Keeping On - Spring 2022

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Keeping n THE OFFICIAL VOICE OF AGE CONCERN CANTERBURY Vol 115: Spring 2022

New logo for Age Concern, Page 4

Phone (03) 366-0903, Fax: (03) 365-0639, Email: team@ageconcerncan.org.nz, www.ageconcerncan.org.nz Charities Commission Number: CCC29446


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A WORD FROM THE PRESIDENT FROM THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE We are all looking forward to spring after a long cold and very wet winter. It has been especially wet over the last few weeks and as I write there is more rain to come in the weather forecast. I hope you have managed to do some walking and exercise in the picnic areas that I have told you about. Other suggestions that I have are to go to the end of the airport runway and do some plane spotting. The busy time is 2.00pm to 3.30pm. Take a picnic in your car and watch the aircraft come and go. Another place is to go to the car park at New Brighton beach again with your picnic and watch the waves breaking and there will probably be some hardy surfers to watch also. While it is raining or too cold to go out and you have a space on a flat surface of a table put out a jigsaw

puzzle. It is something that you can go back to every day to do a little bit, or while away an hour or two. It is challenging and very satisfying when you see the picture coming together. Many of you will be knitters and the neonatal unit at the hospital is always grateful to receive tiny garments, hats and mittens for the premature babies. If you do knit for them, it must be in wool not synthetic yarns. Now is the time to get your second Covid vaccination booster and, if you have not done so, the winter flu vaccination. Protect yourself and your families from illness. Keep warm and use the winter warmth allowance that is added to your National super until October. During winter it is especially important to eat nourishing meals and good soups. Keep hydrated to prevent infections. Look after your self and look out for any neighbours that might need assistance or who are lonely. Take care Trish Adams President

CONTENTS

Hello and welcome to the spring edition. We have seen the shortest day and look forward to the ‘new life’ spring brings, with warmer weather - perhaps inspiring us to get more exercise, get out and about and more connected. Winter warmth is still very important this time of year. While we see the days getting longer there is no shortage of cold and wet days. The government’s winter heating payments will be in each of you bank accounts (if you are over 65) we encourage you to use the funds directly on keeping warm. Can a Keeping On go by without the mention of COVID? Unfortunately, not. We have seen the waves in the community reflected in waves of staff having to isolate at home with illness themselves or family members (me included). The message is clear, get boosted, wear your mask, and follow isolation protocols (hand washing should be thrown in there too!). If you do need to isolate, for your

own or a household member’s illness, and need support – we are there to help. Our wonderful community connectors can provide support for many of the things you may need – please just call us. It is great to welcome Anna Tillman to the team – you can read more about her further in the publication. Anna will be leading our health promotion, with a focus on exercise. ACC tell us that 1 in 3 over 65’s will have a fall. The good news is there is something you can do about it. Strength and balance classes are run all over Canterbury – get in touch with Anna to see where one is near you. We all need to do more to promote positive ageing, and to value the contribution older people make to society. That is our vision and mission, and my challenge to you – ask yourselves what you can do to make the life of an older person better. Your call to action could be October 1st, the international day of the older person – or don’t wait and connect today! Ngā mihi nui Simon Templeton Chief Executive

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OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF AGE CONCERN CANTERBURY (INC) Page 3, From Canada to Christchurch

Page 13, Teaching Granny to suck eggs

Page 21, Fire Service offers free home fire safety visits

Page 9, South of the Glaciers

Page 19, Community Award for Gaynor

Pages 22, Did you know?

Page 25, Health Promoter chit chat Page 27, My Book Club recommends Page 32, My Two Cents

Keeping On is distributed by Age Concern Canterbury to Christchurch Malls, Senior Citizen Clubs and Groups, Libraries, Medical Centres, Rest Homes, Hospitals and Institutions, Housing Complexes and Agencies working with older people and individuals. Keeping On is published quarterly in February, May, August and November each year. Written contributions for consideration can be emailed to the Editor at dmcgrath@ageconcerncan.org.nz or contact Deirdre on (03)366-0903. The Keeping On Team: Deirdre McGrath - Editor, Mike Crean - Journalist, June Peka - Journalist, Anna-Marie Hunter - Advertising Representative/Desktop Publisher. Keeping On is printed by Inkwise, Rolleston. Age Concern Canterbury is very grateful for the support we receive from our advertisers. Without advertisements this publication could not survive. Some of our advertisements are the traditional type and others include advertorial (an advertisement that’s written in the form of editorial content). To be transparent to our readers each of these advertorial pieces is labelled with the symbol A. Views and opinions expressed in Keeping On are not necessarily those of the Editor of Age Concern Canterbury. Neither does publication of an advertisement imply endorsement by Age Concern Canterbury.


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Jim Tritschler, from Canada to Christchurch by Mike Crean

Grizzly bears invading the garden, cunning cougars preying on farm goats – this was life for Christchurch man Jim Tritschler in the mid-1940s to mid-1950s. He grew up in a remote area of northern British Columbia. His world as a youngster was deep ocean inlets where fishing and forestry produced hard-earned incomes for the toughest of the tough. How life can change. For the last 50 years, Jim’s home has been in temperate, cordial Christchurch. Jim’s father was Welsh, with German ancestry. He worked on fishing boats in the short summers and at logging in the other months. Nearby was a Norwegian immigrants’ settlement. Next was a native Indian community. The Indians were friendly and helpful; the Norwegians were not, Jim recalls. A steamboat brought supplies to the area once a fortnight. Urgent access was by float-plane. At 16, Jim acquired a boat and went fishing for three months. The family then moved to the big city of Vancouver. Jim was hired by a sawmill company to maintain the teeth on giant saw blades. With his pay he bought a car. The very next day he was laid off as the company retrenched on a “last on – first off” basis. His mother urged him to apply for a job advertisement she had seen for an optics apprentice. He got the job and is still working in optics, though now with his own dispensing optician’s clinic and shop at Northwood-Belfast. It’s a long way from grizzlies and cougars. Jim achieved a certificate proclaiming him a “Member of the Canadian Guild of Dispensing Opticians”, in 1966. Part of his studies involved a correspondence course from Australia. He was then employed by a large company which

Jim’s own dispensing optician clinic and shop at Northwood-Belfast is a long way from the grizzlies and cougars of Canada.

sent him to help in its many clinics around Canada. Unknown to Jim, a tourist who had been travelling the world and working on odd jobs for four years was about to leave Vancouver and head home to New Zealand. He did not know her but he decided to go to her farewell party. There he met the Flying Kiwi, Evelyn. He knew straight away that she was “the one”. She realised it too and she delayed her departure. The couple came to New Zealand in 1972. Jim knew nothing about New Zealand. He thought it was part of Hawaii. But touching down at Christchurch, he immediately felt at home. Moving to Evelyn’s family farm in North Otago, he felt even more familiar. He took a job with the local

rabbit board and shot rabbits from the deck of a small truck. A Canadian firm wrote to him, offering a job in optics, but he turned it down. By then, Jim realised “it was better to own your own business”. So, he and Evelyn accepted a loan from a family member and moved to Christchurch. There they raised their three children. And there, in 1974, they opened their own optician shop on Victoria Street, near Bealey Avenue. Needing more space, Jim moved the business to a new building on the corner of Hereford Street and Oxford Terrace in 1979. The business flourished for more than 30 years. Then the earthquakes struck. Jim says the biggest one “felt like a bomb exploding underneath….it was

vertical, up and down”. Looking out the window he saw the Hereford St Bridge undulating. He had never known earthquakes before. The Hereford St building was badly damaged. Jim had to move out. He found temporary quarters in a wholesale laboratory at Addington. Many people left town and others did not like coming into the city, he says, so custom was cut by half. He badly needed a new site in a handy location. He found it in a new building on Main North Road at Northwood. He moved there in 2012. As more than 60% of his customers were country people, the site was well placed. The lease was cheaper and parking easier than in the city. Evelyn has joined him on the staff as receptionist. Custom has increased lately. New housing developments in the area have helped, he says. Now in his 80th year, he is looking at retirement. Some possible purchasers have asked about the business. He hopes he can put up the “Gone Fishing” sign by the time this edition of Keeping On appears. Jim is an avid angler. He will fish anywhere, with any sort of tackle. He looks forward to more time with rod and reel, though the deteriorating state of Canterbury rivers disappoints him. Reminiscing a little, Jim says driving to Tekapo with the Southern Alps looming ahead is like driving inland from Vancouver towards the Rockies, except Tekapo is half the distance. He sees Canadians and New Zealanders as similar types, unlike Australians and Americans. His six trips to Canada have felt like going home but returning to New Zealand has felt even more like coming home. He will stay here.

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New branding for Age Concern Age Concern New Zealand has launched new branding, but our core business of supporting older Kiwis to live their best lives will still be our key focus. Age Concern New Zealand unveiled the new logo on 1 July at Parliament in an event hosted by the Hon. Dr Ayesha Verrall, Minister for Seniors. National President of the Age Concern New Zealand Board, Wayne Bradshaw said the refresh was timely because the charity had changed significantly since it launched over 70 years ago. “The makeup of our population has changed too—we’re getting older, living longer, and we’re more diverse than ever before, he said. "Our organisation is changing what we do and how we look to better reflect our older population in New

Zealand. We also have an ageing population with those over 65 making up 1/4 of our population, he said. “Our new brand reflects the leadership role we have and the respect we hold for our elders. We are shifting the perceptions of ageing,

Mature Moves is about helping people If you are considering moving into a smaller home, perhaps a retirement village or residential care and you feel you could use some help Mature Moves could be your answer. It is a Christchurch based company with local people helping older people to downsize and move when the need arises. They understand that sometimes your family are not positioned to help as they might like to or have time restraints. True to their motto ‘to treat you like they treat their own families’, the team at Mature Moves can pack up, declutter and move all of your belongings and furniture to your new home. Then they unpack and set up your new home to the very last detail, setting up the home just the way you like it. Decluttering can be a bit overwhelming. However, it is made much easier with some understanding

standing up to ageist attitudes and policy, and focusing on programmes and activities that support dignity, wellbeing and social connections,” The new logo depicts a circle of colourful huia feathers which are a sacred treasure for Māori and

symbolise leadership and mana. Huia feathers were given as tokens of friendship and respect and traded for other valued items such as greenstone and sharks’ teeth. The tail feathers were particularly revered. This bold and contemporary design uses the individual Huia feathers to represent the mana of our elders and the leadership role Age Concern takes. Each feather is a different colour, representing the diversity of the people of Aoteoroa. At the same time, the circle of three portrays the concept of community, friendship and respect. The words ‘He Manaakitanga Kaumātua Aotearoa’ are a Māori translation for ‘Age Concern New Zealand’.

Test your crossword skills (#90722 by RVT)

help. Step-by-step you can have things sorted and organised with minimal fuss and stress. Along with this wonderful service, they can also organise selling things you no longer require, or if you desire gifting them to family or charities. They can also clean homes inside and out, and complete the gardening to get houses ready for sale. Mature Moves is about helping people. You let them know what help you need and they will set about showing you just what they can do to help you. A visit and consultation is free of charge, with no obligation to use their services. However, if you feel they may be of assistance a quotation can be provided for your consideration. You can phone Mature Moves on 0800 777 214 to talk about your move. We are sure Mike and the team can help you to lighten the load and make your move a smooth transition. A

Are you thinking of moving? Could you use some help?

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Setting up your new home Preparing your house for sale Cleaning: inside & out Rubbish removal/gardening Selling & gifting items Estate Clearance

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Across: * = cryptic clue 1. Direction (2), 3. Feeder (6), 5. Bleat (3), 6. Orientation (6), 9. Sung verse (5), 11. Dress feature (5), 12. Georgia capital city (7), 13. Intention (4), 15. * Report, breaking in type (4), 17. Restriction (5), 18. * Resultant figure, divides court (3), 20. Scaffolder (6), 22. Matures (4), 24. Rents (6), 26. Everyone goes (2, 5), 28. Legal document (4), 29. Adolescents (5), 30. Descend (4) Down: * = cryptic clue 2. * Seeds, heard at times (4), 4. Believe (4), 5. Neat help (anagram – 8), 6. Parking places (7), 7. Verdict (8), 8. * Sounds like a pay increase, resulting from beams, 9. * Coat so rust can’t eat off it (5), 10. Inclination (7), 14. * Sounds like a plea to eat vegetable, 16. Squirmed (8), 19. Exclude (7), 20. Sends onwards (6), 21. Evaluated (6), 23. Bath (3), 25. Team (4) 27. Opening (4) SEE ANSWERS ON PAGE 27.


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My children are coming today My children are coming today. They mean well But they worry. They think I should have a railing in the hall. A telephone in the kitchen. They want someone to come in when I take a bath They really don’t like my living alone. Help me to be grateful for their concern And help them understand that I have to do what I can as long as I can. They’re right when they say there are risks. I might fall. I might leave the stove on. But there is no challenge, no possibility of triumph, no real aliveness without risk. When they were young and climbed trees and rode bicycles and went away to camp, I was terrified. But I let them go, Because to hold them would have hurt them. Now our roles are reversed. Help them to see. Keep me from being grim or stubborn about it . But don’t let them smother me. Author unknown

Retirement villages v rest homes Are you thinking it’s time to downsize but feeling confused about what downsizing might look like for you? Or about the difference between a retirement village and a rest home? Whatever your next step might be, it’s important you know that a retirement village and a rest home are very different and cater to different needs. A retirement village is designed for seniors who are choosing to downsize and who are still be able to live independently or semiindependently. Many villages offer a range of accommodation as well as shared common areas and a range of activities. A rest home is designed for seniors who are no longer able to care for themselves at home and who have higher medical needs. In New Zealand, you can’t choose to go into a rest home. You’ll need to be assessed as requiring care at a level that cannot be provided to you in your home. Many retirement villages offer a ‘continuum of care’, meaning that you can purchase an independent unit now but, if your needs or your health changes, you can transfer to a unit which is either semi-independent or which provides rest home or hospital level care. As a first step, identifying what your

needs are and what’s important to you will be crucial. Do you feel that now is the right time to downsize or have your health needs changed to the extent that you require assistance? What do you need versus what would you like? Are you independent or do you need more help? Do you want to be part of a large village, or would you prefer a smaller, more intimate setting? Having an idea of what is important to you, both now and in the future, will make it easier for you to find an option that best meets your needs, but has as many of the things you would like as well. It's also important that you understand what the costs will be to you whether you are living in a retirement village or a rest home. Will you need a Residential Care Subsidy or Loan, or will you need to fund your costs privately? When you are making a decision about your next step, it’s important you get good advice from a team who understand retirement villages, rest homes and the costs involved so you feel confident in the decisions your making. Please contact us at Fleur McDonald Legal on 03 365 1595 or office@fmlegal.co.nz. Together, we’ll find the best solution to meet your A needs.

Every age adds value by Debra Buckley, CEO, NZ Institute of Management

On the 6th July 1885, Louis Pasteur successfully tested his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. While you think, wow, 1885, the true fascination to me is that immunisation had in fact been presaged by Edward Jenner almost 100 years earlier. Leadership, innovation, passion and purpose at its finest. It does make you wonder in 2085, what big reflections will there be for the 21st Century and will the next generation be able to draw learning from our leadership, did we act with passion and purpose? If not on the grand scale of Louis Pasteur, I am hopeful that within their community or family, there are examples of such leaders. I can tell you something for free, it won't be a contribution from anyone over the age of 50. I am being very tongue in cheek when I say that. This week I saw an advertisement for a recruiter who is specialising in Recruitment for Seniors, great I thought to myself. We are in the middle of a labour crisis and it may encourage those retirees with skills back into a little part-time work. Oh how wrong I was, this ad was targeting those 50 and over. Really, 50! Come on, what is wrong with the world? I don't think I am being sensitive when I say that 50 and senior should never be used in the same sentence. Even if you are set on a retirement age of 65, 50 is middle-aged and given that we cascade into new careers over our working life, 50 is not, under any circumstances,

senior. Louis Pasture was 63 when he experienced his groundbreaking medical advancement. Last time I checked, productivity was based on presenteeism, a sense of belonging, ability to connect, and ultimately the capability of the individual to complete the task. Surely if we are moving into a phase where 50 is the new 65 there is a massive potential untapped workforce. How about considering a few of these measures that have nothing to do with age: • Measuring social currency and belonging to a team • Correlating rates of output to ease staff retention • Benchmarking human capital costs against losing customers • Calculating the impact of leadership style changes on culture • Innovating and creating new knowledge based on shared experiences If we have moved into a phase where 50 is considered senior, then you have not seen the worst of our labour crisis. 85% of our team at NZIM range in age from 50 years to 82 years and there is nothing you could tell me that would make me shift my thinking on this. Experience, a steady mindset, flexible life stage, endless knowledge, commitment,encouragement, willingness, purpose and empathy. Given the complexity of life, can we please just let the dust settle on ageism. Young or mature, we all add value given the right environment. (Reprinted with permission)

Book your advertising for the November 2022 issue of Keeping On. Deadline for ads is Friday, 4th November 2022. Contact Anna-Marie on 331-7804.


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All experience is an arch Getting out and about All Experience is an Arch by Dick Sainsbury. Publisher: Quentin Wilson Publishers April 2022. As my long career as a geriatrician was coming to a close, I reflected how fortunate I had been in my career choice, what interesting older people I had met and what dedicated and skilled health team members I had worked with. Over the years I had collected and published some short stories and vignettes about remarkable old people and how we can learn from them and my friend and colleague Tim Wilkinson encouraged me to expand them into a book. The first Covid lockdown in 2020 gave me the opportunity I needed to do this and in April 2022 the book titled All Experience is an Arch was published. The title comes from Lord Tennyson’s poem Ulysses and reflects one of the themes of the book which is the continuing quest for knowledge, or lifelong learning. Henry Ford observed, “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at 20 or 80. Anyone who keeps learning is young”. I am often asked by people expecting me to give a certain birthday reply, “When do you become old?” While certain ages might have significance, qualification for superannuation or a Gold Card, for example, I prefer to view ‘being old’ in terms of a person’s attitude and outlook. This is certainly the spirit of the poem and was captured by Captain Tom Moore in England during the Covid outbreak. Setting out to walk 100 circuits of his home before his hundredth birthday to raise 1000 pounds for the National Health Service, he ended up raising 35 million pounds! Appropriately he was knighted by the Queen. I have always been fascinated by the life stories older people have shared with me. I have always encouraged them to write them down for the interest of their grandchildren or other people. Some people are reluctant, mistakenly thinking that no-one else would be interested when the reverse is true. Narrative is an important component of health care and gives us a fuller picture of the patient. Another theme of the book is older people in literary works. This has long been an interest of mine as I believe that literature can enrich the practice of health care. As Australian surgeon and ethicist Miles Little put it, ”the preoccupations of literature are the preoccupations of patients and doctors – love and birth and death, pain and loss and suffering, grief, anger and tranquillity, balance and harmony and rhythm”. The latter

‘All Experience is an Arch’, a new book by Dick Sainsbury.

third of my book is therefore devoted to the treatment of ageing and older people by a number of authors and poets. My favourite is the section ‘Wordsworth’s Noble Elders’ in which a number of older people in the poet’s works are introduced. These are characters who maintain calm, dignity and poise in the face of challenging life circumstances. I am hoping that some readers will direct me to other literary works on the subject that I have overlooked or not yet encountered. The topics of maintenance of function and quality of life are also discussed. When an older person becomes unwell or sustains an injury through falling, fractured hip commonly, they often lose function through a process described as ‘deconditioning’. This means some loss of muscle function often accompanied by a feeling of dizziness as the person stands up due to a fall in blood pressure, known as ‘postural hypotension’. It is therefore important to provide rehabilitation and gait retraining so that the person can regain their previous level of function if at all possible. We are endeavouring to maintain the person at the level they were before the illness occurred. This requires the skills of a good multi-disciplinary team. I gained a lot of satisfaction when preparing the book. It brought to mind many memorable older patients, the privilege of working in skilled and happy teams and a reminder of the importance of family/whanau in the support of older people. I hope that people will enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. All Experience is an Arch Is available through a number of bookshops and through Nationwide Book Distributors, Oxford, Canterbury. RRP $37.50.

Getting out and about is vitally important for our mental health and overall wellbeing! It can be a tricky thing to manage however if you are not able to drive, or struggle with public transport. This is where the Total Mobility Scheme (TMS) comes in. It is open to people with a permanent, temporary, or fluctuating disability that prevents them from travelling on buses, trains or ferries, or getting to or from where the public transport starts or ends. Funded by local regional councils, and in conjunction with the NZTA, the TMS provides door to door discounted travel with Driving Miss Daisy, allowing you to travel in a safe, and dignified manner. You’ll need to apply to become a Total Mobility Scheme card holder. There’s a number of different agencies that can help with this, it’s easy to do and your local Age Concern is a good place to start. Once you have been accepted, you can begin to access discounted travel! Your fare is subsidised by 50% per trip, up to a maximum regional subsidy cap. To make getting out and

about even easier, the government are funding an amazing 75% subsidy, which will be in place until the end of January 2023. Driving Miss Daisy are an accredited Total Mobility Scheme Provider. You can be reassured that when you book with us, we will 100% tailor the service to meet your needs. A door-to-door service with us is our “standard”!, and all of our Franchise Owners and Drivers are fully NZTA trained to transport passengers with impairment or disabilities. Many of our ‘Daisies’ can offer a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle on request. They hold a p-Endorsement licence, First Aid Certificate, are Dementia-friendly trained and have additional Police Vetting that includes a Children/ Youth/Elderly and Vulnerable Adult check. Our aim is to provide independence and peace of mind for you and your loved ones. The Total Mobility Scheme helps to make it just that little bit easier. Call us today for a quote and to discuss your requirements. A

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Cheaper and more flexible travel for SuperGold card holders If you use Christchurch’s Metro bus or ferry service to get around town, you’ll no longer need to keep an eye on the clock when out and about. From 1 July 2022, Metro has removed the paid period during weekday afternoons which was previously from 3pm to 6:30pm. This means that SuperGold Card holders can now enjoy free trips on the Metro bus and ferry services from 9am until the end of the day on any weekday. Weekend and public holiday travel on Metro services remains free too. Simply show your physical SuperGold Card to the driver when boarding and be on your way free of charge. Standard fares to also be reduced SuperGold Card holders using the bus before 9am on weekdays still

need to pay a standard adult fare, but there is good news for early birds. The government’s half-price fare discount has been extended to the end of January 2023 which means a standard $2.65 Zone 1 Metrocard

fare is currently only $1.30. The good news continues with Metro’s new fare structure starting from 1 February 2023 following Environment Canterbury’s Annual Plan consultation last year. The

change introduces $2 standard fares and $1 concession fares for all bus services in the Greater Christchurch Area. This brings a standard Zone 3 fare of $4.70 to just $2. Community Service Card holders, total mobility card holders and tertiary students will also be eligible for $1 concession fares once the new fare structure begins next February. Visit metroinfo.co.nz for more information and updates on Metro fares and services. Making the most of cheaper and more flexible travel There are some great places to go and see on the Metro bus and ferry network. Make the most of the golden opportunities your SuperGold Card unlocks.

Wills and their ins and outs People often confuse the term attorney with the term executor. An

attorney is someone that you appoint to act for you while you are alive. This

Protecting you through all stages of life Our friendly and experienced Seniors Law team offers specialised legal advice so you have peace of mind and feel confident when it comes to making decisions that are right for you and your family. Our Seniors Law team can help with: Wills Trusts Funeral Trusts Occupation Right Agreements Enduring Powers of Attorney

Rest Home Subsidies Estate Planning Asset Protection Sale and Purchase of Property

Visit us in our new offices within the Central City, or we can come to you with our home visit service and other alternative locations. Contact Phillipa Shaw P (03) 379 7835 E phillipa.shaw@harmans.co.nz A 79-81 Cashel Street, Central City, Christchurch 8011 www.harmans.co.nz

may be a general power of attorney, in one off situations, for example, if you are going to be away when a document is required to be signed. An enduring power of attorney allows your attorney or attorneys to act if you lose mental capacity. This is important if you have a health issue or accident that leaves you lacking mental capacity and requiring an attorney to make decisions for you. Having enduring powers of attorney set up to cover your personal care and welfare and another to cover property is a key safeguard to protect your wishes if you can no longer make these decisions or communicate them yourself. An attorney’s power to act ends when you die. This is commonly not understood, and some attorneys believe that they can continue to deal with the deceased’s property including the bank accounts. It is another common misconception that money to cover the funeral expenses needs to be withdrawn before the bank accounts are frozen. Firstly, the attorney is no longer authorised to act and secondly it is not necessary as most banks have a process of allowing the payment of funeral expenses before probate is granted by application from the executors or their lawyer. When you die your latest Will becomes effective and the person or persons you have named as executors are able to start their role of dealing with your estate. Your executor’s first duty is to deal with your funeral arrangements. If you

have expressed a wish in your Will for burial or cremation or for a particular service or to not have a funeral service at all, your executors can take these into account. Your executors are not bound to follow the wishes expressed in your Will regarding your funeral arrangements, so it is a good idea to discuss these with the person or persons you are appointing to check that they are agreeable to carrying out your preference. It is also helpful to let the persons you are appointing know where your original Will is held and where you keep a copy. Setting up enduring powers of attorney allows you to decide who you want to act for you while you are alive and particularly for when you cannot make decisions yourself. Without these deeds someone would need to apply to the court to be your welfare guardian and/or property manager if you lost mental capacity. And completing a Will allows you to appoint the people you trust to carry out your funeral wishes and to state how your assets are to be distributed. If you die without a Will someone needs to apply to the High Court to administer your estate and the distribution is set out in a formula in the Administration Act 1969. At Harmans we have a specialist seniors team to help with any queries and to assist you to set up the deeds that best meet your needs. Give Phillipa Shaw a call on 379 7835 to arrange an appointment. A


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South of the Glaciers by Mike Crean

You may want to see Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers before climate change dissolves them. If so, why not go even further south? Exploring all the way to Jackson Bay is well worthwhile. And you never need to get off the tar seal. Travellers often miss interesting places before the glaciers. These include historic gold mining town Ross, the boggy paddock at Hari Hari where the first solo flight from Australia to New Zealand ended abruptly when the plane tipped over and the pilot emerged to a mighty celebration. Gorgeous Waitaha Valley snuggles below Alpine ranges. The quaint settlement of Okarito breathes history while the graceful kotuku (white herons) breed. The glaciers are still worth seeing and all the information you need is available there. While you are at Fox, take the walk around Lake Matheson. Its calm waters mirror Aoraki-Mt Cook in the stillness of morning. Back on Highway 6, Haast beckons and the driving is easy. You glide along avenues of native forest that creep right to the road edges. You cruise beside picturesque lakes. You soar to vantage points above the Tasman Sea. When you are ready for a break, there are places of beauty where you can stop. One is Bruce Bay, where a modern Marae looks over a small beach. Around the bend are relics of a small town. Along the beach, near the Mahitahi River mouth, avid gold seekers dug in the sand for nuggets brought down by the river – but in vain. It was all part of a trick. A successful prospector in the Hokitika area became annoyed by newcomers following him around. So he told them of the vast riches awaiting them at the Mahitahi. They rushed there and started digging. When they found nothing, they rioted, then headed back north. Foolish types, for gold

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Franz Josef glacier to see before climate change dissolves the glacier.

was discovered a while later at the Mahitahi. Bruce Bay was named after an early steamer that operated along the South Westland coast. It sank near the Mahitahi, just one of many shipwrecks in this remote area. Alongside Lake Paringa are several parking places, ideal for opening your Thermos, pouring the tea and savouring the scenery. A little further on is Lake Moeraki, then the highway rises and you reach Knights Point. This is a lookout high above the sea, with magnificent views, plenty of parking space, and clean toilets. Work gangs approaching from north and south met here in 1965, thus completing construction of the Haast Highway. Was Knight’s Point named after the project boss? Not at all.

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Knight was the name of a dog that belonged to a lowly surveyor. That’s Kiwi democracy. Pushing on, you approach Haast and cross the Haast River bridge. The murdered body of foreign tourist Jennifer Beard was found under the bridge. At a time when murders were rare, the 1969 crime revolted New Zealanders. It was never solved. Turn off the highway, to the right, after crossing the bridge. The road ahead takes you to Jackson Bay, 40 minutes away, It passes through several small settlements, some dating from the 1950s and ‘60s when a large depot was established for the highway building project. Concrete leftovers are easy to see. Ships brought machinery and materials into Jackson Bay (some say Jacksons

Bay), reputedly the safest harbour in Westland. With big trucks carrying heavy loads in an area of high rainfall, the road had to be sealed. So, the area inherited a sealed road and a long pier, which are still in use. Climate and remoteness made farming difficult here. Stories tell of European immigrants long ago arriving under false impressions of a Garden of Eden They were almost dragooned to settle and develop the land. Some did. Others absconded. Pathos pervades a little cemetery in the bush on your left, a short distance after you cross the Arawhata bridge. Denis Glover wrote of this river in his popular poem about legendary character, William O’Leary, known as “Arawata Bill”, (written before Maori spelling was taken seriously). As you cross the Arawhata bridge, look upstream and you may glimpse the ghost of O’Leary looming out of the mist, leading his pack horse along the shingle bank. Jackson Bay is named after a ship’s captain who sailed in these waters. The adjacent Jackson Headland shelters it from strong winds. The bay is still used by fishing boats. In the warmer months, a restaurantcaravan serves the best fresh fish meals you will get anywhere. Back to the Highway, turn right and you will soon see the new Haast township on your right. Here is an excellent information centre. When you have seen all you want, you must choose which way to go home – over Haast Pass to Central Otago, or back the way you came.


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Calcium - key nutrient for strong bones Calcium is a major building block of our skeleton and is vital for strong bones. Eating a diet rich in calcium is one of the steps that can help prevent the onset of osteoporosis. Eating a balanced diet that includes foods rich in calcium and vitamin D is important to give your bones the calcium they need. The amount of calcium we need in our diet varies at different stages of our lives. Ninety-nine percent of the 1 kilogram of calcium found in the average adult body resides in our bones. Bone acts as a reservoir for maintaining calcium levels in the

blood, which is also essential for healthy nerve and muscle function.

Natural arthritis and circulation booster Exercise while sitting watching TV or reading. Affordable, effective and so easy. Twelve years ago when a lady from Te Horo devised a means of relieving her husband’s severe arthritic pain, stiff joints and swollen ankles, she didn’t anticipate the demand for her Aircycle. The inflatable cushion, shaped like a pair of feet, allowed her husband to exercise his ankle, knee and hip joints, lower back, wrists, fingers, arms and shoulders while sitting. It was so effective an arthritis educator requested more be made for other sufferers. Word spread and now it’s used by thousands of people here and overseas. The gentle exercises not only help aching joints but hugely improve circulation in legs, feet and hands. Users report swollen ankles, night cramps and restless legs greatly improved. Diabetes related problems are eased. Leg muscles are strengthened and balance improved helping users to walk further with greater confidence. Those who derive the greatest benefit from the Aircycle use it several times a day. "Aircycle is even better than the

information says. The pain in my knees has gone and although I use a walker I don’t need it around the house anymore. I can move more freely and have much less pain in both my hands and feet. My feet are warmer too and now I don’t need bed socks which I’ve worn for years," Gay, Rotorua. “After using for only four days my Uncle’s swollen ankles disappeared before his eyes,” Susan, Cambridge. Aircycle is made in NZ, registered with Medsafe and has a lifetime warranty. Visit www.aircycle.co.nz to see it demonstrated and read testimonials from health professionals and people whose lives have been changed as a result of regular use. Order on line or call Sue in Levin on A 0800 141415.

If you don’t supply your body with the calcium it needs, the body responds by taking calcium from your bones. This leads to Osteoporosis a condition where the density and quality of our bones is reduced, making them weak, brittle and more likely to fracture (break). There are usually no symptoms of osteoporosis until a fracture occurs. Treatment and prevention will normally focus on lifestyle changes and medications to boost bone density. For healthy individuals, the recommended daily calcium intake can be achieved through a healthy diet which contains calcium rich food.

Foods high in calcium include dairy products, dark green vegetables, beans, legumes, fish (especially sardines or salmon which are eaten with the bones), soybean products, cereals and nuts. It is recommended that at least 1000mg of calcium is taken in each day. As a guide, a 250ml glass of milk will provide around 360mg of calcium and a pottle of yoghurt is around 195mg. Other examples of calcium contents include a cup of boiled broccoli (59mg), 100 grams of tofu (105mg), calcium fortified soy drink (286mg), and 10 raw almonds (30mg). Vitamin D is also essential as it promotes absorption of calcium into the bones. Food high in vitamin D includes sardines, tuna, eggs and liver. Regular but moderate exposure to sunlight also helps to produce vitamin D in the body but remember excess sun exposure poses other health risks. For further information on Osteoporosis see www.osteoporosis. org.nz

Osteoporosis New Zealand Our vision is better bones and fewer fractures for New Zealanders. Our mission is to make this happen by engagement with the public, health professionals, policymakers and the private sector, through programmes of awareness, advocacy and education, to prevent fractures caused by osteoporosis. Phone 04 499 4862 or Email info@osteoporosis.org.nz Osteoporosis New Zealand, PO Box 688, Wellington 6140

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* Relieving arthritic and joint pain * Diabetic foot care * Cold hands & feet * Aiding prevention of DVT * Sciatica * Reducing swollen ankles * Stroke rehabilitation * Cramps & restless legs * Parkinsons & MS * Building muscle/preventing falls View and order at www.aircyle.co.nz or phone Sue in Levin on 0800 141415.

Energetic and reliable cleaners are required to clean houses for older adults living in the community. Needed in all areas Casual work only. Payment is on an hourly rate. Drivers licence and an appropriate level of fitness is required.

For more information please phone Deb on 366-0903


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Now is the time to get your second booster A second booster is now available, including for everyone 50 years and older, and immunocompromised people. You can get your second booster 6 months after your first. The second booster lowers your chances of getting very sick from COVID-19. If you’ve had COVID-19, it’s recommended you wait 3 months after testing positive before getting any COVID-19 vaccination. You can book an appointment for a booster dose online at bookmyvaccine.nz or by calling the COVID-19 Vaccination Healthline on 0800 28 29 26.

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New information tool for tenants over 65 who want a warmer home Over 65 and renting? Current house too cold or not easy to heat and looking to move to something easier to heat? CEA Charitable Trust has developed a free checklist for tenants looking for a new home that is warmer, drier and healthy to live in. The checklist is available as a free booklet or a free online tool. Especially when you are getting older, it is important to keep warm at home. A house that is hard to keep warm or that costs you a lot to heat, may not be the best choice for you and if you are renting and considering moving to another house, you may wonder how you know your next home will be better. Although the Healthy Homes Standards go a long way to make sure a rental property is warm and dry for tenants to live in, there is a lot more to keep in mind if you want to rent a place that is warm and

easy to heat. Now the rental market seems to be easing, you may have a bit more choice as a tenant and it

would be very useful to have a look at CEA’s checklist. Sometimes it can be cheaper to have a rental that is slightly dearer in rent but much drier and easier to heat and keeping you healthier. Some examples: Many older style downlight (the little lights that sit flush with the ceiling) cannot have insulation over or even around them which means the ceiling insulation has many holes in it, making it less effective. Homes without an option to vent a dryer to the outside can become very damp. And whether a house has good curtains can make a difference to how much heat is lost through windows. The online tool is available from CEA’s website at www.cea.co.nz/ rental/cea-track-rental-options. The booklet version is available from CEA’s office (16 Leslie Hills Dr, Riccarton), ACTIS (37 Hampshire

Street, Aranui) or the Age Concern office (24 Main North Road, Papanui). You can also order the booklets at www.cea.co.nz/shop (just pay $3 postage and handling). The checklist has been developed with funding from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment under the ‘Support for Energy Education in Communities’ Programme. CEA also offers free insulation for eligible low income homeowners. If you have a Community Services Card endorsed GoldCard or live in an eligible low income area and own the home you live in, you are likely to qualify for free insulation. Free insulation to keep you warmer is much cheaper than treating sick people in hospital so anyone taking up the subsidies is doing their community a favour. Visit www.cea. co.nz or call 0800 GETWARM (0800 4389276) for more information.

Caring for older people primary focus at Enliven At Enliven, we ensure that older New Zealanders have access they need to community-based support from someone to talk to, activities to join in with or help that will ensure a safe, healthy independence at home. The newest service we offer is the Enliven East Christchurch Kaumātua/ Older People service that aims to support the independence, social inclusion, health and wellbeing of our valued kaumātua/older people who live in the East Christchurch suburbs. Our team provides free counselling, social work, advocacy and whānau/ family support. While they will provide emotional support and a listening ear, their main task is to support you through some of your more challenging situations while working with you to develop strategies to overcome the barriers you may be currently encountering. They’ll be a

neutral advocate for kaumātua/older people and their whānau. Clients will be able to talk to one of the team in confidence, be able to discuss their concerns and know that they will be treated with respect and empathy.

Volunteers Needed!

Another Enliven service is HomeShare. HomeShare is a small, personalised service where older people can enjoy companionship and activities in a private home in their own community. At HomeShare older people will enjoy a home-cooked

meal, have a place to share their interests and make friends. HomeShare wouldn’t be possible without our Hosts. They are volunteers who very generously open their homes, providing a place for older people/kaumātua to socialise and share friendship, fun and laughter. Hosts are vital to the success of this service and their commitment and hospitality is second-to-none. Enliven is all about providing services that keep older people/ kaumātua socially connected and promote health and wellbeing. We believe that everyone has the right to age with dignity and to enjoy life to the fullest extent possible. For more information visit www. psuppersouth.org.nz/enliven or call 0800 477 874.

One Stop Mobility & Independence Shop Hire, Sales and Service More Moblity has over 500 products in store to keep you independent * Mobility Scooters * Power Wheelchairs * Standard Wheelchairs * * Walkers/Rollators * Walking Sticks, Canes & Crutches * Rehabilitation Aids * Toilet & Bathroom ware * Lift Chairs * Kitchen & Grooming Aids

Do you want to make a difference and learn new skills? We are currently seeking kind and caring van and day programme assistants, and HomeShare hosts to join our Enliven services across Canterbury. Volunteers are essential to our work in supporting vulnerable older people in our community, so get in touch today! To find out more call Roni Jordan on 03 261 2889, or email ronij@psusi.org.nz

www.psuppersouth.org.nz/enliven

113 Blenheim Road, Riccarton. Christchurch. Ph: 348 3460 or 0800 666222


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Teaching Granny to suck eggs Top tips by June Peka

You have to laugh. Here’s me washing bread bags, crocheting dish cloths, and cooking pea and ham soup on the log burner under laundry that didn’t dry on the outside line. I toast and crumb every crust, mend shopping bags, make ginger beer and compost, and turn citrus peel into fire starters. We collect firewood and cones, buy $1 bags of manure for the garden, keep plastic containers for freezing, and NEVER buy to throw away (except toilet paper) - not because we’re poor people, but we do like to be in charge of our discretionary dollars and it’s a buzz to feel we’re doing our bit for the planet at the same time. There was a time I was extremely grateful for this know-how, handed down from parents and grandparents who lived through world war shortages and the depression. It was almost life-saving stuff as a 17-year-old young married with a baby living in a railway hut with a one-element stove, no hot water and an outside loo in the 1960s – in Papanui Road. We saved for a house deposit in three years. I think of the folk caught up in today’s spiral of unemployment, food and petrol costs, low wages, huge rents, housing availability and the like and hope they have the good advice and mentoring we had. But here’s the laugh. With information virtually at their fingertips, via life hacks, twittering bloggers, and clever young pundits from The Press financial pages, they are offered advice on how to change electricity companies and phone plans, trawl around the supermarkets for use-by dated food and the best specials on baby food, get into audio and ebooks rather than hard copies, and use menstrual cups instead of tampons. And as I

write, we’ve just seen a news clip on food price rises with a young couple bemoaning that it now costs them $37 for pizza and a drink. I talked to a few friends who read this magazine about how they’ve got through hard times, what good advice has stayed with them, and how they’ve adapted it to current living. Edward Benton from Rangiora uses a one-purpose cleaner for everything, sometimes diluted up to 50%. If you have a choice, always use the bathroom closest to the hot water cylinder, he says. He never uses a clothes dryer – preferring a line on the verandah or in the garage. He buys in bulk (including dog food) wherever possible, and finds mixing milk powder cheaper than the cabinet product. With experience in the supermarket business he says to check bread tags for freshness and use slices straight from the freezer.

St Martins Voluntary Library Open: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday from 2.00-4.00pm. Wednesday & Saturday 10.00am-12.00pm We have the latest fiction/non fiction books and large print. Books by - James Patterson, Stephen Leather, Lucinda Riley, Ann Cleeves etc! Yearly subs: $12.00 per person, $18 for double membership.

St Martins Community Centre, Cnr Wilsons Road and Wades Avenue, St Martins. Christchurch.

Avoid the middle height shelves in many displays – the cheapest are at high or low level. Edward uses Youtube clips to deal with repairs and maintenance. John and Liz Veix from Rolleston are seriously into sustainability at all levels. They garden and add free coffee grounds from cafes and service stations into their compost. They reuse the blank side of paper for lists, notes, recipes etc. Liz searches opshops for wool to knit for charities and makes draught excluders from old trousers. They have some meatless meals using lentils and pulses. They turn off lights when leaving a room, and John says it’s good practice to switch off “phantom loads” (microwave, computer, TV, oven, dishwasher) at the wall. Over a year, these appliances mount up on your electricity bill, he says. Fran Clarkson from Rolleston makes bread from scratch – no packet mixes. She can turn out an accompanying hearty meal from a packet of Maggi soup, a can of creamed corned and a beaten egg. Extras might include peppers, chillies and herbs she grows from seed, as they are seasonal and expensive to buy. She bottles and freezes the fruit from a blackboy peach tree in a nearby reserve. Robyn Melrose from Christchurch remembers visiting her father’s friends who put cardboard against the windows before pulling the drapes, similar to the bubble wrap some use today to insulate glass. She makes and freezes sandwiches to turn into toasties for visitors and quick lunches. She recommends using smaller towels in winter, for less laundry and quicker drying.

Edward Benton. His TOP TIP: Boil a jug for morning wash and shave and small amounts of dishes.

Fran Clarkson. Her TOP TIP:Cook enough for two meals, for tomorrow's dinner or to freeze.

South Elder Care We provide a programme for older people living in South Christchurch who are suffering from: * Dementia * A disability or mental health related issue * Loneliness * A need for social support. We offer: * Morning tea and a home cooked lunch * Social interaction and fun * Bowls, croquet and Rummy-O * A chance to keep up with daily news * Gentle exercises and walks * Quizzes.

Robyn Melrose. Her TOP TIP: Make and freeze sandwiches for toasties for quick lunches and visitors.

Tuesdays, 10.00am to 2.30pm at St Martins Presbyterian Church, 43 St Martins Road. For more information contact Jeanette on 027 323 0256 or email southeldercare@gmail.com

Liz and John Veix. Her TOP TIP: Draw curtains at sunset, open at sunrise. His TOP TIP: Come and visit the Sustainability Expo at Rolleston, January 2023.


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Memories “The richest bank of all is our memory bank. For years we deposited experiences there. Now we can withdraw them. The interest accruing is our enjoyment.” by Mike Crean

It was the saddest sight I had ever seen. In a large section of a Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery, in Egypt, were the headstones of 1108 New Zealand soldiers. The New Zealand fern was inscribed on each headstone, indicating the remains of a Kiwi killed in battle. These men were victims of a famous World War II battle. They will be remembered during the 80th anniversary of the Second Battle of El Alamein, this October. Few, if any, Kiwi veterans of the battle remain. Allied troops had struggled to advance in the North African desert

Commonwealth war graves at El Alamein.

from 1940 until late-1942. By then, enemy forces had over-extended their supply lines in their drive to reach the Suez Canal. At El Alamein, the Allies turned the German and

Italian forces into retreat. New Allied commander General Montgomery “drew a line in the sand” at a remote desert railway siding. “Monty” freshened and re-supplied his troops. Then, in the darkness of 23rd October, 1942, he launched a mighty artillery bombardment, followed by a massed Allied advance. After two weeks of battle, the enemy began its retreat across the desert. New Zealanders had played a large part in the fighting. The sight of the Kiwis’ graves – the price of victory – brought tears to my eyes. Then, walking among the graves, I sobbed to see a young

Maori soldier on his knees, weeping, and embracing a headstone. Perhaps he had found a relative of his. More tears were shed as I saw headstones bearing no soldiers’ names. They read: “Known only to God”. These were the remains of soldiers so mutilated that they could not be identified. Such is war. Such is why it should never happen again. Such is why we should remember it. A fifty per-cent pacifist, I attended the 70th anniversary of the battle, at El Alamein in 2007, as a journalist, with an army contingent and a group of veterans of the North Africa Campaign.

Navigating the numerous challenges facing us It’s been one of the coldest and wettest winters on record so I hope you’ve been keeping warm in body and spirit, perhaps with all the activities and events on offer in Christchurch or with visits from family and friends. I’m sure many of you have also been putting the government’s Winter Energy Payment to good use. This is just one example of how the Labour government is helping all New Zealanders to navigate the numerous challenges facing us at the moment - there are plenty of others to warm the heart. The cost of living pressures confronting New Zealanders are front and centre of our actions at the moment. While we can’t control external factors driving cost increases, the Labour government has extended successful

interventions and is implementing a range of new measures with the dual aim of providing short-term financial relief and long-term protection. Recently we extended the reductions on fuel excise tax, road user charges and public transport until January 2023. A large proportion of New Zealanders also received the first of three cost of living payments at the beginning of August. These measures help with essential costs and ease the pressure on household budgets. Similarly, we continue to focus on reducing the cost of groceries at supermarkets! We’ve stopped the supermarkets from blocking their competitors’ access to land to set up new stores which will pave the way for greater competition in the grocery sector. There’s more work to come

on this front. We know how valuable senior employees are and we want to encourage and support anyone over 50 to add their skills and experience to New Zealand’s workforce. To that end, we’ve launched the Older Workers Employment Action Plan, which focuses on training and upskilling, finding and staying in work, supporting employers to be more inclusive, and planning for the effects and opportunities of an aging workforce. I’m especially pleased that we are doing more to support our New Zealand seniors. Minister for Seniors Dr Ayesha Verrall also announced funding for 11 projects to prevent elder abuse. This funding is over and above the funding for new prevention initiatives announced in Budget 2022 and

includes a nationwide study to be undertaken by the University of Otago that aims to improve detection of abuse in older people. One in 10 older people experience elder abuse in New Zealand but the Labour government is committed to reducing this troubling statistic. As always, if my team or I can help you in anyway, or if you’d like to raise an issue that’s affecting our community, please do get in touch. We’re here to help. You can reach me and the team at Tracey. McLellanMP@parliament.govt.nz or on 03 376 4512, or by popping in to our office at 642 Ferry Road, Woolston. In the meantime I hope you all keep safe, healthy and warm for the remainder of winter - spring is A just around the corner!

We're here to help Please get in touch if you need any assistance.

Tracey McLellan

Duncan Webb

Megan Woods

Poto Williams

MP for Banks Peninsula

MP for Christchurch Central

MP for Wigram

MP for Christchurch East

Sarah Pallett MP for Ilam

03 376 4512 Tracey.MclellanMP@parliament.govt.nz 642 Ferry Road, PO Box 19 661

03 366 5519 chchcentral@parliament.govt.nz 282-290 Durham Street North, Christchurch Central PO Box 1096, Christchurch 8140

03 338 6347 Megan.WoodsMP@parliament.govt.nz Shop 8, McCarthy Street Shops Corner of McCarthy Street & Rowley Ave, Hoon Hay

03 382 0288 Poto.Williams.MP@parliament.govt.nz Level 1, Eastgate Shopping Centre PO Box 18898, Christchurch 8641

0800 727 244 Sarah.ilamMP@parliament.govt.nz Shop 5, 376 Ilam Road, Bryndwr, Christchurch PO Box 36195, Christchurch 8146

Authorised by Tracey McLellan, 642 Ferry Road, Woolston


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Innovative care suites available now at Rhodes on Cashmere

Home suite home Room to move, with all the care you need. Are you looking for a fresh approach to aged care? Now you can discover the care suites at Arvida’s Rhodes on Cashmere over-65’s community. Located on the lower slopes of the Cashmere Hills, (former site of Rhodes Memorial Hospital), these spacious studio and one-bedroom care suites express Arvida’s Attitude of Living Well TM by providing person-centred care within a family-style environment.

To find out more or take a look today, call Karen Mullaly on 03 332 3240 or 021 830 331 or email sales@rhodesoncashmere.co.nz 5 Overdale Drive, Cashmere, Christchurch. rhodesoncashmere.co.nz


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Who thought of that?

An unusual sight at the mall

by Liz Sugrue, Age Concern Canterbury

We so often use phrases in our everyday speech that we don’t think twice about. They often have very interesting origins. I love finding out who said it first or how it come about. These are my latest etymological finds. And in the spirit of Fathers’ Day I have followed a nautical theme for my seafaring father who lives on his yacht. A slush fund. In the old days on sailing ships the staple fare was salted beef or pork that was boiled in a big old pot and the fat or slush was scooped off the top and kept aside for sailors to spread on their hard biscuits, a bit like butter. At the end of a voyage any left over slush would be sold by the cook (often called Slushy!) and the funds would be used for treats for the crew. Pipe down. Ships crew received a variety of signals from the boatswain’s pipe. One signal was “piping down the hammocks”, which instructed the crew to go below decks and prepare for sleep. Toe the line. Members of the British navy were required to stand barefoot and at attention for inspection. They lined up along the seams of the planks on the deck with their toes touching the line. This became known as “toeing” the line. So this is a sentence my father could have said while I was growing up; “There is no slush fund so pipe down and toe the line!” (This was possibly shouted when he was “three sheets to the wind.”)

Elephant washing at Riccarton Mall in the 1970s. Photo by Peter Scott (see Peter’s story on page 19)

Get creative at WEA Thinking of downsizing? Research shows that art has substantial benefits as you age in terms of helping you to retain neural connectivity, cognitive function and memory. Making art or talking about art as an older person helps reduce common symptoms of dementia. (National Endowment of the Arts with National Institute of Health). The joy from art is proven, with a 10% increase in blood flow to the brain, especially in the pleasure centres, a similar reaction to falling in love. (The University College of London). Creative activities can also contribute toward reducing stress and depression. (American Journal of Health). Our classes, talks and workshops in the arts are designed for beginners, with a welcoming atmosphere. Our tutors excel at introducing beginners

to techniques and skills that will help you flourish. So why not try an art or crafts course and tap into your creative side? Register online at www.cwea.org.nz, grab a brochure from your local library or chat with us at WEA, 59 Gloucester Street. In Picasso’s words “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life”. A

CANTERBURY WORKERS EDUCATIONAL ASSCOCIATION ROOPU KAIMAHI MATAURANGA O WAITAHA

What will you create? Art History, Calligraphy, Drawing & Painting Classes or Workshops Your space to be creative & draw inspiration from others in a central location

59 Gloucester St, Chch Enrol at www.cwea.org.nz or call us on 03 366 0285

Thinking of downsizing, moving to a village or curious about the value of your home in the current market? Cathy and Ian Falconer at Mike Pero Real Estate are the ones to call for free, no obligation advice about your home. Cathy and Ian understand and relate to the process of downsizing and moving to a retirement village having assisted both their mothers through this process in the last five years. They are with their vendors every step of the way and go above and beyond to ensure their vendors have a smooth transition from their home to a village or smaller unit. See below a recent testimonial from a vendor’s son: Cathy was key to the successful sale of my mum's home. Mum was moving into a retirement home, so not only was timing and pricing

important, but supporting mum in a caring way was necessary. Mum had to down-size considerably, and Cathy offered endless help to sort out her possessions and keep her on track - and that wasn't a small task. Cathy communicated with us well throughout the sales process. The whole family thanks you Cathy and Ian. Moving to a retirement village is a big decision and one that can take time as vendors consider what option best suits them for their lifestyle after selling their home. Cathy and Ian pride themselves on their personable service and together with a network of experienced professionals can help you start this daunting process. Call to see how they can assist you Cathy 0276601920 or Ian 0278490404 or Freephone 0800 888 426 A


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Warming up for the warmer months with Arvida Good Friends As the weather warms up, it’s a great opportunity to become more active and improve your overall health. The Community Living Well Centre in Addington offers a range of activities and membership options to older people. You’ll get a warm welcome and tour of the impressive centre from Manager Vanessa and Living Well Advisor Alex. From aquarobics to line dancing, yoga to tai chi sessions, there are plenty of activity options to keep active for a variety of fitness levels. Walking Group Don’t forget the walking group continues every Thursday afternoon for members and non-members (just $5). You can expect walks to parks and gardens around the city, then it’s back to the Community Living Well Centre for a coffee and healthy treat. DigiKiwis DigiKiwis is an exciting initiative that pairs volunteer young people with older adults who need some extra assistance with their phone, tablet or personal computer. You can find DigiKiwis every Saturday from

10.00am in the Community Living Well Centre. Arvida Good Friends in Christchurch gives older Cantabrians support to stay living well at home for longer. Not only is there a community centre, there’s also private home help and home care support, as well as Good Friends Go - their members’ rideshare transport service for appointments, shopping and socialising. To find

out more about memberships and to book a tour, call 0800 20 41 20, or visit goodfriends.co.nz The Arvida Good Friends Community Centre is open Monday to Saturday from 8.00am until 4.30pm. The centre can be found at 47 Whiteleigh Avenue, Addington (parking on-site and gate connection A to Show Place).

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Just a thought

“Know that you are the perfect age. Each year is special and precious, for you shall only live it once. Be comfortable with growing older.” Louise Hay

KEEP ON TOP OF YOUR GAME MEMBERSHIP

Stay active and strong with a Moving Well membership at the Arvida Good Friends Community Centre in Addington. Enjoy a personalised plan in our specialist 50+ gym, as well as access to our pool, spa and classes 6 days a week. All supervised by qualified exercise scientists. Get a member discount at the café after your workout too. To become a member call 0800 20 41 20 or visit goodfriends.co.nz today.

$20 A WEEK Subscription benefits include: — Access to the Living Well Centre gym, pool and spa — An exercise plan tailored to your needs — Four assessments per year — Free member access to all Living Well activities and classes like aquarobics, tai chi, line dancing, strength and balance and brain gym.

Keep doing you


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Christchurch South Men’s Group Come join our Christchurch South Men’s group for a once-a-month afternoon tea outing to a local Working Men’s Club, RSA or café. Transport is available or you can drive and meet the group. Fond memories of old Christchurch to be shared. Great fun to be had by all! Contact Katie Faithful on 331 7801 or Debbie Garraway on 331 7814.

VOLUNTEERS OF THE MONTH

Men’s groups are proving popular.

Companion Walking Service A service for people who find it difficult getting out and about on their own. Would you like to be able to go for a walk in your community? Our walking companions service provides oneon-one assistance for people who are finding it difficult to get out and about on their own. Walks are personalised to your interests & abilities. Our carefully chosen volunteers are vetted, fully trained and supported to ensure you receive a safe and enjoyable experience.

June 2022 Jenny Brunton, Minibus Host, Social Connection Service July 2022 Gordon Osten, Minibus Driver, Social Connection Service August 2022 Elsie Hartley, Visitor, Visiting Service September 2022 Jill and Harry Crossland, Minibus Hosts, Social Connection Service

VOLUNTEERS WANTED FOR SOCIAL OUTINGS

24 Main North Road, Papanui, Christchurch. P (03) 366-0903, Freephone 0800 80 33 44 E team@ageconcerncan.org.nz www.ageconcerncan.org.nz

WOULD YOU LIKE MORE COMPANY?

Hostts d Hosts, drivers rii ers and dd drivers’ rii ers’’ assistants assiisttantts needed need ded d for our well-loved Social Outings Service.

The Visiting Service at Age Concern Canterbury has caring volunteers who are keen to spend time with an older person. Our volunteers visit on a regular basis for about an hour each week. They tell us that they enjoy the opportunity to get to know an older person, and that they benefit and learn from the experience.

Please call Rebecca on 331 7816 if you would like to find out more.

Drivers transport clients in our minivans to a morning or afternoon tea in and around Christchurch, supporting them to make new friends. No special licence required. Casual basis. Hosts provide a morning or afternoon tea on a monthly or casual basis to a group of 5-9 clients. Drivers’ assistants support the drivers and help clients.

Please contact Katie Faithful on 331 7801 or Debbie on 331 7814 for more information. Email k.faithful@ageconcerncan.org.nz or dgarraway@ageconcerncan.org.nz

Social Connection Team – Age Concern Canterbury

Proof Read

Phone 366 0903 or www.ageconcerncan.org.nz For the Visiting Service ask for Rebecca Hopgood, Peter McGrath or Emma Parker. For Social Outings ask for Katie Faithful orAnna-Marie Debbie Garraway. Deirdre Hazel


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Peter Scott - news photographer by Deirdre McGrath, Age Concern Canterbury

The Age Concern Visiting Service is a befriending service that matches older people who are lonely or socially isolated with volunteers who are keen to spend time getting to know them, and get to know them they do! Our visitors are often amazed by the interesting lives that many of our clients have led. Peter Scott is one such client and his visitor Gaynor James was keen for us to talk to Peter and share his story in Keeping On, and I am very glad we did. Peter was born and educated in Christchurch, he attended school in Addington and Shirley and went onto Shirley Intermediate which, at the time, consisted of two prefab buildings on the swampy ground that was later to become Shirley Boys’ High School. He’d always had an interest in photography – an interest that ran in the family. His grandfather had built a dark room under the stairs in his Lyttelton home and his mother had worked in a darkroom for a short time. He was intrigued by the thought of a career in photography after reading a book at school about a news cameraman which he can still recall some 75 years later – Bob Lane, News Camerman. Peter was quick to jump at the opportunity to work as a news photographer on a Christchurch Star community newspaper. Some

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Community Award for Gaynor

Peter Scott, right, always had a keen interest in photography.

years later that led to him taking up a job as the Chief News Photographer with the Marlborough Express in Blenheim. Peter and his wife Eileen enjoyed their time in Blenheim and Peter enjoyed the range of stories he got to cover across the Marlborough District. Sadly, they only stayed in Blenheim for three years as Eileen’s health required a move back to Christchurch, closer to family and friends. On his return to Christchurch Peter had a variety of jobs including one which involved picking up and delivering brand new Mercedes cars around New Zealand. Eileen died shortly after the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes. About three years ago Peter moved from the home he shared with Eileen in New Brighton to

a new build flat in nearby Parklands. When I went to take his photo with my phone, Peter commented on the many changes he has seen in his life and particularly in the newspaper industry, where technically skilled jobs like typesetters and photographers are becoming obsolete. “In fact, newspapers are disappearing too,” he said. However, Peter doesn’t let such thoughts get him down and has a great philosophy on life. Despite debilitating arthritis he looks after himself (and his cat) well in his warm and cosy Parklands home, and says “It’s no use complaining.” He has good support around him and looks forward to his weekly visits with Gaynor.

current Council. Residents feel like they are being ignored. “It is time for change, and Papanui needs a strong local voice, one that isn’t tied to a political party,” she says. “It’s time to introduce new faces, fresh energy and a more inclusive way of doing things. If we want our

communities to thrive in the future we need sensible local solutions to today’s challenges – smarter spending, appropriate climate action, and better engagement with the community. “I will be a councillor who listens. This is your city, your rates, and your

Emma Norrish and Gaynor James.

We are proud to celebrate with our volunteer Gaynor James who received a Community Service Award from the Waipapa/ Papanui Innes Community Board in June. Board Chair, Emma Norrish, joined us for morning tea to present Gaynor with her award. Gaynor is both a volunteer visitor and driver's assistant for our outings. Clients enjoy her friendly personality and conversation. When asked why she enjoyed the volunteer role so much Gaynor said "Well I like meeting and talking to people and I love going out for coffee, so why wouldn't you!" Thank you so much Gaynor for all you do for Age Concern Canterbury.

Victoria, a positive change for Papanui

Victoria Henstock, Independent Council Candidate for Papanui, is hard to miss with her smiling face on almost every prominent corner in Papanui. A strong advocate for local communities and families, Victoria has served on various school boards, charitable trusts and worked extensively with Women’s Refuge, and Community Law Centres. Victoria is concerned about the future of local democracy, the 3-Waters Scheme, and looming reforms for local government. With a background in law and executive leadership working with central and local government and Iwi, she will be a strong voice for Papanui and Christchurch. Since announcing her candidacy she has had hundreds of conversations with locals frustrated at the performance of our current Council. This is no surprise given the results of the recent council satisfaction survey showing public confidence in this Council has plummeted to its lowest level ever. Our City deserves better. “A good example is the Papanui Harewood cycleway proposal. Local residents are opposed to the overengineered and expensive option that has been pushed through by the

voice must be heard.” Victoria is a pragmatic and strategic thinker. She is not afraid to have tough conversations, and will bring a mix of vision, practical decision-making, professionalism, and experience to A the table. www.victoriahenstock4papanui.org

A positive change for Papanui Listen to the community Fix what’s broken Sensible spending No more over engineered cycleways DECISIVE - NO NONSENSE - FUTURE FOCUSED Authorised by V Henstock: victoria4papanui@gmail.com


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A tale of many Covids at Age Concern Canterbury by Deirdre McGrath, Age Concern Canterbury

Working in the Health environment we were all very aware of the impact the virus could have on our organization, our clients and the services we provide. We had taken all protection necessary to prevent the spread; mandating that staff and volunteers were all vaccinated, providing staff and volunteers with ample supplies of masks and sanitizers, working from home and in separate teams, when necessary. Despite all precautions the Covid 19 virus hit Age Concern Canterbury like a sledgehammer at the end of March. However, unlike Robbie Burns’ mousie, Omicron was no “tim’rous beastie”, and once it snuck into Age Concern Canterbury it spread quickly

and with varying degrees of intensity. Some staff suffered nothing more than a mild cold, others were distinctly unwell for a couple of days and a few others were really knocked for six and required more than the seven compulsory “at home” days to recover.

Family members have also been affected by the isolation requirements, and it is strange how some staff members still haven’t succumbed despite working (and living) side by side with the “infected”. And it still goes on... Those who hadn’t succumbed then

have also slowly become infected, and not a week has gone by when there isn’t someone not at work due to their own illness or as a household contact. What it showed us is that Covid 19 can be felt in many ways and everyone’s experience is different. It is still about in the community, and with winter ills and the threat of influenza as well, it is important that we continue to take precautions. Ensure that your vaccinations for flu and Covid 19 are up to date, continue to wear a mask in crowded indoor situations, and make use of hand sanitizer. These measures can help minimize the spread of the virus and its impact on our family and friends.

Cancer screening programmes Toil and trouble for Kiwi Trusts can lead to early intervention In New Zealand approximately 25,000 people are diagnosed with cancer each year. Cancer is more common among older people. As our population ages and grows and our lifestyles change, the number of New Zealanders with cancer is predicted to increase by 40% over the next decade. If cancer is detected early before it has a chance to spread the outcomes are likely to be more positive and treatment more effective. One of the benefits to screening is that it can identify cancer early before you have any symptoms. New Zealand has the following nationwide screening programmes in place for cervical, breast and bowel cancer: · Free mammograms are offered every two years to eligible women aged 45 to 69 years; · Cervical screening tests are offered every three years to women aged between 25 and 69 years;

New disclosure requirements introduced by the Inland Revenue · Bowel screening kits are sent Department (IRD) for domestic trusts via post every two years to eligible will almost certainly affect all family people aged 60 to 74 years, identified trusts. The new disclosure requirements through a national register. apply to all domestic trusts with If you are a male over 50, your doctor will likely talk to you about assessable income over $200. There is a silver lining, though. If getting checked for prostate cancer. A your trust is considered to be ‘passive’ blood test that can detect the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) – one that earns an income of $200 in your blood is available. A high or less in a financial year - it does PSA reading can be an indication of not have to meet the new disclosure cancer. Your doctor is the best person requirements, provided, a non-active to advise you on your screening declaration is made for the trust. Your options and there is a helpful online accountant will need to fill this in and tool at kupe.net.nz. file it with the IRD. Regardless of age, checking your Trusts can be used to protect assets skin regularly for new spots or moles from being at risk because of debts, or changes to them is also important. business liabilities, relationship For information and advice on skin cancer checks, visit the Cancer breakdowns, and to help arrange the distribution of assets to younger Society website www.cancer.org.nz. If you have any signs, symptoms family members in the future – but or concerns, discuss these with your these days, administering a trust is a doctor immediately. Don’t wait for your complicated business. The law is constantly changing and next screening test, be proactive, be eroding the protection that a trust has A seen now.

traditionally afforded, so it’s important to regularly review the purpose of your trust and ask yourself if it is still relevant for today and carries out the purpose it was intended for. Divesting your assets to a trust means those assets are no longer yours and cannot just be given away under your will. They can only be distributed by the trustees, according to the terms in the trust deed. To work well, a trust should be backed up by a will. Your will should be written to compliment the trust and a memorandum of wishes should accompany both the trust and the will. That way, the entire package is wrapped up tight so that you get the outcome you want. Trust Management Services can help you manage your trust. Our online Trustee Management Selfassessment Tool at aspiringlaw. co.nz/TMSA can also help you evaluate how well you’re doing when it comes to administering your trust. A

Your local law firm, wherever you are

Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.

Cancer doesn’t stop, and with your help we won’t either. Donate now at your local Cancer Society centre or www.daffodilday.org.nz

No matter what life throws at you. An Enduring Power of Attorney or an EPA gives a person you appoint, the authority to act on your behalf if you can’t, due to sickness, an accident, or something else, during your lifetime. Use our online tool to get started. aspiringlaw.co.nz/EPA

0800 277 529


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Fire and Emergency NZ offers free home fire safety visits Fire and Emergency New Zealand offers free Home Fire Safety Visits to people, family and whanau who require fire safety advice. This includes: * Checking smoke alarms and providing advice on where they should be installed and how they should be maintained. We can also install free smoke alarms for

qualifying homes. * Talking through escape plans and ensuring that everyone can get out of the home quickly and safety in the event of a fire, and that you have an agreed safe meeting place. * Discussing fire safety to ensure we cook, heat and live in our homes safely.

Talk on Home Fire Safety from Fire and Emergency NZ Come and hear Fire and Emergency NZ talk about free Home Fire Safety visits.

Thursday, 29th September from 2.00pm to 3.00pm. Age Concern Canterbury Seminar Room, Age Concern Canterbury, 24 Main North Road, Papanui. Christchurch 8053. Limited numbers RSVP by Monday, 26th September on 366 0903.

Arthritis pain relief that works in minutes Florentine Gold All Natural Harmony Body and Joint Rub is an amazing product with so many uses and benefits. You can purchase this online by visiting our website www. florentinegold.co.nz or email us at info@florentinegold.co.nz * Made with all natural mineral crystal salts and essential oils. * Excellent for sensitive skin - no harmful additives. * Contains Omega 3 and Omega 6. * Easy absorption, non greasy, biodegradable, ozone friendly. * Vegan and cruelty free certified. The All Natural Harmony Body and Joint Rub is wonderful for all types of pain relief including peripheral neuropathy sensory ataxia, gout, neck and shoulder pain and stiffness, headaches, migraines, pulled and strained muscles and tennis elbow and much much more. Also gives relief to some skin conditions including acne, eczema and psoriasis. It is excellent for sore throats and toothache (for

external use only), speedy recovery from migraine headaches, for the relief of sunburn and takes the itch from mosquito bites. The 200ml bottle of Florentine Gold Natural Harmony Body and Joint Rub is couriered to your door for $46.50 and $36.50 for the 100ml bottle. There is an additional charge of $6.00 for Rural Delivery. THERE’S A SURPRISE IN EVERY BOTTLE with a dose of scepticism: “I tried the Body and Joint Rub for my damaged cervical spine and carpal tunnel and joint problems. It freed up and alleviated the pain and increased mobility almost immediately. With Allodynia, a nerve condition, and head injury symptoms, I then tried it on my scalp and to my joy and surprise it stopped the nerve over stimulation. I am now using it daily. Indebted to Florentine Gold for providing such a great product.” John S. Canterbury. 1st July 2022

?9ŔTŖ PPX8 Ŗh?XLŖ P8?0 Ŗ 2 L8PŖ L Ŗ b?L0&9 b ŔL Ŗ$ L ŖT?Ŗ$ 2I ƚ ŶŽ ĐŽƐƚ ƚŽ LJŽƵ͕ ǁĞ ĂƌĞ ŚĂƉƉLJ ƚŽ ǀŝƐŝƚ LJŽƵƌ ŚŽŵĞ ĂŶĚ͗ ϭ͘ ŚĞĐŬ ĞdžŝƐƚŝŶŐ ƐŵŽŬĞ ĂůĂƌŵƐ ƚŽ ĞŶƐƵƌĞ ƚŚĞLJ ǁŽƌŬ ĂŶĚ ĂƌĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƌŝŐŚƚ ƉůĂĐĞƐ͘ Ϯ͘ /ŶƐƚĂůů ŶĞǁ ƐŵŽŬĞ ĂůĂƌŵƐ ŝĨ ƌĞƋƵŝƌĞĚ͘ ϯ͘ DĂŬĞ ƐƵƌĞ ƚŚĂƚ LJŽƵ Θ LJŽƵƌ ŚŽŵĞ ĂƌĞ ƐĂĨĞ ϰ͘ ,ĞůƉ LJŽƵ ŵĂŬĞ ĂŶ ĞƐĐĂƉĞ ƉůĂŶ͘ ϱ͘ Ăůů ϬϴϬϬ ϲϵϯ ϰϳϯ Žƌ ĞŵĂŝů ĂŶƚĞƌďƵƌLJͲ ZZdĞĂŵΛĨŝƌĞĂŶĚĞŵĞƌŐĞŶĐLJ͘Ŷnj Λ ΛĨŝƌĞĂŶĚĞŵĞƌŐĞŶĐLJ͘Ŷnj ƚŽ Ŭ Ă ǀŝƐŝƚ͘

All Natural Harmony Body & Joint Rub Great for all manner of joint and muscle stiffness, sprains and strains and dry flaky skin. EXCELLENT FOR SENSITIVE SKIN Phone: 027 517 2347 Email: info@florentinegold.co.nz www.florentinegold.co.nz Natural Harmony Body & Joint Rub is $46.50 for 200ml and $36.50 for 100ml and includes delivery with an addiitonal $6.00 for rural delivery. You can purchase by visiting our website www.florentinegold. co.nz, by emailing us at info@florentinegold.co.nz or by phoning us on 0275172347. TESTIMONIAL

“Thank you. Thank you. I started using the Florentine Gold All Natural Body and Joint Rub on the 6 April 2022. This is the first time in nearly 7 years that I have been pain free. I have osteoarthritis in my lumbar spine region and am waiting for a hip replacement. A friend rang me to tell me about your product - she had just discovered it. I will be recommending it to others that I know who have trouble with pain. Once again, thank you so much.” Ann Mason, Waikato 2022

The All Natural Harmony Body & Joint Rub would make a wonderful present for family and friends.


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New Health Promoter for Age Concern Canterbury Hi everyone. My name is Anna Tillman and I am the newest addition to the Age Concern Canterbury Team, having started as the new Health Promotor at the beginning of July. I am still learning as I go, but I’m loving the work and the challenges and especially the wonderful people I have met so far! I have a background in Physiotherapy where I primarily specialised in treating stroke patients. Keeping healthy and assisting others to achieve and maintain their best health is very important to me. I met my English husband 30 years ago in England and managed to convince him to move back to NZ(thank goodness!) We have 3 adult children, 2 boys and a girl, with our youngest nearly 21. We also

Anna Tillman, Health Promoter

have a very active 11year old border collie called Pippa. We lead quite a busy life but any spare time is taken up mountain biking and walking in our wonderful Port Hills, gardening, travelling, and catching up with family and friends.

Living with independence and confidence At SECURELY, we believe staying connected with your loved ones doesn’t mean you have to check in with them each day. Giving everyone the freedom to live their best lives, while knowing we’re all safe provides peace of mind for all. Introducing Canterbury sales agent Jonathan Sibbles has joined the SECURELY team as a sales agent for Canterbury. Jonathan brings with him over 30 years of experience in the health and disability sector. With his warm and empathetical manner, Jonathan can guide you through the features of a SECURELY medical alarm and find the best solution for you or those you care for. SECURELY provides options to support seniors in doing this from the SECURELY GO for those who want to be covered when they leave home, go on holiday, or to lunch with friends. SECURELY FAMILY provides not only the senior with peace of mind of being able to seek help if needed but also for their family by being able to receive daily activity updates by text message. All alarms are connected to our SECURELY certified Monitoring

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Jonathan Sibbles, Master Sales Agent for SECURELY Medical Alarms

Centre, based in Levin, which operates 24 hours a day 7 days a week. SECURELY is New Zealand-owned and operated and we are passionate about delivering the best service to our seniors and their families to enable them to remain independent for as long as possible. SECURELY is an accredited provider of medical alarms by the Ministry of Social Development and a member of the Telecare Services Association NZ (TSANZ) and a certified member of the New Zealand Security Association (NZSA). If you want to know more or book a no-obligation home visit call Jonathan today on 021 438 067.

Medical alarms th hat leave the th that others oth thers hers behind behi be ehind nd

Habitat for Humanity offers a Home Repairs programme with Interest free repayments. The programme is supported by the Bank of New Zealand, and helps low income families back on track with their home maintenance. For affordable and interest free repayments from the homeowner over five years, Habitat carries out the most urgent home repair projects, often relating to weathertightness, accessibility, heating and safety issues. Find out more about the Home Repair Programme: www.habitat.org.nz/contact/christchurch or phone 03 420 4342 or email christchurch@habitat.org.nz

Personal driving service for Christchurch Getting out and about and doing the things you have always done are important parts of keeping independent. Freedom Companion Driving offers a safe, trustworthy and caring service that is about much more than just transport. While we are well-known in the North Island, we have expanded into the South Island, more specifically in Christchurch. Freedom Companion Driving is able to provide a friendly, reliable service offering standard transport as well as a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle capable of transporting both manual and larger power wheelchairs. “We love to support the local community and our service is designed to provide personalised transport and assistance to anyone needing a bit of extra help getting from A to B. We specialise in driving seniors and trips cover a wide range of outings including the usual medical and business appointments as well as shopping or just a nice afternoon out with a friend or two. Our wheelchair accessible vehicle

is a larger hoist model with plenty of headroom for taller passengers to travel in comfort,” says local owner Julian. “Travelling with Freedom is like riding with trusted friends or family. You can enjoy building a relationship with a very small team of drivers who you will get to know and trust,” adds Julian. Freedom prices are competitive and comparable to, and often less than, other options or standard taxi services. Our service is highly personalised to your needs with a convenient pick up and drop off at your front door. We always escort you to the car and to your destination and we always go ‘the extra mile’. We take Total Mobility cards (TM) and we are ACC Registered Vendors. All our drivers are fully licensed and NZ Police checked for your protection. Our service is pre-booked and prequoted. To find out more please give Julian a call on (03) 352-1599 or 027 364 6877. A

Transport you can trust - Christchurch

Do you need a reliable, friendly driver you can get to know? * Extra care for seniors * Medical appointments * Social and sightseeing * Shopping trips * Airport transfers * Business appointments * Pets to the vet

Call Dean Stewart on 03 352-1599 or 027 364 6877


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SWELL - Ageing well in Selwyn Held annually in October, SWELL – Ageing Well in Selwyn aims to bring older residents together through organisations and activities which support wellbeing and inclusion within the community. From Monday 10 until Sunday 23 October, take a stroll through some of Selwyn’s most beautiful gardens or take a guided walk through Harts Creek in Leeston, or the Liffey walk in Lincoln – both rich with fascinating flora, fauna and native birdlife. Tie up your laces and go for walk around Selwyn Sport Centre’s 240m indoor walking track. While you’re there, try your hand at table tennis, pickleball and indoor bowls. Learn how to be safe on the internet or gain insight into planets, stars and galaxies that make up our solar system. Get creative with embroidery and cross stitch, create a scrapbook to keep all your memories or paint your own watercolour greeting card. And don’t miss our SWELL Expo on Monday 17 October from 9am until 2.30pm, free to attend with over 70 exhibitors! Learn which social activities and community groups in Selwyn to join, and everything you need to know

about healthcare, life planning, volunteering and travel. Bring your family or friends along, as there will be live entertainment, guest speakers, food and market stalls for everyone to enjoy.

To find out more and book yourself in, pick up a copy of the What’s on in Selwyn brochure (available 14 September) from your local library or Council Community Centre or go to: selwyn.govt.nz/swell

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Keeping On Reader Feedback It is amazing the connections that arise from some of the articles we publish here in Keeping On, and it is always nice to connect long lost relatives and friends, or hear other memories of people and events. The May article about journalist Kate Fraser, prompted the following feedback “I am a regular reader of Keeping On and was delighted to read the story about Kate Fraser in the latest edition. I first met Kate when we were members of a Women’s service club. Not being an enthusiastic cook myself I looked forward to Kate's recipes in the Christchurch Press. One in particular I favoured was printed in February 2009 called "Make-yourown-muesli". I cut it out and pasted into my recipe book, where it still is today. After testing and tasting the recipe, I have since doubled the recipe and now make it regularly not having purchased commercially made muesli since that time. I would like to see, if possible, this recipe reprinted again in these days if rising prices. I saved a lot of money over those 13 years. Many thanks Kate.”

10 – 23 October 2022

Over 65? Join us for two-weeks of fun activities around Selwyn – guided walks, bingo, exercise classes, craft workshops, speaker sessions, garden tours and more! Plus, don’t miss our SWELL Expo at the Lincoln Event Centre on Monday 17 October, 9am–2.30pm and connect with over 70 community clubs, organisations and wellbeing providers. Enjoy live entertainment, guest speakers, activities, food vendors and market stalls. Pick up a copy of the What’s on in Selwyn brochure (available 14 September) from your nearest Council facility to find out more.

selwyn.govt.nz/swell


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Aspire Canterbury Over 40 years in the antique business ‘Moving’ forward From 3rd October 2022, Disabled Persons Centre Trust T/A Aspire Canterbury moves to BrainTree Wellness Centre, 70 Langdons Road, Papanui, Christchurch 8053. The Disabled Persons Centre Trust which trades as Aspire Canterbury (‘Aspire’) supports a broad range of people with disabilities and impairments. Children and adults living with neurological and/or physical disabilities and impairments often have complex needs that require integrated supports. With significant data showing that a total wellness approach has a hugely positive impact on people’s lives, BrainTree is creating this reality. We share the vision of BrainTree and want to make a difference to the communities we serve in living a life full of purpose and meaning. As well as a shared

vision, working collaboratively and becoming a tenant of BrainTree, the Centre boosts organisational efficiency, increases effectiveness, and drives a broader social change. Within the BrainTree Wellness Centre, you will also find Multiple Sclerosis & Parkinson’s Canterbury, Dementia Canterbury, and the Stroke Foundation. The Centre has a couple of seminar rooms, a studio, and a social area and whole food café allowing individuals to have an experience while they visit the charitable trust/s. The centre is also available for use by the wider local community groups, providing a ‘place-based’ approach focused on engagement to access services, benefiting the people we serve. So, come along to BrainTree and see us, A we are here to help you!

Steve Purcell is a licensed antique dealer trading as A n t i q u e s International Limited, with over 40 years experience in Steve Purcell, licensed antique the business. dealer Steve started frequenting antique shops and restoring antique furniture when he was 15 and developed a passion for Kauri furniture in particular. After “doing up” a number of pieces it soon became apparent that some would have to be sold to make room for more projects. Developing associations with a number of dealers, it was a natural progression into general antiques, art and jewellery. In the ‘80s the hobby became a business selling items at antique fairs, on behalf in established

shops and converting an old Bedford bus into a mobile antique shop. In the ‘90s the first official shop “Circa 1900” was formed with a partner in Merivale and a second shop in Riccarton called “Finders”. With the dawn of the new millenium internet communication was now a well established medium for selling, opening the door to a world-wide customer base. “Circa 1900” was closed and the company Antiques A International was formed.

inspiring independent living

STEVE PURCELL ANTIQUES

ASPIRE is a not-for-profit organisation, established over 40 years ago ASPIRE CANTERBURY CANTERBURY ŝƐ Ă ŶŽƚͲĨŽƌͲƉƌŽĮƚ ŽƌŐĂŶŝƐĂƟŽŶ͕ ĞƐƚĂďůŝƐŚĞĚ ŽǀĞƌ ϯϬͲLJĞĂƌƐ ĂŐŽ͘

BUYING - SELLING - VALUATIONS - APPRAISALS - ESTATE ADVICE

ŝƐĂďŝůŝƚLJ /ŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞ Ͳ ƵŶďŝĂƐĞĚ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͕ QShop and hire of assistive technology. ǁĞ ĂƌĞ ŚĞƌĞ ƚŽ ůŝƐƚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ŚĞůƉ LJŽƵ͘ Total Mobility Scheme - 50% off Taxi’s up to a maximum QofDŽďŝůĞ ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ Ͳ ŽŶŶĞĐƟŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ͘ $35 (terms and conditions apply) dŽƚĂů DŽďŝůŝƚLJ ^ĐŚĞŵĞ Ͳ ϱϬй Žī dĂdžŝΖƐ ƵƉ ƚŽ ŵĂdžŝŵƵŵ Ψϯϱ QMobile Services - connecting with the community. ;dĞƌŵƐ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĚŝƟŽŶƐ ĂƉƉůLJͿ͘ Information Service - unbiased ^ŚŽƉ ĂŶĚ ,ŝƌĞ ŽĨ ĂƐƐŝƐƟǀĞ ƚĞĐŚŶŽůŽŐLJ͘ QDisability

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information, we are here to listen and help you.

tĞ ŶŽǁ ƐƚŽĐŬ ĐŽŶƟŶĞŶĐĞ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐ͊ Q džĐĞůůĞŶƚ ůĞĂŬĂŐĞ ƉƌŽƚĞĐƟŽŶ ĂŶĚ ƐŬŝŶ ĚƌLJŶĞƐƐ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ƵƐĞƌ͘ Q ŝƐĐƌĞĞƚ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞ͘ Q &ƌĞĞ ĚĞůŝǀĞƌLJ͘

Old jewellery and scrap gold * Old coins & banknotes * Old New Zealand items * Paintings and old prints * Old silver and pewter * Medals & badges * Collectables * Old China porcelain & pottery * Old watches & clocks

Contact us face to face or over the phone for a chat about your needs. Ph: 03 6189. 0800 P > 366 03 366 6189 •FREEPHONE FREEPHONE 0800 347347 242 242. The BrainTree Wellness Centre, Road, Papanui. Christchurch. P > (TOTAL MOBILITY) 03 366 909370•Langdons 314 Worcester St, Linwood, Christchurch E > admin@aspirecanterbury.org.nz > www.aspirecanterbury.org.nz Email: admin@aspirecanterbury.org.nz • W Website: www.aspirecanterbury.org.nz

If you have any of the above items you wish to sell please contact today for a consultation or to arrange an appointment.

0800 4 BUYER - 0274 327 514 - 03 351 9139 stevepurcellantiques@gmail.com WWW.STEVEPURCELLANTIQUES.COM

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Steady As You Go classes are popular

by Anna Tillman, Health Promoter, Age Concern Canterbury.

Hi. Welcome to what we are hoping to make a regular column in Keeping On. A wee blurb from me to you, talking about exercise. Given that this is my first chat, I was thinking it would be great to hear back from some of you with some topics you would like me to cover, questions you have surrounding exercise and maybe stories of the benefits you have gained from exercising and I will do my best to get as much information back to you as possible, bearing in mind Keeping On is a quarterly publication. Remember we have our wonderful Steady As You Go (SAYGo) community classes and a Companion Walking Service to help you on your way if you are wondering how to start. Exercise. A word that can fill some with fear, others with guilt and others with satisfaction when they have done their daily dose. As we all age, maintaining good fitness, muscle strength and length and working on balance should be something that we all embrace, and not leave to do another day. If you begin to decrease your activity your strength and balance can be affected. Stay active but also stay safe. Exercise should be something that you enjoy, otherwise you just won’t do it. It could be going for a walk, joining a local exercise class or gym, swimming, playing croquet, bowls or tennis, to name a few. Grab a friend or two or do it on your own, it doesn’t really matter. Enjoyment is the name of the game. Remember, whatever you do should be achievable but slightly challenging. The more you do the more you can do, and it will help

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you feel better about yourself. So, for those of you who are only thinking of exercise rather than doing any at the moment, I will leave you with 2 simple but effective lower limb strengthening exercises, focusing on the major lower limb muscles, that you can start with. The stronger these muscles are the easier you will find your general day to day functional movements and walking. Start with doing between 5-10 of each exercise , 2 or 3 times a week and gradually build up your reps (up to about 20) and the number of times you do them each week. Exercise 1. Heel Taps Sit in a comfortable chair with a straight back (kitchen chair) with your feet flat on the floor. With control lift your leg and tap your heel on the ground as far away from you as possible then with control lift your leg back again to the start position. Repeat each leg 5-10 times initially and increase as able. Exercise 2. Sit to stand Sit in a comfortable chair with a straight back (kitchen chair) with your feet flat on the floor. Lean forward slightly and then working your legs and pushing your feet hard down into the floor move up into standing, trying to keep your knees apart as you stand. If you need to use your hands, make sure you have started the movement with the push up through your feet first, then help with your arms. Stand tall then with control, sit back down into the chair. Repeat 5-10 times initially and increase as able. If you are a little wobbly on your feet, do this exercise next to a solid table to help steady you if necessary. Remember to always stay safe while exercising. Happy exercising and I look forward to hearing from some of you via my email anna.tillman @ageconcerncan. org.nz

The Steady As You Go classes that run in our community are proving to be a hugely popular way of maintaining strength and balance as well as adding the all important social aspect of exercising, making it enjoyable and therefore more likely for us to want to continue. If there is anyone out there who sees a need in their local community for a SAYGo class, please contact Anna Tillman on 366 0903 so we can hopefully meet that need together.

Steady As You Go (SAYGo) Falls Prevention – Exercise Classes in Canterbury (July 2022) For more information about groups please phone Age Concern Canterbury 366 0903. A koha of $2.00 is appreciated. Each class is a one - hour session.

CHRISTCHURCH CITY AND SOUTH Day /Time

AREA

Location of class

Mon 10.00am St Albans Mon 10.00am Redcliffs Mon 10.30am Wainoni Mon 10.30am Hei Hei Mon.11.00amParklands 12.00 noon Mon 1.00pm Harewood (Waitlist) Mon 1.00pm Halswell Mon 2.00pm Harewood Mon 2.00pm Papanui Tues 9.30am Papanui (Waitlist) Tues. 10.00am South Brighton Tues. 10.00am St Albans Tues 10.30am Upper Riccarton (On Hold) Tues 10.30am Bryndwr (Waitlist) Tues 1.30pm Hornby Tues 2.00pm Waltham Wed 11.30Halswell 12.30pm Wed 1.30pm Lincoln Wed. 2.00Papanui 3.00pm Thurs 9.30am Riccarton (On Hold) Thurs 10.00am Heathcote Thurs 9.30am St Albans Thurs 11.00am Avonside/Linwood Fri 9.30am Hoon Hay Fri 10.00am New Brighton (Waitlist) Fri 10.00am Opawa NORTH CANTERBURY

St Albans Community Centre, 1049 Colombo Street Port Hills Uniting Church, Augusta St Celebration Centre, 81 Bickerton St Wycola Ave Community Centre Hei Hei Parkview Lounge, 75 Queens Park Drive, Parklands.

Day time

Location of class

Tues 10.00am Wed 10.00am Wed 11.00am Thurs 10.30am Thurs 10.00am Thurs 11.00am

AREA

Rangiora Rangiora Amberley Rotherham Oxford Amberley Beach (in recess) Thurs 1.30pm Rangiora Thurs 1.30pm Pegasus Thurs 2.00pm Kaiapoi ($3.00) New Classes are highlighted

St James Church Hall, Harewood Road, airport end Te Hapua, Halswell Service Centre and Library, 341 Halswell Rd St James Church Hall, Harewood Rd, airport end Papanui Village Presbyterian Church, Frank Street Age Concern Centre, cnr Main North Rd and Loftus St South Brighton Community Centre, Beattie Street. Lamb of God Community Centre, 21 Thames Street, St Albans Fletcher Place Residents Lounge, off Bowen Street Bryndwr Chapel, 179 Idris Road Community Care Centre, Goulding Avenue Waltham Community Cottage, 201 Hastings St East Te Hapua, Halswell Service Centre and Library, 341 Halswell Rd Lincoln Community Care, Lyttelton St, Age Concern Canterbury, 24 Main North Road, Papanui. Kauri Lodge, 148 Riccarton Road Malt Works Villa Hall, Port Hills Rd St Albans Community Centre, 1049 Colombo Street Holy Trinity Church, 168 Stanmore Road Hoon Hay Presbyterian Church Lounge, 5 Downing St New Brighton Library – in the Pay and Display Room Opawa Community Church, cnr Opawa Rd and Aynsley Tce

RSA Hall, Victoria Street, Rangiora Ballarat Retirement Village, 21 Ballarat Rd Amberley Library, RSA Room Rotherham Hotel, 42 George St Oxford Town Hall, 34 Main Street Amberley Beach Hall RSA Hall, Victoria Street, Rangiora Pegasus Community Centre, corner Pegasus Main and Tahuna St Anglican Church, 23 Cass Street, Kaiapoi


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The Eldernet Group celebrates 25 years of empowering people When Eleanor Bodger co-founded The Eldernet Group in 1997 from a bedroom in her family home, the then nurse and social worker could only have dreamed it would become one of the country’s most trusted provider of information for older people, their whānau and aged care professionals. The establishment of Eldernet was in response to seeing a need for a comprehensive information service that focused on issues concerning older kiwis. When Eldernet launched in 1997, it was one of New Zealand’s first websites during a time when many said the internet ‘wouldn’t be a thing.’ The company, which now employs more than 20 staff, celebrated its 25th anniversary in July with a special event at its new offices – fittingly less than one kilometre away from where the company began in the Christchurch suburb of New Brighton. The company’s success hasn’t come as a surprise to Eleanor, who remains The Eldernet Group’s director (alongside daughter Esther Perriam). “Providing help for older people has always been our goal and I’m

The Eldernet Group’s directors Eleanor Bodger (left) and Esther Perriam celebrate 25 years of empowering older people. Photo credit: John Cosgrove.

proud that the company continues to do that. It didn’t surprise me that it got this big; it almost felt like a bit ahead of its time at the beginning,” says Eleanor. “We’re already looking ahead to the next 25 years.” The Eldernet Group offers numerous different services, each designed to empower older people to live their best lives. Its online offerings at www.eldernet.co.nz include Eldernet Residential Care,

Learn about the benefits of professionally drafted Wills Ensuring that you are looking after your loved ones now and after you pass away becomes more important as we get older. However, due to today’s fast-paced society and everincreasing costs it can be difficult to find the time and/or money to draft or update a new Will that reflects your wishes. With the availability of “do it yourself” Will kits, there now appears to be a convenient method to draft your own Will without involving a solicitor. But what are the dangers of creating and using these homemade Wills? An issue we often come across in Estate administration when dealing with ‘homemade Wills’ is that they are not signed properly and therefore may not be considered a valid Will. The effort to save money today may unfortunately incur additional costs down the track as the homemade Will has to be sent to the High Court to first be validated, before the Estate can be dministered. It is important to remember that the cost is not only financial; the emotional toll of having to deal with additional stress can also have an impact on the surviving loved ones. Another issue to consider, is lack

of clarity within the homemade Will. A gift or bequest given under your Will may be clear to you at the time of drafting, but it can be unclear after you have passed. This may result in the wishes you had when drafting your new Will not being able to be carried out. Assets also can change over time, so having a solicitor who is able to assess the risks and draft your Will accordingly is essential. By drafting a Will with a solicitor you can be sure that your Will is validly prepared and executed in a clear and concise manner. Once the Will is signed and complete, your solicitor will also take care of storage and safe keeping of your Will, both in digital and physical form. It can be easy for documentation to be lost if kept at home and once lost your family may not be able to locate or be aware of your last wishes. If a Will is drafted by a solicitor, you do not need to fear losing the original Will, as it will be kept safe digitally and physically in the solicitor’s records. If you wish to have a Will drafted or to update your existing Will, the Pier Law team is available to assist – visit A www.pierlaw.co.nz

an essential resource outlining the ins and outs of transitioning into care; retirementvillages.co.nz, which hosts the largest selection of retirement village properties in New Zealand; Making Life Easier, a comprehensive directory that allows people and their loved ones to find local care and support options, community and advocacy groups, and service providers all in one place; and the Knowledge Lab,

an online library where you’ll find unbiased information, cutting-edge thinking, and answers to questions you’d never thought to ask. It also produces a hard copy handbook, Where from here He ara whakamua, which is commonly referred to as ‘the older person’s bible’. All its services are free to access. The Eldernet Group will continue to celebrate the milestone over the coming 12 months and plan to surpass its 20th anniversary festivities, which involved sending batches of 20 cupcakes to aged care facilities and older person’s services up and down the country. “It’s important that we acknowledge the incredible support we have had from our clients over the years. We truly wouldn’t be here without them,” says Eleanor. The Eldernet Group provides free, unbiased and comprehensive information via www.eldernet.co.nz to help older people make decisions that are right for them. Freephone 0800 162 706 for a free copy of our Where from here He ara whakamua handbook.


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My Book Club recommends The Dictionary of Lost Worlds by Pip Williams Reviewed by Cory Blackburn The Dictionary of Lost Words is a fictional account of the creation of the first Oxford English Dictionary. Initiated in 1879 and completed in 1928, the Dictionary is at the centre of this story with main character Esme Nicoll’s life, the rise of the suffrage movement, and the horrors of WWI playing out around its development. I was excited by the premise of this book — who chose which words made it into the dictionary and how did they decide? Such a momentous task would have a huge effect on the education of subsequent generations and how they accessed language to understand their world. Which words would be excluded or missed and what would that mean for the people who used those words most? I learned that many commonly used words had never been written down. Usually they were words used by the poorer classes, often illiterate, often women. With the ‘dictionary men’ intent on including only words with written references, many of these words were excluded. These are the words Esme Nicolls, daughter of a kindly lexicographer who devoted his life to working on the dictionary, decides she must seek out and preserve. Interwoven with the formation of both dictionaries (the Oxford and Esme’s Dictionary of Lost Words) is the life of a woman dealing with the challenges of her time — some of which are still ongoing struggles

several perspectives. I was outraged on behalf of Esme, but knew I would never truly be able to understand what she went through. The women in my group, many of them mothers, added so much to my understanding of this story and helped me connect with it on a deeper level. About Cory

for women today: reproductive rights, societal expectations, career prospects, political representation, recognition and autonomy. My book group was started by my wife and I was fairly easily coaxed into joining. I have always loved reading and made time for it in my life, but I heavily favoured the sci-fi and fantasy genres. The book group gives me an opportunity to read outside my typical tastes and uncover some real gems. The Dictionary of Lost Words is one of those, combining a piece of history with compelling and believable characters, and expanding this man’s knowledge of women’s experiences. It’s great to be part of a mixed-sex book group because we were able to discuss this book from

Help Greenlight Recruitment keep Christchurch moving We’re a locally owned Christchurch based boutique recruitment agency looking to connect great workers with great companies. We aim to help people at all stages of their career. While most of our work is growing careers for those earlier on in their careers, it also includes those looking for something to keep them busy in their retirement or as they head into retirement. We’ve a select group of clients that foster having a diverse work force and having a few extra years under the belt is seen as a benefit. They appreciate the work ethic, reliability and experience maturity often brings to the table.

The majority of roles available tend to be in a warehousing environment. Some include working in a cool store. The work is mainly picking and packing orders, such as boxes of food items or similar where heavy lifting isn’t a requirement. The beauty of the roles is they’re casual opportunities where you can choose the shifts you take each week to suit your lifestyle. If you’d like a shift or two a week, then come join the team. Get in touch with the temp and casual recruitment team at Greenlight. Give Kristina or Chris a call today 03-963 1110 or email jobs@glr.co.nz A or visit www.glr.co.nz

A busy business-owner and chef, Cory often seeks out the audiobook version of his book club reads so he can listen while prepping in his kitchen. He arrived in New Zealand in 2010 on a working holiday visa from the United States, just in time for the onset of the Canterbury earthquakes! He met his wife soon after and is now a permanent resident, living in Christchurch. Apart from reading, he enjoys following American sports, and making the most of living in beautiful Aotearoa, snowboarding and hiking whenever he can.

Book Discussion Scheme (BDS) provides enough copies for your club to read the same book at the same time, as well as professionally-prepared discussion notes. Membership starts from $70 per person for a year’s membership and includes delivery. Find a group to join (or find members to start your own) at www.bds.org.nz/join.

Crossword Answers #90722 ACROSS 1. Up; 3. Udder; 5. Cry; 6. Gender; 9. Psalm: 11. Pleat; 12. Atlanta; 13. Will; 17. Limit; 18. Net; 20. Rigger; 22. Ages; 24. Leases; 26. All leave; 28. Deed; 29. Teens; 30. Dive. DOWN 2. Pips; 4. Deem; 5. Elephant; 6. Garages; 7. Decision; 8. Rays; 9. Plate; 10. Leaning; 14. Lettuce; 16. Wriggled; 19. Isolate; 20. Relays; 21. Graded; 23. Side; 27. Vent.


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Join Shirley Recreation Walkers for various walks Meet at 9:30am, Mondays and Thursdays by the Shirley Community Centre Site for car pool to start of walk. Park on Chancellor Street (entrance off Shirley Road). If you want to go straight to the start of walk, you must let Sue know on the day. For further details on the walks phone Sue on 981 7071. $4.00 petrol contribution to driver (unless otherwise stated). Please note that some walks could be subject to change due to road, footpath, walkway and track conditions, MONDAYS 5th September, HOON HAY VALLEY (2 hours approx.) This pleasant countryside walk features farmlands, spring lambs, blossoms and alpacas along with Lower Westmorland. Start from Penruddock Rise, near Francis Park. 12th September, TRAVIS WETLANDS-QEII PARK (2 hours approx.) This walk features a circuit of Travis Wetlands and a variety of birdlife along with a walk through the grounds of QEII Park. Start from the car park of Travis Wetlands near the toilet block (at the end of Beach Road). 19th September, NORTH HAGLEY PARK-BOTANICAL GARDENS (2 hours approx.)

Hill walks and walks on the flat are options for walks.

This walk features North Hagley Park with cherry blossoms, daffodil woodlands and the beautiful Botanical Gardens. Start from the footbridge by the car park entrance off Armagh Street Bridge). For those who wish bring lunch and a thermos to enjoy following this walk, or you can purchase from the nearby café.

Jayne works to the benefit of her clients Jayne Martin is a Licensed Sales Consultant with Harcourts, Kaiapoi. Jayne brings the discipline and organisational skills of a dedicated Police Officer in the London Metropolitan Police and a Probation Officer here in New Zealand. The wealth of knowledge and interpersonal skills she acquired in these diverse positions works to the benefit of her real estate clients. She has travelled and worked extensively and understands the diverse needs that reflect a multicultural market. Being passionate about property Jayne has bought, renovated and sold many times in New Zealand. Working with her own properties was so gratifying, she knew she had found her lifetime career. Her career move into the Real Estate arena was fuelled by her passion for engaging with and helping the public.

You will find that her work ethics are second to none; an admirable quality that makes Jayne stand out from the crowd. Her work is meticulous and detailed, not only because it’s good business, but because she prides herself in her work. Residing in North Canterbury with her partner, Jayne is down to earth and has a warm personality to match. Of more importance is her work ethic, commitment towards the job, and knowing that her clients can both trust and rely on her - whether it be a sale or purchase. Doing what is right for her clients is first on her list. Awarded the Top Sales Consultant at Harcourts Kaiapoi from 2015 to 2022 you will see that customer satisfaction still exists when you use Jayne to market your property! Mobile: 027 517 7937 Office: (03) 327 5379 Email: jayne.martin@harcourts. co.nz A

ARE YOU thinking OF DOWNSIZING, RELOCATING TO A RETIREMENT HOME OR SIMPLY WISH TO KNOW THE VALUE OF YOUR HOME? Jayne can help you with all three, she has helped many of her clients with an easy stress free transition, covering Christchurch and North Canterbury, Jayne prides herself on going the extra mile for her clients. If you would like +, , )&$ 1&,+ % 1 +! ,ƛ""Ǿ give Jayne a call.

26th September, BROAD PARKNEW BRIGHTON PIER(2 hours) This walk takes you from Waimari Beach to New Brighton and back, and followed by coffee at the Beach Café near Broad Park. Start from Broadpark Road near the playground. THURSDAYS 8th September, STAN HELMSBRIDLE PATH (Lyttelton side) (2 hours approx.) Take the realigned track up to the Pioneer Women’s Shelter, then walk down the Bridle Path back to Lyttelton. Walk back onto Harmans Road to the reserve and cars. Start

MEMBERSHIP Age Concern Canterbury is funded by the community. Your support ensures the independence and wellbeing of older people is enhanced. If you wish to contribute to the work and services that Age Concern Canterbury provides please complete the form below. I would like to: (please tick one box): Become a member ($20 per person, $30 per couple) Become a friend ($10 per person) Make a donation Note: Members have voting rights.

I would like to subscribe to the Keeping On newspaper, delivered quarterly, for a (please tick box) cost of $20.00. I enclose: Membership Subscription Keeping On Subscription Donation TOTAL

$ $ $ $

Note: Donations of $5.00 or more can qualify for a tax credit. Direct credit to BNZ 02-0800-0188056-000

Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms First Names: Surname: Date of Birth: Street Address: Suburb: City & Postcode: Phone No.: Email:

Jayne Martin 027 517 7937 | 03 327 5379 jayne.martin@harcourts.co.nz harcourtsfourseasons.co.nz

from Voleas Road near the reserve. 15th September, TAYLORS MISTAKE-BOULDER BAYGODLEY HEAD (2 hours approx.) This walk features Pilgrims Way, Boulder Bay and Godley Head. Take lunch, drinks, warm/waterproof clothing, good shoes/boots. Start from the car park near Taylors Mistake Surf Club. $5.00 to driver. 22nd September, HALSWELL QUARRY (2 hours approx.) This walk features several walking tracks on this site. Start from the car park of Halswell Quarry off Kennedys Bush Road. For those who wish, bring lunch to enjoy after walk or you can purchase from the coffee van. 29th September, HARRY ELL WALKWAY (2 hours approx.) Walk from the Sign of the Takahe up Victoria Park Road and onto Harry Ell Walkway. We will have our morning tea stop at The Sign of the Kiwi Café. Return via Harry Ell Walkway and Dyers Pass Road. Park cars on Dyers Pass Road near The Sign of the Takahe.

Four Seasons Realty Four Seasons Realty 2017 Ltd Licensed Agent REAA 2008

Signed:

Jayne

Post to The Chief Executive, Age Concern Canterbury Inc, 24 Main North Road, Papanui. Christchurch 8053.


AUGUST 2022

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Ageing gracefully across cultures by Harmony

For you, what is the most romantic thing in the world? You may think you should throw this question away if you are over 25 years-old! Romantic things? We are not naive teenagers. But the answer lies in a Taiwanese pop song: “The most romantic thing I know is, I will be getting older with you!” But, back to the real world - the reality of getting older is always there, no matter whether in my home country or here. The only difference is how getting older is viewed among different cultures. One day, I was at a country golf course. I was talking with a middleaged Kiwi woman when her 93-yearold friend drove into the carpark. The older lady started to drag her set of golf clubs laboriously from her car boot. I rushed to help her but the woman beside me stopped me and told me: “Please let her do it herself!” I stopped, and the woman and I stood there and watched as the older lady assembled her golf gear, waved at us, and smiled. I left them with more understanding of getting old and some reflections of how to stay young as I age. Before I moved to New Zealand, I knew that western culture takes independence more seriously than most Asians. For the 93-year-old lady, her “I can” belief brought her confidence. For an Asian lady in the same situation, it’s hard to say. But I am pretty sure I would be reprimanded if I did not help her. In Taiwanese public transport, there are always some seats which are reserved for senior people only. Young people sitting on the reserved

A traditional Chinese fisherman.

seat will stand up and leave, or even say sorry when a senior comes over to these seats in the same train or bus. So, here’s a fun test; if you are around 55 years-old, and you are not sure whether you look older or younger than your age, just take public transport and see if any young people stand up for you! I know someone who felt heart-broken when for the first time in his life, a young man donated his seat, because it meant he looked old enough to be a senior citizen! I explained it was really a great compliment, but he could not see it. There are many retirement villages and aged care centres in New Zealand, even though I know many Kiwi seniors prefer to stay in their homes. In my home country,

aged care is just a start-up industry. Taiwan now has a population of over 23 million and almost 20% are over 65. My parents' generation could not accept the sort of place which was called a rest-home. It was a “shame” if they stayed in a rest-home because it meant they were “abandoned” by their children. This is one of the reasons why you see some immigrant families in New Zealand with one single parent looking after children the other parent has to go back and look after their parents in the home country. Recently, I realised that the phrase “old people” can be used with a negative meaning in New Zealand. That also brought back the changes to honouring your parents and elders in my home country in the past decades. The Chinese word for “old” is perhaps more multi layered and more positive in Taiwan. People like to use the Chinese proverb “When there is an old person in the family, it is like having treasure there”, teaching the young to respect the older generation. There is another saying: “When you are getting old, you should prepare three treasures for yourself – the old company (normally husband or wife), the old capital (money) and the old friends!” Yes, for traditional Chinese, “old” is something to treasure. Now I am also getting old, like my parents and grandparents. I am pretty sure my son has not yet understood what it means, like me in my younger years. However, now it is my turn to sit, contemplate and ask myself “what will it be like in my older years?”

I hope everyone is managing to keep well and warm over winter. We had the pleasure of Janet Brown (representing the Retirement Village Association) visiting us and gaining information on what the Rainbow population and people in general would expect from a Retirement Village and its environment. As I was the “only gay in the village” that day I spoke on behalf and as an individual as to what would be helpful and unhelpful. The rest of our staff were active participants, and we covered a broad range of requirements and support needs. We talked about affordable rental options for over 65’s and the lack of availability. It could be an area that the RVA may start to address in the future via its members. There are some facilities in the North Island, but they are very limited so far. One such place allows its tenants to partake of the facilities available to the Village property owners which sounds like a great model of service delivery. Other areas/ideas covered were a roving rainbow ambassador for each of the large retirement village providers, more RVA staff education including rest home staff etc., rainbow cohorts in retirement village enclaves and more rainbow friendly advertising by providers. Janet will be compiling a researched article on all these areas when she has gained a perspective from Rainbow people already living in a retirement village environment and will be making this freely available to us on completion. The next meeting is on 29th September at Age Concern Canterbury. Please email Liz. barnard@ageconcerncan.org.nz your attendance or phone 331 7811.

WanderSearch Canterbury Charitable Trust Do you care for someone with a cognitive impairment (Dementia, Autism, Down’s Syndrome or brain injury) who may be at risk of going missing? Canterbury WanderSearch help. can Trust Charitable WanderSearch provides small, robust radio-frequency devices * (pendant, wrist strap or keyring) that are worn by the person at risk of going missing. If the person does go missing they can be located by trained police and/or Land Search and Rescue Volunteers. WanderSearch Canterbury supports people safely living and participating with freedom in the communities they love. The WanderSearch Programme has been developed in New Zealand over the last 15 years. It is delivered by not for profit organisations, and is endorsed by both NZ Police Canterbury. A Dementia and

*Please note the individual is only provides 907 0072 (include area code) or device WanderSearch tracked should they go missing. A peace of mind for the person using email emma@wandersearch.nz the device and reduces carers’ stress for family/whanau, friends and caregivers, that should they go missing there are methods to assist in locating them quickly. For people WanderSearch Canterbury supports people who have frail health or who can be living safely, and participating with freedom unaware of environmental hazards in the communities they love. the time taken to locate them can be WanderSearch Canterbury supports individuals critical and having a WanderSearch with cognitive impairment who may be at risk of going missing. We provide devices (pendant, device can be life-saving. wrist strap or keyring) that can be located by income that believe strongly We trained police and/or Land Search and Rescue should not be a barrier to receiving Volunteers should the individual go missing. this support. We maintain a device loan bank so that anyone with a For more information on our diagnosed cognitive impairment and Device Loan bank please contact who has a risk of going missing can WanderSearch Canterbury 03 -907 0072 receive a device regardless of their or info@wandersearch.nz Endorsed by Dementia Canterbury financial situation. and the NZ Police. If you would like to find out WanderSearch how about more Canterbury can protect your loved one, contact Emma Parker on 03-


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Endeavour NZ Itinerary Specialists Endeavour NZ Itinerary Specialists started 4 years ago. Managing Director, Pete Salvesen, a Scotsman by birth, has always had a fascination for travel. Pete has enlisted the services of John Anderson and Gordon Duff, a professional photographer over the past two years to assist him. We have handpicked all our accommodation, activities and attractions from around New Zealand to ensure the clients are well looked after and budget restrictions are met. All bookings include a meet and greet with one of our team. This is where we introduce ourselves to the clients. We create the finest holiday itineraries, with the most professional care and dedication. Stunning landscapes, world renowned Kiwi hospitality all driven with the same passion to deliver the absolute best to our clients. We have designed ‘short stay’ tours from Auckland, Wellington,

Christchurch, Queenstown and Dunedin. Our current tours include Ride the Rails, Taste of the South, Christchurch City Tour and Cultural Heritage Tour. See our website for more details. Ride the Rails Ride the Rails is an 8-day rail adventure taking in New Zealand's finest scenery by rail. Taste of the South The tour is done in a spacious 15 seat minivan. Dunedin – Catlins Coast – Bluff – Te Anau – Doubtful Sound – Arrowtown – Kinross – Queenstown. Christchurch City Tour This fully hosted day takes in the best of the Garden City and includes a wide range of attractions and activities. Small groups of up to 10 guests per tour. Central Heritage Tour This fully escorted small group tour is a fabulous way of exploring the A lower North Island.

AGE CONCERN CANTERBURY Staying Safe Refresher Driving Courses 10.00am to 2.00pm. Light lunch provided 2022 Friday, 16th September, Ashburton Tuesday, 20th September, Rangiora Wednesday, 28th September, Addington Monday, 3rd October, Age Concern Canterbury, 24 Main North Road, Papanui Tuesday, 18th October, Greymouth Wednesday, 19th October, Reefton Wednesday, 26th October, Addington Friday, 4th November, Ashburton Wednesday, 30th November, Addington Course dates are continually being updated so please phone 03 366 0903 to register or to enquire about future courses.

Enduring power of attorney - a snippet of what your future can hold Another one of life’s little challenges – have you ever pondered what happens if you have an accident that leaves you incapacitated, or with age (or illness), you become confused and unable to make sound decisions about your wellbeing and property? There are two tools available to assist you with this process, being Enduring Powers of Attorney (EPAs). One EPA for Personal Care and Welfare, and one EPA for Property. Your attorneys are essentially trusted persons you grant legal capacity to, who makes decisions relating to your welfare and property. It is imperative that you consider carefully how, and who you want to appoint as your attorney so that what you had intended to happen in your life plan has the best chance of achieving, with the least amount of stress to your family and friends. An attorney acting as a user under an EPA has the following obligations:

• Always promote and protect your best interests; and • Encourage you to maintain or develop your own competence to manager your property affairs where possible; and • Consult you and the persons you have asked to be consulted where practicable; and • Keep records of all transactions they make on your behalf. If you do not have an EPA in place when an event happens, oftentimes the Court must appoint an attorney on your behalf. This is stressful for loved ones and can cause delays when there is a time restraint for decision-making. If we can assist you in getting you long term plan sorted, please contact the Life Law team at Godfreys Law (03 366 7469) who can guide you through the process of creating your EPAs to ensure your rights and wishes will be respected and upheld. A

REAL PEOPLE. REAL SOLUTIONS.

For expert planning and advice in your twilight years

Gina Dobson

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Solicitor (03) 366 7469

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AUGUST 2022

Anyone for tennis? New or returning to tennis? St Albans Tennis Club, 37 Dover St, St Albans is providing a FUN coaching programme for all senior citizens wishing to learn how to play or are picking up a racquet for the first time in years. Nick Caton, Head Coach, will run a programme suitable for all abilities. The club will provide the coaching, courts, equipment, refreshments, and the opportunity to interact with others afterwards. Cost $7 per person. Note; for those who wish to play social games only, you are most welcome to join us. Register your interest with Robyn, 027 733 4315 or email info@ stalbanstennis.co.nz My name is Nick, and I am excited to be offering a specialised programme for mature adults at the St Albans Tennis Club. I will be running a 5-week rolling programme which will be suitable for all abilities. These sessions are all about having fun while at the same time learning more about the game. Thanks to my Nana, I had an early introduction to tennis, and went on to be the first person from Whanganui to represent New Zealand. My continued passion for tennis led me to become a fully qualified coach which has taken me all over NZ, UK & Europe over the last 18 years. I am proud to continue my Nana’s legacy by inspiring seniors to be active and social. I look forward to seeing you on the courts soon.

UPDATE FROM THE CLUBS Amberley Welcome Club members enjoyed a shared lunch at a Church Hall with a speaker from St Johns. A mid-Christmas dinner was attended by members at Main Road Hotel, Amberley in July. In August a further lunch at the Church Hall will be held. In September members will be touring the Mainpower Stadium followed by lunch at The Plough in Rangiora. Meet: Wednesdays at 12.00 midday at Church Hall, Church Street, Amberley. Contact: Ann McKenzie on 021 1012086. Lincoln Area Senior Citizens Club members enjoyed lunch at the RSA Rangiora in June and a lunch at The Famous Grouse Hotel in Lincoln in August. Pete Majendie spoke about the White Chairs in Christchurch in July. Future activities include a bus trip to The Racecourse Hotel, Riccarton for lunch, a talk on drug sniffer dogs and an outing to Loch Leven Gardens and Nursery in Rotherham. Meet: 1st Tuesday of the month at the Lincoln Event Centre. Contact: Gloria on 027 434 6554 or email Claire on nzelford@gmail.com.

Somerfield Garden Club members celebrated 70 years with a lunch at Rosendale Winery. Members also enjoyed a talk from a lady talking about flax weaving. In August a speaker from Allwood Trees will talk about garden design. A further speaker will be giving a talk on succulents in hanging baskets. The Spring Show will be on in October. Meet: Monday at 1.15pm at the Cashmere Club, South Colombo Street. Contact: Colleen Davis on 03 338 7117.

Sumner Senior Citizens Club members went to Darfield and enjoyed a very nice lunch. The Club’s AGM was completed with afternoon tea. Cancellation of two activities occured in July. Meet: 2nd and 4th Wednesday at 1.30pm, Sumner Surf Club. Contact: Lola Bouckoms on 384 9889.

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Seating people comfortably Many elderly and disabled people sit for long periods of time. Some are able to move themselves while others are not able to move without assistance. For those of us caring for the elderly and disabled we need to think carefully about how we seat them, we need to consider: · posture · pressure relief · potential mobility Good posture is important to prevent back pain, encourage mobility, assist swallowing and prevent chest

infections. When choosing a chair, it needs to be supportive to prevent them from slumping. When sitting for long periods without adjusting your position, circulation can get cut off to the bottom, legs and back causing discomfort and, if left, pressure sores. Pressure relief is important. Some chairs have pressure relief features built into them; we recommend these, especially for people who are unable to change their position. Alternatively pressure cushions can be used. Air filled pressure cushions (Rohos) can be problematic. They can be slippery causing a person to slide forward into a slumped posture. A slumped posture is uncomfortable, can make swallowing and breathing

difficult and taking part in activities hard. The cushions raise the height of the seat, which may cause the feet to dangle, causing discomfort under the thighs.

For more information on pressure injuries go to Therapy Professionals information page. Mobility keeping people standing or better still walking safely is in everyone’s best interests. To assist mobility, it’s important you choose a chair that encourages the person to get out of it easily. The ideal seat, maintains an upright posture with:• the bottom back in the chair and hips at a 90 degrees angle. • supporting the spine and thighs with a gap behind the knees. • armrests that support the arms with relaxed shoulders. • feet flat on the floor or supported on a footstool. For more information on choosing a seat go to the information page on Therapy Professionals website. If you need some help seating the elderly or disabled in your care our friendly Physiotherapists and Occupational Therapists can help, just contact us at Therapy Professionals. Phone 03 377 5280 or email: admin@tpl.nz

IS AGEING, DISABILITY, INJURY OR ILLNESS MAKING LIFE DIFFICULT? Therapy Professionals Ltd’s physio, speech language, music and occupational therapists and dietitians can make life easier. We can help. We come to you. For more information contact: Telephone: (03) 377 5280 Fax: (03) 377 5281 admin@tpl.nz www.therapyprofessionals.co.nz


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My two cents by June Peka

Bespoke reflections If the ramblings on this page read like those of a drug-addled ageing ex-journalist with a crumbling hip, it’s because they are. Famous musicians and song-writers have purportedly produced magnum opii under the influence of similar, mind-altering chemical cocktails but I’m struggling to string two words together by deadline. Bear with me please. When the grandies were much younger we counted yellow cars (two points for a Volkswagen or a truck, three for a bus). They’ve long outgrown this nonsense but just today I totted up 14 points between home and Pak n Save, via South City. It is possible I’m a bit compulsive in the repetitive and counting departments I suppose, because just lately I’m noticing images of reflections all over the place too – travel agents, billboards, window advertisements, cruise sales, screenshots, even the chookhouse in our own flooded back yard. Mac used to think this was weird behaviour, but lately he’s been smacked in the eye by “bespoke”. In newspapers, magazines and even on television, he’s found reference to bespoke Samsung cleaners, bespoke high-profile roles (as of that briefly enjoyed by disgraced TV One news reader Kamahl Santamaria), bespoke feather pin brooches, bespoke garage shelving, bespoke leather armchairs and even John Lennon’s bespoke Rolls Royce with its pull-out bed and writing table. Now I clearly remember, hunched over a crossword with my dear mum, asking her what “bespoke” meant. It related to what happened at the tailors when a gentleman went in to be measured for a suit, she explained. Particular attention would be paid to the crutch area of the trousers she said, because whilst most gentlemen were right-handed, others favoured the left. Aged 10, I was confused. Whilst we were in confessional mode, my good man and I both admitted to noticing how nothing these days simply goes, but it must “go forward” it seems. Maybe we should get a life eh? But some day soon whilst going forward to Pak n Save we won’t be at all surprised if we come across a tailor-made yellow submarine reflected in the Avon. How many points for a submarine?

Our favourite cold weather treat is best shared with friends. I do love a compliment, and this old-fashioned steak and kidney pudding always elicits one. Its not the type of slow cooking you can slide in the oven whilst you pop up to the mall though, so prepare for an afternoon in, watching the water level as this deliciousness develops. I use a 10 x 18 cm stainless steel bowl and a not-much-larger pot with a well-fitting lid, a good flat bottom and a trivet. I found suet at St Martins New World.

Steak and Kidney Pudding Filling 800-900 grams steak, diced ( I like skirt steak for this recipe.) 1 or two lamb’s kidneys, finely chopped 1 large onion, chopped. Approx ¹/ cup of flour seasoned with salt, pepper and mixed herbs. Approx ¹/ – ¹/ cup water. Pastry 1¹/ cup flour 1¹/ teasp baking powder Pinch salt 1 cup packet suet. (Or grated fresh if you can get it.) Approx 1 cup tepid water. Method Mix dry ingredients and water to a soft dough. Knead and roll out into a large circle. Cut out one quarter and set aside for top. Grease basin, and line with pastry. Toss steak, kidneys and onions in seasoned flour and add to basin with water. Re-roll the quarter-shaped pastry into a circle to fit over top, moistening edges for a good hold. Press firmly. Cover with baking paper or tin foil with a 2 cm pleat across the middle, for expansion of pastry. Tie securely with string, leaving looped handles for lifting. Place in boiling water in pot. Over 3¹/ to 4 hours maintain simmering/gently boiling water level at 3/4 way up the basin. Use boiling water to top up when necessary. I like to up-end the pudding onto a pretty dish, but it can be served straight from the basin, with mashed potatoes and brussels sprouts.

The sound of the rain on the roof "If we don't get three inches, man, Or four to break this drought, We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan, "Before the year is out." In God's good time down came the rain; And all the afternoon On iron roof and window-pane It drummed a homely tune.

Everyone likes the sound of rain on the roof, right? Well, as I write this after the wettest July on record, I’m not so sure about that. Right now, into August, the deafening din of Hughie piddling on the porch perspex is more than a few beats short of joyful. A gardener, I never thought I’d hear myself say that, but with a 150 mmdeep semi- permanent pond (soupybrown with the run-off of lovely horse and sheep manure from the garden) in the backyard, and access to the chooks possible only by float or gumboot, I’m well and truly over it. We thought we knew about rain – hah! Since 1985, when whanau moved to Western Australia we’ve

popped over more than 40 times. Christmas is way too hot for us in that wide brown land so early on we settled on July. Subsequently we’ve been caught in showers almost daily, but have never been cold and we dry quickly. And on that sandy ground, no puddles formed. When we did complain our son-in-law Tim Bird called us Hanrahans, reciting from his school days the iconic rollicking 1919 poem by bush poet and priest, John O’Brien. It’s quite long, and makes a fabulous song too - well worth checking out. See rght for a few of my favourite verses from “Said Hanrahan”.

And through the night it pattered still, And lightsome, gladsome elves On dripping spout and window-sill Kept talking to themselves. It pelted, pelted all day long, A-singing at its work, Till every heart took up the song Way out to Back-o'Bourke. And every creek a banker ran, And dams filled overtop; "We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan, "If this rain doesn't stop." And stop it did, in God's good time; And spring came in to fold A mantle o'er the hills sublime Of green and pink and gold.