.: Orleans Arena AMA NATIONAL ENDURO NATIONALENDURO.com Sept. 15: Lynnville, Ind.: Gil Jochem, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 624-0344, www.blackcoal.org Oct. 20: Oklahoma City: Chuck Howard, Oklahoma Dirt Riders; (405) 249-6702, www.okiedirtriders.com

Aug. 10: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla

AMA Vintage Dirt Track AMARACING.com

Aug. 17: Tooele, Utah: Miller Motorsports Park

Aug. 16: Indianapolis: ST, Mid-America Speedway; Jim Terchila; (317) 871-4392; info@midamspeedway.com

Aug. 24: Lake Elsinore, Calif.: Lake Elsinore AMA PRO ROAD Racing CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.com Aug. 16-18: Indianapolis: Indianapolis Motor Speedway Sept. 13-15: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park Sept. 27-29: Monterey, Calif.: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca AMA PRO flat track CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.com Aug. 11: Peoria, Ill.: TT, PMC Race Park Aug. 17: Indianapolis: Mile, Indiana State Fairground Aug. 24: New Kent, Va.: Mile, Colonial Downs Aug. 31: Springfield, Ill.: Mile I, Illinois State Fairgrounds Sept. 1: Springfield, Ill.: Mile II, Illinois State Fairgrounds

Sept. 21: Cuddebackville, N.Y.: ST, Ron Edlin, Tri-State MC; (845) 566-4956; www.tristateclub.com Sept. 22: Cuddebackville, N.Y.: ST, Ron Edlin, Tri-State MC; (845) 566-4956; www.tristateclub.com AMA HARE AND HOUND AMARACING.com Aug. 24, Amateur and Youth: Panaca, Nev.: Zach Livreri, Silver State Trailriders; (702) 645-2506; desertracer24p@gmail.com Oct. 12, Youth; Oct. 13, Amateur: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: Ryan Sanders, 100’s Motorcycle Club; (949) 584-9395; www.100sMC.org AMA National Mid-America Cross Country Series www.themaxc.com Aug. 10: Martinsville, Ind: Copperhead Row Sept. 7: Monrovia, Ind: The Bulldog Sept. 28: Plymouth, Ind: The Blackhawk Oct. 19: Gosport, Ind: Rally in the Valley

Sept. 29: Santa Rosa, Calif.: Mile, Sonoma County Fairgrounds

Nov. 2: Freedom, Ind: Coyote Run

Oct. 12: Pomona, Calif. Half-mile, LA County Fairplex

AMA ATV Motocross ATVMotocross.com

AMA PRO HILLCLIMB CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM

Aug. 10-11: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: Loretta Lynn’s Ranch

Sept. 8: Freemansburg, Pa.

AMA ATV EXTREME DIRT TRACK EDTRACING.com

Sept. 29: Jefferson, Pa.

Aug. 23-24: Batavia, N.Y.: Keith Dawydko, Batavia Motor Speedway; www.bataviamotorspeedway.com

Oct. 13: Oregonia, Ohio

50

AMA PRO ATV Motocross CHAMPIONSHIP ATVMOTOCROSS.com

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

AMA AIReS NATC MotoTrials AMARACING.com

Competition Dirt Riders, (609) 319-7496; www.competitiondirtriders.org

Aug. 24-25, Rounds 9 and 10: Duluth, Minn.: Steve Ahleri, Northland MC Riders Association; (218) 349-9578; dam@ cpinternet.com

Sept. 8: Shippensburg, Pa.: South Penn Enduro Riders, (717) 265-6055; www.southpennenduroriders.com

AMA FEATURED SERIEs

AMA western checkpoint enduro championship ridechec.com Sept. 28-29: Toulon, Nev.

Oct. 27: Gorman, Calif. 100-mile Qualifier Oct. 26-27: Elkins Flat, Calif.

Sept. 15: Brandonville, Pa.: Valley Forge Trail Riders, (484) 948-5361; www.vftr.org Oct. 20: New Lisbon, N.J.: Ocean County Competition Riders, (609) 758-2747; www.occr.net Nov. 10: Warren Grove, N.J.: Motorcycle Competition Inc., (609) 575-7820; www. ride-mci.com

Nov. 9-10: Stoneyford, Calif.

Nov. 24: New Lisbon, N.J.: Central Jersey Competition Riders, (732) 5586475; www.cjcrmc.org

VirginIa championship hare scrambles series vchss.org

EAST COAST ENDURO ASSOCIATION HARE SCRAMBLES SERIEs ECEA.ORG

Aug. 11: Martinsville, Va. Aug. 25: Penhook, Va. Sept. 8: Sutherlin, Va. Sept. 22: Spring Grove, Va. Sept. 29: Chatham, Va. Oct. 13: Rural Retreat, Va. Oct. 27: Dillwyn, Va. Nov. 10: Spring Grove, Va. AMA ATV heartland challenge heartlandchallenge.com Aug. 15-17: Carlisle, Iowa AMA ACTION SPORTS Grand Prix series ACTIONSPORTSracing.com Aug. 24: Athens, Ohio: Action Sports Moto Park, Action Sports Promotions, (740) 591-7223 Sept. 21: Athens, Ohio: Action Sports Moto Park, Action Sports Promotions, (740) 591-7223 Oct. 20: Athens, Ohio: Action Sports Moto Park, Action Sports Promotions, (740) 591-7223 Nov. 16: Athens, Ohio: Action Sports Moto Park, Action Sports Promotions, (740) 591-7223 AMA DISTRICT 37 BIG 6 Grand Prix series BIG6racing.com Oct. 5-6: Ridgecrest, Calif.: Ridgecrest Fairgrounds, Viewfinders MC Nov. 2-3: Gorman, Calif.: Quail Valley, Prospectors MC Dec. 7-8: Pala, Calif.: Pala Raceway, Vikings MC EAST COAST ENDURO Association ENDURO SERIEs ECEA.ORG Aug. 11: Three Springs, Pa.: Green Marble Enduro Riders, (410) 638-9367; www.greenmarbleenduroriders.org Aug. 18: Berkshire, N.Y.: Ithaca Dirt Riders, (607) 657-8248; www.ithacadirtriders.com Aug. 25: Mauricetown, N.J.:

Sept. 21-22: Plymouth Township, Pa.: 2-Day, High Mountain Dirt Riders, (570) 954-7799 Sept. 28-29: Three Springs, Pa.: 2-Day, Green Marble Enduro Riders, (410) 638-9367 Oct. 5-6: Eagleswood, N.J.: 2-Day, Pine Barons Enduro Riders, (609) 654-6300 Oct. 26-27: Millville, N.J.: 2-Day, Competition Dirt Riders, (609) 319-7496 Nov. 16-17: New Castle, Del.: 2-Day, Delaware Enduro Riders, (302) 834-4411 ALL-STAR NATIONAL FLAT TRACK STEVENACERACING.com Aug. 31: Springfield, Ill: ST, Illinois State Fairgrounds Sept. 28: York, Pa: Half-mile, York Expo Center AMA IOWA ATV HARE SCRAMBLES IATVHSS.com Aug. 16-17: Carlisle, Iowa: Heartland Challenge Sept. 7-8: Beaconsfield, Iowa: Coyote Crossing Sept. 14: Chariton, Iowa Oct. 5-6: Carlisle, Iowa: Blue Ridge Run AMA American sportbike racing association CHAMPIONSHIP SERIEs AMARACING.COM Aug. 17-18: Loudon, N.H.: New Hampshire Motor Speedway Sept. 21-22: South Beloit, Ill.: Blackhawk Farms Oct. 17-20: Daytona Beach, Fla.: Daytona International Speedway AMA american sportbike racing association TEAM CHALLENGE SERIEs AMARACING.COM Aug. 25: Summit Point, W.Va.: Summit Point Circuit (3 hours or 200 miles) Sept. 8: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsport Park (3 hours or 200 miles) Oct. 19: Daytona Beach, Fla.: Daytona International Speedway, 30th Annual Race of Champions


2013 EVENTS AMA U.S. GRAND PRIX RIDERS UNION SERIES USGPRU.NET

AMA DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES

www.enduroriders.com Oct. 26-27: Prescott Valley, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (623) 826-1092; www.arizonatrailriders.org

Aug. 17-18: Loudon, N.H.: New Hampsire Motor Speedway Sept. 21-22: Alton, Va.: Final, Virginia International Speedway

Nov. 2-3: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (888) 274-4469 or (856) 7852754; www.teamhammer.org

AMA AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS

AMA BIG SKY AMATEUR NATIONAL OFF-ROAD CHAMPIONSHIP BIGSKYXC.COM Aug. 24-25: Big Sky, Mont.: National Championship, Jamey Kabisch, Lone Peak Racing; (406) 223-0478; www. BigSkyXC.com AMA HILLCLIMB GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM Aug. 9-11: Monson, Mass.: Jim O’Connell, Quaboag Riders; (413) 2670332

AMA EXTREME ENDURO GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS TENNESSEEKNOCKOUTENDURO.COM Aug. 17-18: Sequatchie, Tenn.: KENDA Tennessee Knockout, Trials Training Center AMA ROADRACE GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM Sept. 21-22: Alton, Va.: Virginia International Raceway AMA LAND SPEED GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS - BUB MOTORCYCLE SPEED TRIALS BUBENT.COM Aug. 25-29: Wendover, Utah: Bonneville Salt Flats INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION: U.S. ROUNDS/WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX FIM-LIVE.COM Aug. 16-18: Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Motor Speedway FIM WORLD SUPERBIKE CHAMPIONSHIP WORLDSBK.COM Sept. 27-29: Monterey, Calif.: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca FIM TRIAL DES NATIONS FIM-LIVE.COM Sept. 8-9: La Chatre, France FIM MOTOCROSS OF NATIONS FIM-LIVE.COM

Nov. 29-30: Palmdale, Calif.: LABarstow to Vegas, AMA Dist-37 DualSport, Paul Flanders; (626) 446-7386; www.dist37ama.org

AMA HUSQVARNA NATIONAL DUAL-SPORT SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Aug. 10-11: Columbus, Ind.: Buffaloe 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772; www. stoneylonesomemc.com Aug. 17-18: Tillamook, Ore.: Rat Dog Dual Sport, NW Tour & Trail, Tom Niemela; (503) 681-8881; www. blackdogdualsport.com Aug. 17-18: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeremay Valley; (989) 7516863; www.gldsmc.org Sept. 5-7: Kamiah, Idaho: Lewis and Clark Dual-sport Adventure Ride, WW Fullface Riders, www.happy-trail.com

Sept. 13-15: Reno, Nev.: Ride Reno 200, Dust Devils MC, Gary Lambert; (775) 224-0361; www.lbl200.com Sept. 21-22: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050; www. kaeppnerswoods.com Sept. 28-29: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens; (209) 649-3633; www.familyoffroadadventures. com Sept. 28-29: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 350-2030; www. widualsportriders.org Oct. 5-6: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, Washington Area Trail Riders, Andy Giordano, (540) 379-5631; www. watr.us Oct. 12-13: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr National Dual Sport, Enduro Riders Assn., Steve Barber; (614) 582-7821;

AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES

AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM AMA NATIONAL CONVENTIONS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Sept. 18-23: Ruidoso, N.M.: AspenCash Rally: www.motorcyclerally. com AMA NATIONAL GYPSY TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Aug. 30-Sept. 3: Killington, Vt.: Killington Classic: www. killingtonclassic.com

AMA YAMAHA SUPER TÉNÉRÉ NATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Aug. 10-11: Columbus, Ind.: Buffaloe 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772; www.stoneylonesomemc.com Aug. 19-23: Various, Idaho: Sasquatch Dual Sport Tour, Sound Rider!, Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808; www.soundrider.com

Sept. 7-8: Golden Pond, Ky.: Land Between The Lakes 200, KT Riders, Jesse Thomas; (270) 522-3703; www. lbl200.com

Barstow to Vegas, AMA Dist-37 DualSport, Paul Flanders; (626) 446-7386; www.dist37ama.org

Sept. 6-9: Buena Vista, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Autumn Hot Springs Adventure Tour, Exit Tours MC, (719) 207-1189 Sept. 13-15: Reno, Nev.: Ride Reno 200, Dust Devils MC, Gary Lambert; (775) 224-0361; www.lbl200.com Sept. 21-22: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050; www. kaeppnerswoods.com Oct. 26-27: Prescott Valley, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (623) 826-1092; www.arizonatrailriders.org Nov. 2-3: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (888) 274-4469 or (856) 7852754; www.teamhammer.org Nov. 16-17: Hammonton, N.J.: Pine Barrens 300, Cross Country Cycles, Jack O’Connor; (732) 714-8874; www.pinebarrens500.org Nov. 29-30: Palmdale, Calif.: LA-

Oct. 11-13: Redding, Calif.: Big Bike Weekend: www.bigbikeweekend.com AMA SIGNATURE EVENTS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM March of Dimes Bikers For Babies Rides: Nationwide: www. bikersforbabies.org Rides For Kids Events: Nationwide: www.rideforkids.org AMA NATIONAL GRAND TOURS, PRESENTED BY SHINKO TIRES AND FLY STREET GEAR AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Jan. 1-Dec. 31: Polar Bear Grand Tour: AMA District 2 of New Jersey; (609) 8942941; www.polarbeargrandtour.com March 25-Oct. 1: Eddie’s Road and Team Strange Airheads Smoke Chasing Grand Tour: Eddie’s Road and Team Strange Airheads; www.smokechasing.com April 1-Oct. 31: Tour of Honor Grand Tour: Tour of Honor; www.tourofhonor.com AMA NATIONAL EXTREME GRAND TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Jan. 1-Dec. 31: SCMA Four Corners Grand Tour: Southern California Motorcycling Association; www.usa4corners.org. Aug. 30-Sept. 2: SCMA Three Flags Classic Grand Tour: Southern California Motorcycling Association; www.sc-ma.com.

Check Out the All-New AMA CLASSIFIEDS! YOUR ONLINE MARKETPLACE FOR MOTORCYCLES, POWERSPORTS & MORE.

Sept. 29: Teutschenthal, Germany FIM INTERNATIONAL SIX DAYS OF ENDURO FIM-LIVE.COM

Sept. 30-Oct.5: 2013 ISDE: Sardegna, Italy BUB MOTORCYCLE SPEED TRIALS BUBENT.COM Aug. 25-29: Utah: Bonneville Salt Flats COOK MOTORSPORTS PRIVATE LAND SPEED SHOOTOUT Sept. 12-16: Utah: Bonneville Salt Flats

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September 2013

53


GUEST COLUMN ONCE MORE IN A BLUE MOON The Past Lives On By John Landstrom

In the summer of 1969, the year of my 16th birthday, I started visiting motorcycle shops. Chicago, particularly Cicero Ave., was crowded with small, dark, greasy shops as well as big sparkling dealerships. You could still buy a new BSA, Norton, Triumph or Royal Enfield motorcycle. The BMW dealership carried MV Agusta and the owner rode a new Munch Mammoth. You still saw an occasional used Indian at the Harley shop. For aesthetic reasons I was attracted to the clean round lines and lustrous chrome of the BSA. My paper route and dishwashing fortune went to buy a 5-yearold 650 Lightning. On the way home from the dealer, the head gasket blew. “Too bad,” said the dealer. I didn’t have the $90 it would take to fix it, so I borrowed some tools and got my first lesson in motorcycle mechanics and customer relations. I never went back to the BSA shop. A few years later, in the height of the chopper era, I decided I would attempt to ride my scratch-built rigid-frame Harley-Davidson to Idaho to see if Evel Knievel could make it over the Snake River Canyon. I made it. He didn’t. Visiting Harley shops along the way was more out of necessity than recreation, but I still appreciated the ambiance of the small town Midwest Harley dealers, many of which had been family owned for generations. It was in one Montana Harley/BMW dealership that I felt my first attraction to BMW. They had a brand new 1974 R90S with beautiful silver smoke paint. I sat on that motorcycle and looked down and saw a clock. After vibrating 2,000 miles on that bone-jarring, rigid-framed Harley, I decided that my next motorcycle would be a BMW—smooth enough to have a clock! A year later, I owned my R90S. By this time, motorcycles were more than an obsession. They would become my life’s profession. For the last 40 years, I have been fixing, restoring, buying and selling BMW motorcycles. I appreciate all the new technology and I know the modern motorcycles are the best ever, but in my heart I still love the old machines. I get a feeling of satisfaction, of having earned the privilege to ride the old motorcycles. Breakdowns and rebuilds create character in the owner as well as in the machine. Perhaps that’s why I still run out of gas occasionally—there’s nothing like pushing a 500-pound motorcycle

54

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

that last half-mile to make you appreciate the wonders of the internal combustion engine. I tend to gravitate toward the obscure, even oddball, motorcycles such as Tornax, Gnome Rhome, Munch Mammoth and Bohmerland. Between selling and servicing new motorcycles and restoring BMWs for customers I try, every winter, to build one motorcycle for myself. This year I bought a basket case Nimbus motorcycle on eBay. I was attracted to the flat steel frame and the exposed overhead valve and inline four-cylinder engine. I thought the simple construction and straight lines would make an interesting bobber. If you’ve never heard of Nimbus motorcycles, they were made in Copenhagen, Denmark. The company was a vacuum cleaner manufacturer, but in 1918 built its first prototype motorcycle. In 1934, they introduced the Model C, which remained virtually unchanged until the last Nimbus was made in 1960. My Nimbus is a 1948 model. The bike is relatively stock, but like all true bobbers, it has gone on a diet. Any unnecessary parts have been removed or lightened. What I like most about my Nimbus is that most folks have never seen one, and they often think it is a scratch-built machine—that and the sound of the 750cc four cylinders sounds kind of like a hopped-up Model A Ford. It’s a hoot to ride. My love of old and obscure bikes is why my shop, which opened in the mid1980s and is located outside Atlanta in Norcross, Ga., is also a vintage museum. The second floor holds a display of about 100 vintage motorcycles, mostly of European decent. In addition to BMW,

Zundapp, NSU, DKW and Adler, there are Bohmerland, Imme, Munch and Gnome Rhone. The new bike sales keep the employees fed and support my expensive habit, but it’s the classics that breathe life and originality into both shop and owner. The more technologically advanced we become, the easier it is to collect and restore vintage motorcycles. The Internet has been a great leap forward. eBay is like a big virtual swap meet. Need information on a 50-year-old Bing carburetor? Just Google it. There are more reproduction parts available now than ever before, and as a result, motorcycle restoration (for the popular brands) has become easier, not harder, as time has gone by. Some things never change, though. There’s nothing like spending a weekend at a rally or attending one of the few remaining good swap meets. Even the more obscure brands still have their specialists. Often these experts do not speak English and they don’t take credit cards, so for these reasons one must be patient and personable. Motorcyclists as a whole are my kind of people. The most important thing is to get out and ride your motorcycle, attend a local bike night, or spend a Sunday morning with the wind in your hair. Our motto at Blue Moon is “Don’t ignore it; restore it,” but when it’s restored “Don’t hide it; ride it.” In sticking with that, I plan to ride my 1928 BMW R62 across the United States next year. Thanks to all my customers and my staff for making such an adventure possible. John Landstrom runs Blue Moon Cycle in Norcross, Ga.


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AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame

INDuCTION CeReMONy — and —

LeGeNdS ReCeptioN October 18-19, 2013

Green Valley Ranch Resort, Spa and Casino • Las Vegas, Nevada

CLASS OF 2013:

Ricky Carmichael Danny Hamel Norm McDonald Randy Renfrow Diane Traynor Mike Traynor FEATURED LEGENDS:

Torsten Hallman Mark Blackwell

2013 LEGENDS WEEKEND The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on Friday night, Oct. 18, will see the Motorcycle Hall of Fame class of 2013 take to the stage to be inducted. The next morning will see the all-new Dave Mungenast Memorial Legends Reception, where the Class of 2013 and other Hall of Famers from previous years will be honored. www.motorcyclemuseum.org | (800) 342-5464


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M O T O R C Y C L E

American Motorcyclist 09 2013 Street Version  

The Journal of the AMA.

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