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POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

March 1, 2012 Issue 251-16-5

Agronomist Provides Expertise to Help Senegal Farmers Produce More Food

Special Features FFA Chapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11 Crop Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Planting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Car Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Weather Al Dutcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Quilt Pattern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Agronomist Ryan Nickerson of Doniphan talks to farmers in the west African country of Senegal. Nickerson traveled on a mission trip to Senegal Jan. 28 through Feb. 11. (Courtesy photo)

By Robert Pore The Grand Island Independent For Ryan Nickerson of Doniphan, visiting the west African country of Senegal was an eye-opening experience, but one where an individual can make a difference in helping people become more productive farmers.

Ag Management Lack of Communication, Can Cut Farm Family Ties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Livestock News Nickerson, who is a Servi-Tech agronomist, volunteered to go to Senegal. He visited with farmers and producers in Kaolack and several small villages, giving soil fertility advice, from Jan. 28 through Feb. 11. "What I got from the trip was that worldly experience, the gratification of being able to go to a place that

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

obviously needed help and being able to help people there," he said. Nickerson said the Senegal farmers were "very grateful to have people, like myself, who were willing to go over there and help." "It was that satisfaction that I went and helped make the world a better place," he said. Continued on page 12

Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Production News Water Challenges Global, But Solutions to be Found Locally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-23

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/17/12

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$109.41 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .139.00 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131.00 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .167.75 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80.36 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .89.87 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .162.62 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .355.28

125.29

129.15

181.21 189.41 152.73 156.62 182.54 189.04 84.00 84.18 * * 58.15 86.52 148.38 * 386.99 384.36

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.80 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.86 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.41 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .11.50 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .4.15

6.13 * * 10.64 3.17

6.16 * * 10.95 3.48

155.00 137.50 100.00 202.50 70.63

137.50 145.00 100.00 197.50 74.50

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .140.00 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .72.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . . . .* Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* * No market.

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Page 2

Heartland Express - Weather

March 1, 2012

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report Three precipitation events during the past 2 weeks impacted Nebraska. The first system impacted the state during the 2/192/20 period bring up to 5 inches of snow to the Panhandle and north central Nebraska, with trace amounts to eastern sections of the state. The second system brought very Allen Dutcher light moisture to the northern 1/3 of the state during the 2/22-2/23 period. The most impressive system of the period impacted the state on 2/28 with severe weather reported across the southern 2/3 of the state and the first February tornado in recorded history touching down near Stapleton. Snowfall was reported across north central Nebraska with 2-4 inch accumulations reported. Further north, blizzard conditions and snow exceeding 12 inches hammered northeast South Dakota, west central

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Assistant/Circulation LeAnne Killion

Sales Representatives Dana Gieber • Chelsie Shaw • Tim Lingg Todd Smith • Lesli Goodsell • Darlene Overleese Production - Chris Frazer

Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 • Copyright © 2012 Front cover mast head background photo courtesy of OWH, Jeff Beiermann

Minnesota, and eastern North Dakota. This was the first major precipitation event to hit this region since last summer. With very warm temperatures indicated by weather models during the next two weeks, wheat should easily break dormancy. Week One Forecast, 3/3 - 3/9: Well above normal temperatures are projected by weather models during this period. Two potential weather systems are indicated swing through the central Plains during this period. The first system is projected to drop a cold front through the state on 3/4, but moisture appears limited as the system moves southeast from the northern Plains. The best moisture chances are currently projected for northeastern Nebraska, but total moisture projections are under 0.20 inches. The second system is scheduled to move across the central U.S. on 3/7 and bring a chance of scattered showers to the eastern half of Nebraska. Again, total moisture with this system looks to be less than 0.10 inches. Dry and warm conditions are forecasted for the remainder of the period. High Temperatures: 3/3 (low 30's NE - low 40's W), 3/4 (low 40's NE - mid 50's W), 3/5-3/6 (mid 50's NE mid 60's SW), 3/7 (mid 30's NE - mid 50's SW), 3/8

(mid 50's NE - mid 60's SW), 3/9 (low 60's NE upper 60's SW). Week Two Forecast, 3/10 - 3/16: Models indicate that above normal temperatures will continue during this period. Two potential systems may impact the state during this period. The first system is currently projected to move into the central Plains on 3/11. Very warm and moist air is projected to lift north from the Gulf of Mexico in advance of the surface low. If the models are correct, a significant severe weather outbreak is possible from Texas northward into Nebraska. Further north, heavy snow and high winds are a possibility. The second system is projected to impact the state on 3/16, with rain and thunderstorms possible. Dry conditions are expected for the remainder of the period, with highs potentially breaking the 70 F mark across sections of western Nebraska during the 3/13-3/14 period. High Temperatures: 3/10 (low 50's NW mid 60's S), 3/11 (low 40's NE - low 50's W), 3/12 (low 60's NE - upper 60's SW), 3/13-3/14 (mid 60's NE - low 70's SW), 3/15 (upper 40's NW - upper 60's SE), 3/16 (upper 30's NW - low 60's SE).

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report Agricultural Summary: For the month of February 2012, temperatures averaged 4 degrees above normal for the eastern half of the state and near normal for the western half. Heavy precipitation in the form of rain and snow fell early in the month. Overall, precipitation for the month was above normal for most of the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Moisture accumulation was greatest across the South East District with over 2 inches received. Elsewhere, one half to one and a half inches were common. At the end of the month, snow depth was limited mainly to the Northeast District with near 2 inches of snow cover. Strong winds have dried soils leaving soil moisture mostly adequate to short. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 32 to 37 degrees. The coolest soils were in the northern half of the state and increased moving to the south. Hauling grain to market, preparation for spring planting, and livestock care were the main activities during the month. Wheat condition continued well above year ago levels. Producers have not had to do as much supplemental feeding of cattle due to mild conditions. Most feed supplies are adequate. Cattle and calves are in good to excellent condition and calving was progressing well with the mild weather.

Weather Summary: Average snow depth at the end of February averaged less than one half inch statewide. By region, the heaviest snow depth was across the northern third of the state. Temperatures averaged above normal at the beginning and end of the month but below normal for the second week. Average temperatures for the month got warmer moving from north to south across the state. Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 1 percent very poor, 5 poor, 29 fair, 59 good, and 6 excellent, well above 40 percent good to excellent last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 5 short, 92 adequate and 2 surplus, near year ago levels. Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 8 fair, 74 good, and 17 excellent, above last year. This release is based on data from FSA county directors, county extension educators, NOAA, and the High Plains Regional Climate Center. County comments and reports can be found at: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State /Nebraska/Publications/Crop_Progress_&_Con dition/index The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators: Continued on page 14


March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - Country Living

Page 3

Cleaning Time Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County Yes, it is still winter but we can get a head start on spring cleaning. Choose a room and get started. Make a list of all tasks, large or small, that need to be done. This is helpful if it is just you who is cleaning or to divide up tasks among the family. Closets are the smallest “rooms” in a house yet require more decision making than many rooms. Pick a closet and take everything out. Wipe out the walls and shelves; allow to dry. Check for bugs, mold and wall cracks. Before putting items back in the closet, make sure they are “keepers”. Some items may be ready for recycling, tossing or donating. Also, think about whether each item should be stored at this location or elsewhere. Bathrooms are small rooms that do not require a lot of time for spring cleaning since weekly (or more frequent) cleaning is done. However, some extra cleaning should be done at least once a year. Start with the medicine chest. Dispose of any expired prescription or over-the-counter medications. Check with your local pharmacy or health care facility for proper disposal. Check to see if items such as cosmetics and suntan lotions have changed color or texture,

Tile Style indicating the item may be less effective. Get in the habit of marking the container with the purchase date so you know how old the item really is. Next check out what is in the bathroom. Are there items that do not need to be in this room? Is storage adequate? If not, can more storage be added? Larger rooms will take more time. My Mom always told me about the spring cleaning job of pulling up the large rugs, taking them outside and beating them with a rug beater. While I’m not advocating that this should be done, I do suggest that furniture be moved and floors and carpets be cleaned. If bookcases are in a room, take all the books off the shelves. Clean the shelving units and let air dry. Before re-shelving, check to see if you want to keep each book. If you have a lot of books (like me), have a plan for organizing by subject matter, author, alphabetical or whatever method works for you. For books you don’t want to keep, consider giving them to family or friends, donating to a charity or library used book sale, or sell to a used book store. Next time the snow flies this winter, do some spring cleaning then reward yourself with a good book and a cup of hot tea or hot chocolate - that’s what I do.

Horticulture Update Noel Mues, Extension Educator University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Furnas County Dormant seeding of cool season grasses can take place during winter. Although fall is the optimum time to seed cool season grasses, dormant seeding is usually more effective than spring seeding and only slightly less effective than September seeding for Kentucky bluegrass or tall fescue. A potential problem with dormant seeding is the seed may germinate during an unusually warm spell in early spring and the seedlings are then killed by ensuing cold temperatures. Therefore dormant seeding works better in northern climates where the weather remains cold enough to delay spring germination. Checking seed viability – Test the germination rate of leftover seed before buying new. The seeds of many plants can remain viable for up to five years if stored correctly. Conduct a germination test by placing some seed between paper towels that are kept constantly moist and at a temperature between 65 and 70 degrees F. Check seeds daily for sprouting. If, after 7 to 10 days, the germination rate is seventy percent or less, consider buying new seed.

Desiccation injury – Our unseasonable warm and open winter can increase desiccation damage in cool-season turfgrass lawns, sports turf, and golf courses. Desiccation occurs when roots cannot supply enough water to dormant/semidormant plants to keep up with the amount of water lost through leaves and crowns. Warm winter temperatures and high winds increase evaporation from plants and soil surface. Desiccation injury is greatest on exposed or elevated sites with sandy soils and areas where surface runoff is greatest. Rainfall and/or correct irrigation late into fall, along with protection by windbreaks, helps reduce the risk of desiccation damage but rainfall did not occur during much of November and December. Where feasible, winter irrigation can help maintain plant and soil moisture and minimize damage. Winter irrigation of turf is not practical for most homeowners. On home lawns, wait and see what the effects are this spring; then repair thin or damaged areas with over-seeding and good turf management practices. Where winter irrigation is attempted, soils must not be frozen and air temperatures need to be above 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Learn the Latest on Diabetes Amy Johnson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension in Knox County Yes, we have come a long way since we first began working in the field of diabetes education. We now know that the complications associated with diabetes can be prevented or delayed. Our growing knowledge of various foods and their effect on blood sugar levels enables people with diabetes to eat food they like, choose when and how much to eat, and still control blood-sugar levels. It is the best time in history to have diabetes, especially in light of the difficulties our parents and grandparents would encounter had they been diagnosed decades ago. Today people with diabetes can choose from a wide variety of nonnutritive sweeteners and can even figure out how to fit sugar-containing foods into their meal plan. With carbohydrate information now readily available for most foods, diabetics can easily learn to count carbohydrates at each meal. This allows diabetics to fit virtually any food into their meal plan. Fitting diabetes into your lifestyle is the key message. Diabetes does not have to dictate how you live. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension and Franciscan Care Services of West Point invite you and your family members to participate in a new and exciting diabetes educational program. The series of programs is being offered via the two-way interactive distance education facilities. Participants will learn about current issues related to diabetes from educators with over 20 years of team-teaching experience. Wednesday, March 28, is the first of three programs in the “2012 Control Diabetes for Life”

series. Topics that will be addressed during the two-hour program are: “What Does it Mean to be Diagnosed with Pre -, Type 1, Type 2, or Type 3 Diabetes?”; “Dietary Guidelines for Americans”; and the “Great Salt Debate and Potassium’s Role” along with other helpful hints. Participants will sample a new recipe for a diabetic appropriate food. Team-teaching the program will be Deborah Willcox, R.D. and L.M.N.T., and Stacie Petersen, R.N. and Certified Diabetes Educator both of Franciscan Care Services in West Point and Debra Schroeder, UNL Extension Educator in Cuming County. This program will be offered in Knox County at the Extension Office in Center, Nebraska, on Wednesday, March 28, 2012, beginning at 1:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend this pre-recorded program. Please register by calling 402-288-5611 or email knox-county@unl.edu so we have an appropriate number of handouts available. “Control Diabetes for Life” is a joint project of University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension, Franciscan Care Services of West Point and the schools hosting the presentation. “Control Diabetes for Life” will help participants learn to control diabetes and prolong the onset of complications from the disease. These sessions are designed to supplement the education that you receive from your local diabetes education team and are not a substitute for diabetes classes through your local health care providers. Nebraska School Food Service Association has approved this session for two hours of continuing education credits for food service staff for attending. Control your diabetes for life! Start by attending the March 28 program. Call today to register!

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Small but smart, this one-story plan provides maximum livability in a compact design. Sloped ceilings in the living and dining rooms create a sense of enlarged space. Decorative arches include plenty of space above for plants, pictures, or family treasures. The kitchen shares space with the bayed breakfast nook. The adjacent family room includes a fireplace and creates a living area ideal for informal gatherings. Sleeping quarters consist of the master suite, a secondary bedroom, and a study that may be used as a third bedroom.

Detailed Specifications

House Style Mediterranean Ranch Southwest Spanish Revival Bedroom Extras First Floor Kitchen Extras Breakfast Nook Snack Bar Foundation Type Slab Built-in Desks Fireplace Windows Bay / Box / Bow Expansive Rear View Key Information 1,898 Square Feet Beds: 3 Baths: 2 ½ Stories: 1 Garage Bays: 2 Width: 51' Depth: 59' Room Summary Den / Study Formal Dining Room Formal Living Room Laundry Room - First Floor Master / Main Suite Special Features Family Room Patio / Terrace / Veranda Porch - Front Split Bedrooms

Main Level

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Page 4

Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

March 1, 2012

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • B u r e a u c r a t s I n Tr a i n i n g by Lee Pitts

Some Washington DC grown-ups making mischief have proposed changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act what would forbid youths under the age of 16 from operating tractors on operations other than their own family farms. Are these people nuts? That's a rhetorical question; of course they are, they're government bureaucrats. Their job is to stifle ambition, creativity and humanity. Next thing you know they'll say kids under the age of 21 can't ride horses without helmets, knee pads, shin guards, a rollover bar, seat belts and training wheels. The proposed changes are in response to a new study that says agriculture is the most dangerous profession. But that's just because the same government bureaucrats have put most of the loggers and fishermen out of business with their endless regulations. We're told that the feds are also considering making rules that would forbid kids from working when it gets too hot. My, my, get little Hortense and Farnsworth out of the sun, hand them their sippy cup, blanky, video game and some junk food. And mothers, don't forget to disinfect with one of those disinfectant wipes you carry in your purse. The kids will be safe that way. And you'll still be handing them their allowance when they come back to live with you at age 26 because all the

jobs have been taken by foreign kids who weren’t nurse-maided and mollycoddled. When I was the age they are talking about I got a job so that one day I could buy my own pickup. And when I got that pickup I knew how to drive because old Mr. Moore let me drive his equally old Fordson tractor to pull the spray rig. Believe me, the only safety device that tractor had was a rear view mirror with Mr. Moore in it, checking on my driving. Occasionally he even let me drive it when he wasn't around, but he later studied my tire tracks to see if I deviated from the straight and narrow. If these proposed new rules had been in effect then I wouldn't have been near the driver I was when I got to drive the family car and, who knows, I might have hit another car head on as we both were traveling at 65 miles an hour instead of hitting the occasional slowmoving lemon tree while going three miles per hour on the tractor. I learned important things while driving my first tractor, such as, watch your gauges, know your implements, keep air in your tires, keep your hitches low, don't run out of fuel, look behind you as well as in front of you, don't exhaust in a closed building, and don't be in a hurry to take chances. These all turned out to be important lessons for life as well as driving a tractor.

We figure things out better and faster when we're kids, just look at six year olds with their cell phones. I was a workhorse at an early age and sure I got hurt. I was riding a bike to my work all over town, and of course I fell down once in awhile, but I got right back on and explored the world. At least that part accessible to a kid on a Schwinn bike that I paid for myself by doing jobs the feds wouldn't let me do now. Years ago a tractor company issued their ten commandments for tractor safety. One of them was, "Keep your kids off and away from your tractor." It's the worst advice I ever heard. Kids ought to be required to be around tractors. Maybe then they'd be better drivers when we hand them the keys at age 16. Bureaucrats worry that kids are "at risk." I have news for them, kids are born at risk. If you don't want them to be in danger don't have any. There's a fine line between being careful and being overprotective, and we've crossed that line. Most urban American kids today don't work outside in the sun much, that's for farm kids, foreigners and migrant workers. Instead they sit on their duffs spending hours Facebooking, Tweeting, and producing nothing except text messages and high video game scores. They're in training to become government bureaucrats.

www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com Features In Upcoming Issues: • FFA • College Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

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March 1, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 5

Bunny Hop Table Mat Supplies: Wools –

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Fusible web Perle cottons to match wool colors Instructions: Make a template of the scalloped mat and trace scalloped mat onto fusible web. Cut out mat just outside the traced line. Cut out the center of the fusible web from the scallop mat leaving a scant ½” just outside of the scallops. Iron fusible web to the tan wool background. This will leave a ring of fusible web along the scallops. Cut out mat on the traced line. Trace 4 each of all appliques onto the fusible web. Iron to correct wools. Cut out all appliques on traced line. Remove paper backing and iron onto the wool background. Stitch around all appliques with a blanket stitch. Remove ring of paper from fusible web on the back of the wool background mat. Iron the wool mat background to homespun backing. Cut out backing using the wool mat as a guide. Fray check outside edge of backing. Blanket stitch around scalloped edge of mat. Embellish bunnies and flowers as desired. The mat will finish at 17” in diameter. *Kits are available at Cottage Inspirations for $25.00.

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Page 6

Heartland Express - Goverment

March 1, 2012

Nebraska Doesn’t Need Another Stimulus by Congressman Adrian Smith Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, better known as the “stimulus,” turned three years old on Friday. When properly accounted, the price tag for this historic spending law is more than $1.1 trillion. To put this figure in perspective, the stimulus is more than twice the size of the New Deal and more than the entire value of Australia’s economy. Supporters of the stimulus plan promised it would “save or create” 3.5 million jobs and keep unemployment from reaching 8 percent. However, instead of seeing a dramatic increase in growth, our country is experiencing the slowest pace of economic expansion since the Great Depression. Quarterly growth has averaged an anemic 1.4 percent since the stimulus was passed. By comparison, quarterly growth averaged 5.6 percent in the same period of time following the recession ending in 1982. While the pace of job creation has improved in recent months, the continued decline of the American labor force is a cause for concern. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the labor force participation rate – the number of

able people working or looking for work – currently stands at a thirty-year low. If the participation rate were at the same level today as it was before the recession started, the national unemployment rate would be an astounding 11.4 percent due to the severe lack of job opportunities. Clearly, the stimulus has not worked, which is why I was disappointed to see the President double down on this approach in his recently proposed budget. Like last year’s proposal, the budget he recently submitted has been met with bipartisan opposition because it contains hundreds of billions of dollars in new spending. It’s time to consider new ideas. Nebraskans understand we cannot spend our way to prosperity with money we don’t have. Our state has weathered the Great Recession better than almost any other precisely because we chose not to grow government or engage in wasteful spending. We don’t need another stimulus. I have remained focused on progrowth policies which eliminate government barriers to private-sector job creation, voting to

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

pass nearly 30 bipartisan bills which would reduce burdensome regulations, cut wasteful spending, and expand domestic energy production. Bills like H.R. 1633, which would prevent the EPA from regulating farm dust, and H.R. 1173, which would repeal the unsustainable CLASS Act, passed the House 268-150 and 267-159 respectively; there is broad, bipartisan support for these commonsense pieces of legislation, but they are still awaiting a vote in the Senate. If the President were to put as much energy into supporting these responsible pieces of legislation as he has his misguided and wasteful stimulus measures, our nation may well be on a more sustainable fiscal path. Getting government out of the way and living within its means would be the best stimulus plan of all. I will continue working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reverse this pattern of overspending and free our economy from the burden of excessive regulation, over-taxation, and growing debt.

They’re Ba-a-a-ck; The E-15 Critics by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

There they go again. Last week, the House Science, Space and Technology Committee approved along party lines a bill that would require the Environmental Protection Agency to commission a study of the ethanol blend E15 before allowing it to be used in vehicles. This will cause an unwise delay in use of this fuel that holds so much promise. Wisconsin Republican Representative Jim Sensenbrenner’s measure would delay EPA’s final approval of the fuel blend by up to 19 months while the National Academy of Sciences carries out the study. Sensenbrenner’s actions seem funny since I thought Groundhog Day had already come and gone but here we are seeing the same old thing again. Last year, another Republican Congressman attached an amendment to the House’s rejected H.R. 1 which blocked the continued implementation of E-15.

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

E15 as a Renewable Fuel No fuel blend has been tested as thoroughly as E15. No fuel blend has undergone the level of scrutiny E15 has – and passed the tests like E15 did. They’ve been looking at E15 for more than three years. E15 will reduce our dependence on foreign oil by 7 billion gallons annually. E15 will create up to 136,000 American jobs that can’t be outsourced. E15 will improve our environment – 59 percent less harmful emissions.

data, science and research in its support than any of the other 11 Clean Air Act waivers previously approved by the U.S. EPA. In October 2010, EPA approved a waiver allowing 15 percent ethanol in gasoline for passenger vehicles from model years 2007 and later. The agency approved E15 for use in models from 2001 to 2006 in January of last year and released a gasoline-station label for the blend in June. EPA has yet to complete final registration of the fuel under the Clean Air Act.

The House Should Stay Out The House has inserted itself in another situation that did not need Congressional meddling, causing further delay in moving forward the development of this domestic renewable fuel. The Green Jobs Waiver for E15 was accompanied with more independently-gathered

Choose Science Not Politics This amendment chooses politics over science. E15 is the most tested fuel in history and holds a lot of promise for America’s future as a renewable fuel source that will help us in our battle for energy independence. We should get on with it and stop the political game playing.

Earmarks By Any Name Are Still Earmarks by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

As if the Congressional approval rating isn't low enough, the Senate, after swearing off earmarks and carve-outs, is now considering a bill containing an earmark. It's not obvious at first glance, but if you dig through the legislative text of the highway bill currently being considered, you'll find a provision which clearly falls under the definition of an earmark as outlined by Rule 44 in the Standing Rules of the Senate. Because of the Senate's no-earmark pledge, along with President Obama's promise to veto any bill with earmarks, the Senate should demand this bill be changed. I've introduced an amendment which would strip the earmark. Here's what the provision in question does. First, it identifies a very specific section (an old earmark, as it happens) from the 2005 highway bill. This provision is so specific that we know it applies solely to an earmark to fund the Nevada portion of a Maglev rail project from Las Vegas to Los Angeles. That project has since proven so expensive that even the addition of an earmark could not get the project off the ground.

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

Taxpayer dollars appropriated for the earmark – $45 million – have sat unspent for years. The highway bill currently before us explicitly identifies this money and gives it to "such state" as was identified previously – in this case, Nevada. According to the Senate rules, that's an earmark. The provision directs a specific amount of funding to a specific state, by rescinding an old earmark. Instead of returning the taxpayer money to the federal Treasury, the provision spends it through a new earmark, directed once again to Nevada. Some claim this provision isn't an earmark because it's not "new spending." This argument cannot hold. For one, the Senate's definition of an earmark does not mention anything about "new" spending. Second, accepting this argument means that any member could delete wasteful spending programs and send the money to pet projects without acknowledging that the provision is in fact an earmark. Furthermore, because President Obama has vowed to veto any bill containing an earmark,

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

Washington, D.C. Office 404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510

this provision must be stripped for the bill as a whole to have any chance of becoming law. The year I arrived in the Senate, 2009, I took a stand against earmarks. I believed then, as I do now, that the earmark process lacks openness and transparency. Earmarks are often used to entice members of Congress to vote for legislation they might otherwise reject as irresponsible. In an age of trillion dollar annual deficits and a $15 trillion national debt, it is unacceptable to use taxpayer dollars as bargaining chips. The federal government is borrowing 42 cents of every dollar spent and should not borrow more to give the state of Nevada a gift no other state will receive. This provision slipped into the highway bill is a perfect example of the preferential treatment of tax dollars which led to the Senate earmark moratorium and the President's pledge to veto them. I will continue the push to get my amendment passed, and I encourage my colleagues to cosponsor it. We owe an earmark-free bill to the American people.


March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - Market

Page 7

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

Country Grain Prices as of 2/28/12 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon Hemingford

New Corn

$6.39 $6.24 $6.35 $6.36 $6.39 $6.35 $6.47 $6.42 $6.08 $6.42 $6.32 $6.42 $6.33 $6.41 $6.32 $6.41 $6.41 $6.40 $6.39 $6.43 $6.37 $6.35 $6.52 $6.43 $6.43 $6.26 $6.48 $6.41 $6.32 $6.41 $6.45 $6.31 $6.35 671 Above Above Above

$5.20 $5.08 $5.18 $5.16 $5.19 $5.18 $5.24 $5.25 $5.03 $5.20 $5.17 $5.25 $5.23 $5.26 $5.15 $5.26 $5.20 $5.18 $5.16 $5.15 $5.24 $5.24 $5.21 $5.06 $5.20 $5.26 $5.09 $5.18 $5.26 $5.08 $5.05 Northern Oil Flowers Spring Wheat Spring Wheat

Beans

New Beans

$12.42 $12.35 $12.45 $12.05 $12.45 $12.38 $12.58 $12.51

$12.04 $12.00 $12.08 $11.74 $12.09 $11.87 $12.40 $12.01

$12.42 $12.04 $12.53

$12.01 $11.73 $12.01

$12.43 $12.04 $12.13

$11.98 $11.73 $12.03

$12.27 $12.59 $12.24 $12.10 $12.32 $12.67 $12.46 $12.36

$12.23 $11.86 $11.78 $12.24 $12.01 $11.98

$12.44 $12.48

$12.18 $12.03

$12.32 $12.40 $12.35 $12.38

$11.98 $12.04 $11.93 $12.04

$42.00 $24.85 $7.72 $7.77

Wheat

New Wheat

$6.65

$6.39

$6.25

$6.09

$6.63 $7.30 $6.63 $6.50

$6.39 $6.94 $6.39 $6.29

$6.30 $6.81 $6.66 $6.63 $6.30

$6.14 $6.57 $6.49 $6.44 $6.14

$6.25 $6.20 $6.64 $6.56 $6.37

$6.09 $6.49 $6.38 $6.19

$6.66 $6.14

$6.48 $5.99

$6.64 $6.20

$6.44 $5.99

$6.83 $6.69

$6.69 $6.48

$50.00 Pinto Oil Flowers (new) Spring Wheat(new) $4 Spring Wheat(new)

New Milo

$6.14

$5.09

$6.05

$4.68

$6.05

$4.68

$6.25

$4.88

$6.07

$4.74

$6.17 $5.93

$4.98 $4.58 $4.67

$6.19 $6.18

Corn trade has pushed higher this week, moving to levels not seen since the January USDA report. May corn is up 14 cents and December is up a dime. The corn trade has moved solidly above 20-day moving average, now at $6.45 on the May contract, giving us a current positive chart outlook. The 200-Day moving average is the upside resistance at $6.70. A move above the 200-day would be a friendlier upside chart break out which occurred in beans just over a week ago. The dollar has remains near the lower end of its recent range for the moment. The trade will now watch the progress of Brazil’s second crop acres coming forward, and more will be know about its prospects in the month ahead. Most private analysts continue to hold the expectations for the Argentina crop at the 20 million metric ton level and Brazil at 58 to 60 million metric tons. The new crop trade has moved higher despite the USDA Outlook Forum numbers pegging corn acres at 94 million, and a carryout of 1.616 billion on trendline yields of 164 bu. an acre. Many in the trade feel that hitting trendline will be challenge due to the increase of marginal acres, and the need for good weather in the Corn Belt to reach those numbers. Export inspections were near expectations with 27 million bushels on Monday. This still keeps shipments near the pace of the prior crop year. With Chinese domestic prices remaining firm, US corn still prices into the Chinese market reasonably well. Going forward the Chinese government has lowered crop size expectations for the coming year by 8.5%. Exports were 690,000 metric tons, in the middle of the 600,000 to 850,000 metric ton range. Hedgers call with questions or to discuss your 2012 and 2013 hedging plan.

Dec. 12 542 583

May 2012 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .6.560 High . . .6.560 Low . . . .6.504 Close . . .6.546 Change .-0.032

The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 2/28/12 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$5.11 $4.88

Soybeans

Wheat

May 12 625 678

to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options.

$7.16 $7.26

Corn

Support: Resistance

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience

The wheat trade has been able to move higher on the back of strong row crop action this week. The weekly net change heading into Wednesday was 27 higher in Chicago, 20 higher in KC and Minneapolis 19 higher. May Chicago wheat has moved back above the major moving averages, at $6.56 on the 10-day, and $6.50 on the 20-day. The chart has turned a little more positive which should help spur a little more short covering. The KC/Chicago spread has continued to work around 38 to 40 cents which is tighter than we have seen in sometime. The Chicago wheat contract has reestablished at 10 cent premium to corn for the moment. Russian ports are expected to unfreeze in the coming weeks, opening shipments back up again. The Russian crop has average winter kill with only 6% estimated, with the Ukraine much higher. Analysts expect further growth in the European wheat crop in the coming year. China has struggled with a dry winter in their key grain growing areas, which is raising concerns. Crop conditions in the US hard wheat belt are around 60% to 65% good to excellent for all states except Texas which say an increase to 43% poor to very poor on continued dry weather. The forecast for the coming weeks calls for little precipitation and could send the wheat crop rolling backwards. Export inspections were disappointing with only 7.5 million bushels, but there are often revisions higher in wheat after a Holiday Week. Iran has been actively seeking grain via barter arrangements. Exports for the week were 414,000 metric tons of old crop, and 95,000 metric tons of new. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 616 700

K City 663 737

Minneapolis 765 844

May 2012 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .6.662 High . . . .6.670 Low . . . .6.604 Close . . .6.636 Change .-0.042

Soybean trade has shifted higher this week due to positive chart items, outside market strength from last week and continued concerns about South American production support the market. May futures are 34 higher on the week and November is up 19. Nearby meal is up $15 and bean oil is down 18 points. The soy complex continues to hold his new crop gains against corn, but is not to a point where it is flipping acres yet. May soybean chart support is at the 10-day moving average at 12.91 and the 20-day at 12.71. November beans remain solidly above their 200-day moving average at $12.65, with prices up near $13 now, and nearby futures moved above the 200day on Monday. The trade has been marking down Brazilian productions as the crop in the key southern areas is stressed further. Analysts have been reducing Brazilian estimates further to the 68 to 70 million metric ton range. Argentina has gotten beneficial moisture and some analyst have begun to upgrade the production forecasts slightly in that region to 48 million metric tons from 46-47. Moisture is now getting to be a mixed bag, because its too late to improve crop items, it will only slow harvest. China continues to be around the market as they seek beans for the March/April time frame as logistical disruptions hamper shipments out of Brazil. Early harvest continues to gain steam in Brazil with estimates of 30% complete so far. Yields are good in the Northern growing areas that say better weather during the growing season. Chinese domestic prices remain firm which should support the old crop in the near term. Export shipments were strong again this week, with 37 million bushels inspected. Exports on the week were disappointing with 49,000 metric tons of old crop beans and 427,000 metric tons of new crop sales 400,000 to 800,000 expected. Product sales were low at 40,000 metric tons of meal while 75,000 to 150,000 metric tons expected, and 4,800 metric tons of soy oil. The huge numbers last week made the lower numbers on Thursday not that negative to the market. Hedgers call with questions

Support: Resistance

May 1254 1357

May Meal 324 369

May Oil 5372 5562

May 2012 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .13.154 High . . .13.174 Low . . .13.062 Close . .13.152 Change .-0.046


Page 8

Heartland Express - FFA

March 1, 2012

Proud Supportors of FFA Featuring Chapters in these Counties Banner • Box Butte • Deuel • Garden Kimball • Morrill • Scotts Bluff • Sheridan • Sioux

The Scottsbluff FFA Chapter Chrissy Peters, Scottsbluff FFA Reporter

July-early August, the FFA Chapter is busy with activities during the Scottsbluff County Fair such as the chapter dinner, the FFA Alumni Lawnmower Races, showing livestock, and attending all of the attractions. Shortly after fair, school began and the chapter started preparing for upcoming contests, activities, and new members that are introduced into the chapter. To benefit new and present members, the Scottsbluff FFA Chapter attended the IMPACT Workshop which was held at the Gering Civic Center. At the workshop, the State Officers come and lead individual leadership workshops for all of the district chapters who choose to attend. Select members participated in the Land Judging Contest and the Range Judging Contest in September. In October, the Senior Officers and the 2010 Sr. Livestock Judging Team, Ashley Pike, Kenny Willman, and Kira Baldwin, accompanied by their advisors, attended the 84th National FFA Convention. The Livestock Judging Team competed against 167 other participants at a national level; they received a Silver Emblem. The Scottsbluff FFA Chapter is proud of their members for qualifying for the state contest which will be coming up in March. These team contests are Floriculture, Ag Sales, Welding, Livestock Management, Sr. Parliamentary Procedure, Ag Mechanics and as well as one individual Sr. Public Speaker. Currently the chapter is preparing for the upcoming district contests that include: Nursery and Landscape, Meats, Senior Livestock Judging, Junior Livestock Judging, and Agronomics.

The Scottsbluff FFA Chapter has been busy these past months with various activities. They began their 2011 year inducting their new senior officers at the banquet in May. Over the summer the new chapter officers attended a COLT conference in Aurora, NE where they learned leadership skills, and worked together in team building activities. The officers brought back many ideas which benefited the chapter, one being the idea of creating “MYPODS� which were groups of members each Senior Officer were assigned. The Senior Officer’s duty was to inform their group of members about upcoming events such as meetings, contests, chapter activities, etc. By doing this the chapter gained more member involvement. As the summer went on, many members were preparing for the Scottsbluff County Fair. Every year the Scottsbluff FFA Alumni sponsors a progress show for FFA and non-FFA members from all around. This progress show is held during the beginning of July, shortly before the county fair. The Scottsbluff Senior Officers help run this event by: announcing, passing out ribbons, and being where ever help is needed. Few of them also participate in showing livestock. This progress show allows competitors to get a head start and prepare themselves for the county fair. For preparation, the chapter also participates in “Fair clean up� with all FFA chapters and 4-H clubs. They work together to clean the fairgrounds, livestock barns, and the general area. During late

Scottsbluff FFA also participated in local activities such as the Farm and Ranch Expo, Truck Full of Love, Water for Tomorrow, and attended the Denver Stock Show. The chapter looks forward to future activities such as National FFA Week, the KNEB Spring Show, and the Labor Auction to raise money for the trip to State Convention. The Scottsbluff FFA Chapter gives huge thanks to its advisors, Bob Pedulla and Shane Talkington, the Senior Officers Ashley Pike, Tevyn Baldwin, Maggie Hopp, Chrissy Peters, Brayden Auer, Alexis Aragon, Taylor Russell, and Katey Myers, and the Scottsbluff FFA Alumni. Without them the chapter wouldn’t function as smoothly as it does or have the ability to continue on with the everyday activities they participate in. In the future, the Senior Officer Team has much in store for the chapter and looks forward to having a great rest of the year.

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March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - FFA

Page 9

Alliance FFA District Contests in January The Alliance FFA competed in the District 12 Agriculture Career Development Events Contest on Wednesday, January 11, at WNCC at Scottsbluff. The Alliance FFA Livestock Management team received 3rd at the competition. The competition is made up of a team of 3-6 members and who take practical exams on six different species areas. Alliance placed 1st in beef, 2nd in dairy, 3rd in swine, 4th in poultry, 5th in sheep, and 6th in equine. The team was made up of Chase Dye, Hannah Kesterson, Ashtyn Shrewsbury and Krista Carter. The Alliance FFA advisor is Lori Walla. Other team areas where Alliance competed Wednesday were: Welding Team- 7th place team; Tyler LeisyArc Welding; Denny Garza-O/A Welding; Bret Schwaderer- MIG Welding-4th place MIG indiv. Floriculture Team- 8 place team: Cheryl Aby11 place indiv, Amanda Lower- 26th place indiv., Rhiannon Minich, and Brittany Walker. State FFA competition and convention will be held in March in Lincoln, the Alliance FFA Livestock management team and Welding team are now qualified to attend. Also qualified at this time is Ashtyn Shrewsbury in Extemperaneous Speaking.

Alliance FFA Members Attend Stock Show Eleven of the Alliance FFA members attend The Black Hills Stock Show in Rapid City. The trip was an FFA activity points award trip. While at the stock show the students were able to watch the Maine Anjou and Limousin cattle sales, attend the PRCA Rodeo, view many ag business booths, and walk through the South Dakota FFA petting Zoo. The majority of the petting zoo animals came from the Richard Laursen farm just outside of Alliance. Students earning enough to attend were: Brett Schwaderer, Ashtyn Shrewsbury, Cheryl Aby, Hannah Kesterson, Amanda Lower, Krista Carter, Chase Dye, Tegan Ramariz, Brittany Walker, Tess Benham, Angello Warfield along with chaperones Marty Loch and advisor Lori Walla.

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Page 10

Heartland Express - FFA

Alliance FFA Alumni Receives Awards

March 1, 2012

Two Alliance Members Submit District Proficiency Applications Nikki Dunovsky and Krista Carter both submitted District Proficieny applications to be review by a team on February 3rd here in Alliance. Nikki’s application in Horse Production-Entrepreneurship received 1st place Gold and Krista Carter’s application in Diversified Crop production- Placement also received Gold. The Agricultural Proficiency Awards honor FFA members who, through their SAEs, have developed specialized skills that they can apply toward their future careers. Students can compete for awards in 47 areas* covering everything from Agricultural Communications to Wildlife Management. Each award area also has two categories, placement and entrepreneurship. SAE’s - An agricultural education program is made up of three integrated parts: Classroom instruction, FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE). Students with an SAE learn by doing. With help from their agricultural teachers, students develop an SAE project based on one or more SAE categories: Entrepreneurship - Own and operate an agricultural business (e.g. a lawn care service, a pay-to-fish operation, holiday poinsettia production and sales.) Placement - Get a job or internship on a farm or ranch, at an agriculture-based business, or in a school or factory laboratory. Research and Experimentation - Plan and conduct a scientific experiment. (e.g. Determine whether the phases of the moon affect plant growth, or test and determine the efficacy of different welding methods.) Exploratory - Explore careers in agriculture by attending an agriculture career fair, or creating a report or documentary on the work of a veterinarian. Nikki and Krista’s applications will again be reviewed for state recognition on Feb. 25th in Kearney.

At the State FFA Alumni Conference was held in Grand Island, January 20-21. Alliance FFA Alumni members TomWalters, Amy Shrewsbury and Lori Walla were in attendance. The Alliance FFA Alumni received a gold rating on their Chapter Award. This gold rating Chapter award will be eligible to be submitted to the National FFA Alumni Conference in the fall. The FFA alumni also received 1st on their scrapbook, and Washington Leadership Conference Scholarship for one of the high school FFA members. Alliance FFA member Ashtyn Shrewsbury spoke at the Saturday luncheon on her WLC experiences this past summer as she had received a scholarship from the Nebraska FFA Alumni to Attend. While at the conference members toured Nova-Tech an agricultural pharmaceutical company, Standard Iron, an ag manufacturing company, the Power plant and H & H Distributing of Grand Island. Next years Nebraska State FFA Alumni Conference will be held in Alliance Jan 24th and 25th.

Alliance FFA Food Science Team Wins The Alliance FFA competed in the District 12 Agriculture Career Development Events Contest on Tuesday, Feb 3, at Gordon Rushville High School . The Alliance FFA Food Science team 1st place at the District competition. The 4 member team had to take a online test over Food Science information. Members of the winning team included: Krista Carter, Hannah Kesterson, Ashtyn Shrewsbury, and Brittany Walker. Krista and Hannah tied for first place individuals and Ashtyn place 3rd. The Alliance FFA advisor is Lori Walla. Other team areas where Alliance competed Tuesday were- Agriscience team- Cheryl Aby(13th place indiv) and Tegan Ramirez. State FFA competition and convention will be held in March in Lincoln, the Alliance FFA. The Food Science and Agriscience teams both qualify for state.

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March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - FFA

Page 11

Creek Valley FFA News By Shania Brown, FFA Reporter The Creek Valley FFA Chapter has been very hard at work going to competitions and planning for FFA week. On January 11th fourteen members went to Career Development Events in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. The Livestock Management Team of Forrest Hendrickson, Kelsey Wade, Luke Cavalli, Logan Criswell, and Dane McConnell placed ninth as an overall group. The Ag. Sales Team had Hannah Schievelbein placing 17th, Aysia Ekman placing 21st, and

Clarice Ford placing 28th. As a team they placed 8th. The Floriculture Team placed 9th over all, with Summer Mueller placing 30th, Shania Brown 33rd, Ashley Burr 39th, Aftan Bartels 42nd, and McKenzie Akeson earning 47th. Most recently, four members went to the Envirothon contest in Gordon, Nebraska. Aysia Ekman, Aftan Bartels, Cody Wilmoth, and Kelsey Wade placed 7th overall, and won two of the individual divisions, Rangeland and Wildlife. FFA week is always a fun time here in Chappell, Nebraska. This year, Monday was Wear Blue and

Gold Day, Tuesday was Official Dress Day, Wednesday was Cowboy Day, Thursday was FFA Shirt Day, with the officers making a delicious breakfast of pancakes and eggs for the whole student body, and Friday was Farmer Day allowing everyone to drive their agriculture vehicles to school. The next big event for the Creek Valley FFA Chapter is CDE’s in Kimball, Nebraska on March 7th, where we hope to qualify even more of our members for State FFA in March.

Seniors in Alliance FFA Hannah Kesterson is 18 years old and has only been in FFA for one year. Although time with the FFA has been short she has participated in many activities. These include helping with stadium clean ups, concession stands, taking part in the district Livestock management contest, going to meetings, selling fruit, winning the food science District contest, attending the Rapid City Stock Show, and helping to build floats. She Hannah has enjoyed being able to work with friends and classmates in FFA. She is looking forward to attend State FFA convention and compete in Livestock Management and Food Science. She also noted that there are a lot of similarities between FFA and 4-H. Hannah has been very active in 4-H, its easy to see they go hand in hand in leadership development. This year her supervised agriculture experience program has been her place of employment. She thinks that being in FFA has helped her learn to lead more and become more active. After high school she plans to attend college and moving into the medical field, working toward a pharmacy degree. The advice she gives to first year members is to try hard and do everything that he or she can. Hannah’s parents are Clint and Kristin Kesterson. Brittany Walker is 18 years old and has been in the FFA for three years. Brittany’s SAE has included working in food service; she has worked over 800 hours each year. She has participated in many events including, Impact, Floriculture, Nursery Landscape and Land judging district contests, highway clean ups, food drives, ag fair, selling fruit, Santa’s helpers, concession stands, stadium cleanups, building floats, being on planning committees and attending

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Denver/Rapid Stock show. Brittany also had the opportunity to show her rabbit at county fair this past summer. Brittany has competed in the areas of Ag Communications and Agriscience at State Convention and is looking forward to competing in the food science contest this year. Last year one of the highlights was competing at state FFA conference and the county fair. When asked what she has enjoyed the most about FFA, her reply, “seeing people excited about FFA and seeing how well we do at competitions”. Brittany says that she has learned that just about any career you do in the midwest will have something to do with agriculture. She has also learned many skills that will help her be a better leader. How has she benefited from ag classes and FFA, “she says she has learned how important agriculture is to our state and many skills in ag areas that she can use.” Advise for new members is “do as much as you can because you only have so much time before you’ll be moving on”. After high school Brittany is planning to attend college/tech school in agriculture and wildlife, she would like to study more about wildlife. Brittany’s parents are Brian and Milly Walker. Brett Schwaderer, 18, has been a four year member of the Alliance FFA. Brett serves as reporter this year, as a junior Brett served as sentinel. Brett has been very active in the FFA. He has participated in COLT, Impact, ag fair, highway cleanups, food drives, FFA week activities, parliamentary procedure team, toy show, Husker Harvest days, Denver stock show, Rapid stock show, floats at the county fair, Heritage Days, and Christmas, and water testing. He competed at the district MIG welding and placed 3rd, and will represent Alliance at the state Welding contest. His most memorable FFA activity has been placing 3rd in the State Ag Marketing Plan competition last year. Bret says that he has learned that it doesn’t matter if you’re a rancher/farmer or even live in town: there is always a place in agriculture for everyone. He has enjoyed being able to travel and experience different places. The leadership camps have been quite an experience, they have helped him to face problems and also learn to support others. What trip he liked the most “Rapid City Stock Show”. Advise for new members is” if you want to

experience the most and have the opportunity become an FFA officer”. He believes that being involved in FFA has showed him how to grow as a person, but also help him pick out what he would like to do as a career. He also says that he has learned more about agriculture by taking classes/FFA than he did before. Bret’s SAE has included working at J & C Lawn Service where he mows lawns in the summer and does snow removal in the winter. He also assists with upkeep and repair on machines. After high school Bret is planning to go to college to be a Diesel Mechanic, but it will be on the ag side of mechanics if he has his choice. Bret’s parents are Chris and Leslie Romick.

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Page 12

Heartland Express

March 1, 2012

AGRONOMIST PROVIDES EXPERTISE Continued from page 1 He said farmers in the U.S. have many modern conveniences to help make life easier, from the tractors they use to the way they test crop yields. That isn't the case elsewhere. Nickerson said going to Senegal was "the right thing to do." He said Senegal only grows enough food to feed 60 percent of its population. "That means that 40 percent is going hungry or looking elsewhere for food," he said. For Nickerson, it was a question of, "Why couldn't I go, and with some of my expertise, help raise that number a little bit?" To increase crop production in Senegal, Nickerson said it is a matter of knowing what they grow, how they grow it, and teaching how to properly apply fertilizers to help increase crop production. He educated farmers about the role that nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium play in a plant's life. He also provided strategies for applying compost to the land. "My whole philosophy was taking what they do and making it better," Nickerson said. One thing people have to remember, he said, is that there's a great technological divide between agricultural practices in the U.S. vs. Senegal. "We are talking five- to six-acre fields, still using a mule and a plow and the primary fertilizer sources are manure," he said. Because of the lack of financial resources, Nickerson said, Senegal farmers do not have the money to increase technology in their operations. In some cases, it was tweaking or modifying a farming practice to make it more productive. "They don't have the resources or the money to buy fertilizer or bring in outside resources," Nickerson said. Also, Senegal is a dry country and has only enough moisture during the year for one crop. Nickerson said he decided to take on the challenge and travel to Africa because of ServiTech's purpose " making the planet more productive. "The trip was my one opportunity to make the world a better place and make the planet more productive," he said. Senegal has sandy soil that is low in organic matter. Nickerson said the farmers knew that implementing compost creates nutrient rich, organic material, but they didn't know when, or how, to apply that material to the land. Servi-Tech's Central Nebraska territory manager, Rick Runyan, said he was happy to hear Nickerson would be traveling abroad as an agriculture expert. "This was a chance of a lifetime for Ryan to represent his company and his talents for the betterment of the people of a foreign country," Runyan said. Since French is spoken in Senegal, Nickerson used a translator to talk to the farmers. Runyan said Nickerson brings back an appreciation for technology, communication and infrastructure " things typically taken for granted in the U.S. Farmers in Senegal don't have tractors, irrigation technology or access to Ostermeyer Equipment, Inc. Shelton, NE 308-467-2345

fertilizer or crop genetics like U.S. farmers have. Nickerson developed ways the farmers could plant their corn, peanuts and millets crops in rows.

Senegal only grows enough food to feed 60 percent of its population.

His advice also included different land management strategies. For example, at the end of a growing season, Senegal farmers burn the fields to get rid of the crop residue. But burning the fields can be dangerous and can hurt the soil cycle and soil structure. "I did a lot of educating about what they're doing and how it's affecting the soil," Nickerson said. He found out about the trip through his former college adviser, Stephen Mason, a professor of agronomy at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. This is Nickerson's first time traveling overseas to share his agriculture expertise, although he has been overseas before. He served in the military in Iraq from April 2003 to May 2004. He also helped build a school in Nicaragua through the military.

Ryan Nickerson of Doniphan poses for a photo with children in a village near Kaolack, Senegal. (Courtesy photo)

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"Sometimes we don't realize what's going on on the other side of the world," he said. "As good as we have it, there are millions of people out there that need help. I'm just happy to help a few of them." While in Africa, Nickerson kept readers updated on his progress by updating a blog at mp2.ag. He and his wife, Amanda, have two children, Ethan, 8, and Kayli, 4. He grew up on a small family farm near Cambridge that raised cattle and dryland corn. Nickerson is a senior agronomist with ServiTech. He provides agronomic services to farmers in Central Nebraska. By the mid-part of the century, there will be an estimated 9 billion human beings who will need to be fed. While U.S. agriculture will be a big player, Nickerson said they can't feed the world alone. "We want to double crop yields by 2020 to meet this growing population," he said. Coming back to Nebraska, Nickerson said, he thought about how lucky people in the U.S. are to have such an efficient agricultural industry. "I want people to realize and not to forget that there are people out there that are not as fortunate as we are," he said. " Servi-Tech was organized in 1975 by three farmer-owned cooperatives to provide technical service for agricultural producers in southwest Kansas. Today, Servi-Tech provides consulting to approximately 2,000 farmers across five states and more than 1 million acres.

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March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - Crop Insurance

Page 13

Lack of Communication, Can Cut Farm Family Ties By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub KEARNEY - Dave Specht looked around a conference room filled with women and joked that he felt as if he'd "been let into a secret private club." Then he advised his audience at the 27th annual Nebraska Women in Agriculture Conference in Kearney of a truth everyone should know: A woman's influence is the key to generational transitions on farms and ranches. "Every family is unique," said Specht, coordinator of family business programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Center for Entrepreneurship. He also has a private consulting business to help farm and ranch families to make business transition plans. He became interested in the topic during an elective course for his master's degree at San Diego State University. At the same time, he knew of two family businesses with very different methods and outcomes when incorporating a second generation. One family had a plan that worked well, while a lack of communication and planning destroyed the other family's auto business. In the second case, the dad died without discussing his transition plan with his wife and children. "The attorney was left to tell the story of Dad's intentions," Specht said, which was to leave half of the business to his wife and half to his daughter. No one knows why the son was left out. The son quit, opened his own auto business two blocks away and attracted all of the family's customers, which left his mom and sister with nothing. It also ended their family relationship. Specht said that illustrates the need for members of the younger generation to know what their role will be in the family business. He described the financial and emotional ties family farmers and ranchers have to their land in rodeo terms." You tie yourself to this raging bull that takes you this way and that," Specht said. The hardest landings come when families don't talk about their expectations for a son or daughter joining the business or about what happens when parents retire or die. Specht described three "C's" to transition planning: Contingency, communication and cash flow. "If something would happen to any of the landowners, what would happen to ownership?" he said, asking women in the room Thursday if they would want to be in business with their in-laws if something happened to their husbands. Would they be able to buy out their in-laws' remaining interests in the farm? There also needs to be a management contingency plan that includes having more than one person know how to do every job. "What are the things in your operation that only one person knows how to do? If you have that, you have a big risk," Specht said. Also, is the transition plan for the family business shared with everyone with a stake in it, including children and employees who may or may not be working with the next generation? Good communication includes having family members talk about what the farm and ranch means to them, Specht said. Is it just a financial asset or does it mean more than that? Cash flow is huge on family farms. He said that if the older generation expects 100 percent of their retirement cash flow to come from the farm, they aren't really retiring. That means JANET NOTEBOOM ~ OWNER ERIC NOTEBOOM ~ VALENTINE OFFICE MANAGER FARM/RANCH INSURANCE DEPT. • MAPPING TECHNICIAN • LICENSED AGENT

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including whether the child who works on the farm should get a bigger share of the estate than siblings who are absentee owners. Specht said the young farmer or rancher who works with his or her parents may believe that will be true, but it might not be the parents' plan. "Whatever the scenario is, it needs to be communicated ... You can't assume anything because there is too much as stake," he said. Often, the two generations don't understand each other. Parents may never think a son or daughter is truly is prepared to own and operate the farm, Specht said, and the younger generation seeing today's high commodity and land prices may not appreciate the sacrifices their parents made to build the family business. He advised the Women in Ag participants to go home, seek to understand all the people within the family farm system and be intentional about doing something. "You have more influence than you know," Specht said.

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Page 14

Heartland Express - Planting

March 1, 2012

NEBRASKA WEATHER AND CROP REPORT Continued from page 2

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NORTHWEST BOX BUTTE: Light snows have brought some moisture but the constant winds blowing hard (some days have averaged over 40 mph) several days in a row have taken their toll on moisture accumulation. Most areas did not have much fall rainfall and very little snow accumulation to give the wheat much reserve. The relative warm temperatures have allowed it to stay green while moisture has been taken from the reserve or accumulation. SCOTTSBLUFF/MORRILL: Strong winds the past month have caused some minor wind erosion at this point to wheat fields. NORTHEAST BOONE: Weather has been mild, starting to snow today so will probably have a little snow cover this weekend. CEDAR: We had rain and snow this past week. Warmer temperatures melted much of the snow that did fall. Favorable conditions for calving. DIXON: Cattle are still picking up feed in open stubble fields. Some amount of supplemental feeding has been needed over the past month. Winter has remained open here for a wide spectrum of outside work to be done including grading, shaping, excavation, construction, etc. KNOX: Primary activities have been grain marketing, tax preparation, review of crop insurance options, care of livestock, and preparation for spring fieldwork. CENTRAL BUFFALO: Lack of winter moisture is a concern. We are not hurting but we certainly do not have any surplus. The open winter has been a blessing for livestock producers and except for about one cold week, we have had excellent calving conditions. EAST CENTRAL DODGE: Hauling grain to town and putting lime on fields are the main activities. With

snow about gone, cattle continue to graze stalks. DOUGLAS: We need RAIN! SOUTHWEST CHASE: We have had extremely high winds!!! What moisture we did have is now gone. FRONTIER/RED WILLOW: The mild winter has helped improve livestock conditions and hay supplies. We are still seeing numerous truckloads of hay/forage sorghum headed south. Calving appears to be going well. KEITH/ARTHUR: Conditions are very dry in the area. We have received very little snowfall and have had high winds the past week. The dry weather is taking its toll on wheat crops in the county. Reports from ranchers on calving so far have been good. LINCOLN: The weather has been nice except for the wind. We have had some moisture this month which has been helpful. SOUTH CENTRAL FRANKLIN: Preceding the last snow we had 1 ½ inches of rain and then 5 inches of wet snow. I believe the top soil moisture has improved considerably. I would think the subsoil is still on the dry side but have not dug down to see. Cattle are doing well. It has been good weather for calving. Plenty of hay left due to mild winter. HARLAN: Lambing is ending and calving is beginning. Only 1 snowstorm for moisture. PHELPS: Phelps County had approximately 11 inches of wet snow the week of Feb. 11th. The moisture was good. Due to warm weather the snow cover is now melted. Most producers are busy with calving. Warmer weather has decreased loss. Producers are beginning to prepare for fertilizer application.

48373


March 1, 2012

Heartland Express - Car Care

Page 15

Under the Car Hood Do you know your way around under the hood of your car? While not as critical as it used to be, checking under the hood periodically can head off problems before they become costly. Today, with self service gas stations everywhere, often the only way you will get it done is for you to do it yourself. Start by reading your owners manual. There will always be a section on under hood checks. Keep a pair of old gloves and a roll of paper towels in the trunk First, a word about safety. Read the safety warnings in your owners manual and any safety warning stickers that may be under the hood. If the engine has been running for any length of time, there are areas under the hood that can be very hot. Except for checking transmission fluid level, all checks should be done while the engine is turned off. If the engine is running, do not put your hands near any belts or fans. If you are not comfortable with touching a hot or running engine, then just do the checks that can be done with the engine cold and turned off and have someone else do the rest. The following items should be checked periodically: Engine oil level This is the most important under-hood check you can do. An engine cannot run without oil even for a minute without serious engine damage or total destruction! To check the oil level, make sure that the engine is turned off, then find the engine oil dipstick and remove it. With a paper towel or rag, wipe off the end of the stick and notice the markings on it. You will usually see a mark for "Full" and another mark for "Add." Check your owners manual to be sure. Push the stick back into the tube until it seats then immediately pull it out to see the oil level. You should not add oil unless the level is below the "Add" mark and NEVER add oil to bring the level above the "Full" mark. Your main concern with this check is that oil consumption is not rapidly increasing. If it is, take your car to a repair shop as soon as possible and have it checked out. It is acceptable for the oil to be dark as long as you change it at the recommended intervals. However, it should never be foamy and should never have a strong gasoline smell. If either of these conditions exist, have it checked out soon. Transmission fluid Most automatic transmissions should be checked while the engine is running. Check your owners manual to be sure. Also make sure the car is on a level surface and fully warmed up. Pull the transmission dipstick out, wipe off the end and note the markings on the end of the stick. The usual markings are "Full" and "Add 1 pint." Push the stick into the tube until it seats, then immediately pull it out to see the fluid level. Transmission fluid should be pink or red in color with the look and consistency of cherry cough syrup. If the fluid is a muddy brown or has a burnt smell, have it checked by a mechanic. As with the engine, never add fluid unless it is below the "Add" mark and never bring it above the "Full" mark. Make sure you

use the correct transmission fluid for your vehicle. If you plan to add Transmission fluid yourself, you should know that fluid usually comes in quarts, but the level may not be low enough to take the full quart. Also, you will need a special funnel to get the fluid into the small tube that the dipstick came out of. Check your owners manual for the type of fluid and do not substitute anything else. Any noticeable transmission oil consumption should be checked out at a repair shop. Brake fluid The brake fluid reservoir is under the hood right in front of the steering wheel. Most cars today have a transparent reservoir so that you can see the level without opening the cover. The brake fluid level will drop slightly as the brake pads wear out. This is a normal condition and you shouldn't worry about it. If the level drops noticeably over a short period of time or goes down to about two thirds full, have your brakes checked as soon as possible. NEVER PUT ANYTHING BUT APPROVED BRAKE FLUID IN YOUR BRAKES. ANYTHING ELSE CAN CAUSE SUDDEN BRAKE FAILURE! Keep the reservoir covered except for the amount of time you need to fill it and never leave a can of brake fluid uncovered. Brake fluid must maintain a very high boiling point .Exposure to air will cause the fluid to absorb moisture which will lower that boiling point. Power steering fluid The power steering fluid reservoir usually has a small dipstick attached to the cap. Remove the cap and check the fluid level. The level should not change more than the normal range on the stick. If you have to add fluid more than once or twice a year, then have the system checked for leaks. These systems are easily damaged if you drive while the fluid is very low. Another warning of low power steering fluid is a buzzing noise when you turn the steering wheel at slow speeds. Coolant (Antifreeze) level Never open the radiator of a car that has just been running. The cooling system of a car is under high pressure with fluid that is usually hotter than boiling water. Look for the cooling system reserve tank, somewhere near the radiator. It is usually translucent white so you can see the fluid level without opening it. (Do not confuse it with the windshield washer tank). The reserve tank will have two marks on the side of it. "FULL HOT" and "FULL COLD." If the level frequently goes below "full cold" after adding fluid, you probably have a leak which should be checked as soon as possible. Today's engines are much more susceptible to damage from overheating, so do not neglect this important system. Battery Most batteries today are "maintenance free" which simply means that you can't check the water level. This doesn't mean however, that there is nothing to check. The main things to check are the top of the battery which should be clean and dry, and the terminal connections which should be clean and tight. If the top of the battery continuously becomes damp or corroded soon after cleaning, then have the

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Page 16

Heartland Express - FFA

March 1, 2012

Water Challenges Global, But Solutions to be Found Locally LINCOLN - It's important to have a global understanding of water issues, but in the end solutions will come locally, said the newly arrived director of the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute. Roberto Lenton, who assumed his job at the new institute earlier this month, spoke Monday as part of the Heuermann Lectures in the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The title of Lenton's talk, "Water for Food: Think Globally, Act Locally," is a key theme for the University of Nebraska's Water for Food Institute. Lenton said he expects the institute to play a key role in solving the challenges facing a world that will need to feed a population expected to grow from about 7 billion to 9 billion by 2050 on finite resources such as land and water. Already, Lenton noted, agriculture worldwide consumes 70 percent of available water. In some parts of the world, a trend of decreasing precipitation is having an impact even as the world becomes more urbanized, meaning "thirsty cities" will compete with agriculture for water. Lenton noted that water availability and uses depend on local conditions, and technological and policy options also are locally driven. So, one-size-fits-all solutions to getting "more crop per drop" are not realistic. "It's very important to have a global understanding, but in the end these solutions are inherently context-specific and must be locally determined," he said. Lenton said the Water for Food Institute is well situated at a land-grant university in Nebraska to be a key player in the research, policy and technology challenges to come. The state is home to the largest aquifer in North America, with decades of data on which to draw, major river systems, diverse climates and soil types, a reputation for successful

management of water resources and a keen interest in the issue. As an example, Lenton pointed to the turnout of 600 to 700 people last week for an E.N. Thompson Forum lecture at UNL on the global water crisis. "You couldn't get 600 to 700 people in New York or Washington to talk about water," he said. "If you're going to have a water institute, you'd better have it in a place where water is vital and where there is local experience you can draw on," said Lenton, an internationally recognized expert in water management and development who most recently served as chairman of the independent World Bank Inspection Panel.

"Water for Food: Think Globally, Act Locally," The University of Nebraska is such a place, with more than 120 faculty on all four NU campuses involved in all aspects of water. And UNL's land-grant tradition will be key, Lenton added. "There should be a focus on innovation and connecting the research with practice and policy," he said, predicting, "the greatest revolution in technology might actually come at this stage in information technology, not irrigation technology." "We have a huge task ahead of us," Lenton concluded. The Water for Food Institute was established in April 2010 with a $50 million founding gift commitment from the Robert B. Daugherty Charitable Foundation to the University of Nebraska. The institute already is forging key

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public and private partnerships in the Netherlands, Brazil, India, China and the United States, Lenton said. Just last week NU and the U.S. Agency for International Development agreed to collaborate on expanding research and development capacities related to water management in the Middle East and North Africa, work that will be conducted through the Water for Food Institute. Lenton also is former chairman of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council and of the Technical Committee of the Global Water Partnership; lead author on the final report of the United Nations Millennium Project Task Force on Water and Sanitation, which he co-chaired; director of the Sustainable Energy and Environment Division of the United Nations Development Programme in New York; and director general of the International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka. The Heuermann lecture series at IANR is made possible through a gift from B. Keith and Norma Heuermann of Phillips, Neb. The Heuermanns are longtime university supporters with a strong commitment to Nebraska's production agriculture, natural resources, rural areas and people. The final lecture of 2011-12 will feature Jay Keasling, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Keasling, a UNL graduate, will speak May 8. The first lecture of 2012-13, Sept. 28, will feature a panel of four former U.S. secretaries of agriculture " Clayton Yeutter, Mike Johanns, Dan Glickman and Ann Veneman " discussing the future of the land-grant university tradition, part of a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the establishment of land grants.

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March 1, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 17

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Buying Supplements Questions seem to arise that go something like the following: I(the producer) know my cows that are in late gestation and grazing dormant native range are deficient in protein, what protein source is my best buy? One of the challenges is that supplement costs, when priced on a ton basis, may look a lot alike price-wise, but the supplements under consideration may differ in protein content and that's where part of the confusion comes from. In addition, another confusing aspect many times is the protein supplements being considered differ in moisture content, so that throws another wrench into the pricing process. To make direct comparisons of these supplements, purchase the supplements on a per pound of nutrient basis. If the cows are deficient in protein, then protein supplements can be purchased on a cost per pound of protein basis. The same thought process can be used if energy (TDN), or phosphorus, or any nutrient for that matter is needed to supplement the base diet. Accounting for the differences in moisture content of different supplements may seem, at first, difficult to account for. As an example, what are the steps to take to compare two protein supplements if the protein supplement options are

a 30% crude protein cube that is 90% dry matter and 10% water and wet distillers grains that is 30% crude protein and is 35% dry matter and 65% water. The easiest way to account for the differences in moisture content is to convert both feeds to 100% dry matter basis. In this example, if both protein supplements are priced on a ton basis, determine the pounds of actual feed, not water, being purchased. The amount of actual feed of the 30% protein cube that is being purchased per ton is 1,800 pounds. This is calculated by multiplying 2,000 pounds times the dry matter content of the cube (2000 lb x 0.90 = 1,800 pounds). To determine the amount of wet distillers grains being purchased, the same calculations can be used. If the wet distillers grains is priced on a ton basis, then 700 pounds of distillers grains (excluding the water) on a dry matter basis is purchased (2,000 lb x 0.35 = 700 pounds). The next step is to determine the amount of actual protein in each of these feeds that could be used as a protein supplement. Both supplements are 30% crude protein on a dry matter basis. The amount of protein purchased for the 30% cube is 540 pounds and is calculated by multiplying the

amount of dry matter times the protein content (1,800 pounds x 0.30 = 540 pounds). The same procedure can be used to determine the amount protein in wet distillers grains that is purchased and is 210 pounds of protein (700 pounds x 0.30 = 210 pounds of protein). After the amount of actual protein purchased is determined, calculating the price per pound of protein is relatively simple. In this example, if the 30% protein cube is priced at $200 per ton, divide price per ton by pounds of protein purchased in a ton on a 100% dry matter basis. For the 30% protein cube, the price per pound of protein is $0.37 per pound of protein ($200/540 lb = $0.3703). If wet distillers grains is priced at $78 per ton, then the price per pound of protein is $0.37 per pound of protein ($78/210 lb = 0.3714). In this example, there is really no difference in price per pound of protein for these supplements. The price of both supplements was priced delivered to your ranch. It is assumed that the ranch has the equipment to deliver both supplements to the cows. This is an important consideration for the supplements selected as the ranch has to have the ability to deliver it to the herd.

U.S. Cattle on NE Cattle on Feed Up 4 Percent Feed Up 2 Percent LINCOLN, Neb. -- Nebraska feedlots, with capacities of 1,000 or more head, contained 2.57 million cattle on feed on February 1, according to the USDA’s, National Agricultural Statistics, Nebraska Field Office. This inventory was up 4 percent from last year. This is the largest inventory since the data series began in 1994. Placements during January totaled 430,000 head, the same as 2011. Fed cattle marketings for the month of January totaled 395,000 head, up 3 percent from last year. Other disappearance during January totaled 15,000 head, equal to a year ago.

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Page 18

Heartland Express - Market

March 1, 2012

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 2/27/2012

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction - Bassett, NE; Burwell Livestock Market - Burwell, NE; Ericson/Spalding Auction Market – Ericson, NE; Huss Livestock Market LLC – Kearney, NE; Imperial Livestock Auction – Imperial, NE; Lexington Livestock Market – Lexington, NE; Loup City Commission Co. – Loup City, NE; North Platte Livestock Auction – North Platte, NE; Tri-State Livestock Auction – McCook, NE; Valentine Livestock Auction – Valentine, NE Receipts: 27,978 Last Week: 24,367 Last Year: 33,025 Compared to last week, steers under 600 lbs sold weak to 3.00 lower with weights over 600 lbs trending mostly steady. Heifers sold steady to 3.00 higher. Demand was mostly moderate, instances good on Red Angus and Hereford replacement heifers. Most calves are showing a little more “flesh” than they have in recent weeks with “thin fleshed” (green) offerings selling for a premium. Several lots of replacement type heifers were on offer this week with the majority going back to the feed yard. Slaughter Cattle: Dressed sales sold 3.00 lower at mostly 200.00 late Friday with live sales sold steady to 1.50 lower from 127.00-128.00. This week’s reported feeder cattle auction volume included 70 percent over 600 lbs and 49 percent heifers.

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1 marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide customers FuturesOne President and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des company, FuturesOne, is a Moines and at the Chicago Board of full service risk Trade. You may contact David via email management and futures at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1brokerage firm. A primary 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on web at www.futuresone.com. focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful the agricultural marketing advice via daily, Everyone should always understand the weekly, and monthly analysis of the risk of loss and margin needed when domestic and global markets. trading futures or futures options. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management The information contained herein is solutions and will also actively manage gathered from sources we believe to be pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of trading futures.

By David M. Fiala

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 2/24/2012 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week alfalfa, grass hay, ground/delivered alfalfa to feedlots sold steady. Dehy pellets sold steady to 5.00 higher. Demand was light to moderate for cow hay with some producers having to feed on corn stalks and others are starting to calve. Ground/delivered haulers run at a steady pace. Most alfalfa producers are cleaning out the barn on last year’s contracts. Demand on dehy pellets remains good with a very short supply available. Prices are dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne.us click on Hay Information. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 225.00. Good large rounds 130.00145.00. Grass Hay: Good large squares 125.00. Good large rounds 95.00-105.00; fair large rounds 70.0080.00; small square bales 135.00-140.00. Corn Stalks: large rounds 50.00-60.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 285.00-320.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Good large rounds 140.00-150.00, Fair to good large rounds 135.00. Grass: Good large rounds 90.00-100.00. Alfalfa ground and delivered to feedlots: local hauls 180.00-185.00. Corn Stalks: large rounds 65.00-95.00 delivered. Ground and delivered corn stalks 110.00115.00. Cane: ground and delivered 140.00.

Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 300.00. Western Nebraska: Compared to last week: All classes steady to firm. Many areas are reporting they are sold out for the year. Some areas are reporting dry conditions and producers are hanging on to their supply to make sure they have enough to cover their own needs. Most hay moving is has been previous bought hay and a good percentage is moving south to the drought stricken areas. Demand very good with very good buying inquiry noted in all areas. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Mixed Grass Premium Lg. Sqs 250.0090. Premium Lg. Rd. 230.00 Wheat Straw Fair-Good Lg. Sqs. 200.00-210.00 Wheat Lg. Round Corn Stalks Ground & Deliv. New Crop 70.00-85.00 170.00-190.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, February 20, 2012 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 11,331; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 4,906 Head; Carcass Wt: 52-99 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 82.4; Wtd avg. Dressing: 50.3; choice or better; 98.2% YG 72.4% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 41 . . . . under 55 lbs . . . . .38.2 . . . . . . .350.00 - 450.00 . . . . . . . .398.78 655 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .60.8 . . . . . . . .322.00 - 345.10 . . . . . . . .329.73 1,421 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .71.7 . . . . . . . .301.78 - 336.00 . . . . . . . .318.54 2,554 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .80.5 . . . . . . . .297.52 - 352.00 . . . . . . . .328.09 5,365 . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .95.6 . . . . . . . .290.65 - 335.14 . . . . . . . .325.54

Lean hog trade started the week on a down note, but rebounded on Wednesday. The April contract is 70 lower on the week. The April contract is just above the 10-day and 20-day moving averages in the low $89 range. June has moved back below the $99 level early in the week. Cash prices have been steady as packers have been able to move processing margins back into the black, with hogs getting harder to come by, and packers are a little short bought. Kill schedules have not picked up much yet, which is restraining further cash gains. The pork cutout has continued to struggle this week but the trade is looking for Easter demand to help things along. Export trade has struggled as Asian hog herds have grown, but pork is priced very competitively in grocery coolers domestically, which should open an opportunity for increased demand. Hedgers call with questions.

Apr. 12 8640 9200

Jun. 12 9582 10142

April 2012 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .88.300 High . . .89.550 Low . . .87.700 Close . .89.425 Change .+1.400

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 5 . . . . . . . . .257 . . . . . . .257 . . . . . . .250.00 . . . . . . . .250.00 6 . . . . . . . . .310 . . . . . . . .310 . . . . . . .210.00 . . . . . . . .210.00 23 . . . . . . .381-388 . . . . . .384 . . . .205.00-217.00 . . . . .209.75 21 . . . . . . . .358 . . . . . . . .358 . . . . . . .239.00 . . . . . . . .239.00 27 . . . . . . .403-448 . . . . . .421 . . . .192.00-206.75 . . . . .200.45 46 . . . . . . . .405 . . . . . . . .405 . . . . . . .224.75 . . . . . . . .224.75 68 . . . . . . .452-497 . . . . . .485 . . . .185.00-204.00 . . . . .195.58 269 . . . . . .501-549 . . . . . .533 . . . .175.50-194.00 . . . . .188.31 60 . . . . . . .554-599 . . . . . .589 . . . .157.00-178.50 . . . . .172.09 205 . . . . . .605-645 . . . . . .635 . . . .159.00-176.00 . . . . .171.98 331 . . . . . .652-698 . . . . . .674 . . . .154.00-169.75 . . . . .163.52 90 . . . . . . .700-737 . . . . . .721 . . . .149.50-156.50 . . . . .154.08 133 . . . . . .750-795 . . . . . .778 . . . .149.00-159.00 . . . . .154.73 26 . . . . . . . .883 . . . . . . . .883 . . . . . . .138.50 . . . . . . . .138.50

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 48 . . . . . . .329-349 . . . . . .335 . . . .195.00-216.00 . . . . .207.02 130 . . . . . .353-395 . . . . . .376 . . . .177.00-210.00 . . . . .203.68 231 . . . . . .402-448 . . . . . .428 . . . .176.00-209.00 . . . . .192.05 6 . . . . . . . . .415 . . . . . . . .415 . . . . . . .200.00 . . . . . . . .200.00 554 . . . . . .455-499 . . . . . .479 . . . .172.00-188.00 . . . . .182.62 110 . . . . . .451-469 . . . . . .459 . . . .187.00-205.50 . . . . .197.42 809 . . . . . .500-548 . . . . . .530 . . . .162.00-186.75 . . . . .175.24 1232 . . . . .550-596 . . . . . .571 . . . .163.00-181.00 . . . . .171.06 29 . . . . . . . .595 . . . . . . . .595 . . . . . . .163.50 . . . . . . . .163.50 51 . . . . . . . .570 . . . . . . . .570 . . . . . . .176.50 . . . . . . . .176.50 2077 . . . . .600-647 . . . . . .620 . . . .142.00-171.00 . . . . .163.02 29 . . . . . . . .648 . . . . . . . .648 . . . . . . .153.00 . . . . . . . .153.00 191 . . . . . .600-648 . . . . . .627 . . . .161.50-181.50 . . . . .169.97 1879 . . . . .650-699 . . . . . .672 . . . .142.50-165.00 . . . . .155.89 49 . . . . . . .654-699 . . . . . .684 . . . .146.75-149.50 . . . . .147.53 536 . . . . . .657-690 . . . . . .680 . . . .165.50-181.50 . . . . .172.24 1420 . . . . .700-748 . . . . . .723 . . . .145.00-160.00 . . . . .151.06 25 . . . . . . . .738 . . . . . . . .738 . . . . . . .149.35 . . . . . . . .149.35 459 . . . . . .701-741 . . . . . .721 . . . .154.00-176.50 . . . . .165.27 675 . . . . . .750-798 . . . . . .769 . . . .142.50-150.00 . . . . .146.77 46 . . . . . . . .774 . . . . . . . .774 . . . . . . .142.50 . . . . . . . .142.50 136 . . . . . .751-796 . . . . . .787 . . . .148.75-162.50 . . . . .158.07 539 . . . . . .801-849 . . . . . .824 . . . .137.50-145.35 . . . . .143.86 100 . . . . . .816-841 . . . . . .832 . . . .145.00-151.50 . . . . .149.63 138 . . . . . .854-890 . . . . . .865 . . . .137.00-145.75 . . . . .141.63 55 . . . . . . .865-875 . . . . . .866 . . . .135.00-138.00 . . . . .135.44 27 . . . . . . .909-917 . . . . .916 . . . .130.00-137.75 . . . . .135.35 10 . . . . . . . .996 . . . . . . . .996 . . . . . . .126.00 . . . . . . . .126.00 30 . . . . . .1005-1031 . . . .1026 . . . .130.00-133.00 . . . . .130.59

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 17 . . . . . . .307-337 . . . . . .316 . . . .180.00-191.00 . . . . .187.55 5 . . . . . . . . .388 . . . . . . . .388 . . . . . . .168.00 . . . . . . . .168.00 51 . . . . . . . .377 . . . . . . . .377 . . . . . . .194.00 . . . . . . . .194.00 36 . . . . . . .440-448 . . . . . .444 . . . .175.00-185.00 . . . . .179.29 55 . . . . . . . .443 . . . . . . . .443 . . . . . . .182.75 . . . . . . . .182.75 43 . . . . . . .472-495 . . . . . .483 . . . .160.00-170.50 . . . . .165.63 127 . . . . . .508-545 . . . . . .523 . . . .150.00-177.00 . . . . .166.28 129 . . . . . .550-598 . . . . . .578 . . . .155.00-164.00 . . . . .160.34 66 . . . . . . .630-645 . . . . . .637 . . . .146.00-158.00 . . . . .156.63 120 . . . . . .656-698 . . . . . .679 . . . .146.00-152.00 . . . . .149.58 122 . . . . . .704-745 . . . . . .732 . . . .140.00-149.75 . . . . .147.07 29 . . . . . . .768-771 . . . . . .770 . . . .133.00-143.50 . . . . .137.70

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 2/26/12

Confirmed: 92,051 Week Ago: 147,595 Year Ago: 148,592

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,146 . . . . . . . . .1,192-1,550 . . . . . . . . . . .124.00-129.00 1,433 . . . . . . . . . . .126.72 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,317 . . . . . . . .1,150-1,550 . . . . . . . . . . .124.50-130.00 1,390 . . . . . . . . . . .127.69 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,843 . . . . . . . .1,125-1,455 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-129.50 1,318 . . . . . . . . . . .128.22 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .480 . . . . . . . . . .1,315-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .128.00-129.00 1,340 . . . . . . . . . . .128.12 Weighted Averages Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,193 . . . . . . . . .1,150-1,425 . . . . . . . . . . .122.50-128.50 1,265 . . . . . . . . . . .126.78 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,616 . . . . . . . .1,100-1,500 . . . . . . . . . . .124.50-129.50 1,272 . . . . . . . . . . .127.76 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,829 . . . . . . . . .1,025-1,375 . . . . . . . . . . .127.00-129.50 1,193 . . . . . . . . . . .128.43 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .============================================================================================================== Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,738 . . . . . . . . . .756-995 . . . . . . . . . . . . .198.00-203.00 921 . . . . . . . . . . . .200.29 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,839 . . . . . . . . . .771-952 . . . . . . . . . . . . .199.00-203.00 886 . . . . . . . . . . . .200.87 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,888 . . . . . . . . . .781-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .200.00-203.50 867 . . . . . . . . . . . .201.03 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,393 . . . . . . . . . .750-896 . . . . . . . . . . . . .200.00-202.00 843 . . . . . . . . . . . .200.29 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,987 . . . . . . . . . .671-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .200.00-203.50 832 . . . . . . . . . . . .200.73 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,828 . . . . . . . . . .682-854 . . . . . . . . . . . . .199.00-203.50 743 . . . . . . . . . . . .202.38 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .26,786 . . . . . . .1,358 . . . . . . .127.87 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .27,638 . . . . . . .1,243 . . . . . . .127.89 Dressed Del Steer . . .13,465 . . . . . . .893 . . . . . . . .200.73 Dressed Del Heifer . . .8,208 . . . . . . . .817 . . . . . . .200.91

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Week Ago Averages:

Year Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .39,152 . . . . . .1,338 . . . . . . .128.03 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .36,991 . . . . . . .1,242 . . . . . . .128.01 Dressed Del Steer . . .25,363 . . . . . . .892 . . . . . . . .202.40 Dressed Del Heifer . .19,518 . . . . . . .812 . . . . . . . .202.50

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .41,828 . . . . . . .1,318 . . . . . . .111.02 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .41,874 . . . . . . .1,218 . . . . . . .111.11 Dressed Del Steer . . .26,536 . . . . . . .863 . . . . . . . .179.76 Dressed Del Heifer . . .16,262 . . . . . . .806 . . . . . . . .179.14

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 13 . . . . . . . .347 . . . . . . .347 . . . . . .235.00 . . . . . . . . .235.00 143 . . . . . .358-390 . . . . .379 . . .211.00-235.00 . . . . . .225.72 289 . . . . . .400-447 . . . . .425 . . .207.00-229.00 . . . . . .217.41 24 . . . . . . . .412 . . . . . . .412 . . . . . .225.00 . . . . . . . . .225.00 523 . . . . . .450-499 . . . . .482 . . .193.00-214.00 . . . . . .208.38 11 . . . . . . . .450 . . . . . . .450 . . . . . .223.00 . . . . . . . . .223.00 77 . . . . . . . .461 . . . . . . .461 . . .211.00-216.00 . . . . . .215.55 641 . . . . . .500-549 . . . . .526 . . .189.25-208.00 . . . . . .197.11 155 . . . . .524-525 . . . . .525 . . .210.50-211.00 . . . . . .210.68 104 . . . . . . .515 . . . . . . .515 . . . . . .209.75 . . . . . . . . .209.75 1133 . . . . .550-597 . . . . .579 . . .176.50-197.00 . . . . . .186.21 11 . . . . . . . .550 . . . . . . .550 . . . . . .198.00 . . . . . . . . .198.00 7 . . . . . . . . .597 . . . . . . .597 . . . . . .175.00 . . . . . . . . .175.00 80 . . . . . . . .561 . . . . . . .561 . . . . . .202.25 . . . . . . . . .202.25 1376 . . . . .603-645 . . . . .622 . . .166.00-186.25 . . . . . .179.23 71 . . . . . . . .615 . . . . . . .615 . . . . . .190.00 . . . . . . . . .190.00 17 . . . . . . . .630 . . . . . . .630 . . . . . .168.00 . . . . . . . . .168.00 1560 . . . . .650-699 . . . . .677 . . .159.50-181.00 . . . . . .171.15 64 . . . . . . . .651 . . . . . . .651 . . . . . .186.75 . . . . . . . . .186.75 1297 . . . . .700-749 . . . . .720 . . .151.00-173.00 . . . . . .163.65 46 . . . . . . .717-735 . . . . .727 . . .155.00-155.50 . . . . . .155.21 1391 . . . . .750-798 . . . . .777 . . .146.00-165.00 . . . . . .155.22 70 . . . . . . .764-797 . . . . .787 . . .151.00-153.00 . . . . . .151.75 1183 . . . . .802-848 . . . . .820 . . .144.00-165.35 . . . . . .154.10 832 . . . . . .850-898 . . . . .881 . . .143.50-150.25 . . . . . .148.34 27 . . . . . . . .892 . . . . . . .892 . . . . . .141.25 . . . . . . . . .141.25 383 . . . . . .907-930 . . . . .916 . . .141.00-147.25 . . . . . .144.09 121 . . . . . .910-939 . . . . .916 . . .142.00-143.75 . . . . . .143.41

Support: Resistance

Apr. 12 12662 13237

Mar. 12 Feeder 15415 16015

Live cattle trade has rebounded in the middle of the week after some post report selling pressure. The April contract was up .25 through Wednesday and $2 below the last contract high printed early last week. Feeder Cattle contracts are down .18 on the week, but remain supported near record levels. The chart trend has turned positive at this point moving above the 10-day moving average at 129.70 and the 20-day at 129.05. The cutout has built on its recent improvement this week with choice up 1.38 to $198.80, and select up 1.68 to $195.15, as retailers are a little short covered. Showlists are mixed this week, and packers have bought a few cattle at $128 paying steady money early in the week. Feedlots have raised the bids to the low $130’s range and $203-207 area dressed. More significant cash trade is expected to develop later in the week as packers and feeders continue their game of chicken. Packer margins are very near break even to slightly positive, but

another round of higher cash sales can tip them back to negative. However cutout trade volume is still fairly week. With grilling season right around the corner, expectations are for more aggressive retail buying to begin to surface. Feeder cattle pricing remains strong as the beginning of an expansion cycle limits the placement of an already small calf crop. The month cattle on feed report was friendly with placements at 98% vs. 98.5% expected, marketings were 102% vs. 100.5% expected, and cattle on feed were overall at 102% vs. 102.5 expected. Exports have remained strong to some of the non-traditional buyers make up for the higher prices slowing movement to Asia. The overall market attitude remains very bullish, but when everyone gets leaning one way is when a market can turn, so it is a good time to at least consider option protection. Hedgers call with questions or to discuss your hedging plan with us.

March 2012 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

April 2012 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open .129.800 High .130.025 Low . .129.650 Close .129.925 Change +0.100

Open .158.000 High .158.000 Low . .157.100 Close .157.425 Change +0.200

AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com


March 1, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 19

Schedule of Events Mar 10-11 - Ponca (Dixon County) Marsh Madness; Ponca State Park 88090 Spur 26E. Celebrate the park's abundant natural areas and view spring migration of waterfowl. Interpretive programs, guided tours, observation blinds and more. (402) 755-2284 www.outdoornebraska.org

Mar 17 - Kearney (Buffalo County) 2nd Annual Celtic Festival; Trails & Rails Museum, 710 W. 11th St. Celtic music, dancing and food. Learn the history of the culture and how it ties in with Buffalo County. Free Jennifer Murrish (308) 234-3041 www.bchs.us

Mar 16-17 - Geneva (Fillmore County) Home & Garden Show; Fillmore County Fairgrounds, 100 5th St. Fri, noon-8pm; Sat, 9am-1pm, Free (402) 759-1155

Mar 17 - Wisner (Cuming County) St. Patrick's Day Celebration; Main St. Sign up for the Leprechaun fun run/walk at noon, watch the Grand Parade at 1:30pm, feast on a delicious Irish meal from 11am-1pm, or enjoy live entertainment and dancing all evening long. Noonmidnight, Free (402) 529-3212 www.wisnerareachamberofcom merce.com

Mar 16-17 - O'Neill (Holt County) St. Patrick's Day Celebration; City-wide. Parade, fun run and events for all ages. (402) 336-2355 www.oneillchamber.org Mar 17 - Fairbury (Jefferson County) Shamrock Shuffle; Chuckles Bar. Wear your craziest St. Patty's Day attire and join in the fun! 5K run/walk, giveaways, food and live entertainment. Race begins at 11am Mar 17 - Henderson (York County) Heartland German Smorgasbord & Concert; Heartland Community School, 1501 Front St. Homemade German food followed by a band concert. 5pm, $4$10 Kelsey Bergen (402) 723-4228 www.heartlandschools.org Mar 17 - Kearney (Buffalo County) 2012 Rivers & Wildlife Celebration's Wild Experience; Holiday Inn, 110 Second Ave. Celebrate the annual migration of 500,000 Sandhill Cranes and millions of waterfowl. Hands-on, family-friendly activities and more. 10am-3pm, Free Christine Thody (402) 472-8741 www.nebraskabirds.org

Mar 23-31 - Alma (Harlan County) White Pelican Homecoming Celebration and Spring Fling; Harlan County Reservoir and city-wide Wildlife viewing sites surround the lake. Music, wagon rides, spaghetti feed and more. Spring fling on Friday evening. Paradise on the Prairie Art Show and Sale. Free (800) 762-5498 Mar 24 - Gibbon (Buffalo County) Rowe Sanctuary's Family Crane Carnival; Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary, 44450 Elm Island Rd Learn about the Sandhill Crane migration and take part in educational activities with the family! Touchable exhibits, face painting, coloring and stamping, origami, outdoor activity trail and more. 10am-4pm, $2 Keanna Leonard (308) 468-5282 www.rowesanctuary.org Mar 24 - Gibbon (Buffalo County) 8th Annual Crane Watchers Breakfast; American Legion, 1029 Court St. Gourmet breakfast buffet. 710:30am, $7 Sherry Zwink (308) 468-5905 www.gibbonchamber.nctc.net

Mar 24 - Milligan (Fillmore County) Beers of Nebraska; Milligan auditorium, 6th & Main Sts. Sample Nebraska microbrews and sit back and enjoy live music and food. Scott Oliva (402) 6294446 www.visitfillmorecounty.org Mar 24 - Stanton (Stanton County) St. Patrick's Day Extravaganza; Uptown Brewery, 801 10th St. Irish music, storytelling, food display, Irish refreshments, imported Irish gifts and more. 6pm (402) 439-5100 Mar 24-25 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lancaster Antique Show & Sale; Lancaster Event Center, 84th & Havelock Ave. More than 30 years and going strong! Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 10am4pm, $3.50 Russ Blank (402) 432-1451 Mar 30-31 - Aurora (Hamilton County) 33rd Annual Nebraska Mennonite Quilts & Crafts Sale; Hamilton County Fairgrounds, 310 A St. Musical entertainment, delicious ethnic foods and quality crafts, quilts and wood items. Fri, 4-8pm; Sat, 6:30am-3pm, Free John Thimm (402) 8062974 www.nebraskamccsale.org Mar 30-31 - Fremont (Dodge County) 2012 Bull Riding Classic & Rural Living Expo. Mutton busting for the kids, funny man acts, bull fighting, dance and more. The market place at the expo features businesses promoting the rural lifestyle including a Cowboy Cave. (402) 721-2641 www.fremontne.org Mar 31-Apr 1 - Ashland (Saunders County) Platte River Art Show; Eugene T. Mahoney State Park, I-80 Exit 426. A fine arts celebration featuring wildlife, landscape, still life and more. The most prestigious art show on the river! Sat, 9am-8pm; Sun, 9am-4pm, Park entry permit required Adam Offner (402) 944-2523 www.outdoornebraska.org

Auctioneers — Don’t miss your opportunity to get your auction bills in front of this audience across the Midwest!

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Look for more news @ www.myfarmandranch.com


Page 20

Heartland Express

March 1, 2012

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, March 8th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on THURSDAY, March 15th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, call 800-658-3191 and ask for Lesli 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14', WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 MO - M & W PC147 BATWING MOWER, 15', GOOD CONDITION, $7,500.00, (660) 548-3804 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE KS - NH HS HEAD. PLANETARY DRIVE & PUMP FOR NH 8040, (785) 731-5190 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32' 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889

1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421 1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - RICHARDTON HIGH DUMP WAGONS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS/PARTS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS/PARTS. CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 IA - WINTER SPECIAL ON TWINE AND NET WRAP, (866) 999-1006 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 5824303 NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 MO - AC D17'S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 KS - AGGRESSIVELY BUYING JD TRACTORS, NEWER MODELS, DEALERS WELCOME, WILL TRADE, CALL FOR CASH OFFERS, (785) 776-6176

1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 582-4303 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC 706 FOR SALVAGE, (308) 269-2586 NE - NEW & USED COMPACT TRACTORS. USED LENAR 25 HP W/LOADER. USED LENAR 30 HP W/LOADER, 170 HOURS. (2) NEW LENAR 30 HP W/LOADER. SEVERAL 3 PT ATTACHMENTS FOR TRACTORS, SCOTTHOURIGAN CO., (800) 284-7066 NE - M FARMALL TRACTOR W/BAD MOTOR. $600 COMPLETE. OR WHAT PARTS DO YOU NEED?, (308) 624-2177 KS - 2007 JD 8330 IFS, FRONT & REAR DUALS, $159,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - 90% TREAD 24. 5 X 32 DIAMOND TREAD 12 PLY ON 10 HOLE RIM, (308) 2692586 IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & OTHERS. WE SHIP DAILY. PLEASE CALL, (217) 370-1149 NE - CASE 1270, 135 HP, NEW MOTOR, FRESH TRANS OH, 4 REMOTES, GOOD TIRES, $8,250.00, (308) 874-4562 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344

To place your classified ad call Lesli @ 800-658-3191

1105 - DISKS WANTED TO BUY NE - JD 235, 20'-25', (402) 726-2488

DISC ROLLING STEEL BLADES ..........AND..........

GRINDING HARD BORON BLADES Installed after 2005

Now grinding both sides for maximum effectiveness and longer blade life. Will travel to your farm within 200 mile radius of Craig, NE

Call Roy’s Cell: 402-660-8298 Or Leave Message: 402-377-2437 FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5' SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,100.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 NE - IH 560, 6-16'S WITH HARROW, LIKE NEW, $950.00, (308) 874-4562 NE - JI CASE 308 4-18'S, CUSHION COULTERS, $1,000.00, (308) 874-4562 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 IA - NEW & USED KINZES, SORENSEN EQUIPMENT, HARLAN, IA, (712) 755-2455 KS - 1990 JD 7200, 16R30", 250 MONITOR, MARKERS, IN-ROW FERT. GOOD CONDITION., $23,000.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - C-IH 12R36" VERTICAL FOLD 3 PT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 995-5515 1110 - SEEDERS FOR SALE NE - 4010 CONCORD AIR SEEDER. 308-3600377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1111 - DRILLS FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $14,000, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 www.myfarmandranch.com

120 OWS 6P PL E E GEA F W O S R RH D N EP NE - SALE EAD SA E ADS W W O 1101 - TRACTORS S L S ON(3, 0 150 P E HE ' N I 5 6 I 8 H B X 0 T ) P I N M 4 PER 11 FOR SALE - CO ALE KING COND 1 E - 995-55 GEAR TRIP 8712 S S 0 ' R H 3 1 R 1 EAD 1 20 ) NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF FO FLE X OOD 5-2541 5P0IC0KHEP 4 AMAR 5 , 6 OR SALE OURNE 0, (785 G ) 86 ING HP :3 $ ILL R B 0 F . LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, KS L O A 0 0 TIOSHE P W, (62 LE X K 51N5E - R4O:W ,50 5 , 700 G DR A (308) 436-4369 PLO 00.00, F 95-5 90H HARUS 74$-600 , 70 H E ARH KS - , ER, $5 36' ER, B W 1 8 0 D , , E 9 H P P E 1 151 N 96 DAPT 0 50ITH 048:3) MOT (308 5:4 ADHSEA KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS $ W - N 308) CD9O - CJOD A ELL 58 NE EELS, ( , 6-16'S3.00H0, P(130:1 $45O0 NORS ) 624- $650 0:711 M BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) A F O I G , 0 2 0 1 $SH , 7-0 E A P ES R C H R 6 5 1 7 5 9 4 W K :3 ,$CU 700874 HP RH 7 865-2541 O NE0 SERSIA5LE00 NST-A2265 U IH W, $ E S E , ' 3 5 ) E A 2 N 08 5 361 LK NO 12, L/ N 18 : D IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, 8 4- 00, (300, (3080HP 5: 3 $40 S IAWEEWEELL, $3X,4(X5880) POLY S BAOLR IKE 0 L 3 R . L 0 4 R , 6" USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, E ) 62 2 0 7 , OE 456 - JI CAS , $1,00 4-21 $600, (712 1L2A6R5GE2N0," N&E.3 N36E0A-R037 IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & , S 7 ) E 8 R M ( R 7 N 8 3 0 E N E 2 R IND 08 N70 . O3U 200 E LT EN OTHERS. DAILY. GPLEASE THE WE YSHIP COIULE2RS H1A9Y09- C- OBRHUEL-1AL1DS24 30NDS, M ) 832- E - RE U 260 WIND RGER F 0 - O (217) B370-1149 A 3 N 6 O 1 R G O A 5 03CALL, T S R T A IST 4 T KE O 156 WFROR SBAALLE28T2AL H OL 3 S, ERE APP ES K B R AINE - 2 SALE TED KSS 32FOVR W-INTCR & '40' I- - GRAIN FFE G N F D A R A S A E L W LES CELL: D. HOR NE& G- REGISTERED FOR ANGUS, PPE INDOWION, 003 B COBB& A-L'S59O SEAL'E30'SUCKSCOND2604 LE O A S A H R J & S HAESR AS LS(308) O SA SAL GR A 6' 2 , W L2E0A04SE - MOR L ACK SD TOERT,C HI,N2G TCHHEDING T ES. S TO O WA 732-3356 999308-870-1119, 199 525BL A G AN MO FOR 11 GSI 3 L TARP SS . OLD N R VY 1 NE (25) COMING 2 EYR C 3 T P 5 U ERSA KDS -DU, R$9A9CCNOEW L 0 R C 6 2 O 73 LE AS T FO ED A NET 136 OR L 55807 MO K M BRO GAN CHAROLAIS BULLS(308)L 567 OK - ER R USIES P19AY 9 86-2 0

To place your classified ad call Lesli @ 800-658-3191

1113 - CULTIVATORS WANTED TO BUY NE - ORTHMAN 8R30" FLEX GANG HILLER, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 17 ORTHMAN RIDGING WINGS, (308) 485-4486 NE - NEAR NEW 8 ROW WIDE THREE POINT REAR MOUNT CULTIVATOR, 7" TOOLBAR. ALSO FOR SALE A HESSTON STACK MOVER, IN GOOD SHAPE. CALL, (402) 385-2698 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. STAINLESS STEEL TANK FLOATER, $2,950.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $400.00, (402) 787-2244 KS - SPRA-COUPES. I BUY/SELL. CALL FOR BID. WALKER GATZ, (785) 547-7711

Speidel Weed Wiper

#1 Herbicide applicator for weed control. Uses very little chemical. Kill rye in winter wheat, and weeds in pastures, all sizes available. Recovers in stock ATV mounting brackets & Quality Carts. 580-886-2396 • 800-544-1546 www.acrsales.com

1119 - ROD WEEDER FOR SALE KS - USED PARTS OFF 45' MILLER ROD WEEDER, DRIVES, TEETH, RODS, ETC. ALL FOR $500, (620) 865-2541 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY NE - YETTER 2995 COULTERS, (308) 2821330 FOR SALE KS - SURE CROP QUALITY LIQUID FERTILIZERS. PRE-SEASON DISCOUNTS, SEMI-LOAD DISCOUNTS, SOIL ANALYSIS CREDITS. FLEXIBLE FINANCING OPTIONS. "ASSURING CROP SUCCESS FOR YOU". DELIVERY DIRECT TO YOUR FARM. ASSURE CROP. SENECA, KS., (800) 635-4743 1125 - AG CHEMICALS WANTED TO BUY

Healthcare for your crops! Nutritional Supplements, slow release polymer technology, spray tank, gleanor & neutralizer. Contact Greg Swan at 402-382-8554. www.atlanticpacifictrading.com 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 NE - ORTHMAN FLAT FOLD 8R30" TOOLBAR, $3,500.00, (308) 485-4486

MEYERS TRACTOR SALVAGE Aberdeen, So. Dak. 1000+ Tractors & Combines 400+ Reground Crankshafts 500+ Tractor Tires 300+ Radiators Large line of Swather, Baler & Cutter Parts

GOOD BUYS AND SERVICE WANT TO BUY TRACTORS & COMBINES & SWATHERS FOR SALVAGE

Phone (605) 225-0185 5 Miles North & 1 Mile West of CASE IH Mon. - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM & Sat. 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM


March 1, 2012 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE - CONT’D TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT. NEW & USED PARTS. TRACTORS, COMBINES, HAY & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & FARM EQUIPMENT SALES. ORDER PARTS ONLINE AT: KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 582-3000 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176" $15 EA; 4 GATES C240" $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240" $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270" $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94" X 1 1/4" WIDE $10, (308) 624-2177 NE - USED 350 CHEVY, OIL & WATER SHUT OFFS, SURGE TANK, CENTURY WELDER, AC/DC, (402) 726-2488 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10" WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515 NE - NEW DODA PUMPS, SEVERAL USED PTO PUMPS, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 1203 - PIPE WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED TO BUY: USED ALUMINUM PIPE. PAYING TOP CASH PRICES. WE PICK UP ANYWHERE IN THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. MINIMUM PURCHASE 1000' PIPE. CALL FOR A QUOTE., (308) 380-4549 FOR SALE NE - 8" TEXFLO 20" GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 8" MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 IA - WINCO GENERATORS, NEW & USED, 1PH 50KW $4,170. KATO LIGHT NEW 1PH AND 3PH WINPOWER USED 1PH $1,000. CALL WES SEBETKA AT, (641) 990-1094 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515 NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 70 HP 5:4 $650, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (308) 624-2177 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 70HP 2:3 $400, 50HP 10:11 $700, 50HP 5:4 $600, 30HP 4:3 $300, (308) 6242177 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (308) 624-2177 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - USED PIVOTS FOR SALE FOR INFORMATION CALL PLAINS IRRIGATION AT 308-3829240 OR, (800) 584-9334 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW OCMIS HH: 4" X 1312', (800) 2847066 NE - NEW CADMAN 4" X 1250' HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - NEW GREENFIELD 3" X 1200', USED BOSS 4. 5" X 660', 8 USED HEINZMAN 4. 5" X 660', VERMEER 3" X 660', BAUER 4" X 1180', (800) 284-7066 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 364-2592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER CELL 580-525-1265, $7,500.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD CELL 580525-1265, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - 30 INCH STRADDLE DUALS FOR 2388 WITH AXLE EXTENSION, 18. 4 X 38 RADIALS, (308) 269-2586

Heartland Express 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 1986 CASE IS 1680, 3, 093 HRS. NEW STYLE UNLOAD GEAR BOX, NEW STYLE FAN, TSR LONG SIEVE CHOPPER NEW ROTO CAGE AND SPECIALTY ROTOR, (308) 2692586 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER CELL 580- 525-1265, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - PARTS FOR 1680 CLEANING SYSTEM, CALL FOR LIST, (308) 269-2586 OK - 1988 1680 IHC, STANDARD ROTOR, 3045 X 32 TIRES, $15,000 CELL 580-5251265 OR, (580) 361-2265 OK - R70 GLEANER, 2689 ENGINE HRS, 1904 SEPARATOR HRS, $20,000 CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 NE - 2 SETS OF JD COMBINE DUALS, 50 THRU 70 SERIES. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET'S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 KS - SHELBOURNE 20' STRIPPER HEADER, $5,500.00, (785) 871-0711 OK - MACDON 960 36' DRAPER W/50 SERIES JD ADAPTER, BAT REEL, $12,500 CELL 580-525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 NE - 20" & 36" POLY SNOUTS, JD HEAD. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - JD 925 & 930 FLEX HEADS. 308-3600377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - JD 853A. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 2821330 NE - '04 CASE IH 1020 20' FLEX HEAD W/CRARY AIR REEL, ALWAYS SHEDDED, NICE, $14,900.00, (402) 787-2244 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - DEMCO 550 OR 650 GRAVITY WAGONS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE IA - 25', 30' & 36' GRAIN HEADER CARTS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 NE - A&L 425 BUSHEL. ROLLOVER TARP, 540 PTO, (308) 436-4369 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - M & W 650, SUPERB SA500C, GSI 525C, 8 MC'S, '09 BROCK SQ20D, 600 HOURS, 4 FF'S, (800) 284-7066 NE - NEW BROCK SQ20M, (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 4" & 5" AIR SYSTEMS, (800) 2847066

GRAIN DRYERS

Reliable - Efficient Vacuum Cool Towers NEW Trilogy Low

Call Jeff (515)577-7563 Ask about M-C Trax Remote Monitoring 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - HUTCHINSON BIN OR TRUCK FILL AUGER, 8-10", PORTABLE, WITH SPECIAL ORDER OF 1/4" THICK FLIGHTING ALL THE WAY UP. "BIG WINTER DISCOUNTS" CALL HARLEY AT, (402) 649-6711 NE - KEWANEE 10" X 27', 7. 5 HP SINGLE PHASE MOTOR, NEW FLIGHTING, $3000. 308-380-7161 OR, (308) 485-4486 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51' CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 NE - CONRAD AMERICAN-EATON BINS. GRAIN STORAGE, CONCRETE, & ERECTION. HYNEK CONSTRUCTION. MIKE HYNEK. 402984-1200 CELL,, (402) 257-2200 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LOANS W/ GREAT RATES. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - 8" AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 OK - ROTEX GRAIN CLEANER, HAS CORN SCREENS RIGHT NOW, CELL 580-525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 FOR SALE

BULK TANKS-USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Buy-Sell-Trade

800-844-5427 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - BRAKE DRUM/ROTOR TURNING LATHE, $110.00, (785) 778-2962

Air Compressors • Heavy duty cast iron, no alum., 3-5 & 10 h.p. elec. Disc valves, not Reed valves, rod inserts, 2 stage, 60-80-120 & 200 gal. All compressors priced delivered.

North Central Air 619 S. Morgan, Downs, KS

785-454-3409 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 IA - 6 ROW 30 BUFFALO CULTIVATOR WITH GUIDANCE SYSTEM. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 NE - HYDRAFORK CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, BUYING & SELLING HAY. NILSEN HAY CO. HAZARD, NE, (308) 452-4400 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 KS - ALFALFA PELLETS, SUN CURED 1/4" & ALFALFA MEAL, 17% PROTEIN; CHOPPED ALFALFA; WE BUY & SELL ALFALFA., (620) 793-7701 CO - LARGE SW COLORADO PRODUCER OFFERING QUALITY ALFALFA HAY. TESTED. BARN STORED OR TARPED. AVAILABLE YEAR ROUND. 3X4X8 BALES. TEST AVAILABLE. UTEMOUNTAINFARMANDRANCH. COM. CALL BILL, (480) 905-0785 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 IA - HAY & STRAW AUCTIONS EVERY MONDAY & THURSDAY AT 12:30. ROCK VALLEY, IA. FREE EXPERIENCED ORDER BUYING SERVICE. TRUCKING AVAILABLE. ROCK VALLEY HAY AUCTION. ROCKVALLEYHAY. COM CELL: 712-470-1274, OFFICE:, (712) 4765541 CO - HAY SALES, 2ND SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH. LOCATED ONE MILE NORTH OF GREELEY, CO., (800) 791-2333

Page 21 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 KS - WE STILL HAVE HAY FOR SALE. MIXED GRASS HAY, CRP GRASS HAY, AND CHOPPED CORN STALK HAY. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. 620-243-3768 OR, (620) 8423237 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 200+ LG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240, (308) 436-5491 NE - BRIGHT WHEAT STRAW, 3X4'S, SHEDDED AND TARPED, (402) 245-7740 1506 - CORN WANTED TO BUY KS - DAMAGED GRAIN. HIGHEST PRICES, IMMEDIATE PAYMENT. WE HAVE GRAIN VACS. MINIMUM QUANTITY 800 BUSHEL., (800) 214-7788 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 WY - CERTIFIED SAINFOIN SEED: CAN OUT PRODUCE ALFALFA. WILL NOT BLOAT LIVESTOCK. VARIETIES INCLUDE: SHOSHONE/BIG HORN REMONT. $1/45/LB. TO ORDER GO TO WWW.SAINFOINSEED.COM OR CALL MARK AT 307-202-0704 OR CARMEN AT, (307) 202-1569 IA - BEAN LADDERS FOR SOYBEAN SEED. SEED OATS & ROUND- UP READY SOYBEAN SEED; APHID RESISTANT., (712) 210-6587 1519 - CORNSTALK BALES FOR SALE NE - 3X4X8, NEAR MINDEN & LEWELLEN, NE., (308) 832-1563 IA - LARGE ROUNDS, MAKE OFFER, (712) 870-1124 NE - CORNSTALK BALES FOR SALE. NET WRAPPED. ALSO WANTED ALFALFA & GRASS TO CUT FOR CASH OR SHARES. PLEASE CALL, (308) 999-3673 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER WANTED TO BUY

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN & CORN IN ANY CONDITION WET OR DRY INCLUDING DAMAGED SILO CORN AT TOP DOLLAR WE HAVE VACS & TRUCKS CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE, INC. 800-205-5751 NE - LOOKING FOR GRASS FOR 100 TO 150 COW/CALF PAIRS FOR 2012 & BEYOND. DAYS, 402-360-4154. EVES,, (402) 337-0817 FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 MO - HIGH ENERGY LIQ FEED. 22% PRTN, 6% FAT, $155/TON. 15% PROTEIN, 7% FAT. TOP DRESS FOR HAY OR TMR RATION, $160/TON. NATIONAL FEED COMMODITIES. FOB ATCHISON, KS. MINIMUM ORDER 23 TON TRUCKLOADS., (888) 674-8279 IL - MADISON COUNTY AG AUCTION, BETHALTO, IL. HAY & STRAW AUCTION EVERY SATURDAY AT 11 AM THRU MARCH, SELLING WIDE VARIETY OF SM & LG SQ, RND BALES & STRAW. MIKE HAMILTON 618410-4293;, (618) 462-5556 KS - WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN - GRAIN VACS AVAILABLE., (316) 640-3203 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 24' HAY FEEDERS MEALS ON WHEELS. SAVES HAY, SAVES TIME & SAVES MONEY! CALL, (712) 210-6587 1815 - WATERERS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471

GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS Tanks made from used earth moving tires. Sizes from 6 to 13 foot. Can be open topped or drinker holes cut for frost-free winter use. Full loads can be delivered anywhere in the United States.

Guaranteed best quality & lowest price. Call

605/473-5356

1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. -BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 352-2761 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS OR ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 MN - BEDDING FOR SALE. DRY SAWDUST FOR DAIRY BARNS, DELIVERED ON WALKING FLOOR TRAILERS. WILL DELIVER TO MN, EAST SD, WEST WI, & NORTH IA ONLY. ALSO AVAILABLE SWEET CORN SILAGE, CALL FOR PRICES, (888) 339-2381 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 KS - USED HOG OR SHEEP PANELS & GATES, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR W-W STAMPEDE & NORTHSTAR DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397

We Buy, Sell & Trade Feed Mill Equipment, Rollers, Crackers, Hammer Mills, Ribbon & Paddle Mixers, Grain Handling Equipment, Etc...

G & G Sales

712-229-7452 “Meridian Mfg. Group” Discounts available on all your ingredient storage needs, whether dry or liquid, mild steel or stainless, overhead structures, Ag & Commercial application’s. G & G Sales U.S. Sales Representatives

Brian 712-299-6051 • Dave 712-229-6162

1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING "QUALITY" FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 1902 - FEEDERS HEIFERS FOR SALE IL - WEANED HEIFERS: FARM DIRECT 550600 LBS. 60-70% BLACK. ALSO 480-550 LB. HEIFERS AVAILABLE UNWEANED. MIXED COLORS 50% BLACK 20% CHAR-X. BALANCE RED NECKS. LOAD LOTS ONLY. HOLSTEIN STEERS AVAILABLE 300 LBS. RAISED FROM BABIES. CALL, (877) 498-9150


Page 22

Heartland Express

1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I'M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939

T H E

CATTLE SHOP .COM

Fall Calving Cows Available Several Nice Sets of Angus Cows The Simple Way to Buy & Market Cattle The Cattle Shop helps buyers and sellers connect online

Visit www.TheCattleShop.com to learn more If you would like to speak to a Cattle Shop Representative Contact Us at 660-641-9945 or contact@thecattleshop.com

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS & GRANDSONS OF 878, TRAVELER & SITZ ALLIANCE SONS, FORESIGHT GRANDSONS, (308) 569-2458 NE - PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS, YEARLINGS & 2 YR OLDS. SITZ UPWARD, TC TOTAL, CONNEALY RIGHT ANSWER, WAR PARTY BLOODLINES. SCHULTE ANGUS RANCH. KEARNEY, NE CALL 308-708-1839 OR, (308) 236-0761 1913 - BABY CALVES FOR SALE

NEWBORN CALF HOOD

Holds ears warm against neck away from freezing Cow Saliva. Heavy d duty, t insulating, Neoprene. “SAVE ME EARS” $39.00 plus S/H, Order online: www.Save-Me-Products.com Ph: 701-486-3354

1914 - BISON WANTED TO BUY

BUFFALO WANTED All classes, any quantity

402-694-9353 1920 - MARCH PRODUCTION SALES NE - MLM GELBVIEH OPEN HOUSE & PRIVATE TREATY KICK OFF SALE: MARCH 5, 2012. BRED & FED WITH THE COMMERCIAL MAN IN MIND! GELBVIEHBULLS. COM, (402) 879-4976 KS - CATTLEMAN'S CHOICE ANGUS & SIMANGUS SALE. 3/6/11. 1PM WASHINGTON LVK MKT, WASHINGTON, KS. SELLING 75 REG ANG BULLS: 40 18MO, 35 SPR YRLING. BEST GENETIC VALUE ANYWHERE!, (785) 325-2926 NE - JAGER FARMS SIMMENTALS 27TH ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE & PRIVATE TREATY SALE. SAT, MARCH 10TH, 2012 AT THE FARM LOCATED 1. 5 MI. E OF HAZARD, NE ON HWY 2. OVER 50 POLLED, STOUT, GROWTHY, PERFORMANCE TESTED YEARLING BULLS W/PRIORITY ON CALVING EASE & GROWTH, (308) 452-4402 KS - ROCK'N R ANGUS RANCH 24TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE. 1 PM. 3/12/12. 7 MI E, 3. 5 N OF PLAINVILLE, KS. SELLING 225 BULLS: 150 18 MO ANG, 60 18 MO RED ANG & 15 COMING 2 ANG. 135 FEMALES: 60 REG AI HEIFERS, 45 REG ANG & RED ANG SPR OPENS, 30 REG SPR CLV COWS, (785) 6238054 NE - QUIRK LAND & CATTLE CO. 36TH ANNUAL SALE. 3/20/12. HASTINGS, NE. 140 PEFROMANCE-TESTED BULLS, INCLUDING 75 LOW BIRTH WEIGHT HFR BULLS & 45 OPEN, OUTCROSS FOUNDATION FEMALES. YOUR PROVEN SOURCE FOR PROVEN, OUTCROSS GENETICS. QUIRKLANDANDCATTLE. COM, (402) 463-6651 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1920 - MARCH PRODUCTION SALES CONT’D NE - SMITH ANGUS 23RD ANNUAL BULL SALE. 3/30/12. AT THE RANCH 25 MILES SE OF BASSETT, NE., (402) 244-5440 NE - GONSIOR SIMMENTALS IN THE HEARTLAND 2012 PROD. SALE. 3/10/12. 12:30 PM. GONSIOR FARMS SALE FACILITY, FULLERTON, NE. SELLING 133 SIMGENETIC LOTS OF BULLS, BREDS, PAIRS, OPENS, AND EMBRYOS. ONLINE CATALOG: EDJESALES. COM/ EBERSPACHER/GONSIOR, (308) 536-3101

17th Annual Sale at the Ranch south of Higgins, TX

Saturday, March 24, 2012 • 1 p.m.

It’s harvest time for Littlerobe Genetics and we will be selling at auction! 109 lots • 60 head of registered performance bred bulls, 12-18 months old • 40 head of select open registered heifers, ready to breed • 9 heifers AI bred to SS Objective for fall calving

“We will assist all buyers with the purchase of visual AngusSource® eartags with a maximum of 25 calves sired by each Littlerobe bull.” Northeast Corner of Texas Panhandle Email: Web Site: www.angusjournal.com/littlerobeangus lilrobe@wildblue.net Dale & Brenda Jenkins Duane & Donna Jenkins Cell (806) 255-8873 11790 Co. Rd 30 Higgins, TX 79046 $ We can help you (806) 852-4171 make more Profit $ Cell (806) 898-8876

2012 TOTAL PACKAGE BULL SALE March 26, 2012 • 1 p.m. (serving complimentary lunch beginning at 11 a.m.)

FREEDOM, OKLAHOMA The junction of Hwy. 64 and Hwy. 50 is Camp Houston. From Camp Houston, go north 2 miles and then 1/2 mile east.

2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 2208 - HORSE TRAINING WANTED TO BUY

Colt Started Colt started on cattle Horse breaking and training Problem solved Cutting and reined cow horses Ranch horses Ranch rope work Arena work Thousands acres to ride out on Clinics and lessons

605-430-0529 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE - SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLION, TBONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831;, (308) 5872344 2305 - LLAMAS FOR SALE NE - ALPACA HERD LIQUIDATION. BREEDING STOCK, FULL RECORDS, VET CHECKED, READY TO GO. GRAND ISLAND, NE. FOR INFO OR A VIEWING CALL, (308) 382-5345 2313 - BEES FOR SALE IL - HARDEST WORKING FARM HANDS ON EARTH. HONEY BEES WORK FOR ROOM & BOARD TO POLLINATE YOUR CROPS & PROVIDE YOU WITH HONEY. FOR SUPPLIES CONTACT DADANT & SONS, INC. WWW. DADANT. COM OR CALL, (888) 922-1293 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK

Selling: 75 18-Month-Old Fall and 65 Spring Yearling Bulls Ky Luddington 580-327-7127 Konnie Ott 620-239-4185 Home 620-886-2081 Cell To receive a sale catalog, email or call Konnie. Catalog can be viewed online at www.luddingtoncattle.com

E-Mail: konnie@sctelcom.net Visit us at www.luddingtoncattle.com 1921 - APRIL PRODUCTION SALES FOR SALE NE - SONDERUP CHAROLAIS RANCH INC. 30TH ANNUAL BULL SALE. AT THE RANCH, FULLERTON, NE. 1PM 4/12/12. SELLING 110 YEARLING CHAROLAIS BULLS. OVER 30 YEARS OF PERFORMANCE TESTING. WWW. SONDERUPCHAROLAIS. COM, (308) 5362050 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2007 - BOARS FOR SALE

Durocs, Yorks, Hamps & Cross Breed Boars York & F1 York Hamp Gilts Show Pigs also available privately

Nelson Bros. 605-267-2741 or 605-661-7855 2101 - FEEDER LAMBS FOR SALE SD - CUSTOM SHEEP FEEDLOT: LAMBS & EWES TO FEED, FATTEN & GROW!!! SHIPPY SHEEP FEEDLOT. CALL KYLE AT 605-8420935 OR DALE 605-842-3967. WWW. SHEEPFEEDLOT. COM, (605) 842-3967 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-888689-8924 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - AQHA HORSES: BLUE ROAN STUD & MARES, (308) 569-2458 NE - BUCKSKIN COMING 2 YR OLD STUD COLT FROM TOP MARE, DOC BAR DASH FOR CASH, ACTIVE COLT, (308) 569-2458

FULL TIME/SHOP MANAGER Experience with pivots and grain bins a must. Clean driving record with Class A CDL preferred. Needed, ability to multitask, prioritize and to work as a team member. Job description: but not limited to, outside inventory, repairs of pivots and grain bins, inventory control and warranties.

Send resume to laurel@thepivotman.com. FOR SALE NE - FAMILY OWNED AG EQUIPMENT DEALER LOOKING FOR A FULL-TIME SALES PERSON. EQUIPMENT INCLUDES MCCOR MICK, VERMEER, TYM, BUSHHOG & SEVERAL SHORT LINES. RESUMES WITH REFERENCES MAY BE SENT TO MILLER REPAIR LLC, PO BOX 89 MAXWELL, NE 69151. CALL, (308) 582-4303 WANTED TO RENT NE - PARTS PERSON. PROGRESSIVE AG EQUIPMENT DEALERSHIP SEEKS PARTS PERSON. COMPUTER SKILLS REQUIRED. EXPERIENCE OR SCHOOLING PREFERRED. THOENE FARM SERVICE, BURWELL, NE. CONTACT FRED OR HANK AT, (308) 3465250 ID - EARN $75,000/YR PART TIME IN THE LIVESTOCK OR EQUIPMENT APPRAISAL BUSINESS. AGRICULTURAL BACKGROUND REQUIRED. CLASSROOM OR HOME STUDY COURSES AVAILABLE., (800) 488-7570 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES FOR RENT KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515

CUSTOM SEED CLEANING FOR WHEAT & BARLEY SEED 20 plus years experience! Several references including Cargill, Busch Ag & Coors. On-site cleaning, completely self contained.

208-221-5338 We travel to you!

FOR SALE NE - CUSTOM MANURE HAULING. 3 SPREADERS & A PAYLOADER AVAILABLE. OUR REPUTATION FOLLOWS US. KENT BACKER, (402) 499-8060 KS - ALFALFA: PICKED UP OR DELIVERED. CALL ROY AT PLEASANT ACRES AT, (620) 804-1506

March 1, 2012 2510 - SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION/SCHOOLS WANTED TO BUY

Cattle Artificial Insemination Courses March 15-18, 2012 in Ault, CO Registration Deadline February 15, 2012

March 22-25, 2012 in Ault, CO Registration Deadline March 1, 2012

April 12-15, 2012 in Lamar, CO Registration Deadline March 15, 2012 Contact Us About Refresher Courses Late registration fee: $100 Cost: $475 Classes Limited to 15 students

For more info or to register: Dallas Schleining (970) 420-0267 www.schleininggenetics.com

2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD FACTORY BED FOR '73-'79 FORD PICKUP, NO RUST THROUGH, (620) 8652541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (308) 624-2177 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - '59 CHEVY 60, V8, 4&2 SP, 15' B&H, 2 NEW TIRES, TUNED UP, ETC, $999.00, (620) 865-2541 KS - 1976 FORD 3500 CAB & CHASSIS, $500.00, (785) 778-2962 SD - 1952 IH L160 TRUCK, 16' COMBINATION GRAIN & STOCK BOX & HOIST, GOOD CONDITION. $2000, (605) 386-2131 NE - 1976 CHEVY TRUCK W/FLATBED AND KNUCKLE BOOM, $5,000.00, (308) 4854486 NE - 2002 FL80 GRAIN TRUCK, 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC DET. 50 275 HP DBL FRAME, NEW 22' SCOTT BOX/LL3000 HOIST, ALLOY WHEELS, NEW VIRGIN RUBBER, TOGGLE TO BACK, RED & WHITE, (402) 469-0789 2604 - GRAIN TRAILERS FOR SALE OK - 2011 GSI 36' 2 HOPPER GRAIN TRAILER, ROLL TARP, WINDOWS $20,000 OR LEASE $1550/MONTH. CELL 580- 525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 NE - 1996 48' WILSON GRAIN TRAILER, 10'1" SPREAD, LED LIGHTS, 66" SIDES, GOOD TIRES & BRAKES, $18,750.00, (308) 485-4486 2611 - MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE

ONLINE AUCTION Pickups, ATVs, Boats, RVs, & More!

www.crankyape.com 2614 - BOATS & PWC FOR SALE KS - 16' HOBIECAT, $600.00, (785) 7782962 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 KS - RANS S-5 ULTRALITE, (FACTORY BUILT), $6,000.00, (785) 778-2962 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 NE - WANTED 4 18. 4 X 34 FIRESTONE TIRES, (308) 587-2344 NE - 11. 2 X 36 OR 12. 4 X 36 TIRES, (308) 587-2344

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

2616 - TIRES FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - RIM-GARD, NON CORROSIVE, TIRE BALLAST, (308) 587-2344 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 1975 IH SEMI, 318, 13 SP, TWIN SCREW, 5TH WHEEL, (785) 871-0711 KS - 1974 UTILITY CHASSIS W/2-350 BU. GRAVITY BOXES, HYD AUGERS, ETC., $9,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - (2) 2005 9400I ISX 450 HP TEN SPEED 51" LOW PRO SLEEPER, 213 WB, JAKE, WHITE, 3. 70 REARS, FLEET MAINTAINED, FISHER TRUCK SALES, (402) 469-0789 NE - 2004 9200I FLAT TOP CAT C-15 450 HP, TEN SPEED, WHITE, 670K MILES, (402) 469-0789 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER WANTED TO BUY KS - 14. 5" RIM FOR TRAILER HOUSE, 5 HOLE, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 KS - 8-12 YARD SCRAPER, LATE MODEL, EXCELLENT COND. , REASONABLE, (620) 865-2541 SK - WANTED: CATERPILLER CABLE SCRAPERS, LEVER HOLDINGS INC. CALL, (306) 682-3332 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10' & 12'; 3PT'S 6' & 8', (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - TOREQ 40" PTO DITCHER, $7,200.00, (660) 548-3804 MO - BUFFALO 12' BOX BLADES IN STOCK, (660) 548-3804 MO - ASHLAND 6 YD DUMP SCRAPER, (660) 548-3804 ND - SCRAPER: BUY & SELL OLD CABLE SCRAPERS, CAT 60, 70, 80; LETOURNEAU LS, LP, FP; A/C; ALL MAKES AND SIZES, WILL CONVERT OVER TO HYDRAULICS, VERY PROFESSIONALLY DONE, TIRES & PARTS. CONTACT STEVE, WWW. STEVEVOIGHTMAN. COM. CELL 701-6808015 OR BUS., (701) 742-2182 MO - TOREQ 6 YD. HYD EJECT, (660) 5483804 MO - SOILMOVER 12 YD. HYD EJECT, (660) 548-3804 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 ND - 20KW TO 2000KW; DIESEL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS. ALL LOW-HOUR TAKEOUT GENSETS. CUMMINS/ONAN, KOHLER, CAT, DETROIT DIESEL & MORE. ABRAHAM GENERATOR SALES COOPERSTOWN, ND (COMPLETE INVENTORY ONLINE) WWW. ABRAHAMINDUSTRIAL. COM WE SHIP NATIONWIDE!, (701) 797-4766 2809 - CONSTRUCTION TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - PALLET FORK, NEEDS TO BE QUIK TATCH & TINES NEED TO BE 60" FOR SKID STEER, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - COMPLETE SET OF BOOKS (REPAIR MANUALS) T-200 BOBCAT SKID LOADER, $100.00, (785) 778-2962 www.myfarmandranch.com


March 1, 2012 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT CELL 580-5251265, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 MO - CAT 8000# 2 STAGE W/PNEUMATIC TIRES, HYDRAULICS ARE EXCELLENT, ENGINE NEEDS WORK. CHEAP!, (660) 5483804 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE

MN - THE BEST RADIANT FLOOR HEAT WATER TUBING. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ON A COMPLETE SYSTEM. VOLUME DISCOUNTS, FACTORY OUTLET PRICES. COMPARE & SAVE! GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. WWW. MIKESHEATING. COM & CALL, (800) 446-4043 3001 - ANTIQUES FOR SALE NE - 1975 GOTLIEB ELECTRO-MECHANICAL PINBALL MACHINE ABRA-CA-DABRA 60K GAMES GOOD BOARD GOOD GLASS BAD BACK GRAPHICS. NEW RUBBER, NEEDS TINKERER CAN E- MAIL PICTS. $600.00 OBO CELL 308-920-0156 PICK UP ONLY! SOUTH CENTRAL NEBRASKA, (308) 9289035 NE - COIN-OP FOOSBALL TABLE PHOENIX AUTOMATION BRAND TOURNAMENT QUALITY. STRAIGHT BARS, MEN IN GREAT CONDITION (HAVE FACES WITH DERBY HATS) VERY HEAVY $200.00 OBO PICK UP ONLY SOUTH CENTRAL NE. CELL 308-920-0156, (308) 928-9035

Heartland Express 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515 FOR SALE NE - TEENS, 20'S, EARLY 30'S IHC TRUCKS, PARTS, LITERATURE, (308) 894-6965 NE - 1950 GMC 450 WRECKER, GOOD TIRES, GOOD CAB, GOOD GLASS, $2,500.00, (308) 874-4562 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356

3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE - CONT’D

FRANK BLACK Pipe & Supply Co. 2-3/8"; 2-7/8"; 3-1/2" oilfield tubing 3/4" thru 42" new & used line pipe square & rectangular tubing plate steel • sucker rods beam, channel & angle iron Call us for all your steel pipe needs.

WE CAN DELIVER! (620) 241-2582 • McPherson, KS

12 GAUGE USED GUARDRAIL Hot Dip galvanized. 26’ Please call for delivered quote 423-791-4771 • 721-726-3562 620-546-3507

STRUCTURAL PIPE

‹ Excellent Condition ‹ Overstock Price ‹

2 3/8 @ $.95 ALL SIZES AVAILABLE RPJ ENERGY Call or E-mail Ray: 970.405.8866

Page 23 3018 - LUMBER FOR SALE NE - CEDAR LUMBER, GREEN OR KILN DRIED, PINE, BLACK WALNUT, COTTONWOOD & OAK AVAILABLE. CEDAR MULCH CHIPS. PEELED TREATED CEDAR FENCE POST. DRY KILN CEDAR OR PINE SHAVINGS. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. SPRINGVIEW, NE. WE ALSO BUY LOGS. CALL, (402) 322-3600 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE '30'S & '40'S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455 FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 3032 - GIFT ITEMS FOR SALE

raypropes@rpjenergy.com • www.rpjenergy.com

3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE KS - '76 FORD 2000 GAL TANK WAGON FUEL TRUCK, 2 HOSE REELS, 5 COMPARTMENTS, READY TO GO, (785) 448-5893 NE - 5000 & 2500 GAL NEW FUEL TANKS, 3/16" THICK, (402) 563-4762 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 www.myfarmandranch.com

WANTED:LEADERS

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Great gifts for young and old! Illustrated Children’s books about farm families. Collector series of stories accurately depict farm families, animals & chores with imagination & humor.

Preserve your farm heritage with these keepsake books. Sample pages and reviews by children, farmers, parents, & grandparents at www.gordonfredrickson.com Order from author online, by email or by phone. For more info or questions: twogfsc@integra.net • 952-461-2111

5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE MO - 120A/90 TILLABLE, 130A/110 TILLABLE W/HOMESTEAD AND OUTBUILDING. NW MISSOURI 30 MIN FROM ST. JOSEPH, CALL AFTER 6PM 816-369-2071 OR, (816) 378-2015

• Rated in Top 100 growth companies by Business Week and Fortune Magazine. • Regional leaders earning $5K-$15K per month helping people

FOR SALE BY OWNER COUNTRY LIVING! 34 ACRES AND LARGE NEWLY REMODELED HOME. 4 MILES NORTHEAST OF BRIDGEPORT, MORRILL COUNTY, NEBRASKA. 24 IRRIGATED ACRES, TREES, HUNTING, GUEST OR RENTAL HOUSE, BARN, EXTRA GARAGE, GRAIN BIN AND MORE.

PHONE 308-262-1370 LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER.

5006 - RENTAL PROPERTY WANTED TO RENT NE - WANT TO RENT! FATHER ALONG WITH SON (WHO IS HOPING TO GET STARTED FARMING) LOOKING FOR FARM GROUND TO RENT. MODERN EQUIPMENT, WILL PAY GOING RENT PRICE. PLEASE CALL 308-2632361 OR, (308) 991-5184 7000 - TRADE SHOWS FOR SALE IN - PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT YOUR LAND. EARN TOP $$$ FOR HUNTING RIGHTS. CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE & INFO PACKET TOLL FREE 1-866-309-1507 OR WWW.BASECAMPLEASING.COM, (866) 309-1507 7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS FOR SALE MT - CALGARY STAMPEDE: 7/13-7/16;3 NIGHTS HOTEL, RODEO TICKETS FOR THE 14TH & 15TH. EVENING SHOW THE 14TH ROUNDTRIP DELUXE MOTORCOACH WILL DEPART FROM BILLINGS & GREAT FALLS, MT. $789 PER PERSON DOUBLE OCCUPANCY. CONTACT BEARTOOTH TRAVEL 800554-2303/, (406) 445-2303

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I AVERAGE

$100,000

PER YEAR

Let me show you how! “Business success is determined by each individual’s own efforts.”

CALL BOBBY, Independent Distributor

5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

1-866-234-8426

Midlands Classified Ad Network MUSIC TEACHER K-8 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR ST. AGNES ACADEMY, ALLIANCE, NE. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, CREDENTIALS AND REFERENCES TO: DOYLE CHRISTENSEN, PRINCIPAL, 1104 CHEYENNE AVE. ALLIANCE, NE 69301 IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR A FULL-TIME SALESPERSON FOR AN ESTABLISHED NEW CAR DEALER. WE ARE LOOKING FOR SOMEONE WHO HAS PREVIOUS SALES EXPERIENCE. EXCELLENT EMPLOYER PAID BENEFITS. SEND RESUME TO BOX A-985, KEARNEY HUB, PO BOX 1988, KEARNEY, NE 68848. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER IN NORTH PLATTE, NE IS SEEKING CANDIDATES FOR THE POSITION OF ACCOUNTING MANAGER. THIS POSITION IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MANAGING, COORDINATING, AND ADMINISTERING THE ORGANIZATION’S FINANCE FUNCTION TO INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING AREAS: INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING, CAPITAL EXPENDITURES AND FIXED ASSETS, ACCOUNTS PAYABLE, TAX AND REIMBURSEMENT REPORTING, FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL REPORTING. 5 – 10 YEARS OF HEALTHCARE ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE OR RELATED FIELD PREFERRED. BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN ACCOUNTING REQUIRED. CALL: JOHN AT (800) 543-6629, EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM, APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS A DIVERSE INSTITUTION WELCOMING ALL APPLICATIONS FOR A FULL-TIME 12- MONTH ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR. RESPONSIBILITIES: ADMINISTRATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE ENROLMENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM, PROVIDING LEADERSHIP IN STUDENT RECRUITMENT, RETENTION, AND ADMISSIONS; FACILITATES THE ADMISSION AND ORIENTATION OF NEW STUDENTS; WORKS WITH ALL COLLEGE DEPARTMENTS, PRIMARILY IN THE AREAS OF RECRUITMENT, MARKETING, FINANCIAL AID AND ADMISSIONS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS AND TO ENSURE THEIR SUCCESSFUL ENROLLMENT IN EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE. REQUIREMENTS: BACHELOR'S DEGREE. EXPERIENCE IN ADMISSIONS, RECRUITING, MARKETING, AND MANAGEMENT PREFERRED; STRONG COMPUTER SKILLS, ALONG WITH THE ABILITY TO ORGANIZE AND MANAGE MULTIPLE PRIORITIES IN A DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT, AND CREATIVELY SOLVE PROBLEMS, ARE CRUCIAL. THE ABILITY TO BUILD AND MAINTAIN POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS AND COMMUNICATE IN SPANISH IS DESIRABLE. A VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE AND THE ABILITY TO TRAVEL ARE ESSENTIAL. EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACKAGE, HIRING RANGE $48,527 - $53,564. SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, THREE LETTERS OF REFERENCE, OFFICIAL GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE TRANSCRIPTS TO THE PERSONNEL OFFICE

3200 WEST C ST. TORRINGTON, WY 82240. FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO; WWW.EWC.WY.EDU. EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER QUALITY MANAGER: PROFESSIONAL HAVING DEGREE IN BUSINESS/ENGINEERING/SCIENCE OR RELEVANT EXPERIENCE, ISO 9001:2008 BACK GROUND IS A MUST. YOU WILL WORK WITH CUSTOMERS, AUDITORS, AND PRINT SPECIFICA TIONS. MID LAND MOLDING IS AN ESTABLISHED COMPANY GOING ON ITS 23RD YEAR OF BUSINESS. WE ARE LOOKING FOR A SELF DRIVER, HARD WORKING INDIVIDUAL WHO WILL CONTINUE TO HELP OUR COMPANY GROW. TO APPLY SEND RESUMES TO KBURG@MIDLANDMOLDING.COM OR ONLINE AND APPLY AT WWW.MIDLAND MOLDING.COM SIMON CONTRACTORS - A DIVERSIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR SPECIALIZING IN HIGHWAY, BUILDING AND ROAD CONSTRUCTION THROUGHOUT WY, NE, SD, AND CO HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING IN OUR SCOTTSBLUFF, NE LOCATION FOR A: SAND PLANT OPERATOR. TWO OR MORE YEARS' EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. COMPETITIVE WAGES AND EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACKAGE OFFERED. SEND RESUME TO: 1914 W. OVERLAND; SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361, FAX TO 308-632-3442, OR APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.SIMONCONTRACTORS.COM. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, M/F, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER LEADING MANUFACTURER’S REP AGENCY IN THE HUNTING/SHOOTING INDUSTRY SEEKING A FULL TIME SALES ASSISTANT. BACHELORS DEGREE BUSINESS/ MARKETING OR EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. SOME OVERNIGHT TRAVEL REQUIRED, EXPENSES PAID. SALARY $30-35K PLUS BENEFITS. EMAIL APPLICATION AND RESUME TO: RESUMES@ODLESALES.NET. VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.ODLESALES.COM APPLICATION DEADLINE 3/20/2012." BERTRAND NURSING HOME & ASSISTED LIVING, BERTRAND, NE, HAS OPENINGS FOR CERTIFIED

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WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES. VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER LOCATED IN NORTH PLATTE, NE IS SEEKING A MOTIVATED, FOCUSED INDIVIDUAL FOR THE POSITION OF MEDICAL CODER. THIS POSITION IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CODING ACCURATELY, DIAGNOSES, AND PROCEDURES UTILIZING THE ICD AND CPT. PROVIDE CPT, ICD, AND HCPCS CODING SUPPORT FOR PHYSICIAN AND NONPHYSICIAN STAFF. CPC, CCS-P OR EQUIVALENT PROFESSIONAL CERT. REQUIRED. 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICIAN CODING REQUIRED. CALL: JOHN AT (800) 543-6629, EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM , APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM BOX BUTTE GENERAL HOSPITAL IN ALLIANCE, NE IS ISSUING A REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR INTERESTED DESIGN-BUILD FIRMS, OR ARCHITECTURAL /ENGINEERING /GENERAL CONTRACTORS ENTERING INTO A JOINT DESIGNBUILD VENTURE, TO DESIGN AND CONSTRUCT AN APPROXIMATELY 79,000 SQUARE FOOT ADDITION TO BOX BUTTE GENERAL HOSPITAL AND TO REMODEL EXISTING SPACE FOR A NEW REHABILITATION UNIT. TO RECEIVE SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE RFQ, INTERESTED FIRMS MUST SUBMIT A NOTICE OF INTEREST, VIA EMAIL ONLY, TO: JAMES PARKS, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, JPARKS@BBGH.ORG. 308.761.3422 COMPLETED PROPOSALS MUST BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2012. THE VA BLACK HILLS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM IS RECRUITING FOR A NURSE MANAGER OF MENTAL HEALTH IN FORT MEADE & HOT SPRINGS, SD. BENEFITS: 401K W/ EMPLOYER MATCHING • GENEROUS ANNUAL & SICK LEAVE • EXCELLENT HEALTH & LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAMS • COMPETITIVE SALARY • HIGHLY QUALIFIED APPLICANT ELIGIBLE FOR RECRUITMENT INCENTIVE! QUALIFIED APPLICANTS SHOULD HAVE: BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN NURSING (MASTERS PREFERRED) • UNRESTRICTED RN LICENSE • MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE CONTACT MAVERICK DUNAVAN AT (605)720-7090 WITH QUESTIONS. TO VIEW THE ANNOUNCEMENT & APPLY VISIT WWW.USAJOBS.GOV & SEARCH FOR VACANCY ID: 605349. EOE. SURGICAL TECHNICIAN NEEDED AT GORDON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. WILL ASSIST SURGEON DURING OPERATIVE & INVASIVE PROCEDURES, ASSURE OPERATING SUITE IS ADEQUATELY PREPARED FOR PROCEDURES, & CLEAN & STERILIZE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. SHOULD HAVE PREVIOUS SURGICAL EXPERIENCE & THE DESIRE TO BE PART OF A HIGHLY TRAINED, EFFICIENT TEAM. CONTACT TRACEY AT 308-282-6181 OR APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GORDONMEMORIAL.ORG

DIETARY MANAGER, CNAS, MED AIDES, RN, RN/LPN. 308-472-3341, TERESA OR RUTH OR EMAIL: BERTRANDNURSINGHOMEAL@HOTMAIL.COM. BUSINESS TEACHER VACANCY ARE YOU A TEACHER WHO WILL TAKE THE TIME TO KNOW EACH INDIVIDUAL STUDENT, CHALLENGE HIM/HER TO ACHIEVE FULL POTENTIAL, AND DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO HELP YOUR STUDENTS LEARN? WOULD YOU LIKE TO WORK IN A PROGRESSIVE, FLEXIBLE, FOWARD-THINKING SYSTEM TO CONTINUE TO DEVELOP A 21ST CENTURY BUSINESS PROGRAM? IF YOU ANSWERED YES, PLATTE COUNTY #2 IN GUERNSEY, WY WOULD LIKE YOU TO APPLY. PCSD#2 CURRENTLY OFFERS A $41,500 BASE, FULL WYOMING RETIREMENT PAID BY THE DISTRICT, 100% HEALTH INSURANCE PAID, 50% TUITION REIMBURSEMENT, AND NUMEROUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES. COACHING OPENINGS ARE POSSIBLE IN BASKETBALL AND TRACK. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.PLT2.K12.WY.US FOR FULL APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS. ELEMENTARY TEACHER POSITION ARE YOU A TEACHER WHO WILL TAKE THE TIME TO KNOW EACH INDIVIDUAL STUDENT, CHALLENGE HIM/HER TO ACHIEVE FULL POTENTIAL, AND HAVE THE FLEXIBILITY TO DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO HELP YOUR STUDENTS LEARN? DO YOU ENJOY SMALL CLASS SIZES AND BEING PART OF A PROGRESSIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT? IF YOU ANSWERED YES, PLATTE COUNTY #2 IN GUERNSEY, WY WOULD LIKE YOU TO APPLY FOR AN ELEMENTARY TEACHER POSITION. PCSD#2 OFFERS A $41,500 BASE, FULL RETIREMENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE PAID BY THE DISTRICT, AND DISTRICT INCENTIVES FOR GRADUATE DEGREE WORK. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.PLT2.K12.WY.US FOR FULL APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS. ST. JOSEPH'S CHILDREN'S HOME, TORRINGTON WYOMING, SERVING CHILDREN & FAMILIES FOR OVER 80 YEARS - EDUCATION ASSISTANT: FULL-

Glyfos X-TRA $8.95 LV6 $23.50 Dicamba $30 Corvus $3.36 w/rebate Bal Flex $2.75 w/rebate Will meet or beat all prices!

Quantity Discount

Benes Service Valparaiso, NE • 402-784-3581 49329

TIME, 12 MONTH POSITION, TO ASSIST SCHOOL TEACHERS WITH THE CARE, HEALTH, SAFETY AND EDUCATION EXPERIENCE OF EACH CHILD ASSIGNED, CO-FACILITATE DIDACTIC GROUPS AND WRITE PROGRESS NOTES, WORK ON LIVING UNITS DURING SCHOOL VACATIONS AND ONE TO TWO HOURS DURING SUMMER SCHOOL. REQUIRES: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR EQUIVALENT AND WYOMING SUBSTITUTE TEACHER CERTIFICATE, OR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS TO OBTAIN; MINIMUM OF 21 YEARS OF AGE AND THE ABILITY TO LIFT 50 POUNDS. - SECONDARY SCIENCE TEACHER: THIS IS AN OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN OUR DYNAMIC AND PROFESSIONAL TEAM TO PROVIDE HIGH QUALITY EDUCATIONAL SERVICES TO CHILDREN IN A PSYCHIATRIC RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT SETTING. WE VALUE OUR TEACHING STAFF MEMBERS WHO CONTINUALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN CHILDREN’S LIVES. FULL TIME - 12 MONTH POSITION REQUIRES: BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION AND CURRENT WYOMING TEACHING CERTIFICATION WITH AN ENDORSEMENT IN: SCIENCE. BENEFITS: COMPETITIVE SALARY, OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT, MAJOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, AND VISION INSURANCE, PAID TIME OFF, RETIREMENT PLAN, LIFE AND LONG TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE, SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM, AND EXTENSIVE STAFF DEVELOPMENT. POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. FOR APPLICATION OR TO VIEW OTHER CAREER OPPORTUNITIES, VISIT US ON-LINE AT WWW.STJOSEPH-WY.ORG, OR IN PERSON AT 1419 MAIN STREET, TORRINGTON, WY SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATIONS TO: HR DIRECTOR, PO BOX 1117, TORRINGTON, WY 82240. E-MAIL: SLOWER@STJOSEPH-WY.ORG OR, FAX TO 307532-8405 OFFICE MANAGER WANTED - MEDICAL & BUSINESS OFFICE EXPERIENCE PREFERRED, LOCATED IN NORTH PLATTE. SEND RESUME TO 1115 SOUTH WILLOW, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101 www.myfarmandranch.com

MORE THAN JUST SPRAYERS! Check With Us First For Parts

• Banjo Valves, Strainers and Fittings • Hypro. and Ace Pumps and Parts • Teejet Nozzle Bodies • Turbo Drop Nozzles • Fertilizer Orifices • All Sizes of Hose

Select Sprayers, LLC

4319 Imperial Ave., East Hwy. 30, Kearney or call

308-338-8006

48953


Page 24

Heartland Express

March 1, 2012

49154

49310

THE WIND BLOWS A LITTLE DIFFERENTLY OUT HERE IN THE WESTERN CORN BELT. Hoegemeyer Hybrids has a lot in common with its customers, and understands the unique demands of this region called home. Hoegemeyer brings 75 years of Western Corn Belt experience into every aspect of business, so you can expect personalized recommendations to meet your needs, the very best seed for your farm, and friendly, helpful service from one season to the next. Visit your local Hoegemeyer dealer or go to www.therightseed.com.

The Right Seed for the Western Corn Belt

1-800-AG LINE 1 . 1-800-245-4631 . therightseed.com

BE COM E A FA N

3% EARLY PAY DISCOUNT through March 15, 2012

Hoegemeyer® is a registered trademark of Hoegemeyer Hybrids. ©2012, Hoegemeyer Hybrids. 48859

/HE_030112  

http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_030112.pdf

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