Issuu on Google+

FREE February 2013

THE

EdUcAtiON

GUIDE

p10

Back to basics

p16

Amanda Uhle brings joy to learning at 826Michigan

Battle of p16 the bulge

Mother Mayhem conquers the cookie jar

Taco party!

p17 Chela's Restaurant & Taqueria's authentic Mexican cuisine p15

FAVORITES


2

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com


Volume 6 • Issue 2 February 2013

Follow us on...

departments

5 community snaps 6 what’s briefly happening 7 new kids

8 9 18 19

commentary 16 mother mayhem

Getting a handle on my handles

on the block

exceptional families

16 parent profile

tween the lines

A battle of the bulge —by Mary Helen Darah

Back to fundamentals

— compiled by Julian Garcia

marketplace

17 food fight

calendar

Vot

Meet Amanda Uhle, mother of two and leader of 826Michigan —by Sharon Gittleman

Muy caliente

e!

Chela’s Restaurant & Taqueria offers a taste of Mexico City —by Katy Clark

p15

p10

THE

EdUcAtiON

GUIDE

Valentina Brown, 3, Jonesville

Want your child to be our next cover kid? Send your photos to production@adamsstreetpublishing.com with your child’s name, age and hometown. Photo by Natasha Barros

FAVORITES

recycle this paper For our children's future ...

Have a Look at What’s Coming Up! March

Childcare /Pre-School Guide issue date: MARCH 1 reserve ad/edit space Special ad by FEBRUARY 15

packages available with

BONUS EDIT!

APRIL

RESERVE SPACE BY:

MAR. 15

Advertise with us. Get results. 734.668.4044 www.findlayfamily.com www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

3


AdamsStreet StreetPublishing PublishingCo. Co. Adams Publisher/Editor in Chief

Collette Jacobs: cjacobs@annarborfamily.com

Co-Publisher/CFO

Mark I. Jacobs: mjacobs@annarborfamily.com

NEW COLUMN!!!

Editorial Editors Alia Orra: editor@annarborfamily.com Scott Recker: scott@annarborfamily.com

Calendar

Julian Garcia: calendar@annarborfamily.com

Contributing Writers Katy M. Clark, Nan Bauer, Mary Helen Darah, Matthew Reger, Sharon Gittleman, Kristy Erdodi, Kristen Gibson

Advertising

Sales Manager

Aubrey Hornsby: ahornsby@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Account Executives

Kelly Schwark: kelly@adamsstreetpublishing.com Charles Towne: charles@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Art/Production Art Director

Leah Foley: leah@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Senior Designer

Kristi Polus: kristi@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Graphic Designers

Aquarius Kids Born January 20 – February 18 By Sue Lovett

Megan Anderson: manderson@adamsstreetpublishing.com Sarah Baird: production@adamsstreetpublishing.com Brittney Koehl: adsin@annarborfamily.com Jameson Stanelius: jameson@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Classified Sales

Emily Gibb: classifieds@annarborfamily.com

Distribution

Michele Flanagan: distribution@annarborfamily.com

Administration Accounting

Robin Armstrong: rarmstrong@annarborfamily.com

Publisher’s Assistant

Jan Thomas: jthomas@adamstreetpublishing.com

Office Assistant

Marisa Rubin: mrubin@adamsstreetpublishing.com

Advertising/General Info: For advertising and general information, call (734) 668-4044 or fax (734) 668-0555. E-mail ads to adsin@annarborfamily.com Ann Arbor Family subscriptions are available by mail for $28/quarterly or $75 per year at Ann Arbor Family, 3003 Washtenaw, Suite 3, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. Letters to the editor must be limited to 300 words, are subject to editing and should include the writer’s full name and phone number. Entire contents © 2013 by Adams Street Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without the written permission of the publisher.

Toledo Area Parent News Winner of 28 awards for design and editorial content General Excellence Best Commentary Best Personal Commentary

In-Depth Reporting Best Overall Writing Best Cover Photo Best Supplement Design

recycle this paper For our children's future ...

4

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

Aquarian kids come into the world bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. Constantly looking around, they are curious and friendly. At times they seem to be in a world of their own — so make sure you have their attention before addressing them. They have “selective hearing” even as toddlers. Above all, they love everyone. Other children follow them and they all play nicely together. They include everyone in their special circle. They are curious about many things, but not always sensible. Thomas Edison, an Aquarian, once sat on eggs to see how the chickens could hatch them. They are popular leaders who like to “belong” and love to participate in organizations such as reading groups at the library, special tours to the zoo, gardens, museums, etc. They are fascinated with computers, iPods, and gadgets of all kinds. They walk with one foot in the future.


Luuk Van Kampen, age 3, and Silvia Van Kampen, age 1 of Saline

Away and at play A2 kids took advantage of holiday vacations to travel near and far! Brothers Gustavo Antunes,20 months, and Joao Antunes, 6, enjoy the beach in Brazil

Helping those in need Ann Arbor’s Daycroft Montessori School students raised nearly $2,500 for Hurricane Sandy Relief with a bake sale.

Fun and fitness A2 kids know how to make fitness fun!

Kole Wukie, 7, Ann Arbor

Saline Twirlettes at a local contest, from left: Elly LeCursi, 7, Andrea Doa, 14, Sloane Pepper, 12, Amber Reed, 16, of Saline and Ruby Boyer, 7, of Ypsilanti

Rudy Rotta, age 12 , a resident of the St. Louis Center in Chelsea, enjoys a recent outing at the Tree House.

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

5


what’s

briefly happening...

Ambitious towers made of toys

Go on a cross-continent safari without leaving the Ann Arbor Downtown Library. Musician Donna Novack will be bringing Harpbeat!, a live harp performance program, to guide children from preschool to grade 5 on a musical journey that starts in Africa, crosses the Middle Passage to the West Indies, and then climbs aboard the Underground Railroad. She’ll also be bringing some percussion instruments for kids to try out. “I developed this program with a friend from South Africa, where people use whatever resources they have on hand to make percussion instruments,” says Novack. “Kids can see that, when it comes to making music, your imagination can invent all kinds of cool music.” The show incorporates Swahili, Zulu, and sign language to help kids learn about African musical heritage and how it revolutionized American sounds. Wear your dancin’ shoes; the journey stops in Motown! Thursday, February 21 from 10-11am. Free. Downtown branch of Ann Arbor District Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave. 734-327-4200. www.aadl.org. —NB

6

Courtesy of Knapp Branch - Detroit / JoAnn Mannino

To the beat of my heart

Adam Reed Tucker blends his love of art and architecture with one of America's most beloved toys: the humble Lego block. He builds these models, some over 18 feet tall, using only Lego bricks. No mortar or glue of any kind. Maybe that's why he's one of only 11 certified Lego professionals in the world. You can see Tucker's recreations of famous structures, from The Empire State Building to Shanghai's Jin Mao tower, at the Lego Architecture: Towering Ambition exhibit on display at the Henry Ford Museum through Sunday, February 24 . It comes highly recommended for children of any age with a penchant for architecture, science and design. Guests will be able to build Lego structures of their own among thirteen of Tucker's masterpieces. Free for members, $17 non-members. The Henry Ford Museum, 20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn. 313-982-6001. www.thehenryford.org. —JS

Questions welcome Ever wonder why every culture has bread and some kind of noodle? At the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History, the Family Reading and Science program is exploring that question and helping kids ages 6 to 11 discover answers that are surprising, fun, and super interactive. At the “Just Like Me? Exploring Culture, Biology and the Human Experience” workshop on Sunday, February 10, “We’re taking a look at the things we have in common across cultures and the science behind them,” says Amanda Paige, Library Outreach Program Manager. “Kids learn about why certain harvesting and cooking choices are made, and what happens in their bodies once the foods get in there. We have hands-on activities to help them understand how things work.” Registration is strongly encouraged. Additionally, the program will be offered at Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti libraries; see the website for full details. Event starts at 1 pm and is free. UM Museum of Natural History, Education Room at Ruthven Museums Building, 1109 Geddes Ave. 734-764-0478. www.lsa.umich.edu/ummnh. —NB

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

Photo by Leisa Thompson

Nature's Valentines Shake up your concept of “love birds” with the Leslie Science Center owl-themed programs this month. “We have everything from tiny Northern SawWhets to great horned owls,” says Francie Krawcke, Raptor Director at the Center. “Kids— and adults, who am I kidding — are always amazed at the way they move and how silent they are.” Kids ages 4 and 5 are invited to “Love Is in the Air,” a series of meetings that teach about these majestic creatures who mate for life through stories, hands-on activities and a nature hike. “Whoo’s Your Valentine?” uses the Center’s resident barn owl and his perfectly heart-shaped face as inspiration for a craft session. And for 16year-olds and up looking for a safe and affordable date night, the special “Owl Do I Love Thee – A Natural Romance” will feature a cozy fire, candlelight, chocolates, diversions, a self-directed lantern-lit poetry hike, and a special flight of the Center’s barn owl. "Love Is in the Air," $11 per session on Thursdays, February 7, 14, and 28 from 1-2:30pm; "Whoo's Your Valentine," $5, on Sunday, February 10 at 3pm; "Owl Do I Love Thee?," $15 per couple on Thursday, February 14 from 7-9pm. 1831 Traver Rd. 734997-1553. www.lesliesnc.org. —NB


DON’T FORGET TO Vot p.15 e! FAVORITES Shoppers’ delight for a Lincoln or less

Need a place to take every single person in your extended family and not get an eye roll? “Teenagers love this place,” says Five Below manager Rex Atkinson. “But we see everyone — young moms with babies, grandmas, everyone in between.” The discount shop, one of a national chain in which everything is five dollars or less, feels hipper, cleaner, and just more fun than your average dollar store. On our scouting trip in January, a neat and thorough collection of exercise equipment — including yoga mats, resistance balls and tubes, sports bras in every color of the neon rainbow, and push-up handles — was well-stocked to help people keep resolutions. Farther down, adorable hats, mittens, socks, and backpacks were arranged for maximum visibility and temptation, and for snowbound days, dozens of kits for fun projects to keep kids entertained. There’s also a terrific section where you can find headphones, iPhone cases, and a variety of gadgets that will run you considerably more just about anywhere else in town. And while you can get a sneak peek on the chain’s website (fivebelow.com), the best strategy is to keep coming back. You could find a sock monkey backpack, an accordion water bottle, or maybe just the perfect pair of brilliant turquoise headphones for your upcoming plane trip. —NB Five Below is open Monday thru Saturday, 10am-9pm; Sunday 11am-6pm. Located in Arborland, 3529 Washtenaw Ave. 734-975-0742. fivebelow.com.

Dutch treats for the Ann Arbor streets

You may think you’ve tasted a Belgian waffle at, say, IHOP or someplace. But unless you’ve been to Belgium or the Netherlands, you haven’t — at least, not according to Community High graduate Noah Goldsmith. After a post-senior year jaunt through Europe, he took one bite of the real thing and decided to recreate the experience in his hometown. With his business partner Tia Hoffman, Noah developed The Wafel Shop, opening on Liberty Street this month. The star of the show: the Liège waffle, crisp, dense, and dusted with powdered sugar. “In the Netherlands, it’s the ultimate street food,” says Tia. “You buy one rolled up in a paper cone, and then add fresh fruit and whipped cream.” The pair will be duplicating the experience, and are dedicated to fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. “We’re working with local farmers and Calder Dairy,” says Tia, “but we do have to import the Belgian pearl sugar for the Liege waffle. That’s got to be authentic!” Tia and Noah both love a clean, pop art look, so the décor will be simple, with art from a combination of local and Belgian artists. “We just want to serve great food and have fun doing it,” says Tia. “Everything will be cooked out front. We want things to be transparent, casual, super fun, so that anyone will be at home here and have as much of a blast eating great food as we do making it.” —NB The Wafel Shop is open from 7am-10pm, seven days a week. 133 E. Liberty St. www.facebook.com/pages/The-Wafel-Shop.  

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

7


8 */" Ê vœÀÊ«>Ài˜ÌÃʜvÊV…ˆ`Ài˜Ê܈̅ÊëiVˆ>Ê˜ii`Ã

Free P.L.A.Y.

In 2012, a young mother walked into the Ann Arbor District Library’s first “Play Connection for Children on the Autism Spectrum” event and told youth librarian Laura Raynor that she was hoping for some answers. The mother wondered if her young boy was on the autism spectrum, or if she was oversensitive. So during the event — an open play for families — she spoke with professionals from the P.L.A.Y. (Play and Language for Autistic Youngsters) Project, a therapy program for children with autism that focuses on parent/child relationships. (We wrote about the P.L.A.Y. Project in our September issue.) By the time she left, the mother felt secure in what she should do next and who she could contact to evaluate her son. As Raynor watched that family leave, she decided to host the event again. This year’s session, on Saturday, February 23 from 1 to 3 pm, will again involve staff from the P.L.A.Y. project, including Dr. Rick Solomon, founder of the project and Ann Arbor area developmental and behavioral pediatrician. In a casual atmosphere, the staff will play alongside children and their families. They will answer any questions and provide tips to better parent/child interaction. The play area will include puppets, a sensory station, an active section with trucks and tunnels and even a quiet area for children who feel overstimulated or need downtime. A smell expert, Michelle Kydd, will also attend, so parents can explore how certain scents affect their children. Raynor hopes to watch at least one family gain from the event just as the young mother did last year. “I know that most families that walk in the door are very knowledgeable about their children, because they’re there,” she said. “But we hope that even the most knowledgeable will pick up even one little tip on the type of scent their child reacts to or a new toy they didn’t think about before that their child likes.” The event will be held at the Ann Arbor District Library's Pittsfield Branch Program Room, and is open to children in preschool to 5th grade with a parent or caregiver. For more information, visit www.aadl.org. —KE

8

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com


THELINES TWEEN advice for parents with children 10-16

Bringing down the wall

Shy children and teenagers now have a refuge to improve their social skills in a group therapy session that promises fun and practical skill learning. Therapist Rob Moesta runs groups ranging from withdrawn tweens as young as 10, to teenagers as old as 17. Members in Social Skills for the Adolescent, for shy 10 to 12 year olds, will learn how to make new friends easier, deal with anger, understand the feelings of others, and handle peer teasing, amongst other things children face in social situations. "Adolescents and Teens enjoy the social interaction (and in some cases friendships) they experience from attending group. They often are anxious the first time they come in, but they soon realize that they have a safe place to talk about problems, peer relationships, and learn better social and coping skills," says Moesta on reactions from group members. The New Social Skills Group, for ages 15 to 17, focuses on wise decision-making, regulating emotions, and making effective relationships with others. "With the pressure adolescents and teens face today, (i.e. technology, Facebook, texting, and crazy schedules), teens need a safe place to come in and talk without feeling judged," said Moesta. Teens diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, who can "feel frustrated with interacting with peers," are encouraged to participate in New Social Skills. $50 per session. Social Skills for the Adolescent, Tuesdays 5:45pm - 6:30pm. New Social Skills Group Wednesdays same time. 8110 Jackson, Suite D, Ann Arbor, MI 43103. www.robmoestatherapy.com. —EH

The first A2 YMCA Leaders Club, seen here with program leader Josh Humbel, traveled to Prague in 2008

Leading the charge

Looking for a positive outlet for your teen's after-school and weekend free time? The Ann Arbor YMCA's Leaders Club provides youth between the ages of 12 and 17 an opportunity for personal growth and leadership development that helps them employ their free time wisely, and enjoy themselves with their peers while they're at it. Here's how it works: YMCA employees nominate teens for the Leaders Club yearly, based on responsibility, character and interest in the program. Participants must attend monthly meetings, which range from training in CPR and First Aid to workshops on completing job applications and being a good volunteer. Members also complete service through the YMCA, with many spending around 45 hours volunteering yearly. “We create volunteer opportunities that are one hundred percent about their interests and building their skills," says program leader Josh Humbel. Those opportunities include helping with classes, assisting in marketing, planning events and participating in a range of other activities. The YMCA often selects Leaders Club members to take part in youth events, as well. Three of the group’s current 12 members will even attend the YMCA Europe Festival 2013 in Prague. Many members use such events, along with club activities, to develop a longstanding relationship with the YMCA. In fact, a handful of former Leaders Club members comprise the association’s staff today. For more information about the YMCA Leaders Club, visit www.annarborymca.org/ leadership-development.php or contact Josh Humbel, YMCA youth and teen director and leader of the Leaders Club program at 734-661-8012, jhumbel@annarborymca.org. —KE

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

9


Special Advertising Section

THE

EdUcAtiON ,

GUIDE Private Catholic/ Christian schools

Montessori

Ann Arbor Children’ s House

Montessori school for children ages 2.5 to 6 years 2309 Packard St. 734-330-8190 www.annarborchildrenshouse.com

Traditional: They have a fully-

equipped Montessori classroom with a small class size of 22 students ranging from 2.5 to 6 years old. Instructing the children are two traditionally trained and certified Montessori teachers and a classroom assistant with a masters in education.

Leaders: “The kids who started last

year who were so little, shy and unsure are now robust leaders in the classroom who take such pride in showing the younger children how to do things,” said Program Director Amy Sundback.

Tech savvy: Sundback keeps a regu-

larly updated blog on the website to provide a window into their multi-age classroom.

10

We ve made finding the perfect school for your family as easy as

Open house: Parents can visit the school during their open house on Saturday, February 23.

Ann Arbor Christian School

Preschool/ Childcare

‘chapel families’ of students from different grades. Our older middle school students get a chance to lead the younger ones during their chapel time together.” Party time: Special occasions include a Christmas concert, an art show in the spring, and a harvest festival in the fall.

preschool to middle school faith-based education

Ann Arbor Hands- On Museum

5500 Whitmore Lake Rd. 734-741-4948. annarborchristian.org.

Vision: Providing an academically rich environment centered on the Christian faith.

Teaching focus: An integrated cur-

riculum that incorporates mainstream materials, Biblical teachings, and art, music, and physical education. “Since we begin with the basic perspective that all truth comes from God and his word, Ann Arbor Christian promotes an education that intelligently and honestly examines all areas of learning through the lens of our faith.”

Modern families: “We put together

a science, math and technology museum 220 E. Ann St. 734-995-5439 www.aahom.org

CSI: On-site programs offer fun learning activities for students, such as creating slime to learn about states of matter and staging a crime lab to analyze fake blood and fingerprints. Outreach: Museum instructors visit

schools and libraries to set up Super Science Days for students and families to rotate through activity stations.

Big wig thinkers: Prominent scientists visit for activities such as Teacher

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

Tutoring/ Enrichment

Professional Development classes. NASA is coming in March to teach a professional development session on Mars, says Director of Programs Ann Hernandez.

Infinite info: “It’s not just a one-time education stop … we have parents who come and say ‘I remember when I came as a kid,” Hernandez says. 

Ann Arbor School for the Performing Arts

music education

637 South Main St. 734-213-2000. www.aa-spa.org.

Mission: To nurture and inspire the

musician in everyone and be accessible to all in the Ann Arbor Community.

Playlist: Music courses for all ages and levels, including private and ensemble instruction.


Special Advertising Section

The difference: “Our incredible

faculty has world-class training,” says Artistic Director Kasia Bielak-Hoops. “From classical to jazz to musical theater, any instrument, including voice, we’re here to help you wherever you are in your musical journey.”

Equal opportunity: The School works in public schools to help music students who may not otherwise be able to access lessons.

College Nannies and Tutors

a resource for professional nannies and tutors

3907 Jackson Rd. 734-761-8393 www.collegenanniesandtutors.com

Super sitters: With full-time and

on-call nannies who also tutor, parents come home to fed children and finished homework, leaving quality time to spend together, says owner Sharon Ragland-Keys.

Mannies: Male nannies are available,

especially for families with all boys.

Emergency tutoring: “If a student has an exam tomorrow, and needs to brush up on math or whatever subject it is, we can help them,” Ragland-Keys says. College prep: Besides one-on-one tutoring provided at their location, free monthly ACT and SAT practice tests are offered. “That’s the way we give back to our community, by analyzing it and making recommendations at no charge,” Ragland-Keys said.

Daycroft Montessori School

Preprimary Campus

(Preschool and Kindergarten): 100 Oakbrook Dr. 734-930-0333. www.daycroft.org Elementary Campus (K-6):1095 North Zeeb Rd. 734-662-3335. www.daycroft.org

Growing up: Originating as a pre-

school program in 1968, Daycroft has since grown to offer full-day or halfday kindergarten, a Young 5 program, elementary school through 6th grade,

before-school and after-school care, summer camp programs, and afterschool enrichment.

Forward-focused: The school

blends the distinctive student-centered teaching methods of Maria Montessori with traditional and progressive educational methods.

Individualized: Learning is highly

personalized to nurture the whole child. Students explore and discover in their own styles to develop a lifelong love of learning.

Early Learning Center Preschool

traditional half-day preschool program 3070 Redwood Dr. 734-973-7722. www.elcpreschool.com.

Philosophy: Learning through a

play-based curriculum gives kids structure and encourages maximum expression.

What’s unique: The NAEYC accredited school is a traditional half-day preschool program, not a daycare or co-op. Who thrives: “We’re ideal for parents who like their children home for lunchtime and naps,” says teacher Marciah Boerema. Walking the walk: “We do tons of dramatic play; we love how it helps kids learn to collaborate,” says Boerema. Teachers set the example by working in teams.

Go Like the Wind Montessori School

infant to middle school Montessori school with a Christian environment 3540 Dixboro Lane. 734-747-7422. www.golikethewind.com.

Mission: To provide the highest

quality infant through middle school Montessori education within a Christian environment.

Great outdoors: The 40-acre wooded campus features an outdoor education center for in-depth nature studies. continued on p. 12

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

11


Special Advertising Section continued from p. 11

Melody makers: Four separate musical groups include a jazz band and a string orchestra. Ongoing engagement: “Montessori classes are busy places,” says Executive Director Doug Collier, “but people are often amazed that the kids are so focused and engaged in what they’re doing. It’s extremely active, but peaceful and purposeful.”

Great Lakes Educational Group

provides tutoring, academic enrichment classes and science camps 956 E. Michigan Ave., Saline. 734-944-5658 www.greatlakeseducationalgroup.com

Jack of all trades: Great Lakes

Educational Group designs programs for students K through 12 in areas such as homework help, study skills, organization and standardized test preparation, and are open in the summer to begin students’ preparation for the next school year.

Wiz kids: 95% of their students

increase their ACT scores, says Lauree Gilbert, director.

Hands-on guidance: “When some-

body calls to enroll, we speak to the par-

Check us out online at

annarborfamily.com

12

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

ents directly and design an education plan for them. No two students have the same goals," Gilbert says. "They’re all individual goals that we work towards."

Humane Society of Huron Valley Humane Education

animal shelter in Wasthenaw County

3100 Cherry Hill Rd. 734-662-5585. www.hshv.org.

Purpose: To help young people develop empathy and compassion for animals. The effect: Research shows that

children who are taught compassion for animals often mature into caring, responsible adults.

The program: A variety of programs instruct kids of all ages on animal safety, body language, care and feeding of pets, and feature plenty of animal interactions.

People’s best friends: “Kids get

so engaged with the animals, and they love it when a shelter animal finds a good home,” says Karen Patterson, Director of Humane Education.

It’ s a Small World

daycare, childcare and preschool inside of Calvary Bible Church, 8318 Carpenter Rd., Ypsilanti. 734-714-3040.  www.smallworlddaycare.org.

The vibe: Home away from home where your children can grow and learn.


Teaching focus: “We’re play-based, with super-creative, highly educated teachers,” says Director Danielle DeSano-Smith.

Roots: Small World began as a home daycare operation. “We love our spacious new center and huge gym,” says DeSano-Smith. “But we’re still about that feeling of warm and personal family connections.”

All inclusive: “We embrace all kids,

with all types of abilities and needs. We want to be really true to our name!”

Meadow Montessori School

infant through high school Montessori education

1670 South Raisinville Rd., Monroe.  734-241-9496. www.meadowmontessori.org.

Distinction: The only fully accredited infant through high school Montessori program in the U.S.

Commitment: To nurture and sustain a community of life-long learners, and inspire them to serve humanity.

The peace program: “Peace educa-

tion teaches mutual respect and encourages students to talk through their differences,” says Director of Development Amanda Gipson. “That spirit spreads through the entire community.”

Cultural and ecological sustainability: “Academic programs

held on our six-acre campus are enhanced through student participation in our organic gardens, farm program, and international travel,” says Gipson.

Special Advertising Section

Saline Cooperative Preschool

a non-profit, non-sectarian preschool

6299 Ann Arbor Saline Rd., Saline. 734-429-0685 www.salinecoop.org

Parental Involvement: Director and Lead Teacher Bonnie Jacques encourages parents to be in the classroom on a regular basis to monitor their child’s development and learn about the new friends their child is making. “Every child’s education is a result of the parents as well,” she says. Guest Speakers: They are “truly blessed,” Jacques said, with guest speakers like Native Americans from a tribe in Adrian, dentists and a yearly visit from the Fire Department. Unconventional ed: Jacques puts an emphasis on making learning fun and providing various socialization activities, such as a yearly Beach Party, field trips and “lunch bunch,” where the afternoon kids arrive early to eat lunch with her.

St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School

private, Catholic preschool8th grade education

2270 E. Stadium Blvd. 734-821-2200.  www.stfrancisa2.com/school

Mission: For over 60 years, the Catholic school has been educating and empowering students to help them continued on p. 14

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

13


Special Advertising Section continued from p. 13 achieve their educational, social and spiritual goals.

Inclusion for all: Students of all

religious, racial and ethnic backgrounds and at all grade levels are welcome.

Balance: Teaching students about the value of self-worth shares equal importance with academic achievement. Fun, games, and learning: Spanish is offered from pre-school on up. Music, dance, instrumental band, and drama are included in fine arts curriculum, and many sports options for 6th to 8th graders.

TLC Adventure Preschool

faith-based preschool

Trinity Lutheran Church, 1400 W. Stadium Blvd.  734-662-4419. trinityaa.org/preschool.

Open House: Tuesday, March 5, at 6 p.m. 

Offering: A theme-oriented curriculum in a creative, non-denominational Christian environment geared toward educating the whole child. “We strive to cover all areas of child development,” says Program Director and teacher Barbara Daniel. Typical day: Plenty of creative

playtime, snacks and lunch, daily Bible story, songs, and small groups working on age-appropriate projects.

Sing out: “We love our Education

Through Music program,” says Daniel. “It’s folk song based; kids love it, too.”

14

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

Celebration time: “Every month we

have a special event: a winter carnival in January and a spring shamrock walk, where kids look for four-leaf clovers — indoors, so they don’t get too muddy!”

Tutor Time Learning Center

a childcare center and private kindergarten

2380 Oak Valley Dr. 734-996-9352 www.tutortime.com

Camps: Besides providing childcare

for children six weeks to five years old and a private kindergarten, Tutor Time Learning Center offers camps for school-age children where they can go on field trips to the Natural History Museum, petting zoos and much more.

Family affair: The before and after school program for ages six to 12 provides busing to ten local schools and convenience for parents with multiple children since they can pick them up in one place. Personalization: “I ask a lot of

open-ended questions and figure out what each parent is looking for,” Director Dawn Linsenman says. “Each tour is unique for the needs of the family.”

Word of mouth: Their referral program offers both the referring family and the new family a week of free tuition.


Special Advertising Section

WHO OO fami OOO ar e yo ly Vot favorit ur es e best of t for the ? he p ast yea r.

S E T I R FAVO VOTE ONLINE @ ANNARBORFAMILY.COM

FAMILY FROLICKING

Place for winter fun ......................................... Rainy-day activity ............................................ Sunny-day activity ........................................... Place to sneak in a history lesson ........................................... Dance class .................................................... Martial arts program ....................................... Art class ......................................................... Music class .................................................... Free activity .................................................... Family-friendly fair or festival ......................... Live theater for kids ....................................... Place to hop on a horse ................................. Place to volunteer .......................................... Park or playground ........................................ Story hour (name location) ............................. Swim lessons ................................................ Place to swim ................................................ Indoor water park .......................................... Vacation that won’t empty your wallet .......................................... Family-friendly gym ....................................... Gymnastics center ......................................... Place to play rec sports ................................. Bowling alley ................................................

TELL A2F

Favorite thing about Ann Arbor Family ..................................... Things you would love to see in Ann Arbor Family.................................. Best Ann Arbor Family Column ............................................ Reason to visit www.annarborfamily.com ........................... .......................................................... ..........................................

FEED THE FAM! Family Restaurant ...................................................... Healthy fast food ....................................................... Pizza joint (non-chain) ............................................. Burger place (non-chain) ........................................... Ice cream shop .......................................................... Place where kids eat free .......................................... Kid-friendly grocery store .......................................... Natural food store .....................................................

HEY SHORTY! IT’S YOUR BIRTHDAY!

Entertainer ................................................................ Birthday party venue ................................................. Place for goodie bag loot ........................................... Place to buy a cake ...................................................

RETAIL THERAPY

Kid’s clothier ........................................................... Kid’s shoe shop ....................................................... Kid’s consignment ................................................... Place to buy maternity clothes ................................. Place to furnish your little one’s “nest” .................... Locally owned specialty toys/gifts ...........................

GROWN-UP TIME

Support group for moms ....................................... Mom-friendly play date ......................................... Place for single parents to meet ............................ Parent blog ........................................................... Date night restaurant ............................................ Place for Mom to be pampered ............................. Romantic getaway ................................................ ............................................. ................................................

RULES 1 You may only vote once. 2 No answer should be repeated more than three times. 3 A minimum

ANN ARBOR’S HIGH FLYERS Neighborhood to raise kids ............................................ Program (activity for preschoolers) ................................ Summer day camp ......................................................... Tutor/learning center ..................................................... Teacher (and his/her school) .......................................... Family-friendly car dealership ....................................... Kid-friendly emergency room ........................................ Place to take Dad for Father’s Day ................................ Place to take Mom for Mother’s Day ............................ Kid-friendly salon ........................................................ Picnic spot .................................................................. Parent-friendly work place ........................................... Bank/financial institution ............................................. Family Lawyer ............................................................ Dentist/orthodontist ..................................................... Place to give birth ....................................................... OB/GYN ...................................................................... Optometrist ................................................................. Midwife ...................................................................... Pediatric practice ........................................................ Doctor ......................................................................... Chiropractor ............................................................... Allergist ...................................................................... Veterinarian ................................................................ Place to nurse a baby .................................................. Kid’s photographer ..................................................... Special needs services .............................................. Place to worship ........................................................ Preschool ................................................................... Daycare ..................................................................... Drop-in childcare ....................................................... Family-friendly restroom ............................................

For display advertising call Emily at 419.244.9859 or email sales@annarborfamily.com Space reservation deadline May 15th Winners announced in the June issue of Toledo Area Parent

of 30 questions must be answered for your ballot to be eligible. 4 Your name and email address must be included. Please mail completed ballots to 3003 Washtenaw Ste. 3 Attn: Family Favorites, Ann Arbor, MI 48104. Or vote online at annarborfamily.com! 5 No ballot stuffing! No photocopies! (We will discard any ballots that we suspect are fraudulently submitted.)

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

15


Getting a handle on my handles

Mother Mayhem battles with the bulge By Mary Helen Darah

Back to fundamentals

Amanda Uhle goes back to basics, both as a mother of two and leader of 826Michigan By Sharon Gittleman

What do R2-D2, Rosey the Robot Maid and Amanda Uhle have in common? It may be different on the planet Naboo and at the Jetson household, but here in Ann Arbor, droids and humans work together to help kids. How do they do it? Just ask Amanda Uhle, the executive director of 826Michigan, a writing and drop-in tutoring center, offered free for children six to 18. Youngsters stop by the center after school and on weekends to create poetry, write songs, pen novels and work on their algebra. Where do the cyborgs come in? The Liberty Street Robot Supply & Repair, a shop with shelves stocked with solar-powered robot kits, waddling mechanical “ducks” and futuristic Russian nesting dolls, helps fund the center. It’s really not surprising that purchases of wind-up toys and “fridge rovers” pay the bills. The center is all about joyful learning. Kids can sign up for volunteertaught writing workshops like, “Name that Rune,” a course helping kids translate “ancient” runes marked with eerie inscriptions or a mystery writing class, based on the game “Clue.” “We don’t make it punitive or hard,” said Uhle. “We make it fun.” Many youngsters even have the chance to see their stories in print – and on the shelves of the robot shop. An inschool residence program publishes boys’ and girls’ work in hardbound volumes. “These students don’t have a long history of people thinking what they do is important,” said Uhle. “It astounds them in a wonderful way. They do everything from screaming and yelling to acting profoundly quiet. I think they don’t believe it.” Center kids’ writing may be published in chapbooks and ‘zines. While high-tech gadgets can be an inspiration, they can also hold youths back. Opening up kids’ worlds beyond electronic game screens is something Uhle 16

Fun Facts Children: Daughter Beatrix, 3, and stepdaughter Elizabeth, 17 Favorite book: "The writer Richard Ford has always been a favorite. His new novel, Canada, is stellar.” Parenting motto: "My constant hope is that I'm not setting my own agenda for my daughters, which would interrupt the great honor and pleasure of watching their own independent lives take shape." Favorite places to take the kids in Ann Arbor: "Beatrix and I can't get enough of the Ann Arbor District Library. We go every Sunday and load up on new books to read for the week. We're also big fans of the Leslie Science and Nature Center; she is an owl devotee." De-stress tip: "The best way to unwind for me is to turn off all electronics and enforce some quiet time on myself. If I can combine that with a vigorous walk at County Farm Park, that's the best solution."

and her husband, a freelance business writer put into practice with their own little girl, age 3. “We love to tell stories together,” Uhle said. “We try to make writing and storytelling a part of daily life [and] we spend tons of time at the Ann Arbor public library. We aren’t really TV people.” Signing up for a workshop or spending time with a tutor at the center can make a big difference to a child. “We see every day students change their minds about themselves and about writing,” said Uhle. “A young student may come in and say they hate writing and then they come in and open their minds.” Liberty Street Robot Supply & Repair is located at 115 E. Liberty St. For more information about 826Michigan, visit www.826michigan.org.

I wrapped, detangled lights, removed caked-on frosting from one contented Corgi who ventured into a post-holiday filled hefty bag, performed Biblical miracles by feeding a guest list that had an unexpected growth spurt, imbibed and feasted. Now the same society that wanted me to shop until I drop hours after giving Thanksgiving gratitude for all I have, expects me to miraculously lower my cholesterol, drop some pounds and lose my Spanx for the New Year. Even worse as I try to get a handle on my “handles,” Cupid’s revenge (a.k.a. Valentine’s Day) pops up on the calendar. Gratuitous chocolate consumption is always a part of this glorious holiday. Although heart-shaped cards full of sentiment are nice, nothing says “I love you” like a brownie with powdered sugar and sprinkles. I try. I really do, but there has never been a baked good I have met that I didn’t bond with immediately. Also, I have to get over the first few days of some pretty high octane psychological “stuff,” the first being the “I am going to eat every carb in sight today because tomorrow I begin as the healthier me” mentality. This state of mind usually lasts about three weeks. Once I get beyond that negative behavior the “What? You’re telling me I can’t have that? Well, I’ll show me!” phase kicks in. This usually ends with the realization that  I can’t zip my calves into my chic knee high boots and that I find it necessary to hold my upper arm when waving goodbye so I don’t flab someone to death. This year I decided to be “hip” as I lost my hips and calculate my food consumption with an “app” on my phone. I tracked my caloric intake and found out at the end of day one that if I were a 6’7”, 278 pound male I stayed within my boundaries. I guess as a 5’10”-ish female I didn’t hit the mark. Cranberry muffins are a wonderful mood booster and after consuming one (OK fine, two

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

… and a half), I shooed the dust bunnies off the VCR and busted out a kick boxing tape. I nearly killed the dog with my first back kick. I decided that maybe it would be better and safer to hit the floor and work the abs. The combination of having a canine with two inch legs that rejoices in the rare moments when you are at eye level and trying to detect the source of origin for the stains in my carpet (which is right up there with trying to identify road kill) rendered the floor routine ‘not a success.’ The tapes that followed consisting of various models and celebrities breathing seductively (while I sounded like I was giving birth without an epidural) and clad in skin-tight leotards didn’t make the cut either. I settled for a Bollywood dance workout. I am happy to report that I have the “feed the chickens” and “elephant” moves down, but I have a long way to go before I find my “inner Indian.” I have been trying to eat more fruits and veggies as well. I just don’t understand why blueberry Pop Tarts don’t count as a fruit serving. I also purchased a pedometer. FYI: there are 85 steps from the couch to the TV, 153 from my desk to the bathroom and 56 from the back door to my car. Another helpful tip is to visualize how you want to look. It beats laying on your bed trying to stuff yourself into your jeans. Crazy diet plans have been around for centuries. In 1087, William the Conqueror of England was upset because his girth kept him from riding his horse. His brilliant plan of action to shed unwanted pounds was to substitute food for alcohol. He died from falling off his horse. I am so proud of my daughter who shed pounds not by eating grapefruit, swallowing a tapeworm or drinking 12 glasses of lemonade a day with cayenne and maple syrup, but by doing something radical. She ate healthy and exercised. Who ever heard of such a thing?!


Muy caliente

Chela’s offers a taste of Mexico City at the right price By Katy M. Clark

THE SHORT COURSE

Chela’s Restaurant & Taqueria

Kid-friendly Yes To avoid wait Go at lunch or prepare to wait a few minutes to order and find a table. The word is out that Chela’s is affordable and tasty! Noise level Medium. Bathroom amenities No changing table in the unisex restroom.

693 South Maple Rd. 4079 Stone School Monday through Saturday, 10:30am – 9pm Sunday 10:30am – 8pm 734-332-6055 www.chelasannarbor.com “Oh, I hope he gets to see this,” said Lori Iraola, one half of the husband/ wife team behind Chela’s Restaurant & Tacqueria. Iraola was anxious for her husband, Adrian, to arrive. Why? Their restaurant on Maple was teeming with families. Moments later, Adrian arrived and began taking pictures of the crowd. “We wanted to have families (as customers),” he said to the whole restaurant. “This makes my whole day!” he proclaimed, placing his hand on his heart. The Iraolas opened their first Chela’s at the corner of Maple and Liberty in June 2012. A second location on Stone School near Ellsworth opened late this fall. Inspired by the food that Adrian grew up eating in Mexico City, the Iraolas goal is to bring fresh, authentic, and affordable Mexican food to Ann Arbor. Both locations are casual, cozy eateries with yellow walls sparsely decorated with hints of Adrian’s homeland. Seating is available for 30 or so. On the random Thursday night that my family chose to dine at the Maple location, Chela’s was packed. No worries, though. They have counter service for ordering and patron turnover is quick. The menu offers tacos, quesadillas, tortas (sandwiches), tamales, and salads. Both locations can make items with marinated beef, chicken, and Chorizo sausage while the Stone School location offers turkey instead of the marinated pork available at Maple. Vegetarian versions of all dishes are available, too. My family of four ordered a boatload

High chairs Yes. Got milk No. Kids can try limeade made from cane sugar and fresh limes, Jamaica (sweet hibiscus tea), soft drinks, or Jumex juices from Mexico. Kids’ menu There is a kid’s quesadilla for $2.50, or kids can order from the main menu. Anything healthy for kids Everything is prepared fresh and from scratch. This is not a place with an excess of deep fried Mexican food, either. Food allergy concerns Nothing they use contains peanuts or is peanut based. Ask before you order regarding other allergy concerns and they’ll be happy to help. of food for $30. We got 3 barbacoa and 1 carne asada taco, 2 chicken tamales, a kid’s quesadilla, chips with salsa and guacamole, and rice pudding and flan for dessert. We chose Jamaica (sweet hibiscus tea) and limeades (lime and cane sugar) to drink, which was especially tasty, with a light, sweet flavor. The barbacoa (beef) and chicken tacos were served on locally-made, 100% corn tortillas and doused with cilantro and onion. The tacos, small but substantial, tasted fresh and yummy. They made one especially for our 5-year-old daughter with only beef and cheese. She enjoyed separate

bites of tortilla, meat and cheese. The sizeable order of guacamole had lots of avocado and hints of tomato and cilantro. The red salsa was “hot, but not ridiculously hot,” according to my husband. The green salsa and salsa taquera were milder but still flavorful. We ran out of crunchy, salty chips before we finished the salsas and guacamole. “Oh wow, that’s good,” I said after biting into my chicken tamale. It was moist and spicy, with a nice proportion of meat and masa. My husband liked his tamale as well, while my nine-year-old son inhaled his kid’s quesadilla with Oaxaca cheese.

For dessert we tried rice pudding and flan made from scratch. While the rest of my family passed on the rice pudding, I found it sweet, with a strong cinnamon flavor. The flan was divine — caramelized sugar over creamy, sweet custard. Although presented in a plain plastic container, the flan’s flavor and freshness knocked my socks off. I’ll be heading back to Chela’s to try more fresh Mexican fare. I’ve got my eye on the tortas and quesadillas — I’ll save a spot for you in line. Katy M. Clark is a freelance writer from Saline.

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013` •

17


February 2013

Friday, February 15

Kodo

All calendar events are subject to change, cancellation, and limited size. Calling ahead for confirmation is recommended.

9 SATURDAY Wild Swan’s Chocolate Crush 2013 Enjoy a night of chocolate, wine and artistry for Wild Swan’s signature fundraising event that features Michigan chocolatiers, fine food and drink, live and silent auctions, and musical entertainment by the Royal Garden Trio. Proceeds fund Wild Swan’s groundbreaking disability access programs. 6:30pm. $75-$125. Lake Forest Golf Club, 3110 W. Ellsworth Rd. 734-995-0530. www.wildswantheater.org

Family Science Workshop: Everybody Cooks - Every country has a cuisine, but why do the same ingredients or types of food pop up all over the world? Families will learn how geology relates to food, what “cultural transmission” is, and then make their very own bread starter. For children grades K-5 with an adult. 10-11am. Pittsfield Branch Library, 2359 Oak Valley Dr. 734-327-4265. www.aadl.org

Roses Are Red, Valentines Are, Too! - Make Valentine’s Day cards and flowers for someone you love or for patients at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital or Veterans Hospital. Make a card here or at home (or buy a Valentine’s Day card), then drop it off at any AADL location from February 5-11. You can choose the hospital or let AADL staff decide. 11am-12pm. Pittsfield Branch Library, 2359 Oak Valley Dr. 734-327-4265. www.aadl.org

Family Ice Fishing and Bonfire Watch an ice fishing demonstration and try it yourself. Make your own fishing pole and enjoy other winter games and activities. Part of the lake will be cleared for skating. Warm up afterwards around a bonfire while you roast marshmallows and drink hot chocolate. Bring your own hotdogs to cook for lunch. Park at the Mill Lake lot on McClure Road near Chelsea or hike/ski over from the Eddy Discovery Center. 10am-2pm. Free. Gerald E. Eddy Discovery Center, 17030 Bush Rd., Chelsea. 517-522-3949. www.wnha.org

14 THURSDAY Jack And The Beanstalk - This lively rendition of a classic tale presents a humorous giant, appropriate for young theater-goers. In Wild Swan’s version, Jack’s journey up the fantastical beanstalk not only leads to his encounter with a very silly giant but to the rescue of his long lost father as well. Thursday & Friday, 10am & 1pm; Saturday, 11am. $3, 2 and under / $8 child & senior / $12 adult. WCC Towsley Auditorium, 4800 E Huron River Dr. 734-995-0530. www.wildswantheater.org

17 SUNDAY Kung Fu Panda - A clumsy panda bear becomes an unlikely kung fu hero when a treacherous enemy spreads chaos throughout the countryside in this animated martial arts adventure featuring the voices of Jack Black, Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, and Jackie Chan. 1:30pm. Free for kids 12 and under. Michigan Theater, 603 East Liberty St. 734-668-TIME. www.michtheater.org

Photo by Takashi Okamoto

16 SATURDAY

19 TUESDAY VegMichigan Presents Veg 101Please join VegMichigan for this fun and informative cooking class. Attendees will learn the nutritional aspects of a plant based diet and taste samples of the prepared food. The presenters will discuss how easy it can be to transform a standard meal into a delicious plant-based (no meat or dairy) option. Registration is required. 7-8:30pm. Free. Whole Foods, 990 West Eisenhower Parkway. 734-997-7500. www.vegmichigan.org

21 THURSDAY Concert: Harpbeat! African Musical Safari - Harpbeat’s harpist, vocalist and percussionist Donna Novack takes you on a magical world tour and explores the geography, culture, language, and music of Africa. Featured languages include Swahili and Zulu. Harpbeat! recordings and Donna’s original songs have won many national awards. 10-11am. Downtown Library, 343 South Fifth St. 734-327-4265. www.aadl.org Tea with the Fairies - Children and their families are welcome for tea and petits fours served by real-life fairies! Celebrate with magical fairies as they serve tea, treats, and magic. There will be story time read from books available from Crazy Wisdom Bookstore. Fairy attire is encouraged. Be creative! Tickets may be purchased by stopping in or calling. 1pm & 4pm. $11 / Babies 18 Months and younger free. Crazy Wisdom Bookstore, 114 S. Main St. 734-665-2757. www.crazywisdom.net

22 FRIDAY HomeGrown Local Food Summit: (Re)Imagining a Fair Food System Recognizing Michigan’s roots as a deeply agricultural state, this year’s Summit focuses on local food as an economic driver, and continues the main theme of strengthening connections across the local food landscape. This conference-style event brings community members together to strategize, network and learn from each other. See website for details on registration. 8am. $40. Morris J Lawrence Building @ WCC, 4800 E Huron River Dr. www.localfoodsummit.org

18

• February 2013 • www.annarborfamily.com

Give your family a night to remember and experience the magic and mastery of Kodo, a traditional Japanese drum performance troop. Drums were used as ritual instruments as well as for entertainment and a way to call the community together. Kodo was honored by the Japanese government as a Living National Treasure, and the troop has been known to make a village out of audiences around the world. This new performance will demonstrate the thundering grace and percision while opening doors to the culture of the far east. 8pm. $10-$56. Hill Auditorium, 825 North University Ave. 734-763-3333. www.ums.org—JG

23 SATURDAY P.L.A.Y. Connection For Children On The Autism Spectrum - Parents with children on the autism spectrum are invited to an open play with fun activities to explore. For children pre-school through grade 5 with an adult. See story on pg. 8. 1-3pm. Pittsfield Branch Library, 343 South Fifth Ave. 734-327-4265. www.aadl.org Mitten Mixer Coffee Tasting - Bring your favorite ceramic mug and a donation for Food Gatherers to the Silver Lake Day Use Area and sample different coffees provided by RoosRoast of Ann Arbor. Take a brief hike on the popular Potawatomi Trail and warm up by the bonfire. The event is open to all singles who love coffee or who want to meet someone who share similar interests. 4:30-6pm. Pinckney State Recreation Area, 8555 Silver Hill Rd., Pinckney. 734-426-4913. www.michigan.gov Open House: Ann Arbor Children’s House Montessori - Discover Montessori education for your young children 2-6. Visit the classroom and meet the teachers. Registration for the 2013-14 school year is open. 2-4pm. Free. Ann Arbor Children’s House, 2309 Packard St. 734-330-8190. www.annarborchildrenshouse.com

24 SUNDAY Skins, Scat and Skulls - Naturalist and educator Dave Szczygiel will bring his large collection of Michigan animal skins and skulls, as well as other animal specimens. Learn how various creatures use their specialized body parts for survival and how you can recognize animal signs in the wild. Following the program there will be an optional outdoor walk to look for evidence of animals. 2-3pm. $2 person / $5 family. Gerald E. Eddy Discovery Center, 17030 Bush Rd., Chelsea. 517-522-3949. www.wnha.org The Kerfuffles Live At The Library The Kerfuffles are an Ann Arbor/Ypsilantibased group which performs musical stories with songs that range from traditional favorites to funny originals. Kids of all ages will enjoy singing along, dancing and experiencing the music! 2pm. Pittsfield Branch Library, 2359 Oak Valley Dr. 734-327-4265. www.aadl.org


25 MONDAY Ann Arbor Young Actors Guild Auditions - Students grades 3-5 have the opportunity to audition for The Reluctant Dragon, adapted by Mary Hall Surface, and directed by Robyn Taylor. Rehearsals will be Mondays & Wednesdays from 6-8pm. Performances will run April 19 & 20 at Eberwhite Elementary School. February 25 & 27, 6-7:30pm. Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor, 2935 Birch Hollow Dr. 734-926-5629. www.aayag.org

27 WEDNESDAY Understanding Your Child’s Temperament - Children are born with their own unique temperaments which are “hard-wired” and endure over time. This session will identify nine characteristics of temperament and offer suggestions to help parents enhance the fit between themselves and their child, with ample opportunity for questions and discussion. 7-8:15pm. Free. University Center for the Child and the Family, 500 E. Washington St., Suite 100, Ann Arbor. 734-615-7853. www.iha.umich.edu

“Understanding Your Child’s Uniqueness” - Without efficient processing of a child’s sensory systems, they are unable to interact comfortably with the world, resulting in behavior problems, body awareness problems, slow learning and reliance on multiple senses to gain information about the environment. Come hear Stephanie Ramser, pediatric Occupational Therapist talk on Sensory Processing. Coffee and conversation will be available. 9-10am. Free. Clonlara School, 1289 Jewett. 734-926-4617. www.clonlara.org Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Auditions A2CT’s Junior Theatre will be holding auditions for Anne of Green Gables, adapted and directed by Jacqueline Courteau. The play has roles for young actors in grades 4-12. Auditions will consist of a mix of theater games and cold readings from the script. Thursday,4-6pm; Friday, March 1, 6-8pm. A2CT’s Rehearsal Studio, 322 W. Ann St., Ann Arbor. 419-971-2228. www.a2ct.org

To add or see more events go to annarborfamily.com MONDAYs-Fridays Lactation Consultation, Consultant Shin Ai Shyn is available for advice, bra fittings and general info about breast and bottle feeding. Call for appointments.10am-12pm. Free. My Urban Toddler, 7025 E. Michigan Ave., Saline. 734-944-3628. www. myurbantoddler.com MONDAYs Homebirth Circles, On the second Monday of the month attend this social gathering and discussion group for families who are considering homebirth, planning a homebirth or have birthed at home. Meet the Midwives from 6:30-7:30pm. 7:30-8:30pm. Free. Center for the Childbearing Year, 722 Brooks St. 734-424-0220. www.newmoonmidwifery.com Wednesdays Parent-to-Parent, This is a free, informal drop-in group for parents. Moms, dads, infants, and toddlers all welcome!10-11:30am, Center for the Childbearing Year, 722 Brooks St. 734-663-1523. www.center4cby.com

Nursing Cafe, Hang out with other breastfeeding moms and enjoy a pot of nursing tea, with professional support on hand for questions and help. Pregnant moms are welcome, too. 2-3pm. Indigo Forest, 4121 Jackson Rd. 734-994-8010. www.visitindigo.com

Just scan the code using your phone to join the list!

28 THURSDAY

THURSDAYS Parent Toddler Group, This is a unique opportunity for children 12-36 months and adults to spend quality time together playing, working on simple art projects and having a snack. Older siblings are also welcome. 9:15-10:45am. $92. Lamaze Family Center, 2855 Boardwalk. www.lamazefamilycenter.org

Mama Circle, Mothers & Mothersto-be gather to laugh, talk, & cry on their journey through motherhood. In this safe place, discuss topics of interest, create long-lasting friendships & build community; your children are welcome as you care for them while you attend. 9:30-11am. Indigo Forest, 4121 Jackson Rd. 734-994-8010. www.visitindigo.com FRIDAYS Breastfeeding Café, This is a free drop-in group for breastfeeding mothers and their babies, hosted by lactation consultant Barbara Robertson. Stop by for a cup of tea, some good company, baby weight checks, bra fittings, and more! 10-11:30am. Free. Center for the Childbearing Year, 722 Brooks St. 734-975-6534. www.bfcaa.com Saturdays Children’s Story Time, Story time for children ages seven and under.11am. Free. Nicola’s Bookstore, 2513 Jackson Ave., 734-662-0600. www.nicolasbooks.com

Super Saturday Storytime, Stories, songs and a simple craft for preschoolers and older children. 10:30am. Free. Ypsilanti District Library, 5577 Whittaker Rd., Ypsilanti. 734-482-4110. www.ypsilibrary.org

Join our e-mail list for Private Sales, Special Offers and Promotions! You can also visit annarborfamily.com to join.

marketplace ADVERTISING IN MARKETPLACE Free Classifieds: Individuals may receive one free 20-word ad per month (products offered in ads must sell for under $100). Each additional word 40 cents, payment must accompany ad. Free ads run 1 month and are reserved for private-parties use, noncommercial concerns and free services. Ads MUST be typed or neatly printed and MAILED, E-MAILED, or DROPPED OFF to Ann Arbor Family Press. Classifieds by the15th of the month prior to publication.

Line Classifieds: Only $10 per month for 20

words or less. Each additional word is 40 cents each and any artwork will be $5 extra. Display Classifieds: Display classifieds with a box may be purchased for $25 per column inch. Photos are accepted with ads for an additional $5 per photo.

ANNOUNCEMENTS APRIL 13, MOM2MOM CONSIGNMENT SALE. Liberty School, 7265 N. Ann Arbor St., Saline. 9-2pm, $1.00 entry. More info at: www.mom2momconsignmentsale.com

SERVICES

BE A BETTER PARENT: At your wits end? Child struggling? I can help. Parenting Consultant, Annie Zirkel, LPC is available for Consultations, Child Coaching, Classes, School Presentations. Specialties: empowered parenting; power struggles; helping children/ teens dealing with bullying, anger, anxiety. Call 734-735-5522 or visit www.practicenow.com. It really can get better. HOME CARE Our First love residential services now offering homemaker personal care, supportive living, and personal assistance and much more. 419-450-8601 or robinson1106@sbcglobal.net. Ask for Mary

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY UNLIMITED INCOME POTENTIAL FROM HOME, flexible schedule, great training and support. Have fun and make a difference. Call Marie 734-475-4607

HEALTH & WELLNESS meet the midwives! An open forum to ask questions about the midwives at New Moon Midwifery, home birth, waterbirth, doula support or options in childbirth. Mondays 6:307:30pm at the Center for the Childbearing Year ~ 722 Brooks St. Ann Arbor, Mi 48103. Free. For more info call 734-424-0220 or www.newmoonmidwifery.com Moms- get fit and have fun! Come workout for FREE every Friday at 1pm Details at http://www.facebook.com/ MomentumBeachbodyFitClub. Prenatal, postnatal, Swedish, and sports massage. Nationally certified. Clinic on A2’s west side. Chair or table. 17 years experience. Holiday Gift Certificates or on-site events. Call Carol: 734-368-2138

call Emily at

419.244.9859 to sell your stuff today

Deadlines: Ad copy must be received by the 15th of the month prior to publication.

Payment: Payment must be received before an ad can

be placed. We accept checks, cash, money orders and credit cards (Visa/Mastercard).

Mail or drop off:

Ann Arbor Family Press Classifieds, 3003 Washtenaw Blvd., Ann Arbor. Phone: 734-668-4044

E-Mail: classifieds@annarborfamily.com Refunds: Sorry, NO REFUNDS given. Misprints: Credit toward future ads.

annarbor

family .com

STRESS REDUCTION, DEEP TISSUE, CMT. 14 years of experience, intro massage special $45/ hour AA Northside. Call Jane 734-741-0761 Homebirth Circles, A social gathering and discussion group for families who are considering homebirth, planning a homebirth or have birthed at home. Sponsored by the Midwives at New Moon Midwifery. Mondays 7:308:30pm at the Center for the Childbearing Year ~ 722 Brooks St. Ann Arbor, Mi 48103. Free. For more info call 734-424-0220 or www.newmoonmidwifery.com FREE REIKI EBOOK Learn about distance Reiki. Get and give this gift of information and healing today. www.FreedomReikiHealing.com CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call Today 888-6972316 for $25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

HELP WANTED CAREGIVER. Our First Love Residential Services is looking for people who can help with homemaker personal care. STNA background and experience. Fax resume 419-241-8182 or email robinson1106@sbcglobal.net “ME TIME” & EXTRA INCOME - just some of what I receive with this work from home opportunity. You can too! Andrea 734-780-7845 “We’re looking for a freelance writer and a freelance photographer.” Paid gigs. E-mail us at aspcsocialmedia@gmail.com

FOR SALE DIRECTV FOR $29.99/MO for 24 months. Over 140 channels.FREE HD-DVR Upgrade! FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/CHOICE Package! Call TODAY for details 888-706-6149 HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERYWHERE By Satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! (200x faster than dialup.) Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST! 1-888-905-7621 SHARI`S BERRIES - Order Mouthwatering Gifts for the Holidays! 100 percent satisfaction guaranteed. Hand-dipped berries from $19.99 plus s/h. SAVE 20 percent on qualifying gifts over $29! Visit www.berries.com/ berry or Call 1-888-770-1867

www.annarborfamily.com • February 2013 •

19



A2F February