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PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

May 2, 2013 Issue 263-17-9

2012

a k s a r b e N r o f r a e Y

d o o G A Livestock Industry

Check out our Agstuff Classifieds Pages 22-27

FFA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Weather Al Dutcher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Ag Management LEAD Applications Now Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Livestock News Heartland Cattle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Despite drought and high feed costs, 2012 was a good year for Nebraska's livestock industry. Cash receipts from marketings of cattle and calves and hogs and pigs in Nebraska last year totaled $11.26 billion, which is up from $9.5 billion in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Meat Animals Production, Disposition and Income 2012 Summary released last week. Cash receipts from marketings of cattle and calves in Nebraska last year totaled $10.38 billion, which was up from $8.63 billion in 2011. Nebraska was second in the nation in cash receipts from marketings of cattle and calves, behind Texas with total cash receipts of $10.5 billion. Cash receipts from marketings of hogs and pigs in Nebraska last year was $891 million, compared to $920 million in 2011.

Drought last year hurt grass production and forced producers to supplement feed to their cattle. Drought also cut back on hay production. According to the USDA, hay production was down 28 percent in 2012. The cost of hay averaged $196 per ton in Nebraska last year. Hay prices are still high because of scarcity as the USDA reported that preliminary hay prices averaged $227 per ton in April. A cool spring this year has slowed grass growth, forcing producers to draw on short forage supplies. The USDA said hay and forage supplies were rated 23 percent very short, 46 percent short, 31 percent adequate and 0 percent surplus. As of Monday, April 29, the condition of Nebraska cattle and calves was rated 0 percent very poor, 2 percent poor, 25 percent fair, 66 percent good and 7 percent excellent. Spring calving was 91 percent complete. Calf losses this spring have been 7 percent below

average, 88 percent average and 5 percent above average. Also, last year, some cow/calf producers were forced to cull their herds because of the lack of grass growth and high feed costs. According to the USDA, average steer and heifer prices in April 2012 were $128 per hundredweight. Preliminary prices this April are also $128 per hundredweight. Nebraska was the nation's top commercial red meat producer in 2012, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Total red meat production in Nebraska in 2012 was 7.29 billion pounds, up from 7.16 billion pounds in 2011. Cattle slaughter led the way in Nebraska as the state was first in cattle slaughter in the nation. Nebraska ranked in the top 10 in hog slaughter. In March, Nebraska led the nation in commercial red meat production with 571.9 million

Production News Irrigation Season Remains a Mystery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Central Platte NRD Board Concerned About LB522 Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent The Central Platte Natural Resources District's board of directors expressed concern about LB522 at its monthly meeting in Grand Island. The Central Platte NRD board is concerned about the precedent the bill would set for compensating water

Continued on page 15 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

Continued on page 20

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/12/13

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$122.64 126.86 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .182.97 165.91 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153.83 138.41 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .177.79 196.75 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79.27 73.45 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* * Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .78.22 78.45 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .148.63 97.50 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .371.29 286.30

127.63 160.74 139.84 190.60 81.52 * 81.91 * 288.12

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.48 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.20 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.83 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .10.45 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .3.43

7.01 7.45 14.45 12.36 4.31

7.06 * 14.38 11.32 4.13

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . .225.00 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . .145.00 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . .97.50 Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229.25 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76.75 * No market.

* 245.00 227.50 227.50 212.50 217.50 264.00 247.50 102.50 89.00


Page 2

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Weather

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report

Allen Dutcher

Based upon preliminary data, April temperatures averaged close to 8° F below normal across northern Nebraska and 5-6° F below normal across southern Nebraska. There is a high probability that this April will be in the top five coldest Aprils on record dating back to 1895. Almost the entire state received above normal moisture, with areas of eastern Nebraska nearly 200% of normal for the month. The past two weeks were well below normal in regards to temperatures, even with the brief period of warmth between 4/7-4/30. Planting delays due to residual wetness and cold soil temperatures were common through 4/28. Only 3% of the corn acreage was seeded as of 4/28 according to the Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service. This compares to the 5-year average of 26% and last years pace of 40%. A brief opportunity to plant occurred during the 4/29-4/30 period, but that was brought to a screeching halt when a significant rain/snow event developed late on 4/29 and continued through 5/3. If the models are correct, less organized precipitation is projected during the next two weeks, with a strong warmup indicated for the second half of this forecast period. Week One Forecast, 5/4- 5/10: The upper air trough responsible for the widespread rain and snow that the state received during the 4/30-5/3 period has shifted southeast of Nebraska and formed a cut off upper air low. The low is expected to slowly drift eastward through the weekend. On its western flank,

periodic showers are possible across the eastern third of Nebraska through 5/5. Western Nebraska should remain precipitation free with a gradual warming trend. Models indicate that the entire state should see dry weather during the 5/6-5/7 period with temperatures returning to near normal. Another cutoff upper air low is projected to be situated over the southern Rockies and produce scattered showers over the Central Plains. These models indicate that the most likely areas for measurable moisture will be across the eastern half of the state during the 5/7-5/9 period. On 5/10, weather models indicate that a piece of energy from this upper air low may move into western Kansas and bring scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms to the western half of the state. High Temperatures: 5/4 (51 N - 60 SW), 5/5 (58 NE - 65 SW), 5/6 (62 NE - 75 W), 5/7 (68 NE - 75 W), 5/8 (70 NE - 80 W), 5/9 (68 NE 75 W), 5/10 (72 E - 80 W). Week Two Forecast, 5/11 - 5/17: Weather models are having a difficult time determining what this period will bring to Nebraska in regards to precipitation. Some models bring the southern Rockies cutoff low into the Central Plains, which would result in daily chances of scattered showers and/or thunderstorms. The model used for this forecast pushes a much drier forecast. If it verifies, scattered showers and thunderstorms are again possible for the western half of Nebraska on 5/11, with isolated showers/thunderstorms for eastern Nebraska. Dry and warm conditions then develop for 5/12-5/14 period. During the 5/15-5/17, scattered showers or isolated thunderstorms are possible for the eastern half of Nebraska with little moisture expected for the western half of the state. With this drier trending model, high temperatures are expected to soar into the 80s east and possible 90s west. High Temperatures: 5/11 (66 NE - 75 W), 5/12 (75 E - 86 W), 5/13 (80 E - 90 W), 5/14 (85 E - 95 W), 5/15 (77 SE - 90 NW), 5/16 (86 E - 95 W), 5/17 (78 W - 88 E).

Nebraska Weather and Crops LINCOLN — For the week ending April 28, 2013, rain early in the week combined with below normal temperatures to limit fieldwork until the weekend when conditions warmed and soils began to dry, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Moisture accumulations near 1 inch were common across the southeastern third of the state. However, precipitation was again limited in many western counties where soil moisture profiles are depleted. Corn planting was underway as soil temperatures rose into the upper 50s by Sunday. For the week, temperatures averaged 3 to 6 degrees below normal. Pastures continued to show little growth, forcing producers to draw on short forage supplies. Fieldwork was limited with only 3.2 days considered suitable for fieldwork. Statewide, topsoil moisture supplies rated 13 percent very short, 31 short, 55 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 47 percent very short, 42 short, 11 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Weather Report: Precipitation and temperature data are now being provided through the High Plains Regional Climate Center. Field Crops Report: Corn planted was 3 percent, well behind last year’s 40 and 26 average. Wheat conditions rated 14 percent very poor, 30 poor, 44 fair, 12 good, and 0 excellent. Wheat jointed was 6 percent, well behind last year’s 66 and 28 average. Oats planted were at 70 percent, behind last year’s 92 and 85 average. Oats emerged were 24 percent, behind last year’s 67 and 46 average. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Stock water supplies rated 7 percent very short, 20 short, 72 adequate, and 1 surplus. Hay and forage supplies rated 23 percent very short, 46 short, 31 adequate, and 0 surplus. Cattle and calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 25 fair, 66 good, and 7 excellent. Spring calving was 91 percent complete. Calf losses this spring has been 7 percent below average, 88 average, and 5 above average.

May 2, 2013

Weather Outlook

Western

Central

Eastern

Saturday, May 04

Saturday, May 04

Saturday, May 04

High: 55 Low: 30

High: 54 Low: 39

High: 50 Low: 39

Chance of Precip: 15%

Chance of Precip: 25%

Chance of Precip: 50%

Partly Cloudy

Isolated Showers

Scattered Showers

Sunrise: 6:41 AM - Sunset: 8:54 PM

Sunrise: 6:29 AM - Sunset: 8:36 PM

Sunrise: 6:17 AM - Sunset: 8:27 PM

Sunday, May 05

Sunday, May 05

Sunday, May 05

High: 63 Low: 36

High: 61 Low: 45

High: 59 Low: 45

Chance of Precip: 10%

Chance of Precip: 20%

Chance of Precip: 45%

Partly Cloudy

Isolated Showers

Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 6:40 AM - Sunset: 8:55 PM

Sunrise: 6:28 AM - Sunset: 8:37 PM

Sunrise: 6:16 AM - Sunset: 8:28 PM

Monday, May 06

Monday, May 06

Monday, May 06

High: 72 Low: 37

High: 68 Low: 48

High: 66 Low: 52

Chance of Precip: 10%

Chance of Precip: 15%

Chance of Precip: 20%

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 6:39 AM - Sunset: 8:56 PM

Sunrise: 6:27 AM - Sunset: 8:38 PM

Sunrise: 6:15 AM - Sunset: 8:29 PM

Tuesday, May 07

Tuesday, May 07

Tuesday, May 07

High: 66 Low: 50

High: 72 Low: 50

High: 72 Low: 52

Chance of Precip: 15%

Chance of Precip: 20%

Chance of Precip: 20%

Isolated Showers

Isolated Storms

Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 6:38 AM - Sunset: 8:57 PM

Sunrise: 6:26 AM - Sunset: 8:39 PM

Sunrise: 6:14 AM - Sunset: 8:30 PM

Wednesday, May 08

Wednesday, May 08

Wednesday, May 08

High: 77 Low: 54 Partly Cloudy

High: 75 Low: 54 Sunny

High: 77 Low: 55 Sunny

Sunrise: 6:37 AM - Sunset: 8:58 PM

Sunrise: 6:25 AM - Sunset: 8:40 PM

Sunrise: 6:13 AM - Sunset: 8:31 PM

Thursday, May 09

Thursday, May 09

Thursday, May 09

High: 77 Low: 54 Partly Cloudy

High: 77 Low: 57 Mostly Sunny

High: 77 Low: 55 Sunny

Sunrise: 6:35 AM - Sunset: 8:59 PM

Sunrise: 6:24 AM - Sunset: 8:41 PM

Sunrise: 6:12 AM - Sunset: 8:32 PM

Friday, May 10

Friday, May 10

Friday, May 10

High: 73 Low: 54 Isolated Showers

High: 73 Low: 57 Scattered Showers

High: 77 Low: 57 Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 6:34 AM - Sunset: 9:00 PM

Sunrise: 6:23 AM - Sunset: 8:42 PM

Sunrise: 6:10 AM - Sunset: 8:33 PM

Saturday, May 11

Saturday, May 11

Saturday, May 11

High: 68 Low: 54 Scattered Showers

High: 75 Low: 57 Isolated Showers

High: 77 Low: 59 Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 6:33 AM - Sunset: 9:02 PM

Sunrise: 6:22 AM - Sunset: 8:43 PM

Sunrise: 6:09 AM - Sunset: 8:34 PM

Sunday, May 12

Sunday, May 12

Sunday, May 12

High: 77 Low: 57 Mostly Sunny

High: 75 Low: 59 Isolated Showers

High: 75 Low: 59 Partly Cloudy

Sunrise: 6:32 AM - Sunset: 9:03 PM

Sunrise: 6:21 AM - Sunset: 8:44 PM

Sunrise: 6:08 AM - Sunset: 8:35 PM

Monday, May 13

Monday, May 13

Monday, May 13

High: 86 Low: 57 Mostly Sunny

High: 82 Low: 68 Partly Cloudy

High: 81 Low: 66 Mostly Sunny

Sunrise: 6:31 AM - Sunset: 9:04 PM

Sunrise: 6:20 AM - Sunset: 8:45 PM

Sunrise: 6:07 AM - Sunset: 8:36 PM

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Representatives Todd Smith • John Lynott • Jodi Newtson Cher Scoville • Erik Williams • Darlene Overleese

Production - Chris Frazer Production Assistant - Laura R. Zayas Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 Copyright © 2013


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Country Living

Caring for Wood Furniture & Carpet Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Colfax County Wood Furniture Wood furniture looks great year after year when properly cared for, which can take time but the results are worth it. The sun’s ultraviolet rays can damage the finish and may even bleach the wood. Preventative measures include closing the drapes, placing the furniture out of direct sunlight and changing the room arrangement. Spilled liquids can penetrate or remove the finish and even damage the wood underneath. Use coasters to set beverages upon. Use trivets or hot pads to avoid placing a hot item on a wood surface. Hot items placed directly on the furniture surface can cause a chemical change in the finish, leaving a white spot or ring. Soil plus perspiration and body oils pose another danger, particularly for chair arms and areas around drawer or door pulls. Protect these areas by using a furniture polish which can help prevent the finish from softening and wearing away. Abrasion can scratch the finish and dull the surface. To prevent abrasion, do not dust with a dry cloth and do not use abrasive cleaners. Cotton diapers, terry toweling, cotton knit wear and flannel scraps all make good cleaning cloths. Avoid synthetic or permanent press fabrics or fabrics that are coarse or leave lint. Also avoid using discarded clothing with snaps, seams, buttons or other details that could scratch the finish. Furniture polish should be applied regularly to add shine and provide protection. Never use soap and water on wood furniture.

Carpet Frequent vacuuming is key to having a longlasting carpet. Areas receiving little traffic may require once-a-week vacuuming, while areas with heavy traffic may need daily attention. Vacuum as often as needed to remove dust and lint as well as prevent soil build-up. Before routine vacuuming, remove toys, debris and other small objects from the carpet. This sounds trivial and you may ask, “Doesn’t everyone do that?” The answer is no. Adjust the carpet pile height control to the correct setting. Going over the carpet once with the vacuum cleaner is probably not enough. Areas of light traffic need three to four strokes over the carpet; heavy traffic areas need more. Some types of dirt and grime will not respond to a simple vacuuming. Commercial cleaning products and/or machines can be used. Powdered carpet cleaning compounds are formulated to release dirt from the fibers. Spray foams or shampoo concentrates with water do thorough cleaning but care must be taken to avoid overwetting. If overwetting occurs, the backing may shrink or the carpet may develop a discoloration problem known as browning. Hot water extraction uses a machine to distribute a hot water and detergent solution into the carpet. It then extracts the solution along with the dirt and soil. Always use a cleaner recommended by the machine manufacturer. When using a spot and stain remover, use a cleaning product specially formulated for carpets. Read and follow the label directions since directions can vary from product to product. Blot, but don’t rub, using a clean white cloth or paper towel. Work from the edge of the stain to the center. It is helpful to pre-test the spot removal solution on an inconspicuous area of the carpet in case the cleaning product causes a color change.

Controlling Pesky Trees & Shrubs Todd D. Whitney, Extension Educator, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Hamilton County Arbor Day is celebrated each year in Nebraska during the last week of April as a great time of year to plant trees, and applause to those who have planted desirable trees in the right locations. Trees can provide many wonderful benefits such as windbreak protection, beautification and shade. However, the current drought cycle has again favored volunteer tree problems as undesirable trees have become invasive. Drought stress shrinks grass root mass; this, in time, allows pesky perennial plant numbers to expand in many no-till fields and pastures during extended dry periods. One of the challenges with long-term no-till is volunteer tree control (especially locust) which seem to increase to high numbers around year 6 or year 7 of continuous no-till. For no-till corn fields, the Hornet herbicide is labeled for locust tree control when the product is applied postemerge during the corn (spike to V6 or 20 inches height) stage of development. Two other corn herbicides labeled for locust suppression include Curtail and dicamba. For pasture managers, the best long-term solution to controlling pesky trees and shrubs is adjusting stocking rates and increasing rest periods for the desirable grasses. This is the same principle as homeowners raising their lawn mowing height (greater than 3 inches), helping the grass out compete the weeds. Increasing the above-ground grass height will directly increase the grass root mass below ground, which then helps the grass outcompete the invasive brush plants. Prescribed burning can also help in tree and shrub control, but this practice increases liability due to potential out-of-control fires. Therefore herbicide controls have become a very popular control option; even though, the burning can be very cost effective. Pesky perennials such as locust, buckbrush, wild plum and smooth sumac can all be invasive, but the most challenging of these species may be the black locust, which have a thick, waxy cuticle coating their leaves and long wicked thorns. Since locust can readily form from long underground root sprouts, cutting or scraping volunteer trees without a chemical treatment may result in seven-fold population increase during the next year as the locust roots resprout. So, herbicides should either be used to kill the locust plants prior to cutting, or apply an herbicide to the stump(s) soon after cutting.

As a general rule, pesky brush species are most susceptible to foliar herbicides when the chemical is applied just after the full-leaf stage of development in the spring. Herbicides applied at this time are absorbed and translocated to the site of action. Plants vary on when they reach this full-leaf stage, based on the year and species. For example, buckbrush and plums reach full-leaf (early May) about a month earlier than locust trees, hedge trees and sumac (early June). Black locust can be cut at the base with brushcutters, chainsaws or hand tools, followed by treating the stump with herbicides such as Crossbow, Remedy, Tordon, Pathfinder, or a 20-50 percent glyphosate solution. Treatment should be applied to the cut stumps within 30 minutes after the cut for best results. Locust are also more effectively controlled with chemicals when the trees are still small and thin-barked (6 inches or less trunk diameter). This method reduces resprouting from roots and stumps when applied between midJuly and the end of December. In rangeland, herbicides such as Tordon22K, Surmount, and the triclopyr chemicals (Remedy/Crossbow) combined with Tordon 22K and 2,4-D ester have proven more effective than spot applied glyphosate (Round-Up products) for controlling locust. For spot application, Remedy is recommended at a 2 percent solution in diesel fuel, although the diesel fuel may kill the grass vegetation around the target trees. Perennial buckbrush, plums and smooth sumac can also be tough to control. Herbicides applied to foliage during this time of year, though, (once the plants near full-leaf stage) can be very effective. Herbicides such as picloram (Tordon); picloram/2,4-D Grazon; Cimarron; triclopyr (Remedy); and 2, 4-D can provide excellent pesky weed control, especially if applied on warm days (greater than 60°F). Repeat applications may be necessary in the following years. The 2,4-D amine (water-based) and low volatile ester (LVE) 2,4-D formulations are both labeled for brush control; however, the LVE (oil-based) formulations are much better to control perennials. Since perennials have an oily, wavy leaf surface, the ester products provide better penetration and control. Spring applications (if the weather is warm enough) usually provide better control than summer applications since the plants are usually not under heat stress, and the pesky plants’ waxy leaf coating is thinner.

Page 3

Radbourne

#HOMEPW00476 Radbourne Visit www.homeplans.com

A comfortable array of contemporary amenities fill this home, despite its engagingly traditional exterior. A richly windowed, vaulted great room flows into an equally bright, vaulted nook, then on into a kitchen with work island and step-in pantry. The utility room is linked to a two-car garage that doubles as mud room.

Detailed Specifications

House Style Country Bedroom Extras First Floor Dual Sinks Master Suite - Shower Kitchen Extras Breakfast Nook Country / Family Island Walk-in Pantry Foundation Type Crawlspace Key Information 2,017 Square Feet Beds: 3 Baths: 2 ½ baths: 1 Stories: 2 Garage Bays: 2 Width: 50' Depth: 52' Room Summary Bonus Space Great / Gathering Room Den / Study Laundry Room - First Floor Special Features Split Bedrooms Vaulted Ceilings Walk-In Closet Bay / Box / Bow Fireplace Open Floor Plan

Main Level

Upper Level A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.homeplans.com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #HOMEPW00476. Online: Go to www.homeplans.com.


Page 4

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - The Lighter Side

May 2, 2013

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • Riding Instructions by Lee Pitts

So, you want to be a cowboy? The first thing you’re going to want to learn to do is ride a horse, but horses are like computers in that none of them comes with a “Riding Horses for Idiots” book, or instructions, other than, “He’s a little waspy in the morning but he’ll line-out by evening.” Or, “I’d watch those hind feet if I were you.” There is more to making a hand than polishing your backside on a saddle. Having the proper tack so as to not look like a gunsel is the most important thing. Saddles come in two types: English and western. Picking the right one depends on if you have a flat rear end, or a round one. You’ll have to be the judge of that. For your introductory ride have an ambulance and paramedics standing by and stage the event at a riding or rodeo arena so you won’t have to repeatedly walk a long distance to retrieve your horse after it bucks you off. Always remember, you’ll break fewer bones falling on soft dirt than you will on hard rocks. Don’t wear clown shoes or you could get your foot caught in the stirrup and your horse will transform you into a human plow. On the other hand, by disking the dirt you would be making the ground softer for all future falls. Become proficient at judging the merits of horseflesh, or in your case, tail wringers, sunfishers, broncs and the nearly dead,

which are the only horses you’re going to be offered as a neophyte. Try to pick out a horse that weighs more than you do with a full tail, as the tails on maniacs are often cut as a warning. It’s like the warning label on a pack of cigarettes which everyone ignores. It’s the same with horses. You wouldn’t want to ride a horse without any spunk or spirit, would you? After you have identified your mount have someone catch it for you. If you can catch the horse yourself it means it lacks ambition and is too lazy to run away. In the cowboy vernacular, “You’ll have to carry the deadbeat around on your spurs all day.” At this point it might also be wise to ask someone if the horse has ever been ridden before. If not, you’re probably NOT going to need those goofy spurs you’re wearing. Make sure the cinch is tight because that will be the only thing holding you on top of the horse, instead of under it. Walk your horse around in a small circle three times, set your reins while you are still on the ground and DON’T stand on a rock or box to climb aboard or you’ll be laughed out of the bunkhouse. Ride a miniature horse if you have to, but don’t use a ladder to get on. Welcome aboard. Now, don’t look down. Note all the leather strings hanging from the saddle. Don’t ever be afraid of grabbing them if you feel yourself falling. This is

where the term, ‘pullin’ leather’ comes from. There is, however, a big debate on whether or not it’s all right to grab the saddle horn, shake hands with grandma, or squeeze the biscuit. Some say go right ahead, that’s what the horn was put there for, while purists say the horn is only for taking your dally. My feeling is that the horn wasn’t put on the western saddle just so team ropers could go broke entering jackpots, USTRC ropings and rodeos every weekend. So go ahead. Grab the apple. To go forward, gently nudge your horse with your spurs and say “Giddeup.” If you want to stop pull back on the reins. If this doesn’t work I’d be looking for a good place to jump off if I were you, keeping in mind that points are awarded for stylish dismounts. And that’s about it. It’s really not all that complicated. I know a lot of people get carried away with the finer points about changing leads and all that ridiculous bouncing up and down and stuff. I don’t know anything about any of that because I didn’t go to a private school or a riding academy back east where they teach such things. Just remember to keep your butt in the middle with a leg hanging down each side, steer with the reins and let the horse go in the direction it’s going. After all, he’s done this before. You haven’t.

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May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 5

Summer Salads Strawberry Spinach Salad 3 cups fresh baby spinach leaves 1 cup bite size romaine lettuce 1 egg 1/2 cup vinegar 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 cup very finely chopped onion 1 cup sliced strawberries DRESSING: Beat together egg and vinegar. Put in a small pot and simmer, stirring well. Continue to simmer, add sugar and onion, and cook for 5 minutes. Stir occasionally. Chill in fridge for 1 hour. Wash and drain baby spinach leaves and romaine lettuce well. Place in large salad bowl. Pour chilled dressing over salad and add strawberries on top. Mix well.

Broccoli Salad 1/8-1/4 cup sugar 1 tablespoon vinegar 1/2 cup salad dressing or mayonnaise 1/2 lb. bacon, fried & chopped 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated 2 small broccoli heads raw cut into bite sized pieces 1 onion, chopped (red or white) In small mixing bowl combine sugar, vinegar & salad dressing; stir well. In large mixing bowl combine bacon, cheese, broccoli, and onion. Pour first mixture over second and stir until coated. Refrigerate. This gets better the longer it sits.

Cottage Cheese Salad 1 1/2 (32 ounce) containers small curd cottage cheese 1 large cucumber, clean and dried 1 large green bell pepper 1 large firm tomato 1 (1 ounce) package ranch dip mix Chop cucumber, pepper, and tomato into manageable bite size hunks, and place in large mixing bowl. Pour ranch dip mix over veggies and mix to coat. Fold in cottage cheese and mix to distribute dip mix and veggies throughout. Chill until ready to eat.

Cool Cucumber and Black Bean Salad 1 English cucumber, diced 1 (15 ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed 1 (15 ounce) can corn, drained 1/2 red onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 1/2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon cilantro 1/2 teaspoon cumin 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper salt and pepper Make sure everything is drained well, then mix everything in a bowl and serve! Great alone, as a salsa for chips, or on a taco salad!

BLT Chicken Salad 4 slices bacon, each cut in half 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 cup red onion, very finely chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 (9 ounce) bag romaine lettuce, torn into small pieces 3/4 cup grape tomatoes, halved 1/4 cup carrot (shredded or thinly sliced) 2 cups rotisserie cooked chicken (skinless and shredded) 1/4 cup pecans, toasted and roughly chopped In saucepan, cook bacon over medium heat 5-6 minutes or until browned. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Save 2 tablespoons bacon drippings from saucepan. With a wire whisk, add balsamic vinegar, Dijon, maple syrup, oil, onions, garlic, salt and pepper to drippings in saucepan and heat to boiling over medium heat. Remove from heat. Place romaine in large salad bowl. Add tomatoes and carrots. Pour hot dressing over romaine, tossing lightly until coated. Add chicken and toss until well mixed. Crumble bacon and sprinkle over salad. Sprinkle pecans over salad.

Pasta Salad 1 1 1 1

lb. tri-colored pasta cup chopped broccoli cup chopped red pepper cup asparagus, cut into 1 inch pieces 1/4 cup pitted and chopped olive 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1/2 cup cubed mozzarella cheese Dressing 1/4 cup yellow mustard 1/4 cup white vinegar 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 3/4 cup sugar 3/4 cup vegetable oil or 3/4 cup canola oil salt and pepper

Mexican Butter Bean Salad 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1/3 cup canola or olive oil 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper 2 limes, juice of 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon salt 2 (15 ounce) cans butter beans, drained and rinsed 1 (15 ounce) can whole kernel corn, drained 1 large cucumber, peeled and diced 1 cup diced red onion 2 cups grape tomatoes, halved 1 cup cilantro leaf, coarsely chopped Add garlic, oil, cumin, cayenne, lime juice, pepper and salt to large mixing bowl. Wisk well. Add all other ingredients. Mix well to coat all ingredients with the dressing. Cover. Refrigerate until chilled. Stir well before serving. Serve cold.

Green Bean and Almond Salad 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1/2 lemon, juice of 1 tablespoon sherry wine vinegar 1/2 teaspoon capers, roughly chopped 1 teaspoon of brine from the jar of capers 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 1 lb. green beans, ends trimmed 1/2 cup slivered almonds, lightly toasted

Blanch broccoli and asparagus in boiling salted water, then plunge into ice bath to stop cooking. Cook pasta until al dente. Rinse with cold water and drain. Toss pasta with chopped vegetables. Mix first four ingredients of dressing, and slowly whisk in oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Toss dressing with pasta and vegetables. Chill until ready to serve.

Heat a small skillet over medium heat and add the vegetable oil. Add the slivered almonds and stir them in the pan until they are golden brown. In a medium bowl, whisk together the Dijon mustard, lemon juice and sherry vinegar. Add the capers, caper juice and a pinch of salt and pepper. Slowly whisk in the olive oil. Taste for seasoning. Set aside. Bring a large pot to a boil. Add salt until it tastes like mild seawater. Prepare an ice bath by filling a bowl large enough to hold the green beans with cold water. Add some ice cubes and put a colander in the middle of the bowl. Stir the green beans into the boiling water and allow them to cook, 2-3 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove them from the water, transferring them immediately to the colander inside the ice bath. Allow them to sit in the ice bath for a few minutes, swirling them gently in the water to assure they are all cooling in the cold water. Transfer the green beans to a kitchen towel spread on a flat surface and thoroughly dry them. Transfer them to a medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste and toss with the vinaigrette and the toasted almonds. Serve immediately.

Loaded Baked Potato Salad

Fruit Salad

8 potatoes, cubed 2 teaspoons salt 6 slices bacon, diced & crisp cooked 6 green onions 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 16 ounces sour cream 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 cup salad dressing Boil potatoes with salt. Drain. Crumble bacon and slice onions (including tops). Combine sour cream, pepper and salad dressing. Add to potatoes. Add bacon, onions and cheese (reserve some of each for top). Mix with potatoes. Pour into baking dish. Top with reserved cheese, onions, and bacon. Bake 350 for 10-15 minutes (until cheese melts).

1 (29 ounce) can peach slices, undrained 1 (20 ounce) can pineapple chunks, undrained 1 (3 1/8 ounce) box dry vanilla instant pudding 1 lb. strawberries, stemmed and quartered 1 banana, sliced 1/2 pint blueberries 1 bunch grapes 1-2 tablespoon sugar In a large bowl, combine cans of peaches, pineapples, and vanilla pudding mix. Mix well until pudding is dissolved. Stir in strawberries, banana, blueberries, grapes, and sugar if desired. Chill.


Page 6

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

May 2, 2013

Proud Supporters of FFA Featuring Chapters in these Counties Chase • Dundy • Frontier • Hayes Hitchcock • Keith • Lincoln • Perkins • Red Willow

Wauneta-Palisade FFA Chapter Awards Banquet Daniel Andrews, Wauneta-Palisade FFA Advisor

Written by E. M. Tiffany

The evening concluded with the installation of the 2013-2014 chapter officers. They are as follows: President – Landon Jutten Vice President – Nicole Strand Secretary – Cassidy Rathe Treasurer – Ellie Lee Reporter – Cameo Rector Sentinel – Jeremiah Kerns Parliamentarian – Stephanie Acosta Officer-at-Large – Joe Sramek

Pictured is the Wauneta-Palisade 2013-2014 officer team from left to right: Joe Sramek, Cameo Rector, Nicole Strand, Landon Jutten, Cassidy Rathe, Ellie Lee, Jeremiah Kerns, and Stephanie Acosta.

Hitchcock County FFA

The Wauneta-Palisade FFA Chapter concluded its very successful 2012-2013 year with the annual member awards banquet on April 25. The meal consisted of grilled smoked pork chops with carry-in main dish, salads and desserts. The keynote address was the watching of the video “Turning Setbacks into Comebacks” by Ron “Gus” Gustafson. When Gus was 9 years old he had his right arm and shoulder taken off and his right leg severely damaged in a tractor accident near Lyons, Nebraska. The chapter had sponsored Gus live on April 18 for a school-wide assembly. Recognition of members is as follows: Greenhand Degree – Cameo Rector, Ellie Lee, Stephanie Acosta, Tryssta Duvel, Joe Sramek, Billy Straub, Cody Barrett, and Jeremiah Kerns Star Greenhand – Cameo Rector Chapter Degree – Nicole Strand Star Chapter Degree – Tayler Nordhausen Wauneta Seeds Scholarship – Tayler Nordhausen Scholarship Award (GPA > 3.50) – Tayler Nordhausen, Tailor Lee, Cassidy Rathe, Nicole Strand, Ellie Lee Honorary Membership – Mr. & Mrs. Chad Nordhausen

FFA Creed I believe in the future of agriculture with a faith born not of words but of deeds achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the better things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years. I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those associations which, even in hours of discouragement, I cannot deny. I believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others. I believe in my own ability to work efficiently and think clearly, with such knowledge and skill as I can secure, and in the ability of progressive agriculturists to serve our own and public interest in producing and marketing the product of our toil. I believe in less dependence on begging and more power in bargaining; in the life abundant and enough honest wealth to help make it so — for others as well as myself; in less need for charity and more of it when needed; in being happy myself and playing square with those whose happiness depends on me. I believe that American agriculture can and will hold true to the best traditions of our national life and that I can exert an influence in my home and community which will stand solid for my part in that inspiring task.

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May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

Page 7

Wallace FFA Chapter Concludes Great Year By Earning Top Honors at State Convention

Sutherland FFA Chapter Forecasts Bright Future

Lisa Kemp, Wallace FFA Advisor

Ty Vallier, Sutherland FFA Advisor

FFA chapters work diligently all year long to display their advances in agricultural knowledge and Wallace FFA is no different. Throughout the year students take part in leadership workshops, organize chapter involvement activities and take pride in giving back to the community. All of this is accomplished while still supporting a busy academic schedule that landed them at the top of their district and state competitions. Wallace found great success with livestock judging this year, qualifying a Junior and Senior Livestock Judging team for state competition. Our senior team was made up of members Mark Jameson, Katelyn Melton, Sara Hubbard and Paige Aylward. The junior team consisted of members Mickayla Sheets, Dillon Koop, Jeff Harms and Collin Swedberg. This team went on to place 4th overall at state competition! In addition to our livestock judging teams there was great success in Veterinary Science as well. Team members Abbey Rohde, Mickayla Sheets, Chelsea Sowle and Katelyn Melton took top honors at districts and found themselves two points from the top ten at state. This was the first year that Nebraska offered the Veterinary Science competition, where students were required to identify various livestock and companion animal breeds and equipment in addition to performing assigned clinical work, while displaying knowledge of vaccines and their application, diseases and overall medical

terminology. Finally, in our Livestock Management competition, members Mark Jameson, Mickayla Sheets, Taylor Nielson, Alex Lundvall, Dillon Koop and John Mardquart were state bound with first place finishes in the poultry, beef, dairy and sheep divisions. Wallace FFA members are not limited to success in those events related to the animal sciences. An outstanding performance by the Floriculture team was also honored. Members Sara Hubbard, Alex Lundvall, Landon Swedberg and Jaclyn Nelson were awarded top honors at district competition earning them a trip to Lincoln for State FFA competition. Jaclyn Nelson was the individual leader and was awarded first place! They proved themselves proficient in their contest area once again by receiving third place team overall at state. Jaclyn Nelson led her team to this high achievement by winning the competition individually and earning a $500 scholarship to the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This year Wallace also excelled in the areas of Welding and Ag Mechanics qualifying teams for state competition in both areas. Welding team members Josh Grauerholz (MIG), Pilar Olave (Arc), and Andy Perdomo (OAW), and Ag mechanics team members Josh Grauerholz, Mark Jameson, Shane Anders and Juan Gomez had a successful trip to Lincoln.

Sutherland FFA is a new chapter with a bright future. Students at Sutherland High School have taken the new chapter and started it out on the path to much future success. Members have put in time and effort to reach their goals and strive for more success as a chapter. Students will be competing at the upcoming State FFA Convention in Lincoln in the areas of welding and agronomy. The agronomy team placed 4th at districts and hopes to make a strong showing at State. In welding the team finished 5th at the district competition and have studied and improved and also look to do well at the state level. In livestock judging at districts Sutherland FFA narrowly missed qualifying for state. With a third place finisher and others qualifying for ribbons, the team missed qualification by just a few points. The junior livestock team had several members earn ribbons. Sutherland FFA has a bright future ahead of it and look for them to only improve in years to come. Continued on page 11

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Page 8

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

May 2, 2013

McCook FFA Chapter Reports Results Sarah Knutson, McCook FFA Advisor End of year activities State FFA Convention Results: State Degrees – Cashous Bortner, McKenzie Crowe, Collin Messersmith, Morgan Schilling, Melinda Shields Ag Sales – 15th place team – Morgan Schilling (6th place), Trevor Gleason, Chance Koetter and Collin Messersmith (White ribbons) Agriscience – Cole Peters (White ribbon) Nursery and Landscape – 9th place team – Cashous Bortner (5th place), Lucas Post (Blue ribbon) and Sydney Pfeifer Livestock Management – Morgan Barnhart, Caitlyn Mockry, Melinda Shields, Kylie Peter, and Justin Samuelson (11th Place) Ag Issues – Marlys Brenning, Madison Crowe, Stephen Hoffman (5th Place) Ag Issues Academy – Chance Koetter and Liz Haag McCook FFA Chapter – Top 15 Premier Chapter Award Banquet results: Keynote Speaker – Mark Friehe of Frenchman Valley Coop

Pictured is the 2012-2013 McCook FFA Officer Team: Secretary Melinda Shields, Vice President McKenzie Crowe, Reporter Brendon Hauxwell, President Chance Koetter, Treasurer Kasey Taylor, Sentinel Luke Lichty, and Parliamentarian Marlys Brenning.

Honorary Members (Community members who help the chapter) – Willow Creek Meats, Coppermill Steakhouse and Ben Siegfried Cornerstone Award – (Staff members) Pam Wolford Scholarship (3.5 GPA or higher) – Freshmen are Madison Crowe and Kasey Hahn; Sophomores are Luke Lichty and Peyton Stagemeyer. Junior is Sydney Pfeifer. Seniors are Cashous Bortner and Sara Larington. FFA Pride (Attended most activities) – Freshman is Cole Peters. Sophomore is Colton Lashely. Junior is Elizabeth Haag. Senior is Caitlyn Mockry. Bonehead Award (A silly member) – Brendon Hauxwell Greenhands (Freshman/first year member) – This award was given in the fall, but there were a couple more given now: Jessi Barnberg, Trevor Gleason, Kasey Hahn, and Andrew Heskett. Star Greenhand was Cole Peters. Chapter Degree (Highest degree a chapter can bestow on a member) – Max Allen, Marlys Brenning, Nick Cole, Liz Haag, Brendon Hauxwell, John Paul Kain, Chance Koetter,Dane Larington, Colton Lashley, Luke Lichty, Kylie Peter, Sydney Pfeifer, Peyton Stagemeyer and Kasey Taylor

Proficiency Awards (Awarded to members with outstanding supervised agricultural experiences) Beef Production Entrepreneurship – Brendon Hauxwell (Local district and state), Dane Larington, (District) Veterinary Medicine Placement – Caitlyn Mockry Star in Agricultural Placement – Cashous Bortner Dekalb Award – Morgan Schilling The seniors retired their jackets. New officer initiation was held. McCook FFA Officer Team 2013-2014 President – Chance Koetter Vice President – McKenzie Crowe Secretary – Melinda Shields Treasurer – Kasey Taylor Reporter – Brendon Hauxwell Sentinel – Luke Lichty Parliamentarian – Marlys Brenning Activities the chapter is still participating in are: Adopt-A-Highway, Third Grade Outdoor Education Day, and Chapter Officer Leadership Training.

McCook seniors pictured in the front row are State FFA Degree recipients from McCook are Cailtyn Mockry, Sara Larington and Morgan McKenzie Crow, Cashous Bortner, Morgan Barnhart. Back Row consists of Collin Schilling, Collin Messersmith and Melinda Messersmith, Morgan Schilling, Cashous Bortner, Shields. Lucas Post and Trevor Gleason.

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52791


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

Page 9

Southwest FFA Chapter Reports State Convention Results Les Roggenkamp, Southwest FFA Advisor On Friday, April 5, in Pershing Auditorium in Lincoln, Neb., five Southwest FFA students were honored with their State FFA Degree. Cassa McConville, Kate Kelley, Blake Storrs, Dylan McConville, and Justin Daffer were awarded the Gold FFA pin signifying the honor presented to only the top 3 percent of Nebraska FFA members. Southwest also competed in several contests while at the convention and received an award for their involvement in the “I Believe” campaign. Contest results follow: Biotechnology – 2nd place team in the state – Megan Kelley (5th), Austin Minard (8th), Asic Helberg (9th), and Brian Riley (14th) Agronomy – 5th place team in the state – Megan Kelley (7th), Asic Helberg (Purple), Erin Greenlee (Purple), and Austin Minard (Blue) Natural Resources – 5th place team in the state –Blake Storrs (6th), Asic Helberg (Purple), Austin Minard (Blue), and Cassa McConville (Blue). Welding – Top 20 team – Toby Honeymann (6th in Oxy), James Rae (Blue in ARC), and Micheal Worley (in MIG) Parlimentary Law – Bronze plaque – Cassa McCoville, Brooke Ruggles, Kate Kelley, Blake Storrs, Megan Kelley, and Miranda Wordekemper. Meats Team – Top 20 team – Micah Hinz (Blue), Lindsey Sughroue (Red), Miranda Wordekemper (Red), and Trevor Van Pelt (Red) Ag Mechanics – Top 30 Team – Brian Riley, Austin Minard, Austin Miller, Adam Eaton. AgriScience – Olivia Pollmann, Ali Townsend, and Brenton Ellis Farm Management – Blake Storrs (Blue), Dylan McConville, Cassa McConville, and Kate Kelley Livestock Selection – Andrew Conway (White), Lindsey Sughroue, Haley Teter, and Austin Miller

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Page 10

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

May 2, 2013

WALLACE FFA CHAPTER CONCLUDES GREAT YEAR BY EARNING TOP HONORS AT STATE CONVENTION Continued from page 7 While at state, Wallace was awarded the NIFA Grant and Governor’s Excellence Award. Funds from this award were used to purchase GPS units for the classroom. Agriculture has made good use of the technology available to increase yields and put into implement conservation practices. GPS units will help the students develop life skills that will help them become the next innovators of the industry. Another great success for Wallace was the induction of Taylor Nielson into the Ag Issues Academy. Every year the Ag Issues Academy accepts 35 delegates from across the state to take part in the academy. This academy focuses on providing its participants with the skills needed to become spokespersons for our industry. The program exposes students to current issues, develops communications skills and provides them the opportunity to personally meet our industry leaders and lawmakers. With all of the success that Wallace has seen at the competition level there are still great things taking place back in the classroom. Students of the Ag Leadership class organized a petting zoo for the student body and community. The handson approach to learning and exposure to these animals provided a great chance for students to learn about agriculture. The students provided information pertaining to each animal and allowed the petting zoo visitors to experience the animals first hand. Baby ducks, chicks, calves, lambs, goats and horses make for a great learning experience!

Danny, Don, & Derek

Another exciting portion of our year was the opportunity to plant a corn plant at the Monsanto water test station near Gothenburg, Neb. Students were given the opportunity to make decisions that would affect their corn crop such as hybrid, fertilizer amounts, plant population, fungicide, and tillage system. A great deal of time and effort goes into making these decisions. The students learned a lot and had a great experience. As we near the end of the school year we are in anticipation of sunny skies and warmer weather. Nothing reminds us more of spring and summer than the pops of color from our favorite garden or landscaping plants. This year the FFA chapter purchased supplies for the erection of a greenhouse. This could not have been possible with out the help of the $1,500 grant from John Russell Applegate Foundation, $1,000 from Channel Seed, and the $7,500 grant from Pioneer. All parties have been instrumental in securing the needed supplies to complete this learning tool. Look for our first sale of mums in the fall as you head back to school! Summer holds many great events for the Wallace FFA chapter. Everyone looks forward to helping with the Cattleman’s Ball, supporting the Keep Wallace Beautiful project, which is the town’s trash pick-up or taking part in the summer reading program at the library. There are a lot of great things happening in the Wallace FFA!

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The Perkins County FFA has created a leadership workshop called Lead by Example. In this program we encourage everyone to be a mindful citizen by keeping their grades up, getting their work in on time, wearing their seat belt, and not texting while driving. We have presented this workshop the last two years at the State FFA Convention. We encourage people to sign our pledge to lead by example, and give them a thumb band to wear while they are driving that says “My Pledge.” This band is supposed to remind you that the text you just received or want to send can wait until your vehicle is stopped, not putting yourself and others in danger. This year we have added a new segment on the dangers of alcohol and drug consumption both behind the wheel and not. It is our hope to make a difference in our community and in others as well. We hope that you will choose to lead by example and truly make a difference in your home and community.

Perkins County FFA

52683

52520


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - FFA

Page 11

Another Successful Convention for Medicine Valley FFA Tonya Mortensen, Medicine Valley FFA Advisor The 85th Nebraska FFA Convention brought over 3,000 junior high and high school FFA members to Lincoln for three days of competition, leadership development and networking. The theme for this year ’s convention was “Grow” – and all workshops and sessions brought out the message of personal growth as part of every member’s FFA journey. Twenty-four high school and thirteen junior high members of the Medicine Valley FFA chapter participated in the convention. Other than competitions, members at convention spent time at leadership workshops, including one from National FFA President Brennan Costello and activities such as the Teach Ag luncheon, where National FFA Advisor Dr. Steve Brown spoke. The College of Ag Science and Natural Resources also hosted a “Big Red Tailgate” event, where motivational speaker and former Husker athlete Aaron Brown spoke, along with Olympic athlete Curt Tomaisevicz, who also spoke to the assembled group of students. The FFA members also got to enjoy the State Chorus performance, see the results of the 2013 Stars Over Nebraska pageant, the Proficiency Awards results, the reception of the Gary Scharf Helping Hand Award by State FFA Executive Director Donelle Johnson, and see the retirement of the 20122013 state officer team along with the installation of the 2013-2014 state officer team. In the career development event, or CDE, competitions, the top 5 teams and top 10 individuals in each competition were recognized in an awards ceremony held on Friday afternoon on East Campus. Rulon Taylor was recognized as the 8th place individual in Agronomy, while the team finished in 4th place. Tonya Mortensen, Medicine Valley FFA advisor, was very pleased with all the CDE teams’ results. “We have to put in a lot of hours of preparation for CDEs, because our district is very competitive. For example, in Agronomy, three of the top 5 teams in the state were from our district: EustisFarnam and Southwest.” Agriscience: Allison Campbell, Levi Farr, Hannah Hosick and Tate Lueth received a white ribbon as a team. The focus of this year’s competition was aquaculture, and the team had to dissect a perch and take an individual knowledge test on the anatomy of fish. Individually, Tate received a purple ribbon and Allison received a blue ribbon. Agronomy: Riley Garey, Dallas Petersen, Rulon Taylor and Keith Towne were the fourth place team (purple ribbon) overall. This

SUTHERLAND FFA CHAPTER FORECASTS BRIGHT FUTURE Continued from page 7 “With the quality of students we have here I only see one way for this program to go, and that is up,” says Advisor Ty Vallier. Vallier also comments on the community and the school that “with the amount of community and school support, I forecast Sutherland FFA making a difference in the Nebraska FFA Association. Sutherland FFA will strive to reach higher goals in the future and create positive role models and student leaders in this community for years to come.”

contest includes a test on soil structure; insect identification, life cycle, damage and control methods; weed and crop seed and plant identification; disease and disorder identification and damage type; and a general knowledge exam. Individually, Rulon, Riley and Keith each received a purple ribbon and Dallas received a white ribbon. Floriculture: Regan Garey, Starla Henderson, Connor Russell and Starla Henderson received a red ribbon. This contest included a knowledge exam, a design portion, plant identification, disease and disorder identification, and a marketing activity. Connor received a blue ribbon and Regan received a red ribbon. Junior Livestock Evaluation: Spencer Bierfreund, Tate Hodson, Tate Lueth and Kathryn Schick competed in this contest. The contest included eight judging classes of beef, swine, sheep and goats, a general knowledge exam, and three sets of questions based on the judging classes. Spencer earned a blue ribbon and Tate Lueth earned a red ribbon. Natural Resources: Madison Clark, Riley Garey, Cory Merrigan and Rulon Taylor competed and earned a purple ribbon (seventh place overall) in this contest. The contest includes an individual written exam, and a team activity in ecology. Rulon earned a purple ribbon, Riley and Madison earned blue ribbons, and Cory received a white ribbon. State Convention is also the site of the Leadership Skills Events, or LSEs, which are mostly public speaking and/or performance competitions. Each district in the state is allowed to send its top two district finalists to State LSE contests. Medicine Valley qualified four speakers this year: Rodger Farr in Extemporaneous Speaking, Jessa Lemon in Junior Public Speaking, Connor Russell in Senior Public Speaking and Rachel Towne in Cooperative Speaking. LSE results are given in categories of bronze, silver and gold. Rodger, Jessa and Rachel all received bronze rankings, while Connor earned a gold ranking. The Medicine Valley junior high FFA members had the opportunity to compete in the State Quiz Bowl and Leadership Development Workshop on Friday of convention. Thanks to the generous donation of time and attention from sponsors Lynn Hodson and Mary Klintworth, thirteen members of the Medicine Valley junior high Quiz Bowl teams were able to participate in the round-robin style competition in the morning and then work through the Leadership Development workshop in the afternoon. The seventh grade members this year at State Quiz Bowl were Riley

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Eisenhauer, Sheldon Johnsen, Ryan Klintworth, Rachel Lashley, Isaac Lenz and Chase Newcomb. Eighth grade members were Bailey Anderson, Justin Anderson, Logan Burke, Korinne Hansen, Brice Hodson, Wyatt Roblee, Skyler Sandoe. Medicine Valley also had the honor of seeing six FFA members receive their State FFA Degree this year. The State Degree is the highest honor that Nebraska can bestow on an FFA member, and it is the reflection of years of hard work and dedication to self-improvement from an FFA member. These students worked hard to develop a quality Supervised Agricultural Experience program over their years in high school, and completed a difficult application and interview process. On Friday night, this honor was conferred on Riley Garey, Brendan Johnsen, Dallas Petersen, Taylor Sandoe, Rulon Taylor and Keith Towne. The Medicine Valley FFA will close out the year with the annual banquet, where the past year’s officers will turn over the chapter to the newly selected officers and various awards will be given. It has been a very successful year for the Medicine Valley FFA chapter thanks to the support of the parents and community members who are always willing to help our members “Grow.”

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Page 12

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

May 2, 2013

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

Country Grain Prices as of 4/30/13 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon *** Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial *** Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Sidney St.Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon Hemingford

New Corn

Beans

New Beans

Wheat

New Wheat

$6.91 $6.97

$5.21 $5.14

$14.10 $14.09

$11.39 $11.37

$7.47

$7.32

$6.70 $6.97 $6.85

$5.28 $5.23 $5.16

$13.87 $14.16 $14.16

$11.08 $11.34 $11.20

$7.46

$7.23

$7.39

$6.90 $6.40 $6.91 $6.69 $6.96 $6.61 $6.84 $6.69

$5.23 $4.95 $5.21 $5.26 $5.24 $6.63 $5.23 $5.28

$14.26

$11.34

$14.10 $13.87 $14.36

$11.39 $11.08 $11.39

$13.99 $13.87

$11.29 $11.08

$6.72

$5.28

$6.91 $6.83 $6.73

$5.22 $5.26 $5.28

$14.33 $14.01 $13.92

$6.87

$5.25

$7.00 $6.90 $6.67

$6.86

671 Above Above Above

New Milo

$6.60

$4.81

$7.28

$6.29

$4.66

$7.50 $7.36

$7.28 $7.18

$6.29

$4.66

$7.34 $7.57 $7.52 $7.48 $7.34

$7.16 $7.46 $7.34 $7.31 $7.16

$6.50

$4.87

$6.09

$4.73

$7.45

$7.22

$11.69 $11.21 $11.13

$7.41 $7.34

$7.55 $7.20 $7.16

$6.43 $6.32 $6.35

$4.87 $4.73 $4.74

$14.01

$11.33

$7.47

$7.26

$5.17 $5.28 $5.23

$14.05 $14.01

$11.30 $11.31

$7.32 $7.49

$7.32 $7.24

$5.17

$14.12

$11.29

$7.30

$7.30

Northern $43.00 Oil Flowers Spring Wheat $7.78 Spring Wheat $7.84

$33.00 Pinto Oil Flowers (new) Spring Wheat(new) Spring Wheat(new)

Corn trade streaked higher to start the week on weather concerns before giving back a portion of the gains into midweek. For the week, the July contract is 25 higher with new crop 25 higher. July futures left a gap in the $6.30 area; chart resistance is up in the $6.69 overnight high from Monday. December futures moved to a new low for the move, which is the lowest new crop trade since last June. The continued cool and wet spring is limiting planting currently with indicated planted acres at 5% planted. This is the slowest pace since 1993. The opening at the beginning of the week, should have allowed the farmer to catch up a little bit before weather turned poor again. The weekly export shipments slipped to 11.5 million bushels which is still pretty soft. The weekly sales number was ok at 329,300 metric tons of old crop, and 656,000 of new. Ethanol production jumped .03% on the week, ahead of the USDA pace, while inventories slipped to 18 month lows. The tight ethanol inventories should support margins in the near term, as summer driving season approaches. Weather will continue to dominate the market in the near term, opening up the possibility for wild swings. There is growing speculation about acres losses in the Dakotas, but flooding may not be as bad as feared. Hedgers call with questions or to use us as your risk management advisor, there are things to look at now. This has been a good moment to look at buying call options on top of a portion of sold bushels and end users should be increasing old crop coverage and new crop where good historic positive margins are present. July 13 593 696

Dec. 13 500 595

July 2013 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . .6.460 High . . . .6.566 Low . . . .6.450 Close . . .6.534 Change +0.070

$6.37

to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options. The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 4/30/13 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$4.82

$7.50 $7.55

Corn

Support: Resistance

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience

Wheat

Soybeans

Wheat trade has moved sharply higher to start the week on growing production concerns out of Kansas. The weekly net change on the May contracts was 30 higher in Chicago, 32 higher in KC and 12 higher in Minneapolis. US wheat remains priced competitively on the world market, but the Black Sea looks to clean up a bit more of left over wheat. Export inspections were good at 30.5 million bushels, and further business to China continues to be rumored. The weekly export sales report was mixed at 219,200 metric tons of old and 497,300 of new. The fundamental bull argument will need a sustained solid export pace. Overall crop conditions were lower with poor to very poor up by 2%, and good to excellent slipping by 2 to 33%. Improvement came in the soft wheat, and further declines were noted in the hard wheat. Spring wheat was 12% planted with more delays expected. The Kansas wheat tour has come in with lower yield expectations than last year, with slow progress noted, and the rougher areas of Western Kansas yet to come. The weather news along should limit downside in wheat near term in our view. Better exports or confirmation of damage to winter wheat may be needed to take us out of our recent range and to the upside. Hedgers call with questions.

Soybean trade has been actively mixed so far, with significant pressure developing on Wednesday with selling to start the month. The spread trade has continued to fluctuate as well. The weekly change is 8 lower on July while November beans are flat. July meal is unchanged and bean oil is 70 lower. July beans have support at $13.40, and resistance in the $13.85 range. Concern about China’s economy has pressure the outside markets to start the week. We just think we are seeing more money chance stock market returns, and leaving commodity, specifically long commodity, investments. Cash basis premiums continue to push higher as it becomes harder to source trade in the near term, with rumors of import around. The weekly export inspections slipped to 8.8 million bushels as business shifts seasonally and the weekly export sales numbers for beans were mixed with -109,800 metric tons of old crop and 1.34 million of new crop. Product sales were softer at 93,300 metric tons of meal and 1,100 of oil. South American harvest is on the downhill slide with Brazil moving beans out a little more orderly, but Argentine farmers are holding beans as a hedge against inflation. Crush margins have contacted but remain positive. Hedgers or speculators call us with questions. We expect old to gain further on new in the week ahead. November new crop upside should be limited with corn planting delays keeping a bias toward greater 2013 soybean acreage.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 669 763

K City 712 834

Minneapolis 784 834

July 2013 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . . .7.204 High . . . .7.280 Low . . . . .7.176 Close . . . .7.232 Change .+0.022

Support: Resistance

July 13 1301 1460

July Meal 373 438

July Oil 4720 5106

July 2013 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . .13.730 High . . .13.832 Low . . . .13.714 Close . . .13.786 Change .+0.056


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Government

Page 13

$890,000 on Nothing by Senator Deb Fischer Washington D.C. Office 825 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-1325

“U.S. government spends $890,000 on nothing” – it sounds like a bad joke, but it’s no laughing matter. The Washington Post recently reported, “This year, the government will spend at least $890,000 on service fees for bank accounts that have nothing in them. At last count, Uncle Sam has 13,712 such accounts, each with a balance of zero.” The American people are no strangers to reports of excessive government waste, from robotic squirrel research to Moroccan pottery classes. This latest example, however, comes at a particularly frustrating moment as thousands of Americans are stuck waiting for hours in airport terminals with delayed flights – the result of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) decision to furlough thousands of air traffic controllers. Federal law, known as sequestration, requires the government to reduce overall spending by five percent in each agency, totaling $85 billion for the remainder of the fiscal year. While the $890,000 currently spent on unused bank accounts may seem like a drop in the bucket, it nonetheless proves there is plenty of fat to trim without directly impacting essential government services and jobs. Like many Nebraskans, I remain concerned about the federal government’s failure to effectively target these required – and necessary – budget cuts. Of particular concern is the FAA’s complete mismanagement of the cost reductions, which has resulted in unnecessary travel delays across the nation.

Lincoln Office 440 North 8th Street, Suite 120 Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

Since 1996, the FAA’s operations budget has grown by an astounding 109 percent, from $4.6 billion to $9.7 billion; a mere five percent budget cut would simply return the FAA to 2010 funding levels. Despite two years to prepare for budget reductions, the FAA chose to provide Congress and the airline industry less than a week’s notice regarding its plans to furlough its workforce, showing complete disregard for the travelling public. The FAA has insisted on targeting air traffic controllers rather than solely focusing on lowerpriority personnel to ensure “morale.” The FAA has 47,000 employees, of which 15,500 are air traffic controllers; while I appreciate the hard work of many federal workers, air traffic controllers should be the last ones on the FAA’s budgetary chopping block. Rather than selectively ratcheting up the pain of budget cuts on American citizens with long delays, the FAA should instead focus on cutting its $500 million in spending on consultants, or the $325 million spent on supplies and travel. For months, the administration has argued that it lacks flexibility to target required budget cuts in a smart, responsible manner that mitigates the impact on the public. To that end, I have cosponsored several legislative efforts to provide the administration with tools to ensure “essential” federal employees continue to provide vital services such as control tower operations.

Omaha Office 11819 Miracle Hills Drive, Suite 205 Omaha, Nebraska 68154 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

Most recently, I cosponsored the Essential Services Act, which would simply require each federal government agency head to identify and exempt essential employees from any furlough policies, using the same standards created by multiple administrations during government shutdown scenarios. Unfortunately, the President and my Democrat colleagues continue to oppose any measures to both achieve needed savings (without tax hikes) and preserve important government functions. Notably, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta recently testified at a Senate hearing that he does, in fact, have discretion to prioritize spending cuts. If true, then it appears the FAA is more interested in scoring political points rather than cutting its $2.7 billion in non-personnel operations costs. I am very disappointed in Administrator Huerta’s lack of forthrightness with Congress. When asked at the same hearing about the FAA’s possible furlough strategy, Huerta provided only general statements. Just hours later, FAA officials provided detailed furlough plans to airlines – a disturbing move to hide the ball from lawmakers, who were left without the opportunity to mitigate the impact of extensive furloughs. I stand ready to work with the President and any of my colleagues committed to making budget cuts in a smart and efficient manner that preserves essential government services – and my record proves it.

President’s Proposals Would Undermine Agriculture’s Success by Congressman Adrian Smith Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

Earlier this month, President Obama released his budget even though it was due on February 4th. While the House and Senate have already passed 10-year budget resolutions and the President’s proposals have little chance of being enacted, it is a revealing look at his priorities and vision for America. Of particular interest to Nebraskans is how the President’s proposals would affect agriculture, the backbone of our local economy. For example, President Obama’s 2014 budget proposes cuts to the federal crop insurance program. While we need to reduce our deficit and debt, it is counterproductive to undermine producers who manage risk. Without crop insurance, only those producers able to purchase their own insurance will be able to afford to farm. Further cuts to this program will discourage participation which could increase premiums for producers and raise the cost of food for consumers. Given the success of crop insurance, and in light of last year’s severe drought, we should be working to strengthen this fiscally responsible publicprivate partnership – not cutting it.

Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

While the President has proposed cuts to crop insurance, he maintains increased funding levels for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as “food stamps.” Over four years, spending on the food stamp program has more than doubled, increasing from $35 billion to around $80 billion. This amount accounts for most of the nutrition title, which comprises approximately 80 percent of the cost of the Farm Bill. Even during times of nationwide economic growth, food stamp spending increased. It is not unreasonable to consider modest changes without hurting families in need. SNAP and agriculture programs have been enacted together in the Farm Bill since the 1960’s, and more recently food stamp funding has been one major sticking point holding up passage of a long-term Farm Bill. Maintaining the status quo on food stamps while gutting crop insurance only complicates Farm Bill passage. The President’s budget also makes a major shift in how the U.S. provides food aid around the world through the Food for Peace program.

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

The White House budget would reduce the amount of food purchased from American farmers and ranchers, and spend more to buy it from foreign producers or give cash payments to foreign suppliers. We face logistical challenges to getting food to those most in need, and those problems deserve thoughtful deliberation. This does not mean we should push taxpayer dollars to foreign suppliers at the expense of high quality American products and jobs. Despite these and other frustrations, I am pleased the President proposes bringing negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership toward a conclusion by the end of 2013 – an ambitious goal which could open markets to more American agriculture products. I hope the President continues to pursue avenues of new market growth. As the budget process continues, Congress should prioritize the programs and policies which encourage growth. Agriculture remains a bright spot in an otherwise bleak national economy – we cannot afford to undermine it.

The President’s Overdue, Underwhelming Budget by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

Long gone are the days when citizens worked the land to pay their share to the crown before being allowed to keep anything for themselves. I think we can all agree it’s a good thing those days are behind us. But even though Tax Day is in the books, we are still paying the government to cover this year’s tax burden. While April 15 is the national tax payment deadline, April 18 marks Tax Freedom Day, the point at which the total earnings of all Americans since the beginning of the year surpasses the total tax bill for the year. In theory, that’s the day when you can start keeping the money you’ve worked hard to earn. This date only accounts for the government’s tax revenue, which has been less than its expenditures in recent years. If you calculate the amount it would take to pay off the year’s expected deficit, you’d be paying the government until May 9. In the budget proposal submitted to Congress by President Obama last week — two months after the legal deadline and after both chambers of Congress already passed their respective spending

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

plans — President Obama is asking for another $ 1.1 trillion in new taxes to go along with the $1.7 trillion he has signed into law since taking office. What’s more unfathomable: despite these tax increases, the President’s spending plan will never balance. It calls for government spending to exceed tax revenue in perpetuity at a time when our country clearly has a spending problem. To illustrate this spending binge, 2008 government spending was $3 trillion and the national debt at the beginning of that year was $8.9 trillion — still unacceptably high. However, under the President’s plan, the government is projected to spend $5.66 trillion annually and the national debt will balloon to $25.4 trillion. Americans deserve greater accountability of their hard-earned tax dollars — especially if the government is asking for an even bigger allowance. Forcing folks to fork over more money to help pay for the government’s reckless spending habit is unacceptable if not insulting. Despite the President’s refusal to admit we have a spending problem, I do want to acknowledge his

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

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admission that important programs like Social Security and Medicare are in trouble and must be strengthened. To his credit, he has proposed adjusting the formula used to calculate Social Security and Medicare cost of living adjustments to more accurately reflect inflation rates. But this is only part of the equation. If the President really wants to stimulate the economy, he should reverse his record of increased spending and taxes. More money in the pockets of hard-working Americans means more money exchanging hands on Main Street. He should commit to meaningfully reducing the deficit and forging a path to a balanced budget. My hope is that the President’s recognition of the unsustainable path of our entitlements is only the first step — one that will be followed by additional meaningful proposals and real leadership. There are willing partners eager to get our country back on course if the President chooses to step up to the plate.


Page 14

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

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May 2, 2013

Public Forum Regarding New DNR Fully Appropriated Basin Evaluation Methodology LINCOLN — The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources has released new draft rules and methods that it plans to utilize in its annual evaluation of availability of hydrologically connected water supplies. This annual evaluation is aimed at ensuring that stream flow water supplies for existing groundwater and surface water uses are protected into the future. The results of this yearly evaluation are highly valuable in supporting proactive planning efforts conducted by the state and local natural resources districts. These new rules and methods are aimed at providing greater clarity on the basin water supplies and water uses across the state to facilitate more effective water planning efforts. Director Brian Dunnigan said, “These new rules and methods, which have been developed over the last four years, will serve to provide foundational information on Nebraska’s water supplies and uses, thus allowing for more effective coordinated planning efforts across the state.” In an effort to address questions or comments related to the new

draft rules and methods, the department has set up a 60-day public comment period, which will run through Friday, June 7. During this public comment period, the department will host several public forums across the state. These forums will serve to answer questions related to the new rules and methods. These public forums will be: — Monday, May 13, Norfolk and Valentine — Tuesday, May 14, Scottsbluff and Kearney — Wednesday, May 15, Beatrice — Thursday, May 16, Lincoln The department has also developed a web-portal to receive public comments related to the draft rules and methods. To view more information, the specific times and locations of these forums or to provide your comments on the draft rules and methods, visit the department’s website at http://dnr.ne.gov. Public hearings are anticipated to be held later this summer after public comments have been received with potential rules modifications to be finalized by the end of the year.

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Atkinson Flannery Hay Equipment Inc. 402-925-5488 888-FLANHAY (352-6429) ••• Benkelman Bob & Dee Stamm 308-423-2892 (Dee) 308-423-2441 (Bob)

Burwell Thoene Farm Service 308-346-5250 ••• Loup City Eldon Kieborz 308-745-0293

Maxwell Miller Repair 308-582-4303 millerrepair.com ••• McCook Cappel Sales, Inc. 308-345-5115

Prague Prague Hay Equipment & Supply 402-663-6333 ••• Shelton Ostermeyer Equipment, Inc. 308-467-2345

Valentine Cherry County Implement 402-376-3490 877-BALE-HAY

52568


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 15

2012 A GOOD YEAR FOR NEBRASKA LIVESTOCK... Continued from page 1 pounds, which was 6 percent lower than March 2012. Nebraska was also first in the nation in cattle slaughter in March with 518,000 head. The average live weight was 1,383 pounds, which was 28 pounds heavier than March 2012. Nebraska was sixth in hog production with 643,000 head slaughtered, with an average live weight of 273 pounds, 5 pounds lighter than the previous year. Total production for cattle and calves and hogs and pigs last year was 6.38 billion pounds, compared to 5.9 billion pounds in 2011. Cattle and calves production in Nebraska was 5.1 billion pounds and for hogs and pigs 1.28 billion pounds last year. In 2011, cattle and calves production was 4.58 billion pounds, and hogs and pigs production was 1.32 billion pounds. Earlier this year, the USDA reported the value of Nebraska's corn crop was $9.1 billion and soybeans $2.9 billion. The combined value of Nebraska's corn, soybean, cattle and calves and hogs and pigs last year was $23.27 billion. Nationwide, 2012 production of cattle and calves and hogs and pigs

totaled 73.5 billion pounds, up 1 percent from 2011. Production increased 4 percent for hogs and pigs but decreased 1 percent for cattle and calves. Total 2012 cash receipts from marketings of meat animals increased 6 percent to $90.1 billion. Cattle and calves accounted for more than 75 percent of that total, and hogs and pigs accounted for nearly 25 percent. The 2012 gross income from cattle and calves and hogs and pigs for the United States totaled $90.7 billion, up 6 percent from 2011. Gross income for cattle and calves increased 8 percent, and hogs and pigs increased 2 percent over the previous year's gross income. Cash receipts from marketings of cattle and calves increased 8 percent from $63 billion in 2011 to $67.9 billion in 2012. All cattle and calf marketings totaled 55.4 billion pounds in 2012, down 1 percent from 2011. Cash receipts from hogs and pigs totaled $22.2 billion during 2012, up 2 percent from 2011. Marketings totaled 33.3 billion pounds in 2012, up 4 percent from 2011.

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Page 16

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

May 2, 2013

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Is There a Best Cow Size for Beef Cattle Producers? There are individuals in the beef cattle industry who claim there is a need for smaller brood cows, because smaller cows are more efficient and therefore more profitable. On the other hand, there are those who claim the larger the cow the better, and these generally are those who feed calves to slaughter. The proponents of both sides seem to have logical reasons that support their claims. So who is right? Recent work on cow systems at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory, conducted by scientists from the University of NebraskaLincoln West Central Research and Extension Center, shows that the contribution of dam’s weight to profit is surprisingly different, depending on how and when the offspring are marketed. While biology is a large player in the answer, the economics must be considered to formulate an appropriate solution. While larger cows may not be as efficient in the pasture, the larger framed offspring may more than compensate for this by their feedlot performance. Costs and revenues covering the years 2002 to 2011 were matched with production data recorded for four consecutive production years. This was used to evaluate nine different cattle production systems or scenarios (Table 1). These nine systems included four where calves were raised and sold either as weaned calves, yearlings or fat cattle priced either as live cattle or on a grid system. The remaining five systems included situations where the calves were not raised, but instead were purchased as one class of calves and sold as another. It was found that calves sold as fat cattle generally contributed more positively to profit if they were from larger cows, with the exception of those bought as yearling calves and sold on a grid and those bought as weaned cattle and sold as yearlings, both of which were optimized at the small dam size. Raised animals sold as weaned calves or yearlings also reached optimal returns for the smallest dams. These results are consistent with

the notion that cow-calf producer’s profits may be increased with smaller brood cows, including those who buy and raise stocker calves. When calves were sold as fat cattle, those born to larger dams were generally more profitable than calves born to average weight or small dams. The only exceptions were those purchased as yearlings and sold as fat cattle on a grid. As a rule, calves from medium/average sized dams were the least profitable compared with either small or large cows. However, in one instance, dam weight near the average was the most profitable. This occurred in the fifth scenario (Table 1), where purchased weaned calves were sold as fat cattle priced on a grid system. In the two scenarios where weaned calves and yearlings were raised and sold, the smallest dams provided the greatest contribution to returns, but both the largest and the smallest outperformed the middle weight cows. In all cases, the optimum dam weight was not the same for fat animals sold on a live basis

versus the dam weight for fat animals sold on a grid. This fact adds a layer of complexity to the choice of marketing fat cattle. All of these results lead to at least one general conclusion: contribution to profit is not just a matter of biological efficiency of the cow, but extends to the whole system, including costs and market conditions and the performance of the calf. From this work, the answer to the question “What is optimal cow size?� is clearly not the same for all producers. This work is available in its entirety from the authors upon request. Matthew Stockton, (308) 696-6713, Agricultural Economist, Assistant Professor, mstockton2@unl.edu; Sunil Dhoubhadel, (308) 696-6738, Economics Research Analyst, sdhoubhadel2@unl.edu; Aaron Stalker, (308) 696-6707, Beef Range Systems Specialist, astalker3@unl.edu, University of NebraskaLincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center

Table 1. Summary Results of the Optimum Cow Size for the Nine Production Systems Scenario Number

Production Systems

Optimum Cow Size

1

Sell Calves at Weaning

Smallest

2

Purchase Weaned Calves, Sell as Yearlings

Smallest

3

Sell Raised Yearlings

Smallest

4

Purchase Weaned Calves, Sell as Live Fat Cattle

Largest

5

Purchase Weaned Calves, Sell as Fat Cattle on a Grid

6

Sell Raised Live Fat Cattle

Largest

7

Sell Raised Fat Cattle on a Grid

Largest

8

Purchase Yearlings, Sell as Live Fat Cattle

Largest

9

Purchase Yearlings, Sell as Fat Cattle on a Grid

Smallest

Medium/Large

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May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 17

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 4/27/2013

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction – Bassett; Huss Livestock Market LLC – Kearney; Imperial Livestock Auction – Imperial; Lexington Livestock Market – Lexington; Loup City Commission Co. – Loup City; Ogallala Livestock Auction Market – Ogallala; Valentine Livestock Auction – Valentine Receipts: 17,100 Last Week 11,880 Last Year 11,200 Compared to last week, steers sold 4.00 to 5.00 higher and heifers sold 2.00 to 4.00 higher. Demand was moderate to good for all classes of cattle. Few, more offerings this week compared to a year ago, many of the lots below would normally be retained by ranchers and then most would be sold on summer BBQ sales. Majority of the feeder cattle receipts consisted of heifers; some buyers are still in the market for a replacement type female but most the calf hood vaccinated heifers went to feedlots. Cow/calf pairs and bred cows continue to come to market with many ranchers almost out of feed and summer pastures are growing at a very slow rate. Many areas are in need of moisture and some warm temperatures to get the grass going. Feeder supply included 42 percent steers with 69 percent of the total over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 7 . . . . . . . . .324 . . . . . . . .324 . . . . . . .250.00 . . . . . . . .250.00 51 . . . . . . .374-390 . . . . . .381 . . . .195.00-228.00 . . . . .209.70 166 . . . . . .400-445 . . . . . .424 . . . .173.00-201.00 . . . . .191.07 334 . . . . . .450-496 . . . . . .481 . . . .170.00-185.00 . . . . .176.60 688 . . . . . .500-549 . . . . . .531 . . . .157.00-185.00 . . . . .172.22 498 . . . . . .551-590 . . . . . .574 . . . .154.00-179.50 . . . . .171.44 722 . . . . . .600-640 . . . . . .621 . . . .149.50-168.00 . . . . .161.72 401 . . . . . .650-695 . . . . . .667 . . . .141.70-162.50 . . . . .151.71 343 . . . . . .700-740 . . . . . .725 . . . .139.75-149.50 . . . . .146.06 246 . . . . . . .715 . . . . . . . .715 . . . . . . .155.75 . . . . . . . .155.75 292 . . . . . .754-796 . . . . . .769 . . . .133.00-148.25 . . . . .137.93 9 . . . . . . . . .772 . . . . . . . .772 . . . . . . .127.25 . . . . . . . .127.25 73 . . . . . . . .785 . . . . . . . .785 . . . . . . .148.25 . . . . . . . .148.25 559 . . . . . .804-837 . . . . . .827 . . . .125.00-141.75 . . . . .134.59 136 . . . . . . .845 . . . . . . . .845 . . . . . . .140.10 . . . . . . . .140.10 571 . . . . . .854-897 . . . . . .885 . . . .126.85-135.25 . . . . .130.21 6 . . . . . . . . .884 . . . . . . . .884 . . . . . . .121.00 . . . . . . . .121.00 476 . . . . . .900-939 . . . . . .918 . . . .125.25-133.00 . . . . .128.87 49 . . . . . . .950-965 . . . . . .954 . . . .119.50-126.10 . . . . .121.41 71 . . . . . .1010-1043 . . . .1012 . . . .122.25-123.10 . . . . .123.04 10 . . . . . . . .1041 . . . . . . .1041 . . . . . . .116.25 . . . . . . . .116.25 9 . . . . . . . . .1050 . . . . . . .1050 . . . . . . .119.50 . . . . . . . .119.50

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 17 . . . . . . . .349 . . . . . . . .349 . . . .164.50-182.50 . . . . .175.09 81 . . . . . . .362-394 . . . . . .380 . . . .159.00-187.00 . . . . .169.18 165 . . . . . .410-447 . . . . . .433 . . . .155.50-166.50 . . . . .160.01 11 . . . . . . . .422 . . . . . . . .422 . . . . . . .173.00 . . . . . . . .173.00 267 . . . . . .450-496 . . . . . .478 . . . .146.50-165.50 . . . . .159.24 793 . . . . . .500-549 . . . . . .531 . . . .141.50-153.25 . . . . .148.29 71 . . . . . . . .520 . . . . . . . .520 . . . . . . .160.00 . . . . . . . .160.00 680 . . . . . .550-595 . . . . . .575 . . . .138.50-151.25 . . . . .145.15 1256 . . . . .600-648 . . . . . .621 . . . .136.50-150.75 . . . . .143.44 20 . . . . . . . .623 . . . . . . . .623 . . . . . . .131.00 . . . . . . . .131.00 10 . . . . . . . .643 . . . . . . . .643 . . . . . . .1070.00 . . . . . . .1070.00 836 . . . . . .653-697 . . . . . .679 . . . .131.25-144.50 . . . . .136.24 22 . . . . . . . .650 . . . . . . . .650 . . . . . . .129.75 . . . . . . . .129.75 65 . . . . . . . .673 . . . . . . . .673 . . . . . . .1070.00 . . . . . . .1070.00 619 . . . . . .700-745 . . . . . .718 . . . .125.50-136.50 . . . . .132.05 40 . . . . . . . .735 . . . . . . . .735 . . . . . . .125.75 . . . . . . . .125.75 86 . . . . . . . .700 . . . . . . . .700 . . . . . . .138.00 . . . . . . . .138.00 1020 . . . . .751-797 . . . . . .771 . . . .123.25-132.50 . . . . .127.45 82 . . . . . . .770-797 . . . . . .783 . . . .120.50-122.60 . . . . .121.56 28 . . . . . . .768-792 . . . . . .783 . . .1030.00-1150.00 . . .1072.01 624 . . . . . .801-849 . . . . . .818 . . . .117.00-127.70 . . . . .125.72 145 . . . . . .813-844 . . . . . .834 . . . .118.00-120.50 . . . . .120.12 52 . . . . . . . .815 . . . . . . . .815 . . . . . . .1150.00 . . . . . . .1150.00 7 . . . . . . . . .847 . . . . . . . .847 . . . . . . .127.85 . . . . . . . .127.85 678 . . . . . .856-885 . . . . . 861 . . . .117.50-126.00 . . . . .121.94 17 . . . . . . . .852 . . . . . . . .852 . . . . . . .123.50 . . . . . . . .123.50 128 . . . . . .900-926 . . . . . .910 . . . .116.00-123.50 . . . . .119.22 27 . . . . . . . .920 . . . . . . . .920 . . . . . . .120.00 . . . . . . . .120.00

brokerage, farming and By David M. Fiala marketing, ranching experience to provide customers FuturesOne President and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des company, FuturesOne, is a Moines and at the Chicago Board of full service risk Trade. You may contact David via email management and futures at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1brokerage firm. A primary 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful on the web at www.futuresone.com. agricultural marketing advice via daily, Everyone should always understand the weekly, and monthly analysis of the risk of loss and margin needed when domestic and global markets. trading futures or futures options. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management The information contained herein is solutions and will also actively manage gathered from sources we believe to be Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2 pricing decisions for ag producers. . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Head 6 . . . . . . . . .345 . . . . . . . .345 . . . . . . .190.00 . . . . . . . .190.00 management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change 7 . . . . . . . .355-370 . . . . . .361 . . . .169.00-171.00 . . . . .170.12 accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in 20 . . . . . . .415-430 . . . . . .422 . . . .182.00-185.00 . . . . .183.38 54 . . . . . . .450-487 . . . . . .480 . . . .160.00-179.00 . . . . .164.03 FuturesOne draw on decades of trading futures. 44 . . . . . . .516-538 . . . . . .531 . . . .151.00-168.50 . . . . .162.60

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 4/26/2013 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week: alfalfa hay, grass hay, ground/delivered hay and dehy pellets sold steady on a light test. Corn stalk bales continue to be sought after from ranchers and feedlots alike. Corn planting has been at a standstill due to the cold wet weather across most of the state. Some area contacts reporting soil temperatures in the high 30’s which is still too cold for corn to germinate. Prices are dollars per ton FOB (freight on buyer) stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne.us click on Hay Information. Northeast/Central Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large rounds 250.00-275.00; Good large rounds 225.00-230.00. Grass Hay: Good large rounds 210.00-235.00. Cornstalks round bales 90.00-100.00, few 110.00-125.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein and meal: 360.00. Platte Valley area of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium small squares bales 350.00- 365.00. Good large rounds 225.00-230.00. Corn stalks large round bales 90.00- 100.00. Alfalfa ground/del 250.00-260.00; blended alfalfa 50/50 blend by weight 200.00-230.00. Corn stalks ground/del 130.00-140.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 330.00 alfalfa meal 336.00-337.00.

Western Nebraska: All classes are trading steady. Supply remains light on all classes with the majority of the remaining inventory consisting of third and fourth cutting hay with most producers being sold out. Buyers continue to purchase hay on an as need basis as a way to mitigate costs until pasture land and new crop hay becomes available. The spread between high quality and dry stock hay is narrowing with price and availability being the limiting factor, not quality. Cooler than normal temperatures coupled with another bout of moisture this week limited the number of suitable days of field work delaying the planting of sugar beets, oats, and spring wheat. More spring storms blanketed the region which increased Wyoming's snowpack level to 100 percent of average. According to USDA NASS top soil moisture is rated 71 percent adequate to surplus. However the range and pasture conditions have yet to see the benefit of the recent moisture with 61 percent rated poor to very poor. According to USDA NASS Nebraska range and pasture continued to show little growth due to the cooler weather, further stressing the already limited forage supply as producers are forced to continue feeding. Trading activity was slow on moderate demand. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales. Alfalfa Large Squares: Supreme 255.00; Good 210.00. Ground and delivered 220.00. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, April 22, 2013 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 11,660; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 4,416 Head; Carcass Wt: 73-134 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 93.8; Wtd avg. Dressing: 51.2; choice or better; 95.9% YG 62.1% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 170 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .40.3 . . . . . . .230.00 - 360.00 . . . . . . . .259.53 1,007 . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .63.7 . . . . . . . .210.00 - 268.89 . . . . . . . .249.83 3,132 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .69.3 . . . . . . .218.82 - 280.00 . . . . . . . .231.57 3,303 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .81.5 . . . . . . . .200.31 - 291.00 . . . . . . . .234.61 3,638 . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .101.9 . . . . . . .190.00 - 233.76 . . . . . . . .210.83

. . . . . . . .560 . . . . . . . .560 . . . . . . .611-641 . . . . . .629 . . . . . . .660-690 . . . . . .673 . . . . . . . .734 . . . . . . . .734 . . . . . . .752-793 . . . . . .774

. . . . . . .150.50 . . . . . . . .150.50 . . . .140.00-152.50 . . . . .148.04 . . . .144.50-146.50 . . . . .145.59 . . . . . . .136.25 . . . . . . . .136.25 . . . .125.00-132.50 . . . . .128.43

Lean hog trade has traded sideways firmer to start the week with seasonally dipping numbers partially offsetting outside market weakness. For the week June futures are up 40 with some upside momentum still in play. We moved above the $90.70 50-day moving average providing the next upside target at $93, the early April high, and trade is just below that area. Above there the 100day would be the next chart resistance level up at $95.40. Cash has been helped by tighter numbers of finished pigs, while the cutout has slipped a bit on the poor weather. The dollar as turned softer, which should help exports, while packers need more cutout strength to turn margins good. Hedgers call with questions, and focus on margins looking forward. Jun. 13 8992 9457

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 13 . . . . . . .310-346 . . . . . .330 . . . .152.00-171.00 . . . . .159.19 33 . . . . . . .360-376 . . . . . .374 . . . .156.00-157.00 . . . . .156.15 85 . . . . . . .410-430 . . . . . .419 . . . .142.00-157.50 . . . . .155.26 67 . . . . . . .468-496 . . . . . .484 . . . .139.50-152.25 . . . . .149.78 52 . . . . . . .510-541 . . . . . .523 . . . .135.00-143.50 . . . . .140.18 28 . . . . . . .551-583 . . . . . .567 . . . .136.50-145.00 . . . . .139.75 26 . . . . . . . .580 . . . . . . . .580 . . . . . . .140.50 . . . . . . . .140.50 27 . . . . . . .608-625 . . . . . .611 . . . .125.00-135.25 . . . . .133.31 42 . . . . . . .650-698 . . . . . .660 . . . .123.00-133.00 . . . . .130.88 16 . . . . . . . .735 . . . . . . . .735 . . . . . . .127.75 . . . . . . . .127.75 12 . . . . . . . .772 . . . . . . . .772 . . . . . . .125.50 . . . . . . . .125.50

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 4/28/13 Confirmed: 98,080 Week Ago: 74,292 Year Ago: 88,352 Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,849 . . . . . . . . .1,270-1,550 . . . . . . . . . . .124.00-130.00 1,431 . . . . . . . . . . .127.47 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,975 . . . . . . . . .1,250-1,475 . . . . . . . . . . .127.00-130.00 1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .128.62 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,014 . . . . . . . .1,125-1,425 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-130.00 1,279 . . . . . . . . . . .128.06 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204 . . . . . . . . . .1,200-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-128.00 1,239 . . . . . . . . . . .126.59 Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,205 . . . . . . . . .1,200-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .124.00-130.00 1,307 . . . . . . . . . . .127.57 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,152 . . . . . . . . .1,100-1,360 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-130.00 1,243 . . . . . . . . . . .128.05 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,940 . . . . . . . . .1,075-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-130.00 1,175 . . . . . . . . . . .128.28 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- .................... ============================================================================================================== Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,940 . . . . . . . . . .787-972 . . . . . . . . . . . . .200.00-204.00 891 . . . . . . . . . . . .203.27 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,448 . . . . . . . . . .752-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .200.00-204.00 872 . . . . . . . . . . . .203.57 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,286 . . . . . . . . . .784-900 . . . . . . . . . . . . .201.00-204.00 846 . . . . . . . . . . . .203.72 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- .................... Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,272 . . . . . . . . . .720-947 . . . . . . . . . . . . .198.00-206.00 816 . . . . . . . . . . . .203.58 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,605 . . . . . . . . . .709-864 . . . . . . . . . . . . .199.75-204.00 783 . . . . . . . . . . . .203.77 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,139 . . . . . . . . . .704-803 . . . . . . . . . . . . .201.00-204.00 730 . . . . . . . . . . . .201.48 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- .................... -

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .22,042 . . . . . . .1,335 . . . . . .128.10 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .12,297 . . . . . . .1,232 . . . . . . .128.02 Dressed Del Steer . . .17,674 . . . . . . .873 . . . . . . . .203.51 Dressed Del Heifer . . .13,016 . . . . . . .781 . . . . . . . .203.16

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Week Ago Averages:

Year Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .20,221 . . . . . . .1,315 . . . . . . .126.30 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .17,755 . . . . . . .1,221 . . . . . . .126.27 Dressed Del Steer . . .12,071 . . . . . . .885 . . . . . . . .200.43 Dressed Del Heifer . . .7,425 . . . . . . . .777 . . . . . . . .199.29

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .29,336 . . . . . . .1,308 . . . . . . .119.76 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .26,692 . . . . . . .1,194 . . . . . . .119.85 Dressed Del Steer . . .11,139 . . . . . . .877 . . . . . . . .193.34 Dressed Del Heifer . . .5,129 . . . . . . . .824 . . . . . . . .192.61

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

14 41 33 12 17

Support: Resistance

Jun. 13 12085 12405

May 13 Feeder 13717 14367

Cattle trade has been pretty sideways to start the week, with outside markets limiting gains. The April live cattle are 5 lower and feeders are 180 lower with the corn bounce adding pressure. June Live Cattle futures have challenged recent highs at $123.50, so we are close to a breakout to the upside on the chart if better cash trade could move things higher. The cutout is strong on the week with choice $6.70 higher at 199.49 and select up 5.43 at 189.86. The choice select spread has started to indicate that the feedlots have improved

their currentness. Tighter showlists and the boxed beef trade should open the door for higher cash trade this week after some business got done at $128, which was steady on the week. Outside markets have limited buying enthusiasm so far. Hedgers call with questions.

May 2013 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

June 2013 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Aug. 13 8982 9372

June 2013 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . .92.350 High . . .93.050 Low . . . .92.200 Close . . .92.950 Change .+0.375

Open .140.025 High . .140.125 Low . .139.725 Close .140.025 Change +0.525

Open .123.000 High . .123.300 Low . .123.000 Close .123.150 Change +0.675

AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com


Page 18

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

May 2, 2013

Tax Break for Wind Energy Sweeps Forward in Nebraska Legislature Paul Hammel, The Omaha World-Herald LINCOLN, Neb. — The state would be poised to gain a $300 million wind farm under a bill given resounding initial approval Wednesday, April 24. The measure would provide a sales tax exemption for the purchase of turbines, towers and other wind-farm components — a tax break that nearby states Iowa, Kansas and Oklahoma have parlayed into a wind-energy boom. Meanwhile, Nebraska has lagged behind, ranking 26th of the 39 states that generate wind energy, despite having the fourth-best wind resources in the country. Iowa generates more than 13 times as much wind power as Nebraska — 4,536 megawatts to 337. And Nebraska ranks last among its neighboring states. Proponents of Legislative Bill 104 said the state needs to act now if it wants to develop its abundant wind resources, because a major wind-energy incentive — a federal production tax credit — is scheduled to expire at the end of the year. "This discussion is extremely important and time-sensitive. It's as important as any decision being made this year," said State Sen. Galen Hadley of Kearney. He said Nebraska just lost a major company, Facebook, to Iowa in part because the tech giant wanted access to wind energy to power a proposed data center. Facebook has a corporate goal of utilizing 25 percent renewable energy. Sen. Steve Lathrop of Omaha, who made LB 104 his priority bill, said wind farms provide a needed boost for rural areas.

Lathrop said a 200-megawatt wind farm planned near Allen in northeast Nebraska would provide lease payments to local landowners of $10,000 to $15,000 per turbine, create 200 construction jobs and 12 to 16 permanent jobs, and pay $700,000 a year in local taxes. TradeWind Energy will decide soon whether it will build in Nebraska or elsewhere, Lathrop said, so the Legislature cannot wait. But critics, including Gov. Dave Heineman, have said the measure and another wind bill should wait until next year, after the Legislature completes a major study of state tax breaks. Sens. Beau McCoy of Omaha and Charlie Janssen of Fremont said that there's no guarantee that the federal incentives won't be renewed and that tax breaks for wind farms should be weighed against other tax breaks. Heineman has said lawmakers should provide tax breaks for retirees, military veterans and other regular Nebraskans before giving a tax exemption to an out-of-state wind company. TradeWind has its headquarters in Lenexa, Kan. McCoy questioned how the Legislature could afford LB 104, and its $7.8 million estimated cost, along with another wind bill, LB 402, that is designed to help smaller turbine farms. That measure has a $6.7 million estimated cost. The Legislature has about $41 million to spend on new bills, and spending one-third of that on wind is probably too much, McCoy said. But Sen. Heath Mello of Omaha, chairman of the budget-writing Appropriations Committee and sponsor of LB 402, said both bills can be passed and funded with some adjustments.

Mello said his bill would amend a current law, the Community Based Energy Development Act, to lower thresholds for local investment, making it easier for projects to qualify for a sales tax break. Meanwhile, LB 104 simply grants a tax exemption if a project invests enough money. The bills have caused some disagreement among wind-energy proponents. Some groups, like the Nebraska Farmers Union and Center for Rural Affairs, have said they support LB 402 because it would create more economic development in rural areas by requiring purchases from Nebraska to qualify for tax breaks. The Sierra Club supports both bills. Sen. Ernie Chambers of Omaha criticized LB 104 as being only about investors. But several rural senators said any wind energy development provides an unmatched opportunity to help revitalize small towns. Frank Costanza, a representative of TradeWind, said the company prefers LB 104 because it would cost less to qualify for a tax exemption. The bill would allow the company to charge the lowest rates possible to its customers. The company estimates that Nebraska's lack of a sales tax break adds 10 percent to 15 percent to the production cost of wind power, thus making it uncompetitive with power produced in states that provide such tax advantages. Derek Sunderman of TradeWinds said that the company expects to gain about $15 million in tax breaks for its proposed wind farm but that it would generate about $40 million in new tax revenue.

Irrigation Season Remains a Mystery Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald Even a healthy snowpack in the Rocky Mountains is not enough to encourage farmers to dash into the 2013 growing season without some serious thought on how to manage their operations this year. Up from 20 percent of average in some basins, the 100 percent of average coverage now blanketing the Colorado and Wyoming mountains can produce a boom or bust runoff, depending on the weather. Managers of the three large irrigation districts in the Panhandle voiced their thoughts on how the summer could play out. At this point, with about 270,000 acre-feet of water “in the bank,” they all propose caution, even to alfalfa producers who are eager to get that first water on the crop. Gary Hergert, soils specialist at the UNL Panhandle Research and Extension Center, said producers must take into consideration their whole farming system, not just irrigation. In fact, he said, “the prevent plant insurance is a wild card. It’s a complicated issue, and about all they can do is use their best guestimate, and hope they have enough pieces of information to make it a good one.” Farmers are faced with several issues as they get into the 2013 growing season. Dennis Strauch, manager of the Pathfinder Irrigation District, said the first irrigation is very important, especially in their system where the Inland Lakes must be filled before farmers can begin irrigating their crops. Once the PID system begins deliveries, the goal is to get as many days of water as possible onto the crops. This could incorporate rotating delivery dates, reducing amounts step by step, and daily monitoring of water levels. “The whole idea is to buy time, minimize losses, and give producers the flexibility they need,” Strauch said.

To move ahead as quickly as possible, Strauch expects the PID to begin transferring water to the Inland Lakes early this week, a process that will last about 17 days. FID manager Kevin Adams said return flows, or the lack of them, are impacting his district’s farmers. The district has experienced a 17 percent reduction in its supplemental storage to meet demand because return flow has declined. “It’s an intricate system,” Adams told the gathering. “Most of the stream flow and aquifer are built by the three large systems.” Rick Preston, manager of the GFL district, said a tremendous snowpack is critical to area irrigators because they have no ability to store water for later use. The GFL diversion from Whalen dam east of Guernsey, Wyo., has a 64 percent efficiency rating. The rest of it evaporates or soaks into the ground during the delivery process. “We live or die on those efficiencies,” he said. “We tend to be edgy about getting water to where it’s needed the most.” According to Preston, the pivots have affected return flows. He noted that the labor issues have been resolved, but farmers do not use less water. He said there is no deep percolation to be used again. Depletions mean more demand on the river, and that means more demand on storage. “It’s frustrating,” Preston said. “It all affects the system from one end to the other.” Water management is not the only thing producers have to consider this year. Without enough water in the system, growers are investigating the options in the USDA insurance program, prevented plant. Under this program, farmers who do not have enough water to raise their normal crops may, under a barrage of rules and regulations, apply for prevent plant coverage. This protects the farmer from complete loss on his crop. According to David Petersen, RCIS, area claims supervisor, farmers have options, but

must meet a list of qualifications, and follow the rules and regulations to the letter. The number of acres and how they are used are critical. The “reasonable expectation” of adequate water is key to a successful prevent plant insurance experience, Petersen said. “It’s still an uncertain water year,” Hergert said. “With this moisture we’ve received, if their tillage is done, they’re in beautiful condition. When it warms up, they plant, and they’re ready to go.” Those who still need to get their fields ready, are the same as throwing away the moisture that arrived during the past two to three weeks, he said. Following Thursday’s meeting, which was held at the Gering Civic Center and attended by about 70 people, including farmers, water managers, seed salesmen, insurance agents and representatives of other segments of area interests, whose opinions of the current situation were plentiful, but not many were overly optimistic. “We aren’t out of the woods yet,” said Tim Schwartzkopf, a Mitchell area farmer. “This moisture is a plus, and we’re on the right track, but it’s still a scary situation.” Visiting with Schwartzkopf was Danny Gifford, a Pioneer seed representative, who agrees. “There are still a lot of nervous farmers,” he said. “It’s improved, but we still need a lot of help.” Timing of the snowmelt runoff as well as demand, are still unknowns, he said. However, he noted that more efficient irrigation, and more drought-tolerant seed will help in the future, even though they are not cure-alls, “We’re all in the same boat, going toward the same goal,” Gifford said. The irrigation districts will have a clearer picture of their heading after they meet early next month.

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Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Johnstown Family Receives Conservation Award Martha Stoddard, The Omaha World-Herald LINCOLN — A Nebraska ranch family that has handed down an ethic of conservation from father to son was honored Friday for its stewardship. Gov. Dave Heineman announced the Beel family of Johnstown as the recipients of the 2013 Leopold Conservation Award. The award, named in honor of worldrenowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, is presented to agricultural families in Nebraska who practice responsible land stewardship and management. "Conservation on private land is something Nebraskans do very well," the governor said. The Beel brothers, Frank, Henry and Adam, along with wives Jennifer, Mary and Jenny, operate a nearly 22,000-acre cattle operation along the border between Brown and Cherry Counties. Their grandfather, Henry O. Beel, bought the family land in 1937. His son, Henry C. Beel, joined him 23 years later. The third generation took over the ranch in 1990. Frank Beel said the older generations passed on the importance of treating the land with care and the brothers now are teaching the same attitude to their children. "Because God owns it, I must take the best care of it I can," he said. Ranch records show that Henry O. Beel entered into the first of many conservation plans for the ranch in 1945. He developed a soil and water plan allowing for rotational grazing, weed mowing, seeding of wheat and well placement. In more recent years, the brothers have spent numerous hours planning, designing and coordinating the installation of 32 miles of pipeline across the ranch. The system included 89 hydrants, six wells and 45 new tanks. Along with 67 existing windmills and tanks, the system provides a water supply in every pasture on the ranch, allowing them to take best advantage of a grazing rotation. The effort proved valuable during last year's drought, allowing them to maintain their cattle number during the second driest season on record. In 2004, the Beels signed a 10-year wildlife management program agreement. Under it, they created wildlife sanctuaries that now offer exceptional viewing of birds and other wildlife. The Beels also host and educate people who otherwise would not be exposed to ranch life. "The Beel family has always been and always will be excellent stewards of the natural resources that they are entrusted with," said Dennis Bauer of the University of NebraskaLincoln Cooperative Extension, in a letter of support. The Sand County Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Madison, Wis., teams up with local groups to present awards in nine states. In Nebraska, the program is co-sponsored by the Nebraska Cattlemen and Cargill. The Beels will receive $10,000 and a Leopold crystal, which will be presented at the Nebraska Cattlemen's annual convention in December.

Page 19

Asia-Pacific Region Offers Abundant Trade Opportunities for U.S. Agriculture The Grand Island Independent WASHINGTON, D.C. — Strong leadership by U.S. government officials in the TransPacific Partnership negotiations will yield positive results for American agriculture, the American Farm Bureau Federation told Congress last week. Bob Hanson, president of Montana Farm Bureau and an AFBF board member, testified before the Senate Finance Committee regarding the Asia-Pacific region, which he said holds great promise for U.S. agriculture and its role as the food supplier. "The major issue in trade now for the AsiaPacific region is progress on the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations and the addition of Japan to these talks," Hanson said. "The aim of the negotiations is to reach a comprehensive, high-standard agreement that will improve the conditions of trade between the participating countries, which currently include Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam and the United States." Japan is the United States’ fourth-largest agricultural export destination, with $13.5 billion in sales in 2012. "While Japan is a top market for U.S. agricultural exports of wheat, corn, soybeans, beef and pork, it also has many restrictive policies in place that inhibit U.S. agricultural imports, such as substantial tariffs on dairy, horticulture, rice and other products, along with various sanitary and phytosanitary barriers," Hanson said. Hanson urged Congress to take a strong leadership role in the TPP negotiations, especially regarding the addition of Japan to the talks.

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LEAD Applications Now Available The Grand Island Independent LINCOLN — Fellowship applications for Nebraska LEAD (Leadership Education/ Action Development) Group 33 are now available for men and women involved in production agriculture or agribusiness. "Up to 30 motivated men and women with demonstrated leadership potential will be selected from five geographic districts across our state," said Terry Hejny, Nebraska LEAD program director. In addition to monthly three-day seminars from mid-September through early April, Nebraska LEAD fellows also participate in a 10-day national study/travel seminar and a two-week international study/travel seminar. Seminar themes include leadership assessment and potential, natural resources and energy, agricultural policy, leadership through communication, the political process, global perspectives, nuclear energy, social issues, understanding and developing leadership skills, agribusiness and marketing, advances in health care and the resources and people of Nebraska’s Panhandle, Hejny said. The Nebraska LEAD Program is designed to prepare spokespersons, problem-solvers and decision makers for Nebraska and its agricultural industry. In its 32nd year, the program is operated by the Nebraska Agricultural Leadership Council, a nonprofit organization, in collaboration with the University of Nebraska’s Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Applications are due no later than June 15 and are available via e-mail from the Nebraska LEAD Program. Contact Shana at sgerdes2@unl.edu for applications or more information. You also can request an application by writing Room 318, Biochemistry Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 68583-0763, or by calling 402-472-6810. You can visit http://www.lead.unl.edu for information about the selection process.

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Page 20

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

FCSAmerica Announces New Grant Program

CENTRAL PLATTE NRD BOARD CONCERNED ABOUT LB522 Continued from page 1

Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Farm Credit Services of America (FCSAmerica), a customer-owned financial cooperative, has announced a new grant program called the Working Here Fund. The Working Here Fund provides up to $2,000 each in grants for projects and organizations that make a positive, long-term impact in the areas of agriculture education, young and beginning producers, and hunger and nutrition. Applications for the current grant period can be completed online through June 30 online at http://www.fcsamerica.com /workingherefund. "Agriculture works at FCSAmerica," said Doug Stark, president and CEO of FCSAmerica. "As members of the communities we serve, we’re actively demonstrating our commitment with contributions that serve the rural agriculture life we value so highly." Working Here Fund grants will be determined quarterly based on the specific selection criteria outlined on the FCSAmerica website. The next Working Here Fund grant period will run July 1 through September 30, 2013. The Working Here Fund is part of FCSAmerica’s community involvement program. In 2012, FCSAmerica employees volunteered more than 4,000 hours and provided more than $1.4 million in donations to causes and organizations that are making a local difference in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. Each year FCSAmerica contributes more than $225,000 in scholarships and sponsorships for Young and Beginning Programs, leadership programs, 4-H and FFA groups for a variety of local and state needs.

users in the future, saying it could jeopardize a variety of ongoing water management projects in the Platte River Basin. The bill, according to the Central Platte NRD, would provide compensation to Republican River Basin surface-water projects for loss of water due to the Republican River Compact. This past week, a Natural Resources Committee amendment, adopted 26-0, replaced the bill. The amended bill would require the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to provide compensation to affected water users equal to the current compensation for dry-year leases used by natural resources districts. An amendment introduced by Sen. Mark Christensen of Imperial, adopted 27-0, would place a $10 million limit on compensation provided to landowners under the bill. For both fiscal years 2013-14 and 2014-15, $5 million would be transferred from the state's general fund to its water resources cash fund. The bill would direct $10 million to pay surfacewater irrigators as much as $150 an acre per year for two years as compensation for the loss of water. Of that, $6.6 million would come from a fund the Legislature has been paying into since 2007. The other $3.4 million would be new spending from the general fund. The measure also would set policy so the $150an-acre yearly payment could be increased to $300. During their meeting, Central Platte NRD board members agreed to contact local senators and officials to express their concerns that making payments to a select group of irrigation districts that haven't been deprived of their property rights will be seen as unfair by those who don't receive payments and could invite litigation for similar compensation in the future. According to Central Platte NRD, there are grave concerns about LB522, particularly for the Central Platte NRD, as the ongoing funding of several of the district's water management projects may be cut off from 40 percent to 60 percent of funding previously committed by the state, involving literally millions of dollars. The Central Platte NRD has formal contracts with the DNR and would be left holding the bag for remaining costs if the funding is taken out from under the district, according to the NRD. The projects are integral to providing offset water for

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the Platte River required by the Central Platte NRD Integrated Management Plan and the State Basinwide Plan. Christensen selected LB522 as his priority bill in this legislative session. He said the bill seeks to settle a state policy issue regarding the power and obligations the DNR should have when sending closing notices to surface-water appropriators and users during a compact call year. The DNR adopted a regulation in 2006 to prohibit surface-water appropriators from storing or diverting in-stream flows in order to comply with an interstate compact. A 2007 negotiation between the department and landowners established a compensation schedule for those unable to access surface water for irrigation. Christensen said currently, surface water users in the Republican River Basin have been issued closing notices by DNR to prohibit the storing and diversion of such water, requiring it to pass through Nebraska's dam projects to Kansas. "This is great for compliance with the Republican River Compact, but not so good if it is done without compensation for our local economy and future precedents," he said. Christensen said LB522 would require the state to compensate users when DNR issues closing notices to comply with a compact or decree. Prior to this year, he said, the state has paid for water users to forgo the use of surface water. What concerns Christensen is if DNR can shut off surface-water irrigation without compensation, "then what is to stop them from shutting off groundwater irrigation without compensation?" "If the argument is that the state owns surface water, so it has no obligation to compensate for water passing through to Kansas, then the same argument can be used with groundwater," he said. Christensen said that economically, that precedent is unwise and bad for agriculture in Nebraska. "It would definitely not be good news for southwest Nebraska, or in the future for the Platte River Basin," he said. Christensen said Nebraska needs to decide as a state whether it is going to compensate its water users to forgo the use of water. "Injecting uncertainty from year to year into our ag economy is not wise," Christensen said.

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51857


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 21

Schedule of Events May 16 - Humboldt (Richardson County) Humboldt Flower Show; Richardson County Ag Building. Flower show with lunch served. (402) 8552485 www.ci.humboldt.ne.us May 17-18 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Nebraska Wine and Jazz Festival; Downtown, 25th & Central Ave. Listen to jazz from Nebraska musicians and choose your favorites from the wine store and local food vendors. Fri, 5-11pm; Sat, 3-11pm, $20 (308) 237-3114 www.kearneyfoundation.org/nebras ka-wine-jazzfestival May 18 - Ashland (Saunders County) Mud, Sweat and Beers run; Quarry Oaks. www.mudsweatandbeerrun.com May 18 - Chadron (Dawes County) Chadron Adventure Race and Free Park Entry Day; Chadron State Park. Chadron State Park Racers locate checkpoints along the route via running, hiking, mountain biking and kayaking. (308) 432-6297 www.angrycowadventures.com May 18 - Crawford (Dawes County) Free Park Day at Fort Robinson State Park; Fort Robinson State Park. Free jeep rides, horse drawn tours, kids' fishing derby and BBQ. No park permits or fishing permits required. 9am-4pm, Free. (308) 665-2900 www.outdoornebraska.ne.gov May 18 - Grand Island (Hall County) Lincoln Highway Classic Car Show; Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer, 3133 W. Hwy 34. Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Lincoln Highway with a day of classic cars, historic programs and more. 9am-5pm, $8-$10 (308) 385-5316 www.stuhrmuseum.org May 18 - North Platte (Lincoln County) Woofstock; Memorial Park, 1100 4th St. A day for the dogs in the park! Look—alike contests, grooming and activities. 10am-2pm (308) 650-7297 www.pphs.com May 18 - Waverly (Lancaster County) Camp Creek Threshers Swap Meet; Camp Creek Threshers Show Grounds, 17200 Bluff Rd. Machinery, tractors, parts and equipment and flea market. 6:30am-3pm, Free. (402) 489-1680 www.ccthreshers.org May 18-19 - Louisville (Cass County) Becoming an Outdoors Family Camp (BOF); Platte River State Park. Learn outdoor skills including fishing, camping, kayaking, shooting, hiking and more. Events begin at 8am Sat, $99/family (402) 471-5547 www.outdoornebraska.ne.gov

May 18-19 - Springfield (Sarpy County) 2013 Spring Art Festival; Weiss Studios, 13603 Pflug Rd. Art festival featuring the work of self-taught artist Carl Weiss and his son Adam. Fri, 10am-6pm; Sat, 11am-5pm carlweissart.com May 18-19 - Valentine (Cherry County) Outlaw Trail Scenic Byway Trail Ride; Trail ride to Niobrara River Ranch. Enjoy the scenic beauty of Doc Middleton Country on Nebraska's Outlaw Trail. (402) 376-1164 www.nebraskaoutlawtrail.org May 19 - Grand Island (Hall County) 28th Annual Vintage & Classic Wheels Swap Meet; Grand Island Mall parking lot. 7pm Rick Deaton (308) 379-1529 May 19 - Papillion (Sarpy County) 2013 Papillion Half Marathon; Papillion/La Vista South Stadium. Half marathon and 10K fun walk. 7:45am (402) 597-2041 www.papillionhalfmarathon.com May 24 - Humboldt (Richardson County) Memorial Day BBQ; City-wide Celebrate with a BBQ, ice cream social and Happy Czechs Polka band. 5-8pm (402) 862-2821 www.ci.humboldt.ne.us May 24-26 - Superior (Nuckolls County) Victorian Festival; City-wide Celebrate the heritage of Superior. Parade, children's activities, food, Victorian tea honoring Lady Vestey, craft fair, dances and more. 9am-4pm Sherry Kniep (402) 879-3419 www.victorianfestival.info May 24-Aug 23 - Papillion (Sarpy County) Summer Concert Series; Shadow Lake Towne Center, Hwy 370 & 72nd St. 6:30-8:30pm (402) 3325771 www.shadowlakeshopping.com May 24-Aug 30 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) 13th Annual Friday Nights Live Concert Series; South Pointe Pavillions Shopping Center, 27th & Pine Lake Rd. Enjoy everything from R&B to rock to jazz. Fridays, 6:30-8:30pm, Free Julie Lattimer (402) 421-2114 www.southpointeshopping.com May 24-June 2 - Grand Island (Hall County) Appaloosa Horse Show: Fonner Park, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd. Featuring young horse enthusiasts from across the state. (308) 380-7599 www.neapp.org May 25 - Beatrice (Gage County) Monumental Fiddling Championship; Homestead National Monument of America, 8523 W. NE Hwy 4. A day of music and competition with fiddlers and musicians of all ages. 10am-9pm, Free. Merrith Baughman (402) 223-3514 www.nps.gov/home

May 25 - Niobrara (Knox County) Buffalo Cookout and Interpretive Program; Niobrara State Park, Niobrara State Park Group Lodge. 6pm, $6-$9. (402) 857-3373 www.outdoornebraska.ne.gov May 25 - Odell (Gage County) Odell Run for Fun; City park. Includes 1 mile, 5K and 10K races. 7am, $10-$20 Jill Scheele (402) 766-4377 www.odellnebraska.us May 25-26 - Ainsworth (Brown County) 4th Annual Ainsworth Tractor and Truck Pull; N. Old Hwy 7. Antique tractor and truck pull. (402) 7601324 May 25-27 - Brownville (Nemaha County) Spring Flea Market; Main St. More than 200 vendors from across the United States. Antiques, flowers, jewelry, collectibles and food. Free. Charles Anderson (402) 488-0070 www.brownville-ne.com May 25-27 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Fort Kearny State Historical Park's Memorial Day Weekend Event; 1020 V Rd. Living history demonstrations and cannon firing at 2pm daily. 9am-5pm, Park permit required, plus $1-$2 admission (308) 865-5305 www.outdoornebraska.ne.gov May 26 - Atkinson (Holt County) Atkinson Half Marathon & Festival of Arts and Agriculture; Downtown. A $1,000 prize in the men and women's divisions! Marathon is followed by a street festival with local musicians, painters, photographers, artisans, farmers and entertainers. 7:30am-3:00pm www.atkinsonhalfmarathon.org May 27 - Omaha (Douglas County) Old Fashioned Memorial Day Observance; Prospect Hill Cemetery, 3202 Parker St. Featuring a 40-piece brass band, re-enactors, a 21-musket salute, Civil War discussions and a tribute to Anna Wilson, an early Omaha businesswoman. 10:45am - noon, Free. (402) 490-8410 www.prospecthillomaha.org May 31-June 1 - Norfolk (Madison County) Midwest Bikefest; Off Road Ranch, 2900 Old Hwy 8. Bands, poker run, vendors and beer garden. (402) 844-5464 www.offroadranch.net May 31-June 2 - Loup City (Sherman County) Polish Days; Main St. Ethnic festival with music, dancing, melodrama, food vendors and games. (308) 745-0430 www.loupcity.com

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Page 22

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

April 18, 2013

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, May 6th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on THURSDAY, May 16th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, call 800-658-3191 and ask for Jodi 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H, OLDER MODEL, UPRIGHT DISTRIBUTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE OK - LATE 70’S 21’ PULL-TYPE WINDROW DRAPER, $750.00, (580) 829-2543 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - JD 530 BALER, (308) 882-4588

2011 John Deere

468 Baler 220 Bales. $29,500. Laramie, WY

307-399-9425 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 880-2889

1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS WANTED TO BUY ID - NH 8500 ROUND BALE STACKER, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - RICHARDTON HIGH DUMP WAGONS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS/PARTS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND’S-ALL MODELS/PARTS. CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 CO - NEW HOLLAND 1063 BALE WAGON: 160 BALE CAPACITY. EXCELLANT CONDITION & READY TO GO TO WORK! WITH REMOTE CONTROLS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. CALL AND LEAVE MESSAGE., (970) 302-3888 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 MO - AC D17’S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 FOR SALE NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885

1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 8 HOLE 15” TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5’ WOODS BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) 865-2541 IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & OTHERS. WE SHIP DAILY. ALSO BUYING ALL MAKES AND MODELS OF TRACTORS. PLEASE CALL:, (217) 370-1149

1206

International Farmall Tractor Fresh paint, fuel injectors, 18/4 radial tires on back. No cab. Completely restored. Very nice tractor. $15,000.00

308-279-0399 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS. MOST MAKES AND MODELS, WE SHIP DAILY. BUYING TRACTORS AND HAY EQUIPMENT FOR SALVAGE. MILLER REPAIR MILLERREPAIR. COM OR CALL:, (308) 5824303 1102 - LOADERS FOR SALE NE - 40” MANURE BUCKET OR 80” DIRT/SNOW BUCKET FOR AC MODEL 170 LOADER. $75 OR $125, (308) 624-2177

345 DU-AL LOADER Includes: hay head, and push-off. Fits: 686 IH or Farmall. Excellent condition. Price is negotiable. Leave Message: 605.342.3760 Rapid City, SD 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 1105 - DISKS FOR RENT NE - FOR SALE: SWEEP BLADES AND ROLLABLE BORON DISC BLADES. JESS PUTNAM DISC ROLLING. OVERTON NEBR. FULLTIME BUSINESS WITH OVER 30 YRS. EXPERIENCE. WE ALSO INSTALL BLADES! CALL: 800-987-6612 OR CELL NUMBER:, (308) 325-0050 FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344

S 120 LOW 6EP P E GEA F W OR DS N S N A P ALE R HEAD E E DS S E W HEA 1101 - TRACTORS S SW ON(3, 0 150 PLO E ' N I 5 6 R 4X NDITI NE 8) 99 HP G 110 ALE OMB IPPE FOR SALE 2-C S STR 871KING CO 1 110 ER- A 5-5515 EARHE 0 ' R 3 0 O 1 X 2 ) KH AD, 5 M D 54 LE E LE NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF F 6 RFOR SA BOURN .00, (78 - F GOO ) 865-2 NG 5P0ICH P 4:3 ARILL P $ I LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, KS L O A 0 0 E N K T 7 , , 2 0 4 00 AP E IOSH :W W (6 LE X ,5 5 G ' DR , B (308) 436-4369 PLO 00.00, F 95-559105H HA- RURSO 74$-600 , 70 H E ARH KS - , ER, $5 6 3 R W 151 N 960 DAPTE 0 50ITHH P 048:3) 8 MOT , (308 P 5:4 E ADHSEAD KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS $1,1 - NE 308) 9 S W CD9O - CJOD A LL 58 NE EELS, ( , 6-16' 3.00H0, P(130:1 $45O0 NORS ) 624- $650 0:711 M BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) A F WH IH 560 , $950 P 4:3 C1U$S7H0I 7, 47-0H GE ARH 2177 , OKN-E OSRERSIAES 0 RNSCTE2265 865-2541 L0 ,$ 08 P2 -A NE - NEW L /50 - 12,5E 361 LK NOU 18'S 30 8) , 5 : E AD IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, 8 4- 00, (300, (3080HP 5: 3 $40 S IAWEEWEELL, $3X,4(X5880) POLY S BAOLR IKE 0 L 3 RLOER , 6" USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, E ) 62 4 $6 0, 2 0. 7 456 - JI CAS , $1,00 4-21 00, (712 1L2A6R5GE2N0," N&E.3 N36E0A-R037 IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & , S 7 ) E 8 R M ( 7 N LTE NE 8N7E0 R. O3U0 308 220 IND ENOTHERS. DAILY. PLEASE HERWE SHIP 0COIULE2RS H1A9Y09- C- OBRHUEL-1AL1DS24 30NDS, M ) 832- E Y 26 WIND G GER - OT(217)B370-1149 R U F 0 E A 3 N CALL, 6 O 3 0 GI O AKE 156 0 R TR 5 AR LT3 WFROR SBAALLE2S8T2A-1L AIN 4 AINE - SALE STERE ED TK 32FOVRO W-INTCR H '40'S, OFF A K R R T E P G G N S B F P D H NE E ALE A & - REGISTERED ED. ER OLWIOSN 2003 WA COBBSS - 'SO SAL 30'SUC& OND2I604 ANGUS, CELL: P F P O O S D O G C K R ' 5 A R 732-3356 SHS308-870-1119, R AS ALS(308) &G LE 2 H , WIN 2E0A0 SE, MO BL AC - J E , &HA, L 9TCHE E G TO S E A ' A S S S 6 O D R S R 3 A P T R 4 S TOR C IN2G HEDIN 999 ES. WAN LE. ASS 19L9 525B-L A RG AN K MO FO 11 GSI L TAR R VY 1 NE - (25)TOCOMING 2 YR OLD ERSA KDS -DU, R$9A9CCNOEW 20 OL OR 360 07- 5 MO CK M BR RGAN -3673 PLE A CUT FO TED A NET 5 1 R 8 2 1 E K 5 I 9 S CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 9 O O L 567 US S PAY 86 L ER

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

1105 - DISKS FOR SALE - CONT’D

DISC ROLLING SOFT STEEL BLADES ..........AND..........

ABLE TO GRIND NONE ROLLABLE HARD BORON BLADES Call Roy Eckdaul Cell: 402-660-8298 Or Leave Message: 402-377-2437 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE NE - C-IH 12R36” VERTICAL FOLD 3 PT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 995-5515 NE - 16 JD 3 BUSHEL BOXES W/RADIAL BEAN METERS. $300 PER ROW. WILL SEPARATE., (308) 380-7161 NE - JD REFUGE BOX WITH CARRIER, $500.00, (308) 380-7161 1110 - SEEDERS FOR SALE NE - 4010 CONCORD AIR SEEDER. 308-3600377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1111 - DRILLS FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 1112 - ROTARY HOE FOR SALE NE - 30’ JD ROTARY HOE CALL FOR DETAILS, (308) 882-4588 1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131

Hiniker 6000 8-Row Cultivator. Field Ready! Fertilizer Attachments. $8,000 Mike: 970-580-0731 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $400.00, (402) 787-2244 KS - ‘07 MILLER MD 1000, 90’ BOOM, CUMMINS & ALLISON, RAVEN GPS, 1500 HRS, $95,000.00, (620) 865-2541 1117 - FIELD CULTIVATORS FOR SALE KS - CRUSTBUSTER 32’ SPRINGTOOTH FIELD CONDITIONER, HARROW, $500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - J. D. CULTIVATOR UNIT. 8X30”, 5X7 BAR, HEAVY DUTY HITCH & GAGE WHEELS. CALL:, (402) 364-2592 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY NE - YETTER 2995 COULTERS, (308) 2821330 FOR SALE NE - 1000 GALLON PROPANE TANK W/RUNNING GEAR, (402) 726-2488 KS - SURE CROP QUALITY LIQUID FERTILIZERS. SEMI-LOAD DISCOUNTS. SOIL ANALYSIS CREDITS. FLEXIBLE FINANCING OPTIONS. “ASSURING CROP SUCCESS FOR YOU”. DELIVERY DIRECT TO YOUR FARM. ASSURE CROP, SENECA, KS. SURECROPFERTILIZERS. COM, (800) 635-4743

1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 NE - ORTHMAN FLAT FOLD 8R30” TOOLBAR, $2,000.00, (308) 380-7161 TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT. NEW & USED PARTS. TRACTORS, COMBINES, HAY & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & FARM EQUIPMENT SALES. ORDER PARTS ONLINE AT: KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 582-3000

“The Other Cash Crop... Hunting Rights Our hunters will pay top dollar to hunt your land.

Free info packet & quote 866-309-1507 www.BaseCampLeasing.com 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - GOOD USED 25 OR 30 HP ELECTRIC IRR. WELL MOTOR, (308) 624-2177 NE - 4 CYL CHEVY OR FORD IRRIGATION MOTOR, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176” $15 EA; 4 GATES C240” $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240” $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270” $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94” X 1 1/4” WIDE $10, (308) 624-2177 NE - CHEVY 350, (402) 726-2488 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - C. C. W. 3X4 BERKELEY PUMP, PUMP AVAILABLE. CALL:, (402) 364-2592 1203 - PIPE WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED TO BUY: USED ALUMINUM PIPE. PAYING TOP CASH PRICES. WE PICK UP ANYWHERE IN THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. MINIMUM PURCHASE 1000’ PIPE. CALL FOR A QUOTE, (308) 380-4549 FOR SALE MILES AND MILES, used aluminum pipe, siderolls, pumps, gaskets, PVC, motors, cooling jackets, hydrants, 10” water transfer pipe. WATERDOG IRRIGATION CO. Littlefield, Texas Ph-806-385-4620; Fax-806-385-5734 www.waterdogirrigation.com 1205 - GENERATOR FOR SALE IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 IA - WINCO GENERATORS, NEW 1PH 50KW $4,750. KATO LIGHT NEW 1PH AND 3PH WINPOWER USED 1PH $1,000. CALL WES SEBETKA AT, (641) 990-1094 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 70 HP 4:5 $650, (308) 624-2177 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS-90HP 4:3 $450, 50HP 5:6 $650, 50HP 5:4 $600, 30HP 4:3 $300, 50HP 1:1 $800, (308) 6242177 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 80HP 6:5 $700, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (308) 624-2177 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - PIVOT TRACK CLOSER, (402) 726-2488

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191


May 2, 2013 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE

SOUTHWEST RAAFT CO. Rotating auto-Aligning Flotation Track • Reduces center-pivot irrg rut problems • No tire slippage & digging • Works on all brands of sprinklers Bob Gruner - 806-678-0268 Bob_gruner@hotmail.com www.nostuckpivots.com

1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMP W/ PRIMING VALVE ATTACHED TO 262 ALLIS W/ RADIATOR ON CART. CALL:, (402) 364-2592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 NE - IN STOCK UNDERGROUND PIPE, WIRE, FITTINGS, AND ELECTRICAL PARTS. TRENCHING AND INSTALLATION AVAILABLE. CALL US FOR ALL YOUR GRAIN AUTOMATION NEEDS., (402) 678-2765 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 OK - ‘82 GLEANER N6, 24’ HEADER CELL 580-525-1265, $4,500.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24’ HEAD CELL 580525-1265, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24’ HEADER CELL 580- 525-1265, $4,000.00, (580) 361-2265 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET’S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 SD - NH 98C 12 ROW 30 CORN HEAD: HH, HDP, KNEIGHT ROLLS, FIELD READY, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $48,500 ASK FOR JOEL AT, (605) 350-1138 KS - 2011 JD 630R HEADER, ONLY 1000 ACRES, SHEDDED & LIKE NEW, $27,000.00, (620) 865-2541 OK - 1998 MACDON 960 30’, JD ADAPTOR, $11,000.00, (580) 361-2265 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - DEMCO 550 OR 650 GRAVITY WAGONS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE NE - A&L 425 BUSHEL. ROLLOVER TARP, 540 PTO, (308) 436-4369 1312 - HARVESTORS & SILOS FOR SALE WI - SILO DOORS: WOOD OR STEEL! SHIPPED PROMPLY TO YOUR FARM. HARDWARE AVAILABLE WITH STAINLESS STEEL STAPLES. PLEASE CALL:, (800) 222-5726 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 NE - 6000, 4000, 1000, 500 BUSHEL BINS TO BE MOVED, (402) 726-2488

FOR SALE!

Automatic Grain Bin Fan Controller’s by Sentry Pack. The easiest to opperate. *Most reliable controller available.

Valley Grain Managment Ord, NE 308-730-0251 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LOANS W/ GREAT RATES. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 OK - ROTEX GRAIN CLEANER, HAS CORN SCREENS RIGHT NOW, CELL 580-525-1265 OR, $4,000.00, (580) 361-2265

Nebraska Farm & Ranch 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE - CONT’D IA - 24’ TO 42’ COMBINE HEAD MOVERS., (712) 210-6587 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 FOR SALE

BULK TANKS-USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Buy-Sell-Trade

800-844-5427 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 1415 - FURNACES AND HEATERS FOR SALE NE - NEW VAL6 PORTABLE DIESEL RADIANT HEATERS. DAYSTAR RADIANT HEATERS. NEW WASTE OIL HEATERS W/TANKS. AG & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT, (402) 893-4745 ELIMINATE • RISING • FUEL COSTS: Clean, safe and efficient wood heat. Central Boiler Classic and E-Classic Outdoor Wood Furnace; heats multiple buildings with only one furnace. 25 year warranty available. Heat with wood, so splitting! Available in dual fuel ready models. www.CentralBoiler.com. WE ALSO HAVE whole house pellet/corn/biomass furnaces. Load once per month with hopper. www.Maximheat.com.

A-1 Heating Systems Instant rebates may apply! Call today! 307-742-4442. 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 NE - PORTABLE EVAPORATIVE COOLERS FOR SHOPS, SCHOOLS, BEAT THE HEAT AFFORDABLY., (402) 893-4745 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 IA - 6 ROW 30 BUFFALO CULTIVATOR WITH GUIDANCE SYSTEM. CALL, (712) 210-6587 KS - JD 1800 DISPLAY, ONLY ONE YEAR OF USE, LIKE NEW, $1,250.00, (620) 865-2541 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 KS - WANT TO BUY: ALFALFA/GRASS PICKED UP OR DELIVERED ROUND OR LARGE SQUARE BALES. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL KEVIN MELVIN AT, (620) 5463507

ALFALFA WANTED: Big squares or rounds. Alfalfa & any grass wanted.

Chris, PH-620-253-2661;

Toll Free-877-394-0890 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 2ND, 3RD, & 4TH CUTTING SMALL SQUARES. GOOD QUALITY HAY, (308) 8824588 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474

1501 - ALFALFA HAY FOR SALE - CONT’D

FOR SALE

Grass or Alfalfa! Delivery by semi-loads Call Steve for more information

308-325-5964

SD - HAY FOR SALE! ROUND BALES, MIDSQUARE BALES. GRASS HAY OR ALFALFA. CALL:, (605) 842-3125 SD - POWELL TRUCKING: HAY FOR SALE BY THE SEMI LOADS! CALL KENNY AT 605-8770741 OR 719-469-4527 OR SUE AT 605-4316838 RAPID CITY SOUTH DAKOTA., (605) 877-0741 MO - ZIMMERMAN’S HAY. BIG SQUARE BALES OF PREMIUM ALFALFA HAY. DELIVERY AVAILABLE., (660) 216-0938 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 1504 - OAT/WHEAT/RYE HAY FOR SALE

All Types Hay For Sale: Grass, Alfalfa, Mix, CRP Hay, Etc. We Do the Trucking.

717-377-9994 Please Leave Message.

1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 1506 - CORN FOR SALE NE - WHOLE PLANT IRRIGATED CORN WITH GRAIN. RFV 141 TDN 70. 4, PROTEIN 6. 7, NET WRAPPED 1300# BALES, APPROXIMATLY 80-100 BU PER/ACRE CORN. $175.00 TON. LITCHFIELD NEBR. CALL:, (308) 750-7829 1509 - SORGHUM FOR SALE

SORGHUM SUDAN GRASS $42/50# Bag

OTHER TYPES OF FORAGE PRODUCTS ALSO AVAILABLE. FROM RYE TO PEAS AND SUDAN TO ROUNDUP ALFALFA.

Page 23 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER WANTED TO BUY

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN & FEED PRODUCTS IN ANY CONDITION WET OR DRY INCLUDING DAMAGED SILO CORN AT TOP DOLLAR WE HAVE VACS & TRUCKS CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE, INC. 800-205-5751 NE - WANTED: FORAGE ACRES TO CUT. CUSTOMER SHARES. CALL:, (308) 627-3082 FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114

Net Wrap, Twine, Covers, Hay Preservative, Silage Wrap Preseason Sale $48" X 9,840' $185, 64" X 7,000' $178, 64" X 10,000' $250, 20,000' 110 twine $18.95, 4,000' 350 knot $23.95, 50' X 100' Cover $179, Silage Wrap $68.50, Ask About Free Delivery Jordan Ag Supply (800) 726-0401 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1810 - MANURE SPREADERS FOR SALE OK - 2008 INTERNATIONAL PAYSTAR. CAT, 18SP, ROTOMIX VERTICAL SPREADER 80219. 1337 ENGINE HOURS, 21, 853 MILES. EXCELLENT CONDITION! FAMILY OWNED/ OPPERATED. WEDER FARMS: 580-735-2344 EVE. 508-735 -2751 OR CELL,, (580) 7275323 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 24’ HAY FEEDERS MEALS ON WHEELS. SAVES HAY, SAVES TIME & SAVES MONEY! CALL, (712) 210-6587 1815 - WATERERS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471

GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS Tanks made from used earth moving tires.

Sizes from 6 to 13 foot. Can be open topped or drinker holes cut for frost-free winter use. Full loads can be delivered anywhere in the United States.

Guaranteed best quality & lowest price.

Call

605/473-5356

1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS OR ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20’ BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - WE ARE YOUR W-W NORTHSTAR DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421

Located 3 1/2 miles east of Plainview, NE on Highway 20

“If it’s GREEN and GROWS, we probably can supply IT!” Ask about early order/early pay discounts!

To Sell Corn call

Alan Koerperich

Husker Trading at

970-580-5438 402-261-8725

866-348-7537

alankoerperich@yahoo.com 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 KS - FOR SALE: HIGH QUALITY TRITICALE SEED. CLEANED, 54LB TEST WEIGHT, 90’S % GERMINATION. REASONABLE DELIVERY FEE. DELIVER ANYWHERE BULK OR BAGGED. CALL BROCK BAKER AT 316-2491907, (620) 983-2144 IA - CERTIFIED SHELBY 427 SEED OATS, (712) 210-6587

We Buy Damaged Grain.

To Purchase Distillers Grains call

Ryan or Todd at 877-487-5724 ext 3 or 1

WASTE LESS HAY HayMaster Nutrition Injection Systems. Inc. www.haymastersystems.com PROTEIN MINERALS VITAMINS ENERGY

Improve Forage Palatability & Increase Consumption

OLD HAY? POOR HAY? Inject and Feed

Grain Vac’s Available. Also damaged grain from ground piles. Call Greg at 316-640-3203

HIGHEST QUALITY HAY, ALL @ THE LOWEST PRICES! • Alfalfa 4x4x8 Large squares, large rounds - excellent cow hay • Alfalfa small squares - excellent horse hay • Alfalfa/Orchard small squares - excellent horse hay • Alfalfa/Grass Mix Large rounds - excellent cow hay • Timothy/Orchard small squares, large rounds - excellent horse hay • Orchard Grass small squares - excellent horse hay • Alfalfa/50-50 mix 5000 Large round Bales ( 2011 feeder cow hay) • Triticale Large Squares 4x4x8 • Peanut Hay big rounds • Milo Rounds

Truck loads delivered to your location.

Call 855-808-9090

“I’ve never seen cows eat hay like this before. When it’s treated, I can’t even tell where the bale was sitting after they finish it.” Glenn Waller — Harrison, Ga

UÊ/À>V̜Àʜ՘Ìi`Ê>˜`Ê>˜`…i`Ê ˜iV̈œ˜Ê-ÞÃÌi“ÃÊÛ>ˆ>Li°Ê UʈµÕˆ`Ê œ˜Vi˜ÌÀ>ÌiÃÊvÀœ“ÊȯÊ*ÀœÌiˆ˜Ê LÞÊۜÕ“iÊÕ«Ê̜Ê{ä¯Ê*ÀœÌiˆ˜ÊLÞÊۜÕ“i]Ê «>VŽ>}i`ʈ˜ÊÓ¤Ê}>œ˜ÊÕ}ÃʜÀÊÊ LՏŽÊÓxäÊ}>œ˜Ê̜ÌiÃ°Ê UÊœÀ“Տ>ÃÊ>Û>ˆ>LiÊvœÀÊ iivÊ >Ì̏i]Ê

>ˆÀÞÊ >Ì̏i]Êœ>ÌÃ]ÊœÀÃiÃ]Ê-…ii«]ÊiÌV°Ê UÊ-ˆ“«iÊ>˜`Ê >ÃÞÊ̜ÊÕÃiÊ>˜`ʓ>ˆ˜Ì>ˆ˜°Ê ->ÛiÊfffÊ>˜`Ê/ˆ“i°

“It’s nice to buy a product that actually does what you are told it will do. Using the HayMaster System helped to keep my bottom line positive for my farm last year.” Bill O’Connor — Azle, Texas

Cut Down on Wasted Hay The Authorized Distributor for this product in the Southern United States

Warren Scofield

ÕÃ̜“ʈˆ˜}]ʘV°Ê

>ۈÃLœÀœ]Ê>°Ê Lake Preston, SD 605-633-1462 • scofieldwarren@yahoo.com £‡nÇLJÎ{n‡Îä{nÊUÊÜÜÜ°VÕÃ̜““ˆˆ˜}°Vœ“ Contact for dealer near you!

60 Day 100%Customer Satisfaction Guarantee On Every System Sold “Custom Milling also offers a complete line of feed and mineral products for cattle, goats, sheep, alpacas, and llamas.”


Page 24

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER FOR SALE - CONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 IA - 2-3, 000 GAL. CONE BOTTOM POLY TANKS WITH STANDS. $1000 EACH, (712) 625-2311 TX - TANK COATINGS, ROOF COATINGS. AVAILABLE FOR METAL COMPOSITION SHINGLES OR TAR ROOFS. LONG LASTING & EASY TO APPLY. WE ALSO MFG. TANK COATINGS FOR CONCRETE, ROCK, STEEL, GALVANIZED OR MOBILE TANKS. VIRDEN PERMABILT CO. WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 352-2761

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE JD 568, 2011,6800bales .....$31000 NH 513 Spreader...................$1950 BJ Saddle tanks,fits 8000..........Call Glencoe Soil Finisher, 20'......$4500 Dymax Tree Shear .................$6000 IH 560, Diesel........................$5000 JD 2020.................................$5250 Post Augers for skidstr, NEW$1950 JD 960 cultivator, 21' ............$3750 Haybuster 256 + II.....................Call Krause 908 Disk, 25'. ................Call Laurier Bale Retriever............$6250 Ford 641 Tractor........................Call JD 700 Rake, like R23 ...............Call Bestway Field Pro III ...........$19000 Bobcat 773G .......................$13500 Gravity Wagons .........................Call New EZ Haul Hay Trailers In Stock

BradWhiteEquipment.com Broken Bow, Nebr. 308-870-0206 TANK COATINGS â&#x20AC;˘ ROOF COATINGS Available for METAL, composition shingles or tar roofs. Long lasting and easy to apply. We also manufacture tank coatings for concrete, rock, steel, galvanized or mobile tanks.

VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. 806-352-2761 â&#x20AC;˘ www.virdenproducts.com

1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING â&#x20AC;&#x153;QUALITYâ&#x20AC;? FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 1902 - FEEDERS HEIFERS FOR SALE KS - HEREFORDS FOR SALE:SPRING HEIFERS-SHOW PROSEPECTS BULLS, HORNED AND POLLED, SPRING BRED DAVIS HEREFORDS. MAPLE HILL, KS 785-2564643, (785) 256-4643 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 KS - 200 OPEN YRL HEIFERS @ 700/800 LBS, B & BW. **500 BRED, 2 YR. ANGUS HEIFERS, CALVING FEB. 5 THRU MAY. BRED TO QUALINITY ANGUS BULLS NOTED FOR CALVING EASE. WWW. CLOVLANFARMS. COM, (785) 418-2983 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE IA - 53 BLACK ANGUS WYOMING HEIFERS, 1100 LBS. , ULTRASOUNDED TO CALVE MARCH 10-MARCH 30TH, (641) 658-2738 SD - 500 BLACK AND 100 RED FIRST CALVE HEIFERS. CALVES AT SIDE. $1800. ALSO 500 BRED HEIFERS, CALVE IN APRIL AND MAY.$1700. PLEASE CALL:, (605) 933-0279 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE

T H E

CATTLE SHOP

1908 - COW CALF PAIRS FOR SALE WY - DISPERSAL: 140 HEAD BLACK ANGUS COWS. STARTED CALVING MARCH 5TH FOR 56 DAYS. 70 YEARS IN CATTLE BUSINESS. CALL RICHARD AT:, (307) 736-2467 NE - 100 HD OF NE. SANDHILLS ANG HFR PRS, HR, MOSTLY A. I. CALVES OUT OF FINAL ANSWER SONS, 1000-1100# CALL AT, (308) 880-0231 KS - 60-4 YR OLD PAIRS, ALL BLACK. 2003&4 YR OLD PAIRS, ALL BLACK. 80-3&4 YR OLD BRED COWS, DUE IN MAY. VIDEO ON WEB: WWW. CLOVLANFARMS. COM, (785) 418-2983 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS, YEARLINGS & 2 YR OLDS. SITZ UPWARD, CONNEALY RIGHT ANSWER, WAR PARTY, SELECTIVE, WMR TIMELESS, GAME ON, RITO REVENUE, & CONNEALY 044062 BLOODLINES. SCHULTE ANGUS RANCH, KEARNEY, NE. CALL 308-708-1839 OR, (308) 236-0761

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE - CONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D NE - ANGUS- BLACK SEMMENTAL AND CHAROLAIS BULLS FOR SALE! 2 YRS, 18 MONTHS, AND YEARLINGS. RECORDS AVAILABLE, TOP QUALITY, REASONABLE. CALL RICK WETOVICK, FULLERTON NE. :, (308) 536-2901 NE - SMITH ANGUS 24TH ANNUAL PRIVATE TREATY SALE. AT THE RANCH 25 MILES SE OF BASSETT, NE. WE WILL BE OFFERING 60 PLUS YEARLINGS, 33 COMING 2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, AND 15 SIM/ANGUS BULLS. 100% GUARANTEE THE FIRST BREEDING SEASON! SMITHANGUSRANCH. NET, (402) 244-5440

COMING SOON To a pasture near you

YEARLING BULLS

2 Bar Angus BULLS â&#x20AC;˘ FEMALES â&#x20AC;˘ EMBRYOS â&#x20AC;˘ SEMEN

Private Treaty Bulls & Females For Sale Year Around Home of 2 Bar Twenty X #1 REA Bull 2 Bar Entirety #3$B bull

will work well on heifers. Bred for milk and growth. BUY NOW WE WILL DELIVER AFTER APRIL 1! Sons of Denali, Connealy Right Answer, Sitz Upward and other top sires!

Stratford Angus

â&#x20AC;˘ (55) 20 Month Old Bulls â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ (35) 12-15 Month Old Bulls â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ (100) 9-12 Mo. Old Bull Calves â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ $2,500 to $6,000 â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Calving Ease, Growth, Carcass & Maternal â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Volume Discounts Start At 3 â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Full Guarantee â&#x20AC;˘ strato@havilandtelco.com www.stratfordangus.com â&#x20AC;˘ 620-546-1789 â&#x20AC;˘

Top Blood Lines, Medium to Large Frames, Quiet Disposition, Tested & Guaranteed

MIKEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RED ANGUS Geddes, S. Dakota

605.243.2202 â&#x20AC;˘ 605.680.0606

FOR SALE

40 Head Registered CHAROLAIS BULLS Under Private Treaty.

Call: 307-532-1690 NE - 2 YEAR OLD REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS. MODERATE FRAME, EASY FLESHING, CALVING EASE, GOOD DISPOSITION, SEMEN TESTED, MANY GENERATIONS OF OHLDE GENETICS. KEITH REED:, (402) 6782675

BLACK SIM/ANGUS & BALANCER BULLS ARE YOU LOOKING FOR MORE POUNDS IN YOUR NEXT CALF CROP?

200 18 Mo. Old Registered Angus Bulls for Sale on Farm 75% of Bulls Are AI Sired 60 Bulls are ET Calves

,UDELL +3s  OR   LOCATION: 13 miles northeast of Atwood, KS 3ALEBULLSAREINTOPOFBREED â&#x20AC;˘Free Delivery & Boarding 2.3 58 103 average EPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Nemeth sale bulls. for both weaning and 2.6 36 18 66 EPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for current sires yearling weights. of the Angus breed.

SAV GRAND PRIX SITZ TRAVLER 8180 3!6&).!,!.37%2 3!6%-5,/53 BOYD NEW DAY 8005 3!6",!#+#!0-!9 3!6",!#+#!0-!9

The Simple Way to Buy & Market Cattle

For Sale or Lease

Young Black bred cows, spring calving. 1st calf heifers, black & 2 yr old black bull.

FINAL ANSWER SITZ TRAVELER 8180

BW WW MILK YW 

Millvale Shorthorns Robert Miller Family

Breeding program stresses sound feet, legs, teats, udders, growth & calving ease. Call for a DVD!!!

800-807-6944

Cell: 701-331-1153 Berta: 701-331-2403

CONTACT Sonderup Charolais Ranch c/o Mark & Ryan Sonderup Fullerton, Nebraska 308-5500486/cell

POLLED HEREFORD

BULLS

ROCKN H RANCH Registered Angus Yearling, Fall 2 Year old Bulls For Sale by Private Treaty Balanced EPDs, by bred leading AI sires that excel in calving ease and carcass merit. Delivery Available. Semen test, ultra sound measurement care available. Vaccinated & tested PI Neg.

Mayetta, KS

By Breed Leading Sires. YEARLINGS and 2 YOs. Excellent quality and EPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, many calving ease bulls. Guaranteed.

Linton Polled HEREFORDS Miller, Nebraska

(308) 293-5816

lintonpolledherefords.com REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS:

785-207-1232

YEARLING AND TWO-YEAR-OLDS AVAILABLE,

www.crookedcreekangus.com. Many will be suitable for heifers. Crooked Creek Angus 785-332-6206, Saint Francis, KS

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

PRIVATE TREATY

Registered & Commercial Angus Bulls Yearlings & 2-Year Olds Available w/Delivery

Blood Lines Include

3!6%-5,/53

3!63+9%-5,/53

Blair Bros.

Private Treaty Bull Sale The Commercial Cowmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Value Added Leader Customer marketing program Breeder genetics at commercial prices Stacked pedigrees of proven bulls Growth genetics are easy to find...but few breeders create value! Our bulls have bred in carcass genetics Customers can use our reputation and contacts in the feeding industry added value to your replacement heifers

Angus

GAR Premium Beef

GAR Predestined

Offering 400 Yearlings Sons of these breed leading proven Sires: GAR New Design 5050 GAR US Premium Beef B/R New Day 454 ALC Big Eye D09N

GAR Predestined Hoover Dam Rito 7065 WHS Limelight

Ask about our calf buy-back program with major feedyards

NICHOLS STOUT

George Holter 970-566-5438

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

G D A R TRAVELER 71 3)4:%6%2%,$!%.4%.3% "/.6)%7"!.$/

EPD's

Top bloodlines w/excellent selection @ affordable prices. Accurate BW, WW, YW, pelvic measure, ultrasound & semen tested. Test results available on 8 years of Gene Star DNA testing for marbling, tenderness & feed efficiency, as well as performance test results. Great disposition & halter broke. These bulls are the homeraised product of 44-years of progressive breeding success in the Sonderup Charolais program. Also have bred females & cow/calf pairs

* BULLS *

Clarks, Nebraska â&#x20AC;˘ Call or Stop by Anytime!

RICK NEMETH

If you would like to speak to a Cattle Shop Representative Contact Us at 660-641-9945 or contact@thecattleshop.com

Bulls are quiet, but very aggressive breeders. Reds or Roans. 2012 Heifers also available. Pick One or Trailer Load. Delivery available!!!

Mr. K Angus 308-548-8232 or 308-548-2860

H-605.337.2328 â&#x20AC;˘ Rodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cell- 605.680.7628 â&#x20AC;˘ Laramieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cell-605-682-9016

Visit www.TheCattleShop.com to learn more

PREMIUM PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS & COWS FOR SALE!

Bulls are Reasonable Priced & Ready to Go to Work!

Sire: Basic Instinct *this is an example of the bulls we have on our ranch* Our bulls have length, depth, moderate frame, calving ease & good disposition. Sires include: $CUKE+PUVKPEVĹ&#x2013;7RYCTFĹ&#x2013;%QP#KTĹ&#x2013;0GVYQTVJ These bulls are structurally sound with the commercial cattlemen in mind. Performance sheets & Ultrasound data available. Call Rod or Laramie Strand Platte, SD

The Cattle Shop helps buyers and sellers connect online

SHORTHORN

â&#x20AC;˘ Net Worth â&#x20AC;˘ New Design â&#x20AC;˘ Freedom â&#x20AC;˘ Contractor

LS 14 BW: 88 Birth date: 2/24/2012 9/1/12 wt. : 852 lbs. 205 day: 940 lbs. 1/1/13 wt. : 1375 lbs. ADG: 4.4 Rea. : 21.3 IMF : 4.7

BW WW MILK YW 

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE - CONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D

REGISTERED RED ANGUS

FOR SALE AT PRIVATE TREATY

EPD's

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE - CONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D

Buseman Angus, Call Joe 605-351-1535

1-877/2-Bar-ANG â&#x20AC;˘ 806-344-7444 WWW.2BARANGUS.COM

.COM

Fall Calving Cows Available Several Nice Sets of Angus Cows

YEARLING ANGUS BULLS: Many

May 2, 2013

NICHOLSCOMMITMENTK111 .)#(/,3#/--)4-%.4- .)#(/,3",!#+(%)2%33( NICHOLSBUSHWACKERK161

EPD's

BW WW MILK YW 

NICHOLS LULA N77 .)#(/,3,5,!+

Blair Bros. Angus Ed Blair - Rich Blair - Chad Blair - Britton Blair tSturgis, SDt U.S. Premium Beef 4XDOLÂżHGVHHGVWRFNVXSSOLHU

www.blairbrosangus.com


May 2, 2013

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE - CONT’D

1914 - BISON WANTED TO BUY

BUFFALO WANTED

REGISTERED RED ANGUS

All classes, any quantity

bulls for sale. Bred for calving ease growth, low maintenance energy, and strong maternal traits. Performance tested, semen tested, and ultrasounded for carcass data. Please contact us for a catalog.

402-694-9353 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT’S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292

Mud Creek Reds LLC 712-470-2992 KS - HEREFORDS FOR SALE: BULLS, HORNED AND PULLED. DAVIS HEREFORDS, MAPLEHILL, KS, (785) 256-4643 1911 - GRASS CALVES FOR SALE

COLORADO BRAND

DS Cattle Co.

2 IRONS - NICE IMAGE! COMES with FIRE IRON. In the same family since 1940. Offered for Sale at: $6,000.00/OBO Please call Jerry

Starkville, Mississippi David Sanders

662-418-0333 We see 5000 sale barn calves a day. We buy your cattle in one day, and ship your cattle the next day guaranteed!

719.784.6054

leave message, if no answer.

www.dscattle.com Have own trucks, will travel.

J

Nebraska Brand

1912 - BACKROUNDING/FEEDING FOR RENT

J

Taking in all classes of cattle for Sping/Summer & beyound grazing/feeding. Including cow/calf pairs, bred cows & fall breeding stock. AI & calving facilities available. Reasonable Rates References Available

Left Hip and Ribs. Electric Iron $1,500

308.783.1828 2007 - BOARS FOR SALE

605-520-3182

Durocs, Yorks, Hamps & Cross Breed Boars

FOR SALE

& females available Boar Goats, Show Weathers & Breeding, Does also available

CANNONBALL CATTLE Co., Custom Preconditioning and growing. 20+ year experience. Great facilities. High stress calves or seed stock cattle. Consulting vet and nutritionist. Darren at PH-620-214-2060. Scott City, Kansas.

Nelson Bros. 605-267-2741 or 605-661-7855 2010 - FARROWING EQUIPMENT FOR SALE SD - STAINLESS STEEL DRY, WET/DRY PIG FEEDERS. WEAN/ FINISH, 50”, 60”, 70” PIG CRATES. G/STALLS, DOUBLE LL 250HD PORTABLE NURSERY, CAST-IRON CENTER FLOORS 5X7’, TRIBAR FLOORS SS NURSERY GATES, FEEDERS. CALL MIKE AT:, (605) 251-1133 2105 - BRED EWES FOR SALE KS - DORPER AND WHITE DORPER SHEEP, EXPOSED EWES FOR, (785) 827-1722

Let Us Start Your Grass Cattle.

Preconditioning & growing. We have the experience, background and facilities to handle highly stress calves.

Jerry Doornbos, DVM, Scott City, Kansas (O) 620-872-5150 • (C) 620-874-0949

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Registered SimAngus Bulls

FOR SALE PRIVATE TREATY Darr Bull Test Facility • Lexington, Nebraska Sires Represented: • SAV Final Answer 0035 • Hooks Shear Force 38K • WS Beef Maker R13

• SAV Pioneer 7301 • GW Presdestined 701T • LIC Mission Statement P27

For performance information, Contact:

Sid Anderson 307-680-5908 • a3r@msn.com

S

Outback Feeders, Inc.

S

Currently Accepting Grass Calves, Cows & Fall Calves Located in a area where there is a good quantity of roughage & grains! • Starting Backgrounding & Finishing Available. • Have Several Marketing Options Available. • Feed & Cattle Financing Available

Contact us for all your Cattle Feeding Needs!

Joe W. Strnad 785.527.0164

Bryan Brown 785.527.1165

Page 25

2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 2208 - HORSE TRAINING FOR SALE

2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK CONT’D SD - HARVEST HELP WANTED: TRUCK DRIVER, COMBINE OR TRACTOR OPERATOR, PETERBUILT TRUCKS, JD COMBINES, GOOD PAY, MAURER HARVESTING AND TRUCKING. KOREY, CELL:, (605) 380-0002

2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES CONT’D NE - ALL STEEL FEEDLOT FENCING. STEEL FEED BUNKS. PORTABLE CALVING SHEDS, PIVOT BRIDGES. FREE ESTIMATES AND WE TRAVEL. MEISTER WELDING. CALL:, (402) 367-2479

Colts Started

Combine Operators & Truck Drivers Needed for the 2013 Harvest Season

SCRAP METAL CLEANUP

If you can take pride in doing a job well done and make a commitment to doing your best, call Gary Frank Harvesting

CALL FOR PRICES.

Colts started on cattle Horse breaking and training Problem solved Cutting and reined cow horses Ranch horses Ranch rope work Arena work Thousands acres to ride out on Clinics and lessons

605-430-0529 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE SD - MITCHELL LIVESTOCK HORSE SALE, MITCHELL, SD. , MAY 17TH TACK: HORSES: OPEN CONSIGNED HORSES FOLLOWED BY LOOSE HORSES. WWW. MITCHELLLIVESTOCKHORSESALE. COM HIGH DEMAND FOR ALL CLASSES OF HORSES!, (605) 759-5478

Learn Equine Therapeutic Massage

Scott City, KS

Cell 620-874-1295 Home 620-872-5704 www.garyfrankharvesting.com • garyfrank9770@gmail.com

Wheat Harvest Help Wanted from Montana to Texas. 3 CDL Truck Drivers; 2 Combine Operators.

Amber Waves Harvesting Malta, MT

Call for info:

717-377-9994

Job Opening

on Western Nebraska Cattle Ranch Cow/calf/yearling. Use horses and 4-wheelers. Routine ranch work includes: calving, haying, fencing, general maintenance, mechanical skills a plus. Livestock experience plus++. House furnished with extras. References please.

Huffman Ranch

*First Session Maintaining your Performance Horse April 26-28, 2013 *Second Session - Into the Spirit June 28-30, 2013

Whitman, NE Gabe: 308-554-6521 gabehuffman2011@gmail.com Zoe Ann: 308-544-6438 zah@neb-sandhills.net

Both sessions required to receive certificate. Bring your horses. Books, manuals, acupressure charts, two meals per day are included.

- WANTED -

Location: Kearney, Nebraska Instructors: Jan Scott, CEMT and Barb Page, CEMT www.sporthorsemassage.com Pre-registration required. Contacts: Cher Scoville 308-708-1127 or Megan Lange 308-627-5465

CATALOG HORSE SALE Saturday, May 11 1:00 pm Sharp! Central Livestock South Hutchinson $50 catalog fee, 8% commission, NO pass out fee. Catalog deadline May 4th Fax catalog info to 620-662-3390 Tack Sale 10:00 AM

Open Horse Sale Following Catalog Sale Contact: Randy Smith 620-200-7971 or SALE BARN 620-662-3371 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE WY - GOOD QUALITY BLUE HEELER AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOGS: BRED IN MICHIGAN. BEST DOGS I HAVE EVER HAD! PUPS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON A REGULAR BASIS. $300.00., (307) 272-1915

Border Collies For Sale 1-3 year old female 1-7 year old female Working bloodlines. Call for information:

785-787-3534 Border Collies For Sale (4) 8 week old puppies: 3 males, 1 female. (2) 1 year olds: 1 female, 1 male. Tri-colors, working bloodlines, rough coats, ABCA Reg., shots & wormings.

785-201-2866 SAINT BERNARD/ GREAT PYRENEES

* PUPPIES *

4 mo old 2 males/2 females $150/Each Make great guard dogs and family companions. Also have... ...14 YO Draft Mare Amish-broke ...3 YO Percheron Filly ...Draft-size team harness and 4-cart

402-925-2755

Atkinson, Nebraska www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Call Dave: Call Telly:

605-520-6341 605-520-0236

www.loadsearch.net

KS - SILAGE CUTTING AND HAULING: JOHN DEERE 7750, 8 ROW AND P/U HEAD, TANDUM TRUCKS. CORY VANDERVEEN, PRAIRIE VIEW KANSAS. CALL:785-973-2320 OR CELL:, (785) 543-7899

LOOKING FOR WHEAT TO HARVEST IN MIDWEST JD rotary combines with all supporting equipment. No job too big or small.

580-541-7926 Custom bailing, raking, shredding, & hauling of corn stalks and hay! Custom silage cutting

Diesel Mechanic

We rake for downed corn. Have 4 balers & 19 wheel Roush rake. Also do hauling with side dump trailer. Custom Manure Spreading.

308-340-8401

Matt Musil 308-380-8972 • Ravenna NE

Truck & trailer experience. Clean class A CDL. Opportunity for leadership abilities. 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES

Gasper Transportation LLC IA - WANTED DAMAGED CORN AND WHEAT AND ALPHA TOX CORN! PAY PREMIUM DOLLAR WITH VACS IN TRUCKS. CALL CODY 402-350-8187 OR WES 402-250-4185, (402) 350-8187 KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515 SD - SPREAD IT, LLC-CUSTOM FEEDLOT CLEANING & MANURE HAULING. BOOK EARLY TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT. CALL DAN TOLL FREE AT 877-271-9430 OR, (605) 9403275 SD - SHEEP SHEARING CREW AVAILABLE NOW!!!! ASK FOR ROY AT, (605) 380-8768

for all your oversize heavy haul needs. “Connecting Farmers Coast to Coast”

Contact us for a quote to move your equipment 402-678-3400 www.tractortruckers.com or sandy@tractortruckers.com.

CAW FENCING WIRE, PIPE, WOOD & VINYL Serving Western US.

(970) 396-8729

VLACH CONTRUCTION INC. Earth work of all types.

“We now install drainage tile up to 12 inches” Rick Vlach 308-245-4165 Home • 308-219-0072 Cell Steve Kriewald 308-219-0454 Cell Scotia, Nebr.

ALL BREEDS CONSIGNMENT HORSE SALE Saturday, May 11, 2013 Stockmen’s Livestock Exchange in Dickinson, ND Sale: 12 pm MDT Ranch Horse Competition- 7 am MDT For Catalog or more info: Joe: 701-230-3044 or John: 701-720-6674 horsesale@nccray.com www.doublejhorsesales.com


Page 26

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES CONT’D

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE - CONT’D

DAN ZIEMBA WELDING 2005 Peterbilts & Kenworths, ALLISON AUTOMATICS, tandem axle, cab and chassis, can build to suit, Steve 785-259-6817 On site or in the shop welding services Call Anytime 402-366-0160 1076 130 Rd. Osceola, NE 68651 ziembadan@yahoo.com 2510 - SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION/SCHOOLS

Online agribusiness degree and courses through Casper College: Offering online courses from basic record keeping, computer applications, management, and outdoor recreation as they apply to agriculture. For more information contact Marty Finch at mfinch@caspercollege.edu or 800-442-2963, ext. 2595. Visit www.caspercollege.edu/agriculture.

2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD FACTORY BED FOR ‘73-’79 FORD PICKUP, NO RUST THROUGH, (620) 865-2541 FOR SALE NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (308) 624-2177

Exira Auto Sales

Hwy. 71, Exira, IA • 712-268-5345 www.exiraauto.com ‘12 Dodge 2500 Crew Cab SLT, shorbed 4x4, diesel, 41K..................$32,000 ‘12 Dodge 2500 Crew Cab SLT, shortbed 4x4 diesel, 64K .................$29,950 ‘11 Chevy 2500 Crew Cab Short Bed, 4x4, diesel, 75K......................$32,900 ‘09 Dodge 3500 SRW Quad Cab, 4x4, long bed, leather, auto, dsl ....$22,900 ‘08 Chevy 3500 SRW X Cab 4x4, longbed, diesel ..............................$16,000 ‘08 Dodge 3500 SRW Quad Cab, 4x4, leather, long bed, dsl. 6 spd ..$18,900 ‘07 Dodge 3500 Quad Cab Dually, 4x4, 6.7 dsl., auto, 153K..............$21,500 ‘07 Dodge 2500 Quad Cab, short bed, 4x4, 5.9 diesel, auto, 149K....$19,600 ‘06 Chevy 3500 Crew Cab Dually, flatbed, 4x4, dsl. ...........................$16,750 ‘05 Chevy 3500 Crew Cab, dually, 4x4, diesel, 82K............................$25,900 ‘04 Chevy Colorado Crew Cab 4x4, leather ..........................................$9,800 ‘04 GMC 1500 Crew Cab 4x4, 5.3 auto................................................$7,900 ‘03 Lincoln Navigator, 4x4, leather, loaded...........................................$8,300 ‘02 GMC 3500 Ext. Cab, 4x4, diesel, flatbed ........................................$8,900 ‘02 Dodge 2500 Quad Cab, 4x4, shortbed, diesel, auto .......................$8,400 ‘01 Ford F-250 Crew Cab, leather, 4x4, 7.3 dsl., new engine .............$14,900 ‘01 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab, 4x4, 5.9 auto ............................................$2,950 ‘00 Ford F-350 SRW Crew Cab, 4x4, long bed, dsl............................$13,900 ‘99 Ford F-350 SRW XL Reg. Cab 4x4, auto, diesel.............................$9,900 ‘98 Dodge 2500 Quad Cab, 4x4, 12 vlv. dsl, auto, short bed ..............$9,800 ‘98 Dodge 3500 Reg. Cab Dually, 4x4, flatbed, dsl, 5 spd ...................$8,700 ‘98 Dodge 2500 Reg. Cab, 4x4, auto, 360 V-8, snowplow...................$4,700 ‘84 Ford F-250 Reg Cab 4x4, 460 5-spd, flatbed .................................$1,500

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE SD - 1952 IH L160 TRUCK, 16’ COMBINATION GRAIN & STOCK BOX & HOIST, GOOD CONDITION. $2000, (605) 386-2131

MO - CHEVY C65 10 WHEELER, 18’ BED, ROLLOVER TARP, 5+2 SPEED, RUNS GOOD, $7,000.00, (660) 548-3804

FOR SALE Knapheid Tilt Dump Bed: 8’x10’6”, electric hydraulic off 1 ton truck $2,500.00 Western Pro Plow: 9’ complete with lights, like new! For 1 ton thru 2 ton. $3,550.00 1970 CJ Jeep: 4x4, V6, 3 speed, with 2 speed. Total restore! F.G. Top. Call for photo and info. Ford F-350 Dually: V8 auto, 7’x11’ stock bed with 4 ft. sides, with hydraulic electric 2000 lb lift. $3,500.00

MAKE OFFER - LET’S DEAL

307-267-1900 MO - FREIGHTLINER FL70, 8. 3 CUMMINS ENGINE, ALLISON AUTOMATIC, RUNS GREAT, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (660) 5483804 MT - 1990 FREIGHTLINER DAY CAB: RECENT OVER HAUL, NEW BRAKES, NEW CLUTCH KIT, NEW FRONT TIRES, 85% DRIVE TIRES, 60 SERIES MOTOR, 475 H/P, 10 ALCO WHEELS, $16,500 O/B/O. CALL FOR DETAILS,, (406) 660-0540

TRUMP TRUCKS 2002 International 4800, 4x4, DT466, 225 hp, 6 sp, Fabco high/low Transfer case. Stock #12136. $21,500.00 1999 International 4700, DT466, 210 hp, 3560 Allison auto, 12,00 front axle, 21,000 rear axle w/locker. 96,000 miles, very nice. Stock #13002. $18,500.00 2007 Freightliner M-2, 250 hp, Cat 9 sp, 12,000 front axle, 36,000 4 spring rear. Stock #12100. $32,500.00. 2009 International Prostar ISX, 450 hp cummins, 10sp, 12,000 front axle, 40,000 Airride rears, 173” wheel base. Stock #13009. $37,500.00. To see pictures and more information go to

www.trumptrucks.net or call 800-821-5667

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

2006 Freightliner Columbia Tractor Engine: MBE460 Mercedes Benz with Engine Brake. Transmission: 10-Speed Eaton Fuller. Features: 410 Horsepower. Gear Ratio: 3.58. Chassis Specifications: Frt. Axle Cap. 12,000, Rear Axle Cap. 17,000

2005 International 9400 I Tractor

Engine: Cat C15 with Engine Brake - 3 Stage Transmission: 10-Speed Eaton Fuller. Features: 435 Horsepower. Gear Ratio: 3.73. Chassis Specifications: Frt. Axle Cap. 12,000, Rear Axle Cap. 20,000. Cab Specifications: Day Cab

Many Other Tandem Day Cabs Priced To Your Budget Kearney • 6410 Hwy. 30 East, Kearney, NE 68848 • 308-234-2300 • trucksbymasters.com Omaha • 402-933-2500 Council Bluffs, IA • 712-328-0306 Lincoln, NE • 402-540-2816

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE - CONT’D (3) 2006 IH 9400, red, day cab, Cat 435hp, 10spd...................................................$27,500 1994 freightliner daycab detroit,13.$12,000.00 2000 freightliner daycab detroit , 10 spd ............................................$15,000.00 2003 peterbilt daycab overhauled , 10 spd ..............................................36,000.00 1993 Freightliner FLD-120 detroit, 9 spd .......................................................$12,000.00 (2) 1999 KW T-800 daycabs detroit, 10 spd .......................................................$24,000.00 2004 Freightliner classic daycab, detroit, 10 spd pusher axle ..............................$29,500.00 1986 Fruehauf flatbed 45’ closed tandem..............................................$7,500.00 2000 transcraft flatbed 48’ combo ...$9,500.00 FOR RENT 43’ Wilson w/Ag Hoppers, 53’ dry vans for storage, 53’ step deck by the year, month or week

MIDWEST TRUCK SALES & LEASING L.L.C. OMAHA, NE 402-934-7727 www.mwtrucksales.com 2604 - GRAIN TRAILERS FOR SALE KS - GOOSENECK 350 BUSHEL, DUAL HOPPER, TANDEM DUAL, ROLL TARP, EXCELLENT, $6,500.00, (620) 865-2541 2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE KS - ALUMINUM STOCK TRLR. ‘95 BARRETT, 8X28’. NEW TIRES, POWER JACK. HOLDS 16 BIG COWS. EXCELLENT SHAPE. $15,000. VIDEO ON WEB: WWW.CLOVLANFARMS.COM, (785) 4182983 2606 - HORSE TRAILERS FOR SALE

1982 24’ Western World Trailer 6’ living quarters. Fully insulated, sliding windows, all enclosed, king bed, cabinets, wood paneling, rubber mats, feed mangers, 2 horse straight. $4,500.00

Call: 308-470-0500

2607 - UTILITY TRAILERS FOR SALE KS - INTERSTATE 6’ X 12’ ENCLOSED CARGO TRAILER, HAS INTERIOR CABINETS & SHELVING, $2,750.00, (785) 871-0711 2611 - MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE NE - 2005 HONDA VTXR1300, 6600 MILES, $7000 OBO, (402) 726-2488 2613 - MOBILE HOMES & RV’S FOR SALE KS - 1977 CHEVY MOTOR HOME, $3,950.00, (785) 871-0711 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 NE - 11. 2 X 36 OR 12. 4 X 36 TIRES, (308) 587-2344 MO - 20. 4 X 34 REAR TIRES, (816) 3782015 FOR SALE NE - 15” SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - RIM-GARD, NON CORROSIVE, TIRE BALLAST, TUBE OR TUBELESS TIRES, (308) 587-2344 NE - (2) 320 X 90R54 WITH 10 BOLT WAFFLE RIMS, $2,500.00, (308) 380-7161 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE KS - 1974 UTILITY CHASSIS W/2-350 BU. GRAVITY BOXES, HYD AUGERS, ETC., $9,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 1993 FREIGHTLINER FLD120, N14 CUMMINS, 9 SP, GOOD TIRES & BRAKES, A/C, & SLIDING 5TH WHEEL, (308) 380-7161 OK - 2014 BOURBON 36’, DOUBLE HOPPER BOTTOM, (580) 361-2265 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

May 2, 2013 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE

F&S Truck Parts is buying and selling truck beds in your area. Call Zach at 800-440-0721 pick up and delivery available 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE RANCH HELPERS!! Great running MF front-end loader $18,500; John Deere 2003 310G 4x4 backhoe $33,500; CAT 936 loader very good condition $39,500; Ingersoll-Rand forklift, 4x4 $19,500. ALSO motor graders, several dozers, snow plows, etc. ACTION HEAVY EQUIPMENT CO. YOUR SOURCE FOR GOOD USED HEAVY EQUIPMENT, SEE PICTURES AND VIDEOS ON WEBSITE www.actionheavyequipment.com. Call 24/7 307-670-1024.

2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10’ & 12’; 3PT’S 6’ & 8’, (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - TOREQ 40” PTO DITCHER, $7,800.00, (660) 548-3804 MO - BUFFALO 12’ BOX BLADES IN STOCK, (660) 548-3804 ND - SCRAPER: BUY & SELL OLD CABLE SCRAPERS, CAT 60, 70, 80; LETOURNEAU LS, LP, FP; A/C; ALL MAKES AND SIZES, WILL CONVERT OVER TO HYDRAULICS, VERY PROFESSIONALLY DONE, TIRES & PARTS. CONTACT STEVE, WWW. STEVEVOIGHTMAN. COM. CELL 701-6808015 OR BUS., (701) 742-2182 KS - 6 YD PULL TYPE FORCED EJECTION, $2,950.00, (785) 871-0711 MO - LEON HYDRAULIC EJECT 1450 WITH EXTENSIONS, NEW TIRES & PAINT, (660) 548-3804 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS FOR SALE KS - BOBCAT 963, $20,000.00, (785) 8710711 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30’ LIFT CELL 580-5251265, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE MN - THE BEST RADIANT FLOOR HEAT WATER TUBING. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ON A COMPLETE SYSTEM. VOLUME DISCOUNTS, FACTORY OUTLET PRICES. COMPARE & SAVE! GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. WWW. MIKESHEATING. COM & CALL, (800) 446-4043

3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER’S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 300 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE

BARBWIRE FENCE BUILDERS: Removal, construction and repairs. (785)625-5819 • (800)628-6611 Cell: (785) 635-1922

GALVENIZED GUARDRAIL Grade 1 and Grade 2

Please call for delivered quote 423-791-4771 • 712-726-3562 620-546-3507 SD - FOREVER POST 4”X7’POINTED, 5”X8’ FLAT. PLASIC FENCE POST CAN BE NAILED, STAPLED, SCREWED. WON’T ROT. 39 POSTS PER BUNDLE. 4 BUNDLE DISCOUNTS $12 TO $16 EACH. STEEL STORAGE CONTAINERS 8’X20’, 8’X40’ $2500. TO $4500 EACH. WE DELIVER., HAENSEL DISTRIBUTING. I90 EXIT 387 HARTFORD SD. CALL CLINT AT 605-310-6653 OR JOHN AT, (605) 351-5760

STRUCTURAL PIPE

 Excellent Condition  Overstock Price 

2 3/8 @ $32.00 per joint ALL SIZES AVAILABLE RPJ ENERGY

Now selling large square bales, Alfalfa & Grass Hay

Call or E-mail Cortney: 970.324.4580 rpjenergy@gmail.com

Gas & Hydraulic Wire Winders! Hotwood’s

Grand Island, Nebraska

877-407-8645 www.hotwoods.com Dependable, affordable, deep pressure-treated

wood posts. All lengths and sizes. Also.... treated or non-treated lumber. Beaver Creek Post & Lumber Company Call day or night.

605-660-3393

LODGEPOLE PRODUCTS 307-742-6992 SERVING AGRI-BUSINESS SINCE 1975!! Treated posts, corral poles, buck and rail, western rail, fence stays, rough sawn lumber, bedding. SEE US at www.lodgepoleproducts.com and click our “Picking A Fence Post” tab to see why folks choose our posts!!

3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE NE - HIGH DENSITY FOAM BOARD INSULATION. $18.56 PER SHEET - 4’ X 8’ X 2” THICK. ELIMINATE FROST HEAVING IN CONCRETE. PERFECT FOR IN-FLOOR HEATING APPLICATIONS. CALL LITEFORM AT, (800) 551-3313 MO - FARM BUILDING SALE! SAVE THOUSANDS ON BARNS, IMPLEMENT SHEDS, SHOPS AND GARAGES. FACEBOOK: PERKA BUILDINGS OR CALL, (800) 467-3752 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191


Nebraska Farm & Ranch

3030 - OTHER FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344

Used Pool Covers NOW WITH FREE SHIPPING! Used as Cattle Shades, Awnings, Landscaping.

repurposedMATERIALS • Waterproof Billboard Vinyls: hay tarps, pond liner. • Plastic 55 Gallon Barrels: composting, trash bins. • Sweeper Brushes: Livestock back scratchers.

www.repurposedmaterialsinc.com

303.321.1471

3034 - WIND GENERATORS WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE ‘30’S & ‘40’S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE IA - SW & W CENTRAL, KATO LITE PTO GENERATORS. 55 KW & 25 KW ON TRAILERS W/ PTO & POLE HOOK-UP. WES SEBETKA,, (641) 990-1094 IA - SW & W CENTRAL, WINDCO PTO GENERATORS. 80/50 KW, 50/40 KW & 25/15 KW, GENERATORS ON TRAILERS W/ PTO POLE HOOK-UP. WES SEBETKA,, (641) 9901094 IA - SW & W CENTRAL. WINDCO PTO GENERATORS. NEW AND USED ON TRAILERS W/ PTO POLE HOOK-UPS. MAKE ME YOUR LAST CALL! WES SEBETKA, (641) 990-1094 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE WANTED TO RENT KS - YOUNG FARMER LOOKING FOR LAND TO RENT, CUSTOM FARM OR PLANT IN SHERMAN & CHEYENNE COUNTIES. DAN SHIELDS FARMING, (785) 821-0804

Engine Machine Specialist High Efficiency & Long Life G855 .........................$21,000 G3406.......................$22,500

Complete Overhauls G3406 .......................$15,000 G855 .........................$15,000 Complete OH Includes: All new pistons & liners, valves, seats, guides, paint, dress out parts, gauges & run-in

Trades Welcome Nobody Builds A Better Engine Than Us!!

Guymon, OK

5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

580-338-3986

5004 - PASTURE RENT WANTED TO RENT WY - PASTURE NEEDED FOR 200 YEARLING HEIFERS. 2013 SPRING THRU FALL GRAZING SEASON. WILL SPLIT NUMBERS. PLEASE CALL 307-231-0931 CELL OR, (307) 276-3856

LOOKING TO LEASE FOR SALE BY OWNER PRICE REDUCED COUNTRY LIVING! 34 ACRES AND LARGE NEWLY REMODELED HOME. 4 MILES NORTHEAST OF BRIDGEPORT, MORRILL COUNTY, NEBRASKA. 24 IRRIGATED ACRES, TREES, HUNTING, GUEST OR RENTAL HOUSE, BARN, EXTRA GARAGE, GRAIN BIN AND MORE.

307-680-5908 6002 - TRAVEL PACKAGES FOR SALE

Must have good water, fences and corrals. Will consider all locations, and either summer or year-long.

Calgary Stampede July 12th thru 15th: 3 nights hotel, Rodeo tickets for the 13th & 14th, Evening show the 13th with Chuckwagon Races. Round trip deluxe motorcoach will depart from Billings and Great Falls MT. $839.00 per person double occupancy. $1,105 single. Contact Beartooth Travel 800-554-2303

Also... Looking For Cropland up to 15,000 Acres.

605-850-3887

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Pasture Wanted: Up to 400 Pairs or 200 Yearlings. Can be split into smaller groups.

605-280-2441

Call 541-490-5335

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

Wyoming or Nebraska Pasture of Combination Unit for 200 to 300 Pairs Established Operation

For more information:

For Sale!

PASTURE WANTED

Looking for good ranches large enough to handle up to 3500 yearlings and up to 1500 cows.

PHONE 308-262-1370

80x200 Indoor Arena on 7 acres! 3 miles from North Platte on Walker & State Farm Rd. New well, corrals, return alley w/roping chute. Inferred heaters, energy efficient lighting, 500 gl. propane tank, room to build!

5004 - PASTURE RENT WANTED TO RENT - CONT’D

Large Farm/Ranches:

LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER.

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

www.enginesatems.com

Page 27

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

May 2, 2013

MORE THAN JUST SPRAYERS! Check With Us First For Parts

• Banjo Valves, Strainers and Fittings • Hypro. and Ace Pumps and Parts • Teejet Nozzle Bodies • Turbo Drop Nozzles • Fertilizer Orifices • All Sizes of Hose

Select Sprayers, LLC

4319 Imperial Ave., East Hwy. 30, Kearney or call

308-338-8006

51956

Midlands Classified Ad Network SENIOR NETWORK CONSULTANT. RESPONSIBILITIES: PROVIDE CLIENTS WITH TECHNICAL EXPERTISE PERTAINING TO NETWORKING, MOBILITY, VIRTUALIZATION AND CLOUD-BASED SOLUTIONS; EVALUATE, RECOMMEND, AND EXECUTE NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND UPDATE EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE TO ENSURE OPTIMAL NETWORK PERFORMANCE; DEVELOP IT STRATEGIES TO ENSURE THE NETWORK MEETS EXISTING AND FUTURE REQUIREMENTS BASED ON NEEDS AND REGULATIONS; CANDIDATE MUST HAVE THE ABILITY TO WORK IN A VARIETY OF ENVIRONMENTS, HAVE EXCELLENT FOLLOW-UP SKILLS, PROVIDE DETAILED DOCUMENTATION, AND BE ABLE TO WORK EFFECTIVELY AND INDEPENDENTLY; PARTICIPATION IN PROPOSAL CONTENT, PRODUCT RESEARCH, AND SALES MEETINGS WITH PROSPECTIVE CLIENTS MAY BE REQUIRED. REQUIREMENTS: BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE OR EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE; CERTIFICATIONS STRONGLY PREFERRED: MCITP, CCNA, CISSP, AND VCP; MINIMUM OF 5 PLUS YEARS’ EXPERIENCE WITH THE MAINTAINING, TROUBLESHOOTING, AND SUPPORTING OF VARIOUS TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTS; PRIOR CONSULTING EXPERIENCE IS HIGHLY DESIRABLE; COMPREHENSIVE UNDERSTANDING OF OPERATING PLATFORMS, CONNECTIVITY, SECURITY, AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT; MUST BE STRONG IN ALL ASPECTS OF MICROSOFT PLATFORMS; MUST UNDERSTAND NETWORKING AND BE ABLE TO CONFIGURE FIREWALLS, ROUTERS AND SWITCHES; EXPERIENCE WITH VIRTUALIZATION TECHNOLOGIES, SUCH AS VMWARE, CITRIX AND MICROSOFT; OUTSTANDING AND PROVEN COMMUNICATION AT ALL LEVELS WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION, PROJECT MANAGEMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS REQUIRED. WE OFFER COMPETITIVE SALARY AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN A STRONG AND GROWING ORGANIZATION. APPLICANTS ARE ASKED TO SEND COVER LETTER, RESUME AND REFERENCES TO: STAR-HERALD, PO BOX 1709 DEPT: 1899, SCOTTSBLUFF NE, 69363 OR E-MAIL TO: BLINDBOX@STARHERALD.COM WITH DEPT: 1899 IN THE SUBJECT LINE. TIER 1 HELP DESK ANALYST. THE HELP DESK ASSOCIATE WILL, UNDER GENERAL DIRECTION, RESPOND TO AND DIAGNOSE SOFTWARE PROBLEMS THROUGH DISCUSSIONS WITH USERS. THE INDIVIDUAL SELECTED FOR THIS ROLE WILL BE INVOLVED IN SYSTEM PROBLEM RECOGNITION, RESEARCH, AND RESOLUTION. THIS PERSON WILL ALSO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR RESOLVING LESS COMPLEX

PROBLEMS IMMEDIATELY, WHILE ASSIGNING MORE COMPLEX PROBLEMS TO SENIOR LEVEL SUPPORT. QUALIFICATIONS: 2+ YEARS OF RELATED IT HELP DESK EXPERIENCE; COLLEGE DEGREE PREFERRED; HIGHLY PROFICIENT WITH MICROSOFT OFFICE TO INCLUDE EXCEL, WORD, AND POWERPOINT AND MICROSOFT OUTLOOK; PROFICIENCY W/ ACCESS A PLUS; STRONG LISTENING AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS ARE CRITICAL; ABILITY TO EFFECTIVELY COMMUNICATE WITH ALL LEVELS OF EMPLOYEES; GOOD ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS; PROVEN SKILL IN MANAGING MULTIPLE TASKS AND IN ESTABLISHING PRIORITIES; DETAIL-ORIENTED; STRONG INTERPERSONAL AND CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS • STRONG TIME MANAGEMENT SKILLS; WORKS WELL UNDER PRESSURE; WORKS EFFECTIVELY IN A TEAM ENVIRONMENT; ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE AND MEET DEADLINES; HIGH ETHICAL STANDARDS AND MAINTAINS CONFIDENTIALITY; ABLE TO WORK 8AM5PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY; FLEXIBLE WHEN A STAGGERED WORK SCHEDULE IS NEEDED; ABILITY TO WORK OVERTIME INCLUDING EVENINGS AND WEEKENDS AS NEEDED; FAMILIARITY WITH FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY IS A PLUS. APPLICANTS ARE ASKED TO SEND COVER LETTER, RESUME AND REFERENCES TO: STAR-HERALD, PO BOX 1709 DEPT: 1898, SCOTTSBLUFF NE, 69363 OR E-MAIL TO: BLINDBOX@STARHERALD.COM WITH DEPT: 1898 IN THE SUBJECT LINE. SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST. PARTTIME AND FULL-TIME POSITIONS FOR 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR. ESU #13 IS A WELL-ESTABLISHED INTERMEDIATE AGENCY PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES. QUALIFICATIONS FOR THIS POSITION INCLUDE: MASTERS DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS; NEBRASKA CERTIFICATION OR ELIGIBILITY FOR NEBRASKA CERTIFICATION.; ASHA CCC-SLP PREFERRED. APPLICANTS ELIGIBLE FOR CFY WILL BE CONSIDERED. SUPERVISION IS AVAILABLE.; PLEASE SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, AND PROOF OF CERTIFICATION TO: DR. JEFF WEST, 4215 AVE. I, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 OR: JEFFWEST@ESU13.ORG ESU #13 IS AN EOE THE CITY OF MITCHELL WILL BE ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITION OF ELECTRIC FOREMAN UNTIL THE POSITION IS FILLED. PREVIOUS ELECTRIC LINEMAN EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. COMPLETION OF A RECOGNIZED APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM DESIRABLE. SALARY IS COMMENSURATE ON EXPERIENCE. THE SUCCESSFUL APPLICANT MUST ESTAB-

LISH RESIDENCY WITHIN A FIFTEEN MINUTE RESPONSE TIME, MUST BE ABLE TO OBTAIN A NEBRASKA COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE UPON HIRE, AND IS SUBJECT TO RANDOM DRUG TESTING AS REQUIRED BY DOT REGULATIONS. APPLICATIONS AND COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE MITCHELL CITY OFFICES, 1280 CENTER AVENUE, MITCHELL, NE 69357, (308) 623 1616, OR C I T YA D M I N @ M I T C H E L L C I T Y. N E T. AAA/EEO SUPERVISOR. PARKER HANNIFIN IN ALLIANCE, NE IS SEEKING A SUPERVISOR WITH THE ABILITY TO WORK NIGHT AND/OR AFTERNOON SHIFTS. COMPETITIVE SALARY AND EXCELLENT BENEFITS OFFERED. RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FOLLOWING: SUPERVISE, TRAIN AND DEVELOP SUBORDINATES; MOTIVATE AND EMPOWER SUBORDINATES; IDENTIFY CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES; PROMOTE AND ENFORCE COMPLIANCE OF SAFETY POLICIES & PROCEDURES. QUALIFICATIONS: ASSOCIATES DEGREE IN BUSINESS OR ENGINEERING AND THREE YEARS PERVIOUS MANUFACTURING SUPERVISORY EXPERIENCE OR AN EQUIVALENT COMBINATION OF EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE; BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN BUSINESS OR ENGINEERING IS PREFERRED; KNOWLEDGE IN LEAN MANUFACTURING IS PREFERRED; ABILITY TO EFFECTIVELY WORK WITH PEOPLE IN A TEAM ENVIRONMENT AND AT VARIOUS LEVELS OF THE ORGANIZATION. EEO M/F/V/D VETERANS AND MINORITIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY.INTERESTED APPLICANTS PLEASE APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.PARKER.COM OWN YOUR FUTURE! SELLING FURNITURE. GREAT OPPORTUNITY, LOW INVESTMENT, LOW OVERHEAD COST. (785) 462-5861 WWW.IDEALFURNITURE.ORG SECONDARY MATH INSTRUCTOR. BAYARD PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A SECONDARY MATH INSTRUCTOR POSITION FOR THE 20132014 SCHOOL TERM. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR A NEBRASKA TEACHING CERTIFICATE AND HOLD AN APPROPRIATE ENDORSEMENT. BAYARD IS A CLASS C2 SCHOOL IN SCENIC WESTERN NEBRASKA. INTERESTED CANDIDATES PLEASE VISIT WWW.BAYARDPUBLICSCHOOLS.ORG TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION FORM AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. SEND ALL INFORMATION TO THOMAS PERLINSKI, SECONDARY PRINCIPAL, BAYARD PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PO BOX 607, BAYARD, NE 69334, SCHOOL PHONE (308) 586-1700. BAYARD IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

EMPLOYER. THE POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED. COACHING/EXTRA DUTY ASSIGNMENTS AVAILABLE INCLUDING: HEAD HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL, HEAD HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY, ASSISTANT HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL, JUNIOR HIGH COACHING AND ACTIVITY SPONSORS. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER IS LOOKING FOR A DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTING. THE DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTING FOR 120 BED ACUTE CARE FACILITY OVERSEES PREPARATION OF A PROFIT-&-LOSS ANALYSIS, FINANCIAL ANALYSIS, AND OVERALL BUSINESS ANALYSIS FOR BOTH INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL USERS OF FINANCIAL INFORMATION. BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN BUSINESS, ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE REQUIRED. MINIMUM THREE YEARS EXPERIENCE IN ACCOUNTING AND COST ACCOUNTING REQUIRED. EXPERIENCE IN HEALTHCARE SETTING PREFERRED. CALL: RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT AT (800) 543-6629. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM . APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM SALES REPRESENTATIVE: THE LEXINGTON CLIPPER- HERALD IS SEEKING A PERSONABLE AND CHEERFUL INDIVIDUAL TO JOIN OUR TEAM. WILL BE REQUIRED TO SERVICE EXISTING ADVERTISING CLIENTS WITH THEIR MARKETING PLAN. SALES EXPERIENCE A PLUS BUT NOT NECESSARY TO APPLY. MUST HAVE DEPENDABLE VEHICLE AND CURRENT AUTO INSURANCE. HOURS ARE MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8AM – 5PM. SEND LETTER AND RESUME VIA EMAIL TO: TERRIE. BAKER@LEXCH.COM OR MAIL TO LEXINGTON CLIPPER-HERALD, P.O. BOX 599, LEXINGTON, NE 68850. PROGRESS RAIL SERVICES A CATERPILLAR COMPANY IS LOOKING FOR HARDWORKING INDIVIDUALS FOR ITS SIDNEY, NEBRASKA WHEEL SHOP FACILITY. THE RAIL SERVICES INDUSTRY IS A GROWING PROFESSION THAT OFFERS CAREER GROWTH POTENTIAL. MACHINE OPERATORS WAGES ARE BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND COMPLETED SKILL TESTS. IF YOU HAVE A HIGH ATTENTION TO DETAIL AND ENJOY WORKING IN A TEAM ENVIRONMENT THIS CAREER MAYBE RIGHT FOR YOU, SO MAKE PROGRESS RAIL YOUR NEXT APPLICATION. PROGRESS RAIL SERVICES OFFERS GREAT BENEFITS PACKAGE, INCLUDING LOW-COST BC/BS MEDICAL PLAN, DENTAL PLAN, A RX/PRESCRIPTION PLAN, A 401(K) PLAN WITH COMPANYMATCHING, PAID VACATION AND HOLIDAYS, LIFE INSURANCE, IN HOUSE NEW HIRE TRAINING, SKILL BASED WAGE INCREASES AND NOTEWORTHY BENEFITS

ARE AVAILABLE AS WELL AS ADDITIONAL INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V. WE SEEK A DRUG FREE WORK FORCE. APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.PROGRESSRAIL.COM UNDER THE "ABOUT US" TAB KIMBALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE KIMBALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS (EOE) IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR (2013-2014): CERTIFIED: ELEMENTARY GUIDANCE COUNSELOR; CLASSIFIED: CUSTODIAN (STARTING IMMEDIATELY); BUS DRIVER EXTRA DUTIES AVAILABLE BUT NOT REQUIRED. POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME AND CREDENTIALS TO: TROY L. UNZICKER, SUPERINTENDENT, 901 S. NADINE, KIMBALL, NE 69145 ROBUST WYOMING WAGES. IF YOU ENJOY A CHALLENGING, FAST-PACED ENVIRONMENT, WHERE CRITICAL THINKING IS ESSENTIAL, CONSIDER JOINING OUR TEAM AT SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY HEALTHCARE COMMUNITY AS NURSE MANAGER FOR OUR TRANSITIONAL CARE UNIT. WE ARE ALSO SEEKING NURSES AND C.N.A.’S. PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO KHARTMAN@MISSIONHEALTHCARE.ORG OR CALL 307-4728752. EOE, DRUG FREE WORKPLACE TECHNICIAN: SUNDANCE, WY JD DEALERSHIP LOOKING FOR REPAIR TECHNICIAN. JD EXPERIENCE PREFERRED BUT NOT REQUIRED. FULL-TIME, TOP PAY, BENEFITS $60,000 TO $80,000. CALL (866) 6710052 RANCH EMPLOYEE. FLAG RANCH, LLC IS SEEKING A SELF-MOTIVATED RANCH EMPLOYEE. DUTIES INCLUDE BUT NOT LIMITED TO RANCHING, DOCTORING, FENCING AND ROUTINE COWBOY DUTIES. HORSE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. COMPETITIVE SALARY. BENEFITS INCLUDE HOUSING, VACATION, HEALTH INSURANCE REIMB & 401K. SEND RESUME TO PO BOX 1816, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69363 OR FAX TO (308) 635- 7879. SITE GENERAL DIRECTOR. FULL BENEFIT PACKAGE, VERY COMPETITIVE SALARY. COMPLETE APPLICATION AT CORIZONHEALTH.COM OR SUBMIT RESUME TO MELANIE MARTINEZ 7076 RD 55F, TORRINGTON, WY 82240 GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING: ASSISTANT HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING COACH; HEAD JR. HIGH WRESTLING COACH; ASSISTANT 7TH GRADE FOOTBALL COACH. PLEASE FORWARD A LETTER OF APPLICATION AND RESUME TO GLEN KOSKI, AD GERING HIGH SCHOOL, 1500 U STREET IN GERING, NE 69341. THESE POSITIONS WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED.


Page 28

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

May 2, 2013

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Bismarck

We currently have eight model homes in stock. The new, beautiful Bismarck home was featured at Husker Harvest Days. A home you will have to see to appreciate. The Bismarck is a 3 bed, 2 bath home, basement ready. It has a gas fireplace with stone floor to ceiling and raised hearth, abundance of kitchen space, and huge walk-in closet. Total appliance package includes: 25 cubic foot trio refrigerator, electric cooktop, double oven, space saver microwave and dishwasher, 60â&#x20AC;? tile shower, entertainment center, craftsman â&#x20AC;&#x153;woodâ&#x20AC;? trim package.

Ph.: 308-382-3866 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-792-4539

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52455

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51878


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