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February 17 March 2, 2010

Vol. 10 • Issue 15

Adams Street Publishing Co. Marriage is a hard thing to explain, but, in honor of this issue’s Wedding Bells Bells, we asked our staff to share their thoughts of marriage using no more than 5 words.

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Collette Jacobs (cjacobs@toledocitypaper.com)

Love for B.O.T.

Lookin’ good

(“WELCOME TO TOLEDOLAND” FEBRUARY 3 – 16, 2010) Great story, guys! And great Best of 2K9 issue! Keep up the good work!

FIVE WORDS NO CAN DO

Co-publisher/Chief Financial Officer

(“BEST OF TOLEDO 2K9” FEBRUARY 3 – 16, 2010) I really love that you guys do this every year! I think it’s great to celebrate our local culture!

Mark I. Jacobs (mjacobs@toledocitypaper.com)

COLLETTE JACOBS, BRAVEST PERSON EVER

Editorial

Assignment Editor: Gina Sares (gsares@toledocitypaper.com)

THREE YEARS AND LOVING IT

John

Steve Streicher ToledoLand Apparrel

A&E/Metro Music Coordinator: Emily Rippe (erippe@toledocitypaper.com)

HALF WILL END IN DIVORCE

Calendar: Nathan Mattimoe (calendar@toledocitypaper.com)

HITS

SECOND TIME’S A CHARM

2437 416 304 201

Video/Web Coordinator: Doug Wiederhold (doug@toledocitypaper.com)

PROBABLY NOT FOR ME

BEST OF TOLEDO 2k9 BEST OF TOLEDO 2k9 STAFF PICKS

Contributing Writers: Johnny Hildo, Sue Lovett, Kevin Moore, Jacob Corkins, Colleen Kennedy

‘ATHENA’ IS NO MYTH

Art/Production

WELCOME TO TOLEDOLAND

ONLY IF YOU MEAN IT

Design Manager: Jocelyn Hasenbalg (jocelyn@toledocitypaper.com) Graphic Design: Erin Kanary (adsin@toledocitypaper.com)

MARRIAGE IS FOR EVERYONE.

Amanda Holman (amanda@toledocitypaper.com)

MARRY YOUR BEST FRIEND

Production Coordinator: Danielle Suffron (danielle@toledocitypaper.com)

LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED

Advertising

Sales Coordinator: Allison Garcia (allison@toledocitypaper.com)

ANDY + DANIELLE = MARRIAGE

Rockin’ the humor A couple of weeks ago, we (The T-Town Boys) were lambasted by the City Paper (Johnny Hildo’s “Enter the Rat Race”, January 6-19, 2010) with some of the strongest language I have seen in the City Paper for a feature we ran in the December issue of our paper, along with some other letters from people about that piece. The piece had been written and performed by Chris Rock. In the piece there were no “N” words, it’s just street slang. Black and White comedians write funny shit. Remember Eddie Murphy on Saturday Night Live doing Buck Wheat? People laughed! So were they racist or was NBC racist for showing that program? As in the words of Dennis Miller and Bill Maher when has American become so f***ing politically correct?

Nick and Jimmy’s and the T-Town Boys have always been a bit gritty. We are drinking establishments that are adult oriented but we are kid friendly. Sixty-five percent of our sales are generated from our food. We do not hand out balloons to kids and grandparents or have Daisy Blue or some other clown performing tricks for them. No Sponge Bob Square Pants adorns our glassware as in some of the other local establishments. We are hometown joints that raise large sums of monies for Children’s Hospitals, Dental care for under privileged kids and many other local charities. All dealing with a diverse group of people. If we offended you, we are sorry, but don’t be such a tight ass, life is not that serious.

Nick Tokles

Toledo

Account Executives: Andrew Spahr (andrew@toledocitypaper.com)

THREE WORDS: BLUE RUFFLE TUX

Sharon Kornowa (sharon@toledocitypaper.com)

DO IT RIGHT. DO IT ONCE

Nathan Schank (nate@toledocitypaper.com)

BEST THING I EVER DID.

Natasha West (natasha@toledocitypaper.com)

NOT IN THIS LIFETIME

Classifieds/Distribution: Beth Wayton (classifieds@toledocitypaper.com)

and (distribution@toledocitypaper.com)

SETS GIRLS UP FOR DISAPPOINTMENT

Tisha Carroll (classifieds@toledocitypaper.com)

and (distribution@toledocitypaper.com) LOVE IS IN THE AIR

Melissa Reed (classifieds@toledocitypaper.com)

and (distribution@toledocitypaper.com) CAN’T WAIT UNTIL THAT DAY

Administration

Accounting: Robin Armstrong (rarmstrong@toledocitypaper.com)

A VERY REWARDING COMMITMENT

WE’LL ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS send us your STAFF Q’s and check back to see our answers

email: gsares@toledocitypaper.com Advertising/General Info

For advertising and general information, call 419/244-9859 or fax 419/244-9871. E-mail ads to adsin@toledocitypaper.com. Deadline for advertising copy 2 p.m. Friday before publication. Toledo City Paper subscriptions are available by mail for $20/quarterly or $75 per year at Toledo City Paper, 1120 Adams St., Toledo, Ohio 43604. One copy free per person per week; extra copies $1 each. Persons taking copies for any reason other than personal use are subject to prosecution. Letters to the editor must be limited to 300 words, are subject to editing and should include the writer’s full name and phone number. Any letter submitted to the editor or publisher may be printed at the publisher’s discretion in issues subsequent to its receipt. Entire contents © 2010 by Adams Street Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without the written permission of the publisher.

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Reaching out to migrant workers

The Medical Spanish Outreach at the University of Toledo College of Medicine hosts its first Symposium on Friday, February 19. The afternoon event, from noon - 5 p.m., focuses on Issues in Migrant Worker Health, with presentations by Wendy Avina, Campaign for Migrant Worker Justice and Baldemar Velasquez, President of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, as well as a panel discussion regarding Access to Health Care, Prevention, Teaching. The keynote speaker is Pedro Jose Greer, M.D., an internationally recognized gastroenterologist and humanitarian who served as an advisor to Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. The event will take place at the Health Education Building, Room 110, at the University of Toledo Health Science Campus. Register at www.elpuentedesalud.com.

Just say ‘YES’

Toledo’s Christian-based, nonprofit radio station, YES FM is heading to the web to raise funds, with an annual online auction. Through March 1, visitors can register with www.biddingforgood.com through YES FM’s website, www.yeshome. com, (under online auction), then view auction items, refer a friend to the auction, donate

Pedro Jose Greer M.D. speaks at the Issues in Migrant Worker Health on Feb. 19. money or donate an item. Exciting items include guitars signed by the bands Skillet, and Sanctus Real, or a pair of tickets to a Detroit Pistons vs. Chicago Bulls game. By partnering with BiddingforGood. com, supporters can buy at a safe and secure website. For more information, visit www.yeshome.com. 5115 Glendale Ave. 419-389-0893. —GS

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Marketplace changes

YOUR GUIDE TO CHANGES IN LOCAL BUSINESSES

Bringing sexy back PAULETTE’S STUDIO OF DANCE MOVES INTO NEW LOCATION

Stepping into Paulette’s new studio at 4853 Monroe St, Bldg B, you may feel like you’ve left Toledo. The two-room studio space has a “loft” feel, with high, exposed ceilings, brick walls, and plenty of room for dancing. “It’s private, elegant, classy, and sexy – everything my business is about,” explains Paulette. After being in a one-room studio for three years, Paulette realized she needed more space for the styles of dance that she teaches. Close to Westfield Franklin Park Mall, the new studio is centrally-located, which is important for Paulette: “I have people coming here from a one-hour drive radius to take the classes.” Paulette’s has a variety of opportunities for people who want to start moving. Ballroom and Latin dancing classes (like Argentine Tango and Salsa) for couples and singles are available, offering a new take on “date night.” For as low as $10 per person, couples can drop in for up to

Paulette’s new studio of dance has a loft feel, perfect for dancing.

Know of news in the Marketplace? Send it to an hour of dance instruction in a fun editor@toledocitypaper.com. and flirty atmosphere. In addition to partaking in a beautiful art, Paulette Ladies can also have a Girls Night Out says dancing helps to improve relationships, reduce stress, promote health private party for birthdays, bachelorette parties or any other occasion. She and enhance life. No partner is required for these teaches groups of any size classy pole or classes, and men are more than welcome. chair dance routines. “It’s a safe environ“Once you get the guys in the door, they ment for women to come and feel sexy,” actually really like it and find it’s easier says Paulette. Women can let loose with than they thought it would be,” explains friends in a place that is classy, safe and private. Paulette. And don’t feel nervous if you’ve never But, if you’re looking for a ladiesonly experience, Paulette’s offers that, danced before. Paulette says she helps too. Her Pole Dance Fitness classes are inexperienced dancers find rhythm. “It’s an alternative “workout in disguise” for easier than you think; it just takes pracwomen of all ages and sizes. Paulette tice,” she says, encouragingly. “I have a explains, “It’s a ‘feel good’ place for ev- knack for being able to find that dancing eryday women – women who are gaining strength within individuals, because we self-confidence and getting in touch with all have it.” their inner diva” Just as with the other For more information, visit classes, camaraderie builds between the www.paulettesdancestudio.com. 419-654-3262. dancers. —GS

Recycling cartridges keeps the water flowing

Is the ink cartridge in your printer running dry? Think twice before throwing it in the garbage. The student chapter of Engineers Without Borders at the University of Toledo is collecting ink and toner cartridges to raise money to install water distribution systems in Honduran villages. The group has already provided a system in Los Sanchez, and is assessing the possibility of installing another in La Barranca, giving the villagers easy access to clean water. Cartridges can be dropped off at nine stations on UT’s Main Campus, including the Student Union, Rocket Hall, Plant Operations and International House. Students will then take the items to Cartridge World, where they will receive a small profit for each reusable item.

Fit to be green

Being eco-friendly starts from the ground up, which is why local company SSOE has added a new position in their company structure. The international architecture, engineering, and construction management firm recently welcomed Kris Phillips to the newly created position of Sustainable Design Coordinator. In the role, Phillips over-

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After over 30 years of serving delicious wines and champagnes, The Vineyard wine shop at 5305 Monroe St. has closed its doors. Local wine lovers, we hope you’ll join us in a toast to commemorate The Vineyard’s great selection, fun wine tastings and helpful staff. Ypsilanti, MI says goodbye to local gallery, Shankwiler 123 on Friday, February 19. Join in a closing reception from 5-7 p.m. for all the current artists. 35 E. Cross St., Yspilanti, MI 734-487-9150/ www.shankwiler123.com. This year, Clara J’s Tea Room (219 W. Wayne St., Maumee) celebrates its fifth year in business! Join them for tea, lunch or a small shopping trip in their unique gift shop.

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sees all of SSOE’s activities as they relate to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and implements sustainable design practices into projects. He is also responsible for coordinating LEED resources within the company. Jerry Carter, Business Leader for SSOE’s Sustainable and Renewable Solutions group, says, “This appointment is critical to SSOE’s focus on driving sustainability into all of its projects and also to managing the growing number of LEED resources it continues to develop.” Phillips will also be active in helping to convert existing LEED staff to the new LEED credentialing program, and assist in the continuing education of these workers. For more inKris Phillips joins formation, visit SSOE as the new www.ssoe.com. Sustainable Design —GS Coordinator.

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The door’s always open

Elizabeth’s House helps Toledo area women reconnect with themselves by Clara Engel Sometimes a woman’s emotions well up, responsibilities overwhelm, thoughts crowd out intuition, and doubts destroy confidence. At those times, it’s important to conquer the symptoms in a place of healing and renewal, where others are experiencing a change in their lives or working through issues. In Toledo, that place is Elizabeth’s House. Celebrating two years in operation last September, Elizabeth’s House is, as founder Beth Collins describes, a gathering place for women who want to rethink, renew, and reinvent their lives. “Many times women feel there is something missing in their lives and it’s always the same thing – they’re missing a connection to themselves,” says Collins. Elizabeth’s House is a place where women searching for this connection

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can find it through personal coaching, retreats, workshops, yoga, spiritual direction, and guided meditation. But there is also “You Time,” available every Tuesday and Thursday between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. for doing whatever they need to do to unwind from the day, the week, the year, or their life. Take a nap, read a book, or meditate in the garden. Or join friends cooking in the kitchen, crafting by the fireplace, or conversing over tea.

Collins was inspired to open this home of feminine R&R after a serious accident forced her to resign her professional position – she previously worked in non-profit program development and management where she created ways to help low-income women overcome barriers to self-sufficiency. To fully recover, Collins had to examine and reevaluate her own life and perspective. “I began asking myself important questions and more importantly, listened for the answers.” She started coaching and mentoring individuals on the phone, in her home and over coffee, but the women that she worked with consistently asked for one thing: a gathering place to support each other on their individual self-discovery paths. And so Elizabeth’s House was built.

“There is nothing like talking to a group of women who are open and honest about their own struggles to gain perspective on your own.”

“The key to being in (this) kind of community of women is to create a space of non-judgment,” says Collins. There’s a “title basket” at the front door where women leave their titles and roles of daily life and enter a space of freedom. “It is wonderful to watch women leave titles like mother, daughter, wife, sister, caretaker, or crazy lady in the basket,” Collins says. “They leave their name badges from work and come in to a space where no one asks ‘what do you do?’”

Now, with her team of supportive females, including massage therapist, yoga instructor and energy worker Cheryl Roman; author, speaker and trainer CeCe Norwood; spiritual director and retreat facilitator Sr. Joanne Mary Frania; and accredited journey practitioner Karen Kiemnec, Collins has created this sanctuary and nurtured the women of Toledo. “This program has been such a big part of my life since the doors were opened,” says member Louise Kahle.

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Beth Collins began Elizabeth’s House to support local women’s path to self-discovery. “Anyone struggling with something in their life would benefit from Elizabeth’s House (because) there is nothing like talking to a group of women who are open and honest about their own struggles to gain perspective on your own.” It’s stories like this that have spurred Collins and her team to grow their programs, classes, and membership even more. “I’ve watched blocked artists begin to create again, writers finish their books, and professionals leave the careers their parents dreamt for them... I’ve listened as women shared how they ran away from home, or felt like it, and gained support for creating boundaries that helped them return...(and) the best part is I get to watch women reinvent themselves every day...it’s really beautiful.” Elizabeth’s House is located at 3837 Secor Road on the Notre Dame Provincial campus. For more information about membership or programs, stop by during You Time or contact Beth Collins at elizabethshouse@bex. net or 419-356-5544.

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Has-Ben

B Ko a no-show by johnny Hildo

Lots of Hildo fodder this issue, peeps. The City is awash in gallons of red ink, and the rabble has begun to rouse against its appointed savior, Mayor Bell. Just remember, Bell and Company, you asked for this.

the players tend to bounce and slide slowly toward the edge.

Speaking of aroused rabble, the factions of the LC Republican Party continue to file suits and counter suits, playing dirty from the courts to Columbus. Take us to your leader, Rs. Jon Stainbrook or Jeff Simpson? Or Judge Charles Doneghy or Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner? Viewed from afar it reminds us of that vibrating football game, where you line up the players and turn on the vibrating field. From there, the players tend to bounce and slide slowly toward the edge. Or, more likely, they rattle slowly and inexorably in ever widening circles, never really getting anywhere. Then there’s the fulfillment of our remarkably prescient column from one month ago, when we raised the issue of being appointed to elected office. The appointment of current Rep. Peter Ujvagi as Lucas County administrator has set off a flurry of activity, as wanna-bes and term-limiteds line up for the cascade of projected openings. Current State Senator Teresa Fedor, a term-limited senator and candidate for the house seat in November, is likely to be appointed to the Ujvagi house opening when it occurs, which will in turn create an opening in the senate. That appointment is likely to go to one of the declared Dem candidates for the seat, current Rep. and term-limited Edna Brown or current Councilman Joe McNamara. If Brown gets appointed, her seat will likely go to current District 4 Councilman Michael Ashford, a candidate for Brown’s seat. Either way there will be an opening on council, sooner than later. Get in line, kiddies, if you’re itchin’ for a shot at finding $50 mil or so in the City budget.

Gone to the dogs The most intriguing current conundrum, though, is the status of County Commissioner Ben Konop. B Ko has seen his public image decimated by gaffes. His sophomoric responses caught on camera during the “Boo, Ben Konop” event were strike one. His even more infantile appearance on something called MonkeyDome were strikes two and three. How he could have thought a karate kick at a monkey on a lawn chair could salvage his image is beyond our reckoning. Coupled with an inadvertent trashing of an American flag during the fracas, the episode left B

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Ko’s golden child image in tatters.

He has lain pretty low, surfacing occasionally to save all things canine and toothy. Acting as the “just say ‘no’” commissioner has worn thin, and the vicious dog lobby only has so much clout. His recent vote on the Ujvagi appointment indicates just how conflicted the poor boy has become. First he advocateded a large, public search be conducted to replace the departing Mike Beazley, then inexplicably voted for Ujvagi, saying he was the best person for the job. Call us goofy, but if Ujvagi is in fact the best, why would we spend resources on a search? Needless to say, Benny Boy would have faced an uphill battle to retain his seat, with approval numbers reportedly in the single digits. He had named two heavyweight labor leaders as chairs of his re-election campaign, and pulled petitions with the Board of Elections to run months ago. His most likely opponent would have been Republican Georgie Sarantou, who has his head deeply embedded in the red of the Bell administration’s upcoming budget projections.

Numbers don’t lie Those petitions must be filed by February 18th to be eligible to run in the May 4th Primary Election. After the intervening period of rumors and whisperings, it is now official. Ben has decided to give up the ghost. His numbers are so abysmal he can only do himself more damage by running. His chances of winning against the likeable and moderate Sarantou are about equivalent to his likelihood of being hired as the next Lucas County Dog Warden. Of course, that’s not his story. He says he’s tired of not being able to play the political game. He thought the sheer brilliance of his ideas would be enough to advance his agenda. Which begs the question. If you can’t get one measly additional Commissioner’s vote, how brilliant was that agenda in the first place? So Ben’s cutting his losses and bowing out. But he’s waited so long to announce his decision that another D may not have the chance to get petitions filed in time for a run against Georgie. Meaning Sarantou would be unopposed by a D in November, due to Ben’s waffling. And another opening on Council come next January. Has Ben lost a Democratic seat on the County Commission by waiting so long to bow to the obvious? Is it possible that B Ko could take an unprecedented strike four?

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Experience the thrill of the ice with an online video at

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Beauty is in the details by Christy Penka The beauty of weddings isn’t just in the stunning bridal gown or the perfectly tiered cake; it’s a combination of all the minute details you’ve spent months planning. From the invitations to the favors, every part of your wedding should be as fun and unique as you are. Here are some fun things local couples are doing to celebrate their special day.

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Cakes come in all shapes and styles from traditional to completely one of a kind. If you can dream it, a baker can make it! This cake, from Petit Fours Patisserie and Café is exquisitely different. ($3.95 - $4.95 per serving)

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PHOTO BY SHUTTERLOVE PHOTOGRAPHY

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Keep your bridesmaids in style with dresses in different silhouettes of the same hue. Each lady can find the dress that suites her best, but still match on your special day. Available at stores such as Atlas Bridal Shop, Gallippo’s Bridal and Formal and Sophie’s Sister.

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Bride and groom chocolate-covered strawberries from Schakolad Chocolate Factory in Levis Commons leave a sweet taste in your guests’ mouths. These little brides and grooms are $3.50 a piece.

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Or take charge with do-it-yourself favors! Have a knack for baking? Packaged homemade cookies are an enjoyable treat.

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Vintage accessories take the trouble out of finding that “something old”. Sew vintage jewelry into your hair accessories, as this bride did. The Maumee Antique Mall has plenty of unique vintage finds, if you don’t have an heirloom handed down through the generations.

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PHOTO BY MARY WYAR PHOTOGRAPHY

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Orchids are a popular choice with floral arrangements. Commonly thought of as highly priced, these little blooms are proving they are as cost efficient as they are unique and beautiful. This bridal bouquet was done by Jen of Beautiful Blooms. Bridal bouquet cost $155.00, and the bridesmaid bouquets were $100.

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Laser cut mat board invitations from Birds and Bees on Wayne Street in Downtown Maumee are on the cutting edge of the trends. All the info for your special day is burned into the mat board, leaving a flawless invite that will remain steadfast in your scrapbook for years to come.

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Beat the summer heat with a multi-purposed wedding program. This Toledo couple printed their wedding programs into fans to keep their guests cool.

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Tall centerpieces allow guests to converse while setting the ambiance for an elegant party. Branching, crystals and LED lights are all popular and eco-friendly ways to light up a room. These centerpieces were created by Jen of Beautiful Blooms ($100 a piece).

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PHOTO BY JEN-MARY WYAR PHOTOGRAPHY

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“Create a wedding website (most of them are free). This way people can keep up on the pre-event details of the wedding and reception without having to bother you. Also, don’t be afraid to add something to your wedding or reception that is not traditional and shows off your personalities. This will be something that all of your guests will love and remember. And the biggest thing to remember is that you can’t please everyone, so just relax, have fun and enjoy your journey to saying ‘I do!’ —April Gladieux,

Your Perfect Day, Wedding Planning & Decor

October 10, 2009 Doug Wiederhold Photography

LLC

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June 27, 2009 ography New Image Phot

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April 18, 2009 Kellie Allen at icandy Photography

May 23, 2009 raphy Shutterlove Photog

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Cooking with Georgeann

Dundee resident enlivens the kitchen with Un Coup De Main by Colleen Kennedy the best products around Toledo. Upcoming classes include Make Meals Easy on Thursday, February 25. Learn how to make 1-dish dinners like baked ziti or braised cod with Mediterranean vegetables. Apres Ski on Saturday, February 27 features comforting and filling dishes like Julia’s Roasted Aside from the two peacocks that sometimes strut past the back window, Georgeann Brown’s kitchen probably isn’t much different than yours. Hanging beside her stove is a Faberware pan so well used that the copper has completely worn off the bottom. “People always laugh when they see it, but it’s still great for sautéing,” Georgeann says.

Un Coup De Main, 12695 Eggert Road in Dundee, MI. To register for classes visit www.georgeannbrown.com or call 734-529-2318.

Georgeann Brown’s Un Coup De Main teaches cooks with hands-on learning.

This March marks the third anniversary of Georgeann’s home-based cooking business, Un Coup De Main, a French idiom

meaning “a helping hand.” The Dundee, MI resident and master gardener says the idea of hosting cooking lessons from her own kitchen spawned from a woman who taught similarly structured classes in her native Chicago. What Georgeann liked about the concept was the opportunity to give even the most basic cooks hands-on learning in an environment where new skills could easily be transferred to their own kitchens. “Sometimes you get into a rut,” Georgeann says. “A chicken breast is a chicken breast. I try to open their eyes to see that there are others things than just a boneless chicken breast with a can of Campbell’s soup.” To aid in the process, Georgeann has designed discussion blocks into each four-hour lesson to give students time to provide feedback, ask questions, and showcase different methods they’re already familiar with.

Chicken, Sauteed Potatoes and Cheese. Both classes are from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. and cost $65 each. With something always new to learn in the kitchen, Un Coup De Main’s classes are beneficial for everyone, from new to longtime cooks. Georgeann says, “There are a lot of people who don’t like to or don’t know how to cook, but that doesn’t mean you should settle for something out of the frozen food aisle.” And with Un Coup De Main, you don’t have to.

She also tries to focus on strengthening students’ weaknesses and demonstrating various techniques so they can utilize the one that best suits them. For example, she says, a class might bake the same fruit pie two different ways. After taste testing, the group discusses which version came out better, which was easier to make, and how the recipe Georgeann’s classes could be altered. Since qualdemonstrate various cooking ity ingredients are essential techniques, so cooks can use to any recipe, Georgeann also what works best for them. shares the names of suppliers that she has found who carry

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Fettuccine for a cause

On Saturday, February 20, Zia’s at The Docks does more than warm you with delicious comfort food, they are helping to uplift the spirits of a Toledo area family. The Gabriel

Dubois Fundraising Lunch from An enlightening 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. is helping to raise eating experience money for the family of a local 8-year-old Take a trip back in time with boy who has been diagnosed with lung renowned food historian Ivan Day cancer. This type of cancer is so rare in on Saturday, February 20 at the Detroit children that there have only been five Institute of Art’s Lecture Hall. Experience cases in the past fifty years, and there is the food, table ornaments and dining no known treatment. customs of 18th century Europe through Gabriel is currently undergoing re-created food illustrations. See princely chemotherapy through Toledo Children’s Zia’s hosts a fundraising lunch for dishes originally made for the Archbishop Hospital, and proceeds from the $20 lunch Gabriel Dubois on Feb. 20. of Salzburg and sugar sculptures made will go towards his medical bills. Lunch with original molds from the pastry room includes Chicken Parmesan, of the Princesse de Lamballe, confidante Fettuccine Alfredo, Tossed Salad, and Bread, and to Queen Marie Antoinette. 2 p.m. For more information, visit a silent auction will also take place. Call 888- www.dia.org. 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 313-833-7900. 456-3463 for reservations or purchase tickets at Zia’s (20 Main St.) For Find your balance more information about The Toledo area is getting a fresh look at Pan-Asian cuisine Gabriel, visit www. with Maumee’s new eatery, Balance. Located at 514 the caringbridge.com/ Boulevard (corner of Ford and Dussel), this unique grill offers visit/gabrield. flavorful dishes like the SassyMe — choice of protein, water chestnuts and peapods, sprinkled with sesame seeds — and the Wok in the Park, featuring eleven fresh vegetables. Refresh yourself at the milk tea bar and delight in a side of edamame (baby soy beans) or warm, comforting soups. Say hello to the new eatery with fresh food and a fun atmosphere on opening day, Monday, February 22. 419-893-9999/www.balancegrille.com —GS

Welcome back, Wei

Pile on the pancakes!

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IN ys o city h N I l D lwa do per l s ’ i CP is a tole pacom t s T .

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IHOP restaurants are raising the ‘stacks’ on Tuesday, February 23 in honor of National Pancake Day. From 7 a.m. - 10 p.m., guests receive a free short stack of IHOP’s famous buttermilk pancakes. What’s the catch? The restaurant simply asks that you consider making a voluntary contribution to the Children’s Miracle Network or other local charities. To date, IHOP has raised more than $3.25 million in four years. This year, they hope to raise $1.75 million, bringing the total raised in five years to $5 million. For more information, to donate online, or for IHOP locations visit www.ihoppancakeday.com.

February 17 • March 2

After a kitchen fire damaged Wei Wei Restaurant in 2008, the Chinese eatery was forced to close its doors. But with a grand re-opening, the gem is back, bringing with it unique and tempting specialties. Reclaiming its former name, Wei Wei Restaurant continues to serve the one-of-a-kind items that give it distinction. Try the steamed cod, topped with house soy ginger and cilantro sauce, or the beef short rib, marinated in a special sauce, then pan fried on a hot skillet. Wei Wei also offers what owner Wei Zheng calls an “authentic Chinese menu,” with delicacies that offer something pleasantly different to guests. “It’s not like your ordinary Chinese restaurant,” says Zheng. “You’ll find unique things here you won’t find anywhere else.” With a full bar, Wei Wei also offers special drinks like their “fresh fruit freeze” and black or green tea, with the option of added tapioca to create a “bubble drink,” giving the unique sensation of “drinking and chewing at the same time,” explains Zheng. With such a varied menu, Wei Wei has something for everyone to try, which makes it no surprise why loyal customers are making a return. And Zheng couldn’t be happier — “It’s good to have them back” 1202 N. Reynolds Rd. 419-531-1117. —GS

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culinary [saturday, february 20]

French Dessert Class

Pierig LePont teaches members of the class how to make four of his favorite French desserts. Call or see website to register. 12pm-2pm. $35. Super Suppers, 7015 Lighthouse Way, Suite 1, Perrysburg. 419-872-6325. www.supersuppers.com.

[sunday, february 21]

Raw-alicious Seminar

Learn how to make easy raw recipes, taste test a variety of foods, desserts and drinks and go home with a recipe book and resource page. Call to register and for location. 2-5pm. $30. 419-575-0908. www.raw-aliciouslivingfoods.blogspot.com.

[tuesday, february 23]

Sauces

Join Erika from the Market for a class on sauces featuring sauces for meats, sides and desserts. Call

or email to register. 6:30pm. $20. The Boulevard Market, 102 East Chicago Blvd., Tecumseh. 517-423-6000. erika@boulevardmarket.com. www.boulevardmarket.com.

Spicin’ things up in the Mexican scene

[friday, february 26]

Chinese New Year Cooking

Celebrate Lunar New Year 2010, the year of the Tiger, with a class on dishes like dim sum and roasted pork. Call or see website to register. 11:30am-2pm. $20. The 577 Foundation, 577 River Road, Perrysburg. 419-874-4174. www.577foundation.org.

Plaza Azteca brings fine Mexican dining to Toledo by Kevin Moore

[sunday, february 28]

Evans Street Station Cooking Classes

Observe preparation in their exhibition kitchen and enjoy a variety of fabulous, hearty winter dishes with recipes to take home. Call to register. 5pm. $50. Evans Street Station, 110 S. Evans St., Tecumseh. 517-424-5555. www.evansstreetstation.com.

enter events online toledocitypaper.com Plaza Azteca welcomes Toledoans to experience a new take on Mexican fare. Plaza Azteca, not to be confused with El Azteca, opens its doors for the first time this month. Located on Monroe Street, in the former El Rodeo (beside Shorty’s Barbecue), this new kid on the block aspires to bring something fresh to the city’s already extensive collection of Mexican restaurants. “We’re excited to bring Toledo something they’ve never had,” said Ramiro Bravo, part of Plaza Azteca’s management team, “and that’s real Mexican food. I challenge people to come in and see the difference. It will speak for itself.” The first Plaza Azteca was started in Virginia Beach in the early ‘90s, and the name has since grown to over 30 locations in 7 states, with the next closest restaurant in Pennsylvania. “We focus on our menu and our food presentation. We try to get away from the standard combo of a burrito, rice, and beans that comes all piled together on the plate. Our food is different, and we present our entrees decoratively on white zen plates.”

Ruben Chicken Zucchini sautéed chicken breast, zucchini, roasted peppers, and corn in a spicy cream sauce. Plaza Azteca carries its philosophy into its drink menu as well. “We understand margaritas are supposed to be made with tequila, so we make them with tequila, and not a generic house tequila mixed with different flavorings. We have nearly a dozen margaritas that use various tequilas, many top shelf. It’s about authenticity. Even our mojitos use 100 percent cane syrup.” The bar menu also contains a healthy variety of beers and wines. “You typically don’t see fine wine at a Mexican restaurant because it doesn’t complement the menu, but here it does.” Even Plaza Azteca’s décor deviates from the expected vibrant color scheme in favor of more rustic furnishings, many of which come directly from Mexico. For an authentic south-of-the-border experience, come to the Plaza! Plaza Azteca is located at 5125 Monroe Street. Hours are 11a-10p Sunday-Thursday, 11a-11p Friday & Saturday. P: 419-841-9250. www.plazaazteca.com

Illustrating what sets Plaza Azteca’s menu apart are dishes like Lobster Enchiladas, the Pescada Azteca which is mahi-mahi steak with shrimp, spinach, mushrooms, roasted peppers in Tastings at the Beer a white wine sauce, and the

and Wine Cave

high spirits

Tastings take place Wednesdays and Thursdays, 6-8pm. $10 beer, $15 wine. Beer and Wine Cave, 4400 Heatherdowns. 419-382-6221. www.toledomeatsandmore.com.

February 17-18

New vs. Old World wines and porters and stouts

February 24-25

California wines and St. Patty’s Day beers

March 3-4

Red and white blended wines and Spring release beers

[february 19-20]

German Wines

Enjoy a selection of four German wines. A Cabernet Sauvignon tasting takes place February 26 and 27. 5-8:30pm. $10. Aficionado Wine and Cigars, 26567 N. Dixie Hwy., Perrysburg. www.aficionadowineandcigars.com.

[saturday, february 25]

Wine Tasting with Uptown Vineyard

Join Uptown Vineyard for a tasting of five restaurant quality wines plus appetizers. RSVP to: ty@uptownvineyard.com. 6:30-8pm. $15. Manhattans Restaurant, 1516 Adams St. 419-283-7280. www.uptownvineyard.com.

24

February 17 • March 2

[saturday, february 27]

Vintage Wine Tasting

The tasting, themed “Vintage of the Century,” features 2007 Chateauneuf-de-Papes and other Rhones. 12pm-5pm. Walt Churchill’s Market, 3320 Briarfield, Maumee. 419-794-4000. www.waltchurchillsmarket.com.

[wednesday, march 3]

Wine Tasting

Join Vino 100 in welcoming Ed Macek from the Foster’s Wine Group as you taste seven sensational wines with appetizers. Call to RSVP. 7pm-10pm. $25. Vino 100, 3355 Briarfield Blvd., Maumee. 419-866-8466. www.vino100maumee.com.

www.toledocitypaper.com


Short and sweet

Michigan Theater shows Oscar Nominated Short Films Compiled by Gina Sares Before Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin take the stage for the 82nd Academy Awards and the Oscars on Sunday, March 7, get to know some of the film nominees at the Michigan Theater in Ann Arbor, MI.

FRENCH ROAST

The Theater tributes this year’s Short Film Live Action nominees and Short Film Animated nominees withe the Oscar Nominated Short Films 2010, Friday, February 19 - Wednesday, February 24. Here’s a peek at what’s playing.

THE DOOR

A man and his family deal with the terrible aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster.

INSTEAD OF ABRACADABRA

A young man dreams of becoming a magician, while his exasperated father wishes he would find himself a job.

KAVI

An Indian boy and his parents are forced to work as slave labor in a brick kiln.

MIRACLE FISH

An eight-year-old boy receives an unusual paper fish for his birthday.

THE NEW TENANTS

Two men move into an apartment and find themselves entangled in its terrifying history.

SHORT FILM \ ANIMATED NOMINEES:

In a world made up entirely of trademarks and brand names, Michelin Man cops pursue a criminal Ronald McDonald.

FRENCH ROAST

A businessman drinking coffee in a Parisian cafe discovers that he has lost his wallet.

GRANNY O’GRIMM’S SLEEPING BEAUTY

An old woman tells her own version of the Sleeping Beauty story to her terrified granddaughter.

THE LADY AND THE REAPER (LA DAMA Y LA MUERTE)

The Grim Reaper and a self-satisfied doctor battle over the life of an elderly woman.

For schedule details, visit www.michtheater.org. Film descriptions from www.oscar.com.

www.toledocitypaper.com

LOGORAMA

A MATTER OF LOAF AND DETATH

As a serial killer threatens the city’s bakers, Wallace and Gromit, now bakery owners, meet a mysterious woman and her poodle.

A cheap escape

If the winter doldrums have you daydreaming of traveling to exotic, faraway destinations, the Michigan Theater has a thrifty alternative to beat those blues away. The “World Cinema Film Series” runs Monday nights through April 19, showcasing classic movies shot across the globe for just $9 a pop ($7 for students, seniors and U.S. veterans). Check out the 1959 Brazilian film Black Orpheus on Monday, February 22. This superb retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice Greek legend is set against Rio de Janeiro’s madness during Carnival. On Monday, March 1, the series features the Indian film Pather Panchali (1955). The first movie from independent India to attract major international critical attention, Pather Panchali won “Best Human Documentary” at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival, establishing Satyajit Ray as a major international filmmaker. 7 p.m. The Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor. For more info, including schedule and special “passport” prizes, 734-668-TIME/www.michtheater.org.

February 17 • March 2

also playing [tuesday, february 23]

Beer Wars

Independent director Anat Baron explores the tumultuous relationship between corporate brewers, craft brewers and the beer drinking public in her first feature length documentary. At once a critical exploration of the centrality of beer in American culture and our culture of consumption, Beer Wars highlights the bitter battle for the souls of American beer drinkers. 7:30pm. Gish Film Theater - Hannah Hall, Bowling Green State University. www.bgsu.edu/departments/theatrefilm

[thursday, february 25]

Crash

Celebrate the fifth Anniversary of Crash, the Winner of the Oscar for Best Picture of 2005 and the most discussed film on racial issues across American university campuses in cinema history. Discussion afterwards to include the film, Avatar and other racial representations in Hollywood in the Obama era. Free and open to the public. The event closes out U.T.’s Black History Film Festival. Free. Center for Performing Arts, Lab Theatre, Towerview and Campus Dr. www.utoledo.edu/as/theatrefilm.

Elementary, my dear Watson

Keeping up with the current pop culture interest in Sherlock Holmes, the Lyric Photoplay Society screens Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1942) on Sunday, February 21. Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce star as the original Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson in this film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic detective stories. The film is the fourth Rathbone and Bruce Holmes movie, and tells a great tale of the race against time to save London from Nazi spies. Don’t miss selected shorts and a pre-show theatre pipe organ miniconcert at 2:30 p.m. $5. The Collingwood Arts Center, 2413 Collingwood Ave. 419-244-2787/ www.collingwoodartscenter.org. —ER

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theater events [thursday, february 18]

Jesus Christ Superstar

Hostage to hilarity

Touring comedy show takes on Toledo by Matt Desmond

Comedians Chillian Thomas, Susan Colletti and Jarred Kreger take stand up to a new level at Connxtions Comedy Club. Comedy might need to be funny, but it doesn’t need to be safe. That’s the working premise behind Comedy Held Hostage, the touring stand-up show featuring three young, brash, and diverse comedians, that came to south Toledo’s Connxtions Comedy Club last month. The comics’ desire to perhaps remove the audience beyond the comfort level is apparent right from the beginning. Comedy Held Hostage announces its desire to go for the throat. There is, as always, an affable local MC, but his set is abruptly cut off in mid-joke, the lights go dark, and ominous music precedes a recorded intro. The voices of outraged “journalists” and “bystanders” describe how the gentle innocuous comedy that they crave has been “captured” by three reckless criminals. And then, in succession, the criminals appear on stage, to get whatever laughs they can.

Restricted Topics “We think we’re holding the typical idea of comedy hostage,” says Chillian Thomas, one of the three Michiganbased comic miscreants. “When you go to a lot of comedy clubs--not all of them, but some—they’ll try to restrict you. A lot of it’s unspoken. Backstage, a lot of times there’s a warning right there about what sorts of material you can do. But it’s all to restrict the comedians from being who they are.”

The Reckless Three Thomas, with his dreadlocks and glasses and relentless charm, seems like an unlikely insurgent, but he relishes the role. “ We’re almost ruining the idea of comedy,” he says, “because we’re doing it exactly how we want to do it.” The Detroit native—”Detroit Detroit,” he is careful to point out, “not metro”—clearly enjoys his position as an African-American poking fun at the racial insecurities of oftentimes largely white audiences. The other two members of the tour, Jarred Kreger, of Harrison Township, presents a mischievous everyman persona, making comic hay out of the not-sounconscious hostility underlying everyday interactions, in the workplace and in relationships, and Susan Colletti, a native of Westland, Michigan living in Los Angeles, tries to illicit a not-unpleasant kind of discomfort with a mockery of her Italian-American background and her frank-verging-on-raunchy stories of her sexual adventures and misadventures. All three are eager to bring into the open issues of class, race, and gender that not every audience will be comfortable with. But even when the jokes might seem retrograde, or playing on outdated stereotypes, this kind of material is a window into a real conversation on these issues, often glossed over in “polite” society. Thomas and Colletti, for example, have great fun expressing their enthusiasm for their interracial relationships—something that might in another context meet with discomfort or ostentatious “toler-

Set in two acts, Jesus Christ Superstar tells the story of the final seven days in the life of Jesus of Nazareth. 8pm. $59, $47, $38. Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St. 419-242-2787. www.valentinetheatre.com.

ance.” These comics are more interested in using laughter to dispel the artificial.

[sunday, february 21]

“It’s the most freedom you’ll ever have,” says Thomas, grinning. “Just to go up there and be yourself. If a joke doesn’t go over well?” He shrugs. “Who cares? Because that’s just how it is.” Whether these three young talents are always successful, or even always funny, isn’t the point— they’re having fun doing it.

New Works’ presents the play Late Bus to Mecca by Pearl Cleage. 3pm. $5. The Elizabeth House, 3837 Secor Rd., Toledo. Also Friday, February 26, 7pm at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. 419-913-0286 www.newworkswritersseries.org.

Your chance to witness Comedy Held Hostage is Wednesday, March 3 at the Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor. 7:30 p.m. For more info, www.aacomedy.com/ 734-996-9080. And don’t forget to check out Chillian Thomas, a regular guest comedian at Connxtions Comedy Club in Toledo. 5319 Heatherdowns Blvd. 419-867-9041/ connxtionscomedyclub.com.

New Works Writers Series: Late Bus to Mecca

[wednesday, february 24]

Bald Soprano and The Lesson

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre explores the “Theatre of the Absurd” with two plays from one of the genre’s masters, Eugene Ionesco. These two classic absurdist “anti-plays” reflect the comedy of a universe based entirely on chance. $9-$13. UT Center for Performing Arts, Center Theatre, Towerview and Campus Dr. 419-530-2375. www.utoledo.edu/BoxOffice.

[sunday, february 28]

Lucretia Preview

The Toledo Opera previews their upcoming production of Lucretia (performed March 13 and 14 at the Valentine Theater) in the Museum’s Great Gallery. Renay Conlin, general and artistic director, introduces the production and musical selections. Carolyn Putney, TMA’s interim deputy director, gives a presentation on the Giusepe Cades painting, The Virtue of Lucretia. 2pm. Free. Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. 419-255-7464. www.toledomuseum.org.

Free falling imagination

Picture a tumbling, flying, twisting, jumping, gravity-defying work of acrobatic art that captures the hearts of anyone who dares to watch. Enter a surreal world that springs from the imagination to exist somewhere between waking dreams and flights of fancy. Welcome to Cirque EOS “Imaginaire” — a dazzling show with interesting characters who arrive straight from the pages of a comic book, and who love nothing more than having fun. You’ll laugh as these air bound merrymakers turn the stage world on its ear. It’s a spectacle you can’t imagine until you see it. Cirque EOS “Imaginaire” runs Saturday, February 20 at the Stranahan Theater. 8 p.m. For ticket information, www.stranahantheater. com. 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. 419-381-8851.

Corny cabaret

You’ve never seen a dinner theatre performance like one from the Corny Beef and Cabaret Players. Having traveled across Southeast Michigan and Northwest Ohio, this Irish-theme show returns to SouthBriar Restaurant for another round of music, skits and jokes on Sunday, February 28. Guaranteed to make you laugh, sing and move in your seat, the show features music by local Irish group Extra Stout. 4 p.m. $25 (includes $10 off meal price). SouthBriar Restaurant, 4147 Main St., Sylvania. For tickets, 419-517-1111.

Fantastic tryouts

Bring your best singing voice and your dancing shoes, it’s time to audition for the highly anticipated musical The Fantasticks.

26

February 17 • March 2

Auditions are being held at The Village Players Theatre on Sunday, February 21 and Monday, February 22 at 7 p.m., with callbacks on Wednesday, February 24. The longest running musical in theatre history, The Fantasticks is based loosely on “Les Romanesques” by Edmond Rostand, concerning two neighboring fathers who put up a wall between their houses to ensure that their children fall in love. After the children do fall in love, they discover their fathers’ plot and they each go off and experience the world. In the end, they return to each other and the love they had, realizing that fathers do know best. Book and lyrics by Tom Jones, music by Harvey Schmidt. If possible, please be prepared to sing from the show or bring another song. Break a leg! Play runs May 7-23. The Village Players, 2740 Upton Ave. 419472-6827/www.thevillageplayers.org.

True Toledo thespian

The American Association of Community Theatre (AACT) recently named local theatre artist Madge Levinson as a 2010 recipient of its Robert E. Gard Superior Volunteer Award, honoring her 40 years of service to the Toledo Repertoire Theatre. Mrs. Levinson has been active in Toledo theatre since moving to the area from Chicago in 1969. Thoughout the years she has acted, directed and organized volunteers for several performing groups in the Glass City. She is a frequent performer at the Toledo Rep, and currently directs its Young Playgoers program. Hailed by her counterparts as “a Toledo community treasure,” Toledo City Paper is excited to recognize Madge Levinson as a prominent Toledo thespian. —ER

www.toledocitypaper.com


Free reign fashion

Fashion gets flipped in “Polarpalooza: An Alternative Fashion Show” at the Arts in Common Gallery in Bowling Green on Saturday, February 20. The brainchild of the gallery’s secretary, Anna Buntain, “Polarpalooza” takes everything you know about the fashion show/beauty pageant scene, and creates a counter-culture spin on winter fashion. “It’s an anti-fashion fashion show,” said Buntain, “I took various things I like for inspiration, like the film Andrew Logan’s Alternative Miss World.” With glitter, drag queens and minimal rehearsing in mind, Buntain’s show features a couple models dressed like Cruella de Vil and Snow White (the Urban Addict). “Polarpalooza” includes alternative fashions by BGSU students past and present, including Briana Blair, Heather Baum, Anna Haigen, Jaimi Wilson Tadsen, and Buntain herself. Winners will be determined by an audience vote, and will be honored with handmade trophies. “Polarpalooza: An Alternative Fashion Show” coincides with Bowling Green’s Winterfest celebration. 8 p.m. $5, $4 with a cold weather apparel donation. Arts in Common Gallery, South Main Commonspace, 437 S. Main St., Bowling Green. For more info, www.artsincommon.org.

Art with the Fords

Jack and Cynthia Ford are now in their third year of honoring Toledo’s best on their afternoon talk show “Coffee With The Fords” on WTVG 13abc. The Fords are currently looking for local 2D artists to submit digital images with all the necessary information (name, title, medium) to be selected for display during guest interviews. Work must be framed and ready to hang. 3D works will also be considered for display on the Fords’ table. Interested artists may submit images on Cynthia Ford’s Facebook page. Coffee With The Fords airs Sundays at 12:30 p.m. For more info, visit The Ford Gallery on Facebook.

subconscious, producing images on canvas with very little outside influence. No matter what the medium — painting, drawing, ceramics or wood — Horn allows his intuition to guide him, often creating personal pieces that will be permanently “painted” into your memory too. Free and open to the public. Hudson Gallery, 5645 N. Main St., Sylvania. 419-885-8381/www.hudsongallery.net.

ARTIST’S PALETTE SHAWN ELIZABETH MESSENGER

Website www.shawnmessenger.com Works exhibited at Collector’s Corner (Toledo), An American Craftsmen (NYC) Carlyn Galleries (Dallas), Edgewood Orchard Galleries (Fish Creek, Wisconsin), Hawk Gallery (Columbus), and a whole bunch more. Job description: Glass Artist Career beginning: 1974 Limehouse by Whistler is unveiled at TMA on Feb. 26

Favorite visual artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany

Glass artist Shawn Elizabeth Messenger at work.

Morning routine: Coffee, toast, yogurt or egg, The Blade

Witnessing Whistler’s legacy

The Toledo Museum of Art unveils its latest collection on Friday, February 26 in an exhibit honoring iconic American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834-1903). “Whistler: Influences, Friends and the Not-So-Friendly” features Whistler’s works on paper, positioning him within the context of his contemporaries, influences, friends and enemies. As a printmaker, Whistler was a leading personality among all modern etchers, and his name is often linked with Rembrandt’s as the most experimental, accomplished and refined masters of the etched line. Works by Felix Braquemond, Heri Fantin-Latour, Sir Francis Seymour Haden and others will also be on display. “Whistler: Influences, Friends and the Not-So-Friendly” runs through Sunday, May 30 at TMA. 2445 Monroe St. 419-255-8000/www. toledomuseum.org.

At age 5, you wanted to be: a cowgirl

Exercise routine: Pilates

Last movie you went to see: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Least favorite music genre: Rap

Last DVD you watched: Blood Diamond

Inspiration: Nature Least favorite chore: Cleaning the house

Printing press days

Beginner printmakers are encouraged to check out a brand new Printmaking Workshop at Tholepin Press (formerly Waterstreet Printmakers) starting Tuesday, February 23. The class, lead by local artist and instructor Jack Ford with guests on “Coffee with the Fords” Paul Geiger, runs for six weeks on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 3 p.m., and covers the basics of Painting the unexpected creating and printing woodcuts, linocuts A splash of paint here, a splash of paint there, and line etchings. With three intaglio at Hudson Gallery in Sylvania nothing goes presses, two litho presses and one relief untouched. Showcasing the vibrant, emotional press, Tholepin Press provides area works of area artist Skot Horn through printmakers with a place to work in the Saturday, February 27, the gallery is pleased finest independent facility of its kind in to exhibit “A Sudden and Unexpected northwest Ohio. Experienced printmakers Brush With Paint.” The solo exhibition may inquire about access and press time features the multi-media works that Horn created as well. tholepinpress@aol.com or call within the past year. Working primarily from Paul Geiger’s Studio at 419-243-4944. memory, Horn’s approach to painting lays in his Tholepin Press, 210 Elm St. —ER

www.toledocitypaper.com

February 17 • March 2

27


Toledo Museum of Art 2445 Monroe St. 419.255.8000 www.toledomuseum.org

new exhibits

Carnick, Norman, Onodera, The group exhibit features large acrylic paintings by Andrea Carnick, digital work by Beverly Norman and experimental jewelry by Masako Onodera. Parkwood Gallery, 1838 Parkwood Ave, Toledo. 419-254-2787. www.acgt.org. Through March 12.

thursday18 Absolut Europa Reception, 6-8pm. River

House Arts gallery presents a fine-art print show with pieces by many famous artists including Miro, Vogel, Kandinsky and Dali. River House Arts, 115 W. Front St., Perrysburg. 419-874-8900. www.river-house-arts.com. Through April 3.

ongoing Urban Forest Project Toledo, An exhibition

of 50 winning banners designed by area artists and selected out of over 140 entries grace the light posts in downtown Toledo in celebration of the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day this April. The woodwork of artist Rick Rickman is also displayed. Space 237, 237 N. Michigan Ave. 419-255-5117. www.space237.com. Through February 19.

Ninth Congressional District Invitational Art Exhibition, The Arts Commission and

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur celebrate the creativity and artistic talent of area youth with the Ninth Congressional District Invitational Art Exhibition. Seventy-six students from 18 different local high schools are participating in this year’s event, with 21 students receiving awards. Fifth Third Lobby, One Seagate. 419-254-ARTS. www.acgt.org. Through February 21.

Let It Snow, The Toledo Artists’ Club is

pleased to announce the opening of the Let It Snow Show. Diana Attie served as juror fort this winter-themed exhibit. Toledo Artists

28

UT Department of Art Juried Student Art Showcase, The University of Toledo

Department of Art is proud to showcase the work of its students in an annual juried exhibit. Sculptor and Wayne State art faculty member, Eric Troffkin, will serve as juror. UT Center for Visual Arts, 620 Grove Place. www.utoledo.edu/ as/art. Through March 21.

Grape Abacus by Beverly Norman, who is featured at Parkwood Gallery Club Gallery, Toledo Botanical Gardens, 5403 Elmer Dr. www.toledoartistclub.com. Through February 26.

The Omni Group Exhibition, The exhibit

includes paintings, sculptures and jewelry by the Omni group artists including Paula Fullilove (Omni Group Director), Wil Clay, Alice Grace, Mack Walton, Ron Jamison, Robert Shorter, Charlene Ransom, Gail Stephens, Kelly Norwood, and C.C. Audrey. Toledo-Lucas County Public Library - Kent Branch, 3101 Collingwood. 419-259-5392. Through February 28.

Black History Month Exhibit, The 15th

annual exhibit features work by Aaron S. Bivins, with guest artists Wil Clay, Charles T. Gabriel, Jr. Marcus Nunn, John Wade III, Mack Walton, Warren Woodberry and Yolanda Woodberry. 20 North Gallery, 18 N. St. Clair St. Through March 6.

Flatlanders Art Gallery 11993 E. US 223 Blissfield. 517-486-4591. www.flatlandersculpture.com

With Technical Assistance, Flatlanders Art Galleries proudly presents this exhibit with the TAs of Adrian College, featuring artists; John Ahearn, Janel Dziesinski, and Meghan Walton. Through April 3. Switch Hitters III, Features sculpture by Ken Tohmpson and John Leyland. Through April 25.

Leslie Adams: Recent Drawings, The show features recent drawings by local portrait artist Leslie Adams. Through April 25.

February 17 • March 2

it’s friday Open until 10pm.

February 19 Create a glass flower in an Art Hour

session ($15, $25), take a tour entitled Inside Story: Race to the Finish, enjoy a wine tasting with Raptor Ridge of Willamette Valley, Oregon ($15, $20) and view glass blowing demonstrations.

February 26 Create a glass flower or swizzle stick in

an Art Hour Session ($15, $25), enjoy a gallery talk with Amy Gilman and Carolyn Putney and attend the Hot Glass, Hot Jazz fundraiser for the Museum’s annual Juneteenth Celebration ($30, $35).

wednesday3 German Wine Dinner, The dinner includes a six-course menu by Chef Erika Rapp with paired German Riesling wines, and two presentations. Jutta-Annette Page, TMA’s curator of glass and decorative arts and a native of Germany, discusses wine-themed works of art. A representative from the Max Richter estate in Germany speaks about the 300-year-old winery and its Riesling pairings for the meal. $100. 419-255-8000, ext. 7432.

ongoing exhibitions Self Portraits, After a three-day workshop with TMA, the young ladies of the Lucas County Juvenile Detention Center were given the tools to create self-portraits. The girls were inspired by portraits done by artist Amedeo Modigliani and worked to emulate his artistic style and use of color, which was earthy and muted, yet rich. Through March 1. Bare Witness: Photographs by Gordon Parks, Pioneering photographer, journalist, and film director Gordon Parks captured a cross section of the human experience—from wealth to poverty, fame to obscurity in his visually arresting images. Perhaps best known as the director of the Hollywood hit “Shaft,” Parks was first acknowledged as a master of the photographic arts. Through April 25.

www.toledocitypaper.com


wednesday 17 [ spiritual fitness ]

Zen Buddhist Evening Practice, This traditional Zen Buddhist Wednesday evening practice at the Toledo Zen Center includes liturgy, Zen meditation, a talk and discussion. 7:15pm. Freewill offering of $10 suggested. Shobu Aikido of Ohio, 6537 Angola Rd., Holland. 419-861-1163. www.toledozen.org.

[ sports ]

U.T. Rockets Basketball, The Rockets take on the Eastern Michigan Eagles. 7pm. UT’s Savage Arena, 2801 W. Bancroft St. 419-530-GOLD. www.utrockets.com.

[ miscellaneous ]

Tarot Card Readings, Liz Hazel does mini tarot and astrology readings every Wednesday night. 5pm. Manos Restaurant, 1701 Adams. www.kozmic-kitchen.com.

thursday 18 [ education ]

Fort Meigs Military History Roundtable, Join Ken Dickson, author of Benjamin Franklin Stickney and the Maumee Valley Valley, for an informative discussion on the life of B.F. Stickney. Mr. Dickson rediscovers the importance of B.F. Stickney, and shares why he should not become a forgotten relic of our past. 7:30pm. Free. Fort Meigs Visitor Center, 29100 W. River Rd., Perrysburg. 800-283-8916. www.fortmeigs.org.

[ health ]

Karen Davis Lecture, Nationally recognized economist and President of The Commonwealth Fund, Karen Davis, speaks for MVDS’ Global

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Education Program Speaker Series focusing on the theme of Healthcare. Ms. Davis has been named to Modern Healthcare’s “Top 25 Women in Healthcare, 2009” and has had a very distinguished career in public policy and research. The title of the talk is A High Performing Health System: Lessons from Abroad. 7:30pm. Free. Maumee Valley Country Abroad Day School, 1715 South Reynolds. 419-381-1313 www.mvcds.org.

[ literary ]

African American Read-In, The African-American Read-In is an event sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English. The public is invited to attend and/or participate. Reading selections are available at the circulation desk of Duns Scotus Library. 4:30-5:30pm. Lourdes College Ebeid Student Center, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania. 419-885-3211. www.lourdes.edu.

friday 19

In honor of Black History Month, the Toledo Lucas County Public Library is hosting Expression of Culture Through the Performing Arts on Saturday, February 27. The event features an array of local talent from musicians and poets to writers and artists. Performances by the Libbey High School Jazz Ensemble, the Clarence Smith Community Chorus and the Afro-Caribbean Dance & Drum Ensemble. Additional activities include spoken word performances, the New Works Writers Series and an art display featuring photographs, paintings and quilts. 2-4 p.m. in the McMaster Center, Main Library, 325 Michigan St. 419-259-5207/www.toledolibrary.org. — ER

[ sports ]

[ education ]

Personal Finance and Money Management Workshop, Area residents are invited to receive insight into the importance of making sound financial decisions as the OCC’s Black Student Union hosts a Personal Finance and Money Market Workshop. Call for more information. 6pm. Free. Owens Community College, Oregon Rd., Northwood. 567-661-7583. www.owens.edu.

[ health ]

Celebration of Culture saturday27

Yoga Nidra Integrative Relaxation, Learn simple, easily-practiced meditation techniques to reverse the effects of stress and create a state of wellness. Bring pillows for body support in comfortable lying meditation. Call or see website to register. 10am-12pm. $15. The 577 Foundation, 577 River Rd., Perrysburg. 419-874-4174. www.577foundation.org.

Freestyle Motocross: Gravity Slashers, The Freestyle Motorcross tour hits Toledo for one night of insane acrobatics. 7:30pm. $15-$30. Lucas County Arena, 500 Jefferson Ave. 419-321-5007. www.lucascountyarena.com.

[ miscellaneous ]

HBA House and Home Show, The House and Home Show is filled with exhibitors, from small improvements like a new floor to a large change, like a new home. See website for details. $5, kids 12 and under are free. SeaGate Convention Centre, 401 Jefferson Ave. 419-473-2507. www.toledohba.com.

February 17 • March 2

saturday 20 [ education ]

TPS Fundraising Expo, Find out what regional fundraising companies can offer your organization. Learn about non-traditional fundraisers from some of Toledo Public Schools’ parenting organizations and share yours. 10am-2pm. $1, or free with a canned food donation. E.L. Bowsher High School Auditorium, 2200 Arlington Ave. 419-704-4288. www.tpspc.org.

[ literary ]

Northwest Ohio Writers Forum Meeting, A monthly meeting of the Northwest Ohio Writers Forum. Open to the public. The February meeting features works in progress read by members. Feedback and discussion to follow. 11:30am1:30pm. Toledo-Lucas County Library, Sanger Branch, 3030 W. Central Ave. 419-202-0642. www.nwowf.org.

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sunday 21 [ dance ]

Advanced Belly Dance Workshop, This workshop is for experienced students and belly dancers that are teaching or dancing professionally. This is not a beginner class. Call or email for more information. 1pm-3pm. $20. 419-280-3674. theplacetoledo@yahoo.com.

[ spiritual fitness ]

Black Emphasis Sunday, Featuring speaker, former Toledoan and Olympian Gold Medalist, Dr. Wilbert “Skeeter” McClure of Chestnut Hill, MA. 10:45am. Warren AME Church, 915 Collingwood Blvd. 419-243-2237.

monday 22 [ education ]

The Life of Abraham Lincoln, Abe Lincoln look-alike Pete Raymond chronicles the life of this beloved president from birth to assassination and his many, great speeches, including the Gettysburg Address. Price includes box lunch. Call for reservations. 10am. $6.50. St. Luke’s Hospital Auditorium, 5901 Monclova Rd., Maumee. 419-893-5911, ext. 6278. www.stlukeshospital.com.

tuesday 23 [ benefit ]

Min Anpil, An evening of music, good food, a silent auction, and a chance to share in hope and help for Haiti. The Dosti Foundation is rallying support for Hut Outreach and Zakuska’s Haiti Relief Efforts.

All proceeds from the event will go directly to help the people of Leogane and Les Cayes, Haiti. Hut Outreach has been working in Haiti for 13 years. Zakuska is a local student group that just returned from Haiti and is working with an established orphanage in Haiti. Holland Gardens, 6530 Angola Rd., Holland. 419-345-9550.

[ miscellaneous ]

Winter Family Picnic Family and friends from communities throughout the region are invited to gather for an evening of fellowship and a hearty meal of broasted chicken, BBQ Pork Sandwiches, potato and vegetable. This meal is available with a free will donation. This year’s community fundraisers supports the non-profit Sauder Village, Fulton County Heart Radiothon and Black Swamp Benefit, Inc. 4:30-7:30pm. Sauder Village, 2661 St. Rt. 2, Archbold. 800-590-9755. www.saudervillage.org.

wednesday 24 [ sports ]

U.T. Rockets Basketball, The Rockets take on the Western Michigan Broncos. 7pm. UT’s Savage Arena, 2801 W. Bancroft St. 419-530-GOLD. www.utrockets.com.

[ miscellaneous ]

Lourdes College Celebration of Black History Month, The Lourdes College annual celebration of Black History Month features Director of the City of Toledo Board of Community Relations, Juanita Green, poet Annette McClair, who will read her original work Help! Somebody and Marshall Rose, Director of the Office of Equity and Diversity at Bowling Green State University. The event also features musical performances by The Clarence Smith Community Chorus, Lourdes College Chorus and Good Company Ensemble and the Sylvania Community Orchestra. 5:30-7:30pm. Franciscan Center Theatre, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania. 419-824-3825. www.lourdes.edu . Psychic Readings, Debra De Angelo performs psychic, tarot and astrology readings. 7pm. Nick and Jimmy’s (Toledo), 4956 Monroe Street, Toledo. Also Thursdays at Nick and Jimmy’s at 7309 Lewis Ave., Temperance, MI, and Saturdays, 6pm at Big’z at 2600 West Sylvania Ave.

friday 26 [ benefit ]

networking events friday 19 We Are 3! EPIC Toledo’s Third Annual Birthday Bash

EPIC Toledo is celebrating their third birthday with a huge bash. Food is provided by local restaurants with a cash bar. Music by Johnny Rocker and the Hitmen. See website for more info. 8pm. $5 for EPIC members and $10 for non members. UT’s Savage Arena, 2801 W. Bancroft St. www.epictoledo.com.

monday 22 Green Drinks

Great food and conversation with interesting folks. Learn about sustainable building materials from Duane Campbell who will be teaching the group about Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCMs). Also discuss what other Green Drinks’ attendees are doing in the community. 5:30pm-8:30pm. Glass City Cafe, 1107 Jackson St. www.greendrinks.org.com.

HEY networking groups! enter your events at

toledocitypaperDOTcom send the Veterans of Northwest Ohio to Washington DC to see the memorials built and dedicated in their honor. Friday, February 26, at 7pm and Saturday, February 27, at 2:30pm. Call or see website to order tickets. $20. E.L. Bowsher High School Auditorium, 2200 Arlington Ave. 419-410-7729. www.HonorFlightNWO.org.

[ miscellaneous ]

Country Peddler Craft Show, This large craft show features over 140 skilled craftsmen from many different states. Get your hand stamped at the show for free re-admission all weekend. Free parking. $4, 12 and under are free. Lucas County Rec Center, 2901 Key Street, Maumee.

Honor Flight Northwest Ohio 2010 Reunion & Fundraiser, Tom Mullica performs Red the only Red Skelton Tribute show in America authorized by the Red Skelton Estate and Lothian Skelton. Honor Flight Northwest Ohio (HFNWO) is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization formed in 2007 in order to

Lovely livestock saturday27 Cockadoodledoo! If you love and support animals, you can’t miss the All Species Ball hosted by Toledo GROWs on Saturday, February 27. This masquerade ball benefits small livestock in Toledo—including chickens, turkeys, goats and bees—and your admission fee helps Toledo GROWS bring these animals to youth at community centers throughout Toledo. Attendees are encouraged to dress as their favorite non-human species. Food, drink, and music provided. Advance tickets $15 per person, $25 per couple or $20/$30 at the door. 7 p.m. Ward Pavilion, Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave. 419-536-5566/www.toledogarden. org/content/toledogrows. — ER

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staff picks Help of the Irish sunday21

I jocelyn I

Embrace your Irish side while supporting a great cause at the second annual Raisin’ O’The Green. Irish United of Northwest Ohio invites the community to the Blarney Irish Pub for a day of Irish food, music and dance to benefit the Cherry Street Ministries on Sunday, February 21. Attendees will enjoy an Irish dinner and live entertainment by Extra Stout, Whiskey Before Breakfast, Toraigh and more. Dance a jig with the Aradan Academy of Irish Dance and the Irish Dancers from the Perrysburg Dance Academy. 3 p.m. $25. The Blarney Irish Pub, 601 Monroe St. 419-418-2339/www.theblarneyirishpub.com. — ER

saturday 27 [ benefit ]

EPIC Toledo Blood Drive, Participate in EPIC’s 1st Ever Blood Drive at Fallen Timbers in the former Lily’s on the Lake storefront near P.F. Chang’s. Their mission is to collect 40 units. Each unit donated can save up to 3 lives. See website to register. Enter sponsor code: EPICTOLEDO. 9am-3pm. The Shops at Fallen Timbers, 3100 Main Street, Maumee. www.redcrossblood.org/make-donationsponsor.

[ pets ]

Yappy Hour, Toledo Dog Training introduces RallyO Demos and Yappy Hours at the Holland training center. Rally is a fun team sport for dogs and their handlers. The Rally demo hour provides an opportunity for owners to determine if Rally is for them. Families can observe dogs and their handlers from

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the current Rally 1 class navigate courses with numbered signs indicating exercises to perform. Yappy Hour provides great social fun for pooches and their people. Bring the whole family to mingle, enjoy light snacks and non-alcoholic beverages. The dog training ring in the training center will be available for off-leash play and training practice. The cost for utilizing the ring is $5 for 10 minutes per family. 10am. Toledo Dog Training, 601 S. McCord Rd. 419-699-7785. www.toledodogtraining.com.

[ sports ]

Sat, Feb. 27 Yappy Hour

Now all I need is a dog.

p. 31 [ miscellaneous ]

Musical Equipment Swap, Attendees sell and buy used and new musical equipment. Part of the School for the Arts Guitar Fest. 10am-5pm. $3 admission, $10 for a vendors table. Toledo School for the Arts, 333 14th St. between Adams and Madison Ave. 419-246-8732. www.ts4arts.org. Seed Swap, Start the gardening season right with workshops, free seeds, kid’s activities, music and more. The seed swap takes place in the Ward Pavilion from 12-3pm and a series of workshops takes place from 10am-5pm. See website for more info. 10am-5pm. Free. Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central. www.toledogarden.org.

tuesday 2 [ education ]

Toledo Walleye Hockeye, The Walleye take on the Gwinnett Gladiators. $15. 7pm. Lucas County Arena, 500 Jefferson Ave. www.toledowalleye.com. U.T. Rockets Basketball, The Rockets take on Ball State. 7pm. Savage Arena (UT), 2801 W. Bancroft St. 419-530-GOLD. www.utrockets.com.

Efforts to Restore Functional Equilibrium for Humanity and the Environment, Sr. Jeremias Stinson, OSF/S, Superintendent of Environmental Stewardship, Shrines and Woodlands for the Sisters of St. Francis, Sylvania, presents this lecture that answers questions such as: The hardwood forests of the Great

February 17 • March 2

I natasha I

Fri, Feb. 19 Freestyle Motorcross: Gravity Slashers

The name just sounds entertaining.

p. 29 I beth I

Sat, Feb. 27 Celebration of Culture

Because culture needs celebrating.

p. 29 I erin I

Sat, Feb. 27 Toledo GROW’s All Species Ball Unicorn bear.

p. 30

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Lakes region are disappearing; what can be done? Statistics on U.S. hunger tell us Ohio is a leader in food production and ranks third highest in the nation; what can be done? Sponsored by Science Alliance for Valuing the Environment. 7:30pm-9pm. 419-824-3691. Franciscan Theater and Conference Center, 6832 Convent Blvd, Lourdes College, Sylvania.

wednesday 3 [ literary ]

Director’s Guild and Emmy Awards. After M*A*S*H, Farrell with partner Marvin Minoff formed ‘Farrell/Minoff’ productions, and produced many films. Beyond film, Farrell is a human rights activist and speaks out on his opposition of the death penalty, two of his prime concerns. His books include Of Mule and Men, and Just Call Me Mike: A Journey to Actor and Activist. 7pm. $10, $8 for students. 419-259-5207. www.toledolibrary.org. Great Hall at the Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd.

Authors! Authors! Series Featuring Mike Farrell, Farrell wrote and directed several episodes of M*A*S*H, which he appeared on for eight years. His writing and directing of the memorable show earned him nominations for

Rollin’ the derby girls friday26 Nobody throws a party like the Glass City Rollers, Toledo’s infamous allgirl roller derby team. On Friday, February, 26, the ladies host a fundraising event at Avalon. The evening features drink specials, No-Holds Barred Fresh Meat Musical Chairs, GCR merchandise, and plenty of photo ops with your favorite derby girls. Bringing sweet skating to Toledo isn’t cheap, 100 percent of the cover charge goes toward the team, and ensures more exciting bouts (next home game is Saturday, April 3). 9 p.m. $5. Avalon, 25 S. Huron St. For more info, visit the Glass City Rollers on Facebook. — ER

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W E H AV E I T A L L O N L I N E ! C O M P L E T E M U S I C E V E N T S AT T O L E D O C I T Y PA P E R . C O M

Kings (and Queens) of Karaoke Toledo DJs and singers give public singing advice by Emily Rippe

THE Dj’s

You don’t have to be a rock star to be a good karaoke-er. At least that’s what our karaoke experts in Toledo say. A good song will take you far. But how does one go about picking the perfect song to sing in public, or better yet, where’s the best place for you to sing karaoke in this town? Originating from Japan in the 1970’s, karaoke remains a popular form of bar entertainment, and Toledo offers seven karaoke nights a week. TCP spoke with a few karaoke DJs and singers to help you find your song and karaoke spot. Use this as your personal guide to the local karaoke scene. For live footage of featured Karaoke Stars, visit www.toledocitypaper.com.

DJ Georgia Peach

VENUE(S):

POPULAR SONGS:

419-885-ROCK

R House

5534 Secor Rd. 419-474-2929 www.rhousebar.com TUESDAYS, 10pm

“Mustang Sally,” “Grease Medley,” “Love Shack” and “Paradise by The Dashboard Light.”

Karaoke DJ Career:

I’ve spent 14 years in the karaoke business, and many more years in the Toledo music business.

The Bier Stube

Burnsy’s Burgers & Grill

www.premiere-karaoke.com

5333 Monroe St. 419-841-7999 bierstubetoledo.com WED-SAT, 10pm

Karaoke DJ Career:

JJ’s Pub

Claddagh Irish Pub

Doug Richardson and Micki Greenburg of Premiere Karaoke We’ve owned Premiere Karaoke for 12 years.

VENUE(S):

JOB PERKS:

Woodchuck’s Bar & Grill

224 S. Erie St. 419-241-3045 myspace.com/woodchuckstoledo WEDNESDAYS, 10pm

I love to watch my singers blossom and bloom into performers. I coach them with techniques I’ve learned throughout the years, and help them become professional vocalists.

POPULAR SONGS:

2450 Woodville Rd., Oregon, 419-725-0071 burnsysburgersandbrew.com TUES & SAT, 10pm

5001 Monroe St. 26611 N. Dixie Hwy., 419-472-1414 Perrysburg www.claddaghirishpubs.com jjsperrysburg.com TUESDAYS, 10pm

They sing everything from oldies to today’s top ten hits. A favorite among many of our crowds is “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow.

ADVICE FOR FIRST-TIMERS:

For info on Yeeha’s Idol, including words & photos from finalists, go to

It’s not “Star Search.” You don’t have to be good. Karaoke is all about having fun. Once people do it, they’re addicted.

Mutz

27 Broadway St. 419-724-4060 myspace.com/maumeebaybrewing THURSDAYS, 10pm

DJ Heat Karaoke DJ Career: 10 years

VENUE(S): Yeeha’s

3150 Navarre Ave., Oregon 419-691-8880 www.yeeha’s.com WEDNESDAYS, 9pm

POPULAR SONGS:

CLUB ATMOSPHERE:

Riz Pack

POPULAR SONGS:

I’ve been DJing since I was 13, and got into the karaoke scene about five years ago

VENUE(S): Dog House Bar & Grill 4935 Lewis Ave. 419-478-6101 WEDNESDAYS, 9pm FRIDAYS, 9:30pm

Dog House singers like the oldies but goodies. Anything from Bob Seeger or Patsy Cline.

CLUB ATMOSPHERE:

We’ve been doing this for about three years at the Dog House, and have a really great following. It’s always a good time. If someone is singing, everybody is turned around, paying attention to whoever is performing. They get really into it.

The Distillery

www.toledocitypaper.com

Favorite song to karaoke: The best karaoke song, hands down, is “Why Don’t We Do It In The Road?” by The Beatles. It’s brief, obscure, has very few lyrics to remember, and incorporates a fair amount of yelling. Advice to first timers: First timers to karaoke should know that there is a direct correlation between alcohol consumption and performance quality. The correlation is more equals better. There is a fine line where the performance suffers, but first timers shouldn’t really worry too much about that and should just plow straight through said line.

Jamie Johnson-Toledo Favorite Karaoke Moment: Back in 2005, I won the Toledo Karaoke Idol contest, where I sang “If I Ain’t Got You” by Alicia Keys. I won $500 and a trip to Vegas. Definitely my most profound karaoke moment. Advice to first timers: It really depends on where you go and how receptive the crowd is. Sometimes they just don’t show you the love. If people can appreciate music and artists, they can sit back and appreciate someone else’s talent and music abilities.

Advice for first-timers:

If you can sing in the shower or in your car, you can sing live.

ADDITIONAL KARAOKE CLUBS TO CHECK OUT: 4311 Heatherdowns Blvd. 419-382-1444 thedistilleryonline.com TUESDAY 9pm

Voted TCP’s Most Eligible Bachelor

Job Perks:

SUNDAY 8pm

Karaoke DJ Career:

Eric Strayer- Toledo

Yeeha’s is typically a country bar, but on Karaoke Night it’s pretty diverse. We have singers perform everything from old school hip hop and R&B to classic oldies. It’s very eclectic. You can’t predict what’s going to happen next. I particularly like giving singers something they enjoy, and offering a night where they can just sing and forget their troubles.

YEEHA’S IDOL NIGHTS:

the stars

The entire Carrie Underwood collection is popular among our lady singers.

Quarters Bar & Grill 27272 Carronade Dr., Perrysburg 419-874-7773 quartersbarandgrill.com FRIDAY 10 10pm

Eugene Bailey- Toledo Favorite song to karaoke: I like to sing love songs. Obvious reasons. I love women so I love to sing love songs. I sing to maintain my voice. But just like any singer if you are not pleasing the audience, then it is not worth your time. The audience favorites for these days are ‘My Girl,” Johnny Lee Hooker’s ‘Boom, Boom, Boom’ and “Me and Mrs. Jones.” Advice to first timers: Karaoke was started by the Japanese. I think the word means tone deaf.

February 17 • March 2

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W E H AV E I T A L L O N L I N E ! C O M P L E T E M U S I C E V E N T S AT T O L E D O C I T Y PA P E R . C O M TCP

WED, FEB 17 ROCK, POP, & HIP-HOP

Frankie’s Inner City: Zach Deputy TCP Howard’s Club H: Lifeless Decay w/ Wretches, Gas Chamber Crucifixion and Blood of the Prophets The Distillery: Mullan and Lovely

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Degage Jazz Cafe: Gene Parker SouthBriar Restaurant: Ray Heitger’s N’Orleans Dixieland Jass Jam TCP

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Basin St. Grille: Gregg Aranda Jed’s (Maumee): Chris Shutters and Frankie May TCP Treo Restaurant: Acoustic Outcast featuring Kristie

OTHER

TCP Bier Stube: Karaoke Daddy Oh’s: Open Mic Night w/ Jason Quick and Ben Langlois TCP Robinwood Concert House: Nate Wooley, Ben Hall and Chris Riggs Trio The 1901: Karaoke The Dog House Bar and Grill: Karaoke w/ Riz Pack The Roadhouse: Karaoke WoodChuck’s: Karaoke w/ DJ Georgia Peach Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Karaoke Night

THU, FEB 18

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Arnie’s Bar & Grill: Chris Shutters Band TCP Clazel Theatre: Ekoostik Hookah Howard’s Club H: Eat Sugar The Bronze Boar: Rivers Edge The Distillery: Steve Mullan Band

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Degage Jazz Cafe: Tim Whalen TCP Manhattan’s Restaurant:

indicates our picks for the week

CITY BEAT

Favorite kind of fan/audience member: The ones that buy the band drinks, bring along friends to the concerts and dance.

Club, The Colony in Detroit, The Whitney in Detroit, Union Ballroom at U of M, The City Club in Ann Arbor, and of course, the Toledo Museum of Art.

Lineup: Dan Welch, Russ Carpenter, Shannon Ford, Kevin Heidbreder - saxophone Dave Sycks, Charles Saenz, Dave Tippett - trumpet Mike Miller, Mark Stewart, Kevin Shope - trombone Pete Ford, Ron Prebe, Gay Galvin - keyboard Jason Gahler, Aaron Keaster, Steve Knurek, Andy Bielski - bass Jeff McDonald - drums

Favorite original song or cover song to play? Their George “The Fox” Williams’ arrangement of Cole Porter’s “I Get A Kick Out Of You.”

Sound: Vibrant, brassy, and percussive. Classic Swing at its finest. Boogies, ballads, and bebop!

JEFF MCDONALD’S SWINGMANIA

Most embarrassing moment on stage: The night in Sandusky when Jeff fell over backwards off the stage in the middle of an inspiring performance. Favorite venue to play: There are several: Trotters Tavern, SouthBriar Restaurant, The Toledo

Gig list: Swingmania has weekly rehearsals (which are open to the public) at Trotter’s Tavern every Tuesday and SouthBriar Restaurant every Thursday. Band’s performance in 5 words or less: Swing is the thing! Web site/contact info: www.swingmania.org

Time together: This group is a “who’s who” of the Toledo music scene, has been playing together for more than 10 years and enjoying every minute of it. Wedding receptions, corporate events, high society dance parties, and concerts in the park are their niche. Influences: Hard core swing; no holds barred artists like Gene Krupa, Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Artie Shaw, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Bobby Darin, Harry Connick, Nat King Cole, Anita O’Day, and June Christy. Quick Trio Murphy’s Place: Toledo School For The Arts Tavern 531: Blues Open Night

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Basin St. Grille: Dirt and Candie Grumpy Dave’s Pub: Dave Conner TCP The Blarney Irish Pub: Kyle White

DANCE AND TECHNO

Avenue Bistro: Live DJ The Ottawa Tavern: Primal Groove

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke Doc Watson’s: Name This Tune JJ’s Pub: Karaoke TCP Mutz: Karaoke

FRI, FEB 19

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Doc Watson’s: Jeff Stewart Fat Fish Blue: East River Drive TCP Frankie’s Inner City: Off With Their Heads w/ Unsinkable Molly Brown and 10 Bars North Headliners: Rock Fights ft. Trucido, A New Factor, and Cordless Penguin Mickey Finn’s Pub: Eat Sugar The Blarney Irish Pub: MAS FiNA TCP The Bronze Boar: The Coosters The Distillery: Velvet Jones The Ottawa Tavern: Joey and the Traitors w/ The Dumb-Easies The Village Idiot: The Nutones Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Big Ticket

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Avenue Bistro: Live Jazz Set Degage Jazz Cafe: Ben Jannson Murphy’s Place: Ellie Martin

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC Mancy’s Italian Grille: Dave Carpenter TCP Swig: Chris Shutters

DANCE AND TECHNO

TCP Wesley’s Bar: Old School Fridays w/ DJs Folk, Perrine and N. Mattimoe

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke TCP Caffeini’s Coffee: 1 Year

Anniversary Celebration w/ Unknown Legends, Kevin R. Daniels and Elements of Sound Happy Badger: Acoustic Open Mic Night w/ Sarah Cohen The Dog House Bar and Grill: Karaoke w/ Riz Pack

SAT, FEB 20

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Basin St. Grille: Earregulars Doc Watson’s: Gingerlove Dog House Bar and Grill: Bethany & Vince Fat Fish Blue: East River Drive Frankie’s Inner City: The Secret Stones w/ Jeff Stewart and Mike Corwin Headliners: Mobile Deathcamp w/ Vivian Banks, Measure The Redshift and Exit Reality TCP Howard’s Club H: Roughneck Records presents JFK Didn’t Even See It Coming and Martin Luther and the Kings TCP Mickey Finn’s Pub: Boogie Matrix Mechanism The Bronze Boar: Swamp Kings The Distillery: Velvet Jones The Lounge (formerly Break Room Lounge): The Ravens The Ottawa Tavern: Vaporizer

Toledo’s Main Street Bar and Grille: Toledo’s Cross Over Band

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Avenue Bistro: Live Jazz Set Degage Jazz Cafe: Ben Jannson Manhattan’s Restaurant: It’s Essential Murphy’s Place: Glenda McFarlin The Bronze Boar: The Swamp Kings TCP The Village Idiot: Mojoflo

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Swig: Chris Konop The Blarney Irish Pub: Cluster Folk

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke Bozarts: We Luv Beatz Burnsy’s Burgers: Karaoke TCP The Glass City Boardwalk: Rock ‘N” The Boardwalk Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Lights Out Party

SUN, FEB 21 ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Frankie’s Inner City: We Are The Becoming w/ Modern Day Escape, Hush

MARTIN LUTHER & THE KINGS HOWARD’S CLUB H/ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Martin Luther & The Kings is not a tribute to the honorable Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. To the contrary, the band is a punk/rock trio from Newport Kentucky. Featuring the musical styles of Matthew “Smitty” Smith on guitar, Aaron “Bogie” Bogren on bass and Brian “Landfill” Landis on drums, these guys are quick and diverse. “Our name came from the unkept mind of Smitty,” the band said. “One day while sitting on the quad, a smoking hot momma says ‘Hey man, I hear you play music, what’s the name of your group?’ With nothing else to say, Smitty rambled the name we have today come to know and love, Martin Luther & The Kings. “We play music without the immediate hope or intentions of spreading a message, as much as spreading our seed...of rock & roll.” Martin Luther & The Kings play at Howard’s Club H in Bowling Green on Saturday, February 20 (courtesy of Roughneck Records), where they promise to bring their blend of sexiness, deadliness and rock & roll to Northwest Ohio. 8 p.m. 210 N. Main St., Bowling Green. www.myspace.com/martinlutherandthekings7. —ER

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indicates our picks for the week

A MATTER OF BLACK & WHITE

There’s no grey area when it comes to drinking and driving. Thanks to Black & White Transportation, a new iPhone application can get you wherever you need to go after a night of fun, frivolity and libations. B4UDRIVE is a free app that calculates your blood alcohol content, taking your gender, weight and the number of drinks you’ve had into account and basing it on the standards set by National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. If the results reveal that you’re best leaving the driving to someone else, the touch of an icon can identify if you are within the Black & White Transportation service area, and will connect you directly to its 24-hour dispatch center. For more info, 419-356-8284/www.blackwhitecab.com. —ER

MOJOFLO

VILLAGE IDIOT/ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Mojoflo: It’s as fun to listen to as it is to say. This soulful R&B septet hailing from Columbus features Amber Knicole as lead vocalist, George Barrie on guitar/ vocals, Tim Magree on keys/vocals, Jake Levy on drums, Toledoan Walter Kolhoff on saxophone, Charles Scott on bass and Kevin Bourassa on trumpet. Mojoflo comes straight out of 1974. Playing both horn-driven instrumentals (“Mojo Stut’) and vivacious ditties (“Waiting”), Mojoflo successfully mixes elements of jazz, funk, hip hop and rock into an eclectic groove they call their own. Having released their debut EP Waiting last April, Mojoflo quickly developed a solid following in Columbus. The band has big plans for 2010. Help them start it off right on Saturday, February 20 at the Village Idiot. 10 p.m. $5. 309 Conant St., Maumee. 419893-7281/www.villageidiotmaumee.com. —ER

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February 17 • March 2

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W E H AV E I T A L L O N L I N E ! C O M P L E T E M U S I C E V E N T S AT T O L E D O C I T Y PA P E R . C O M TCP

indicates our picks for the week Hush Love and Such Great Heights

CAFFEINI’S ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

CAFFEINI’S COFFEE/FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19 For the past year, Caffeini’s Coffee has provided University of Toledo professors and students (and many other Toledoans) with delicious food and drinks, while offering performances by local musicians. On Friday, February 19, the community is invited to an all-day celebration to honor the coffee shop’s one year anniversary. The party runs all day long from 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. with live entertainment. Toledo’s own Unknown Legends take the stage at 1 p.m., followed by singersongwriter Kevin R. Daniels at 3:30 p.m., and an appearance by the eclectic pop/R&B group Elements Of Sound at 6 p.m. Food and beverage specials, along with door prizes. Come get caffeinated at Caffeini’s, 1471 Secor Rd. 419-536-9724. —ER

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Nagoya: Frankie May and Chris Shutters

OTHER

TCP Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Yeeha’s Idol

MON, FEB 22 JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B TCP

Night

Murphy’s Place: UT Jazz

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

The Village Idiot: Frankie and Friends

OTHER

TCP Manhattan’s Restaurant: Open Mic Night

TUE, FEB 23

DOWNTOWN WINTER BLUES FEST

E. CRAWFORD ST., DOWNTOWN FINDLAY/ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Winter blues got you down? Take a drive to Findlay for the exciting Downtown Winter Blues Festival on Saturday, February 27. This inaugural event celebrates the season with everything we love—blues music, ice sculptures and specialty beers like Goose Island Mild Winter. With blues music at the center, the event opens with Josh Garrett & The Bottomline, and features headliners the Jimi Vincent Band. Check out their latest release, Been There, Done That... Won’t Do That Again. The Millstream Mojo Band also plays. Runs from 6-11 p.m. and benefits the Hancock County Center for Safe and Healthy Children. $5. Downtown Findlay, E. Crawford St. For hotel accommodations and specials, visit the Findlay Inn & Conference Center, 200 E. Main Cross. 419-422-5682/ www.findlayinn.com. —ER

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Howard’s Club H: Farewell w/ Rookie of the Year

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Degage Jazz Cafe: Joe Sneider Murphy’s Place: Murphy and Black Trotter’s Tavern: Jeff McDonald’s Big Band All Stars

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Daddy Oh’s: Jason Hudson JJ’s Pub: Bobby May and Jon Barile TCP

OTHER

Burnsy’s Burgers: Karaoke Claddagh Irish Pub: Karaoke Degage Jazz Cafe: College Open Mic Night Fat Fish Blue: Rockband Tournament TCP Rhouse: Karaoke w/ DJ Georgia Peach The Distillery: Karaoke

WED, FEB 24 ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Avenue Bistro: Don and Rachel Coats Frankie’s Inner City: Cowboy Angels w/ Good Sir Con Artist TCP Grumpy Dave’s Pub: Guilio (from Epic Fail)

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Degage Jazz Cafe: Gene Parker Murphy’s Place: College Night SouthBriar Restaurant: Ray Heitger’s N’Orleans Dixieland Jass Jam

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Basin St. Grille: Jeff Stewart Jed’s (Maumee): Chris Shutters and Frankie May TCP The Distillery: Dave Carpenter Treo Restaurant: Bobby May and Jon Barile

DANCE AND TECHNO

Avalon: Wenz Daze Open House Night The Distillery: Rock Star Wednesdays

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke TCP Daddy Oh’s: Open Mic Night w/ Jason Quick and Ben Langlois Martini and Nuzzi’s: Karaoke w/ Hank The 1901: Karaoke The Dog House Bar and Grill: Karaoke w/ Riz Pack WoodChuck’s: Karaoke w/ DJ Georgia Peach Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Karaoke Night

THU, FEB 25 ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

TCP Clazel Theatre: Badfish Frankie’s Inner City: Fred Shafer Grumpy Dave’s Pub: Balloon Messenger

36

February 17 • March 2

Howard’s Club H: The Ataris Mickey Finn’s Pub: Great Lakes Crew The Bronze Boar: J. Woods The Distillery: 56 Daze TCP The Ottawa Tavern: Old West End Records presents Mark Hutchins and The Stuntmen w/ The Fairly Handsome Band and DJ Mighthaveben

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Degage Jazz Cafe: Steve Richko Murphy’s Place: Open Mic TCP SouthBriar Restaurant: Jeff McDonald’s Big Band Revival Party Tavern 531: Blues Open Night

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

Poco Piatti: Dave Carpenter TCP The Blarney Irish Pub: Chris Shutters

DANCE AND TECHNO Avenue Bistro: Live DJ

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke TCP Burnsy’s Burgers: Karaoke JJ’s Pub: Karaoke Mutz: Karaoke

FRI, FEB 26

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

TCP Frankie’s Inner City: Mustard Plug w/ Extra Extra, The Grubs and Every Other Day TCP Ground Level Coffee House: Vandolah CD Release Party Headliners: Sex Slaves w/ Hazard Perry, And Great Was It’s Fall, and Saturnine Hello Howard’s Club H: Radio Broadcast The Blarney Irish Pub: The Bridges The Bronze Boar: Stonehouse The Distillery: 56 Daze The Omni: Panama (Van Halen Tribute) The Ottawa Tavern: Frank & Jesse w/ JWC

TCP WoodChuck’s: Mark Hutchins and The Stuntmen w/ The Sanderlings, The Dumb Easies and The Bleu Ox Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: MAS FiNA

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Avenue Bistro: Live Jazz Set Degage Jazz Cafe: Tim Whalen Trio TCP Fat Fish Blue: Heptcat Revival Murphy’s Place: Glenda McFarlin

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

TCP Basin St. Grille: Distant Cousinz w/ Scott Fish Doc Watson’s: John and Bobby Swig: Kyle White

DANCE AND TECHNO

Avalon: Flashback Friday Plush Ultra Lounge: Fashion Fridays TCP Wesley’s Bar: Old School Fridays w/ DJs Folk, Perrine and N. Mattimoe

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke TCP Clazel Theatre: American Heart Association Charity Event w/ The Reese Dailey Band, Bonepony and Teamnate TCP The Dog House Bar and Grill: Karaoke w/ Riz Pack

SAT, FEB 27

ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Culture Clash: Mark Hutchins and The Stuntmen In Store Doc Watson’s: Stonehouse TCP Headliners: Vesta w/ The Comeback, Miles Before Sleep and Sout St. Claire Howard’s Club H: Resonant Soul w/ Mark Hutchins and The Stuntmen The Blarney Irish Pub: The Bridges The Distillery: 56 Daze ‘80s Party The Omni: Otto’s Jacket

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W E H AV E I T A L L O N L I N E ! C O M P L E T E M U S I C E V E N T S AT T O L E D O C I T Y PA P E R . C O M TCP

indicates our picks for the week

Karen Durrant’s Dreamgirls, 8pm. If you are a fan of Tina Turner, The Supremes, Martha Reeves

THE GLASS CITY BOARDWALK/ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Local musicians coming together to help the Haiti relief effort, the Glass City Boardwalk hosts “Rock ‘N’ The Boardwalk” on Saturday, February 20. The first concert held in more than ten years at the venue is not just good news for those in Haiti, but also for music enthusiasts in Northwest Ohio who fondly remember this once common location for local and national touring groups. Performing acts include Toledo favorites Resonant Soul (unplugged), Endless Envy and Minus Elliot. 7 p.m. $10 advance (available at Guitar Center, 1578 Spring Meadows, Holland) $15 day of show. The Glass City Boardwalk, 27820 E. Broadway St., Walbridge. 419-838-7000/ www.glasscityboardwalk.com —ER Fat Fish Blue: Bourbon Street La-Z-Boy Center, Meyer Theater: 23rd Annual Black History Month Blues Concert TCP Manhattan’s Restaurant: Vytas and His Electric Outfit Murphy’s Place: Nicole Heitger

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

The Ottawa Tavern: TeamNate w/ Flamtronic P TC Toledo’s Mainstreet Bar & Grill: Texas In July w/ Consumer

JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B Degage Jazz Cafe: Tim Whalen Trio

FESTIVALS/SPIRITUAL/ORCHESTRAS/ OUTDOORS/ MUSIC YOUR PARENTS LIKE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19

ROCK ‘N’ THE BOARDWALK

TCP

MORE MUSIC

Basin St. Grille: John Barile and Bobby May Sidelines (Downtown): Meaghan Roberts The Dog House Bar and Grill: Tom Goss TCP Frankie’s Inner City: Nick Motil and Jason LaPorte Swig: Justin Perkins

COUNTRY AND BLUEGRASS

Glass City Cafe: Bluegrass Breakfast w/ Blowing Grains TCP Wesley’s Bar: Kentucky Chrome

and The Vandella’s, Gladys Knight, Donna Summers and the Pointer Sisters, you don’t want to miss Karen Durrant’s Dreamgirls. A wide spectrum of some of the most talented ladies of musical history. $24-$28. Owens Community College Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 30335 Oregon Rd., Perrysburg. www.owens.edu/arts

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Arneis Ensemble Trio feat. Daniel Dona, 7:30pm. The Arneis Ensemble formed in 2007 at Boston University under the tutelage of the Muir String Quartet and features Maumee Valley alum Daniel Dona. Maumee Valley Country Day School, Milennium Theatre, 1715 S. Teynolds Rd. www.mvcds.org

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28

The Rat Pack Is Back, 8pm. This spirited tribute recreates the Las Vegas of the 50s when the swingin’

ring-a-ding group known as the “Rat Pack” knocked ‘em dead with their free-wheeling, no-holds barred nightclub act starring Vegas’ four favorite sons: Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Joey Bishop. TImes and prices vary, 800-745-3000/stranahantheater.com. 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27

Toledo Symphony’s The Planets, 8pm. Thrill to the most dramatic film and photo images from NASA’s unmanned spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope choreographed with the Toledo Symphony’s live performance of Gustav Holst’s The Planets. Toledo ’s own Jamie Farr narrates this timeless journey through space. $16-$40. 419-246-8000. Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theatre, 2445 Monroe St. www.toledosymphony.com Guitar Fest, 9am-3pm. Toledo School for the Arts has lined up artists, performers, producers, technicians

and songwriters for a day of style and technique workshops and performances. Toledo School for the Arts, 333 14th St. www.ts4arts.org

OTHER

Bier Stube: Karaoke Burnsy’s Burgers: Karaoke TCP Toledo School for the Arts: Guitar Fest

SUN, FEB 28 ROCK, POP AND HIP-HOP

Lucas County Arena: REO Speedwagon w/ Styx and 38 Special TCP

OTHER

Yeeha’s Bar and Grill: Yeeha’s Idol TCP

MON, MAR 1 JAZZ, BLUES, AND R&B

Murphy’s Place: UT Jazz Night

ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC

The Village Idiot: Frankie and Friends TCP

OTHER

TCP Ground Level Coffee House: Open Mic Night

TUE, MAR 2 ACOUSTIC, FOLK, AND ETHNIC Daddy Oh’s: Jason Hudson

OTHER

Burnsy’s Burgers: Karaoke Claddagh Irish Pub: Karaoke TCP Degage Jazz Cafe: College Open Mic Night Rhouse: Karaoke w/ DJ Georgia Peach

DAN AND DON: THE CONCERT

FRANCISCAN CENTER AT LOURDES COLLEGE/FRIDAY, MARCH 5 Having performed together in Northern Ohio and Southern Michigan for nearly 30 years, The Dan and Don Show is still rocking the masses. Both musicians (who need no last names) are known for their work in the community. Dan is a singer in the gypsy jazz group Quartet Bernadette and is also a member in Masterworks Chorale. And Don can imitate nearly any singer in popular music; he’s been playing in local rock bands since age 12. With Dan’s tenor voice and 12-strong guitar skills, and Don’s electric bass and acoustic guitar playing, this is a duo that can’t be stopped. Don’t miss “Dan and Don: The Concert at The Franciscan Center at Lourdes College on Friday, March 5. 8 p.m. Tickets available by calling 419-824-3999. 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania. www.franciscancenter.org.. —ER

www.toledocitypaper.com

February 17 • March 2

37


PAYMENT Payment must be received before an ad can be placed. We accept checks, cash, money orders, and credit cards (MasterCard, American Express, or Visa) Sorry, no refunds. Misprint results in credit toward next ad.

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS One (1) free 20-word classified ad per issue. Free ads include noncommercial concerns, free services, products being sold for less than $150. Line Classifieds $20 for 20 words or less. 40¢ per each additional word. Box Classifieds $30 per column inch. One column = 1.375" Photos can be placed in box or line ads for an additional $5 per photo.

DEADLINES Ad copy must be received at NOON on the Friday prior to publication

CONTACT INFORMATION Mail: Toledo City Paper Classifieds. 1120 Adams Street, Toledo, Ohio 43604. Phone: 419-244-9859. Fax: 419-244-9871. Email to: classifieds@toledocitypaper.com toledocitypaper toledocitypaper.com

CLASSIFIEDS ONLINE Enter classifieds online at toledocitypaper.com. Create user account and enter classifieds online yourself. Call 419-244-9859 to have classified placed in the paper. _____________________________

FOR SALE _____________________________ MEN’S MUD HENS winter jacket medium. Worn once. Immaculate. Gift boxed. $40 419-866-1069 ____________________________ FRED BEAR QUEST compound bow like new $125 Fred Bear Golden Eagle compound bow $100 Both with free accessories .419-699-1929 ________________________ ONE YEAR OLD WHIRLPOOL washer. $80. Contact Josh at 216-299-8653. ________________________ HUSKY CUSTOM molded floor mats.19972002 Expedition or Navigator. Front & middle

38

row, gray. Like new condition. $70. 419-376-6934 ________________________ New in a Box Sun Beam 0.7 Cubic ft. Microwave $22.00 ________________________ Compute Complete System Windows XP In Office, Office Premium Ready for Internet $199 or trade. 419-474-9026 ________________________

ANNOUNCEMENTS

________________________ ‘SOCIAL NETWORKING, SEXTING, DEPRESSION, TEENAGE PRANKS & THE LAW’ Open Parent Meeting, Perrysburg High School Auditorium. 2/22/2010 7:30-8:45pm ________________________ APHASIA SUPPORT GROUP meets at Dazy Aphasia Centre, 2940 Douglas Rd. Toledo 43606. Every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. The group is for stroke survivors with Aphasia & their caregivers. ________________________ DISCUSSION CIRCLES for women incest and child sexual abuse survivors. Meets twice monthly. (419) 729-0245 or www.mynirvananow.org. ________________________ TOMMY VINES PHOTOGRAPHY and Larry Parker Sr. artwork on display February Black History Month. 1085 Dorr St. Motts Branch Library. ________________________ TRINITY CHURCH THRIFT SHOP Adams & St. Clair. Women's, men's and children's clothing. All proceeds go to local charities. Monday & Thursday 9:30a-3p ________________________ FOR BEGINNERS who don’t know Democratic Presidents who brought you 1935 - Social Security & Unemployment Compensation: Franklin D. Roosevelt

1939-45 - GI Bill: Harry S. Truman

________________________ ADOPTION HEALING SUPPORT GROUP. 2nd Wednesday and 4th Monday of every month. 7pm. Park Church, 1456 Harvard, Toledo. 419-727-8302, adoptionhealing@bex.net ________________________

FREE KID’S CHESS LESSONS k-6 every Sat 9-11am at the children’s library 325 Michigan. For more info 419-259-5231 ________________________

SERVICES ________________________ ACUPUNCTURE CHIROPRACTIC. Dumaschiropractic.com Mark Dumas DC. ________________________

UNCHURCHED PASTOR Looking For opportunity to grow Christ’s kingdom. Believers or churches call 419-279-7983 ________________________ ORDAINED GOSPEL MINISTER & CONCERT SINGER. Whole Bible & 300 Songs w/Accompaniment. Invited Back Repeatedly. 419-389-0863 ________________________

WANTED TO BUY

________________________ I BUY DIABETES SUPPLIES. Call 419-740-7162. Please leave a message. ________________________

������������������������������ ������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� �������������������������������� ������������ ________________________ WANTED TO BARTER/TRADE SERVICES. Dry wall and plaster, 38 years experience. Will exchange work with other professions. 419-320-2998. ________________________

MARANDA’S CAKE SHOPP 3d specialty cakes for all occasions. Hours buy appointment. For more information, 419-691-6991 or visit www.marandascakeshopp.webs.com

ACUPUNCTURE CHIROPRACTIC. Dumaschiropractic.com Mark Dumas DC.

CLASSIFIEDS CONT. PG 40

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS.$10 per 100. Same day cash. Call Dale. 419-707-2369 or Patsy 419-708-0914 ________________________

SURROGACY

________________________ SURROGATE MOTHERS, NEEDED FROM OHIO: Carry couple’s biological babies, prior birth experience required. Generous compensation. 1-888-363-9457, www.reproductivelawyer.com Melissa B. Brisman, Esq., LLC 77 Market Street / Park Ridge, NJ ________________________

EDUCATION A ATION ________________________ CHILDRENS’ ART CLASSES advanced drawing and mixed media Ages 5-17 The Toledo Artists Club at the Toledo Botanical Gardens Call 419-841-8153 ________________________ MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN integrates keyboard, creative movement, rhythm, ear training, sight reading, music theory and composition. Meg Keller 419.874.6762. kellermeg@yahoo.com ________________________ DRAWING & PAINTING INSTRUCTION from professional artist on Saturday morning at the Secor Building Studios. 419-345-8980. www.ivankende.com ________________________

ABUSER

IN TOLEDO PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1965 - Medicare: Lyndon B. Johnson

STILL ON PAYROLL

ROZMAROVITZ@HOTMAIL.COM ________________________

February 17 • March 2

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Get your kicks

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY HOSTS KICKOFF BREAKFAST

The American Cancer Society is already gearing up for the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event in May with the 4th Annual Kickoff Breakfast on Saturday, February 27 at The Hilton Garden Inn at The Town Center at Levis Commons. Keynote speaker Iman Mohamed, MD, MPH will present an update on breast cancer therapy and a member of the community will discuss how they have been affected by breast cancer. Team Leader Kits for the Making Strides event will be available and event merchandise will be available for purchase. There is no fee to attend, but registration is required. RSVP by February 19 by calling 888-227-6446 ext. 8002.

Balancing act

TOLEDO BALLET OFFERS CLASS FOR IMBALANCE CHALLENGES

The Toledo Ballet has welcomed a new class into its spring semester — one that is meant to help adults with imbalance challenges such as Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), and vestibular system disorders. Led by Ann Heckler, the first part of the session utilizes the ballet barre, then moves to free standing movements. Classes focus on posture, range of motion, strength and poise, with special attention to each individual’s comfort in movement. For more information, visit www.toledoballet.net. 5001 Monroe St. 419-471-0049.

Holistic health

HMH WELLNESS CENTER MOVES TO PERRYSBURG

POLE DANCE FITNESS, build strength, flexibility and confidence in a fun and relaxed environment. Ladies only. Classes forming now. Pre-registration required. Classes held at 10 S. Holland Sylvania Rd. Suite 302. Call Paulette’s Studio of Dance for more info. 419-6543262 or www.Paulettesdancestudio.com. ________________________ BELLY DANCE – FOR THE FUN OF IT! Shake things up with Aegela, international artist and award-winning choreographer. Women of all ages and shapes welcome. No prior dance training needed. Daytime and evening classes. $55 for 6 week session. Martin School, 10 S. Holland Sylvania at Hill, Toledo. www.aegela. com, aegela@mindspring.com, (517) 918-9547 ________________________ HOT YOGA in Perrysburg uses heat to heal and strengthen. Warm muscles are suppler and result in deeper stretching with less soreness. First visit free. New student special 10 Days for $25! Ongoing AM & PM classes. Visit: www. hotyogawithjoe.com or call 419-8742911 ________________________ MIND, BODY, SPIRIT CLASSES – register now for Reiki classes, Intro to the Chakras, Discovering Your Divine/Soul Purpose and Basic Divination – tools to expand your awareness. Call Marcia at (419) 283 – 4344. ________________________ SMOOTHFLAVA LLC Ballroom classes. Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday $8 per session (Monthly memberships available). 1411 Bernath Pkwy (Across form TGIF). For more info 567-277-1353 or 419-514-5784 ________________________ AUTHENTIC YOGA AND MEDITATION. Safe beginners CD/DVD set by Ann Arbor Yoga Master Ema Stefanova. $55. Order at www.yogaandmeditation. com, 734-665-7801. ________________________ INTEGRATION YOGA STUDIO, the Place to Be: Something Fun EVERY Friday – check out the website calendar! Day Retreat 2/6; Workshops: Ayurveda Series on Saturdays, Discover Your Purpose 2/6, Love Potions 2/7, Partner Yoga & Massage 2/13, Pilates 2/20; Restorative Yoga is back! More yoga, drumming & dancing on the website! 4633 West Bancroft (just west of Talmadge). www.integrationyogastudio.com. (419) A-OM-YOGA. yoga.jenn@sbcglobal.net.

TEBA – Toledo Evolutionary Bodywork Alliance: Your Connection to the Greater Toledo Area’s Professional Holistic Bodywork Teachers and Practitioners! Members: Amy Adamczak, Certified Rolfer, Certified Pilates Instructor Caitlin Cousino, LMT, Thai Massage Therapy Shelly DeMeo, Birth Doula, Pregnancy/Therapeutic Massage Andrew Lesniewicz, HypnoTherapist, Counselor Jerry Levin, PhD, LMT Lisa Lutman PT,CSCI - The center at Alternative Physical Therapy Jenn McCullough, Certified Yoga Instructor & Owner Integration Yoga Studio Debra Reis, Nia, Aromatherapy, Healing Touch Isis Rose Magdalena (Tobie Saad) of Acoustic Arcana – CCT, Rose Twin Flame © Reiki, Frequency Attunement and CCT ©, Intuitive Life Coaching, Nontraditional Wedding Services Cathy Skiver, Registered Yoga Teacher Jay Weik, Shobu Aikido of Ohio, Toledo Zen Center.

www.TEBAlliance.com www.toledocitypaper.com

Log onto toledocitypaper.com or call Melissa at 419-244-9859 to post your ad!

Looking for wellness in every aspect of your being and life? The HMH Wellness Center offers a wide variety of services, including massage, body treatments, pedicures, and facials, as well as consulting and training for professionals. The Center recently moved from its location on Central Ave. to 418 Louisiana Ave. in Perrysburg. Relieve stress, rejuvenate yourself, and step into wellness at the new state-of-the-art facility. For more info, visit www.hmhwellnesscenter.com. 419-882-0585. —GS

February 17 • March 2

39


CONT. FROM PG 38

_______________________

________________________ GIRL’S NIGHT IN – Reserve your date for a night in with friends. We bring the pampering to you. Call now! (419) 283 –________________________ 4344...Marcia - for more details VALENTINE’S ALTERATIONS & TAILOR SHOP 520 Madison Avenue Toledo Avenue Toledo, OH 43604. Mend and Repair Hem Pants or Skirts or Make a NEW Outfit!!! ��������������������

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________________________

RENTALS

________________________ TOWN HOUSE 3br, 1.5ba, LR, DR, REC RM, garage w/ opener. Washington local. $750 419-885-2347 ________________________ SPACIOUS 1,600 FT. CARRIAGE HOME. Hardwood floors, 3 bedrooms, deck, chandeliers, electric fireplace. Must pass credit check. $595. 419-244-6313 ________________________

HELP WANTED ________________________ ���������������� ������������������� �������������������������� ������������������������ ����������������������� ��������������������� ��������������������������� ��������������������������� ���������������������������

������������ ________________________ FAIR HOUSING POLICY All residential real estate advertising in this paper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, sex, religion, handicap, national origin or familial status. This paper will not knowingly accept any advertising for residential real estate which is in violation of the law. All readers are hereby informed that all residential properties advertised in this publication are available on an equal opportunity basis.

_______________________

PETS ________________________

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Utilities Furnished, New Carpet. Appliances, Garage. Lower West Toledo. $450 per Month. Lease/Deposit. Call 419-262-4447

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40

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DRIVERS OWNERS/OPS Dedicated Loads From Oh to KS 100% No Touch Automotive Fright. Average 2500-3000 Miles/Weed. Requirements 1999 or Newer Tractor. CDL-A; 18 Months exp, Hasmat. 800-325-7884 ex 4

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JAM SECTION MUSICIANS SEEKING

LEAD VOCALIST plays drums and

THE TOLEDO’S CROSS OVER BAND is

currently booking for the spring and summer season. Call 419-3449651 ask for Mr. Jimmy C.

keyboards. Looking for band or musicians. Call 419-691-2820.

LESSONS

FIDDLE AND UPRIGHT BASS Player

FREE GUITAR LESSONS Rock, Blues,

GOLDEN WITH CLASSIC SOUL seeking

LESSONS, EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTOR. Any instrument, any style.

need for all female Gospel/Bluegrass trio, All About Him. Call Alana at 419-833-8110 for info or audition. background singers, male and female. www.goldenclassicsoul. com 419-508-0190.

Contact Mike 419-376-8111.

FOR SALE

ELECTRIC FOLK-ROCK AND REGGAE/JAM BAND THE PASSENGERS

seeks keyboardist. Vocals or no vocals, come join the band! Call 419-320-8951 VOCALIST/SONGWRITER/PIANIST

Country, all styles; 30 yrs. experience. Give me a call, what do you have to lose? 419-514-6097.

YORKVILLE AUDIO PRO AMP, 3400.

1200 watts per side at 4 ohms. $200. 419-917-3507.

THUNDER STRAT. $199. 419-392-

5020

Available for pop and rock band and seeking other musicians. 517-486-3623

Rentals

SINGER/SONGWRITER/GUITARIST.

storage spaces available 24/7 access. No noise restrictions. Call the house of rock 419-346-5803.

AC/DC to Foo Fighters. Call Joe 419-867-1848

BANDS, ARTISTS, MUSICIANS: REHEARSAL, jam, recording and now

THE RAVE-ONS are now booking.

Vintage Rock and Roll. Call Jeff 419-269-0633.

ADS FOR LOCAL ARTIST ARE FREE! Ads run for 2 issues and must be renewed after the two issues. You must be: advertising for band members or selling instruments under $200 or just looking to jam. Business related ads run for $20. Limit 20 words per ad; $0.40 per additional word.

Log onto www.toledocitypaper.com or call 419-244-9859 to post your ad!

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ADORABLE KITTENS Two 4 month-old kittens need a loving home. Very affectionate. One peach male/one calico female. They would love to be adopted together. Worm and flea free. $25 for one, $40 for both. 419-283-6101

Disclaimer Toledo City Paper recommends that readers do not send money to any company that requires prepayment. Before doing so check out the company carefully!

ENTER YOUR AD ONLINE

toledocitypaper.com Or Call

Melissa at

419.244.9859

February 17 • March 2

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on the 17th and 18th. Then on the 19th your emotions are difficult to express. You speak loudly (as usual) but bury your feelings for a while. You get back to “normal” about noon on the 25th. The full moon on the 28th may bring some hard work.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)The 19th and 20th

the moon is in your sign. You will be noticed so keep your best foot forward. There is shopping to do on the 22nd and 23rd. A special party the 25th is fun. The full moon on the 28th will make you a winner, but only if you take a chance.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If it is an absolute

necessity, return to work on the 17th. Thankfully it is a short week. The 20th is quiet –wake up about noon on the 21st. You become your usual productive self on the 22nd and end the month way ahead of the game. Think NEW CAR!

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The afternoon

of the 18th you are offered opportunities to take a chance. Remember that you can’t win if you don’t play. The 20th and 21st you spend with friends. The week of the 22nd is busy. Things go your way the 24th and 25th. Be careful driving on the 28th.

LEO (July 23-August 22) It isn’t easy but on

the 18th you begin to calm down and get practical. Clear your calendar so you have uninterrupted rest the 20th and 21st. The week of the 22nd make agreements that will benefit you. The 26th and 27th are spectacular. The full moon the 28th brings money.

VIRGO

(August 23-September 22) The

action now is in your seventh house. This is where relationships and new projects are highlighted. You have reason to celebrate on the 20th ant 21st. Your ability to be organized aids in your success. The full moon on the 28th shines where you are noticed.

LIBRA (September 23-October 22) On the

18th the sun moves into your sixth house so you need to pay attention to your good health. Get on schedule allowing time for proper rest and

need answers? get 'em @ toledocitypaper.com

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You need to rest

diet. A spa would be great the 20th and 21st. You are productive the 26th and 27th. Hibernate the 28th.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 21) On

the 19th and 20th the sun gives strength to Pluto, your ruling planet. You are optimistic and tackle all assignments. The 22nd and 23rd success comes your way. Make all of your plans, get them in writing, so they are signed, sealed, and delivered the 28th.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 20) Return to the real world on the 18th. Your

home life is satisfying. Don’t stray too far on the 20th and 21st. Begin to work on career issues the week of the 22nd. On the 27th Jupiter joins the sun and this puts you right on top of your world until the 2nd.

CAPRICORN (December 21-January 19)

All is going very well for you now. Saturn is retrograde so you feel like you are “one quart low” but determination keeps you going. Opposition to your ideas fades after the 22nd. Communications are helpful the 26th. On March 1st you go full speed ahead.

Buzzed Words

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18) Okay,

now you need to take a serious look at your budget – maybe seek some professional help. On the 19th the sun moves into position to make you focus on money. The 20th and 21st are quiet – the 23rd is social. On the 1st your finances may improve.

PISCES (February 19-March 20th) On the

17th you put your financial resolutions into effect. Happy Birthday to you at 1:36 PM on the 18th. It’s party time! A short trip the 20th and 21st is fun. From the 26th thru the 28th you find that the sky is the limit. Whatever Pisces wants, Pisces gets.

Sue Lovett is available for personal astrology readings and private parties. Visit her on the Web at www.suelovett. com or call her at 419-474-6399.

Why Can’t We Be Friends?

myspace facebook twitter facebook.com/ToledoCityPaper • twitter.com/TCPaper • myspace.com/ToledoCityPaper

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©2009 Ben Tausig

February 17 • March 2 This is an easier two weeks for everyone. The sun and Mercury enter the mellow sign of Pisces and the full moon shines. Check your sign below. — BY SUE LOVETT

Across 1. Den ___ (Dutch city, to the Dutch) 5. You might run one up with shots 11. ___-ray Disc 14. Like Cannonball Adderley’s sax 15. In ___ (sort of) 16. Light-hearted 17. Groop of policemen that’s jssss gonna ‘rest this guy fore grabbin’ ‘nother pint? 19. Most Wanted list org. 20. Pope who created the Schism of 1054 21. No longer in the closet 22. Black Cherry gig, perhaps 24. Rear 25. Garr of “Young Frankenstein” 27. Place for a herd 28. Aktors and akattresses who definlly say thare lines better with a couple in ‘em? 34. Whence Bubba Sparxxx and R.E.M. 36. Framing piece 37. It’s capped 38. Verify, as an email address 40. Like some stops, in linguistics 42. Toledo Rowing Club tools 43. Big IT corp. 45. Assertive poker statement 46. ‘lympic competittitors who just wanna see what th’judges react if they do a cannball ri’ here? 49. Penlight batteries 50. Zwei plus eins 51. Boarding pass info 54. Video chatting option 57. Box off. sign 58. Defies the IOC, in a way 60. H1N1, e.g. 61. Milibtary unit on leavbe this weekend and damnasure gonna take ‘vantage of it? 64. Place 65. “The nerve!” 66. Cork’s isle 67. Korean buffer, for short 68. Table linens and such 69. Some improvisatory singing

February 17 • March 2

Down 1. ø___ EspaÒol? 2. Soothing succulents 3. Vibe 4. Chinese desert 5. 1987 Michael Jackson single from an album of the same name 6. Arrange by type 7. Funeral dirge 8. Wide-headed fastener 9. Clean-whistle link 10. Hooked up with, more formally 11. People who totes tell each other *everything* 12. The Intimate Shoppe stock 13. Syllabus section 18. Current 23. Sailor 26. Ascetics of yore 27. Don’t bother, so to speak 29. Something to take off in front of a camera 30. Crappy newspaper 31. Alcohol, e.g. (What isn’t it good for?) 32. Places for piracy 33. Prefix with “pathic” 34. Have one’s ducks in ___ 35. Certain memorial tattoo 39. Soviet, so to speak 41. Extra Crispy Seasoned Crinkles maker 44. Computer part with a laser 47. Ditzy Simpson trial witness Kato 48. One concerned about wrinkles? 52. Big name in natural vegetable chips 53. To date 54. Force in “Milk,” for short 55. “Project Runway” hostess Heidi 56. Fool: Yiddish 57. Something to take you higher 59. Register stack 62. “___-Gadda-Da-Vida” 63. Prepare with fat

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RED On Friday, February 12, The

PHOTOS BY ADAM ROSSI

Courtyard at Navy Bistro hosted TCP’s RED: A celebration of love and lust. A compilation of all things red and sexy (from red martinis to special “RED” sushi rolls), the Co-host Dustin Rybka (far right) poses with Carl Armstrong and Linda Torres. PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BALL

evening was one to remember.

Nathan Vanderbroek accepts his award from guest presenter, Michelle Carlson from the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo.

TCP’s B.O.T. Party TCP staff and Toledo area residents gathered at Doc Watsons on Wednesday, February 3 to congratulate and celebrate the winners of the Best of Toledo awards. A big thanks to everyone who came out to party with the city’s best!

Joe Sparks, of Hot Yoga with Joe, sports a Free Hugs sign while accepting his award.

Stacey Konwinski, Sarah Broadway, Angie Kaighin and Kyla Corbett enjoy a night in the red.

more photos online

toledocitypaper.com

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February 17 • March 2

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February 17 • March 2

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Fettuccine for a cause

Cooking with Georgeann

On Saturday, February 20, Zia’s at The Docks does more than warm you with delicious comfort food, they are helping to uplift the spirits of a Toledo area family. The Gabriel

Dundee resident enlivens the kitchen with Un Coup De Main by Colleen Kennedy the best products around Toledo. Upcoming classes include Make Meals Easy on Thursday, February 25. Learn how to make 1-dish dinners like baked ziti or braised cod with Medivegetables. terranean Apres Ski on Saturday, February 27 features comforting and filling dishes like Julia’s Roasted Aside from the two peacocks that sometimes strut past the back window, Georgeann Brown’s kitchen probably isn’t much different than yours. Hanging beside her stove is a Faberware pan so well used that the copper has completely worn off the bottom. “People always laugh when they see it, but it’s still great for sautéing,” Georgeann says.

Un Coup De Main, 12695 Eggert Road in Dundee, MI. To register for classes visit www.georgeannbrown.com or call 734-529-2318.

Georgeann Brown’s Un Coup De Main teaches cooks with hands-on learning.

Dubois Fundraising Lunch from An enlightening 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. is helping to raise eating experience money for the family of a local 8-year-old Take a trip back in time with boy who has been diagnosed with lung renowned food historian Ivan Day cancer. This type of cancer is so rare in on Saturday, February 20 at the Detroit children that there have only been five Institute of Art’s Lecture Hall. Experience cases in the past fifty years, and there is the food, table ornaments and dining no known treatment. customs of 18th century Europe through Gabriel is currently undergoing re-created food illustrations. See princely chemotherapy through Toledo Children’s Zia’s hosts a fundraising lunch for dishes originally made for the Archbishop Hospital, and proceeds from the $20 lunch Gabriel Dubois on Feb. 20. of Salzburg and sugar sculptures made will go towards his medical bills. Lunch with original molds from the pastry room includes Chicken Parmesan, of the Princesse de Lamballe, confidante Fettuccine Alfredo, Tossed Salad, and Bread, and to Queen Marie Antoinette. 2 p.m. For more information, visit a silent auction will also take place. Call 888- www.dia.org. 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 313-833-7900. 456-3463 for reservations or purchase tickets at Zia’s (20 Main St.) For Find your balance more information about The Toledo area is getting a fresh look at Pan-Asian cuisine Gabriel, visit www. with Maumee’s new eatery, Balance. Located at 514 the caringbridge.com/ Boulevard (corner of Ford and Dussel), this unique grill offers visit/gabrield. flavorful dishes like the SassyMe — choice of protein, water chestnuts and peapods, sprinkled with sesame seeds — and the Wok in the Park, featuring eleven fresh vegetables. Refresh yourself at the milk tea bar and delight in a side of edamame (baby soy beans) or warm, comforting soups. Say hello to the new eatery with fresh food and a fun atmosphere on opening day, Monday, February 22. 419-893-9999/www.balancegrille.com —GS

This March marks the third anniversary of Georgeann’s home-based cooking business, Un Coup De Main, a French idiom

meaning “a helping hand.” The Dundee, MI resident and master gardener says the idea of hosting cooking lessons from her own kitchen spawned from a woman who taught similarly structured classes in her native Chicago. What Georgeann liked about the concept was the opportunity to give even the most basic cooks hands-on learning in an environment where new skills could easily be transferred to their own kitchens. “Sometimes you get into a rut,” Georgeann says. “A chicken breast is a chicken breast. I try to open their eyes to see that there are others things than just a boneless chicken breast with a can of Campbell’s soup.” To aid in the process, Georgeann has designed discussion blocks into each four-hour lesson to give students time to provide feedback, ask questions, and showcase different methods they’re already familiar with.

Welcome back, Wei

Chicken, Sauteed Potatoes and Cheese. Both classes are from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. and cost $65 each.

Pile on the pancakes!

With something always new to learn in the kitchen, Un Coup De Main’s classes are beneficial for everyone, from new to longtime cooks. Georgeann says, “There are a lot of people who don’t like to or don’t know how to cook, but that doesn’t mean you should settle for something out of the frozen food aisle.” And with Un Coup De Main, you don’t have to.

She also tries to focus on strengthening students’ weaknesses and demonstrating various techniques so they can utilize the one that best suits them. For example, she says, a class might bake the same fruit pie two different ways. After taste testing, the group discusses which version came out better, which was easier to make, and how the recipe Georgeann’s classes could be altered. Since qualdemonstrate various cooking ity ingredients are essential techniques, so cooks can use to any recipe, Georgeann also what works best for them. shares the names of suppliers that she has found who carry

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February 17 • March 2

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IHOP restaurants are raising the ‘stacks’ on Tuesday, February 23 in honor of National Pancake Day. From 7 a.m. - 10 p.m., guests receive a free short stack of IHOP’s famous buttermilk pancakes. What’s the catch? The restaurant simply asks that you consider making a voluntary contribution to the Children’s Miracle Network or other local charities. To date, IHOP has raised more than $3.25 million in four years. This year, they hope to raise $1.75 million, bringing the total raised in five years to $5 million. For more information, to donate online, or for IHOP locations visit www.ihoppancakeday.com.

February 17 • March 2

After a kitchen fire damaged Wei Wei Restaurant in 2008, the Chinese eatery was forced to close its doors. But with a grand re-opening, the gem is back, bringing with it unique and tempting specialties. Reclaiming its former name, Wei Wei Restaurant continues to serve the one-of-a-kind items that give it distinction. Try the steamed cod, topped with house soy ginger and cilantro sauce, or the beef short rib, marinated in a special sauce, then pan fried on a hot skillet. Wei Wei also offers what owner Wei Zheng calls an “authentic Chinese menu,” with delicacies that offer something pleasantly different to guests. “It’s not like your ordinary Chinese restaurant,” says Zheng. “You’ll find unique things here you won’t find anywhere else.” With a full bar, Wei Wei also offers special drinks like their “fresh fruit freeze” and black or green tea, with the option of added tapioca to create a “bubble drink,” giving the unique sensation of “drinking and chewing at the same time,” explains Zheng. With such a varied menu, Wei Wei has something for everyone to try, which makes it no surprise why loyal customers are making a return. And Zheng couldn’t be happier — “It’s good to have them back” 1202 N. Reynolds Rd. 419-531-1117. —GS

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