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FREE APRIL 2013

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Stuck like glue

Mother Mayhem's parenting code words p13

Lighting the fire

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Heather Swinehart empowers local kids

Coffee for p16 a cause

Exploring new shop We Serve.Coffee

LCHAASNCTE

! to vote

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FAVORITES


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• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com


Volume 3 • Issue 4

April 2013 www.findlayfamily.com

departments

commentary features

4 5 6 7 8 8 11 17 19

13 mother mayhem Super glue theory

kids’ horoscope community snapshots what’s briefly happening new kids on the block exceptional families/ tween the lines healthy kids calendar — compiled by Julian Garcia

recycle this paper For our children's future ...

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Mother Mayhem reviews her parenting tool kit — by Mary Helen Darah

14 family Planet

No rest for the productive

Finding me-time when your internal alarm is set to “baby time” — by Rose Roccisano Barto

15 parent profile

marketplace

Empowering little ones

Heather Swinehart impacts children through Camp Fire of Northwest Ohio — by Kathy Miller

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16 food fight Josiah Leguire, age 4, Findlay Photo by Matthias Leguire of Superstar Photography

Coffee for a cause

— by Jane Louise Boursaw

New local shop serves up brews for charity — byRose Rocciasno Barto

FAVORITES

We asked our Facebook fans, "What has been the one great lesson you've learned about being a parent?" We got some pretty insightful answers!

Sarah Hill Gillespie:

They have taught me what love is and how love feels (Mother of 2).

Kami Waldman Kosch: Enjoy the journey, it goes by so fast (Mother of 1).

Amie Noel: Pick and choose your battles (Mother of 1). JL Smith: One day they will have children of their own and understand (Mother of 5). Amanda Jean Lovejoy:

Don't sweat the small stuff. Life is too short for it (Mother of 4).

READ MORE COMMENTS ONLINE!

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013•

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Adams Street Publishing Co.

NEW COLUMN!!!

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Collette Jacobs: cjacobs@findlayfamily.com

Co-Publisher/CFO

Mark I. Jacobs: mjacobs@findlayfamily.com

Editorial Editor

Alia Orra: editor@findlayfamily.com

Calendar

Julian Garcia: calendar@findlayfamily.com

Social Media Specialist

Amanda Goldberg: agoldberg@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Contributing Writers

Rose Roccisano Barto, Mary Helen Darah, Sue Lovett, Laurie Wurth-Pressel

Advertising

Sales Manager

Aubrey Hornsby: ahornsby@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Account Executive

Joshua Tolento: joshua@findlayfamily.com

Art/Production Art Director

Leah Foley: leah@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Senior Designer Kristi Polus: kristi@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Graphic Design

ARIES KIDS Born March 20 — April 20      By Sue Lovett

Megan Anderson: mandersons@adamsstreetpublishing.com Sarah Baird: production@adamsstreetpublishing.com Brittney Koehl: adsin@findlayfamily.com Jameson Staneluis: jameson@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Sales Coordinator/ Classified Sales

Emily Gibb: classifieds@findlayfamily.com

Administration Accounting

Robin Armstrong: rarmstrong@findlayfamily.com

Distribution

Michele Flanagan: distribution@toledoparent.com

Publisher’s Assistant

Jan Thomas: jthomas@adamstreetpublishing.com

Office Assistant

Marisa Rubin: mrubin@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Intern

Nadine Akra

Advertising/General Info: For advertising and general information, call (419) 244-9859 or fax (419) 2449871. E-mail ads to adsin@findlayfamily.com Findlay Area Family subscriptions are available by mail for $28 per year at Findlay Area Family, 1120 Adams St., Toledo, OH 43604. Letters to the editor must be limited to 300 words, are subject to editing and should include the writer’s full name and phone number. Entire contents © 2013 by Adams Street Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. Audited by

Brought to you by the publishers of:

Toledo Area Parent News Winner of 28 awards for design and editorial content General Excellence Best Commentary Best Personal Commentary

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• April 2013• www.findlayfamily.com

In-Depth Reporting Best Overall Writing Best Cover Photo Best Supplement Design

Aries kids are the “me first” sign of the zodiac. They are full of energy and fire from the moment they take their first breath of air. They come into the world in a hurry, looking around to see who is there and what is going on. They are not shy and they have no fears. They move constantly and explore with their eyes until they are big enough to crawl, stand, and walk. They do not like fences or play pens or limits of any kind. They ride tricycles and fire engines as soon as they are big enough to climb on. The symbol for Aries is a ram and these kids lead with their heads as they walk and run. They get along well with other children so long as they are as active and adventuresome as the Aries. They love sports of all kinds. They do have a bit of a temper but never carry a grudge. They enjoy wearing hats or caps and are team players.


The great outdoors! Hancock Park District programs introduced area kids to the great outdoors. Above, Assistant Chris Allen shows students from St. Anthony’s Elementary School how the Native Americans made wigwam shelters. At right, living history volunteer Russ Brouneller explains how to gather maple sap at the annual Maple Sugarin’s Day on March 2.

Mylah Lunn, 7 weeks, Findlay

Autumn Calvelage, 6, of McComb, at Castaway Bay Water Park

Smiling faces Findlay area kids are enjoying the start of spring, indoors and out!

Funday Sunday Mazza Museum was “Cat” crazy for its last Funday Sunday. Kids enjoyed dressing up like Dr. Seuss’ most notorious feline.

Jade Alexis Ayers, 2, Findlay

Emalee Noel 5, Findlay

Karli, 2, and Kendra, 9, Arlington

SEND US YOUR

Birthday/Pet

PHOTOS FOR THE MAY ISSUE

Please include their name, age, and your city. Send pics to

production@adamsstreetpublishing.com

DEADLINE: April15

Send us your best high

resolution photos!

*high resolution = 300 dpi

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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what’s

briefly happening... f

Tax filing help, free Each year, millions of dollars of earned income tax credit go unclaimed by eligible families. For that reason, United Way of Hancock County is offering free tax clinics to help Findlay and surrounding area residents claim this money. The clinics are intended for low-to-moderate income families eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other government assistance programs. The clinics can also help families with children about to enter college with FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) applications. United Way began offering tax clinics in 2008, in association with the Ohio Benefit Bank, which provides tax form software, while United Way provides counselors, computers, and the spaces where clinics are hosted. The Ohio Benefit Bank also hosts a free tax filing system on their website. Interested parties should call 2-1-1; information and referral professionals—real live people!— will help callers find a clinic near them, and determine what they need to bring to the tax clinic. The tax clinics will file until Monday, April 15th, the end of tax season. For more information, call 419-423-1432. http://www.uwhancock.org. —JS

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Findlay area guys will don high heels in an effort to combat domestic violence

Walk that walk Findlay area men (and boys!) don’t just talk the talk — and they’ll prove it during the fifth annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event on Saturday, April 27 from 10 am to 2 pm. The walk-a-thon, part of a national movement to raise awareness of domestic violence issues against women, takes the age-old saying in its name literally as participating males don high heels and strut through Riverside Park. That attention-grabbing visual provides an opportunity to discuss gender violence, a difficult but necessary subject for the community to address. Walkers can register alone or as part of a team; proceeds benefit Open Arms Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Center. Riverside Park, 219 McManness Ave. For more info, call 419-420-9261 or visit www.openarmsfindlay.org. —AO

Getting crafty Craft shows are practically a right of passage for Ohioans, and there’s nothing like a 25th annual extravaganza to honor it. The Hancock County Fairgrounds will play host to the annual Springtime in Ohio show, a mega-production featuring more than 300 exhibits over two days. Attendees can explore folk art, primitive (rustic, frontierlooking creations), contemporary and Americana arts and crafts. While there’s a huge selection of handmade items, vendors will also be allowed to sell non-handmade goods like antiques and collectibles in a recently added “marketplace” venue. There will be plenty to explore — 11 buildings, two tents, pony rides and a bounce house, as well as booths cooking up tasty eats — so plan to make a day of it. Saturday, May 4 from 10am-5pm and Sunday, May 5 from 11am-4pm. $5 adults/children 12 and under free ($1 off coupons available on website; pony and bounce house tickets sold separately). 1017 E. Sandusky St. 419436-1457. www.cloudshows.biz. —AO

• April 2013• www.findlayfamily.com

Eco-friendly fun Families looking to celebrate Earth Day can find no better setting than the Hancock Parks. On Sunday, April 21, the park district is hosting Hands On Nature: Earth Day Fun at Oakwoods Nature Preserve Discovery Center, with the aim of celebrating earth’s treasures while teaching families environmentalism in a fun setting. Starting at 1 pm, participants will play “trash toss” and create their own Earth Day hat. Then, at 2 pm, kids and their parents will embark on an “Unnatural Hike.” The day’s festivities aren’t all about the games, though — children will leave with an enhanced knowledge of eco-friendly living. 1-4pm. Free. 1400 Oakwoods Ln. 419-425-7275. hancockparks.com. —AO


On the go, running (other people’s) errands

Short on time? Short on patience? Let Karen Wisner take care of that pesky errand for you. Wisner, owner of the new Karen’s Errands in Findlay, has been grocery shopping, picking up prescriptions and doing other duties since November. She first got the idea from caring for her elderly mother, realizing that her mother and others like her sometimes needed help with life’s mundane tasks. Many people in Findlay are either home bound, on bed rest, without transportation or too busy to get to the store, Wisner says. “Not all people have families who can drop everything and help,” she said. Wisner’s services include grocery and event shopping, post office runs, library book returns, prescription pickups and recycling drop-offs. She is also available to pick up mail during vacations, wait for service calls and re-stock the house for snowbirds before they return home. Some errands have a set fee, others are charged by the hour. She does not provide transportation for people or pets but runs the errands for clients in Findlay and Hancock County. For more information, call 419-420-5214 or visit www.karenserrandsfindlay.com. —RB

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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THELINES TWEEN advice for parents with children 10-16

Pioneer girl

Area teen Madison Leader finds inspiration in farm life past and present By Laurie Wurth-Pressel

Finding a home

For more than four years, Awakening Minds Art has provided therapeutic art and athletics as a way to help reach individuals with special needs or those who benefit from one-on-one instruction, offering services in-home as well as at various area facilities. Now, AMA has partnered with Trends TOO!, a downtown party destination, to share space at 515 South Main St. AMA can host activities in the front part of the space, while Trends TOO! will continue to host parties in the back room, which can also be used for AMA activities when scheduling allows. (AMA will continue to do home and facility visits when appropriate.) New at the downtown space is a sensory station, where clients and caregivers can experience various items such as weighted blankets and affordable toys. “I just feel this will take us to new heights,” says Sarah Crisp, the organization’s director. “We will definitely be taking advantage of the space by offering more group activities.” For more information on AMA, contact Crisp at 419.302.3892 or by email at awakeningmindsart@yahoo.com. www.awakeningmindsart.org. —RB

Deshler teen Madison Leader divides her time between present (as a 4-H participant) and past (as an 1840s living history volunteer) Once a month, Madison Leader, a Deshler eighth grader, turns into a pioneer girl from the 1840s. She loves reenacting the past as a living history volunteer at Litzenberg Memorial Woods in Findlay. A farm girl in real life, Madison has discovered that some values — like hard work — transcend time. As part of our effort to spotlight exceptional area teens, we talked with Leader about her love of history, pioneer life and staying away from Twitter. You’re pretty atypical for a teen — most are more into Facebook than history. When did your love of history start? I’ve always liked the pioneers. I’m a big fan of Laura Ingalls and Little House on the Prairie. I also have the American Girl doll Felicity. I like how the pioneer women dressed so modestly. What role do you play at Litzenberg? My name is Anna McClintock and I’m a neighbor girl of the McKinnis family who live at the homestead. My role changes, but I’ve helped bake a rhubarb pie in the kitchen, sew a quilt, and work in the woods at maple sugaring time. What do you wear? I wear a chemise, three petticoats, dress, apron, day bonnet, socks and boots or black ballet flats. I made the dress and apron myself. What’s the funniest question you’ve been asked while in character? Somebody asked me where our dishwasher was located. My reaction was: “What’s a dishwasher?” What has your role taught you? I’ve learned to quilt. I’ve also learned that kids had to work hard and they respected authority more in those days. Women didn’t have as many rights at they do now — they couldn’t even vote. People were also more

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• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com

social. They relied on their neighbors and helped each other out. Do you think you could adjust to living like a pioneer in real life? I probably could. I’m not into Facebook or Twitter and I don’t have a cell phone, so I wouldn’t miss that stuff like other kids. But on the other hand, it gets really hot and uncomfortable in the clothes you wear. And the pioneers only took a bath once a week. What’s your real life like? I live on a large farm. We have sheep, steers, pigs, one dog named Sam and about a half a dozen cats. I have two brothers and two sisters and I am the oldest. I have a lot of responsibilities at home, including babysitting and household chores like cooking and dishwashing. In the summer, I help my Dad bale hay. What are your hobbies? I like to sew and knit. I’m currently making a sundress for my friend. I’m in 4-H and I raise a lamb each summer for the fair. I also love to read, especially romance novels. Litzenberg Memorial Woods at Hancock County Parks, 6100 U.S. Route 224, Findlay (West). www.hancockparks.com. Know an exceptional area teen who deserves to be recognized? Email editor@findlayfamily.com with their name and contact information.


e c n ha

!

WHO OO fami OOO ar e yo ly Vot favorit ur es e best of t for the ? he p ast yea r.

C 4/15 t s La ine l d a De

S E T I R FAVO VOTE ONLINE @ findlayfamily.COM

FAMILY FROLICKING

Place for winter fun ......................................... Rainy-day activity ............................................ Sunny-day activity ........................................... Place to sneak in a history lesson ........................................... Dance class .................................................... Martial arts program ....................................... Art class ......................................................... Music class .................................................... Free activity .................................................... Family-friendly fair or festival ......................... Live theater for kids ....................................... Place to hop on a horse ................................. Place to volunteer .......................................... Park or playground ........................................ Story hour (name location) ............................. Swim lessons ................................................ Place to swim ................................................ Indoor water park .......................................... Vacation that won’t empty your wallet .......................................... Family-friendly gym ....................................... Gymnastics center ......................................... Place to play rec sports ................................. Bowling alley ................................................

TELL FAF

Favorite thing about Findlay Area Family ..................................... Things you would love to see in Findlay Area Family.................................. Best Findlay Area Family Column ............................................ Reason to visit www.findlayfamily.com .............................. .......................................................... ..........................................

FEED THE FAM! Family Restaurant ...................................................... Healthy fast food ....................................................... Pizza joint (non-chain) ............................................. Burger place (non-chain) ........................................... Ice cream shop .......................................................... Place where kids eat free .......................................... Kid-friendly grocery store .......................................... Natural food store .....................................................

HEY SHORTY! IT’S YOUR BIRTHDAY!

Entertainer ................................................................ Birthday party venue ................................................. Place for goodie bag loot ........................................... Place to buy a cake ...................................................

RETAIL THERAPY

Kid’s clothier ........................................................... Kid’s shoe shop ....................................................... Kid’s consignment ................................................... Place to buy maternity clothes ................................. Place to furnish your little one’s “nest” .................... Locally owned specialty toys/gifts ...........................

GROWN-UP TIME

Support group for moms ....................................... Mom-friendly play date ......................................... Place for single parents to meet ............................ Parent blog ........................................................... Date night restaurant ............................................ Place for Mom to be pampered ............................. Romantic getaway ................................................ .............................................

For display advertising call Emily at 419.244.9859 or email sales@findlayfamily.com

................................................

RULES 1 You may only vote once. 2 No answer should be repeated more than three times. 3 A minimum

of 30 questions must be answered for your ballot to be eligible. 4 Your name and email address must be included. 5 No ballot stuffing! No photocopies! (We will discard any ballots that we suspect are fraudulently submitted.)

DEADLINE Friday, April 12, 2013, 5 p.m.

FINDLAY’S HIGH FLYERS

Neighborhood to raise kids ............................................ Program (activity for preschoolers) ................................ Summer day camp ......................................................... Tutor/learning center ..................................................... Teacher (and his/her school) .......................................... Family-friendly car dealership ....................................... Kid-friendly emergency room ........................................ Place to take Dad for Father’s Day ................................ Place to take Mom for Mother’s Day ............................ Kid-friendly salon ........................................................ Picnic spot .................................................................. Parent-friendly work place ........................................... Bank/financial institution ............................................. Family Lawyer ............................................................ Dentist/orthodontist ..................................................... Place to give birth ....................................................... OB/GYN ...................................................................... Optometrist ................................................................. Midwife ...................................................................... Pediatric practice ........................................................ Doctor ......................................................................... Chiropractor ............................................................... Allergist ...................................................................... Veterinarian ................................................................ Place to nurse a baby .................................................. Kid’s photographer ..................................................... Special needs services .............................................. Place to worship ........................................................ Preschool ................................................................... Daycare ..................................................................... Drop-in childcare ....................................................... Family-friendly restroom ............................................

Space reservation deadline May 15th Winners announced in the June issue of Findlay Area Family Please mail completed ballots to 1120 Adams St. Publishing Attn: Family Favorites, Toledo, OH 43604. Or vote online at findlayfamily.com!

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

U 2013 S

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MEET SUMMMEET ER CA STSUMMER AFFER MP S CAMP FOR M STAFFERS OMORE RE INFORFOR MATIO INFORMATION! N

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F R A N K LI N

P Calling all campers! Black Swamp Area Council invites you to join us for Cub Scout Summer Camp! Chinquapin District Day Camp is being held July 17-19 at Camp Lakota. American Elm District Day Camp is being held July 22-26 at Camp Berry. Hawthorn District Day Camp, July 18-20, will be held at Leipsic Fishing and Hunting Lodge. Cub Scout Family camps will also add to your summer fun! Mom and Me, June 22-23, will be held at Camp Berry. Dad and Lad, July 13-14, will be held at Camp Lakota. Cub Resident Camp will be held on July 28-30 and on August 1-3 at Camp Berry and again at Camp Lakota on August 4-6 and August 8-10. Webelos Resident Camp is being held at Camp Lakota on July 21-23, July 25-27, July 28-30 and on August 8-10. Wbebelos Resident Camp will also be held at Camp Berry on August 4-6 and August 8-10. Call 419-422-4356 or visit www.bsac449-bsa.org for details.

ELD

BGSU College of Musical Arts offers Summer Music Institute 2013. The College of Musical Arts provides intensive music camps, with themes ranging from composition to performance, designed for high school and junior high school students to improve their musical skills and get the chance to work with BGSU faculty. Three sessions are available from June 16 through July 3. Fees vary per camp session. Housing and meals are included in camp costs. For more information, visit www.bgsu.edu/colleges/ music/outreach/smi/

Black Swamp Area Council 2100 Broad Ave. 419-422-4356. www.bsac449-bsa.org

TFI

Bowing Green State University College of Musical Arts 1001 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. 419372-2181 www.bgsu.edu/colleges/music/ outreach/smi

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A P R I L 2 7, W

and totally fun — experiences the Findlay area’s summer camp programs have to offer

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D iscover the educational —

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Franciscan Earth Literacy Center (FELC) 194 St. Francis Ave., Tiffin. felctiffin.org The FELC is an environmental education center and demonstration facility designed to promote the appreciation of nature and encourage sustainable living practices. It’s a space for indoor education and outdoor learning experiences and offers many hands-on activities. It’s a place to discuss, mediate, and act upon ideas to work together and learn how to live well on the earth The FELC offer programs for all ages and abilities. Please visit felctiffin.org and find us on Facebook. Imagination Station 1 Discovery Way (at Adams and Summit). 419-244-2674. www.imaginationstationtoledo.org While it’s HOT and steamy outside, we’ve got fun-filled, week-long summer camps loaded with COOL science for you to experience. We’ve got 3 exciting camp options to choose from: Super Splatter Science!, Catapults, Coasters and Cars! and Survival Camp - NEW THIS SUMMER! Summer Camp is for kids 7-12 (in the fall) and runs 9am-4:30pm with before and after care available at no additional cost. For details, dates and registration, visit www.imaginationstationtoledo.org or call 419-244-2674 x259 Morgan Valley Farm 1300 E. Monroe Rd. Tecumseh, Michigan. 517-423-7858 www.morganvalleyfarm.com Children at Morgan Valley Farm overnight camps learn safety, horse anatomy, horse health and horse related occupations. Guest speakers visit camp to discuss various topics. Riding lessons are given daily. Each camper and their partner is responsible

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• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

for their horse during camp. Campers will have the opportunity to clean, brush, feed and exercise their horses. Special activities vary per camp but may include hay rides and horse drawn buggy rides. Morgan Valley Farm offers small group/ counselor ratios and a knowledgeable staff. Campers are groups according to age and experience. Camps are available for children ages 5 and up. SummerTime at Maumee Valley Country Day School 1715 S. Reynolds Rd. 419-381-1313 www.MaumeeValleySummertime.org Half-day and full-day options at MVCDS summer camps will complement a busy family’s summer schedule. Hobbit Camp, for ages 4-5, offers arts and crafts, yoga for kids and exploring the woods among its numerous activities. Hob Haven Afternoon Camp mixes sports, arts, science, stories, nature, with a low camper to counselor ratio ensuring personalized attention to satisfy campers with varied interests. Week-long morning specialty classes for incoming grades 1-12 include soccer, flag football, tennis, basketball, yoga, glee performing classes, sculpture, cooking, crafty creations, playmaking, creative arts, chemistry, philosophy, study skills, algebra, SAT & ACT prep, Chinese, chess and so much more! Before and After Camp Care available from 7:30am - 5:30pm.

Toledo Zoo 2700 Broadway St. 419-385-4040. www.toledozoo.org The Toledo Zoo is one of the world’s most complete zoos, with over 8,500 animals representing more than 750 species. The Toledo Zoo is also one of the region’s top destinations for campers! Speciality camps are available for kids ages 4-14. This year campers can experience the Australian Outback without needing a passport! Critters Down Under (ages 4-5) and Journey through the Outback (ages 6-10) are being offered. Safari Camps are also available such as Fishing Camp, Junior Zoo Keeper and Enrichment and Training. West Ohio United Methodist Camps & Retreats  Camp Otterbein, 15779 Cox Rd. Logan. Camp Wesley, 653 Twp. Rd. 37 E., Bellefontaine. Camp Widewater, 4050 County Rd. 424, Liberty Center. 614-781-2630. www.westohiocamps.org For over 50 years, West Ohio United Methodist Camps have served people for Christian birth, growth, and renewal. Camps are available at three unique locations, each of which is ACA Accredited and offers age and developmentally appropriate activities and faith-forming programs. In addition to traditional, co-ed resident camp we also offer family camps and fully-accessible buddy camps for those with varying abilities. Summer Camp runs June 9-August 4 for ages 7 through 18. Camps are open year-round for retreats. Cost varies and financial aid is available up to $100 per camper with financial need. Information is available online.

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com


Super glue and other parenting tools Mother Mayhem on codes, theories and other necessities By Mary Helen Darah We are all in this parenting thing together, people. It takes a village … and an occasional glass of wine and large quantities of baked goods (especially when three daughters share the same “cycle," making you to want to relocate to the nearest Holiday Inn). Consequently, when someone shares a bit of wisdom or insight that's effective, I like to pass it on.

The Super Glue Theory

I am the mother of teens, so I am navigating my way through the land of flying hormones. I know things have changed since my upbringing, where basically my options were to remain a virgin until I marry or die. It saddens me that my daughters are force fed images that reinforce the message that all they have to offer is their sexuality. To reach “celebrity” status all you have to do is perform intimate acts on tape, get married on live TV (then file for divorce after 72 days), get pregnant with a new “baby daddy” (while waiting for the divorce to become final) and maintain your balance in stilettoes with perfectly lined lips. The cultural female role models offered to my teens

such as Kim Kardashian and Snookie, motivated me to dish out the “Super Glue Theory” (SGT). The SGT equates having sex to super gluing your fingers together; you can pry yourself free and move on, but healing is required. Do this several times and it can be downright painful. In theory, when you least expect it, someone amazing could appear on your radar screen. However, if you are wounded from continually being “stuck,” you could be too busy nursing your injuries and miss out.

The Mandy Code

I learned of the “Mandy Code” from a friend of mine and incorporated it into my “Keeping Sane Through the Teen Years 101” manual. Oscar Wilde was said to have uttered the phrase “Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.” It has been my personal experience that kids love to be unique as long as they are like everyone else. Therefore, the “Mandy Code” is the ideal way for a teen to leave a party and still “save face.”   I told the girls to call me and say, “Mandy, do you want to go get some pizza?” or “Mandy,

Mother Mayhem’s daughter, Maria (center), takes the Super Glue Theory literally pick me up and we will hang out” if they needed to leave a party or situation. My first “Mandy” call came from my oldest child when she was a freshman. I jumped in the car with thoughts that I would be rescuing her from drugs, alcohol or some sexually assertive nightmare. She got in the car and I said, “Lauren, I know I told you that if you used the code, I would pick you up and not ask any questions … but, if you want to share … ” She replied, “Mom, they wanted to watch the Texas Chainsaw Massacre and I didn’t want to get freaked out.” Since then, I have gotten a few “upgraded code blue Mandy calls” and thank my good fortune to have included   the “code” in my parenting playbook.

Get on the “Right Bus”

A dad, coach and all around “good guy” who I am acquainted with continu-

ally tells his sons to “Get on the right bus!" He also tells them that they are three bad decisions away from totally screwing up their life but I digress. His “Get on the Right Bus” motto hit a chord with me because my grandfather would quote Lincoln when he said, “Make sure your feet are in the right place, then stand firm.” This hands-on dad tells them he believes that they are intelligent enough to realize when they are heading in a bad direction. Actually, I’m paraphrasing. He advises that when they sense they are heading in a bad direction, at the very first stop to “GET THE HELL OFF!” Parents have shared hundreds of helpful ideas with me and one of these days I vow to collectively organize and share their insights. In the meantime, I will try to keep my girls “unglued,” away from “Mandy” and on a bus heading toward a great future.

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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No rest for the productive

When the internal alarm is set permanently to “baby time,” you’ve got to look at the bright side By Rose Roccisano Barto to survive. If I wanted to get anything done without By the time you read this, I’ve been up for hours. It’s 3:14 a.m. I’ve just checked the weather forecasts, holding a baby, it needed to be in the wee hours. Over the years my mornings have become more latest news and interesting gossip on the internet. Coffee is brewing, and I’m looking forward to my first cup. By solitary, as my oldest is now a teen and lives to sleep 5 a.m. I will be working out. No one else in my house is later. Her younger sister enjoys a nice sleep-in as awake, and for the only time all day I have the house all well. Even though I could sleep later, I’m stuck in my morning lark habit because it’s so productive. to myself. Most of my writing, exercisI’ve tried sleeping later. But over the ing, cleaning and quiet time hapyears my body clock has been set to wake Are you an early pens before 6 a.m. Then my kids up at ungodly hours. I have my alarm set riser or a night get up to take showers before for 4 a.m., but rarely make it that late. If I owl? Let us know school. By 7:30 a.m. they are on sleep much past 3 a.m. you’d better hold which provides the bus. And I’ve already done a mirror under my nose to make sure I’m the best me-time more before daybreak than many still breathing. at Facebook.com/ people will do all day. I was always an early riser. I was FindlayAreaFamily. I’m not the only one out there. probably the only one among my college According to the United States friends who didn’t mind 8 a.m. classes, and relished having the dining hall almost to myself for Census Bureau, one out of eight of us leaves for work breakfast. But the truly insane mornings started when I before 6 a.m. We get on with our day earlier, but we became a parent. Before then, I would get up about 6 a.m. are also apparently mutants. Neurobiologists at Washington University in St. in order to make my 45 minute commute to work. That was a reasonable hour for most of humanity, and I didn’t Louis, Missouri, have studied why some people can think anything of it. Once my first daughter came along, function on unusual sleep patterns. They’ve identified gene mutations that appear to cause people to go all bets on sleeping later were off. As a baby, it was a surprise if she slept past 5:30 a.m. to bed much earlier and awake earlier. Another muThere were times in the summer I’d take her for a stroller tation, apparently, is to blame for some people sleepride around our neighborhood at first light — until I de- ing 6 hours rather than the more typical 8 hours a night. The only time my early to rise philosophy goes against cided I didn’t want anyone calling authorities because I was walking a baby at 5 a.m. I had to get up early in order society is when there are plays, rehearsals and other events

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• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com

in the evening. I’m pretty much useless after 8 p.m., and will usually be the first person to leave a late-night event. But I’ll still be the first person awake in my house the next morning.


Love American Girl?

“Empowering little ones empowers me”

Like us on Facebook for your chance to win our

Heather Swinehart discovers a place for growth and good cheer for herself and her son with Camp Fire Northwest Ohio by Kathy Miller

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prize pack!

facebook.com/findlayareafamily

Fun Facts:

Children: Tristen, 8, and 3 foster children

Hometown: Findlay Favorite spot in Findlay: Donnell Pond

Favorite place to be: The great outdoors

Favorite restaurant: Chipotle Motto: Every day is a gift to learn something new about ourselves and the world around us.

When Heather Swinehart’s kindergarten-aged son Tristen began coming home from school with anxiety and asking “why he couldn’t be like everyone else,” she knew she had to act. Describing her outdoor-loving child as “all nature, all the time” and one who “thinks outside the box,” she recognized his uniqueness and wanted to find a place where he would thrive. That desire for acceptance led her to Camp Fire Northwest Ohio, the local chapter of a nationwide youth development organization that prides itself on its policy of inclusiveness. To Heather’s relief, Tristen found an oasis with Camp Fire’s coeducational programs. The volunteers were “enthusiastic about who he is,” she explains. “They embraced my son. They encouraged him to just be himself.” Tristen’s turnaround with the Camp Fire served as Heather’s inspiration to get involved. A former teacher who now provides in-home care to “families who have nontraditional structures” she’s always felt “a little socially awkward.” Despite this modest assessment, she’s found success as a volunteer, leading Camp Fire Starflight at Whittier Elementary, an after-school program which pairs her with kindergarten through 2nd grade students. Heather delights in impacting children through Camp Fire. The organization makes a point of collaborating with young participants — a suggestion from

Tristen led to her group’s “random acts of kindness” project, which began with a short timeline and grew into something more impactful than originally planned thanks to her group’s enthusiasm. And the benefits can be more personal, too, Heather says. One tiny charge who initially squeaked out that she was “very shy” has blossomed into a “bubbling rock star.” Add Heather’s out-of-the-ordinary family to the mix, including her foster children, and everyone fits in and relates — being different is the common thread that connects them. While Heather has built a welcoming and safe place for a number of children at home, she and Tristen have found and provided the same acceptance with Camp Fire Northwest Ohio. In a few short years the organization became a big part of her family’s life. “[The staff] are an amazing group of people,” Swinehart says. “There’s just so much support [for me] as a leader and for my son.” Tristen, now 8, is thriving, and Heather’s involvement with Camp Fire has increased her confidence tremendously. Helping children realize their own self-worth has been a fulfilling endeavor, she says. “Empowering little ones empowers me.” For more information about Camp Fire Northwest Ohio, call 419-422-5415 or visit campfirenwohio.com.

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

15


Coffee for a cause

New local shop serves up brews for charity by Rose Roccisano Barto

We Serve.Coffee

Kid-friendly: Yes To avoid wait: Call ahead for a to-go

order or avoid the downtown lunch rush Bathroom amenities: Changing tables in women’s restroom

High Chairs: Yes Got Milk: Not on the menu but juices,

114. E. Sandusky St. 567-525-4680 www.weservecoffee.org Open Monday thru Friday: 7am-2pm Weekends: 9am-3pm

hot and iced chocolate and smoothies are offered Anything healthy for the kids?: Salads

Food allergy concerns?: As always, ask

We Serve. Coffee is not just a place to partake of paninis, salads and specialty coffees. It’s also where one can do good while eating well.  All of the shop’s profits are donated to local and global needs, most recently the City Mission of Findlay. Started by Greg and Cynthia Arnette as a way to give back, it is staffed by volunteers from St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, who also helped with the demolition and renovation of the space at 114 E. Sandusky St.   In addition to donating profits, We Serve.Coffee  offers farm-direct, organic and sustainable coffee and tea. The napkins are made with 100 percent recycled materials, the stir sticks are reusable and the receipts can either be texted or emailed, saving paper. In-house coffee is served in handmade mugs by Findlay artist Dave

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THE SHORT COURSE

Charles. All to-go orders are packed in recycled/recyclable containers, and those ordering drinks to-go are encourage to fill reusable travel mugs in order to save the earth one drink at a time.   What We Serve. Coffee doesn’t save on, however, is taste — both in food and décor. The brightly lit downtown breakfast and lunch spot features exposed ductwork, a brick accent wall and bright colors that add a “cool” factor. Want to watch the world go by? Two window cubbies feature comfy armchairs and an electronic fireplace.

• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com

Food choices include five different paninis, three varieties of salads, smoothies, coffees and Italian sodas, soup of the day and desserts. A kids’ menu features favorites of grilled cheese and peanut butter and jelly ($3.99). Lunch can be either a half or full Panini or salad ($3.99/half or $6.99/ full) or combine a half panini, half salad and cup of soup for $6.99. The teen and tween ordered the full California (featuring turkey breast) and Luau (featuring sliced ham) paninis, and enjoyed them. In retrospect, the portion was large enough that a half would have

been enough for each. My husband had the full breakfast Panini featuring egg, cheese and bacon — along with a cup of soup and salad — while I had the veggie with roasted red peppers, tomatoes and spinach. Desserts we sampled included homemade buckeye candy and cake pops. Next time you get a hankering for soup, sandwiches or salads, try We Serve. Coffee. It’s more than just coffee. It’s coffee — and lunch — for a cause. If you fall in love with both the restaurant and its mission, you can also volunteer to help serve. The store is also interested in hearing from local artists who wish to display their work. Email a store manager at weserve@weservecoffee.org.


{April 2013} All calendar events are subject to change, cancellation, and limited size. Calling ahead for confirmation is recommended.

National Train Day Saturday, May 4 National Train Day rolls back to Toledo’s Amtrak Station to celebrate the heritage and importance of the country’s railroad system. The entire family will enjoy a number of different educational and fun activities. Exhibits displaying a look into the rich history and limitless future of passenger and freight rail will fill the grand Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Plaza. Activities include the opportunity to board an Amtrak “Superliner,” 5 model train layouts, a “family lounge” with Thomas the Tank Engine layouts and a working children’s train that’s big enough for adult rides too! Cannonball Paul will entertain with railroad tunes and stories, and Engineer Steve will present a children’s rail safety program. There will be additional parking at Owens Corning with a shuttle bus for guests. 9:30am-4pm. Free. Toledo Amtrack Station, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Plaza, 415 Emerald Ave., Toledo. 419-241-9155. www.tmacog.org—JG

1 MONDAY Discovery Story: The Pony Express! Playing dress-up is always fun, especially for children ages 3- 6 who are encouraged to dress up as cowboys and cowgirls while learning about the Pony Express! In addition to learning the history of the Pony Express, children will make a pony craft and learn a song sung by cowboys.10am-1pm. Free. Oakwoods Nature Preserve, Discovery Center, 1400 Oakwoods Ln. 419-425-7275. www.hancockparks.com Lego Mania, Build, be creative and have fun. Sharing is a must. For all ages. Mondays April 1 & 8, 5:30-7:30pm; Saturdays April 8 & 13, 9:30am-12pm. Free. Findlay-Hancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-4221712. www.findlaylibrary.org

3 WEDNESDAY Play Dough Play Date - Have fun with play dough and clay tools. Sharing is a must. Parents need to supervise their child. Program repeats on April 10. 10:30am-12:30pm. Findlay-Hancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org

5 FRIDAY Little Tikes - Come play with the library’s fun toys. Sharing is a must. Parents/caregivers need to supervise their child. April 5 & 12. 10am-12pm. FindlayHancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org

7 SUNDAY Funday Sunday “Cats!” - Join the fun during this story-time with book artist, Nick Bruel. 1:30-3pm. Free. Mazza Museum, 1000 N. Main St. 419-424-5521. www.mazzacollection.org

10 WEDNESDAY Tales for Tots “Colors: Yellow” Children will love this story time with Gail Lazarcyzk, followed by an optional sack lunch. 1:30-3pm. Free. Mazza Museum, 1000 N. Main St. 419-434-5521. www.mazzacollection.org

12 FRIDAY

Planetarium Night: I Spy in the Sky - Aspiring mini-astrologists, ages 3 and up, can come explore the evening sky at the planetaruim for a game of “I Spy” to find planets and constellations, accompanied with storytelling. 7pm. Free. Oakwoods Nature Preserve, Discovery Center, 1400 Oakwoods Ln. 419-4257275. www.hancockparks.com FPP Walking Workshop 2013 Team up with photographer Leslie Lazenby and guests FPP Hosts Michael Raso, Mat Marrash and Findlay University’s Professor Jeff Salisbury for a fun and educational weekend of film photography. This is a fluid, fun weekend of casual instructions on all formats of traditional photography. Bring your fav film cameras or check out a camera from the Imagine That shop. Visit the website for the full schedule of events. Reservations required. Friday, 6pm-Sunday, 1pm. Free.The Jones Mansion and The University of Findlay, 313 E. Sandusky St. www.filmphotographyproject.com

Cont. on pg 18

www.findlayfamily.com • April 2013 •

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Cont. from pg 17

MONDAY-FRIDAY

Mom & Tot Skate, Bring the little ones to the Cube for open ice skating Monday-Friday. 10am-11am. $2 child/$3 adult skates included. The CUBE, 3430 N. Main St. 419-424-7176. www.findlayohio.com

TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS

Story Time, Hear stories with songs and a simple craft. For all ages. 10:3011:30am. Free. Findlay-Hancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org

TUESDAYS

Starflight First Grade Trail Starter, Camp Fire USA connects children and families with caring, trained adults in an intimate group atmosphere through our club programs. first and third Tuesdays. 3:30-4:30pm. $15. 733 Wyandot St. 419-422-5415. www.campfireusa-nwohio.com

WEDNESDAYS

Toddler Art Zone, Includes a story, art project and music. For ages one to four. 11:30am-12:15pm. $5-$10. YMCA, Downtown Branch, 300 E. Lincoln St. 419-422-8249. www.findlayymca.org

THURSDAYS

Jr. Teens in Action, This is for children grades six to eight. Curriculum is based on the Five Trails of Camp Fire USA. The Trail to Knowing Me. The Trail to Family and Community. The Trail to Creativity. The Trail to the Environment. The Trail to the Future. 5:30–6:30pm. Camp Fire USA, 305 W. Hardin St. 419-422-5415. www.campfireusa-nwohio.com

FRIDAYS

Baby Story Time, Infants birth-36 months will enjoy simple stories, rhymes, music, puppets, movement for the youngest learners. 9:30am. Free. FindlayHancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org

Healthy Kids Day - Healthy Kids Day is a nation-wide YMCA event that gets families motivated for a more active and healthier summer. It will include various activities, snacks and prizes! 5-8pm. Free. Koehler Center, 1000 N. Main St. www.findlay.edu

16 SATURDAY Teen Movie Night - Movie titles will be posted in the teen area prior to each event. Teens must have a parent permission form on file. Popcorn and pop are provided. 5:30-7:30pm. Free. FindlayHancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org

18 THURSDAY Twice Blessed Children’s Consignment Sale - Browse this sale of children’s items ranging from newborn to teens. There’ll be many items to choose from including clothing, toys, books, etc. 3-8pm. Findlay First Church of the Nazarene, 2501 Broad Ave. 419-422-8660. www.findlayfirstnaz.org

20 SATURDAY Arbor Day 2013 - Help celebrate this national holiday and join the Findlay Shade Tree Commission, Gleaners Life Insurance Society and others to kick off a new “Neighborhood-Adopt-A-Tree” program in the city of Findlay. A variety of demonstrations will be provided on tree care and maintenance by area professionals. Refreshments will be provided. Come help plant trees to reforest this area park. 10am. Mound Park, 850 South Cory St. www.hancockparks.com Movie: Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio - Participants will watch the movie: Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio. Following the movie there will be an optional discussion of the book/movie. 1:30-5pm. Findlay-Hancock County Public Library, 206 Broadway St. 419-422-1712. www.findlaylibrary.org Buckeye Traction Ditcher 110th Anniversary Celebration - The Hancock Historical Museum is celebrating the 110th birthday of “Old 88” the Museum’s Buckeye Traction Ditcher. Old 88 and other visiting antique ditching machines will be on display. Also, children can participate in hands-on activities and learn about soil and water conservation. 10am-4pm. $2-$5. Hancock Historical Museum, 422 W. Sandusky St. 419-423-4433. www.hancockhistoricalmuseum.org Seeing and Navigating the Night Sky - After a presentation by the Millstream Astrology Club on navigating the night sky, telescopes will be set up to view the moon, Jupiter and other wonders of our universe. Join them for an opportunity to learn and see these beautiful objects! 8pm. Free. Riverbend Recreation Area, 16618 Township Rd. 208. 419-425-7275. www.hancockparks.com

21 SUNDAY Hands on Nature: Earth Day Fun To increase awareness and appreciation for the planet, families are encouraged to go the park and learn about the environment and participate in fun activites for children, including a “trash toss” game and creating Earth Day hats. 1-4pm. Free. Oakwoods Nature Preserve, Discovery Center, 1400 Oakwoods Ln. 419-425-7275. www.hancockparks.com 18

• April 2013 • www.findlayfamily.com


22 MONDAY Wee Ones: Trees - Program includes a story, activities and a craft about trees. Recommended for children three years old and under with an adult companion. Other aged siblings welcome. 10am & 1pm. Oakwoods Nature Preserve,1400 Oakwoods Ln. 419-425-7275. www.hancockparks.com

25 THURSDAY Fiddler on the Roof - This classic musical tells the story of Anatevka Tevye a poor Jewish dairyman who struggles to raise his five daughters in the the tumultuous anti-Semitic environment. 8-11pm. $15. Fort Findlay Playhouse, 300 West Sandusky St. 419-422-4624. www.fortfindlayplayhouse.org

26 FRIDAY Daddy Daughter Dance - Dance the night away with your little princess and build a great memory for you and your daughter! Refreshments will be available. Ages 3-12 only. Register by April 19. 7-8:30pm. $15-$20. Downtown YMCA, West Gym, 300 E. Lincoln St. 419-4224424. www.findlayymca.org

27 SATURDAY Multicultural Celebration! - The day features the “Adventures in Aviation” exhibit, food sampling from around the world, displays of art and artifacts, musical performances and special readings, multicultural children’s activities, storytelling, and more. 11am-3pm. Free. Glenwood Middle SchoolCafeteria/Auditorium, 1715 N Main St. 419-423-4954.

Fishing for Kids - Children ages 5-15, with an adult companion, can join us to learn the basics of fishing, fish identification, the fish environment, and more. Fishing will take place afterwards at Giertz Lake. Please bring your own pole, but some will be provided if needed. Register by Thursday, April 25. 10am-12pm. Riverbend Recreation Area, 16618 Township Rd 208. 419-425-7275. www. hancockparks.com ReWINEd - This event will showcase examples of reuse of historic buildings in Findlay with food provided by local restaurants. There will be wine tasting from 4-5pm followed by tours of the featured buildings. Also, an after-tour party will be at Alexandria’s will be at 7pm. Proceeds go to the Hancock Museum Capital Campaign. 4-8pm. $25-$40. Downtown Findlay. 419-423-4433. www.hancockhistoricalmuseum.org Beginner’s Geocaching - Join members of the NW Ohio Geocachers to assist with a free real-world outdoor treasure hunt to locate a hidden container (geocache) using a smart phone or GPS. Participants will be teamed up with experienced club members. No prior experience or equipment required. Dress for the weather and trail conditions. 2pm. Riverbend Recreation Area, 16618 Township Road 208. 419-425-7275. www.hancockparks.com

findlayfamily.com marketplace ADVERTISING IN MARKETPLACE Free Classifieds:

BGSU Grad. 419-422-7804

Individuals may receive one free 20-word ad per month (products offered in ads must sell for under $100). Each additional word 40 cents, payment must accompany ad. Free ads run 1 month and are reserved for private-party’s use, noncommercial concerns and free services. Ads MUST be typed or neatly printed and MAILED, EMAILED, or DROPPED OFF to Findlay Area Family Classifieds by the15th of the month prior to publication.

Violin/Viola/Voice/Piano Lessons

accepting all ages. Let me help develop your gift. 419-704-6195

HELP WANTED Freelance writers needed. Send

Line Classifieds: Only $10 per month for 20

resume to: editor@findlayfamily.com

words or less. Each additional word is 40 cents each and any artwork will be $5 extra. Display Classifieds: Display classifieds with a box may be purchased for $25 per column inch. Photos are accepted with ads for an additional $5 per photo.

Caregiver our first love residential services is looking for people who can help with homemaker personal care. Stna background and experience. Fax resume 419-241-8182 or email robinson1106@sbcglobal.Net

Deadlines: Ad copy must be received by the 15th of the month prior to publication.

Payment:

Payment must be received before an ad can be placed. We accept checks, cash, money orders and credit cards (Visa/ Mastercard).

Serious Moms Wanted. We need serious & motivated people for expanding health and wellness industry. High speed internet/phone essential. Free online training. Http://www.iworkforfreedom.com

Mail or drop off:

Findlay Area Family Classifieds, 1120 Adams St., Toledo, Ohio 43604

Phone: 419-244-9859 Email: classifieds@findlayfamily.com Refunds: Sorry, NO REFUNDS given. Misprints: Credit toward future ads.

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SERVICES

OUR FIRST LOVE RESIDENTIAL SERVICES now offering homemaker personal care, supportive living, and personal assistance and much more. 419-4508601 or robinson1106@sbcglobal.net. Ask for Mary

FOR SALE REFRIGERATOR $60, Table and 4 chairs $60 419-841-7567

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Health young canary, good singer, cage, stand, accessories and food $75 firm cash only Doreen 419-242-7565

ST. JOSEPH’S PARISH SeparatedDivorced Support Group. Tuesdays

Native American Collection, busts and full

beginning Feb. 5 for 9 weeks. Main St.at Ravine Dr. in Sylvania. NonDenominational, 419-885-5791 or 419-344-0713

figures, must sacrifice, relocating. Contact Noreen 419-242-7565

6 SATURDAY Junie B. Jones - Outspoken, precocious, lovable Junie B. Jones stars in a colorful, funny, fast-paced musical about new friends, new glasses, sugar cookies, the annual kickball tournament, and other various first-grade angst-ridden situations. Follow her adventures as she writes down the story of her life in her “Top-Secret Personal Beeswax Journal.” 2pm. $14. Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St. 419-242-3490. www.valentinetheatre.com

11 THURSDAY Toledo Mud Hens Opening Day Mud Hens season kicks off at beautiful Fifth Third Field. Don’t miss all the action and family-friendly fun. Visit the website for the full 2013 schedule. 5pm. Fifth Third Field, 406 Washington St. 419-725-4367. www.mudhens.com

24 WEDNESDAY Earth Day - Celebrate Earth Day with an earth friendly activity thats fun for the whole family. Don’t throw it away— make art out of it! This activity will have you making artwork out of plastic water bottles, bottle caps, straws, string, paper and glue. 10am-5pm. Imagination Station, Summit St. and Adams St. 419-244-2674. www.imaginationstationtoledo.org

26 FRIDAY Sesame Street Live: Elmo Makes Music - Jenny, an enthusiastic new music teacher, arrives on Sesame Street only to discover that her instruments are missing. Jenny’s new Muppet friends quickly come to the rescue and discover ‘instruments’ they never knew existed… rubber duckies, trash can lids and even cookie jars. Elmo and friends teach children that everyone can make and enjoy beautiful music together. Friday, 7pm; Saturday, 10:30am, 2pm, 5;30pm; Sunday, 1pm, 4:30pm. $17.15-$58.45. Seagate Convention Centre, 401 Jefferson. 419-255-3300. www.toledo-seagate.com

27 SATURDAY Treasured Stories of Eric Carle He’s back! The Very Hungry Caterpillar is joined by a whimsical cast of adventurous animals drawn from the pages of Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? and Papa Please Get the Moon for Me. All of Mr. Carle’s stories are guaranteed to educate and entertain everyone. 2pm. $14. Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St. 419-242-3490. www.valentinetheatre.com

LESSONS Music Lessons. Piano, Voice, Guitar.

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Shorties - Tuesdays Luckies Barn & Grill - Thursdays Spaghetti Warehouse - Saturdays Zia’s on the Docks - Sundays

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Findlay Family April 13