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ACU TODAY

Fall-Winter 2013

ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

The Power of Internships ACU interns connect careers with calling, an experience best made possible by generous alumni

Identity, Mission, Future

Outlive Your Life Award

ACU at CitySquare Takes Shape

Nursing School


This ISSUE 2 10 24 40 44 52 57 58 60 62 64 67 68 80

Horizons e Power of Internships Board Report: Identity, Mission and the Future of ACU Outlive Your Life Award: Earline Perry Taking Shape: ACU at CitySquare A House of Healing: School of Nursing Opens in Zona Luce e Bookcase Hilltop View Academic News Campus News Wildcat Sports Your Gifts at Work EXperiences Second Glance

e cast of Les Misérables, the 2013 Homecoming musical, gathers for an encore on the Abilene Civic Center stage. (Photograph by Paul White)

OUR PROMISE

ACU is a vibrant, innovative, Christ-centered community that engages students in authentic spiritual and intellectual growth, equipping them to make a real difference in the world


ACU Today is published twice a year by the Office of University Marketing at Abilene Christian University, Abilene, Texas. S taff Editor and Graphic Designer: Ron Hadfield (’79) Associate Editor: Katie (Noah ’06) Gibson Sports Editor: Lance Fleming (’92) Contributing Writers This Issue: Paul A. Anthony (’04), Raymon Fullerton (’73), Katie (Noah ’06) Gibson, Wendy (Waller ’01) Kilmer, Chris Macaluso, Tamara (Kull ’77) Thompson Contributing Photographers This Issue: Eric Ryan Anderson, Paul Bryan (’05), Steve Butman, Anne-Marie Coffee (’15), Lindsey (Hoskins ’03) Cotton, Jeremy Enlow, John Galloway, Jaime Gordon (’15), Daniel Gomez (’12), Gerald Ewing, Cassie Feerer, Lisa Helfert, Elliot Jones, Jason Jones, Mandy Lambright (’14), David Leeson (’78), Kim Leeson, Craig Melvin, Caroline Nikolaus (’14), Chaz Palla, Gary Rhodes (’07), David Ruiz, Ronnie Ruiz, Timothy Sofranko, Britni (Golden ’11) Tatum, Adam Wesley, Paul White (’68), Jordan Williams (’08), Dr. Lorraine (Clary ’76) Wilson Contributing Graphic Designers / Illustrators This Issue: Greg Golden (’87), Holly Harrell, Todd Mullins, Amy Ozment, Dr. Nil Santana (’00 M.S.) Proofreaders: Vicki Britten, Amber (Gilbert ’99) Bunton, Rendi (Young ’83) Hahn, Scott Kilmer (’01), Robin (Ward ’82) Saylor, Bettye (McKinzie ’48) Shipp

ADVISORY COMMIT T EE Administration: Suzanne Allmon (’79), Dr. Allison Garrett, Dr. Gary D. McCaleb (’64), Dr. Robert Rhodes Advancement: Billie Currey (’70), Paul A. Anthony (’04) Alumni Relations: Craig Fisher (’92), Jama (Fry ’97) Cadle, Samantha (Bickett ’01) Adkins Alumni Association: Randy Pittenger (’80) Marketing: Jason Groves (’00), Grant Rampy (’87) Ex-officio: Dr. Phil Schubert (’91)

corre s pon denc e ACU Today : hadfieldr@acu.edu ACU Alumni Association: alumni@acu.edu Record Changes: ACU Box 29132, Abilene, Texas 79699-9132, 325-674-2620

ON THE WE B Abilene Christian University: acu.edu ACU Today Blog: acu.edu/acutoday Address changes: acu.edu/alumni /whatsnew/update.html ACU Advancement Office (Exceptional Fund, Gift Records): acu.edu/giveonline ACU Alumni Web Site: acu.edu/alumni Find Us on Facebook: facebook.com /abilenechristian facebook.com /ACUsports Follow Us on Twitter: twitter.com /ACUedu twitter.com /ACUsports Follow Us on Instagram: instagram.com/acuedu

ON THE COVER ACU senior nursing major Audrey Deaver makes friends with Amaya Donald, a patient at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, where Deaver interned this summer. (Photograph by Jeremy Enlow)

Fr om the President

“C

hrist-centered education,” Wheaton College president emeritus Dr. Duane Litfin wrote in his book, Conceiving the Christian College, is “an education that rigorously and without apology insists upon looking through and beyond the created order to see the Christ-centeredness of all things.” To continually consider What we do in the 21st century at a Christian university influenced by Jesus in the first century, it is crucial we also continue to examine the Why and How of our academic enterprise. Our Board of Trustees did just that with its landmark report in October 2012 we are sharing with you in this issue of ACU Today in “For Such a Time as This,” a thoughtful look on pages 24-39 at the identity, mission and future of our great university. Authored by a team of Christian theologians, historians, academicians and church leaders, it is a must-read for our graduates, donors, parents and other friends who have invested in Abilene Christian. The content is informative and inspirational in examining where we have been, where we are today, and noting the opportunities and challenges in our future. If you have questions or comments for the Board of Trustees about this report, please email them to identityandmission@acu.edu. This issue also presents some other reaffirming content: • “The Power of Internships,” a look at some of the exciting opportunities our students had last summer to intern around the world with employers who hosted and shared with them life-changing, career-affirming experiences. We are especially proud of the alumni who not only hire these talented young people for internships but after graduation as well (pages 10-22); • A profile of Earline Perry, the 2013 recipient of the Dale and Rita Brown Outlive Your Life Award (pages 40-43) who has committed her energy and support through the years to World Christian Broadcasting, the highly effective missions enterprise that daily delivers the Good News of the gospel to nearly every continent on earth; • “Taking Shape,” the exciting developments in Dallas at ACU at CitySquare (pages 44-51); and • The sight of students wearing purple and black scrubs as the first class prepares for healthcare careers through the new ACU School of Nursing housed on campus in the historic Zona Luce Building (pages 52-56). In the months to come, we will have some exciting news to share about commitments donors are making to major fundraising initiatives at ACU. One of them is noted in this issue, a $4.5 million estate gift from Virginia Heacock to benefit our Partnering in the Journey Campaign. Despite never visiting campus, this forward-thinking woman began a scholarship endowment in 1995. She was touched by the hand-written letters student recipients sent to her through the years, thanking her for investing in their education. Virginia’s generosity will surely outlive her for generations to come. This is a perfect time to step forward and help Abilene Christian achieve its strategic Vision of being the best at providing exceptional academics in a Christ-centered community. As Mordecai challenged Esther in Esther 4:14, “And who knows whether you have not come to the kingdom for such a time as this?” Let us know how we can serve you and help you create a legacy of your own. 䊱

DR. PHIL SCHUBERT (’91), President The mission of ACU is to educate students for Christian service and leadership throughout the world.

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Pass the Popcorn

PAUL WHITE

Large crowds gathered each month this summer for Movies on the Hill, a concept that included an outdoor movie and concert on the front lawn of the Onstead-Packer Biblical Studies Building. The university offered free flicks in June, July, August and September – Despicable Me, Oz the Great and Powerful and Remember the Titans – while local food-truck vendors kept everyone fed. The June movie event, Brave, was canceled when threatening weather conditions arrived at the last minute. Otherwise, Mother Nature provided great weather for family fun under the stars in a venue perfect for making friends in the community.

Gypsy Blu, one of the most popular food trucks in Abilene, was on hand to take orders for dinner.

PAUL WHITE

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Ruining the Red Raiders Arguably one of ACU’s best-ever performances in women’s volleyball came in its first home match of 2013, against Big 12 Conference member Texas Tech University. It also marked the Wildcats’ first win over a major NCAA Division I opponent as a member of the Southland Conference. A crowd of 1,300 cheered from start to finish as ACU won 3-1 (25-11, 13-25, 25-18, 26-24). Freshman middle blocker Lexi Mercier provided the game- and match-ending kill to send her teammates and the crowd into a frenzy. See Bonus Coverage at acu.edu/acutoday

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A CU TODAY BONUS COVE RAGE Junior forward Jacob Lancaster shoots a free throw during ACU’s first national TV appearance: a Fox Sports 1 broadcast of a Nov. 25 game in Cincinnati, Ohio, against Big East Conference heavyweight Xavier University. The Musketeers won 93-68.

Xavier guard Semaj Christon pursues ACU junior guard Harrison Hawkins.

TIMOTHY SOFRANKO

TIMOTHY SOFRANKO

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ACU junior guard Julian Edmonson shoots over Xavier guard Justin Martin.

TIMOTHY SOFRANKO

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ACU junior guard LaDarrien Williams battles with Iowa guard Anthony Clemmons.

ADAM WESLEY

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STEVE BUTMAN

Wildcat sophomore guard Parker Wentz pushes the ball into the frontcourt, guarded by the University of Iowa’s Jarrod Uthoff. ACU played the Big Ten Conference-member Hawkeyes on Nov. 17 and were outmanned in Iowa City, falling 103-41.

ADAM WESLEY

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ACU head coach Joe Golding (’99) talks with his team during a timeout at Daniel-Meyer Coliseum in Fort Worth. ACU trailed TCU 63-62 with 2:13 left before falling 71-64 on Nov. 19 in a game on the Horned Frogs’ home court. Below, the Wildcat bench gets vocal late in the game, and junior guard Julian Edmonson (5) drives past TCU guard Jarvis Ray.

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BRITNI TATUM

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CRAIG MELVIN

ABOVE LEFT: ACU guard Parker Wentz drives on St. Bonaventure forward Chris Dees in a game Nov. 11 in Olean, N.Y. ABOVE RIGHT: Julian Edmonson shoots while guarrded by Duquesne University forward Dominique McKoy in a Nov. 9 game in Pittsburgh, Pa. Duquesne’s McKoy fights for a rebound with ACU forward James Pegues (21) and sophomore forward Austin Cooke (12).

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CHAZ PALLA

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ACU’s first game with a major NCAA Division I power was Nov. 11 in College Park, Md., with the Terrapins of the University of Maryland, a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Wildcats led throughout the first half and by six with 14:12 to play before Maryland used its size and depth to pull away for the win, 67-44.

CHAZ PALLA

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LaDarrien Williams drives for a layup against the Terrapins.

LISA HELFERT

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Freshman forward Lizzy Dimba fights through the Texas-Arlington defense in a Nov. 27 game the Wildcats won, 79-72. It was the first ACU victory over a NCAA Division I women’s basketball team since a 1993 win over Idaho State.

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Head coach Julie Goodenough’s team opened the 2013-14 season with a 9-5 record through Dec. 22. JEREMY ENLOW

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Freshman guard Suzzy Dimba (23) scored 16 points against the Red Raiders. Her twin sister, Lizzy, hit two free throws with 3.2 seconds left to seal the win over Texas Tech.

Sophomore guard Whitney West dribbles into the front court during ACU’s biggest win in the fall semester, a 58-57 win in Lubbock on Dec. 22 over Big 12 Conference-member Texas Tech. SHAWN BEST

Senior forward Renta Marquez had 17 points and nine rebounds in ACU’s first victory in women’s basketball over Texas Tech in 35 years.

SHAWN BEST

SHAWN BEST

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Senior forward Renata Marquez is one of ACU’s leading scorers this season. RICK YEATTS

Texas-Arlington guard Tahlia Pope attempts to steal the ball from ACU freshman forward Sydney Shelstead.

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The women’s basketball team huddles before its Nov. 23 game in Denton with the University of North Texas. The Mean Green won, 64-50.

RICK YEATTS

ACU freshman forward Suzy Dimba is guarded by TCU center Klara Bradshaw during ACU’s game Dec. 18 with the Horned Frogs. The Wildcats lost 82-55.

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Sophomore midfielder Nicci Nelson (6) prays with teammates and with opponents from Houston Baptist University following their 1-0 win Sept. 22 at home over the Huskies.

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STEVE BUTMAN

Freshman defender Alyssa Garner

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Freshman midfielder Maria Gomez

Freshman forward Nalalie Throneberry

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GARY RHODES

Head coach Casey Wilson (’99)

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Senior midfielder Jacey Ferrara

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Senior forward Andrea Carpenter finished as ACU’s single-season and career scoring leader. She was named all-Southland Conference and third team all-America.

Freshman goalkeeper Sydney Newton GARY RHODES

GARY RHODES

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ABOVE: Head coach Kellen (Morrow ’05) Mock’s team won three of its first matches with Division I teams: Louisiana Tech, Grambling State and Texas Tech. ABOVE RIGHT: The Wildcats dropped a three-set match against the Red Raiders in Lubbock on Sept. 3. BELOW LEFT AND RIGHT: The Wildcats bounced back with a four-set upset of Texas Tech in Moody Coliseum on Sept. 10.

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Freshman Lexi Mercier (4) attacks during a Sept. 3 match with Texas Tech in Lubbock. JEREMY ENLOW

SHAWN BEST JEREMY ENLOW

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Junior middle blocker Neeley Borger (3), sophomore libero Madison Hoover (14) and sophomore setter Sarah Siemens (3) celebrate winning a point against Texas-Arlington.

Sophomore outside hitter Jennifer Loerch soars during a match Aug. 30 against Texas-Arlington.

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A trio of Wildcats block a kill attempt by Jacque Allen of Stephen F. Austin State.

GARY RHODES

Freshman outside hitter Dorothy Swanson prepares to hit against Lamar University.

GARY RHODES

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Chloe Sussett finished fifth in the Southland Conference cross country meet.

Sophomore Chad Caton

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Senior pitcher Brady Rodriguez tossed a perfect inning against the TCU Horned Frogs in a baseball exhibition game in Fort Worth.

SARAH GLENN

ACU junior Tyler Eager dives back into first base in an exhibition game against Big 12 Conference-member TCU.

SARAH GLENN

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After the Wildcats scored a TD with 19 seconds remaining, they recovered their own onside kick. Taylor Gabriel (below right) caught a lateral from Monte Green-Avery and raced down the sideline before being pushed out of bounds at the Aggie’s 6-yard line. The game’s final play nearly stunned ACU’s FBS opponent. NMSU prevailed 34-29 in a game broadcast on ESPN3.com.

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Senior wide receiver Taylor Gabriel was a high-flying presence in a Oct. 26 game at New Mexico State, catching an ACU single-game record 15 passes, good for 188 yards.

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ABOVE: The Wildcats of head coach Ken Collums were among the nation’s highest scoring teams in 2013, totaling more than 50 points five times. Senior quarterback John David Baker, in his only season as a starter, threw for 3,376 yards and 35 touchdowns. In 2013 he had two of the top eight single-game yardage totals in ACU history: 485 yards against Concordia (with a school record seven TD passes) and 428 yards against Prairie View A&M.

STEVE BUTMAN

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Junior wide receiver Demarcus Thompson (6) celebrates a touchdown with junior tight end Jonathan Parker.

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Junior offensive lineman Logan Hoppenrath

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Junior defensive back Angel Lopez makes a tackle in a 69-12 win over Houston Baptist on Oct. 12. JEREMY ENLOW

ABOVE RIGHT: Darian Hogg leaps in an attempt to block a kick in the 65-45 win over Prairie View A&M on Nov. 16. Offensive lineman Blake Spears (70), tight end Jamie Walker (88), offensive lineman Josh Perez (65) and running back Charcandrick West (26) celebrate a TD during the win over Prairie View A&M.

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ABOVE: Defensive backs Justin Stewart (3) and Justin Stephens (20) celebrate a turnover against New Mexico State. The Wildcats run onto the field Sept. 21 in Normal, Ill., to play Illinois State. The Redbirds won, 31-17. Head coach Ken Collums’ players had to be road warriors in 2013. ACU played only four home games in its first season as a member of NCAA Division I FCS.

BRITNI TATUM BRAD LEEB

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ABOVE LEFT: Senior wide receiver Taylor Gabriel finished his career second in ACU history in catches (215), yards (3,027) and touchdown receptions (27). He had 12 100-yard receiving games in his career, second best all-time and tied with Jerale Badon (’08), Johnny Perkins (’77) and Ronnie Vinson (’72). ABOVE RIGHT: Senior wide receiver Darian Hogg (47) is the only player in ACU history to post four touchdown receptions covering at least 80 yards, including 88- and 87-yarders in 2013.

Senior wide receiver Darrell Cantu-Harkless touched the ball 396 times in his career (188 rushing attempts, 147 catches and 61 returns) and never fumbled. He finished third in career allpurpose yardage (4,432 yards) behind only Bernard Scott (’08) and Wilbert Montgomery (’77).

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Senior running back Charcandrick West ran for more than 100 yards four times in 2013. He finished his career as the only player in ACU football history with at least 2,000 rushing yards, 1,000 receiving yards and 750 kickoff return yards. West’s 3,823 career all-purpose yards are fifth on ACU's all-time list. He scored 35 career TDs (fourth best all-time) and 210 points (sixth best all-time).

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HORIZONS

Les Misérables ACU Theatre’s Homecoming musical presentation of Les Misérables received high praise from patrons who saw it performed in three shows Oct. 18-20 in the Abilene Civic Center. Our Bonus Coverage takes a closer look at festivities from Homecoming weekend.

See Bonus Coverage at acu.edu/acutoday

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PAUL WHITE

Jean Valjean (played by senior Jace Reinhard), sings “Bring Him Home” over a fallen Marius Pontmercy (played by sophomore Will McInerney) in Act 2.

PAUL WHITE

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A CU TODAY BONUS COVE RAGE

Members of women’s social club Ko Jo Kai march in the parade. BELOW LEFT: The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry was represented in the parade by Titus, a chocolate labrador retriever befriended by the department while he recovers from an illness. Titus is owned by Dr. Josh (’01) and Amber (Stableford ’01) Brokaw, who office in the Foster Science Building. BELOW RIGHT: Members of women’s social club Sigma Theta Chi

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Ove Johansson (’77) was part of the Gamma Sigma Phi float, commemorating his world record 69-yard field goal kicked at the Homecoming game in 1976.

PAUL WHITE

Dewby (Adams ’50) Ray was grand marshal of the parade.

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Bethany Roach and Ashlyn Anthony marched in the parade for the Freshman Action Council.

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ACU president Dr. Phil Schubert (’91) and his family – Jamie (Rhoden ’94), Ella, Mason and Sydnie – rode in the parade. STEVE BUTMAN

JEREMY ENLOW GARY RHODES

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Members of women’s social club GATA

Reunion classes, represented by Debbie (Dorsey ’83) and Jim McKissick (’83), presented a check for $809,683 to president Dr. Phil Schubert (’91) at Chapel on Saturday.

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A large crowd gathered for Chapel on Saturday morning in Moody Coliseum.

Seniors Rory Harris, Kayli Huddleston and Rebecca Fowler attended the Queen’s Tea in the Williams Performing Arts Center. PAUL WHITE

LINDSEY COTTON

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LINDSEY COTTON

LINDSEY COTTON

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: Heather Young is surrounded by her GATA friends after being crowned Homecoming Queen; Alexander Brown, crowned King of Campus Court, waves to the Shotwell Stadium crowd; Garrett Holland, Marc Gutierrez, Sean Casias, Joel Jackson Jr., and Adam Lubbers were part of the Big Purple Band that entertained the crowd at Shotwell; cheerleaders (above) Angela Kirkpatrick and Whitney Pell, and (below) Gorgi Hannah, Kennedi Ross and Kimberly McDowell pose with Willie the Wildcat; and senior wide receiver Taylor Gabriel was joined by his sister, Chloe, and his father, Calvin, during Senior Day recognition before the Homecoming football game. PAUL WHITE

LINDSEY COTTON

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GARY RHODES

GARY RHODES

Cold and rainy weather caused the Carnival and JamFest to be moved indoors on Friday night. The Carnival relocated to the Money Student Recreation and Wellness Center while JamFest took place in Moody Coliseum. Artists who performed included (above left) the Dogwoods – senior Jake Hall, senior Caroline Nikolaus and Shay Tuttle (’14) – and (above right) Jessalyn & Lyndsey – Lyndsey Womack (’11) and Jessalyn Massingill (’11).

Saturday night’s Alumni Concert and dessert reception took place in the lobby of the Williams Performing Arts Center.

GARY RHODES

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Saturday’s festivities ended with a fireworks show over Faubus Fountain Lake on Judge Ely Boulevard. Inclement weather Friday night caused the show to move to Saturday.

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HORIZONS Jacob’s Paparazzi Captured Dimensions, an innovative firm in Richardson, Texas, founded by Jordan Williams (’08), is engaged in work to replicate 3-D versions of Jacob’s Dream, the award-winning sculpture by Jack Maxwell (’78) on ACU’s campus. In August, an 8-foot-tall maquette model was shot in the studio by 80 DSLR cameras to create the data files necessary to develop a 3-D digital rendering. Captured Dimensions worked on the time-intensive project, which resulted in a 26-inch-tall version of the sculpture (see inset images) – reproduced with a state-of-the-art 3-D printer. Company representatives, accompanied by Maxwell and three other colleagues from ACU, showcased the product and process in November during a 3-D printing expo Nov. 13-14 at the Smithsonian Instititution in Washington, D.C. (See page 63.)

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MATHEW BARDWELL JESSE CRAWFORD

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A CU TODAY BONUS COVE RAGE e Power of Internships

PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA

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sophomore, Cassie White admits to accepting a Summer 2013 internship in Phnom Penh before consulting a map to find out where in the world Cambodia was located.

“Little did I know that Larry Henderson would turn into a wonderful friend and incredible mentor as he helped guide me through this entire process,” White said of Henderson (’73), longtime missions coordinator for Asia and co-director of ACU’s WorldWide Witness program in the Halbert Institute for Missions. White participated in WorldWide Witness, which pairs students of all majors with host families in a short-term, full-time missions internship each summer that allows them to engage in life-changing, intercultural community service. She was joined by communication sciences and disorders major Sarah Young, as interns with Sokhom Hun, a Cambodian native who escaped to the U.S. years ago during Pol Pot’s genocidal reign of terror while leader of the Khmer Rouge. Hun has now returned home to direct a preaching school, enlisting boys from surrounding villages and training them for three years. Once they graduate, the boys travel back to their village to begin church planting and preaching. White and Young prepared to teach VBS material to neighborhood children and English to the preaching school students for two weeks, but ended up serving as summer-long English teachers. “I taught about 12 boys and Sarah taught six to eight.” White said. “ere were many miscommunications but also a lot of laughter and my students became some of my very best friends.” White and Young also were mentored by American missionaries Dennis and Sharon Welch, who oversaw two other ACU interns this summer: exercise science and health major Shanleigh Clinton, and communication disorders

Sophomore family studies major Cassie White and a new friend, met in Cambodia this summer.

and gerontology major Mallory Wilkins. “I learned so much on this trip; it’s almost impossible to put it all into words,” White said. “I had never been out of the country before so it was all so new and my

eyes were opened daily. ere’s something about going to a different country with just one other person and becoming completely immersed in a new culture. You realize how small you actually are. God has been

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Sarah Young (left) and Cassie White stand in the doorway at Angkor Wat, a Buddhist temple complex in Siem Riep, Cambodia. It was built in the 12th century. ABOVE: Young and White with some of the Cambodians they worked with in a preaching school in Phnom Penh.

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working in Cambodia for a long time and Sarah and I are so grateful to have been able to step in and be part of it.” Actually, White did great job of putting her experience into words. She blogged (calledtocambodiaa.blogspot.com) and one of her last posts summarized her reflections in mid-August:

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aying goodbye was absolutely awful. I wasn’t prepared for that feeling in the pit of my stomach. at feeling reminded me this might be the last time I see these beautiful faces. Yes, there were many tears as I hugged Srey Nang and told the boys how much they meant to me. Yes, there were tears as Tolah drove Sarah and I to the airport Wednesday morning. And yes, there are a couple on my cheek right now. e boys flooded Sarah and I with encouragement, well-wishes, letters, compliments and prayers. As I sat at the school on Tuesday night, I looked around at all of my new friends. I studied each face to make sure it was forever engraved in my memory and listened as they sang Amazing Grace in English, and with all of their heart. I listened and reflected on each word. is trip has been incredible. I was able to rediscover God in every aspect and moment of my life. My eyes have been opened; I can see. It was hard. I was scared. But God took care of every one of those fears. I was blessed when I felt so distant from everything dear to me. It was then that I was able to feel the embrace of the One most dear to me. God revealed himself to me daily. rough my students, at the whiteboard, and even in the afternoon monsoons. He has kept me safe and secure and he will continue to do so until I reach home in Texas and then home in Heaven. He’ll lead me home. His Word became so clear this summer. I felt secure. I was blessed as I became content with who I am – no more, no less. I’m discovering myself to be a proud owner of everything that can’t be bought. is joy and comfort and dependency and absolute love cannot be bought. My body will fail. People will let me down. I will disappoint people. But God will never let me down. I have my whole life and then forever to praise Him. And I cannot wait. I don’t know why I’m so in love with such a dirty and broken country. It might have something to do with the fact that Cambodia kind of reminds me of us. We are dirty. We are broken. And God is so in love with us. I can’t believe it’s over. I’m so grateful to have something that makes saying goodbye so difficult. My love for these people and this country is incredible and something I will

cherish forever. I was shown God’s love in a whole new way and I am absolutely grateful for the opportunity. It’s so funny how God is present in every aspect of your life. Words are incredibly important to me. ey are how I show and feel love. Isn’t it funny how God planned on my summer being full of words? Who knew I would be teaching English, right? I sure didn’t, but I know He did that just so I could be reminded of how much He adores me. Every day was bursting with English words, Khmer words, vocabulary words, scripture, encouragement, yes even miscommunications, words of life. My cup is overflowing, y’all. ank you for keeping up with me and genuinely caring about my sanity, safety, well-being, happiness, growth and everything else you worried about. I thank you immensely for the encouragement and comments on posts and emails and Facebook messages. I felt the prayers and relied on your support. I appreciate you putting up with my blog and all of the ranting, rabbit trails, dramatic nature, and my sometimes diva-attitude. I love you all and couldn’t have done it without you. Here is the list I have been adding to throughout the summer. Some are serious and some are just stupid. ey are basically summaries of my previous blog posts and I hope you enjoy them.

have no idea where they’re going and will then proceed to drive you around for an hour hoping you’ll yell “Chop!” (stop) and hop out and pay him. It was always an adventure. Sour Soup is not your friend: Simple as that. It’s gross. God picks the most unqualified so you have to depend on Him: I had no idea what I was doing and I had no one to tell me how to do it. I had to lean completely on God. My whiteboard prayers and God’s obvious arrival became daily. Fish sauce is in everything and only smells bad when it’s being cooked: Fish sauce is basically liquid fermented fish and Cambodia loves fish sauce. Seriously. It’s in everything. While it’s cooking, you want to die. But if it’s cooked into something, it’s delicious, usually, and you’re shocked. We kind of have a love-hate relationship. Makeup-free living rocks: No makeup is the way to go. Sweat is a friend and should be appreciated: I have never had sweat literally dripping down me, but Cambodian life is different and dripping sweat is a daily occurrence. I’ve been told that it detoxifies you and makes you healthier and blah, blah. So three cheers for my new friend, sweat. Afternoon storms are a wonderful blessing and cool you off tremendously: It is hot and rain makes everything better. And it’s fun to go run and dance in. Simple as that. Things I learned in Cambodia Don’t eat the ice: If it has holes in it, like an ice cube, it’s safe. If it’s crushed, HospitalityChris isn’tGoldman judged(’87) onspoke how Monday great night from Hosea 4:1-12. run away. Or prepare to be throwing up your dinner parties are: I’ve grown up and in bed for three days. thinking that when the Bible talked about Students teach the teacher aboutSTEVE BUTMAN being hospitable, it was talking about how 98 percent of the time: I like to think that you need to let people sleep on your couch I taught them 2 percent of the time, but when they were in town and without a go back and read some previous posts. place to stay. Or that you needed to have I’m pretty sure they taught me more about people over three or four nights a week. Or life than I taught them about English. that people could tell how hospitable you Coconuts are not sweet on the inside: were by the extravagance of your dinner If they’re green and straight off the tree, parties on the back patio. Well, guess what don’t drink from them. Seriously. It’s like folks? at’s not how it works at all. I’ve salty water. been taught that hospitality is all about Khmer coffee is delicious: e coffee making someone feel at home. It’s about itself has this nutty kind of taste. ey pour making someone feel they are loved. an insane amount of sweetened condensed I was shown genuine hospitality through milk in and stir it. You can get it hot the constant invitation into people’s homes, or cold and from almost any street vendor huts, shacks or even just onto their mat or coffee shop. And it’s heavenly. Just ask with them. Even though they may not have for coffee with milk and be prepared to even had enough, I was constantly offered fall in love. food or water or the shade from the hot Air conditioning is a gift. Don’t take it sun. I was humbled by hospitality daily. for granted: No one has air conditioning If your tuk tuk driver tells you he knows in Cambodia. Seriously. It’s too expensive where he’s going, there is a 92 percent and kind of impractical because it would chance he doesn’t: People in Phnom Penh be on all day, every day and full-blast. Plus, are really bad with directions and so the everyone has adapted to the warm climate tuk tuk (three-wheel auto rickshaw) drivers and gets cold with the air conditioner. So rarely know how to get places. If you tell being back in America has been a real treat. them you want to go somewhere and they I actually get a little cold in my house now. say they can take you there, they probably

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Spring-Summer 2013

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When you’re singing from the heart, no one cares if you sound awful: No matter how many times I said “no,” no matter how many times I told my boys that I didn’t sing, I always ended up singing worship songs for them as they tried to learn them. But you know what? ey may have laughed and made fun of me when I couldn’t hit the high notes, but they came back the next day singing it at the top of their lungs. en I would sing off-key and they would sing with broken English. And guess what? It was always a beautiful sound. e Khmer kiss is not a kiss at all: OK. Grab a friend. Purse your lips a tiny bit. Put your nose against their cheek. And sniff them really fast and kind of hard. Yes. You read that right. at is a Khmer kiss. Sarah and I thought people just really liked smelling babies here in Cambodia but then we found out that they were kissing them. Neat, huh? So go and Khmer kiss all your friends; you’ll give em quite a jump. He makes beautiful things: I struggled a lot with body image this summer due mainly to the fact that all Khmer people are tiny. But I was reminded every day of how beautiful I really am. I was reminded every day of how beautiful we all are. As I reflect on my time in Cambodia, I have come to the conclusion that all I want is for my heart and my passions to be the most beautiful things about me.

Drink water whenever you can and always take free water: e water is not clean here and so water bottles are the norm when it comes to your daily drinking of water. Since you can’t guarantee you’ll be somewhere with clean water, always fill up your water bottles when you come across a water filter. And always take free water bottles. Hoarding water bottles is not a bad thing, y’all. Cold showers are underrated: It was just way too hot for a hot shower. I now love cold showers. Plus, cold showers are better for your hair. So save your locks and enjoy a nice chilly rinse. Generosity is not a material thing: Like my lesson on hospitality, generosity was shown to me daily. I began to realize that generosity isn’t about how much money you give to a certain charity or the amount of food you give to a homeless person. Being a generous person means that you’re giving all that you have, even if you have nothing. I was offered the best seat in the house, whether that was a dirt floor or a plastic chair. I was always offered food, even if they didn’t have enough to feed their family. I was offered the fan, the best food, the car, the room to take a nap. And even when they didn’t have anything, they offered a hug or words. ey offered themselves; their heart. Real generosity is about giving all of your heart. And it’s beautiful.

It’s OK to have dirty feet: Dirty feet mean you’re going into the homes of people and building relationships. You have community. Durian (an exotic fruit native to Asia): Don’t smell it. Don’t taste it. at is all. Live in the moment and you’ll see God’s daily arrival: You can’t be focused on tomorrow. Or even on the next hour. I learned to leave school at school and home at home. When you’re completely in the moment, God is able to use all of you. I am not teacher material: e majority of the females in my family are teachers, but I don’t think I’ll be following in their footsteps. I loved it but can’t say I want to make a career out of it. Sorry, y’all. It’s good to be homesick for heaven: I was extremely homesick the first couple of days until it hit me one afternoon; live in the moment. I was going to get to go home eventually, why not live it up in Cambodia until then? I was living in Cambodia, for crying out loud. I needed to make the most of it! I then also realized how I should be longing for Heaven. I ached to go home, to see the people I loved dearly, to share laughter and joy, and to just be home. Isn’t that how I should feel about heaven. I should long to be Home, to see my Father, to sit at his feet, to feel indescribable joy, and to be with those whom I hold most dear. It was a great realization and one that I will hold onto forever.

e Power of Internships

MISSION LAZARUS, HONDURAS

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ew overseas enterprises have engaged and inspired as many ACU students as Mission Lazarus, a multi-faceted missions work in Honduras. Sarah Puckett’s passport is proof of the hold it has on her life. e senior marketing major twice visited Honduras on ACU Spring Break Campaigns before she accepted an eight-week internship for Summer 2013. Each time she returns, she is drawn again to the people and the beauty of the surroundings. “e gratitude and genuine love I saw in almost every person I met was incredible,” STEVE BUTMAN

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Puckett (right) has helped build houses for and friendships with Hondurans such as Maria (left), her husband Oswaldo, and their two children, Yolanda (middle) and Pamela.


Puckett said. “I have gone to Honduras several times and there is a community there that always welcomes me back when I return. And the beauty of that country will never escape my memory. ere are so many places there that will leave you breathless.” Because Spring Break trips are just a week long for college students, experiencing Honduras can feel like the equivalent of cramming for a final exam: lots of activity and energy packed into a short period of time. An internship is more complex. It has an academic component, as students earn credit for their work and have to devote time and thought to multiple writing assignments documenting their experiences and reflections on them. Residing in a third-world country for an extended time provides many challenges for college students accustomed to the conveniences of life back home. And it’s not for couch potatoes: manual labor is required and the adjustments for an Amarillo native such as Puckett to a mountainous, tropical environment in Central America can be daunting. Mission Lazarus is a nonprofit ministry co-founded in 2004 by Jarod Brown (’00), a College of Business Administration graduate, and his wife, Allison. e Browns now manage and raise funds for it from Franklin, Tenn., but it has grown from a small effort to one that includes planting churches (27 so far), a working ranch, a dairy farm, a coffee plantation, an orphanage, medical clinics, and several schools. ere are few aspects of life in the villages and of Southern Honduras not influenced by Mission Lazarus and its work to empower residents. In 2010, Mission Lazarus began a second full-time ministry in Haiti in response to the devastating earthquake there and in tandem with an experienced team of Christians already working on site with needy children and families. Mission Lazarus takes a holistic approach to ministry, focusing on primary education and skill development, medical aid and health education, agricultural development, and, throughout all of these, the preaching and teaching of God’s Word. For nearly a decade, Mission Lazarus in Honduras has served as an experimental classroom for students and faculty from ACU’s College of Business Administration, Department of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Department of Teacher Education, and the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication who have traveled there to do research and work on various projects.

ey return to Abilene with an entirely different worldview. “e kids who come here gain so much knowledge they’d never be able to get out of a book,” Brown said. “en, at the same time, they provide amazing resources to us as well, things we wouldn’t be able to do or have access to here in Honduras.” Puckett’s previous Spring Break trips focused on building houses. is summer she primarily worked with two other interns on an education team that helped at four of the schools established by Mission Lazarus. ey tutored children,

“I was able to see a nonprofit in action in a foreign country, especially one focused on helping the people there, and one that is run by Hondurans. It was great to see how jobs were created and people enabled to help others in their community.” – SARAH PUCKETT inventoried materials and observed operations, working with teachers and administrators to design plans to improve how each school worked, Puckett said. Delivering animals was her favorite part of the summer. One of the ways donors in the U.S. help Mission Lazarus is by purchasing sheep, goats and laying hens for needy families. “We would accompany preachers into towns and many days I would deliver two or three chickens to each house we visited. We prayed over the families, then gave them the animals. ey were so incredibly grateful,” Puckett said. Her supervisor and spiritual mentor for the summer was Greg Armstrong, a Tennessee high school teacher who also is president of the nonprofit Run4Water. One of Puckett’s construction experiences this summer was to help build rain catches for families in San Marcos de Colon, a community of about 24,000 people

on the border of Nicaragua and near Mission Lazarus. “A rain-catch system allows families to have clean drinking water. I also helped Greg construct water pumps on Boca del Rio Viego,” Puckett said. Run4Water teams also have built latrines to improve water quality and sanitation on Boca del Rio Viego, a remote island that is home to more than 60 fishing families. Puckett also spent what she considered a valuable week with Mission Lazarus’ marketing director. “I saw some of what it takes to not only run an international business, but an internationally Honduran-run business as well,” Puckett said. “Not only does Mission Lazarus need to successfully promote itself in the States but it has to be effective in Honduras too. I helped with some photography and writing for the blog. I saw how Jarrod empowered the employees of Mission Lazarus and the delicate situation that every business has in leading and staying on track to achieve its goals.” Puckett said her COBA courses have given her a firm foundation and knowledge of all aspects of a business. “I was able to see those applications throughout my internship, but more than anything, I was helped by the spiritual foundation COBA has helped me build throughout my three-and-a-half years at ACU. at was the beauty of this opportunity. I was challenged spiritually and was able to see the business side of Mission Lazarus.” Six months after returning from Honduras, Puckett said she still finds herself learning from her experience. “I was able to see a nonprofit in action in a foreign country, especially one focused on helping the people there and one that is run by Hondurans. It was great to see how jobs were created and people enabled to help others in their community,” Puckett said. “Personally, I was thrown out of my comfort zone in a big way. ankfully I knew enough Spanish to get by, because I was forced to be a leader through translating, which allowed me to see my potential in pressure situations,” she said. “I learned to actively seek joy and contentment in every situation. ere were many times when I was in a situation that was not particularly ideal, but I learned to laugh and see the meaning in each one. I was molded and changed. I made relationships with people who inspired me and taught me how to be a better person. I loved seeing the difference in our cultures, truly experiencing the people there, and living a summer of simplicity.”

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e Power of Internships

USAA, SAN ANTONIO Keith Lancaster led worship on Wednesday night.

Chris Courtright Jacob Ackerman

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nformation technology majors from ACU are eager to head to San Antonio these days, and it’s for far more than the Tex-Mex cuisine and tourist attractions.

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e migration is to intern at USAA, the insurance and financial services giant whose sprawling headquarters on Interstate 10 serve military families around the world. Ten undergraduate students from ACU’s School of Information Technology interned at USAA in Summer 2013. Other Abilene Christian grads work throughout USAA but nine with IT backgrounds have been added since the company began its college hire program in 2008. All but one work in San Antonio, with another in its new office in Plano. Chris Courtright (’84), lead software developer and integrator at USAA, has a unique perspective on the growing trend. “ACU has a stellar reputation. e students are bright and enthusiastic and their core values really do align well with USAA’s,” Courtright said. “e scuttlebutt is that the ACU interns do so well that when they interview at USAA, there is a long list of managers asking for specific ACU students.” Courtright said that ultimately, interns are placed based on their technical skills, learning goals and alignment to managers’ business needs. But the track record speaks volumes. One recent hire, 2013 graduate Jacob Ackerman, reflects the confidence USAA has in IT majors from ACU. A native of San Antonio, Ackerman interned in Summer 2011 and 2012, then did USAA contract work back on campus during his 2012-13 senior year while finished up a B.S. degree in computer science software engineering. He became a full-time employee this summer. His internships featured work on iPhone and iPad apps, and USAA’s remote deposit capture app that allows customers to deposit a check after taking a photo of it with a smartphone. His contract work involved experimenting with improvements to the image processing algorithms on check images and bug fixes in iOS apps. “I was surprised that USAA was willing

to invest two years worth of internships and part-time work with me before I came on full time,” Ackerman said. “rough a combination of paychecks and education assistance, USAA paid for the lion’s share of the last half of my college degree. I have not heard of another company pursuing new hires in this manner.” Finding future good-fit employees is a prime objective for companies with serious intern programs, as USAA has proven. “We want our interns to experience what it is like to work within a large IT organization. Each internship position has a specific, meaningful work-related goal defined for it. We want the interns to have an impact that will continue past their time with us,” said Courtright, who has worked at USAA for nearly 22 years and is co-leader for recruiting interns and full-time hires at ACU. “But most important, we want them to see what the culture of USAA is like and whether they fit in well with their co-workers. Each intern has to do a presentation at the end of their tenure with us that covers what they’ve learned while they are here. eir experience here exposes them to the multiple career paths that are available to them within our company.” Ackerman appreciated USAA’s thoroughness in working with interns. “I learned much about being professional and about communication,” Ackerman said. “I found that USAA was less interested in what I could produce and how fast I could produce it, and more interested in how I fit into my team and how I collaborated with others.”

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Ackerman also said it was fun to be doing work that mattered beyond a course assignment. “At school, if my code was not the most efficient or had a couple of bugs, I would receive a grade that was a bit lower than it would have been otherwise,” he said. “As an intern, with my code eventually being used by hundreds of thousands or even millions of people, everything I did felt much more significant.” He believes what he has seen thus far at USAA indicates that culture fit and character are more important than raw knowledge. “Interviewing, I thought employers would be most interested in how many things I knew and how quickly I could implement them to solve problems,” Ackerman said. “In actuality, as long as you know how to learn, all of the new technologies and processes can be taught. Character and values cannot be taught so easily, and ACU graduates have consistently displayed characteristics that make them valuable in a team environment. From all of my experiences, they are quick to assist others and readily share knowledge, and these are rare traits in an IT workplace.” Courtright said he enjoys having a growing number of Wildcats in his workplace, which benefits from the enthusiasm they bring to USAA. “eir perspective on how technology can be consumed is valued because they don’t see limits yet and they challenge the workforce to think differently about how problems can be solved,” he said. 䊱


Psalms for Learning to Trust Again Glenn Pemberton is professor of Old Testament at ACU. 978-0-89112-487-0 | 224 pages | $17.99 trade paper

“Readers will find in this book a faithful, strong companion in the move into and out of lament, all in an act of profound faith.” —Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary Volume 1, Ministry, Initiation, and Worship Everett Ferguson is Distinguished Scholar in Residence at ACU.

Learning to Lament with the Psalms

978-0-89112-586-0 | 336 pages | $22.99

978-0-89112-400-9 | 256 pages | $19.99

“A deeply moving and insightful volume” —David Peterson, Emory University

Engaging Today’s Learners with Passion and Creativity Houston Heflin is assistant professor in the College of Biblical Studies at ACU. 978-0-89112-230-2 | 174 pages | $13.99

How Valuing Every Neighbor Restores Hope in Our Cities Larry James is executive director of CitySquare in inner-city Dallas, a partner with ACU.

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978-0-89112-380-4 | 288 pages | $24.99

978-0-89112-395-8 | 228 pages | $18.99

Revised and expanded edition

This expanded edition contains an “Simply put, this is the best, the most readable, and the most powerful book on the social impli- important new chapter by Royce Money cations of the Christian religion that I have read.” on the history of ACU’s apology to African Americans. —Richard T. Hughes, author of Myths America Lives By

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www.abilenechristianuniversitypress.com | www.leafwoodpublishers.com AC U TO D AY

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Identity, Mission and the Future of Abilene Christian University A SPECIAL REPORT OF THE ACU BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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ACU is committed to the integration of faith and learning, grounded in the liberal arts, nurtured in a context of innovation, focused on professional preparation, and undergirded by rigorous scholarship at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Out of such a context will come graduates who will make responsible and informed choices within a Christian context as they serve and lead throughout the world. – ACU BOARD OF TRUSTEES, October 2012

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e live in a time of substantial change – in society at large and certainly in higher education. In such an environment, only colleges and universities that know their identity and focus their mission on new realities will survive undiminished. It is not surprising, then, that Abilene Christian University is engaging questions about its identity and mission. e current challenges and the university’s character and commitment demand it. e vibrancy of its future depends on how the institution responds to these questions and whether it discerns which questions are the most important to ask.

Most colleges and universities today are seeking answers to a variety of pressing questions. Because of current economic challenges, most are exploring new financial models to better serve them. In a time of increased competition for new students, they are looking for the best strategies for recruiting and marketing. With the changing needs and expectations of students and the rapid development of new technologies, faculty are inquiring about the most creative and engaging approaches to teaching. In addition to these questions, Abilene Christian has its own set of concerns, growing out of its particular circumstances. How can ACU extend the accomplishments of its first 100 years into its second century? How can ACU fulfill its 21st-Century Vision, and what elements should be included in any new vision statements? More broadly, how should the significant changes taking place among Churches of Christ – our primary constituency – as well as within the larger Christian world, affect future university policies and practices? ese are significant questions. Such attention on How things could better be done is vital to any university’s future. But an institution’s focus on questions of How must not cause it to miss the more fundamental question: Why? In the words of organizational expert Peter Block, “Too often when a discussion is dominated by questions of How? we risk overvaluing what is practical and doable and postpone the questions of purpose and collective wellbeing.” 1 Such questions – of purpose and collective well-being, of identity and mission – are crucial for these times. ey call us back to what a university was designed to be in the first place. Specifically for ACU,

the Why questions are deeply embedded in its Christian heritage and commitment as it is uniquely expressed through time since its 1906 founding. Poet and essayist Wendell Berry has notably said, “e thing being made in a university is humanity. … What universities are mandated to make or help make is human beings.” eir purpose is to make a certain type of human, “not just trained workers or knowledgeable citizens, but responsible heirs and members of human culture.” 2 For this reason, American institutions of higher education are not designed as multiversities, with the various disciplines and areas of the school functioning independently from one another, but as universities with all areas combining holistically to form mature human beings. To this end, every unit, every office, every individual in the university should be devoted. For Christian universities, few issues could be more central to their identity. If they market and recruit well, are financially stable, teach innovatively, engage in cutting-edge research, and develop national reputations for excellence but forget that they are in the business of shaping human beings into the nature of Christ – the Why of Christian education – they lose their reason to exist. e purpose of Christian education, as Nicholas Wolterstorff has reminded us, is “to equip and energize our students for a certain way of being in the world … a Christian way.” 3 e Why of Christian education, at a fundamental level, is about whether students are formed into the image

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Peter Block, e Answer to How is Yes: Acting on What Matters. San Francisco: Berrett-Hoehler Publishers, 2003, 3. Wendell Berry, “e Loss of the University,” Home Economics. San Francisco: North Point Press, 1987, 77. 3 Nicholas Wolsterstorff, Educating for Shalom: Essays on Christian Higher Education. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004, 33.

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e Board of Trustees of Abilene Christian University prepared this document in October 2012 to articulate what it means for ACU to be a Christ-centered institution of higher education within the Christian heritage of the Stone-Campbell faith tradition, particularly as expressed in Churches of Christ. We strongly affirm the finest values of that heritage and will pursue a Christ-centered focus using the inspired Word of God to guide our decisions as an institution. Rooted in these values, ACU will pursue sound and innovative educational principles so our students will be fully prepared to live lives of Christian service and leadership. is document aims to be comprehensive enough to provide guidance in meeting the challenges and opportunities of the future, yet brief enough to be used readily in various deliberations throughout the university.

of Jesus. Students at Christian universities, as at secular ones, should be well-equipped with certain knowledge and skills to help them do good work and live as responsible citizens. But if Christian universities are true to their purpose, students also are shaped to live into God’s mission in the world, applying what they have learned and who they have become to the brokenness around them, to be the suffering and healing presence of Christ in the world. Regardless of its particular heritage or vision, when a Christian university loses its Why in the rush to answer How, it loses its soul. For precisely this reason, to make clear the Why undergirding ACU’s identity and mission, the trustees of the university created this document. e document is divided into four sections, each oriented by a driving question: • What time is it? Addressing our current challenges requires us to understand the pressures of our particular time and place. • What is our heritage? e key impulses from the past that have shaped Churches of Christ and ACU are crucial for understanding the Why that must shape our future. • What are the core values from our heritage that inform the guiding principles for our future? From our past have come significant values out of which emerge principles for shaping our future. • What kind of university should we be? e university must work to articulate a shared sense of ACU’s purpose and vision.

What Time Is It? When Jesse P. Sewell became president of the college a century ago, just six years after the school had been founded, he said, “We must live in a world as it is now, and not as it has been in the past, or as it may be in the future. We must succeed or fail in the midst of present day conditions.” He spoke these words in a world substantially different than our own. e painful division in the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement had occurred only a few years before. e wounds of that division were still fresh. e school he led was small and struggling. He could hardly have imagined then the global conflicts, economic variability, scientific advances, and cultural shifts to occur during the almost six decades remaining in his life. President Sewell and the trustees had to lead the school on the basis of what they knew. ey had to do it in relation to their own circumstances and out of the context of their own lives and heritage. We, like Sewell and the trustees a century ago, must determine how to adjust to a rapidly changing world, while at the same time holding on to the core principles of our founding faith. e challenges we face today are immense, and so are the opportunities. To say it plainly, we stand at a watershed moment

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in history. We are living in an age of rapid and radical social change. How ACU responds to this moment – how it grasps and applies in this new day the Why of its existence – will shape its present mission and largely determine its future. ACU is affected by these societal shifts in at least three areas: in our relationship to the surrounding culture, in our involvement with various church constituencies, and as a participant in the value system undergirding American universities.

A Time of Change in Culture e world is experiencing a significant shift in social patterns and norms that is affecting virtually every part of our life and culture. e shift began in the early 1900s, at the beginning of a century of global wars, a scientific revolution, the significant expansion of mass communication, and substantial changes in art, music, literature, science, ethics, politics, education and religion. Since the mid-1960s, the cultural changes have been hard to miss. ese changes coincide with a weakening of the pillars of what it has meant to be “modern.” ese pillars, which have prevailed for more than 250 years in Western civilization, include the assumptions that progress is inevitable, that science and religion are mutually exclusive domains, that faith should be relegated to the private sphere, that human ability to make the world better is limitless, that knowledge is inherently good, and that individual rights are almost always more important than the well-being of the community. e deterioration of these defining characteristics of Western culture is having a substantial impact on all of us, both for good and for ill. ese are not small changes or temporary trends. e world as it once was will not return. In every area of life, certainly in higher education, we are facing a new day. Many of today’s university students see the world differently than their parents and grandparents. eir pre-college education was different. eir values are different. eir understanding of truth and authority are different. Students today are generally less optimistic about the future than earlier generations were. ey are open to the divine, though not necessarily to traditional expressions of Christianity. ey often embrace experience more than understanding, the mystical more than “right doctrine.” ey are less interested in propositions and more responsive to narrative. ey have moved from books to electronic images, from the objective to the imaginative, from one Truth to many truths. While this description does not apply to every student, it is descriptive of the inclinations of the generation. is cultural shift is great enough to prompt re-examination of how ACU engages with students and functions as a university. But there is more – the crisis of culture is amplified in light of the corresponding crisis of identity within virtually every Christian denomination or fellowship, including Churches of Christ.


“All of this host of the past – and you  of the present – have been and are like  the originals: people of great faith, determination and hope. Ladies and gentlemen, this is no ordinary college …”

R – DR. DON H. MORRIS, ACU’s seventh president, in his final Chapel speech, 1973

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A Time of Crisis in Churches Churches in the Western world have been experiencing dramatic changes over the past few decades. Two of these developments have a particular impact on ACU. e “Undenominationalizing” of the Church. After 500 years of churches in Western Christianity splintering and forming an ever-wider array of denominations, the tide is now reversing. We are beginning to see early signs of the dissolution of long-held and bitterly contested boundaries among Christian groups – the “undenominationalizing” of the Church. In some cases, especially among groups experiencing a rapid decline in membership, denominations are merging. More commonly, however, the blurring of denominational boundaries is not taking place at the formal structural level but in the actual practice of believers. Many people seem to move with relative ease from one denominational affiliation to another with little concern for doctrinal differences, a practice hardly imaginable a few decades ago. Understandably, this waning of denominational loyalty is having a significant impact on Christian universities tied to particular Christian traditions. As with other Christian fellowships, the diversity of practices and beliefs among Churches of Christ is increasing substantially, creating considerable anxiety and fueling a widespread crisis of identity. Speaking to our own tradition in Churches of Christ, it is not likely that Churches of Christ in the future will be like they were 50 years ago, or even 10. Over the next two or three decades, the boundaries separating Churches of Christ from other Christian fellowships will become increasingly blurred, making it harder to identify congregations as Churches of Christ with clear distinctions from those that are not. In fact, it already is. And the growing diversity between autonomous congregations using the label “Church of Christ” will make it more and more difficult to know what that designation means. e younger generations are very much a part of this post-denominational Christian world. ey do not think in highly differentiated categories common to previous generations. is tendency is more than just a symptom of the decline of denominational loyalty. Rather, something more profound, more culturally rooted, is at play. e intellectual and social life of many within the younger generations is oriented around diversity, pluralism, relativism, and tolerance for differences. As a result, they are difficult to categorize and they strongly resist labels. e impact of these trends on ACU’s identity and mission will be substantial. e Marginalization of Christianity. A second global trend affecting Christian churches and institutions also is at play. As the pillars of our modern world have begun to weaken over the past century, so has the tie between Christianity and the state. 4 at is not to say that our world is post-Christian. A majority of American citizens still profess to be Christians. And globally, Christianity is on the rise. But the tie between Christianity and the state, whether formally as in parts of Europe or South America or functionally as in the U.S., is being torn. Christian institutions and believers are less and less likely to be supported and encouraged by centers of cultural and political power. Students who graduate from schools like ACU will increasingly face challenges that were rare for past graduates. Being a professing Christian may no longer be an advantage in the workplace or in community settings. Christian values may work against the grain of the prevailing social norms. As difficult as these changing circumstances are for Christians, we should see this development as good news. Christianity has always functioned best from the margins of society rather than from the centers of power. But while the opportunities are great, 4

the challenges are even greater. In the U.S., the federal and state governments may not continue an interest in helping educate students in faith-based institutions. Accrediting organizations may penalize the weight given education related to the Bible in the curriculum of a faith-based university. e implications of the end of the alliance of Christendom are not yet completely clear. is we know – the growing marginalization of Christianity demands that ACU profoundly grasp why it is educating students and toward what end. ACU prepares students not just to be excellent professionals and good citizens, but also, most importantly, to be Christian witnesses and servants in the world.

A Time of Challenge in Universities As if the dramatic changes in culture and church were not enough, universities throughout the U.S. are experiencing their own challenges. e modern university, first conceived and established at the University of Berlin in 1810, has been the model for most universities in America since the middle of the 19th century, usually with an emphasis on research. e normal practice within higher education in the U.S. has been to segment, if not isolate, the academic disciplines. e focus has often been on depth of knowledge in specific fields rather than the integration of various subject areas and the holistic preparation of students. Academic disciplines that are focused on information gathering and theory building are typically separated not only from one another but also from professional programs (such as law schools, medical schools, business schools and seminaries) where specific skills and practices have generally been emphasized. Over the past few years, these traditional distinctions have begun to blur, creating significant new challenges in many schools. While faculty has normally been trained in relatively narrow disciplines, they are increasingly called upon to teach across disciplines or gaps in disciplines. is development often requires faculty to retool their research skills and broaden their areas of expertise. Moreover, in many places the traditional gulf between theory and practice is being bridged, and pedagogy – the art and science of teaching – is receiving greater emphasis. In the process, the means of faculty evaluation and promotion are being reassessed and often revised. Growing budget constraints are causing further changes. Many schools are reducing the number of full-time faculty, eliminating courses and cutting majors – even departments. Some schools are choosing to de-emphasize the humanities, the arts, summer programs, and/or traditional graduate programs. At the same time, new programs in income-generating areas, especially for non-traditional students, are being added. Perhaps the most obvious development in university education is the rise of new educational technology and delivery systems. Significant new opportunities for distance education, by various means, are changing the face of higher education. Instruction that extensively uses mobile learning devices also is altering pedagogy in the traditional classroom. Contextual education is moving teaching and learning well beyond the classroom. Universities that cannot adapt to the new technologies, pedagogies and delivery systems will be left behind. ACU’s adaptability, creativity and financial strength, along with a history of excellence in teaching and research, have allowed it to respond well to these academic and financial challenges. In fact, Abilene Christian has been on the innovative edge of many advances in teaching and learning as well as the use of new technologies. However, the effect of these challenges on the

e term “Christendom” has been applied to describe a close relationship between the church and the state, in contrast to the early centuries of Christianity where the state persecuted the believers. In the early fourth century, the Emperor Constantine laid the foundation for the state and the church to be closely tied together, with the state often dominating the church. is practice continued throughout the Middle Ages and even into the Reformation period, especially in Europe.

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“e intellectual giant is worth more than the physical giant. Intellectual training does not consist in cramming facts into a student’s head. e student should be trained to rely on self, to do independent thinking, to discover new ideas, and to see the relation of old and new ideas to present-day problems.”

R – R.L WHITESIDE, ACU’s third president, 1912

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“ere are no subjects  on this earth, or in  outer space, or in the metaphysical realm,  which we cannot study  on the campus of a  Christian institution  of higher learning.”

R – DR. JOHN C. STEVENS 1969 Presidential Inauguration

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university, especially combined with the crisis of culture and church, has been substantial. e next several years will be especially challenging. A firm grasp of ACU’s identity and mission is essential.

What is Our Heritage? All people, all institutions, all movements are indelibly shaped by their histories. Our past both frees and limits us, opening some possibilities and closing others. Our history makes it difficult to see some things. At the same time, it gives us certain values to envision and to build upon in the future. An institution’s past does not determine its future, but it does shape it in significant ways. ACU has a certain past that causes it to value certain things rather than others. As a product of a particular history, we have a unique institutional DNA, which endows us with a certain collective set of gifts and limitations. Our religious and cultural history provides an essential character to our identity. It is at the heart of our Why. e better we know it, the better we can negotiate the hows as we seek God’s preferred future for us. While ACU is independent from any church structure or polity, it has been organically tied from its beginning to Churches of Christ.5 Understanding ACU’s past is not possible without understanding where Churches of Christ came from, which brings with it a certain irony. From the beginning, many churches within the movement that birthed them assumed a kind of “historylessness,” an impulse simply to skip over and even deny the past in an attempt to have a pure connection with the first-century church alone. is tendency to jettison one’s history has a long history. Nevertheless, the movement’s noble and significant past brings with it a number of impulses that can serve these churches and the institutions connected to them well in the crucial days ahead. What follows is a brief summary of five streams that played a major role in shaping the doctrines and practices of Churches of Christ. Where have we come from and how has it shaped our view of Christian higher education?

From the Reformed Tradition Churches of Christ are among a host of other Christian fellowships in the lineage of the Protestant Reformation, which erupted in Europe in the early years of the 16th century. e reformers, led initially by Martin Luther, wanted to free the church from the abuses they saw among the church’s leaders and to bring it back into submission to God’s will. ey called believers back to Scripture alone as the source of authority, rather than the traditions and councils of the late medieval church. ey emphasized God’s sovereignty, individual responsibility before God, and a gospel flowing from grace received by faith. Many of the instincts and practices that became normative for Churches of Christ emerged directly from the Reformation. What is referred to today as the Reformed Tradition grew primarily out of the Swiss Reformation, the non-Lutheran stream of the Reformation, under its two most prominent leaders, John Calvin and Huldrych Zwingli. It was Zwingli, whose teachings were a more radical departure from traditional Catholic teaching, who influenced Churches of Christ centuries later in two particular areas. First, Zwingli argued that any practice the Bible did not explicitly authorize should be forbidden. is “argument from silence” led him to forbid instrumental music and choirs in his churches since, he believed, the Bible did not explicitly authorize such practices. In the mid-19th century, aggravated by events connected to the aftermath of the American Civil War, this

understanding of Scripture became normative for Churches of Christ and fueled their separation from the Christian Churches/Disciples of Christ. While many in Churches of Christ today do not believe this “argument from silence” is the best way of interpreting Scripture, all have been affected by it. Second, Zwingli argued against the prevailing view that Christ was present in a real and substantial way in the Lord’s Supper. Zwingli taught that the Supper was a memorial and that the bread and the wine “represented” Christ’s body and blood. His concern for the authority of Scripture and rejection of what he viewed as superstition shaped his thought and continues to influence Churches of Christ. e most prominent voice in what became known as the Reformed Tradition was that of John Calvin. While his teachings framed virtually all the Reformed conversations that followed, it was a reaction to Calvin that eventually played a role in shaping a key doctrine among Churches of Christ. Several decades after Calvin, Jacob Arminius (early 17th century), a professor of Reformed theology in the Netherlands, challenged several of the major tenets of Calvin’s teachings. Most significantly, he rejected the notion that Christ died only for an elect few who were predestined to be saved. is belief that any person could make a free-will decision to follow Jesus resonated with Barton Stone, omas and Alexander Campbell, and others on the American frontier in the early 19th century. Preaching that called for personal decision fueled the spiritual revival that swept across the Ohio River Valley in their time. From the beginning of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement, the belief in individual free will, rather than predestination of a few, has been a defining characteristic of Churches of Christ.

From the Puritans Perhaps the most direct influence of the Reformed Tradition on Churches of Christ came from the English Puritans in the 17th and 18th centuries. ey worked zealously to purify the church in accordance with their understanding of Scripture. e Puritans passed on to their spiritual descendants at least four doctrines they believed were clearly taught in the Bible and that are still commonly practiced among Churches of Christ. First, the Puritans had a passion to restore the church of the New Testament. Second, through the influence of Scottish reformers, elder-led or presbyterian churches became the norm. ird, many Puritans taught and practiced a congregational form of church organization, in which each congregation functioned autonomously from others. Finally, some Puritans, following the Anabaptists, practiced and strongly advocated immersion of believers, rather than infant baptism. All four of these doctrines or practices became normative for Churches of Christ. 6

From the Enlightenment e period of the Enlightenment, emerging in the late 17th century in Europe, was a time of dramatic transformation in the way Westerners thought about the world. e basic traits of the Enlightenment have largely formed how most people in the Western world understand the modern world. Enlightenment thinkers placed a high value on the ability of humans to think, to reason, to understand the world around them by their own mental abilities. e Restoration Movement, which emerged in the Enlightenment-saturated early days of America, drank deeply of those principles – particularly from the empiricism of John Locke, the scientific method of Francis Bacon, and Scottish Common Sense Philosophy.

5

From its beginning in 1906, ACU has had a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. Although the charter and by-laws specify only that the trustees should be “members in good standing of a local Church of Christ,” historical precedent shows that the same religious affiliation has applied to the faculty and to certain key administrative and staff positions. e charter and by-laws are silent as to faculty and staff religious affiliation. 6 e term “Puritan” in the 17th century originally described English people who wanted to “purify” the Anglican church of the time. Later, the term described a variety of religious groups, not one single group. AC U TO D AY

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e English philosopher John Locke was one of the earliest and most influential of the Enlightenment thinkers. Alexander Campbell regarded him as the “great Christian philosopher.” Locke believed humans were born with a “blank slate.” Humans discover truth empirically, that is, through their senses, and make sense of those truths through reason. Not surprisingly, anyone who followed Locke’s thinking believed in the importance of education and the responsibility of individuals to seek knowledge. Campbell and other Restoration leaders also followed the inductive method of scientific investigation proposed by Francis Bacon. Bacon’s method began with the specifics of a question and argued toward a reasonable and inevitable conclusion. Individuals could discover truth with assurance. For Restoration leaders this method provided a scientific way of understanding Scripture, working from individual facts or rational propositions toward a sure understanding of Bible doctrines. Scottish Common Sense Philosophy, incorporating views from Locke and Bacon, asserted that all humans were capable of knowing. Every person has the capacity to discover moral and religious truth. Alexander Campbell was directly exposed to this philosophy in his early years. is democracy of knowledge – the assumption that every person can know truth – played a prominent part in early Restoration preaching. Restoration leaders became quite confident in their logical and critical skills.

From American Ideals Enlightenment ideals found fertile soil in America. Out of such ideals, churches in the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement developed an acute sense of democratization, which was evident in strong anti-clergy instincts and a view that every Christian was a priest; a determined individualism, which focused on the responsibility of each believer before God; and a pervasive optimism, which expressed itself in a high confidence in humans to understand correctly and live rightly. In the words of church historian Dr. Douglas Foster: In religion this Americanization of Enlightenment ideas led to the assumption that every individual who approached the Scriptures with an honest heart, common sense, and the proper methods would arrive at the same truth in all matters of Christian belief and practice. Different conclusions and practices meant that something was wrong in heart, mind, or method. 7 ese ideals also fueled a substantial spirit of antiintellectualism among these Christians: if everyone had access to the truth and if all that was needed to understand the truth was common sense, then why were experts in Scripture or anything else needed? Among more than a few Christians in the movement, the value of advanced education was questioned, especially education in the study of the Bible. Two impulses, then, emerged side by side. On the one hand, education – including higher education – for all Christians, men and women, was prized. Colleges were established early in the movement, reflecting the high value placed on the life of the mind. At the same time, a suspicion of highly educated people also prevailed. at both intellectualism and anti-intellectualism thrived is one of the paradoxes of the movement. Yet both impulses were rooted in American ideals.

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From a Desire for Unity and a  History of Division  e driving impulse of the early leaders of Churches of Christ in the 19th century was for God’s people to be one. ey believed the church must not fight against itself. ey believed that the church Jesus established is one – not one denomination or fellowship as opposed to others, but one in Christ. ey urged followers of Christ to love one another and to come together in every locality to work and worship in unity. When Stone and Campbell churches began to unite in 1832, in spite of numerous differences among them, their desire was for unity, not more division. 8 ey believed that denominational organizations and creeds separated Christians in the one universal body of Christ. Both men had previously experienced painful fragmentation within Scottish and American Presbyterianism. ey both longed for the unity of all followers of Christ. omas Campbell wrote these stirring words in his “Declaration and Address” in 1809: Division among the Christians is a horrid evil, fraught with many evils. It is antichristian, as it destroys the visible unity of the body of Christ; as if he were divided against himself, excluding and excommunicating a part of himself. It is antiscriptural, as being strictly prohibited by his sovereign authority; a direct violation of his express command. It is antinatural, as it excites Christians to condemn, to hate, and oppose one another, who are bound by the highest and most endearing obligations to love each other as brethren, even as Christ has loved them …9 Unfortunately, the movement that wanted to undo the fragmentation of the Reformation quickly found its love of unity subverted by division. e American Civil War played a significant role in fueling the division among the Stone-Campbell churches, with Northern, urban and wealthier churches on one side and Southern, rural and poorer churches on the other. e seeds of division that had been planted before the war blossomed into full flower in the decades after the war. e churches that had worn the interchangeable names Christian Churches, Disciples of Christ, and Churches of Christ began to fragment into separate streams. e first division in the late 1800s separated Churches of Christ from the Disciples and Christian churches, mainly over the use of instruments in worship and mission societies. Underlying that division was a growing difference in interpretation of Scripture, going back even to the early influence of Zwingli in the 16th century. e 20th century in Churches of Christ witnessed dozens of fractures in fellowship. Divisions came about over differences of interpretation of scripture, combined with a drive for what leaders perceived as doctrinal correctness more than a love of unity. While some of that sectarian spirit is still around, it is diminishing. Increasingly, there is a renewed appreciation for the beauty of Christian unity that focuses on shared core truths and differences embraced in love. ACU has been a positive voice in calling believers to unity in Christ, a theme deeply embedded not only in the history of our movement, but in the words of Jesus himself. ese five streams out of our history have substantially shaped who we are today. Knowing something of that past is not only critical for understanding the primary traits and values of Churches of Christ, it also provides an important perspective on how education in this tradition has been understood.

Jeff Childers, Douglas A. Foster, Jack R. Reese, e Crux of the Matter: Crisis, Tradition and the Future of Churches of Christ. ACU Press, 2000, 102. Richard T. Hughes, Reviving the Ancient Faith: e Story of Churches of Christ in America. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans: 1996, 2-3. 9 Proposition 10 of the document.

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“ACU is a university, not a church. We know the difference.  We grant degrees; we educate people. We teach them the dignity  of a noble profession and the value of a deep personal faith.  We know the difference between education and indoctrination.  Our task is to teach people how to think from a Christian perspective, to be discerning, and to search relentlessly for truth, which we believe to be objective and not relative. Etched in stone  on our Administration Building is the scripture, ‘You shall know  the truth, and the truth shall make you free.’ We believe it.’”

R – DR. ROYCE MONEY, 1992 Presidential Inauguration

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Education in the Stone-Campbell Heritage From the earliest days of America, education was viewed as a cherished resource. In this environment, and out of their particular intellectual and religious context, early leaders of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement aggressively promoted not just education but higher education. Dr. M. Norvel Young, a distinguished educator among Churches of Christ in the 20th century, said that Alexander Campbell was especially devoted to this cause: A study of the early leaders, particularly Alexander Campbell, reveals important influences which have molded in the main the church’s attitude toward education. In the very nature of the stand taken by the early reformer there was an essential emphasis upon the value of education … Campbell’s view of the Bible required an emphasis upon education. 10 In 1836, Campbell wrote the following in his journal, e Millennial Harbinger, We, indeed, as a people devoted to the Bible cause, and to the Bible alone, for Christian faith and manners, and discipline, have derived much advantage from literature and science, from schools and colleges. Of all people in the world we ought then to be, according to our means, the greatest patrons of schools and colleges. 11 Several colleges were established in the 19th century within the Stone-Campbell movement. In contrast to a 19th-century trend in American colleges, all of the Restoration Movement schools were co-educational from the beginning. e assumption was that all individuals – not just ministers, not just professionals, not just men – should be thoroughly educated and fully prepared for productive and informed Christian life in the world. Alexander Campbell established Bethany College in 1840. In the spirit of unity that he so strongly sought, he encouraged ministers from various denominations to preach on campus. Ministers from any denomination were permitted to attend Bethany College without tuition charges. In such environments, the assumption was that the church is not yet fully restored but is in the process of being restored. Churches of Christ are heirs of a vision of higher education in which every assumption and tradition, including its own, is subject to scrutiny. In the words of church historian Dr. Richard Hughes, “e nondenominational ideal of Churches of Christ can thus help sustain the relentless search for truth that characterizes serious higher education.” 12 ese impulses toward gender inclusiveness and the rigorous pursuit of knowledge, which were embedded in the early Restoration colleges, were prominent among the colleges established in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Not surprisingly, all were liberal arts schools. Among them was Childers Classical Institute, established in Abilene, Texas, in 1906, which eventually became Abilene Christian University. e 20th century witnessed the flourishing of several new colleges and universities among Churches of Christ. All of them emphasized the liberal arts. Most required students to take Bible courses and participate in regular chapel experiences. By mid-century, most had established graduate programs, some of which have gained national reputations for excellence. All are regionally accredited, with many of them accredited by discipline-specific accrediting associations. Over the last half century, schools associated with Churches of Christ have produced a disproportionately large number of graduates who have gone on to earn research doctorates and other terminal degrees –

a tribute to a long history of commitment to Christian higher education. ese same colleges affiliated with Churches of Christ were also affected by the social movements of the mid-20th century, especially the Civil Rights Movement. All the Christian colleges and universities except Pepperdine had excluded African-Americans from their beginning. is grave injustice finally began to be corrected in the 1960s, with enrollment open to all ethnic and racial groups. Several years later, in 1999, as the result of a series of racial reconciliation meetings, ACU issued a formal apology for the sin of racial discrimination in its past regarding its admission policies. e university continues to refine its policies and practices to be more consistent with the heart and spirit of Christ, the Creator of all. ese are our roots. is is the path God set us on. From it we should be able to see more clearly our purpose and our promise.

What Are the Core Values From Our Heritage that Inform the Guiding Principles for Our Future? Knowing where we have come from is crucial to knowing who we are and what our vision for the future should be. As we have seen, five dominant historical streams have profoundly shaped the Stone-Campbell Restoration movement, Churches of Christ, and therefore, ACU. In addition, certain instincts have been cultivated in that tradition regarding higher education. Out of that rich heritage have come a number of strengths, a set of values that are deeply embedded in our institutional DNA. From these values emerge guiding principles to help us clarify our identity and envision our future. Like individual strands of a rope, all are important and somewhat interconnected.

Christ at the Center Jesus Christ is the focal point of all Scripture. Because he is Lord and Savior, every dimension of our lives is affected by that belief. e example of Christ should motivate all our behaviors and decisions and be a guide in every relationship. It is through the revelation of Jesus that we know God and the Holy Spirit. erefore, the teachings and example of Jesus as revealed in Scripture should inform everything we believe and do as an institution of Christian higher education. Our aim is a lofty one – to make the priorities of Jesus our priorities. is continual quest requires from all in the ACU community a deep reliance on the Lord for wisdom and guidance. Our goal is to instill in every student a moral and spiritual compass that centers on the person of Jesus and what He would have them do with their lives. We are charging our students to be ambassadors for Christ, agents of reconciliation and bearers of peace in a conflicted and divided world. We will call them and equip them by means of a distinctively Christ-centered liberal arts education to lead and to serve as followers of Jesus throughout the world. PRINCIPLE: ACU will keep Christ at the center of the university, informing the curriculum and co-curriculum, undergirding policies and decisions, and calling everyone to be shaped by His life, death and resurrection.

10

M. Norvel Young, A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. Kansas City: e Old Paths Book Club, 1949, 25. Millennial Harbinger, Series One, VII (1836), 377, quoted in Young, A History of Colleges, 26. 12 Richard T. Hughes, “What Can the Church of Christ Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?” in Models for Christian Higher Education: Strategies for Survival and Success in the Twenty-first Century, edited by Richard T. Hughes and William B. Adrian. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997, 405. 11

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e Authority and Inspiration of Scripture e Bible is God’s inspired Word. is tenet has been an invariable commitment of Churches of Christ from the beginning. e combination of the high value of reason, along with a fervent belief in Scripture’s authority, created an environment in which the study of the Bible was honored and encouraged – publicly and privately. Christian colleges and universities in this movement have always expected students to study and know the Bible. Decisions and policies in most of the schools in this tradition have been based on the assumption of the Bible’s authority and its place in informing faith and practice. It has always been at the heart of ACU’s reason for existence. PRINCIPLE: ACU will always emphasize Scripture as the inspired Word of God, through which believers may see and follow the God to whom Scripture points – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. ACU will have the teaching of the Bible as a significant component of its curriculum and will help students integrate faith and learning throughout all disciplines and university experiences, in preparation for their life and ministry through their careers.

A High View of the Church Churches of Christ have an unusual commitment to the life of the church. Congregational life is the center of Christian fellowship and practice. Each congregation is responsible for its own practices and belief, ideally overseen and shepherded by godly elders. All members are expected to engage in ministry and in worship. 13 A university supported by such churches develops habits of extensive participation by students, staff and faculty in the life of the university. ey engage in regular worship and look out for each other’s interests. e commitment to church life means that people are never viewed as commodities but as bearers of God’s image and valuable to God’s kingdom. rough the years, Churches of Christ have shared common beliefs on church organization, the process of conversion, the structure and content of worship, and other matters. ere is more diversity of thought on these matters now than in days past. But attention to core matters of the Gospel, with grace in matters of opinion, offers the promise of a close and abiding fellowship among Churches of Christ. erefore, a university such as ACU is certainly not synonymous with a particular fellowship known as Churches of Christ, nor is it sponsored or “owned” by the church. Yet it is in some sense intimately connected to Churches of Christ, serving them and the broader Christian community in ways that compel it to be a leader in kingdom matters as an authentic and distinctively Christian institution. PRINCIPLE: ACU is committed to the life of the church through nurturing worship and community, by a commitment to unity and appreciation for diverse people and viewpoints, and as a faithful partner to churches around the world. To that end, ACU will serve the body of Christ by being an authentic and distinctively Christian institution.

13

A Commitment to Academic Quality and Innovation e Stone-Campbell Movement has demonstrated an unusual commitment to thought, reason, study and knowledge – the life of the mind. Since its beginning, the leaders of the movement were committed to educating people so they would make informed, quality choices. From the earliest days, these leaders were noted for their rational, even scientific, search for truth. Restoration churches assumed that every person had a responsibility to seek the truth. For that reason, several institutions of higher learning were established in this movement, as has previously been noted. Since the pursuit of knowledge was an expectation and a responsibility, faculty and students were expected to engage in scholarly activity within the framework of a broad liberal arts curriculum. Because of a strong belief in individual free will 14, the movement was and is committed to educating people so they will make responsible and informed choices within a Christian context. It is important that a strong emphasis on the pursuit of God’s truth in all things be maintained in an environment undergirded by an emphasis on the liberal arts, as has historically been the case. It is therefore no surprise that out of such a heritage, this high level of commitment to learning produces an environment of exceptional innovation at ACU. ACU has emerged as a world leader in the application of technology to learning. is achievement was and is led primarily by faculty from various academic disciplines. In this unique combination of commitment to the integration of Christian faith and learning, blended with serious scholarship in a quest for God’s truth in all disciplines, focused on professional preparation, and set in a context where innovation is encouraged – all in a liberal arts context – ACU is ideally positioned for significant Kingdom influence in the 21st century through its graduates. PRINCIPLE: ACU is committed to the integration of faith and learning, grounded in the liberal arts, nurtured in a context of innovation, focused on professional preparation, and undergirded by rigorous scholarship at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Out of such a context will come graduates who will make responsible and informed choices within a Christian context as they serve and lead throughout the world.

A Commitment to a Passionate Search for Truth At the heart of the movement, growing out of Reformation and specifically English Puritan impulses, was a desire to restore the church of the New Testament. At its best, this impulse has meant each generation has the responsibility of looking at Scripture anew. e standard for the belief and practice of any church or individual is not doctrines passed down by previous generations but what the Bible teaches. In such a context, Scripture is always open to being rethought. Minds are always capable of being changed. e belief that truth can and must be constantly rethought can lead to churches of considerable vibrancy. At ACU, such a commitment has meant that any topic may be discussed and any conclusion constructively disagreed with. For this reason, academic freedom has a high value. is openness to rethink any belief and examine any topic is one of the greatest virtues bestowed on ACU by its heritage in Churches of Christ. As former ACU president Dr. John C. Stevens said at his inauguration in 1969, “ere are no subjects on this earth,

When leaders from this type of radical free-church tradition seek to establish and support a Christian university, it presents a unique set of challenges. With no overarching organization to create cohesiveness, or even a convention of delegates, the university is left with consensus-building and persuasion as the primary ways to maintain a constituency. 14 A defining doctrine among early Stone-Campbell churches was the belief in free will. Because these churches largely emerged out of the Reformed Tradition, it was no small thing to have rejected traditional Reformed teachings concerning the salvation of only the elect and to have insisted on individual free will. ey believed that the will of God is not a detailed life plan to be discovered but a path to be walked in faithfulness. Seen rightly, a belief in free will does not undercut the sovereignty of God, nor does it assume salvation by works. Believers are expected to surrender to God’s authority and to receive salvation as God’s free gift.

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“Part of equipping you means that we must ensure that you  receive a world-class education: one that will open doors  throughout your life, allow you to move in and out of all kinds  of circles of influence, earn a place among the leading experts  and scholars in your field, and create the kinds of opportunities  in which you can truly make that real difference.”

R – DR. PHIL SCHUBERT, 2010 Presidential Inauguration

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or in outer space, or in the metaphysical realm, which we cannot study on the campus of a Christian institution of higher learning.”

regardless of their race, nationality or circumstances. Students are taught to think globally, as they learn to understand their own culture and other cultures. PRINCIPLE: ACU encourages the passionate search for all ACU is blessed to have talented and exceptionally dedicated of God’s truth, where every subject is open to scrutiny, where men and women on the faculty and staff who are committed to dissenting voices are respected, and where conversations on its mission. ey teach and work in an environment of innovation any topic may be engaged with kindness and compassion. At and creativity, which is often directed not only to academics but to the heart of the search for truth are the Scriptures themselves, the solving of problems or crises that arise in our troubled world. where each generation can and must grapple with the eternal rough teaching and example, students are taught Christian truths within its precepts. virtues such as hospitality, generosity, stewardship of all things, and concern for the marginalized A Commitment to of society – much as Jesus did. Christian Unity is unique blend of rigorous From its beginning, the and innovative scholarship Stone-Campbell Restoration with Christian compassion and “ACU prizes Christian unity as a high  Movement has had a strong outreach in the ACU environment value articulating the Christian commitment to Christian unity. is a powerful motivator in Early leaders did not want to transforming lives into the commitments that emerge from its  create a new denomination but to likeness of Christ. heritage, yet welcoming the diversity unite believers everywhere under PRINCIPLE: ACU will inherent in that unity, respecting others  the authority of Christ and in produce Christian leaders response to Scripture. at this who hold differing opinions, extending  and servants who love God unity movement devolved into with all of their heart, soul, and receiving hospitality, and engaging all  division after division is one of mind and strength, and who people with grace and humility. All will  the great tragedies of its history. love their neighbors as But the instincts to unity are still be done under the lordship of Christ  themselves. rough teaching, present and are emerging from example and prayer, students and the authority of Scripture.” within contemporary Churches will be taught Christian of Christ with increasing virtues such as generosity, urgency. Moreover, with global stewardship of all things, and trends evident toward the concern for the marginalized “undenominationalizing” of the – ACU BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 2012 of society – in the spirit of church, the times are right for Jesus – as their lives are these unity instincts to thrive. transformed into His likeness From its founding, ACU has and fitted for eternity. welcomed students of all faiths without discrimination. In recent years, an increasing number of As we go forward guided by the seven principles discussed students have come from a variety of religious traditions, several of above, we do so with the knowledge, taught by experience, that which are non-denominational in nature. Because of the priorities pitfalls may lie ahead. e Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement outlined in these principles, ACU is in an ideal position to honor and the influences that have shaped our past endow us with some the best of its founding religious tradition in Churches of Christ, less desirable qualities as well, such as an inclination towards while at the same time opening its arms wide to any student who arrogance in knowledge and divisiveness in spirit. We also know qualifies for admission. ACU has always been the fruit of visionary that too much emphasis on even the best of our qualities to the and generous men and women from Churches of Christ and is exclusion of others may lead to undesirable results, such as committed to blessing Churches of Christ and the worldwide attempting to attain unity through unrestrained tolerance. body of Christ. Ultimately, we will accept the calling to climb higher in response ACU is in a crucial position in relation to these efforts. to God’s call. Our faith does not allow us to live in fear of falling As a product and steward of this unity movement, the university from the path of faithful excellence. As a Board holding Abilene can serve as well as lead the church toward greater unity. Christian University in trust, we choose to move forward guided Christian unity is a concern ripe for campus engagement, by these principles that call out the best of our past and lead us discussion, scholarship, prayer and action. into the future with a clear sense of identity and mission. PRINCIPLE : ACU prizes Christian unity as a high value articulating the Christian commitments that emerge from its heritage, yet welcoming the diversity inherent in that unity, respecting others who hold differing opinions, extending and receiving hospitality, and engaging all people with grace and humility. All will be done under Perhaps the most frequently quoted statement about ACU’s the lordship of Christ and the authority of Scripture. identity was made by former president Dr. Don H. Morris on Sept. 27, 1973, barely three months before his death, “is is A Commitment to Prepare Students no ordinary college that we have the privilege of being a part of.” to Live as Authentic Christians Few of us would disagree. e impact of Abilene Christian University on the world, on all of us who have been touched by For many years, the university’s primary purpose has been it, has been immense. It is truly an extraordinary university. But summarized in these words: “e mission of Abilene Christian perhaps we need to stop from time to time and ask, in what ways is University is to educate students for Christian leadership and ACU so extraordinary? What are its highest values? What should service throughout the world.” e university prides itself in our students be equipped to do and be? How should we be known? producing decades of leaders and servants whose hearts and What should be passed onto the next generations? In an essay on minds are shaped by their time at ACU. ey are taught through the unique nature of a Christian university, the noted social the curriculum and through their activities to respect all people,

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historian George Marsden concludes succinctly, “e central question is: what sort of community are we trying to create?” 15 e answers to those questions seemed easier in decades past, when our culture appeared to be more stable, when most of our students came from the same sorts of churches, when we did not have to think so much about the state of higher education in America. But we live in the world as it is now, as former president Sewell reminds us, not as it has been in the past. We must succeed or fail in the midst of present-day conditions. And those conditions are challenging and unpredictable. e university will have to make decisions in the next few years that will have substantial effect on its future. Faculty will have to make decisions about programs and curriculum, about new technologies and the best way to teach students who are different than they used to be. Decisions will have to be made about personnel, about how the university is organized, and even about how decisions are made. ere will be decisions about budgets, recruiting, marketing and athletics. Decisions will have to be made about how to best serve a church constituency that is experiencing dramatic change. Trustees must make decisions about board policies and the best way to govern. In such times, the impact of our decisions may be more consequential than in a simpler past. When things are moving so fast and when the landscape has so dramatically changed, taking

one path at a certain juncture may mean never being able to return to the path we chose not to take. We will not be able to pause at each decisive moment to ask about our identity and mission. We must know who we are now. To know who we are and to envision where we might go requires us to know where we came from. en we can grasp our values. en we can set our path forward. Such weighty matters deserve our most fervent prayers. e purpose of this document is twofold: to be intentional about conveying our identity and mission, and to provide the groundwork for the conversations and decisions that lie ahead. ere are many implications to work through. e various constituents of the university must engage in those important conversations and make those crucial decisions. But coming to grips with the Why that drives the many Hows must be done now. 16 We are moving fast into a future where there are significant choices as well as consequences. Now is the time to claim our identity, to affirm our mission, and to live faithfully into our purpose and God’s promise. As the Board of Trustees of Abilene Christian University, we so commit ourselves to God, and ask for His guidance and grace in the faithful undertaking of the trust we hold. 䊱 If you have comments or questions about this document for the Board of Trustees, please email identityandmission@acu.edu

15

“Moving Up the Slippery Slope,” in Samuel Joeckel and omas Chesnes, editors, e Christian College Phenomenon: Inside America’s Fastest Growing Institutions of Higher Learning. Abilene, TX: ACU Press, 2012, 336. is excellent and thought-provoking article makes a careful distinction between faith-based colleges that cave in to cultural pressures over time and lose their Christian moorings (thus the “slippery slope”) and authentic Christ-centered institutions that regularly make cultural and social adjustments to hold faithfully to their Christian commitment. 16 We can no longer assume new faculty, staff and students are aware of ACU’s implicit values simply by being on our campus. Many do not know the university’s story and its rich heritage in Churches of Christ, born of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement. To new members of the ACU community, we need to re-tell the story that has shaped our collective character and defined the values passed on to us from our heritage. We want to ensure they know our guiding principles and core values.

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JEREMY ENLOW

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DALE AND RITA BROWN OUTLIVE YOUR LIFE AWARD

EarlinePerry by Tamara Thompson

E

arline Perry sits in the atrium of her Country Meadows home, just two blocks north of ACU. Like other rooms in the house, it is decorated with memorabilia from her world travels and filled with natural sunlight on a beautiful fall day. It is no surprise that this space is her favorite spot; it easily matches her warm and sunny disposition. In this room she often has hosted five other ACU faculty and staff wives who have gathered to pray weekly for the past 40 years. Here she has entertained board members, administrators and volunteers from World Christian Broadcasting, her lifelong interest. And last spring, in this room she received a bouquet of flowers from ACU guests who announced her selection to receive the Dale and Rita Brown Outlive Your Life Award. Named for its first recipients and the Max Lucado (’77) book, Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make a Difference, the award recognizes Perry’s efforts to keep alive her late

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First announced in May 2011, the Dale and Rita Brown Outlive Your Life Award recognizes individuals who have created a lasting effect on the lives of others. The award takes its name from Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make a Difference, a 2010 book by 1977 ACU graduate Max Lucado, a minister and best-selling Christian author. In its pages, Lucado challenges readers from all walks of life to take what God has given them and help others. This award is designed to recognize all types of servant leadership including civic and community contributions, meeting spiritual or physical needs, producing changes with generational impact, helping redirect the course of people’s lives, and inspiring others to make an eternal difference. Recipients may be alumni or friends of the university.

STEVE BUTMAN

(LEFT) ACU president Dr. Phil Schubert (’91) presented Earline her award at May Commencement. (RIGHT) Dr. Lowell Perry was an engaging teacher in the classroom who was in demand around the world as an expert in the use of radio and TV in mass communication.

husband’s dream of spreading the gospel worldwide through shortwave radio stations. She was honored publicly at ACU’s May 2013 Commencement. “Mom is the epitome of this award because what she has done … will not only outlive generations of our family, but it has inspired many to work toward their dreams for God’s Kingdom,” said her youngest son, Greg Perry (’84). How Earline has made a difference in the world is, in essence, a love story – love for her husband, for God and for missions. Earline Davidson met Lowell Perry (’47) in 1946 after transferring her junior year to Abilene Christian. Having served in World War II, he had just returned to ACU for his senior year. After a whirlwind romance, they married the day after he graduated and moved to Terre Haute, Ind. She finished her Bachelor of Science degree in English and business at Indiana State University in 1948. Lowell continued his studies and earned a master’s degree in speech from ISU and, later, a doctorate from Northwestern University in radio and television. The couple returned to ACU in 1948 so he could teach radio and television in the Department of Communication. There he started the campus’ radio station, KACC-AM (now KACU-FM), and oversaw it for the next 26 years. Earline taught in the business department. As a child, Earline had developed a heart for missions, and she found the same passion in Lowell. “He was one of the few people in the nation to have a Ph.D. in radio and television, and he was

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sought after by many universities,” she said. “He said, ‘I did not get my degree to make money; I did it for Christian education.’ ” In the summer of 1950, the Perrys had an opportunity to spend three months overseas. “We bought a car and traveled all over Europe,” Earline recalled. “We visited all of the [Church of Christ] missionaries in Europe.” One of those 16 missionaries was Maurice Hall (’49), who had set up radio communications for the Yalta Conference between Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin at the end of World War II. “Maurice knew what shortwave radio could do, so Maurice and Lowell kept talking about it,” Earline said. Shortwave radio is a primary source of communication outside the United States, especially in remote areas. Perry knew that shortwave is ideal for longdistance communication because the wavelengths bounce off the ionosphere along the curve of the earth. He dubbed shortwave radio “the sleeping giant” because of its power to reach millions. Always missions-minded, Lowell wrote an article for the Firm Foundation in 1960 about how shortwave could be used to effectively spread the gospel as Jesus commanded in Mark 16:15. “Lowell believed the only way we can reach the multitudes of the world is through the shortwave,” Earline said. “Missionaries are not equipped to reach billions of people. Even if they were equipped, they couldn’t get there. Shortwave is the only way it can be done.”

Alton Howard – a leader of White’s Ferry Church of Christ in West Monroe, La. – saw Perry’s article and wanted to share in Lowell’s dream. In 1965, Perry took a two-year leave from ACU and, with Howard’s help, moved Earline, sons David (’73) and Greg, and daughter Susan (’77) to Sao Paolo, Brazil. “Both my parents showed me the importance of broadcasting the good news of Christ when we all moved to Brazil as missionaries,” said Greg, who was an impressionable 5-year-old at the time. In 1993, Greg started World Wide Youth Camps, now YouthReach International. Both David and Susan also have worked in Asia with the camps. “Passion for spreading the gospel of Jesus to the world was instilled in us, along with a desire to always continue learning,” said Susan. Apparently so was a passion for teaching; Susan teaches kindergarten, and David teaches Texas history classes, both in the Abilene Independent School District. Greg is director of spiritual formation at Lipscomb Academy in Nashville, Tenn. The Perrys returned to Abilene in 1967, and Lowell, Hall and others continued exploring how to use shortwave technology to spread the gospel. Finally, in July 1976, in the Perrys’ living room, World Christian Broadcasting was born. Eager to get a station up and running, the founders asked Perry to scout a site in the Caribbean to broadcast into South America. Hal Frazier of West Monroe, who spoke French, and Jim Ferguson, a radio station owner and pilot, traveled


Radio towers in Anchor Point, Alaska, help World Christian Broadcasting share the gospel in Russian, Chinese and English through 20 hours of programming each day. The Kenai Peninsula location for KNLS’ shortwave station is 211 miles south of Anchorage.

EARLINE PERRY

with Perry in Ferguson’s plane. On March 25, 1977, flying near the island of Martinique, the plane inexplicably exploded, killing all three men. “I never once blamed God for anything because I was just brought up not to do that,” Earline said. “I just know that the Lord has a plan we don’t know about. Really, as much as I missed Lowell, I can see the hand of the Lord now.” Part of God’s handiwork, she said, came just six weeks before the plane crash when she earned her realtor’s license. She sold her first two houses the day before Lowell left for the Caribbean. After the sales, she joked with a friend that she was glad she didn’t have to make a living selling real estate. “My real estate license paid off because I was in real estate for 22 years here in Abilene,” said Earline. “That was the way I made a livelihood and the way I had been able to finance a lot of things for World Christian and the dream Lowell had of getting a shortwave station on the air.” “She always has been an accomplished person in her own right, but she and Lowell were a great team together,” said Ethelyn “Smitty” (Smith ’53) Brecheen, one of Earline’s prayer group friends in Abilene. “After Lowell passed away, she felt a great responsibility for the continued care of their children, and working in real estate offered her that opportunity. She was very successful at it.” “Earline Perry is a remarkable servant,”

says Dr. Bob Scott (’56 M.R.E.), president of WCBC from 1980-93. “Lowell was the love of her life and they were a matched pair. Their family has had great influence on those around them.” Despite the crash, leaders of the fledgling organization were not about to give up on Lowell’s dream. Earline became an advocate for the cause and helped with fundraising. Finally, a site for the station was purchased in Anchor Point, Alaska, and on July 23, 1983, KNLS signed on the air. Earline happily attended the grand opening. Using a magazine format, the station broadcasts 20 hours daily into China, Japan, Russia, Australia, and Pacific Rim countries in three languages. It offers a low-key presentation of the gospel and never asks listeners for financial support. Judging from the many thousands of listeners’ letters received in 30 years of operation, the venture has been successful. Earline – who has worked on a master’s degree in missions at ACU and taught from 1970-74 in its summer missions workshop – joined the WCBC Board of Directors in 1992, and in 2000 she retired from the real estate business to devote her time and investments to WCBC. “She is one of the strongest supporters we have, not only financially but in encouragement also,” said Charles Caudill, WCBC president and CEO. In recent years, WCBC decided to double its broadcasting capabilities

by building another station on a mountaintop in Madagascar, an island nation off the southeast coast of Africa. “When both stations are operating, it is possible for us to reach the entire earth,” says Caudill. “We will actually be broadcasting to more than 95 percent of the planet’s population.” Although the station is broadcastready in Madagascar, on-air production has been delayed by a four-year-long power struggle in which president Marc Ravalomanana was ousted in a military coup and a transitional government set in place, although without blessing from the United Nations or the African Union. WCBC officials are hopeful an election there this fall will stabilize the political, social and economic situation, and enable the station to begin broadcasting in 2014. Having traveled the world, Perry, now 85, is content in the atrium of her Abilene home. “I’ve never had any desire to go somewhere else because ACU is my love, too,” she said. “I met Lowell at ACU. I wish every woman in the world could have a husband like Lowell Perry. It would be a different world.” However, she does plan to take one more trip. “I told my prayer group, ‘I hope I live long enough to know the Madagascar station is on the air,’ ”she said. “ ‘And then, Lord, just take me home, because that will be the fulfillment of my dream because it will be the fulfillment of Lowell’s dream.’ ” 

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Taking Special festive lights illuminated the main entrance to CitySquare at 511 N. Akard St. on the evening of Nov. 14 for the open house of the university’s second-floor facilities. But by day, students and faculty use the entrance (left) on San Jacinto Street, which is designed to let Dallasites know the location for ACU at CitySquare.

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“Our students want to tackle real issues, and they want to do it now, as part of their education.” DR. STEPHEN JOHNSON (’90)

Shape Dean of the Honors College

ACU at CitySquare renovation completed as fall semester begins

A

B Y W E N DY K I L M E R

PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E R E M Y E N L O W, DAV I D L E E S O N AND KIM LEESON

n old Doritos delivery truck, a newly renovated space in a high-rise building, and a handful of students from a university in Abilene make for an unusual poverty-fighting team in South Dallas.

But the innovative ACU at CitySquare program is expanding students’ college experience and unleashing a group of passionate learners into the heart of Dallas’ poverty challenges. “This is about connecting students’ academic experiences to what they’re passionate about,” said Dr. Stephen Johnson (’90), dean of the Honors College. “Our students want to tackle real issues, and they want to do it now, as part of their education. This program puts service at the center, not layered on top of degree requirements. It is squarely in the center of ACU’s mission and reason for existing.” The re-purposed Doritos truck, a donation from Food for Good, PepsiCo’s social enterprise organization, will soon be given new life as a mobile food lab in Dallas, offering healthy food options in an area where they are scarce. But the most significant physical asset of ACU at CitySquare is the second floor of 511 N. Akard St. ACU is leasing the space from CitySquare, and renovations were completed in time for students to start the semester on location this year. For well over two years, a conversation has been emerging across the ACU campus among faculty, staff, administrators and students – a conversation exploring how living and learning in a context like CitySquare might extend, enrich and deepen student learning and spiritual formation, Johnson said. The fall semester of 2012 marked the first steps in the emerging partnership between ACU and CitySquare, as two graduate students moved to Dallas and began working directly with the organization as part of their Master of Science in Social Work degree program. New projects, course work and even full degree plans continue to roll out as the partnership evolves, but the completion of ACU’s renovated space at CitySquare marks a significant milestone in the process. The second floor of the 15-story CitySquare building now includes offices for a few ACU faculty and staff, classrooms, gathering spaces and videoconference facilities. Just

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Larry James is president and CEO of CitySquare.

above it, on the third floor, are CitySquare’s operational headquarters. Floors four through 14 include 200 apartments for low-income and formerly homeless people. A few minutes drive east of the North Akard location, 10 ACU undergraduates, two graduate students and a resident director live in an apartment complex also owned by CitySquare.

The Organization

CitySquare is a respected, 25-year-old poverty-fighting enterprise in Dallas. Formerly known as Central Dallas Ministries, the organization provides a multi-faceted outreach program, including providing food to more than 35,000 neighbors each year, as well as health, social work, legal and job training services. The latest expansion project for CitySquare is the Opportunity Center, a partnership with PepsiCo Inc. and Workforce Solutions of Greater Dallas, among others. The 52,000-square-foot, $14 million facility at the corner of Interstate 30 and Malcolm X Boulevard will gather the main components of CitySquare programs into one central location. The center will include a food distribution center, a new wellness center, an employment training center, CitySquare’s AmeriCorps headquarters/offices, and staging areas for CitySquare’s growing summer and after-school food program. CitySquare is led by Larry James, long-known in the Dallas faith, business and media communities as a social entrepreneur and servant to the people of East and South Dallas. James came to CitySquare in 1994 after serving 14 years as senior minister with Richardson East Church of Christ in Richardson. Dr. John Siburt (’96) is the vice president of programs at CitySquare and is the liaison to the university. He also will be an adjunct instructor for ACU in Spring 2014.

Dr. John Siburt

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The Students

Ten of the residential ACU students are sophomores, part of the JUST – Justice and Urban Studies Team – program, which includes students from various disciplines who are interested in addressing social issues related to poverty through their degree. In their first year at ACU, JUST students live and attend classes on campus at ACU but travel to Dallas several weekends each semester to begin their immersion into CitySquare and the South Dallas community. During their sophomore year, “we flip the script,” Johnson said, moving students to Dallas to live at the LEFT: Students learn from a local architect about plans to offer improved public housing for low-income neighbors. BELOW LEFT: Joyce Schuster, David Wall, Molly Clemans, Bethany Richardson, Jennie Magner and Alan Songer were among the first students to live and learn in Dallas at ACU at CitySquare.

ACU at CitySquare features spaces designed for collaboration. ABOVE: ACU student Jenny Dennis

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Classrooms have movable glass walls to expand or contract space as needed.

CitySquare facility with several trips back to Abilene. The JUST students begin that transition by moving to Dallas immediately after finishing their freshman year, and they spend the summer working at CitySquare as AmeriCorps interns. Students write their own course syllabi around projects they choose related to problems in the community. Their curriculum during the second year is an integration of classwork in Dallas, taught by on-site faculty member Dr. Tracy (McGlothlin ’80) Shilcutt, associate professor of history; course discussions with Dr. Cole Bennett, associate professor and chair of the Department of Language and Literature, during visits back to Abilene; online courses; attending ACU classes through videoconference; and course credit for the social research and hands-on projects that take up much of their time in Dallas. One such hands-on endeavor in Dallas is a food-related project. “Nutrition and access to it are huge problems,” Johnson said. “There’s an epidemic of diabetes and hypertension in our society. There’s also a social/behavioral side to every food culture; it can be hard to change habits.” Large sections of South Dallas have been identified as “food deserts” – defined by the USDA as “500 people and/or at least 33 percent of the census tract’s population reside more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store.” “The lack of access to healthy food is often directly related to chronic health disease,” Johnson said. “In addition, a second problem is behavioral; the lack of access to healthy food over time creates an unhealthy food culture. Those who reside in food deserts are conditioned to accept the conditions and make unhealthy food choices.” JUST students are in the process of researching how the vehicle that formerly transported Doritos can become a mobile, high-tech, high-touch food learning lab for South Dallas to address this health problem through education. This semester they have been 48

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David Wall (left) and Jacquelin Maldonado

brainstorming ideas for its use, and in the spring, they will begin deploying it in neighborhoods and schools for research and surveys to help them design specific plans for the future. Another project focuses on education, working closely with teachers and a group of third-grade students in the Dallas Independent School District to discuss strategies for educating children in poverty. “The Design for Change program works to empower children with the reality that they can be the change in their community,” said sophomore Bethany Richardson, a member of JUST. “As a social work major, I am getting hands-on experience with a portion of the demographic that I one day hope to serve. It also is giving me a history of undergraduate research that will greatly advance my area of study.” In addition to the JUST students, graduate students from ACU’s Master of Social Work degree also live, work and research in Dallas through CitySquare and its programs. Two of them live in the apartment complex with the undergraduates and serve as resident assistants, and four others live nearby in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex.

The Site

ACU at CitySquare’s open-floor concept provides community spaces (above) and distance-learning technology allows students to meet with classmates back in Abilene or anywhere in the world their studies take them.

“I never have a typical day,” says Kelsey Evans (’09), on-site coordinator for ACU at CitySquare. “Every day on site is different.” Evans serves as resident director of the apartment complex where students live but also offices at the North Akard location, where she coordinates its events and activities. When not in use by the residential students for project meetings, living space and course work, ACU’s space at CitySquare serves as a gathering spot for other ACU groups and events in Dallas including short courses, alumni events, admission events and various seminars. Recently, the Siburt Institute for Church Relations and the Department of Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation joined together to offer a seminar for church leaders. ACU’s second-floor space is divided into three sections, each with a specific purpose. One area is designated for collaboration – a wide-open floor plan with soft seating in the middle surrounded by five classrooms, a conference room, the site coordinator’s office and two storage rooms. The space can be transformed into a larger area by opening up three of the classrooms’ movable glass walls to join the center space and allow for larger gatherings like the Nov. 14 open house that attracted more than 100 alumni, community leaders and media. The second section comprises seven offices, one conference room, a large meeting area with a table

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and chairs, a small kitchenette and four cubicles. Faculty-in-residence, visiting professors, CitySquare interns and ACU staff members use offices in this section, and ACU sublets two offices to community partners, including Lifeline Chaplaincy. Community space is the focus of the third section of the floor. The lobby is accessible to the residents of CitySquare apartments, often referred to as “neighbors” who can visit the space and use one of four iPads to surf the Web, check email, browse social media or play games. “Every residential floor of the building at North Akard has some sort of community space – library, children’s room – so our contribution is a technology space for the residents,” Evans said. The interaction and sense of community with CitySquare residents is intentional. “Our students are beginning their mission now,” Evans said. “They are changed by living in a different community, with people of a different income level.”

The Future

ACU has announced plans to offer a Master of Marriage and Family Therapy degree with an emphasis in medical family therapy, and a one-year post-baccalaureate dietetic internship, both of which will largely take place at CitySquare. The proposed dietetic internship program will be one of the first nutrition programs in the nation to offer an internship with an emphasis on community and poverty. The internship is 35 weeks and provides graduate credit. The proposed degree in medical family therapy will include traditional marriage and family therapy classes along with additional courses emphasizing study of illness and disability across the lifespan, collaboration with healthcare systems and medical doctors, and focused internships in a medical setting. Students in both of these graduate programs will live and study in Dallas, applying their learning through work and research at CitySquare. ACU’s programs that introduce research, service and a mission-focus already have proven attractive to students. “When I first heard about the JUST program, I was immediately attracted to the thought of putting my principles into practice,” Richardson said. “When Dr. Stephen Johnson called me and began telling me what the program would look like, going out into the world and getting hands-on experience with the reality of poverty as a freshman in college, I was hooked. There is something refreshing and exciting about being told that you don't have to wait to change the world, that you can start changing it now.”䊱 ABOVE, CLOCKWISE: ACU students Christin King and Liz Savoy; Natasha Hancock is a graduate student and resident assistant; university relations manager Toni (Hale ’84) Young speaks to Dallas-area Wildcats during their monthly alumni networking luncheon; the lobby is a gathering place where students and neighbors can use iPads; and Dr. Joey Cope teaches a seminar for elders, ministers and other church leaders offered the Duncum Center for Conflict Resolution.

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F

CitySquare attracts interest from across ACU’s academic landscape or several years, a number of other ACU departments and organizations have found creative ways to involve CitySquare in their curriculum and projects. Some recent examples:

• In May, students in the Jack Pope Fellows Program attended a seminar course on public service at CitySquare. The Department of Political Science course offered a special emphasis on fundamental problems and issues facing practitioners and critical analysis of significant works.

• Seniors in ACU’s School of Information Technology and Computing recently researched and developed IT solutions to meet the constraints of CitySquare’s lunch program. The students sought to address challenges related to the amount of paperwork associated with the government-run program by instead using Web or mobile apps. Final project designs were presented at the end of the semester for review by CitySquare.

• Eleven students from ACU’s College of Business Administration traveled to the United Kingdom over the summer to research the accomplishments and challenges of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The research was conducted with the goal of understanding how major world events are most effectively organized to have the least negative impact on nearby low-income residents. Students specifically considered lessons learned by organizers of the London Games that might benefit backers of the Dallas 2024 Olympic bid, and upon their return, presented their findings to CitySquare leaders and representatives from the Dallas 2024 committee at the ACU at CitySquare location.

• Dr. Trey Shirley (’04), instructor of general education in the Department of Art and Design, worked with students in his Two-Dimensional Design class this fall to plan and create a series of artwork to adorn the new gallery space in the entry stairwell for ACU at CitySquare. The students visited CitySquare and then created art reflecting their experience and the organization’s mission. They produced pieces exploring a variety of themes ranging from “the wealth of the poor” to “darkness and light.” Several of the designs now hang in the gallery space, which also features art from CitySquare neighbors and a painting from acclaimed Dallas artist Rolando Diaz (’79).

• The university’s Emerging Leaders Experience, coordinated by the Center for Christian Service and Leadership, is designed to challenge and equip students to be leaders on campus and in the community. It typically includes six seminars and two service-oriented projects over the course of the year, and now it also includes integration with CitySquare. The ELE group will spend time at CitySquare and then return to Abilene to consider how to apply principles and practices they observed. 䊱 – WENDY KILMER

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RN Erin Weldon instructs student Mathew Molina.

A HOUSE FOR

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Dr. Becky Hammack

The ACU School of Nursing’s faculty and first class of students.

or a first-year collegiate nursing program, Dr. Becky Hammack has the equivalent of a full house.

A veteran health professions educator, Hammack welcomed 52 students this fall to the renovated Zona Luce Building as ACU’s new School of Nursing opened its doors on campus. It was a new day following 34 years of affiliation with the Patty Hanks Shelton School of Nursing, a consortium that included Hardin-Simmons and McMurry university students in a facility near Hendrick Medical Center. Hammack is associate professor and dean of ACU’s School of Nursing. She earned her B.S.N. from Angelo State University, her M.S.N. from ACU and an Ed.D. from Baylor University, and came to ACU in 2012 after 10 years as dean of health sciences at Midland College. She quickly went to work hiring faculty members, planning curriculum and imagining space in Zona Luce, a facility first built in 1929 and renovated in 1997 but in need of some additional work to accommodate tech-savvy labs, classrooms and offices for

The Zona Luce Building is the new home of ACU’s School of Nursing

a nursing school that will admit another 50 students in Fall 2014 and up to 80 students each year thereafter. Gaining acceptance into the School of Nursing is a highly competitive process. Successful students earn a minimum 3.0 GPA in their first two years of courses, become CPR certified, earn a Certified Nursing Assistant certificate and pass a difficult exam to gain formal entry into the school for their junior and senior years. Technology plays a major role in an ACU nursing student’s education, from all-digital textbooks to state-of-the-art simulation labs that allow students to learn about and practice every skill they’ll need to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, pass the national RN licensing exam, and find their place in one of the nation’s fastest-growing career fields. We asked Hammack to share some insights into the School of Nursing’s first year as an on-campus program.

What’s behind the current and anticipated future shortage of RNs in America?   There has been a national shortage of nurses for several years, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics is projecting an even

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E R E M Y E N LOW

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Technology allows simulation coordinator Pricilla Wyatt, RN, to control high-fidelity simulators in the next room and monitor student responses to the situation. BELOW LEFT: Students Miranda Palmer, Audrey Zinsmeister, Sarah Schoch and Alayna Klassen take a break in the first-floor lounge in Zona Luce. BELOW RIGHT: Nursing student Jordan Dockery (left) works with instructor C.J. Wilson, FNP.

“A Christian health care professional who practices his or her faith also can assist patients in meeting their spiritual needs.” – DR. BECKY HAMMACK

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greater need by 2020, when an additional 1.2 million nurses will be required. This shortage includes more than 700,000 newly created jobs and almost half a million replacement nursing positions as those currently practicing retire and/or leave the workforce. Part of the shortage has been attributed to the Baby Boomer population that is aging, retiring and needing additional health care services. The need for baccalaureate-prepared nurses also has increased because in 2010 the Institute of Medicine published The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, a comprehensive report mandating that by 2020, 80 percent of nurses practicing in hospitals must have earned at least a bachelor’s degree.

Why is it important for Christians to work in nursing and other health professions? People are most vulnerable when they are ill, injured or recovering from surgery. They deserve to be treated not only by a knowledgeable practitioner but also by a person with compassion, understanding, love and empathy. Who better to fill this need than Christ-centered nurses who view their job as their mission field? A Christian health care professional who practices his or her faith also can assist patients in meeting their spiritual needs. Research by the Harvard Medical School indicates there is a positive relationship between spirituality and healing.

What have been some of the challenges in getting a nursing school started?   Approval by the Texas Board of Nursing and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education was a major hurdle, but planning the renovation of ACU’s historic Zona Luce Building to house the School of Nursing has been both exciting and challenging. Even though there is a national shortage of highly credentialed nurses for faculty positions, we have been blessed to attract full-time and part-time mission-fit faculty to teach our students. We will continue to search for more faculty members as the program expands. One way we are meeting this demand is that some of our currently employed instructors and assistant instructors are either enrolled in the next higher degree (a master’s or doctorate) or are exploring those options.

Most of these take place on the campus. In the past, when our students have left campus to attend the consortium nursing school, even though it is only a few miles across town, they often felt like they lost touch with ACU.

How are ACU’s simulation labs equipped, and what is the importance of using them in today’s nursing education? The School of Nursing has state-of-the-art simulation equipment for students to use. There are six mid-level simulators that can be programmed to have heart, breath and bowel sounds. Students can practice numerous skills on these simulators, from dressing changes to catheterization. We also have four high-fidelity simulators including an adult male, an adult female, a birthing simulator and a newborn simulator. The high-fidelity simulators are very similar to an actual human in that as they breathe their chests rise and fall, their eyes blink, they talk, and they have a pulse. Their oxygen and glucose levels can be tested, they bleed, they react physiologically to medications, and so on. Plus the birthing simulator can actually give birth to a baby both by breech and vertex delivery. Simulation has become a crucial part of the education of all medical professionals. It allows students to become proficient in many skills and patient-care situations before working with actual patients. It helps them transfer what they are learning in their didactic courses to a clinical situation. And through simulation experience, students have the opportunity to participate in situations and learn about conditions they may not readily encounter in a clinical facility.

How will medical missions opportunities enhance the education of ACU nurses? By participating in medical missions, ACU nursing students will have the opportunity to be immersed in diverse cultures and medical situations such as surgery or preventive care of people who live in underserved areas. Students also obtain a global perspective about health care while in the mission field. Some students begin nursing careers with the goal of doing medical missions as a vocation, earning a minor in Bible or missions to enhance their preparation.

What are the advantages of ACU having its nursing school on campus rather than across town?

What kind of starting salary can a nursing graduate expect in today’s marketplace?

When students enroll at Abilene Christian for their education, they are immersed in the university’s culture, which includes many activities and opportunities designed especially for them.

After students graduate from ACU with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, they will be able to take the NCLEX-RN, the national council licensure exam for Registered

Dr. Anita Broxson, RN and assistant professor of nursing, instructs students in one of the second floor classrooms in the Zona Luce Building.

RN Marsha Straughn (right) oversees students Alexandra Greco, Ashley Brown and Kaitlyn Moehlman.

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CLOCKWISE, FROM ABOVE LEFT: Students Jared Hargrove and Lonny Anyasi; RN Rachel Newett, Kendra Unamba, RN Rebekah Mullins, Judith Duran and Angela Salvatore; and the Zona Luce Building was one of the first eight structures constructed on the ACU campus when Abilene Christian moved to the Hill from its original North First Street location in 1929.

Nurses. Once graduates pass this exam, they can expect to find an average annual starting salary of about $45,000. Beginning salaries are highly dependent on where the new graduate works geographically and clinically.

How important are student internships to the School of Nursing? Hospitals are becoming more and more likely to offer internships after graduation and/or during the summer between the junior and senior year. This is not an expected part of our program but we will always assist students who wish to apply for internships.

What surprises first-year nursing students about their chosen major? When students first declare nursing as a major in the freshman year, they are probably surprised at the rigor of their prerequisite courses because of the amount of science preparation required in this field. Once the student is formally admitted into the nursing program as a junior, the rigor continues. The kind of testing we do is probably the most surprising because most questions on exams are intentionally designed 56

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to be at the level of what they’ll find on the NCLEX-RN after graduation. We want them to be fully prepared.

How is the on-campus facility and all-freshman inaugural class of students helping develop a tight-knit learning community?  If a student declares a nursing major, we provide all the academic advising for them from freshman year through graduation. Since we have admitted nursing students (upperclassmen) in our building much of the time, our freshmen and sophomores have the chance to see what junior and senior nursing students are doing and can interact with them. We conduct departmental chapel programs once a month to allow students at all levels of a nursing education to interact with each another.

How does it make you feel to see nursing students on campus? It’s awesome to see them walking across campus in their purple scrubs; they stand out in a crowd! The faculty is so proud of them and our program. It’s been a wonderful journey so far, and we expect it to become even more exciting in the years to come. 


Selections of books written, edited, compiled or contributed to by ACU alumni, faculty, staff and students

The BOOKCASE

West Texas Christmas Stories

The Effective Practice of Ministry

Edited by Glenn Dromgoole ISBN 978-1-89112-333-0 • 160 pages acupressbooks.com

ESSAYS IN MEMORY OF CHARLES SIBURT

A warm and humorous anthology of more than 30 Christmas stories set in West Texas, or written by West Texas authors, including Doug Mendenhall (’82) and Dr. Jack Boyd (’55). Boyd is professor emeritus of music, and Mendenhall is instructor of journalism and mass communication, and journalist-in-residence.

Edited by Dr. Tim Sensing ISBN 978-0-89112-328-6 • 303 pages acupressbooks.com Sensing, associate dean and professor of ministry in ACU’s Graduate School of Theology, co-taught with the late Dr. Charles Siburt (’68) at ACU, where Charles endeared himself to churches and church leaders around the world for his wise counsel on best practices in congregational life.

You’ll Get Through This

They Wanted Justice

HOPE AND HELP FOR YOUR TROUBLESOME TIMES

By Dr. Preston Harper (’59) ISBN 978-1-47979-199-6 • 392 pages amazon.com

By Max Lucado (’77) ISBN 978-0-84994-847-3 • 240 pages thomasnelson.com Regardless of the trouble – financial woes, relationship valleys or health crises – it’s easy to feel at times like dark clouds will never leave. But God redeems the broken, defeats evil and makes all things work for good when we trust Him and allow Him to finish his work. Lucado’s 30th book centers on the story of Joseph.

As I Remember It AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Dr. Preston Harper, professor emeritus of English, sets this action/adventure novel in Civil War Texas. Seriously wounded in the battle of Gettysburg, devout Christian Luc Post, a soldier in Gen. Lee’s army, comes to Texas to rehabilitate a serious injury. Healed by a Comanche, he joins a tribal leader and encounters a series of life-changing events.

APA Handbook of Psychology, Religion and Spirituality

By Dr. Jack P. Lewis (’40) ISBN 978-0-892-25598-6 • 272 pages gospeladvocate.com

By Dr. Richard Beck (’89) and Andrea Haugen (’11) ISBN 978-1-4338-1077-0 • 1,449 pages apa.org/pubs/books

The longtime Church of Christ biblical scholar, a professor emeritus at Hardin Graduate School of Religion, tells his life story, beginning with his boyhood in a small Texas town, to studies at ACU, Harvard University and Hebrew Union.

Beck and his former student authored “The Christian Religion: A Theological and Psychological Review” in Volume 1 of a two-volume handbook intended to guide the work of psychological practitioners and scientists working in these important areas.

Shattering the Illusion

Early Explorers of Bible Lands

HOW AFRICAN-AMERICAN CHURCHES OF CHRIST MOVED FROM SEGREGATION TO INDEPENDENCE

By Dr. Jack P. Lewis (’40) ISBN 978-0-89112-451-1 • 208 pages acupressbooks.com

By Wes Crawford (’82 M.Div.) ISBN 978-0-89112-228-9 • 224 pages acupressbooks.com From the late 19th century to the dawn of the Civil Rights Movement, African-American and white members of Churches of Christ perpetuated an illusion of racial unity by playing their long-established roles in southern society, until a pivotal event changed things.

Loves God, Likes Girls A MEMOIR

By Sally Gary, J.D. (’83) ISBN 978-0-89112-359-0 • 240 pages acupressbooks.com The former ACU communication professor offers her personal recollection of a journey to discover the truth about her sexuality. Gary is founder and director of CenterPeace, a nonprofit ministry providing safe places for conversation in families and churches about same-sex attraction.

Lewis tells the stories of John Lewis Burchhardt, William Francis Lynch, James T. Barclay, Selah Merrill and other explorers of Bible lands in the 19th century. Their pioneering work made significant contributions to our understanding of Scripture today.

Forget the Corsage LIFE STARTS NOW

By Ginger (Morby ’04) Ciminello ISBN 978-1-49080-255-8 • 166 pages westbowpress.com The expectation is for women to “have it all” – the best education, a great career and a fairy-tale love story. Too many sit around waiting for the perfect circumstances, when God calls them instead to live up to their potential and unique design. Ciminello’s spiritual memoir is based on motivational speaking she does for youth groups.

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Hilltop VIEW 

Waynai Bible hits the road for repair, tour

KIM LEESON

than 700 Wildcat fans attending an annual alumni event at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. Young met Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan before the game, adding another memory to a night he won’t soon forget. “It ranks way up there at the top,” Young said.

Young’s first pitch precedes Rangers’ win

Q UOTABLE



ACU helps Eagle Writing Center take flight

Thanks to the vision of ACU graduate student James McGee and some assistance from the university, students at Abilene High School now frequent the Eagle

BRITNI TATUM

Former Olympic quartermiler and gold medalist Earl Young (’62) is no stranger to performing in front of a crowd, although he’d feel more at home running a baton across a finish line than tossing a baseball toward home plate. Fifty-three years after helping the U.S. set a world record and win a gold medal in the 4x400 relay at the 1960 Games in Rome, the longtime Dallas businessman donned an ACU baseball jersey and cap to throw the ceremonial first pitch before the Texas Rangers’ 6-3 win June 10 over the Cleveland Indians. In the stands cheering him on were more

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After 57 years in ACU’s library, the 1,094-pound Waynai Bible was loaned in April to the Green Collection for some refurbishment and a move to Colorado Springs, Colo., to be part of the “Passages” exhibit of rare biblical texts. It took Louis Waynai of Los Angeles, Calif., two years (1928-30) to print the 8,048-page Waynai Bible, which is 43.5 inches tall and 98 inches wide when open and 34 inches thick when closed. It was a gift from Rosen Heights Church of Christ in Fort Worth in 1956. In 2017, the book and exhibit will be moved to the Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C. Considered the largest book of its kind in the world, the Waynai Bible was constructed in 31 sections so it could be moved when needed. It had been on display in ACU’s Gaines B. Stanley Sr. Theological Reading Room. 

For the latest, visit acu.edu/news facebook.com/abilenechristian twitter.com/ACUedu instagram.com/acuedu

Writing Center, a place where peer mentors can help them improve a critical skill. McGee oversees the new center and teaches Advanced Placement Literature and Composition at AHS. “It’s important for ACU to be a good neighbor and support our local community. This is a great way for us to be engaged,” said Kevin Campbell (’00), chief enrollment officer at ACU. “And we place great emphasis on the writing skills of our own students. One of the top skills employers are looking for in college graduates is a strong ability to communicate well in writing. High school students with strong writing skills turn into strong college students.” Dr. Cole Bennett, associate professor and chair of ACU’s Department of Language and Literature and director of the university’s Writing Center in Brown Library, helped train Abilene High student tutors who staff the refurbished facility. ACU helped financially by providing furniture and new decor to create a comfortable and less intimidating environment to encourage students to enjoy writing rather than fear it. 

SBCs to add local ministry opportunity

The lineup of Spring Break Campaigns for 2014 will include Service in the City, a ministry program designed to strengthen ties with neighbors in Abilene the week of March 9-15. SBCs began 37 years ago when students traveled to Guatemala to assist with humanitarian efforts following an earthquake. The following year, Max Lucado (’77) and other students used funds from the Students’ Association for

“My face hurts right now because I’m smiling so hard. I can’t even fathom what just happened. It was just too good.”

“Our teacher candidates are in high demand. Principals know that our grads are well prepared and that they are people of integrity.”

– JENNIFER LOURCH Sophomore outside hitter from Georgetown, Texas, speaking to media after her ACU women’s volleyball team upset Texas Tech University in a Sept. 10 match in Moody Coliseum.

– DR. DANA (KENNAMER ’81) PEMBERTON Professor and chair of teacher education, about the news that all 47 of May and August 2013 early childhood and elementary education graduates from her department had secured employment less than six months after Commencement.

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a missions trip to Des Moines, Iowa. In the more than three decades since, SBC student campaigns have taken ACU students around the world. Year-round local programs such as Treadaway Kids, Young Life, SALT, Isaiah 58, Lynay and Pulse also have started and flourished, and, with the help of ACU’s Center for Christian Service and Leadership, provide many additional opportunities for students to become involved in helping others nearby on a daily basis. 

ACU wins national CASE award for overall fundraising performance

ACU has won its third-ever Educational Fundraising Award from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education in CASE’s 2013 Circle of Excellence program. The Overall Performance Award is based on judges’ analysis of three years of fundraising data reported to the Council for Aid to Education. Other honorees among private comprehensive universities such as ACU were the Rochester Institute of Technology, Eastern Mennonite University, Union University, and Gonzaga University. ACU previously won national CASE awards for fundraising in 2004 and 1997. 

Mitchell, Atchley, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer among campus speakers

• Elise (Smith ’83) Mitchell delivered the Charge to the Class of 2013 at ACU’s May Commencement. She is founder and CEO of Mitchell Communications Group in Fayetteville, Ark., and CEO of Dentsu Public Relations Network. • Rick Atchley (’78), minister at The Hills Church of Christ in North Richland Hills, was the featured speaker Aug. 26 at ACU’s Opening Assembly. • I Am Second week (Sept. 9-13) in Chapel featured Chris Plekenpol, lead pastor of

PAUL WHITE

STEVE BUTMAN

Mitchell (left) and Atchley

ACU BY THE NUMBERS 1,900 Number of trees maintained

Wells Branch Community Church in Austin; Remi Adeleke, former U.S. Navy Seal; Lisa Luby Ryan, Dallas interior designer; Cliff Watkins, hip hop artist; and Marc Eckel, Splat Experience artist. • Actor Juliette (Miller ’06) Trafton spoke Sept. 16 to theatre students in a Transforming Artists class. She and her husband, Broadway actor Stephen Trafton, were on campus to perform at Summit. • Pulitzer Prize-winning Sports Illustrated photographer Bill Frakes worked in classes alongside students Oct. 1-4 and presented the best images of his long career as a photojournalist in a public lecture sponsored by the ACU Learning Studio. • Kei Tsuruharatani, veteran dancer for the Metropolitan Opera, was on campus for the Fall 2013 semester to work with ACU Theatre students on their dance skills. He will be performing in The Magic Flute, Madama Butterfly and La Sonnambula at the Met in New York City during its 2013-14 season. • Dr. Carlos Stroud, professor at the Institute of Optics and Department of Physics at the University of Rochester (N.Y.), met with ACU physics students in October. Stroud is a world-renowned leader in the fields of quantum optics and laser science. • Bob McDonald, retired president, board chair and CEO of Procter & Gamble, spoke to students Oct. 29 in the College of Business Administration’s Distinguished Speaker Series. • Dr. Carl Holladay (’65) was the featured speaker Nov. 14 at ACU’s 27th annual Carmichael-Walling Lectures on “The Church of the Spirit; The Spirit of the Church.” Holladay is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of New Testament Studies in Emory University’s Candler School of Theology.

“You were meant for a calling, not just a career. Now, career is what you’re going to get paid for, but a calling is what you’re made for. And I think a school like ACU can help you prepare for both. … Here, some wise mentors can show you how to leverage that knowledge to make an eternal difference in the office, in the operating room, in the classroom.” – RICK ATCHLEY (’78) Minister at The Hills Church of Christ in North Richland Hills, Texas, speaking Aug. 26 at Opening Assembly in Moody Coliseum.

at ACU by its Landscaping and Grounds crew. The team also tends 6.5 acres of flowerbeds and 150 acres of turf on the university’s 250-acre main campus. There are 34 linear miles of pavement to edge each week during the growing season.

100 Percentage of Texas residents among 2012 ACU health professional graduates who applied and were accepted to in-state medical schools. Overall, 90 percent of all ACU health professional grads were accepted to medical schools. The national average is 50 percent.

90 Percentage of all 2012 ACU graduates who were enrolled in graduate or professional school within six months. In 30 areas of study – including advertising, advertising and PR, Bible/missions/ministry, biochemistry and chemistry, communication disorders, English, journalism, nutrition, political science, sociology, and teacher education – the percentage was 100 percent.

79.4

Percentage rate for freshman-to-sophomore retention in Fall 2013, the best in school history. There are 1,030 freshmen, the fourth largest entering class ever at ACU, up 7.6 percent over 2012 and 11 percent above 2011.

11

Number of times the past 12 years that ACU has won the Outstanding Chapter Award from the Society of Physics Students. Less than five percent of chapters at U.S. universities are honored; ACU has had a student chapter for 44 years and is a mainstay of the national organization.

7 ACU single-game record number of touchdowns thrown by senior quarterback John David Baker in his first collegiate start Aug. 31 in an 84-6 win over Concordia College. Baker broke the record of six thrown by Clint Longley (’74) in 1973 and Billy Malone (’10) in 2006 and 2008. (See story about Baker on page 64.)

“Don’t ever call me for a game again.” – MARK TURGEON University of Maryland head men’s basketball coach in postgame comments to ACU head coach Joe Golding (’99) after the Wildcats gave the 2002 national champion Terrapins all they wanted for most of a Nov. 13 game in College Park, Md. ACU led by six points with 14 minutes left in the contest until the Atlantic Coast Conference power used its height and depth to defeat ACU, 67-44. Golding took the comment as a compliment for his team’s spirited play against a much more experienced lineup. Maryland has made 24 appearances in the national tournament, including 13 Sweet Sixteens, five Elite Eights and two Final Fours. AC U TO D AY



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Ac adem ic NEWS Tippens leaves Pepperdine to return for new role at ACU Veteran teacher, writer, researcher and scholar Dr. Darryl Tippens is retiring as Pepperdine University’s provost to return to ACU in Fall 2014. Tippens left ACU’s English faculty 13 years ago to become chief academic officer at Pepperdine, where he was “a steady voice for the essential and historical link between scholarship and faith,” said its president and chief executive officer, Andrew K. Benton. Tippens returns to ACU as its first University Distinguished Scholar of Faith, Learning and Literature. The externally funded position will include serving as senior advisor for academic initiatives. “As a University Distinguished Scholar, Darryl will be a tremendous resource to our students and faculty. He will teach and research in his discipline of English while also working to enhance the reputation of ACU through the development of a Distinguished Speaker Series and frequent interaction with other national leaders in Christian higher education,” said ACU provost Dr. Robert Rhodes. “His role as senior advisor for academic initiatives will be equally valuable as we draw upon his extensive experience with undergraduate and graduate program development, international programs, and the recruitment and retention of faculty.” “It will be a privilege to have Darryl work with us on a variety of strategically important initiatives and projects,” said ACU president Dr. Phil Schubert (’91). “His love for the church, for Christian higher education and ACU are well known. He is deeply respected by our faculty, staff and

trustees, and I look forward to the expertise he will contribute to our efforts in advancing Abilene Christian.” Tippens taught at ACU from 1987-2000 as the James W. Culp Distinguished Professor of English. Prior to that, he was professor and chair of the Division of Language and Literature for 14 years at his alma mater, Oklahoma Christian University.

Texas DPS inspector general added to political science faculty Dr. Stuart Platt, inspector general of the Texas Department of Public Safety, brought more than 30 years of professional experience in law enforcement and criminal justice to ACU when he was added to the political science department faculty in Fall 2013. Platt had directed the 24-person DPS Inspector General’s Office since 2010, with responsibility for reviewing the conduct of DPS personnel across Texas. From 1996-2010, he served as U.S. magistrate judge in the Western District of Texas, Midland/Odessa and Pecos divisions, and thereafter as DPS general counsel. He served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Department of Justice from 1986-96 in the Eastern District of Texas and the Eastern District of Tennessee, and was Criminal Division chief for the Eastern District of Texas from 1990-94. Platt was named Texas Prosecutor of the Year by the Texas Narcotics Officers Association in 1990. He also is a retired colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve and a licensed peace officer in Texas. “It is rare for any university to gain someone with such real-world experience

Student news Seniors Adam Simpson and Andrew Miller were recognized for their research poster presentations in Orlando, Fla., at the Quadrennial Physics Congress (PhysCon) by the Society of Physics Students and were featured in SPS Observer, a quarterly magazine published by SPS and the American Institute of Physics. Simpson received the OSA Foundation Outstanding Student Poster award. Senior business management major Kayli Huddleston received the 2013 Excellence in Education Scholarship at the Human Resources Southwest Conference, held Oct. 20-23 in Fort Worth. She was selected for recognition from a group representing more than 30 student chapters of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

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from the top level of law enforcement in Texas,” said Dr. Greg Straughn (’94), dean of ACU’s College of Arts and Sciences. “Dr. Platt could have decided to teach at any university in the nation, but he came to our growing criminal justice program.”

New degree, certificate programs added to meet grad student needs, growing career opportunities New graduate degree and certificate programs are being added at Abilene Christian, three of them largely online and focused on expanding opportunities at ACU at CitySquare in Dallas. The university has announced plans to offer a Master of Marriage and Family Therapy degree with an emphasis in medical family therapy and a one-year post-baccalaureate dietetic internship. ACU’s partnership with CitySquare offers students in a variety of disciplines the opportunity to connect their learning with real-world situations, particularly focusing on urban poverty (see pages 44-51). The degree in medical family therapy includes traditional marriage and family therapy courses along with additional courses emphasizing illness and disability across the lifespan, collaboration with healthcare systems and medical doctors, and focused internships in a medical setting. Students in both of these graduate programs will live and study in Dallas, applying their learning through work and research at CitySquare. The proposed dietetic internship

Before they graduated this spring, Sarah Ratliff (’13) and Ashley Close (’13) spoke April 3 in Washington, D.C., at International Justice Mission’s Student Freedom Summit and Global Prayer Gathering about how they developed and marketed ACU’s annual Justice Week event. The summit brings together universities and churches to collaborate and create event ideas for their respective campuses. Close and Ratliff are co-presidents of the ACU IJM chapter. Justice Week raises awareness of and funds for the cessation of human sex trafficking. Faculty news Dr. Rick Lytle, professor and dean of the College of Business Administration, spent the 2012-13 academic year representing the university as a research fellow at the CEO Forum in Colorado Springs, Colo., and as a visiting marketing professional at Walmart headquarters in Bentonville, Ark.


UNDERGRADUATERESEARCH

Students accompanied Lee on history-making discoveries program at CitySquare, starting in 2014, is one of the first nutrition programs in the nation to offer an internship with an emphasis on community and poverty. The internship is 35 weeks and provides graduate credit. A new online graduate Certificate in Enrollment Management is designed to prepare enrollment management professionals to become leaders in the areas of recruitment, marketing, retention and financial aid. As part of the program, students will complete four online courses and participate in a three-day residency at Disney Institute in Anaheim, Calif. The 48-hour Master of Arts in Christian Ministry (M.A.C.M.) degree program is changing to meet the needs of those working in full-time ministry, allowing up to 75 percent of the course work to be completed online. Thirty-six hours of the new program can now be completed online. The balance takes place during a series of one-week intensive courses conducted in Abilene. Students have the option to complete some or all of the other 36 hours via on-campus courses. They also can personalize their degree through electives selected to fit their ministry interests. The two-year, 69-hour Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree will be offered starting in Summer 2014. Students will gain hands-on instruction and experience during their fieldwork placements at local health care facilities. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase 33 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Each of these new programs is pending final approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, and related program-specific accrediting bodies. For more: acu.edu/grad

Ecuador is not exactly just down the road from Abilene, but when biology professor and chair Dr. Tom Lee wants his undergraduate students to experience potentially ground-breaking research, he knows where to take them. He alternates guiding annual trips with students to study marine biology in the Caribbean and to explore ecosystems in the Andes Mountains. On the last two trips to the mountain cloud forests in Lee Ecuador, he and his students have found themselves looking at new species of mammals that have made scientific history and been featured in the Journal of Mammalogy. In 2012, Lee, Grayson Allred (’13) and Andrew Hennecke (’12) were checking nets one night for bat specimens in the Otonga Cloud Forest Reserve. They caught a glimpse of something in the tree canopy above them, and photographed what would become known a year later as an olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina), the first new species of carnivore discovered in the Americas in 35 years. The furry, short-nosed, long-tailed, two-pound carnivore was shown to the world Aug. 15 in a presentation at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The olinguito had been confused for years with a similar-looking mammal called an olingo. The research team credited with the discovery also cited Lee’s work in their paper. In 2010, Lee and student Amy Scott (’10) were doing mammal survey work in Ecuador’s Sangay National Park when they discovered in their traps

New faculty added for 2013-14 school year ACU has 243 full-time faculty members and 94 percent of those on a tenure track hold terminal degrees. The following were added to the faculty for the 2013-14 school year: • Brian Brown (’09), instructor of language and literature • Dr. Anita Broxson, assistant professor of nursing • Jeff Goolsby (’01), instructor of music • Dr. Kristen Guillory, assistant professor of social work • Rachel (Frazier ’97) Hewett, instructor of music • Dr. J. Darby Hewitt (’08), assistant professor of engineering and physics • Dr. Hope Martin, associate professor of occupational therapy

what would later be determined to be Caenolestes sangay, a new species of the shrew-opossum. Scientists from Ecuador, New York City’s American Museum of Natural History, and Chicago’s Field Museum provided data analysis of specimens and DNA to confirm the new species. The find was featured on the October 2013 front cover of the Journal of Mammalogy, and specimens now reside in ACU’s remarkable Natural History Collection and in another at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, where biologists Santiago Burneo and Alexandra Camacho make Lee’s Ecuadorean work possible. “Ecuador is one of the most species-rich areas in the world for mammals,” Lee said. “It’s exciting to go there to see new things people have never seen before.” The Andes are the world’s longest continental mountain range, spanning 4,500 miles along the western shore of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile and Argentina. Runoff from the Andes feeds tributaries of the Amazon River, and the Ecuador cloud forests contain as much as 17 percent of the world’s plant species and nearly 20 percent of its bird diversity. In other words, it’s a perfect place for biologists such as Lee to explore and discover, especially with his students. “It is important to share the field experience with undergrads so they will care about the earth and all the living things on it,” Lee said. “It also is invaluable to their career preparation.” For more: acu.edu/biology

• Dana Mayhall, instructor of teacher education • Dr. Stuart Platt, assistant professor of political science • James Prather, instructor in the School of Information Technology and Computing • Dr. Trey Shirley (’04), instructor of general education • Dr. Jessica Smith (’02), associate professor of journalism and mass communication • Rachel Smith (’98), instructor of communication sciences and disorders • Dr. Matthew Steele, assistant professor of engineering and physics • Dr. Charles Wadlington (’08 M.S.), assistant professor of psychology

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Campus NEWS Heacock’s generosity adds $4.5 million to campaign Virginia Heacock couldn’t go to college, so she spent her life making sure others could. Her mother died when Heacock was too young to remember, and her grandmother, who took over her care, died when Heacock was in high school. Hers was to be a life of work, not study. She served 41 years for ExxonMobil, retiring as a business systems projects administrator. On the advice of some friends from church, Heacock began giving to ACU, helping students she never met attain their dreams. And when she died in August, her estate left nearly $4.5 million to endowed scholarships – pushing ACU’s Partnering in the Journey Campaign more than halfway to its $50 million goal. The Partnering in the Journey Campaign is the largest fundraising effort in ACU’s history dedicated solely to student scholarships. “She knew she needed to do something with her money,” said Dan Garrett (’73), ACU vice chancellor and Heacock president of the ACU Foundation. “The thing I think sealed the deal were the beautiful letters she received from students thanking her for their scholarships.” Heacock never visited campus, but her commitment to ACU’s students was solidified in 1995, when she created the Virginia Heacock Scholarship Foundation, which made donations for the next 18 years

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– awarding more than 220 scholarships to more than 165 students, and counting. “ACU is incredibly blessed by the generosity of great people like Virginia Heacock,” said Dr. Phil Schubert (’91), university president. “Virginia partnered in the journeys of hundreds of students while she was alive, and her legacy will be a part of the journeys of thousands more students for decades to come.” For a list of the most recently created scholarship endowments, see page 65. More information about the Partnering in the Journey Campaign – including videos, student spotlights and more – is available at acu.edu/journey. To donate, email don.garrett@acu.edu or give online at acu.edu/giveonline. 䊱

Innovative annual block tuition proves a big hit with students Eighty percent of first-year students in Fall 2013 are taking advantage of the flexibility and financial savings from ACU’s annual block tuition program. At many colleges and universities, block or flat-rate tuition allows students to take 12-18 hours of credits each long semester (fall and spring) for the same price. ACU’s annual block tuition plan is based on 30 hours per year but allows full-time undergraduate students to take up to 36 hours at no additional cost. Nineteen percent of ACU students are maximizing the program’s benefits and are on track to graduate in 3.5 years or less, saving an average of $6,094 each in tuition their first year. “Some students prefer to make their college experience a traditional four-year one,” said chief enrollment officer

Student accomplishments Organ recipient Ryan Flores, junior biology major from Spring, competed in the 19th World Transplant Games in Durban, South Africa, winning bronze medals in golf and discus throw. Flores spoke in Chapel as part of “I Am Second” week Sept. 9-13. Abilene freshman Kyler Faulkner, who suffers from Osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), finished in first place in the wheelchair division of the National Sporting Clays Association Championship Tournament Oct. 23-28 in San Antonio. ACU’s Student Alumni Association (SAA) was recognized by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) for three entries in its 2013 ASAP regional competition honoring collegiate student organizations. The SAA earned

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Kevin Campbell (’00). “This plan provides them every opportunity to graduate on time. But others are realizing the benefits of early entry into a highly competitive job market, and the significant cost savings annual block tuition offers.” The price includes all required student fees (academic enrichment and technology, academic services, healthcare, public safety, and student activity and recreation) but does not include room and board, or course-specific and individual fees. For more: acu.edu/blocktuition 䊱

Education experts again tout ACU; university has one of higher ed’s best-performing endowments High praise for ACU from business and education experts came from all directions this fall. James Stewart, best-selling author and columnist for The New York Times, spotlighted ACU’s success in endowment performance with a story in early November about the university’s five-year annualized average return of 5 percent, compared to 3.1 percent for longtime investment leader Yale University and a national average endowment return of just 1.1 percent. It also quoted ACU chief investment officer Jack Rich (’76) about Abilene Christian’s success strategies over the past two decades. The returns reported for the year ending June 30, 2012, were part of the latest NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments by the National Association of College and University Business Officers. ACU ranked among the best performers of endowments with assets of more than $100 million. Stewart is the Bloomberg Professor of Business Journalism at Columbia University’s journalism school, and a

CASE recognition as Outstanding Organization, Outstanding Tried and True Program for its purple Tradition shirts, and Outstanding External Program for its King of Campus Court competition at Homecoming. For more about the King of Campus Court, see online-only Bonus Coverage at acu.edu/acutoday. Twenty-four students from the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication and College of Business Administration and four faculty/staff guides traveled to New York City over Fall Break in November to meet with executives of Johnson & Johnson, CNN and the National Basketball Association. They were hosted on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange by Brandon Baker (’98), vice president of NYSE Technologies. Other alumni who met with the group included Ryan Swearingen (’98), director of marketing at Magnet Media and Elise (Smith ’83) Mitchell, CEO of Dentsu Public Relations Network.


INNOVATIVEACU

Maker Lab stretches campus imagination, creativity Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and editor for The Wall Street Journal. Rich is president of the Abilene Christian Investment Management Company (ACIMCO), a wholly owned subsidiary of ACU that manages its endowment. Rich said ACU diversifies its investments with an allocation of up to 20 percent in oil and gas infrastructure, exploration and production, with support from LCG Associates as a consultant and a well-informed Board of Trustees. “The icing on our cake is the energy exposure,” Rich said. “Oil has been good for us even as other resources have gone down.” ACU’s endowment has grown from $50 million to about $337 million the past 20 years, Rich told The Optimist student newspaper. Annual “Best Colleges” rankings for 2014 by U.S. News & World Report, The Princeton Review and Forbes once again included ACU among the top regional universities in the West. U.S. News ranked ACU 19th among 90 universities in the region, and again No. 2 on its “Up-and-Comers” list. Abilene Christian has been either first or second in that category five of the past six years. And for the sixth straight year, ACU also ranked in the top 15 in the region among “Great Schools at Great Prices.” Forbes again ranked ACU among the top 8 percent of all accredited post-secondary institutions in the nation. The only other Church of Christ-affiliated university it honored was Pepperdine. The Chronicle of Higher Education has published its “Great Colleges to Work for” rankings for six years, and each time, ACU has made the grade. For its 2013 rankings, the Chronicle surveyed almost 44,000 administrators, faculty members and professional support staff members at 300 colleges and universities. ACU is among only 97 four-year schools honored this year. 䊱

There’s a new creative space at ACU. A 6,500-square-foot space in the Brown Library, formerly home to Special Collections, has been transformed into a workshop known as the Maker Lab. On Homecoming weekend, ACU students, faculty, staff and alumni gathered to celebrate the lab’s grand opening. The Maker Lab was inspired by a new creative movement sweeping the country. The Maker Movement seeks to combine new technologies with a spirit of exploration and openness, and to experiment with new ways of creating in community. Earlier this year, Dr. Kyle Dickson (’92), director of the Digital Media Center and associate professor of English, and Dr. James Langford (’78), director of educational technology, worked with media specialists Nathan Driskell (’07) and Mathew Bardwell to create We Are Makers, a 17-minute documentary about the movement. Langford and Dickson presented the film at the World Maker Faire, an event hosted by MAKE Magazine at the New York Hall of Science, convening makers and creators around the nation. “Each makerspace looks different,” Langford said. “We wanted to take the principles of the movement and incorporate them into our planning.” The Maker Lab team bought a few core tools, such as a 3-D printer and a laser cutter. Rather than filling the space with equipment, they decided to wait and see what needs emerged. “We want students to have a say in shaping the direction of the lab,”

Bible majors to receive 50 percent tuition discount Although scholarships and grants for entering freshman majors in the College of Biblical Studies already provide, on average, discounts that nearly equal 50 percent of the cost of tuition, ACU officials want them to know they will not pay more than that, beginning in Fall 2014. Even with the average first-year student’s financial aid package (grants, scholarships, work-study and loans) totalling $24,000, the university wants Bible, missions and ministry majors to be assured of significant cost savings when they are shopping for a university and making enrollment decisions. “We’ve never advertised it that way,” said ACU provost Dr. Robert Rhodes. “But we know some students overlook us because we seem too expensive. The truth is, ACU is competitively priced and we believe it is important for the

Langford said, citing the creation of a student advisory group headed by Dylan Benac, senior political science major and president of the Students’ Association. The group will weigh in on what equipment to buy and how to organize the lab space. “This is not a departmental resource but a community resource,” Langford emphasized. “It’s for everyone, and everyone is welcome.” So far, the Maker Lab has played host to projects spanning departments and disciplines: engineering, woodworking, electronics, fiber arts and graphic design. Dr. Nil Santana (’00 M.S.), assistant professor of art and design, has held his packaging design class in the space this fall. With the Maker Lab’s cutting-edge tools, students can design and print prototypes of 3-D containers as they test different concepts. The open nature of the space means students can collaborate on projects, sharing and tweaking their ideas for everything from class projects to extracurricular hobbies. Langford, Santana, art professor Jack Maxwell (’78) and library dean Dr. John Weaver were at the Smithsonian Institution in mid-November for a 3-D printing expo at which Weaver presented about a project involving Jacob’s Dream (see pages 8-9). “The open-source movement includes pride of ownership and a spirit of openness,” Langford said. “We want people to use our space to learn and help each other, to create and contribute to projects and then make them available for others to contribute to and enjoy.”䊱 For more: blogs.acu.edu/makerlab

next generation of ministers, missionaries and theologians to have access to an Abilene Christian education.” AISD students receive full-tuition grants for dual-credit classes Thirty juniors and seniors from the Abilene Independent School District received up to full-tuition grants this fall to apply to their dual-credit classes for the 2013-14 school year. The only cost to students was an annual fee of $50, plus their books and a parking pass. Courses included English 111, Psychology 120 this fall, and English 112 and Speech and Communication in Spring 2014. The classes were limited to 20 AISD students each. Dual-credit classes meet high school and college graduation requirements. AC U TO D AY

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Wildcat SPORTS Baker’s faith helps him step out of Gale’s shadow, into history ACU senior quarterback John David Baker never imagined his summer trip to Africa would end with him standing in a swimming pool baptizing people, including the “Michael Jordan of Ugandan basketball.” But there he was in mid-May, immersing – among others – Sam Obol, who had escaped his hometown when Joseph Kony (the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda) began rounding up young men to join his forces. Obol went on to play for the national team and in his country’s professional basketball league, where he was named MVP. A veteran of high school mission trips to Mexico and Brazil, Baker had made his way to Uganda with International Sports Connections, a group that runs

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clinics in third-world countries to help raise awareness for sport. Obol and his wife met Baker and his group during the sports clinic. Baker said Obol told him he believed in God, but had never fully committed his life to the Lord. “One day we were talking about how he wanted to create a ministry within the professional league,” Baker said. “I mentioned my involvement with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and that led us into a conversation on God, faith and what it meant to be a true follower of Christ. We stayed up until about 3 a.m. in a mosquito-filled room talking about faith and he came to the conclusion that he wanted to be baptized, and his wife said she wanted to as well, and they decided to commit their lives to Christ together.” A few days later, Baker was back in Abilene continuing to prepare for his one and only season as the Wildcats’ starting quarterback. He quickly

DR. LORRAINE WILSON

JEREMY ENLOW

John David Baker and J Wilson (’76) baptize a young Ugandan in May 2013.

Scott, Montgomery united on same NFL team The top two running backs in ACU history are now on the same NFL team. The defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens signed Bernard Scott (’08), who was released earlier this season by the Cincinnati Bengals after recovering from an injury. He is being tutored by Wilbert Montgomery (’77) who is in his sixth year as running backs coach for Baltimore, and 27th season as either an NFL player or coach. Scott is ACU’s No. 1 career rusher (4,321 yards) and ranks No. 2 in touchdowns scored (73). Montgomery is No. 2 in rushing (3,047 yards) but No. 1 in TDs (76). Other NFL players from ACU this season include safety Danieal Manning (’07) of the Houston Texans, wide receiver Clyde Gates (’11) of the New York Jets and running back Daryl Richardson (’12) of the St. Louis Rams.

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earned the respect of his teammates with strong play in summer camp, and that carried over into one of the best seasons ever by a Wildcat quarterback. e San Angelo native spent the previous three seasons as Mitchell Gale’s backup, seeing very little playing time. “I knew I had to prove myself and gain the trust of my teammates and coaches,” he said. “I was a little more reserved than normal and took a business approach to what I did because as my dad continually reminded me, I ‘had a job to go do.’ ” And he did magnificently, capping a career that began with shoulder surgery in 2009 and 2010, and self-doubts about whether he had chosen the right university. Baker kept his mind and his heart open, and his faith was rewarded. He threw for 3,376 yards and 35 touchdowns with only five interceptions, and became the first ACU quarterback to throw and run for 40 TDs in a year. Just five Wildcats have ever thrown for more than 3,000 yards in a season; he ranks fourth. “During my time as a backup, I learned everything wasn’t about me. I was able to get away from selfish tendencies and began to pour myself into other people and create real relationships with my teammates,” he said. “It allowed me to appreciate the blessings and gifts God has given me, and I understand He can take them away at any time. I’ve grown as a man, as a player and as a Christian leader. e time I spent watching and waiting is a big reason for the success I’ve experienced this year. “I’ve also been blessed with one of the best supporting casts in ACU football history. Simply being a part of their story and helping them achieve milestones makes it all worth it to me,” Baker said. “Ultimately, we serve an awesome and faithful God who will bless even those who lose faith in Him at times. He allowed me to grow and mature and to have the kind of season I’ve had, and because of that I’m humbled, blessed and thankful.”䊱

The defending Canadian Football League champion Toronto Argonauts had three Wildcats on their roster: quarterback Mitchell Gale (’13), offensive lineman Tony Washington (’10) and linebacker Major Culbert (’12). Carpenter named Lone Star Conference Male Athlete of the Year One of the last accomplishments for Abilene Christian University in the Lone Star Conference was golfer Alex Carpenter (’13) being voted Male Athlete of the Year. Carpenter completed his career with 20 collegiate tournament victories, believed to be the NCAA record for all divisions, surpassing the previous record of 16 set by PGA legend Phil Mickelson. In 2013 he also won his second Jack Nicklaus Award as the NCAA Division II Player of the Year. In June, he led the U.S. to a win over Europe in the 2013 Palmer Cup, and is now working to qualify for the professional Web.com Tour.


Named first team all-Southland Conference were the soccer team’s leading scorer, Andrea Carpenter (2), and women’s cross country standout Chloe Susset (35).

JEREMY ENLOW

e most talked-about moment of ACU’s first autumn as an NCAA Division I athletics program nearly stood out as one of the greatest plays in Wildcat history, had the football field been six yards shorter. With the ball on his own 21-yard line and nine seconds left in a game seen live on ESPN3.com, quarterback John David Baker rolled out to the right and heaved the ball as far as he could. Receiver Monte Green-Avery caught the tipped pass in traffic, spun around and was about to be dragged down at the Aggies’ 20-yard line when he flipped the ball to wideout Taylor Gabriel. Gabriel sprinted down the sideline for what looked like a game-winning touchdown to rival “e Play” by Cal in its 1982 win over Stanford, minus the marching band roaming the field. But just as it appeared Gabriel would score, New Mexico State University’s Trashaun Nixon knocked him out of bounds at the 6-yard line, turning a potentially miraculous finish into a heartbreaking loss, 34-29. e football team found little joy in the media spotlight when its last-ditch play made ESPN’s college football highlights that weekend, but Wildcat fans from coast-to-coast quickly took to Twitter and Facebook to express pride and elation that ACU’s first game against an FBS opponent since 1980 came down to the game’s final play. Because ACU played the season as an FCS independent, it was tough to find more games against teams from college football’s highest level. But the Wildcats proved to be a worthy foe in a 31-17 loss at Illinois State and later thumped future Southland Conference rival Houston Baptist University, 69-12. e Wildcats

JEREMY ENLOW

Wildcats find early success in transition to NCAA Division I

also smothered Incarnate Word, 40-6, at Homecoming, and scored 196 points in starting the year 3-0 over Concordia College, McMurry University and New Mexico Highlands University. No Wildcat team won more times this fall than women’s soccer, which finished 13-5-1 and placed fourth among 13 teams in the Southland Conference. eir showing was impressive considering ACU was picked to finish 10th in a preseason poll of the league’s coaches. In a near-perfect response to the coaches’ less-than-favorable opinion, the Wildcats went 6-0-1 against non-conference opponents before winning four of their first five Southland matches. Senior Andrea Carpenter led the team from start-to-finish, scoring 32 points and 16 goals, while longtime teammate Brie Buschman helped usher in a new-look defense led by freshmen Kelsie Dombrowski, Sydney Newton and Kelsie Roberts. Carpenter, Buschman, Roberts and midfielder Whitley Lindholm each were voted all-conference but the first Wildcat to earn all-Southland status in the Division I era was senior cross

Wildcats named to Southland Conference All-Decade Teams for 1960s The late Jim Lindsey (’71), who was college football’s career passing leader when he graduated, was recently named Player of the Decade on the Southland Conference All-Decade Team for the 1960s. Other Wildcats honored were linebacker Chip Bennett (’70), offensive linemen Larry Cox (’65) and Bob Rash (’69), running backs Pat Holder (’70) and Mike Love (’66), defensive lineman Jack Kiser (’71), and wide receiver Ronnie Vinson (’71). The Southland’s 1960s All-Decade Team for men’s basketball includes John Ray Godfrey (’68) and Charles Cleek (’66), and co-Coach of the Decade, the late Dee Nutt (’50). ACU competed in the Southland from 1963-73, and returned in 2013.

country runner Chloe Susset. In the final season of her decorated career, Susset finished fifth of 102 runners with a season-best 6K time of 21 minutes and 29.4 seconds at her first and only Southland Conference Championship. Behind her was a pack of fast and talented Wildcat freshmen who will provide the cross country program with a solid foundation for seasons to come. e volleyball team didn’t win as many matches as anticipated, but the 1,300 raucous spectators cheering in Moody Coliseum on Sept. 10 will never forget its 3-1 victory over Big 12 Conference member Texas Tech University (see pages 4-5). e men’s basketball team went 2-8 through a brutal non-conference schedule that took them to play road games with Duquesne, St. Bonaventure, Maryland, Iowa, TCU and Xavier. e Wildcats led Maryland at the half and by six with 14 minutes to play, before the Terrapins rallied for the win. ACU trailed 63-62 with 2:13 to play at Big 12 Conference-member TCU before falling 71-64. Several games were regionally televised, with the Xavier game a national broadcast on Fox Sports 1. 䊱

Errata In “The New Cat in Town” feature story in our Spring-Summer 2013 issue, we incorrectly identified Dr. Norman Whitefield (’47) as the art professor who teamed with head coach Oliver Jackson (’42) in 1958 to design a five-point shield with the acronym ACU inside (at right). The logo largely appeared on the uniforms of Jackson’s record-setting track and field teams when they competed around the world. With the introduction of a new Wildcat logo earlier this year, the shield will no longer appear on the front of uniforms, but a new secondary logo mark (at left) created to honor the longstanding tradition of track and field at ACU, will appear in other locations on jerseys and team apparel. AC U TO D AY

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Sports ROUNDUP S occer • The Wildcats went 13-5-1 in their first year as an NCAA Division I member of the Southland Conference and placed fourth in the 13-team league with 21 points. • Senior Andrea Carpenter was named first team all-Southland Conference after scoring 13 goals and 32 points, while senior defender Brie Buschman received second team honors. Buschman also was recognized with a spot on the Capital One Academic all-District 7 first team.

Thor Woerner

Vo lleyb all • The Wildcats’ first Division I win was a 3-2 decision Aug. 31 against Louisiana Tech at the Texas-Arlington Hilton Invitational. Their season included victories over Texas Tech, Grambling, Towson, Nicholls State and New Orleans.

GARY RHODES

Men’s Basket ball • The Wildcats began their first season in NCAA Division I on Nov. 9 with a month-long series of road trips including games at Duquesne, St. Bonaventure, Maryland, Iowa, TCU and Xavier (see story on page 65). Two more games will be televised next semester: a pair of Southland Renata Marquez Conference men’s and women’s doubleheaders with Sam Houston State on Jan. 25 from Moody Coliseum, and on the road Feb. 13 against Incarnate Word. • Head coach Joe Golding (’99) began revamping his coaching staff in June with the addition of seven-year Stephen F. Austin State assistant Brette Tanner and former prep school coach Patrice Days. Tanner and Days join assistant Brian Burton, director of operations Cooper Schmidt and graduate manager Michael Bacon (’12). • This year’s roster features 12 newcomers. Christian Albright, Chris Blakeley, Michael Grant and Jaris Tinklenberg were recruited out of high school, while the remaining eight are junior college transfers. Sophomore Parker Wentz is the Wildcats’ lone returning player from last year’s team. Women’s B asket ba ll • The Wildcats began their season with a four-game homestand with Texas Lutheran, Wayland Baptist, Angelo State and Northwood. After losses to

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G o lf • Junior Corbin Renner fired a final-round 65 to win the individual medalist title Sept. 10 at the Charles Coody West Texas Intercollegiate golf tournament at the Diamondback Golf Club. ACU tied for third and later placed ninth at Houston Baptist, second at the Harold Funston Invitational, and tied for fourth at the Territory Classic. M e n’s Te nnis • The Wildcats competed in four fall tournaments hosted by Midland Racquet Club, New Mexico State, Tennessee-Chattanooga and Baylor. Junior Borja Cortés led ACU with 11 singles victories and reached the consolation finals of the ITA Texas Regional after beating opponents from Incarnate Word, Texas Tech and Texas-San Antonio.

JEREMY ENLOW

C ro ss C ountr y • The distinguished collegiate career of senior distance runner Chloe Susset reached its end at the Southland Conference Championships when the native of Clery Vexin, France, finished fifth out of 102 runners. The top-five showing earned Susset a spot on the all-conference first team. • Susset led the Wildcats to a seventh-place finish in the 14-team field at the conference meet with 192 points, while the men placed 10th with 291 points.

Brie Buschman

GARY RHODES

Fo ot ball • Senior linebacker Thor Woerner was named first team Capital One Academic all-District 7, which encompasses universities in Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. Woerner was one of only 24 players selected by members of the Collegiate Sports Information Directors of America. • Senior quarterback John David Baker threw for 322 yards and tied a school-record with seven touchdown passes as ACU opened its inaugural season as a member of NCAA Division I with an 84-6 romp over Concordia College. The following week against McMurry, Baker became the first ACU quarterback to run for more than 100 yards in a game since 1965. He rushed 10 times for 102 yards and a touchdown and also threw for 212 yards and two TDs. • Against New Mexico State on Oct. 26, senior wide receiver Taylor Gabriel set the ACU single-game record with 15 catches, breaking the old mark of 14 set by Jerale Badon (’08) in 2006 against Tarleton State. In that same game, senior wide receiver Darrell Cantu-Harkless became the first player in ACU history to top 1,000 career yards in rushing, receiving and kickoff returns.

Division I members North Texas and Grand Canyon, the Wildcats beat Texas-Arlington 79-72, the alma mater of head coach Julie Goodenough. Other Division I teams on the schedule before the semester break included Texas-San Antonio, Tulsa, TCU and Texas Tech. • Second-year head coach Julie Goodenough added two assistant coaches during the offseason. Kendra Hassell coached previously with Goodenough at Oklahoma State and Charleston Southern following her all-America career with the Cowgirls. Mattilyn McIntyre played college basketball at Arkansas-Little Rock and Texas A&M-Commerce before competing professionally in Romania and Portugal. • The Wildcats return three players from last year’s 21-win team: senior Renata Marquez and sophomores Cemetra Jenkins and Whitney West. Marquez – a second team all-Lone Star Conference selection last season – started all 28 games and averaged 13.1 points and 5.9 rebounds per game, while West became the ninth Wildcat in team history to be voted LSC Freshman of the Year.

Wo me n’s Te nnis • The Wildcats’ fall schedule brought them to tournaments hosted by the Midland Racquet Club, Boise State, Rice, TCU and Memphis. Sisters Kaysie and Micah Hermsdorf and freshman Erin Walker all tied for the most singles wins with nine. Walker, the youngest daughter of ACU assistant coach John Walker (’89), recorded the team’s biggest win of the fall season when she defeated nationally ranked Victoryia Kisialeva of Baylor in three sets at Midland. S o ftb a ll • ACU’s 2014 season starts Feb. 8 with a seven-game homestand vs. Texas Lutheran, Prairie View A&M and Oklahoma Christian. The Wildcats also will play at tournaments hosted by North Texas (Feb. 20-23) and Texas Tech (Feb. 28 - March 2 and March 7-8). B a se b a ll • Josh Scott joined the Wildcats as their pitching coach earlier this fall. Scott, the nephew of former Houston Astros pitcher and 1986 Cy Young Award winner Mike Scott, comes to ACU after spending the 2013 season at Appalachian State. • ACU’s 55-game baseball schedule in 2014 includes road games with Oklahoma (March 4-5), Missouri State (March 7), Utah (March 8), Texas-Arlington (March 9), Texas Tech (March 11), Texas A&M (April 15), and a season-ending western swing to play Arizona State (May 20) and Arizona (May 23-25). Tra ck a nd F ie ld • Keith Barnier was selected in May as the 18th head track and field coach in ACU history, and has since added several former Wildcat greats to his coaching staff, including pole vaulters Angie (’07) and Cory (’06) Aguilar, thrower Nick Jones (’13) and jumper Vladyslav Gorbenko (’08). • ACU’s indoor season begins Jan. 18 at Texas A&M. The Wildcats will host outdoor meets at Elmer Gray Stadium on April 12 and 30. 䊱


YOUR GIFTS AT WORK Calling Center connects students, generous friends

LINDSEY COTTON

Ada Mendez has been working with ACU students for less than one semester, but she already sees a big difference. Mendez is manager of the ACU Calling Center, which phones Abilene Christian alumni, parents and other friends to make connections, collect information and raise money. “ACU is a tight-knit community,” Mendez said. “at sense of pride is very much present.” e ACU Calling Center, which sits off campus in the Judge Ely Boulevard shopping center also housing United Supermarket, is run by RuffaloCODY, a company with which the university has contracted for more than 15 years. Although employed by RuffaloCODY, Mendez and the team of about a dozen ACU students she supervises are collectively one of ACU’s chief fundraisers. During the 2012-13 school year the Calling Center raised more than $210,000 from nearly 2,500 members of the ACU community. “e callers understand the need for us to do that type of fundraising,” she said, “because a lot of the callers benefit from it. Student supervisor Marshall Fox, A lot of them receive scholarships. Calling Center manager Ada It’s something they’re proud Mendez and student supervisor of sharing.” Carole-Marie Wiser In all, student callers made more than 275,000 phone calls last school year – just for ACU. e center also makes enrollment calls for other universities with whom RuffaloCODY holds contracts; ACU’s Office of Admissions runs a separate on-campus call center for prospective Abilene Christian students and parents. e calls do more than simply raise money, however. ey also help members of the ACU community update their information and provide a way for alumni, parents and others to ask questions, raise concerns or get updates about what’s happening on campus, Mendez said. “We really just want to reconnect with everybody, update them and let them know what’s changed since their time here, and encourage them to come back and visit,” she said. e Calling Center also provides invaluable experience for the callers, two of whom each year are selected as supervisors, responsible for monitoring the callers’ progress toward ACU’s goals and ensuring the alumni who answer the phone have a positive experience. “Alumni really enjoy hearing about campus news through our students,” said student supervisor Marshall Fox, senior English major from Waco. “As a caller, I always appreciated the fun and active atmosphere at the Calling Center, and now as a supervisor I see the benefit of connecting with our alumni and maintaining those relationships.” Callers rejoice with alumni as they share family and career news, and they take prayer requests, which are passed on to ACU staff. ey also learn how to experience rejection at times. Far and away, however, students hear about the rich diversity of experiences alumni have seen since their time on campus – and such connection not only encourages and inspires them, Mendez said, but also does the same for the person on the other end of the line. “It’s a learning experience for the callers,” she said. “Any advice alumni can provide, they really take that to heart.”䊱 – PAUL A. ANTHONY

Recent scholarship endowments created • John Levi Estes Jr. and June Linn Estes Scholarship Endowment • Larry Fatheree Tennis Endowment • Lonestar Baseball Scholarship Endowment • Earl O’Quinn Memorial Scholarship Endowment • Barbara Sunderland Rives Nursing Scholarship Endowment • Ivan B. and Kathryn (Hough) Smart Memorial Scholarship Endowment • Jillian Hope Thomas Memorial Scholarship Endowment • Wessel Scholarship Endowment To create your own endowed scholarship or contribute to an existing one, see acu.edu/giveonline or call 800-588-1514. AC U TO D AY

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EX PERIENCES Submit your news online at blogs.acu.edu/acutoday/experiences or use the EXperiences card in each issue of the magazine. Deadlines: ACU Today is published two times a year (June and December). Because of printing deadlines, your news could be delayed by one issue. Births and adoptions: Please indicate whether the addition to your family is a boy or girl. Marriages: Remember to indicate the date and place of your marriage. In Memoriam: A member of the deceased’s immediate family should submit this notification. Please include class year for all former ACU students in the family.

1955

1960

Mary Sue (Merritt) Balliett is on the board of WTU Arts and a volunteer buyer for the Texas Panhandle Heritage Foundation. 6200 Candletree Court, Amarillo, TX 79119. marysuemer@yahoo.com

Jerry Townsend is a retired marriage and family therapist/school psychologist. 701 Daniels St., Woodland, CA 95695. jerrnan@aol.com

1959 Myrna E. Johnson had a children’s book, Let’s Take a Hike, published in 2012. She gave a presentation at the 2013 East Texas Book Festival. 1904 E. Austin, Nacogdoches, TX 75965.

1965 Welda (Edwards) Carlton has a new address. 2118 84th St., Lubbock, TX 79423. Dewitt and Prissy (Beauchamp) Jones will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary in March 2014. They live in Abilene.

The Class of 1964 will celebrate its Golden Anniversary Reunion on campus April 23-25, 2014.

Vic Swedlund celebrated his 70th birthday this summer with 70 family members and friends. 610 Harwell St., Abilene, TX 79601. vnswedlund@hotmail.com

1966 Del and Cindy (Johnson) Davis have a new address. 618 Riverside Blvd., Abilene, TX 79605. cindy.davis27@hotmail.com

1969 Jonni (Koonce) Dunn earned a Ph.D. in English from The University of Texas at Arlington in December 2012. 2270 Arbor Spring Court, Cleburne, TX 76033. rileyjonni@gmail.com Jannice (Bursey) Griffin has returned to full-time teaching after 10 years of retirement. Her husband, Charles, died Dec. 3, 2010. 510 W. 7th St., Quanah, TX 79252 griffinjannice@gmail.com

1972 Ralph Seegren III works for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice as a chaplain. 16 Pine Circle, Huntsville, TX 77320. rseegren@yahoo.com

ERIC RYAN ANDERSON

One of the recipents of a Gutenberg award from the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Homecoming 2013 was Gary Hamilton (’04), senior producer and on-camera host for the New York Yankees. Others were Elvin Ong (’95), director of ASEAN Pacific marketing communications for Phillips Lighting Growth Markets, and Kate Vein (’99), vice president of Elevate Studios in Chicago, Ill. Ong traveled from his home in Singapore for the event.

ANNE-MARIE COFFEE

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Hamilton has worked for NBC, MTV, Columbia Records and Channel One since his graduation from ACU, where he was president of the campus chapter of the National Broadcasting Society.

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ACU NEWSMAKERS

Brandon Kinder (’06) won for best cable TV music at the annual BMI film and TV awards for “Gold in These Hills,” the theme song he wrote for the Discovery Channel’s Bering Sea Gold. He is lead singer for The Rocketboys.

Abby (Staples ’02) Vasek, an interior designer in Wimberley, Texas, was a contestant on Season 8 of HGTV Star.

Haley and Rhodes

PAUL WHITE

Big-game hunter Mindy (Maples ’97) Arthurs of Peoria, Ariz., is a finalist on the Extreme Huntress TV show.

San Antonio’s Sandra Fortenberry, O.D. (’00) was named Young Optometrist of the Year by the American Optometric Association at the association’s annual conference. Dr. G. Scott Gleaves (’91 M.S.) has been Fortenberry named dean of the College of Biblical Studies at Faulkner University. He also earned an M.Div. from ACU. Dr. Jack Scott (’54), ACU’s Outstanding Alumnus of the Year in 2002, received the 2013 National Leadership Award, given each year to one person at the annual convention of the American Association of Community Colleges. Scott served as chancellor of the California Community Colleges System from 2009-12. Dr. Audra Ude (’89) was named associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction in the Abilene Independent School District. She succeeds Dr. Cathy Ashby (’93 M.Ed.) in the position. Kirk Wade (’94) was named president of Abilene Christian Schools. He previously was principal and interim president at Dallas Christian School. Bethany Bradshaw (’11) has been awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarship for an English teaching assistantship position at Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University in Turkey. She earned a B.A. degree in English at ACU and a master’s degree in American and British literature from North Carolina State University. In 2011, Bradshaw was co-editor of The Shinnery Review, the art and literary publication of ACU’s Department of Language and Literature.

Dallas painter Rolando Diaz (’79) was featured in the August 2013 issue of Nashville Arts magazine. Alex Organ (’03) was named Best Actor in Dallas in “Best of Big D: Culture 2013,” the August 2013 issue of D Magazine. ACU TRIO program advisor Randy Scott (’97) was named president-elect for the Texas Association of Student Support Services Programs, the state organization for TRIO staff in Texas. Federal TRIO programs Scott provide services for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Lance Barrow (’77), 10-time Emmy Award-winning producer of CBS Sports’ telecasts of e Masters and other PGA tournaments, was inducted Oct. 21 to the Texas Golf Hall of Fame, for distinguished service. e Texas Golf Hall of Fame is composed of professional golfers, media and even a U.S. president, including the late Byron Nelson (a former ACU trustee), Ben Hogan, Ben Crenshaw, Betsey Rawls, best-selling author-teacher Harvey Penick, and former President George H.W. Bush. Barrow is an ACU trustee.

In July, ACU eatre chair Adam Hester (’77) directed Mother Divine, an off-Broadway production at e Pearl eatre in New York City. He was joined on the cast and creative staff by assistant producer Seth Bazacas (’09), Jenavene

(Hester ’09) Bazacas, Amy Price (’10), Ashley Parizek (’12), senior Will McInerney, Eric Carter (’10) and senior Annie Merritt. Dr. Andrew Huddleston (’00), associate professor of teacher education, was recognized at the International Reading Association annual conference as a finalist for the IRA Dissertation of the Year Award.

Former ACU sports information director Garner Roberts (’72) was inducted in August to the Lone Star Conference Hall of Honor with former NFL players Clayton Weishuhn and James Dearth. Other members of the LSC Hall of Fame from ACU are Wally Bullington (’52), Jennifer (Clarkson ’96) Frazier, Wes Kittley (’81), Delloreen Ennis (’99), Wilbert Montgomery (’77), Billy Olson (’81) and Claudia Schleyer (’86).

Lara Seibert (’06) is a cast member of Big Fish, a new musical on Broadway directed and choreographed by five-time Tony Award winner Susan Stroman.

DAVID RUIZ

Joyce (Williams ’03 M.S.) Haley was presented with ACU’s Teacher of the Year award by provost Dr. Robert Rhodes in May Commencement. She is insructor of journalism and mass communication and faculty advisor for Morris & Mitchell, the university’s student-run advertising/public relations agency.

In July, former ACU head football coach Gary Gaines was inducted into the Texas High School Coaches’ Association Hall of Honor.

Hillsboro ISD music teacher Carissa Martus (’07) was one of 15 teachers from U.S. elementary, middle and high schools to receive a $7,500 Teacher Trek grant from Hilton Worldwide and the Institute of International Education. Martus spent 15 days in China and three in South Korea because 66 of her students at Quatama Elementary School are from Asia, and she wanted to learn more about their culture. Dr. Tom Milholland, ACU professor of marriage and family studies and assistant provost for institutional effectiveness, received Texas Tech University’s Distinguished Leadership Award on Oct. 10 in Lubbock. He earned a doctorate in family studies from Tech in 1983. Bingiee Shiu (’84), longtime conductor of the award-winning orchestras at Spring Branch ISD’s Memorial High School, was honored Nov. 9 in Houston with the Frazier Merriman Award from the American Festival for the Arts. Dr. H. Jeff Kimble (’71) will be honored April 25-26, 2014, at the Kimble Symposium, a gathering of physicists who will discuss “e Quantum Optics Frontier” at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. Kimble is William L. Valentine Professor and professor of physics at California Institute of Technology.

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Wyatt Dean Ussery, son of Joshua and Sarah (Gressett ’03) Ussery of Waxahachie, Texas.

Alexandria Jade “A.J” Bell, daughter of Don (’99) and Melissa Bell of Abilene, Texas.

Eli James Patterson, son of Clint (’04) and Laura (Trammell ’04) Patterson of Hale Center, Texas.

Tanner Lee Hemness, son of Taylor (’04) and Katie (Orr ’04) Hemness of Tyler, Texas.

Brennan Wesley Spain, son of Tim (’01) and Nancy (Whitt ’05) Spain of Troy, Tenn.

Brooke Patton Mayfield, Bennett Knox Larson, son of daughter of Kyle (’04) and Matt and Melanie (Knox ’04) Courtney (Mitchell ’06) Larson of Albuquerque, N.M. Mayfield of Nashville, Tenn.

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Hannah Ellen White, daughter of Rob and Amy (Cox ’92) White of Matthews, N.C.

Brynn Lacy Whitaker, daughter of Aaron and Erin (Clardy ’06) Whitaker of Fort Worth, Texas.

James Douglas, son of Tucker (’04) and Keely (Nelson ’04) Douglas of Dallas, Texas.

Alyce Vivianne Morris, daughter of Chris (’98) and Tiffini (Sheldon ’97) Morris of Winston-Salem, N.C.

Orion Alexander Mount, son of Nic (’08 M.S.) and Vanessa (Herring ’07 M.S.) Mount of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

Collin Thomas Wendt, son of Ryan (’04) and Kelley (Axelson ’05) Wendt of Spring, Texas.

Juliana Fike, daughter of Jeremy (’05) and Adrienne (Forsythe ’05) Fike, and Wyatt Vaught, son of Mark (’01) and Lauren (McDowell ’03) Vaught, all of Temple, Texas.

Dalayni Reagan Carroll, daughter of Don (’92) and Tianay (Chambers) Carroll of Coppell, Texas.

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Parker Gracen Reid, daughter of Caleb (’05) and Bethany (Knox ’05) Reid of San Antonio, Texas.

Judah Oliver Sheldon Ristau, son of Jacob (’00) and Melissa (Sheldon ’00) Ristau of Zionsville, Ind.


BORN TO BE A WILDCAT

ALUMNI CONNECTIONS

The Alumni Association will send a FREE Wildcat BabyWear T-shirt to the alumni parents of each newborn or adopted infant in your family!

Audrey Jan Morgan, daughter of Reagan (’08) and Anna (Roempke ’08) Morgan of Plano, Texas.

Mae McCord, daughter of Evan (’05) and Annalee (Luttrell ’02) McCord of Houston, Texas.

LINDSEY COTTON

Complete the EXperiences news card and mail it to us, or complete the info online at blogs.acu.edu/acutoday/experiences. In-focus, high-resolution digital images (minimum file size of 500kb; use your camera’s highest quality setting) of alumni children wearing their Wildcat BabyWear should be emailed to babywear@acu.edu. Call 800-373-4220 for more information.

• We have been to Tulsa, Okla., to honor Shannon (McKnight ’93) Wilburn; Dallas to honor Rob Thomas (’91); and Houston to honor Chad Baker (’99). • Alumni events were held before football and basketball games in Abilene, Frisco, Fort Worth, San Antonio, Houston, Illinois, Kansas and New Mexico. • We traveled to Nashville to connect with our terrific alumni there and visit some churches and schools. • Our semester also included time in Washington, D.C., visiting with our alumni and supporting our basketball team as they played the University of Maryland. • And of course it wouldn’t be fall without Family Weekend and Homecoming!

Lydia Marie Brown, daughter of Kyle (’01) and Jessica (Clardy ’03) Brown of Fort Worth, Texas.

Jackson Viertel, son of Tanner (’08) and Blair (DeLaughter ’08) Viertel of Keller, Texas.

Julia Gwynn Gholson, daughter of Heath and Rachel (Dorazio ’08) Gholson of San Antonio, Texas.

Aubrey Claire Pierce, daughter of Wade (’08) and Tabitha (Vail ’07) Pierce of Henrietta,Texas.

Konnor Gerstemeier, son of Jared and Katie (Wells ’02) Gerstemeier of Cordova, Tenn.

Charlie James Clark, son of Keith (’05) and Mindy (Mahaffey ’03) Clark of Tyrone, Ga.

Hattie Elizabeth Chance, daughter of Clark (’06) and Lindsay (Davis ’06) Chance; Sawyer Sue Howard, daughter of Lantz and Jessica (Turner ’05) Howard; and Archer Price Belknap, daughter of Mike (’02) and Jennifer (Smith ’02) Belknap, all of McKinney, Texas.

Olivia Ruth Tatum and Norah Josephine Tatum, twin daughters of Darek (’03) and Stacie (Danley ’02) Tatum of Plano, Texas.

The fall semester for the Alumni Relations Office has been a busy one. We would not want it any other way! Spending time with our alumni, supporting our athletics programs, hosting meals and honoring our Distinguished Alumni Citation recipients makes for an incredible semester.

Through the travel, alumni engagement and events, we are reminded daily of the great legacy of ACU. Our team is blessed to hear the stories, experience the passion and witness the commitment our alumni have for this university. What we hear is this: Relationships students form with faculty and staff last well beyond graduation, and those connections separate ACU from what other universities can offer. This place is special, and the alumni it produces are special. This fall we have been encouraging our alumni and friends to “relive the memories, continue the legacy.” It is powerful to look back and share those memories, but it is also important to look ahead and think about how each of us can continue the legacy and traditions of Abilene Christian. We are excited about second, third, fourth and fifth generations of students coming to ACU to build their own memories, chart their own paths and then continue the legacy. 䊱 – CRAIG FISHER (’92) Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Projects

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SERVING YOU ADVANCING ACU

ABILENE AREA Craig Rideout • AC 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 craig.rideout@acu.edu Mark Rogers • AO 325-674-2669, mark.rogers@acu.edu

AUSTIN AREA Tunisia Singleton • URM – Austin / Central Texas 512-450-4329 • tunisia.singleton@acu.edu Lizzie Elston • AC – Austin, Central Texas 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 lizzie.elston@acu.edu Josh Clem • AO – Austin, Central Texas 210-573-2475, josh.clem@acu.edu

FORT WORTH AREA Brent Barrow • URM 817-946-5917, brent.barrow@acu.edu Will Beasley • AC – Erath, Hood, Johnson, Somervell, Tarrant 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 wab06a@acu.edu Chris Ballard • AC – Collin, Denton, Palo Pinto, Parker, Wise 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 chris.ballard@acu.edu Lance Rieder • AO 325-674-6080, lance.rieder@acu.edu

DALLAS AREA Toni Young • URM 214-402-5183, toni.young@acu.edu Lauryn Lewis • AC – Dallas, Rockwall, Ellis, Kaufman 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 laurynl@acu.edu Chris Ballard • AC – Collin 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 chris.ballard@acu.edu Lance Rieder • AO 325-674-6080, lance.rieder@acu.edu Carri Hill • URM 713-582-2123 • carri.hill@acu.edu Meredith Morgan • AC 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 meredithm@acu.edu Eric Fridge • AO 713-483-4004, eric.fridge@acu.edu

SAN ANTONIO AREA LaDonna Mack • URM – San Antonio, South Texas 210-410-9014 • ladonna.mack@acu.edu John Mark Moudy • AC – San Antonio, South Texas 325-674-2650 / 800-460-6228 johnmark.moudy@acu.edu Josh Clem • AO – San Antonio, South Texas 210-573-2475, josh.clem@acu.edu Fall-Winter 2013

– KATIE NOAH GIBSON

AUSTIN AREA facebook.com/ACUAustin • acu.edu/austin

HOUSTON AREA

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Although Brent Barrow (’86) has worked as ACU’s university relations manager in Fort Worth since 2008, his connections with his alma mater’s Advancement Office go back further than that. “I began working for Advancement in the Dallas/Fort Worth area during the Centennial Campaign in 2005,” says Barrow. “Having grown up in Fort Worth and been in business here, I had lots of good relationships and connections.” After three years, Barrow moved to his current position as a URM. “I love people and I love ACU, so University Relations seemed like a natural fit,” he says. is fall, Barrow and the University Relations team have hosted a variety of events, including a luncheon for 40 school counselors with a keynote speech by ACU executive vice president Dr. Allison Garrett, an Alumni and Friends Breakfast at the Fort Worth Club with a keynote speech by Kasey Pipes (’95), and the annual send-off parties for new ACU freshmen. Barrow and his colleagues also coordinate school and church visits, and help facilitate smaller gatherings such as a young alumni group headed by Shay Aldriedge (’10), and an ACU Moms group. “Every day brings some new experience,” Barrow says of his role. He encourages alumni in the Fort Worth area to become involved by attending or hosting local events, helping provide internship or job opportunities for students, or connecting ACU with area churches. 䊱 LINDSEY COTTON

Do you want to recommend a future student, volunteer, host an event or just learn more about how you can be involved with ACU where you live? To help foster relationships with alumni and future students, ACU has assigned personnel from its Advancement and Admissions offices to major markets in Texas. A university relations manager (URM) focuses on establishing relationships with churches and schools, an admissions counselor (AC) reaches out to future students and their parents, and an advancement officer (AO) assists prospective donors seeking an opportunity to contribute funds to ACU. Through this territory team approach, these dedicated professionals can provide exceptional service to those who contribute so graciously to ACU’s mission and 21st-Century Vision.

Barrow’s roots in Fort Worth make his URM work grow

• Jeffrey Boyd (’83) hosted a small group of ACU alumni on a personal tour May 1 of the Texas Supreme Court, greeting them with the sign shown above. The group included Debbie (Corder ’72) Clark, Chris (’07) and Elena (Worley ‘08) Coggin, April (Ward ’06) Farris, Rebecca (Howard ‘75) Lightfoot, Jack Miller (’52), Mason Singleton (’09), Jonathan Wilkerson (’04), and Jean Wison. • Alumni and Friends Luncheons featured speaker Mike Mayeux (’87) on June 4. Lynn (’77) and Mara (Hardin ’81) Ashley, Mark (’81) and Erica Billingsley (’12), Albert Dennington (’71), Henry Green (’51), Joshua Hood (’99), Dr. Eddie Sharp (’73), Rebekah Singleton (’13), Connor (’14) and Becky Terry, Terry Thomas (’96), and Sandra (Wilson ’73) Towler attended. • The Wildcat Caravan rolled into Austin at Scholz Garten

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on July 16. Attendees included Sean Adams (’94), Lindsey Baker (’05), Jennifer Bass (’05), Melanie Boates, Sheldon Busch (’08), Delia Cantu-Harkless, Albert (’71) and Vicki (Rushing ’74) Dennington, Adrian Duncan (’17), Darrell Harkless, Brian Jackson (’87), Bill McClellan (’81), Joe Nanus (’90), Kurt Poe (’01), Todd Self (‘93), Mark Shewmaker (‘96), Patrick Taylor, Brian Thrift (’06), and John T. Wright (’96). • The Waco area Freshman Send-off was hosted Aug. 5 by ACU Moms of Central Texas at the Badger Ranch Pool. Hosts included Kay (Coffee ’81) and Steve Williams, Steve (’84) and Becky (Bourland ’84), Brent (’84) and Liz Fox, and Dr. Bill (’64) and Donna (Guinn ’64) Petty. • The Austin area Freshman Send-off was hosted Aug. 15 by ACU Moms of Austin at the Plantation House, owned and managed by Tanner (’06) and Joanna (Cole ’07) King. Moms hosting were Terra (Hardin ’82) Brimberry, Debbie (Crabtree ’81) Holman, Jeff (’86) and Lisa (Scott ’86) Johnson, Tanya Kirby, Roxanne Lindholm, Sandy Patterson, Carmen (Andrews ’85) Plunk, Cynthia Stien, Jan Swinney, Becky Terry, and Teresa Turner. • Connor (’12) and Amanda (McVey ’12) Best hosted a young alumni gathering in Austin on Sept. 17. Attendees included Alex (’12) and Hannah (Davis ’13) Ketteman, Rebekah Singleton (’13), Rebecca Malcolm (’08), Danielle Sourares (’09), Erin (McClurg ‘08) Van Landingham, Paige Weed (’05), Morgan Wilks (’09), Grant (’12) and Leah (Cameron ’13) Williams, and Casey Kelley (’03). • Among alumni volunteers representing ACU at College Night Fairs in the area were Rebekah Singleton (’13), Jared (’08) and Lauren (Stark ’09) Fields, Billy Don Curbo (’77), Lori Anne (Cade ’04) Shaw, Riane Cochran (’11), Melinda Rowland (’07), Randy Pittenger (’80), Tim Stephens (’82), Ryan (’08) and Sylvia (Tucker ’10) Mack, Grant (’12) and Leah (Cameron ’13) Williams, and Amanda (McVey ’12) Best. • Austin and Waco area ACU Moms gathered April 28, Sept. 19 and Oct. 14 to create care packages and pray for students. Terra (Hardin ’82) Brimberry in Austin and Kay (Coffee ’81) Williams in Waco have hosted multiple Moms’ meetings. Some of the moms participating are Geri (Hargrove ’85) Archer, Jackie (Tubbs ’85) Boyd, Tanya Kirby, Roxanne Lindholm, Wendy Onken, Sandy Patterson, Jan Reagan, Elizabeth Simmonds, Jan Swinney, Kay (Huff ’75) Taylor, Becky Terry, Allison (Wilde ’85) Urban, Amy West, Jean Wison, Melissa Witek, Debbie (Crabtree ’81) Holman, Roxanne Lindholm, Carmen (Andrews ’85) Plunk, Jeanette Davis, Nancy Dowdle, Doreen Kennedy, Tanya Kerns, Laura Mumme,


Maggie Patke, Deana Reed, Dawn Richardson, Melissa Rodriguez, and Sheryl Trevino. • A Purple and White Party on Oct. 8 at Hill Country Bible Church attracted more than 90 future students and their parents. Hosts included Albert (’71) and Vicki (Rushing ’74) Dennington, Ty (’02) and Charis (Dillman ’02) Dishman, and Bo (’07) and Marie (Nordman ’08) Mechinus.

Jamie Adkins, Lamis Alanno, Angela Coleman, Holly Croley, Angie Drake, IIya Golden, Hope Heidelberg, Ellen Jenkins, Cindy (Morris ’83) Klapper, Debra Kline, RaeAnne (White ’90) Landrum, Kim Liptoi, Maureen Marolf, Beth McInemey, Lana Ralston, Marlene Sanders, Tina Steenburg, Audrey (Pope ’85) Stevens, Nancy Sullivan, Isabel Thompson, Val Turnbow, Kellyann Vick, Cynthia Ward, and Donita Wells.

DALLAS AREA

FORT WORTH AREA

facebook.com/ACUDallas • acu.edu/dallas

facebook.com/ACUFtworth • acu.edu/fort-worth

• Alumni and Friends Luncheons • Shay Aldridge (’10) and Matt (’09) were held at Blue Mesa Cafe in and Jana (Atchley ’08) Lambro Plano on May 30 and ACU at were instrumental in putting Austin ACU Moms met in September for fellowship and to pray for students. CitySquare on Aug. 29. Speakers together Young Alumni Gatherings included Dr. Stephen Johnson in the DFW area on May 31 and (’90), John Siburt (‘96), and the Aug. 1. Attendees included Ashlea JUST (Justice and Urban Studies (Allred ’08) Adams, Cody Bowden Moore (’99), Chris Mycoskie, Morgan Myrick (’09), Team) students who are residing in Dallas this (’12), Suzanne Langston (’09), Chris Shim (’10), Shera Niemirowski (’16), Rob Orr (’52), Jim Orr semester. More than 100 alumni and friends attended Mary Shive (’13), Lauren Stevens (’11), Whitney (’86), Marilyn Patterson (’66), Ron and Jana the two events. Stevens (’15), Sawyer Williams (’09), and Adam Peters, Tucker Pierson (’04), Joel Quile (’04), • Nearly 800 alumni and friends gathered June 10 Tate (’12). Daryl Richardson (’12), Urban (’77) and at the annual ACU at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. • Fort Worth Young Alums met Sept. 1 at the Coyote Melissa (Hunter ’76) Rogers, John (’63) and Jan See page 56 for more about the event. Drive-In Theater pavilion. (Wallace ’65) Shewmaker, Christopher Shim (’10), • About 100 people participated June 11 in the 10th • The Wildcat Caravan’s summer stop in Fort Worth was Corey Stone (’95), Ericka Thrasher (’16), Austin annual Rachel Blasingame Memorial Golf Tournament once again at Joe T. Garcia’s restaurant. Those present and Valerie Turnbow, EC Umberger (’81), Evan at Buffalo Creek Golf Club in Rockwall, benefitting July 15 included Stephen Bailey (’92), Starlyn (’10) and Chelsea (Moore ’13) Umberger, scholarships for another six ACU students this fall. (Thomas ’86) Barrow, Cameron (’17) and Sheryl Cameron Watten (’11), Trey Watten (’09), Guy (’79) and Julie (Grasham ’80) Blasingame’s Bonifant, Courtney Connell (’82), Bill Cooper (’79), and Earl Young (’62). daughter, Rachel, who died in a car accident in 2003, Kyle Cotton (’81), Jarod Cox (’03), Dusty Drury • Matt (’09) and Jana (Atchley ’08) Lambro were would have been an ACU student. (’72), Roy Fitts (’73), Kirk Freytag (’84), Noel instrumental in organizing Young Alumni Gatherings • The Wildcat Caravan featured dinner July 15 at Toyota Garcia (’12 M.Ed.), Philip Garcia (’88), Abell in the Dallas area for Aug. 1, Sept. 4 and Oct. 10. Stadium in Frisco. A great turnout of alumni and fans Gebremeskel (’17), Dwight (’92) and Tara • The Church of Christ at McDermott Road was included Victor (’58) and Estellene (Neal ’59) Allen, (Willbanks ’01) Goodwin, Bob (’75) and Belinda the venue Aug. 10 for the Freshman Send-off with Jake Beard, Scott Beard (’88), Ed and Barbara (Halbert ’75) Harmon, David (’71) and Barbara Dave (‘80) and Audrey (Pope ’85) Stevens as Bonneau, Skyler Bonneau, Ryan Bradley (’01), (Tubbs ’71) Hejl, Jason Hooper (’02), Haley (’17) hosts. More than 120 alumni, freshmen and parents Greg (’78) and Debbie (Cox ’79) Brooke, Corey and Lori Hudspeth, Tommy Humphrey (’72), attended. ACU board chair Dr. Barry Packer (’78) Cheek (’92), Alan Copeland (’09), Chris Doggett welcomed students to the ACU family and offered (’92), Don Lewis (’63), Morgan Lineberry (’14), Joe a blessing as they began their journey. Don Martin (’72), Alexis Mason (’18), David and • Dallas ACU Moms held their first meeting Sept. 5 Erin Maxwell (’18), Cle Montgomery (’78), Brad at La Madeleine in Plano. Attendees included KIM LEESON

(ABOVE) Molly Earles, Preston Parker (’54), Eddie Earles (’77), Cindy (Parker ’77) Earles and Katey Earles (’04).

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JEREMY ENLOW

Heath (’89) and Mary (Banks ’89) Jackson, Craig Kin, Monica McCall (’09), Randy McCall (’76), Kelly Moore (’79), Paul Morgan (’78), Mike O’Brien, Johnny Patterson (’62), Stacey Pearson (’98), Scott Smiley, Roy and Linda (Zimmerman ’79) Steele, Jerry Stephens, Stan Stephens (’89), Dub (’74) and Val Stocker, Taylor Sturgis (’09), Jeff Thigpen (’06), and Katie Tull. • Dwight (’92) and Dwight (’92) and Tara (Willbanks ’01) Goodwin hosted the Fort Worth Freshman Send-off Aug. 11 at The Hills Church of Christ. Volunteers included Sara (Sparks ’09) Brooks, Kyle (’81) and Tammie (Minton ’83) Cotton, Kylie (Jennings ’09) Pope, Shay Aldriedge (’10) and Jenny (Wessel ’04) Haskin. •The first ACU Moms gathering met Sept. 19 at the home of Starlyn (Thomas ’86) Barrow in North Richland Hills. Attendees included Kari Bankes, Karen Bowling, Connie (Faulkner ’86) Brown, Cindy Chessher, Tammie (Minton ’83) Cotton, Cari Dennis, Staci Guy, Nancy Morgan, Allison (Flow ’86) Osburn, Kim Vargas, Susan (Moore ’86) Webb, Bonnie Wieder, and Laurie Wischmeyer.

Melanie (Booker ’06), Kyl e (’03), and Ethan Fry we re joined by Lee (Ligon ’80) and Ron Booker (’80) at the UIW tailgate in San Antonio. The Bookers and cooked for the tailgate cro Frys wd.

HOUSTON AREA facebook.com/ACUHouston • acu.edu/houston • The Wildcat Caravan featured lunch July 17 at the Canyon Café. Attendees included Chad Baker (’99), Tim Beckett (’83), Adam Brennen (’04), Jason Campbell (’05), Ryan Cantrell (’12), David Crabtree (’85), Austin Cunningham (’03), Ken and Traci Dornak, Dr. Frank and Sara (Offutt ’65) Eggleston, Hillary Eichelberger (’13), Dr. Dave Fuller (’98), Lowell Good (’87), Carson (’12) and Sara (Shoultz ’12) Henley, Bill Lamkin (’85), Andrew Leeser (’01), Art and Angie Marquez, David Meredith (’95), Josh Parrott (’04), Gregor Reeves (’93), Allen Ritchie (’86), Matt Sanderson (’13), Sherri Scott (’96), Matthew Sloan (’16), Judge Steve Smith (’74), Landon Speights (’05), Wes and Pam (Kennedy ’78) Speights, Mark Sprague (’10), Michael and Angella Thomas, Laure Tucker (Guyer ’77), Gordan Ware (’84), and Ed Williamson (’70). • The annual Freshman Send-off party was attended by about 75 Houston-area incoming students and their families July 27 at the Memorial Church of Christ. Co-hosts and volunteers included Mike (’99) and Melissa (Hall ’01) Avery, Dylan Benec (’14), Steven Booker (’11), Leah Bouteller (’12), Matt Sanderson (’13), Chris (’94) and Jacinda (Jackson ’95) Shanks, Gordon (’84) and Gretchen (Shaw ’85) Ware, Dana (’74) and Sheila Wright, and James (’03) and Tiffany Wright. • Physicians Dave (’98) and Amy (Berry ’95) Fuller, along with Kelsey Chrane (’12), and Carson (’12) and Sara (Shoultz ’12) Henley, hosted about 25 young ACU alumni for dinner Aug. 15 and the launch of a health professionals mentoring group. ACU president Dr. Phil Schubert (’91) also was

SAN ANTONIO AREA facebook.com/ACUSanAntonio • acu.edu/san-antonio • Young alumni gatherings were held at Hofbrau at the Quarry on June 6, at the Luxury Restaurant on July 18, and at the Friendly Spot on Aug. 8. Events have

included interns as well as recent graduates Jordan Abshier (’13), Mike Aguilar (’11), Tyler Allen (’12), Dan Antwine (’13), Brian Billingsley (’10), James Chambers (’06), Drew (’12) and Cadence (Smith ’12) Corbin, Austin Cotton (’17), Mark Daughdrill (’12), Julie Eichelberger (’10), Katherine Garner (’14), Zachary Higgins (’14), Rebeca Ingram (’13), Jimmie Jackson (’10), Darwin Johnson (’12), Jared (’05) and Lauren (Lair ’05) Jones, Sarah Kelly (’13), Chris Lair (’06), Sarah Lane (’10), Jordan Lightfoot (’15), Tori McFadden (’14), David (’02) and Hailey (Martin ’02) Mullican, Catherine Narvaez (’13), Michael Roberts (’09), Rafie Rosales (’14), Chandler Schmidt (’11), Brent Schroeder (’15), Kasarah Seabourn (’14), Rachel Skinner, Tyler Truax (’10), Andrew Voiles (’09), Brendan (’05) and Erin (Utley ’07) Voss, Grant Wilson (’15), Kelsey Woodbridge (’14), Preston Woolfolk (’10), and Tenell Zahodnik (’07). • Recent monthly Wildcat Wednesday luncheons have featured alumni speakers such as Deanna (Kirkpatrick ’83) Rankin on June 12 and Honors College dean Dr. Stephen Johnson (’90) on Sept. 25. • The Wildcat Caravan featured dinner July 16 at The County Line. Attendees included Mike Dormady, Ken Duke, Jason Embry (’85), Jared (’05) and Lauren (Lair ’05) Jones, Matt (’83) and Lisa (Young ’83) Lair, Steve Mack (’82), Doug and Teri McKenzie, Jim (’82) and Debbie (Dorsey ’83) McKissick, Alan (’86) and Janice (Harris ’88) Rich, and Catherine Sansing. • Alan (’86) and Janice (Harris ’88) Rich hosted a Freshman Send-off fajita dinner at their home Aug. 10. Co-hosts included Stephen and Angela Ramsuer, Dan Niederhofer (’83), Teri McKenzie and Steve Mack (’82). Some 70 attendees filled their home to pray over the area students. • Ray and Judy (Evans ’77) Gray and Ken and Doris Schuetze hosted the first official Corpus Christi Purple and White recruiting party on Sept. 22. • Valinda (McAlister ’81) Bacon spearheaded the San Antonio area Purple and White recruiting party Sept. 24 at the North Central campus of Oak Hills Church. Cecil (’71) and Judi (Hines ’68) Eager and Steve Mack (’82) co-hosted this event and more than 100 recruits and their family members attended. • ACU Moms gathered Oct. 7 at the home of Nancy Brister. Moms present included Carla Berryman, Elizabeth Ford, Nancy Brister, Lorna Crane, Peggy Day, Ann Gonsalves, Ramey Miller, Joy Oxford, Tiffany Rano, Catherine Sansing, Kerry (Smith ’89) Stemen, Joy Stewart, and Susan Tomenendal. 䊱 Houston Texans’ safety Danieal Manning (’07) and ACU alumni relations and annual projects director Craig Fisher (’92) visit with Dr. Lynn Luttrell (’78), associate professor of kinesiology, at a tailgate party before the Wildcat football game Oct. 12.

JEREMY ENLOW

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on hand to encourage these new ACU graduates entering various medical schools and programs. • About 40 alumni gathered Sept. 17 at Maggianos Little Italy for an ACU in Houston Alumni and Friends Luncheon with speaker Chad Baker (’99). • ACU Moms in Houston met Sept. 24 in the home of Sara (Offutt ’65) Eggleston for their first interest and launch meeting. Thirteen moms (and mom representatives) spent time in fellowship, planning, prayer and packing student care packages. • The Wildcats came to Houston for the first time Oct. 12 as ACU played Houston Baptist University in football. About 400 ACU alumni and friends gathered at BBVA Compass Stadium for a pregame tailgate party. Ron (’80) and Lee (Ligon ’80) Booker supplied barbecue sandwiches and the trimmings for the tailgate attendees. An army of volunteers also helped at the tailgate, some of which included Rand (’76) and Jane (Pinson ’76) Baker, Tim (’83) and Rhonda (Agee ’83) Beckett, Steven Booker (’11), Mark (’90) and Paige (Henson ’91) Cawyer (and children Bryce and Camille), David Meredith (’95), Warner Phelps (’01), Matt Sanderson (’13), and Justin Scott (’06). • A Distinguished Alumni Citation reception was hosted Oct. 13 for Chad Baker (’99) at the First Colony Church of Christ. Guest speakers included COBA dean Dr. Rick Lytle, Matt Sanderson (’13) and Chad’s daughter, Abbey (a future Wildcat).

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Steve and Linda (Watkins) Giddens moved back to Texas in 2010. Steve runs two businesses and Linda works for Faith Presbyterian Hospice. 1913 Winchester St., McKinney, TX 75070. giddenslw@gmail.com

1975 Rick Maloney has a new address. 4611 Hacienda Drive, Arlington, TX 76017. malorams@att.net

1990

2001

Tag (’92) and Jena (Jones) Williams have a new address. 307 C.R. 3640, Sulphur Springs, TX 75482. tagandjj@swbell.net

ADOPTED

1992

Coleen (Moran) Meyer retired this summer after 37 years in education, 19 of them as principal of Cypress Elementary School in Cedar Park. 311 S. Kings Canyon Drive, Cedar Park, TX 78613.

Charles Freeman is attending the Army War College. 10026A Thomas Drive, Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013. ADOPTED By Derek and Heather (Persful) Cheatham, a 4-year-old boy, Beck Gudeta, from Ethiopia, Aug. 1, 2012. 953 Roxbury Way, Keller, TX 76248. heathercheatham@yahoo.com

1977

1993

Shelda (Moran) Floyd is retired from the Johnson City ISD. She and her husband, Jack, have a new address. 117 Alpine Drive, Round Mountain, TX 78663. skfloyd0042@gmail.com

Jim and Lara (Reeves) Bills have a new address. 300 West 6th Street, Russellville, KY 42276. lararbills@yahoo.com

1976

1978 After three tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, and service as deputy commander of Combined Task Force 151 (a multinational counter-piracy unit), Capt. Steven Cole is returned to Navy Reserve status in November. He is married to Rita (Vaughn ’79) Cole. 7602 Bantry Circle, Dallas, TX 75248. sbcole@sbcglobal.net

1979 Ambrose Ramsey III has retired from his law practice. 36 Forest Green Drive, Mandeville, LA 70448. akramsey3@gmail.com

1981 Rexanne (Bower ’77 M.Ed.) Thomas was elected in July to represent Region 7 school districts on the Board of Directors for the Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education. She is Van ISD’s deputy director of special programs. Her husband is Wade Thomas (’81 M.S.). P.O. Box 1129, Van, TX 75790. brbtwdt0528@gmail.com

1982 Dr. Carl Cates is associate dean of the College of the Arts at Valdosta State University. 3646 Victoria Drive, Valdosta, GA 31605. catesmail@mchsi.com

1985

1994 MARRIED Tim Price and Elizabeth Davis, June 22, 2013. They live in Plano, Texas.

ADOPTED By Mark and Jenna (Blankenship) Howard, a 2-year-old girl, Emma Grace, June 17, 2013. 9753 Forney Trail, Fort Worth, TX 76244. jennahowardlmsw@gmail.com

1997

By Christopher (’02) and Raina (Ullom) Horner, a 3-year-old boy, Layton Christopher, on Aug. 4, 2012. 5408 Rockwood Drive, The Colony, TX 75056. rainahorner@yahoo.com

BORN To Kyle and Amanda (Curtis ’02) Martin, a girl, Penelope, May 9, 2013. 3834 Brookhollow Drive, Abilene, TX 79605. kyleelton@gmail.com To Cody and Autumn (Willis) Cauthen, a boy, Chase Robert, Jan. 15, 2013. 734 E.N. 10th St., Abilene, TX 79601. autumncauthen@hotmail.com To Brian and Jennifer (Losche ’03) Chesnutt, twin girls, Audrey and Hannah, April 14, 2012. 555 Elm Crossing Court, Ballwin, MO 63021. brianchesnutt@yahoo.com To Michael and Jennifer (Beswick ’02) Shepherd, a boy, Mason Thomas, April 22, 2013. 3402 Langley Hill Lane, Colleyville, TX 76034. mickyshepherd@hotmail.com To Jared and Katie (Wells) Gerstemeier, a boy, Konnor James, June 28, 2013. 10151 Woodland Hills Drive, Cordova, TN 38018. krwells@memphis.edu To Dan and Sara (Bills) Dries, a girl, Drew Danielle, June 21, 2013. 3807 Pimlico Point, Missouri City, TX 77459. saradb14@yahoo.com To Joe and Rachel (Cass) Varney, a boy, Jonah Benjamin, June 18, 2013. 7575 Hedgeoak Court, Fort Worth, TX 76112. rachelvarney@sbcglobal.net

2002

BORN

BORN

To Michael and Jennifer (Bradley) Crawford, a boy, Jack Dylan, June 3, 2013. 2001 Centerview, Midland, TX 79707. crawford_family@att.net

1998 Richard and Cynthia (Keck) Halstead have a new address. 7903 202nd St. E, Spanaway, WA 98387. cindyhalstead@hotmail.com

BORN To Murray and Jaime (Bond) Sanderson, a boy, Ezra Woodring, Sept. 21, 2012. 329 Robin Way, Richardson, TX 75080. jaimemsanderson@gmail.com

To Eric and Kylie (McCoy) Dodd, a boy, Jace Clayton, Dec. 11, 2012. They have two other sons, Nathan and Tate. The family has a new address. 2867 S. 48th Way, Yuma, AZ 85364. ekdodd@hotmail.com To Jay (’01) and Julie (Little) Potts, a boy, Grayson Jay, Feb. 13, 2013. 6608 Longhorn Trail, Frisco, TX 75034. To Justin and Yvette (Cantu ’01) Wardlaw, a girl, Layla Rose, March 30, 2013. The couple has two other children. Justin is owner of Silver Tree Construction. 6132 Waco Way, Fort Worth, TX 76133.

2003 David and Brianna (Northam) Idleman have a new address. P.O. Box 22, Spencer, WV 25276.

1999 BORN

BORN

Lt. Col. Don Kotulan returned from a six-month deployment overseas and is now stationed at Eglin Air Force Base. 9 Ardmore Court, Niceville, FL 32578. kotulan@yahoo.com

To Jana (Varley) Green, a girl, Joleigh Pauline, Dec. 4, 2012. The family has a new address. 3633 Varsity Lane, Abilene, TX 79602. bananadc@yahoo.com To Jason and Mandy (Lai) Oban, a girl, Abigail Yi-Wah, Nov. 17, 2011. 1111 Byers Lane, Austin, TX 78753. mandy.oban@gmail.com To Derek and Megan (Vincent ’02) Thurman, a boy, Sullivan Wade, Sept. 23, 2012. 303 Melodywood Drive, Friendswood, TX 77546. derek@thethurmans.net To Spencer (’98) and Kristi (O’Donald) Rose, a boy, Lucas McCain, Sept. 22, 2012. 3027 Reagenea Drive, Wylie, TX 75098. kristilayne76@gmail.com

1988

2000

BORN

J. Hunter Haltom moved to Nebraska in December 2011 while stationed at Offutt Air Force Base. 5062 S. 172nd St., Omaha, NE 68135. Christopher A. Phillips was promoted to colonel in the Air Force. He is director of medical plans, programs and budget in the Office of the Air Force Surgeon General. He is married to Carol M. (Ebeling ’87) Phillips. 13534 Smallwood Lane, Chantilly, VA 20151. cphllipsfamily@yahoo.com

Drew Gaylor is the preaching minister at Richardson East Church of Christ. He and his wife, Jennifer (Fulton), have a new address. 646 Cambridge Drive, Richardson, TX 75080.

To Lucas and Jennifer (Walker) Takala, a girl, Ashlynn Kate, Aug. 9, 2013. 509 Evergreen Drive, Euless, TX 76040. jennifertakala@yahoo.com To Keith and Mindy (Mahaffey ’03) Clark, a boy, Charlie James, May 23, 2013. They have another son, Carson. Their family moved in 2012 to Georgia, where Keith is senior minister of Southern Crescent Church. 135 Lismore Court, Tyron, GA 30290 mindyaclark@gmail.com

Kayla (Horton) Schroeder opened a medical clinic, Pregnancy Help 4 U, in Keller, Texas, in June 2011. The clinic offers pregnancy testing and other resources for women. 8317 West Wind Lane, North Richland Hills, TX 76182. kayla@pregnancyhelp4u.org

1986

1989 Kyle McAlister was recently elected to the Abilene City Council. 2573 Lincoln Drive, Abilene, TX 79601. kylemcalister@gmail.com Dr. Andrea (Rednick) Granados is a sales consultant and Internet researcher at Sales Consultants of Dallas. She also is pursuing an M.L.S. degree through Texas Woman’s University. 3232 Waldrop Drive, Dallas, TX 75229.

BORN To William and Amy (Foraker) Matthews, a boy, Jack Davis, May 23, 2013. 3604 Lipizzan Drive, Denton, TX 76210. willamymatthews@yahoo.com To Jared Jackson (’01) and Kristina Bordine, two boys, Franco Desmond Christmas, May 27, 2010, and Ira Henry River, May 21, 2012. Jared teaches government courses at Austin Community College and also teaches high school. 317 Kimberly Drive, Austin, TX 78745. To Cody (’99) and Chesley (Smith) Walton, a girl, Landry Kate, Dec. 8, 2012. 3616 Homestretch Court, Keller, TX 76244. To Brandon (’01) and Jennie (Bush) Fincher, a girl, Quinn, April 20, 2011. Jennie has opened a business, North Texas Counseling Associates, in Colleyville. 5404 Beaver Ridge, Watauga, TX 76137. jenniefincher@msn.com

To Kyle (’01) and Jessica (Clardy) Brown, a girl, Lydia, May 29, 2012. To Levi and Sara (Phillips) Taylor, a boy, Gavin Reagan, Dec. 7, 2012. 4118 Manorfield Drive, Seabrook, TX 77586. landstaylor@gmail.com

2004 MARRIED William Ivie and Misti Senterfitt, April 27, 2013. Misti is an RN and William is active duty in the Navy. 3232 Pine Road, Apt. A-421, Bremerton, WA 98310. mis_fitt@hotmail.com

2005 MARRIED Matt Briggs and Misty Mahaffey, March 23, 2013, in Abilene. 4810 State St., Abilene, TX 79603.

ADOPTED By Austin and Cassie (Teague) Henley, two boys, 11-year-old Daryan Jude and 8-year-old Rowan Isaac, Dec. 20, 2012. 10146 Shadyview Drive, Dallas, TX 75238. achenley@sbcglobal.net

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Sacred Spaces An exhibition of oil paintings by Jack Maxwell (’78) was shown this fall at the ACU Downtown Gallery on North Second Street in Abilene. A longtime professor of art and design best known for his award-winning Jacob’s Dream sculpture site at ACU, Maxwell also is an accomplished painter whose Summers Abroad exhibit in September 2011 portrayed scenes captured while he and his wife, Jill (Thompson ’78), were in Europe with ACU Study Abroad classes. Sacred Spaces presented “intimate perspectives from recent travels in the United Kingdom and Italy” that he says offered a strong personal spiritual connection. Maxwell’s paintings explore the nooks and crannies of cathedrals, abbeys, theatres and pastures in places such as Wales, Italy and Scotland, from humble, centuries-old churches to the Vatican in Rome. BORN To Lyndell and Sarah (Moore) Lee, a girl, Eleanor Joy, Dec. 26, 2012. 810 Canyon Court, Abilene, TX 79601. lee.sarah.82@gmail.com To Jeffrey and Anna (Zabarskaya) Rance, a boy, Jeffrey Tillson III, Oct. 12, 2012. 1716 Zavala Drive, Allen, TX 75002. jt2@jt2auto.com To Bobby and Jennifer (Knight) Stroupe, a girl, Waverley Anne, Dec. 16, 2012. 7216 Princedale, Tyler, TX 75703. jak00aa@yahoo.com To Matt and Teri (Price) Hudson, a boy, Everett Luke, May 27, 2013. 4808 Ark Lane, Murfreesboro, TN 37128. To John (’06) and Erin (Bricker) Cogburn, a boy, Wyatt Samuel, June 17, 2013. 1938 Mimosa Drive, Abilene, TX 79601. embricker@yahoo.com To Derek and Heather (Freeman) Schoen, twins, a boy (Tucker Rope) and a girl (Adelyn Marie), March 6, 2013. 325 Van Zandt, San Angelo, TX 76905. heather.schoen@gmail.com To Lantz and Jessica (Turner) Howard, a girl, Sawyer Sue, Feb. 15, 2012. 2816 Fair Timber Way, McKinney, TX 75071. To Chris and Jennie (Guinn ’03) Ables, a boy, James Owen, June 4, 2012. 5708 Regents Row, Tyler, TX 75703. To Javier and Crystal (Contreras) Herrera, a boy, Ezra Jude, June 16, 2013. 4221 Judith Way, Haltom City, TX 76137. To John and Lori (Bredemeyer) Ryan, a boy, Jacob Michael, June 30, 2013. 1927 Fillmore St. N.E., #1, Minneapolis, MN 55418. To David and Jillian (Rowland) Clark, a girl, Bevin, Dec. 22, 2012. 1385 W. Weatherby Way, Chandler, AZ 85286. To Ben and Tiffany (Torres) Williams, a boy, Asher James, Jan. 10, 2012. 318 Luby Lane, Florence, MT 59833. tnt00b@gmail.com To Tyler and Valerie (Jolly) Bradley, two boys, Caleb William, July 6, 2010, and Jordan David, May 17, 2013. 102 Mission Drive, Harker Heights, TX 76548. v.bradley06@yahoo.com To Ryan (’04) and Kelley (Axelson) Wendt, a boy, Liam O’Neal, July 15, 2013. 8315 Astwood Court, Spring, TX 77379.

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Empty Vessels: Marble Floors and Wooden Bones

Ascent: Shadowcase

To Joel and Cari (Billingsley) Goudeau, a girl, Taylor Paige, July 15, 2013. 116 Barn Owl Loop, Leander, TX 78641. To Justin Mark and Karena Martinez, a girl, Jayden Mariah, July 16, 2013. 4706 30th St. E, Dickinson, TX 77539. martinezk30@hotmail.com To Lee and Catherine (Deming) Rosenbaum, a son, Luke Wyatt, May 19, 2013. Lee is a land surveyor at Jacob and Martin Ltd. and Catherine is a physical therapist at Hendrick Medical Center. 2941 Arlington Ave., Abilene, TX 79606. catrosenbaum@hotmail.com

2006 Adam and Rachel (Henderson) Smith have moved to Oklahoma, where Adam is a youth minister. 902 N. 5th St., Marlow, OK 73055.

MARRIED Kevin Johnson (’13) and Tori Watson, Aug. 10, 2013, in Abilene. Tori graduated from Marquette University Law School in May 2013. She received a certificate in sports law and was sworn into the State Bar of Wisconsin. The couple has a new address. 1902 S. Highway 121, Apt. 1115, Lewisville, TX 75067. victoriawjohnson@outlook.com

BORN To Robert and Kristie (Clarkson) Wade, a boy, Kasen Robert, June 17, 2013. 523A C.R. 2700, Walnut Springs, TX 77690. kwade@clarksons.org To Josh (’05) and Danielle (Dilworth) Schofield, a girl, Reagan Jo, Aug. 4, 2013. 3514 Waldorf Drive, Dallas, TX 75229. danielle.schofield@hotmail.com To David and Stephanie (York) Prysock, a boy, Gideon Malachi, Sept. 3, 2013. 8725 Pedernales Trail, Fort Worth, TX 76118.

2007 BORN To Jeff and Calee (Varner) Follins, a girl, Jordan Alexandria, April 12, 2013. 4522 S. Aldredge St., Amarillo, TX 79118. calee.follins@hpisd.net To Kallen and Kelsey (Bailey) Collier, two girls, Kylee, Nov. 1, 2011, and Klaire, Dec. 5, 2012. 4201 Lone Oak Drive, Mansfield, TX 76063.

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To Lyndon and Jamie (Randall) Jenkins, a boy, Aaron Randall, Jan. 7, 2013. 5017 Marcus Drive, Flower Mound, TX 75028. To Christopher and Bethany (Ferguson) Butler, a boy, Levi Cole Ferguson, Feb. 9, 2013. The family lives in Weatherford, Texas. To Jeremy (’04) and Robin (Ivester) Laningham, a boy, Bennett Reed, May 1, 2013. 5934 Grace Avenue, Tyler, TX 75707. robinlaningham@gmail.com To David (’08) and Rebecca (Cawyer) Taylor, a boy, Declan Robert, April 17, 2013. 713 Eulalia Drive, Terrell, TX 75160. beccactaylor@gmail.com To Brandon (’06) and Cortney (Riley) Bartee, a girl, Quinn Elise, April 29, 2013. 5422 Monticello Ave., Dallas, TX 75206. To Jordan (’08) and April (Butler) Lyons, a girl, Gemma Grace, May 10, 2013. Jordan is a marriage and family therapist. 617 Cordell St., Denton, TX 76201. To Rich and Kirby (Ladyman) Wilson, a girl, Kally Grace, Dec. 11, 2012. 5313 Crescent Lake Drive, Fort Worth, TX 76137. To Stephen and Betsy (Noah) Brumley, a boy, Ryder Andrew, May 8, 2012. The family has a new address. 7100 WCR 44, Midland, TX 79707. To Travis and Hilary (Vick) Crowell, a girl, Roslyn Hilary, May 28, 2013. 8632 Kirk Court, North Richland Hills, TX 76182.

2008 BORN THIS IS A CORRECTION OF A PREVIOUS LISTING: To Chessley and Megan (Gibbs ’09) Cavitt, a girl, Gracen Claire, Oct, 7, 2012. Chessley is pulpit minister for the Gateway Church of Christ. 3900 E. Rock Road, San Tan Valley, AZ 85143. To Blake and Danielle (Perkins) Tyndell, a girl, Ellie Beth, November 2012. 242 Waters Road, Texarkana, TX 75503. tyndelld@gmail.com To Heath and Rachel (Dorazio) Gholson, a girl, Julia Gwynn, July 10, 2012. The couple married Nov. 7, 2009. 346 Donella Drive, San Antonio, TX 78232. pinkflamingos554@yahoo.com To Jason and Julie (Cain) Ehler, a boy, Austin Paul, Jan. 12, 2013. 11334 Estufa Canyon, San Antonio, TX 78245. juliemae04@yahoo.com


Featured guest speaker Scot McKnight is an award-winning author of The Jesus Creed and The Blue Parakeet.

Malcolm Himes and vocal group Acappella performed a Sunday night concert in Moody Coliseum.

To Spencer (’10) and Alyssa (Hawkins) Ellison, a girl, Tayte Marie, July 17, 2012. 2448 Ibis Ave., New Braunfels, TX 78130. To Daniel and Claire (Matthews ’10) Townsend, a boy, Jonah Mason, Dec. 15, 2012. 316 Morton St. W, St. Paul, MN 55107. To Joseph and Amanda (Baker) Gill, a boy, Jase Carter, Feb. 26, 2013. 105 Vine St., Longview, TX 75605. amb02a@acu.edu To Joshua and Emily (Spurlock) Barnes, a girl, Claire Elizabeth, March 1, 2013. 716 Gaylewood, Richardson, TX 75080. To Aaron and Lupe (Martinez ’06) Hamilton, a girl, Larken Allyson, Aug. 30, 2012. 25 Cambridge Court, Abilene, TX 79603.

2009 Jared Wessel and Erin Knight, April 13, 2013, in Sugar Land, Texas. 2829 Castlereach St., Trophy Club, TX 76262. elk04a@yahoo.com

GARY RHODDES

MARRIED

BORN

Summit 2013

To Richard (’08) and Allyson (Hartline) Keker, a boy, Daniel Grant, Jan. 2, 2013. 2542 Campus Court, Abilene, TX 79601. To Matt (’07) and Erica (Eason) Wickes, a boy, Elliot James, July 30, 2012. 1004 Delwood Drive, Longview, TX 75605. To Kent and Heather (O’Brien ’07) Akers, a boy, David, July 8, 2013. 1602 S. 16th St., Abilene, TX 79602. kent.akers@acu.edu To Jody and Kristee (Davidson ’08) Walker, a boy, Everett Jack, March 1, 2013. 9814 Lakemont Drive, Dallas, TX 75220. kristeewalker@gmail.com

Take a look back at ACU’s 107th annual event

2010

GARY RHODDES

See Bonus Coverage at acu.edu/acutoday

ACU senior Emily Dixon, junior Abbie Baird and Wes Rasbury (’13) sing with a worship team before the Tuesday morning lecture.

MARRIED Adam Baran (’08) and Whitney Brand, Nov. 10, 2012, in Shawnee, Okla. 204 Gold Finch Drive, Richardson, TX 75081.

BORN To Brian and Kaela (Mayes) Richie, a girl, Renleigh Edan, Dec. 17, 2012. The couple were married Aug. 12, 2011. 3309 Somerset Lane, Deer Park, TX 77536. kaela.richie87@gmail.com To Joshua Alkire and Morgan Philpott, a girl, Julian Kay, July 29, 2013. 1217 S. Bowie Drive, Abilene, TX 79605. mep05b@acu.edu

2012 Kasey Stratton completed the Appalachian Trail with her father, Rick, in September 2013. 2409 Merle Huff Ave., Norwalk, IA 50211.

BORN PAUL WHITE

To Brandon and Madison (Hirt) Wilson, a girl, Darby, Sept. 4, 2013. 4930 Slate River Lane, Katy, TX 77494.

ELLIOT JONES

Rochester College names fourth ACU grad as president Rochester (Mich.) College inaugurated its ninth president Oct. 10, looking again to an ACU alumnus for its newest leader. Dr. John N. Tyson Jr. (’81), former vice president for development at Abilene Christian, became the fourth ACU graduate to serve in the top administrative role at RC, which began in 1959 as North Central Christian College and later changed its name to Michigan Christian College. It became Rochester College in 1997. Tyson earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from ACU, and a doctorate from e University of Texas at Austin. He was president and CEO of Abilene Christian Schools when named by RC as president.

He succeeds Dr. Rubel Shelly, who was serving a joint appointment as professor of theology and religion. Previous RC presidents include founder Dr. Otis Gatewood (’35), Dr. Don Gardner (’48) and Dr. Milton Fletcher (’47). Gatewood was the first missionary from Churches of Christ in Germany after World War II. He later served as president of European Christian College in Vienna. Gardner was president of four Christian colleges and co-founder of the National Christian School Association. Fletcher had a distinguished career in Christian higher education, and was founding director of the ACU Foundation. 䊱

ACU chancellor Dr. Royce Money (’64) was a guest speaker at Tyson’s inauguration.

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A CU TODAY BONUS COVE RAGE Eric Wilson was Monday night’s theme speaker on “Pray Always” from Luke 8:1-14.

PAUL WHITE

STEVE BUTMAN

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Larry James was the Wednesday morning theme speaker, with Luke 12:13-21 as his text.

PAUL WHITE

STEVE BUTMAN

Kip Long (center) led a praise team on Monday night in Moody Coliseum.

PAUL WHITE

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Nancy Harbron presents “God, The Master Potter.”

Aaron Metcalf was the theme speaker Monday morning from from Luke 4:16-30 on “Good News at the Margin.”

STEVE BUTMAN

STEVE BUTMAN

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Gordon Dabbs spoke Tuesday night from from Luke 6:17-36 on “The Blessed Life.”

Hazel Fillmon (’57) served pies made by members of Women for ACU. PAUL WHITE

PAUL WHITE

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Dr. Patricia Hernandez, professor of biology, taught classes in the Children’s Ministry Sub-track about “Countering Childhood Obesity.”

STEVE BUTMAN

Junior Bethany Richardson co-presented “Education at the Margins.”

Jonathan Storment was Sunday night’s theme speaker, using Luke 1:26-38 as the basis of “Let It Be to Me.”

PAUL WHITE

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GARY RHODES

GARY RHODES 䊱

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Broadway actor Stephen Trafton presented “The Living Letters” Sunday night in Fulks Theatre.

Jason Caston taught a class about the iChurch Method in “How to Advance Your Ministry Online.”

Dr. John Siburt (’96) presented classes titled “The Word on the Street.”

PAUL WHITE

STEVE BUTMAN

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Luke Timothy Johnson, of the Candler School of Theology at Emory University, was a featured guest speaker on Monday.

STEVE BUTMAN

FROM LEFT: Billy Kellum, Jackie King, Sandra Cheatham, Jerry Cheatham, Linda Fox, Bill Fox and Claud Singer from the Singing Oaks Church of Christ in Denton, Texas.

STEVE BUTMAN

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Sean Palmer spoke on “The Kingdom of God Has Come Near” for the Tuesday morning theme presentation based on Luke 10:1-21.

Carlee E. Doggan taught a class on Tuesday and Wednesday.

PAUL WHITE

Peter Williams of the University of Aberdeen and the University of Cambridge, was a featured guest speaker on Tuesday.

STEVE BUTMAN

PAUL WHITE

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IN MEMORIAM 1941 J.C. Mann Jr., 95, died Aug. 8, 2013, in Abilene. He was born July 16, 1918, in Fort Worth, and although he grew up there, he graduated from the Abilene Christian Demonstration School in 1937. He enlisted in the Navy, serving in Pearl Harbor and the Philippines before attending Midshipmen’s School at Northwestern University in Chicago. He met Betty Lou Flynn there and married her Dec. 17, 1941, before returning to World War II. He was injured in the Okinawa invasion and earned the Purple Heart. He and Betty settled in Midland, where he was a land man for Gulf Oil and a crude oil buyer for Union Oil Co. They lived in Colorado for 17 years, returned to Midland, and he later retired in Houston as Union’s crude oil division manager. He later helped manage ACU’s oil and gas properties. He was a longtime member of University Church of Christ. He was preceded in death by his parents and two sisters, Katherine Green and Theresa Hubert. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter, Dr. Cheryl M. Bacon (’77), and two grandchildren.

1942 Lula Lucine (Cox) Smith, 92, died Sept. 1, 2013, in Abilene. She was born Dec. 17, 1920, in Hollis, Okla., and married Lawrence L. Smith (’29) on May 31, 1941. She attended The University of Texas at Austin and ACU. Smith worked in the libraries of Abilene Christian Schools and ACU, and as a secretary in the university’s Department of Home Economics. She played violin in the Abilene and San Angelo philharmonic orchestras, and sang with the Hillcrest Singers. She was preceded in death by her parents; a sister, Jo Mitchell; a brother, Dr. Paul Cox; her husband of 39 years, Lawrence; a son, Dallas Frank Smith; and a daughter, Lee Ann (Smith ’79) Phipps. Among survivors are daughters Dr. Jo Katherine (Smith ’69) Bagley and Sharon (Smith ’83) Miller; sons Larry Smith (’73) and Paul Smith (’81); a sister, Wanda Mae (Cox ’45) Wilson; 12 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

1947 Dr. Bobbye Muriel Rouse, 85, died March 16, 2013. She was born Feb. 3, 1928, in Fort Worth and earned her medical degree from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas in 1959. She later served as the chief resident and director of the mental retardation unit at The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) hospital in Galveston. She also was associate professor in UTMB’s Department of Pediatrics and a director in the Division of Child Development. She is survived by a sister; two nephews; two nieces; and other relatives.

1948 Bonnie Murle (McGhee) Walker, 89, died June 6, 2013, in Abilene. She was born Dec. 31, 1923, in Austin and married Henry Walker May 13, 1961. He preceded her in death in 1991. She was a librarian for many years and worked at ACU’s Brown Library. Bonnie is survived by two

sons, Henry Walker Jr. (’68) and Nhan Van Hua; two daughters, Virginia Hopper and Elizabeth (Walker ’90) Whatley; many foster children; and several grandchildren. T.J. Finley, 89, died July 30, 2013, in Branson, Mo. He was born March 14, 1924, in Mountain Home, Ark. He served in the Army during World War II and ministered in Churches of Christ from 1946-2013. He married Gwendolyne Williams Nov. 18, 1944. She survives him, as do a son, Jerial Finley (’68); two daughters, Donna Jefferies and Debbie Vinson; a brother; four sisters; eight grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and eight great-great-grandchildren.

1951 Max Caleb King, D.D.S., 82, died Nov. 27, 2012, in Abilene, after a short illness. He was born April 24, 1930, and graduated from Anson High School. He earned his D.D.S. degree from The University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston. King served in the Navy and Army and retired as an Army colonel. He was a member of University Church of Christ and the Kiwanis Club, and volunteered at the Christian Service Center and Christian Homes & Family Services of Abilene. Among survivors are his wife, Diane (Estes ’54) King; two sons, David King and Robert King (’78); six grandchildren; four great grandchildren; and a brother, Dwade King.

1954 James C. “Jim” Sheerer, 83, died April 17, 2013, in Norman, Okla. He was born June 13, 1929, in Corsicana and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from ACU. He served in the Navy and preached for Churches of Christ in Guam, Texas, New York and Oklahoma before retiring in 2009. He married Nona Sue Keenon (’54) Aug. 19, 1955, in Abilene. She survives him, as do three daughters, Janis Hagler, Julie (Sheerer ’92) Diepenbrock and Jennifer McKnight, and seven grandchildren. George “Weldon” Kirby, 80, died Aug. 1, 2013, in Granbury. He was born June 27, 1933, and grew up in Lometa. He served in the Army and later earned a master’s degree in education from Sam Houston State University. He married Margie Guesner Aug. 24, 1979. He worked with his father in the ranching business, and he and Margie founded Kirby Stone Company. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1990. He is survived by his wife, Margie; four daughters, Vickie (Kirby ’77) Speck, Kimberly (Kirby ’80) Becker, Gayle (Guesner ’84) Proctor and Ginger (Guesner ’85) King; two sons, Arthur (’82) Kirby and Jimmy Kirby; 23 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren.

1955 Lou Ann (Nall) Baker, 79, died Sept. 18, 2013, of cancer. She grew up in Big Spring, Texas. She is survived by her husband, Paul Baker; three sisters, Betty (Nall ’50) Coffee, Sue (Nall ’53) Truxal and Frances (Walker ’57 Flournoy); two daughters, Lisa (Baker ’85) Bosley and Nancy (Baker ’92) Vaught; and five grandchildren.

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JEREMY ENLOW

Funds generated by the P4X (“Play for Rex”) Foundation honoring the memory of 10-year old Rex Fleming are allowing his parents, Lance (’92) and Jill Fleming, to give away up to 20 iPod touches by Christmas to pediatric cancer patients at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth. e first devices, intended to help kids pass the time while being treated, were delivered to kids in August. e foundation helps families with funds for medical bills and Apple devices like ones Rex enjoyed as a diversion while passing the long hours required to fight brain cancer. A golf tournament at Abilene Country Club is scheduled for April 14 to raise funds for the P4X Foundation and the Rex Fleming Endowed Scholarship, which assists ACU student-athletes preparing to be physicans. 䊱

Carl Wesley “Wes” Bishop, 61, died Oct. 5. He was born April 27, 1952, and graduated from Snyder High School. He earned a scholarship to play baseball at ACU, and served during a fifth year of school as its assistant coach. He graduated in 1977 from The University of Texas Health Science Center in Dallas with a degree in physical therapy. A civic leader in Sweetwater, he served as board chair of the Nolan County American Heart Association, board member of the American Physical Therapy Association, chair of the Mayor’s Commitee for the Disabled, and president of the Sweetwater ISD Board of Trustees. He was an elder of Fourth and Elm Church of Christ. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Clay. Among survivors are his wife of 38 years, Margaret (Fain ’75); and sons Brett Bishop, Lance Bishop and Reid Bishop (’08).

1977 Christian Diaz, 57, died Nov. 20, 2012, after a two-year battle with cancer. He was born Feb. 2, 1955, in Havana, Cuba, and immigrated to the U.S. in October 1965 with his family. He worked in the advertising and design industry and later worked as a creative consultant and motivational speaker. Chris is survived by his wife, Belinda; two daughters, Lauryn (Diaz ’04) Carr and Trina Dillard; two sons, Jonathan (’07) Diaz and Alexander Diaz; a sister, Rena Gonzales; two brothers, Florentino Diaz and Rolando Diaz (’79); and four grandchildren.

OTHER FRIENDS Joe Connell Owen Sr., 85, died July 20, 2013, in Monroe, La. He was born April 14, 1928, in Gleason, Tenn. He served in the Army for 20 years, retiring in 1974, and later preached at Churches of Christ in several states. He is survived by his wife, Carla (Ashley ’55) Owen; two daughters; four sons; 19 grandchildren; and 25 great-grandchildren. Amos C. H. Ray, 85, died Sept. 1, 2013, in Lubbock. He was born April 8, 1928, in Verbena, Ala., and graduated from Starke Military Academy in Montgomery, Ala., in 1946, and from Auburn University in 1951 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural science. He married Louise “Dewby” Adams (’50) on March 20, 1952. He was a staff sergeant in the Air Force from 1951-55, and the Rays lived in Landsberg am Lech and Landstuhl while he was stationed in Germany from 1952-55. The Rays were members of University Church of Christ before moving to Lubbock in 2013, where they became members of the Broadway Church of Christ. Amos was an active volunteer and board member with the Boy Scouts. He farmed near Tuscola for more than 40 years while working for West Texas Utilities as a draftsman. He was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, J.W. Ray and Frank Ray; and a son, Nathan Ray (’76). Among survivors are his wife of 61 years, Dewby; two daughters, Nancy Ray (’79) and Vicki Biffle; a brother, Bill Ray; seven grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren.

JEREMY ENLOW

Flemings, friends minister to other kids in Rex’s memory

1975

Lance Fleming gets a hug from a grateful patient at Cook who received an iPod touch made possible by the influence of Rex (left), who died Nov. 25, 2012.


ACU Remembers: Lana, Jarrett, Hiler, Ricketts, McMillan Bert Lana, 90, died May 20, 2013, in Abilene. He was born Sept. 11, 1922, in Harrah, Okla., and grew up in Stilwell. He served in the Army during World War II and later earned a B.S. degree from Southeastern State College, where he met his wife, Beth (Robnett). He earned an M.A. degree in school administration from the University of Oklahoma. Bert served as a teacher, coach and principal in several Oklahoma schools and later served as superintendent of Fort Worth Christian Schools. He was the chief of police at ACU from 1980-88. Bert was preceded in death by his wife, Beth (Robnett) Lana (longtime administrative coordinator in ACU’s Department of English). He is survived by a son, Philip Lana (’73); two sisters; a brother; and four grandchildren. Ralph Vinson Jarrett, 70, died June 2, 2013, in Fort Worth. He was born Sept. 24, 1942, in Rome, Ga., and moved to Houston in 1943. He graduated from Reagan High School in 1961 and from the University of Houston in 1976. He was the head coach of ACU’s nationally ranked golf team from 1985-2003 before returning to his alma mater to serve as the UH golf coach from 2003-10. He returned to ACU in Fall 2010 as the associate director of athletics. Among survivors are his wife of 38 years, Patricia Hebert Jarrett; a daughter,

Lisa Jarrett Vacek; a son, Justin Jarrett (’00); and three grandchildren. He also is survived by a sister, Janice Taylor, and two brothers, Jerry Jarrett and Frank Jarrett. Irvin D. Hiler (’45), 86, died July 18, 2013, in Abilene. Born July 25, 1926, in San Antonio, he enrolled at ACU in 1942, and worked in the Print Shop for Homer Howk (’34) until his graduation in 1945 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics. A year later, he became manager of that same Print Shop and three years later, wed Howk's daughter, Alta Faye (’47), in Searcy, Ark. They were married 58 years until her death in 2007. He was named the university’s outstanding staff member in 1974-75 and retired in 1988. Late in his career, he typeset dozens of books and Bible commentaries for ACU Press. Hiler was a cornerstone of the Abilene Founder Lions Club, serving in nearly every leadership role possible, including district governor and chair of the Texas Lions Council of Governors. He also was a volunteer for Abilene’s Meals on Wheels and a member of University Church of Christ. Survivors include a sister, Eula B. (Hiler ’40) Farmer; two sons, Jimmy Hiler (’77) and Gary Hiler (’73); a daughter, Anita (Hiler ’75) Cahoon; five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Charlene Ricketts, 87, died Sept. 24, 2013, in Lubbock. She was born Nov. 8, 1925, in Mora, Mo. She married William “Bill” Ricketts July 7, 1945, in San Marcos. She moved to Abilene in 1955 and worked as administrative assistant to Dr. Robert D. Hunter (’52)

at ACU for 45 years until her retirement in 2012. Charlene was active in Women for ACU and at Hillcrest Church of Christ, and was a competitive distance runner well into her 70s. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bill. She is survived by a daughter, . Elizabeth (Ricketts ’71) Marcus; two sons, Charles Ricketts (’75) and Robert Ricketts (’77); seven grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Dr. Glenn Earle McMillan (’55), 80, died Oct. 14, 2013, in Abilene. He was born March 8, 1933, in Oklahoma City, Okla., and married EuAlice Davidson on May 28, 1957. He earned B.A. and M.A. (1956) degrees from ACU in Bible and Greek, a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Scotland’s University of Edinburgh, and a Ph.D. from St. Andrews University. He was Bible Chair director at the University Avenue Church of Christ in Austin from 1956-69, and missionary to Edinburgh from 1959-62. He began teaching at ACU in 1962, eventually becoming associate professor of Bible. He owned an antiques store and began EDGE Gemco, a construction company in Abilene. Among survivors are EuAlice, his wife of 56 years; sons Mark McMillan (’84), Brent McMillan (’87) and Scott McMillan (’90); and eight grandchildren.

Al Scott’s field of dreams remains part of his family and his Wildcat legacy MANDY LAMBRIGHT

GERALD EWING

Bill Gilbreth (’70) remembers sitting in a pickup truck on campus one day years ago with Al Scott (’61), looking at a nearby wheat field and thinking it would make a fine place for an ACU baseball diamond. The two former Wildcat pitchers agreed on the idea, and not unlike Kevin Costner’s 1989 film, Field of Dreams, a new place to play was eventually carved from those plans, that real estate and the generosity of many people who wanted to see ACU restart its intercollegiate baseball program, which it did in 1991. Today, the Wildcats play at Crutcher Scott Field, named for Al’s late father, Crutcher (’24), who served on the university’s Board of Trustees for more than four decades. Altus “Al” Victor Scott, 75, died Oct. 6, 2013, just weeks after head coach Britt Bonneau, his team and some Wildcat lettermen treated Scott to a final tour around the field he loved to visit as a fan and generous benefactor. There wasn’t a dry eye in the park. Scott was born in Fort Worth but lived most of his life in Abilene, where he played baseball for ACU. He held leadership roles with Rotary, the Abilene Zoological Society, Grover Nelson Zoological Foundation, Abilene Civic Ballet Co., and St. John’s Elementary School. He also coached Little League baseball and performed with the Abilene Community Theatre. Among survivors are his wife, Judy Carson Scott; daughters Sherri Scott (’96) and Susan (Scott ’98) Bennett; a son, Michael Scott; granddaughters Abigail “Abby” Scott and Victoria “Tori” Bennett; and a cousin, Jack Scott. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife of 39 years, Dottie (Mize) Scott; and their daughter, Terri Scott. 䊱

Scott is steadied by Mike Morgan (’94), Bill Gilbreth (’70) and head baseball coach Britt Bonneau on Al’s last trip to the mound at Scott Field on Sept. 2. Judy and Al (left) were married on the field in ceremonies between games of a March 2009 doubleheader.

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Second GLANCE By Raymon Fullerton

Making Amends Former Optimist editor Raymon Fullerton (’73) was a legend on campus, both times he was an ACU student. He lives in New York City, where he is an auxiliary police officer, sings in the Down Town Glee Club and volunteers with his wife, Lindy (Kyker ’74), at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

I was placed in a refrigerator shipping container and wheeled into the Nelson office by a couple of fellows dressed in semi-official-looking coveralls. All was going well until the Abilene Fire Marshal appeared, declaring the locked doors a fire hazard and hinting at criminal charges. Simultaneously, Nelson’s Mother was a 1942 ACC graduate and Dad earned two dorm mother had a sixth sense and shouted, “Raymon Fullerton, degrees from the The University of Texas at Austin. Our educated is that you in there? Come out of there right this minute or family tree featured teachers, lawyers, engineers and ranchers. I am going to call your parents.” I climbed out of the carton Somehow, though, my recalcitrance emerged and grew, and and quietly returned to my McDonald room. college – in short – was not a first choice, despite a brief A few weeks later and my creative juices restored, I asked fascination with a school close to home. about 20 friends for their alarm clocks. Just to see what would Then, a conversation went something like this: “Mother and happen, I placed them on the three floors of Dad, I want to attend East Carolina College.” the library in Chambers Hall, setting them at Their response was swift, clear and implacable. 15-second intervals. Chaos ensued. Thankfully, “OK. But if you do not go to ACC we will not dean Beauchamp and I did not have to meet. support you financially. You will be on your By Spring 1964 I knew I could not go own in paying for college.” through life with a likable personality and no Well, that little family meeting resulted in salable skills. I departed the campus quietly and my arrival on the Hill in 1962. returned to Goldsboro late that summer. Dad loaded up the station wagon with my In January 1965, I informed the folks of worldly belongings, and my boyhood friend my new-found desire to grow up, choosing the Joe Edwards joined us for the cross-country Coast Guard as a means to my goal. After basic trip from Goldsboro, N.C., to Abilene. training I was assigned to a Coast Guard cutter The campus’ northern boundary was a dirt home-ported in Freeport, Texas. Those next lane a few yards in front of Zellner and McKinzie two years at sea were an absolute seminal span halls, with the old military hutments clustered in Fullerton found a career in the Coast Guard. of my life. Later I was trained as a dental the pasture beyond. Gardner was a new women’s assistant, learning the trade in New Orleans and Juneau. dorm anchoring the southeast corner, and the football team Inspired by my maternal grandfather, I began considering the played many of its games across town at Rose Park. My class future for the first time in my life. By August 1969 I was 25 years schedule that first semester was not exactly demanding: 10 hours. old. I applied to ACC for admission and after four-plus years of I got a job in Catchings Cafeteria as a southside dishwasher. active duty and an honorable discharge, I returned to the campus One campus activity during my “first” freshman year was the as a freshman all over again, with appreciation of Yogi Berra’s Freshman Banquet. I asked several girls to be my date. One said epic commentary on the meaning of deja vu. she had to do her hair. Another claimed her parents were coming One year I was appointed editor of the Optimist. I joined in from Waco. Yet another insisted she needed a tube of Clearasil. Phi Delta Psi. I was on a roll. In May 1973 I graduated with a B.S. Nine refused in all, so I went alone and made a spectacle of degree in mass communication and a minor in English. Several myself, a stunt setting a tone for the next 16 months. weeks later I rejoined the Coast Guard and was assigned to the After residing for two weeks in one of the barracks, USCG’s principal newsroom on Governors Island in New York I secured a room on the third floor of McDonald Hall, there City. In 1979, Lindy and I were married by Dr. John C. Stevens finding “my people,” including roommate David Sanders (’67). (’38), a man I probably worried to no end while a student. Spring Break 1963 approached. Hardin-Simmons and My unconventional years at Abilene Christian planted seeds McMurry universities perpetually identified their weeklong hiatus that are still germinating. Men like Beauchamp, the inestimable as Easter Holidays. Not so, ACC; it was always Spring Break. Bible professor Dr. Lemoine Lewis (’36) and former president So, I hatched an idea of sending the administration a “message.” Dr. Don H. Morris (’24) were early models of how to conduct life. (Today I have no clue as to what my reasoning was, or what This fall is the 40th anniversary of my graduation, a good message was intended.) I enlisted a crew of merrymakers, spelled time to express gratitude to my parents for their wise foresight, out my plan and it was accepted. We pooled money and came up and to my classmates for befriending me and demonstrating with a whopping $5 which bought 100 baby chicks in Easter egg Christian values. Those who influenced me in ways they will colors. On the designated morning just as Chapel commenced in never acknowledge include David Himes (’70), Sue Jones, Sherry Sewell Auditorium, we released those chicks, then hightailed it. Joyce (Adams ’73) Kidd, Clifton Willis (’74), Frank Smith (’75), Pandemonium broke loose as they made their way to the stage. Ann (Boles ’73) Kight, Jeff Brock (’72) and Art McNeese (’73). A day later my name, remarkably, was at the top of the I’m sure my antics entertained some of you, and I hear a suspect list in the hands of dean of students Garvin Beauchamp few have even reached some level of lore on the Hill. Each time I (’41). My name was not on any of those chicks, but my reputation, return to campus, I make time to make amends to the professors, evidently, was growing. My grade-point average, meanwhile, administrators and others on whom I inflicted frustration. was hovering several levels below the Mendoza Line. That list is rather long, and sadly, I have outlived most on it. The cast of merrymakers was interchangeable and our next You’ve heard it said, “We make a living by what we get, but project came during High School Day weekend. To impress the we make a life by what we give.” Abilene Christian reinforced that pretty high school girls in from Dallas, Tyler, Midland and San truth in my life, and although it took me a while to pay attention, Antonio, we came up with the clever idea of securing Nelson – I will forever be thankful. 䊱 with chains and padlocks – from the outside. To cap off our stunt, 80

Fall-Winter 2013

ACU TODAY


Philanthropy

HAS NO AGE

D

r. Leroy Garrett (’42) and Joey Hopkins (’10) may span four generations of Abilene Christian University benefactors, but they are partners in our Heritage Society. Leroy, a church history scholar and author, has been a donor for some 50 years, most recently through Charitable Gift Annuities designed to benefit him in retirement and accrue as endowment funds to help advance ACU’s mission. Joey’s philanthropy began as a 20-year-old when he became the youngest member of the President’s Circle in 2007. Now an independent petroleum landman, he recently established the Dell Hopkins Memorial Endowed Scholarship in

memory of his father, who died when Joey was a child. Joey remembers his parents’ and grandparents’ involvement with ACU, and wants to help others who have the same opportunities he enjoyed. At ages 94 and 26, respectively, Leroy and Joey understand the benefits of investing in ACU and its students. Please join them in our Partnering in the Journey Campaign to increase scholarships, and know that every gift is significant in the partnership of Christian higher education. Contact The ACU Foundation today for assistance with your interests and plans for meeting personal, family and charitable goals.


Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Abilene Christian University

Abilene Christian University ACU Box 29132 Abilene, Texas 79699-9132 ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

C O M I N G U P National SAT Test Dates ....................... January 25, March 8, May 3, June 7 National ACT Test Dates .................................. February 8, April 12, June 14 58th Annual Sing Song .......................................................... February 14-15 Premier Weekends .......................................... February 15-16, March 22-23 Annual President’s Circle Dinner ................................................ February 15 Alumni Day Luncheon honoring Rick Atchley (’78) as Outstanding Alumnus of the Year, and Randy (’95) and Anda (Adams ’95) Brown as Young Alumni of the Year .......... February 16 Wildcat Preview Days ................................................ February 14, March 17 facebook.com/abilenechristian facebook.com/ACUsports

Spring Break Campaigns .......................................................... March 10-14 High School Scholars Day .............................................................. March 29 Faith Calls: An Evening With Duck Dynasty featuring Si, Alan and Lisa Robertson in Moody Coliseum, benefitting Global Samaritan Resources and Abilene Christian Schools ......... April 13 Class of 1964 Golden Anniversary Reunion ................................ April 23-25 May Commencement ....................................................................... May 10 June Passport ............................................................................. June 21-24 August Commencement ................................................................. August 8

twitter.com/ACUedu twitter.com/ACUsports

instagram.com/acuedu JEREMY ENLOW

Dressed for success Wide receiver Darrell Cantu-Harkless had a record-setting senior season for the Wildcats.

Wildcat teams took the field, pitch and court this fall sporting new uniforms bearing the new Wildcat logo and athletics graphic identity unveiled in February. The new duds seem to have worked: The football team led the nation in scoring through the first four games, the women’s volleyball team upset Big 12 Conference-member Texas Tech University in Moody Coliseum, and fans were energized by the teams’ first year in NCAA Division I. See coverage on pages 4-5 (plus special Bonus Coverage online) and 64-66.


ACU Today Fall Winter 2013