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Annual Report 2012


3

CONTENTS

1.

Introduction

9. ZOA Worldwide

5

35

Map 35

2.

Who we are

Afghanistan 37

7

Burundi 41

3.

Executive’s Report

Cambodia 45

11

Democratic Republic of Congo 49

4.

Report from the Supervisory Board

Ethiopia 53 Liberia 57

15

Myanmar (with CDN) 61

5.

Organisation

South Sudan 65

19

Sri Lanka 69

6.

Our Approach

Sudan 73

25

Thailand 77

7.

Funding and Communication

29

Uganda 81

10. Disaster Response 8.

Awareness raising

33

Haiti 87 Pakistan 89 Yemen 91

11. Financial report

93

85


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CHAPTER 1

1. Introduction Looking back at 2012, I feel deep gratitude. Made possible by the continuous support of many donors, private and institutional, small and large, we could again support hundreds of thousands of people that were affected by natural disaster or violent conflict. We were able to reach out to them, support them and offer new hope, as Jesus taught us to do.

The heart of our mandate I would like to mention two ZOA highlights from 2012, both powerfully symbolizing what we do. The first is the closing down of our programme in Cambodia. We have been working in Cambodia since 1992, when refugees returned from camps in Thailand to a torn and devastated, stricken country. We were able to support the returnees and internally displaced. Now, in 2012, we could observe strong, vital communities, with enough food and water, where children are going to school and their parents are able to earn an income from diverse sources. We were able to hand over our activities to capable and motivated local partners. Recovery, it is one word of our threefold motto, and it is not just theory. I saw it with my own eyes in Cambodia.

Recovery is not just theory. I saw it with my own eyes in Cambodia.

The second development I would like to highlight is the start of our Disaster Response programme in Yemen. This programme is at the heart of our mandate, reaching out for people affected by violent conflict. Though the conflict briefly made headlines worldwide in 2011, not much help was provided to these people since then. All the while they were surviving in harsh environmental conditions. Basic services such as food and water were no longer available. I am very happy that we as ZOA could find ways to start assistance to these marginalized, vulnerable people and support them, starting with relief and continuing with recovery. ZOA works in situations of conflict and disaster. We face much suffering among our target group and do our utmost to support them. We are grateful for the results we can report, but realize there are still so many people who suffer. Bearing that in heart and mind, we are continuing ZOA’s work in 2013, motivated to do our work and reach out to the most vulnerable. Will you come with me?

Johan Mooij Chief Executive Officer


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CHAPTER 2

2. Who we are Our name ZOA was founded in 1973 in The Netherlands. The three letters ZOA are the abbreviation of the Dutch translation of South East Asia, the area where the organization started its initial activities.

Our mission ZOA supports people who suffer due to armed conflict or natural disasters, by helping them rebuild their livelihoods. We call on our constituency and partners, in the North and in the South, to take responsibility and become involved. We provide maximum added value to those we support and those who support us. Our mission can be summarized in three words: Relief, Hope, Recovery. Relief We provide relief to people affected by conflict or natural disasters. Hope We contribute to a new perspective of hope in which people work together for a promising future in dignity and mutual trust. Recovery Together with the affected communities we work on recovery of their livelihoods.

Our vision In a world full of conflict, injustice, poverty, and disaster, we want to contribute to signs of hope and restoration.

We see this coming about where people experience peace, justice, and mutual trust once again, and where they regain personal dignity and confidence. ZOA acts and contributes from the biblical perspective of God’s Kingdom, which will bring reconciliation and restoration to its full potential. Meanwhile, God calls us to seek justice and be faithful to those who need our support.

Our key values Human dignity All people are different, but everyone is made in God’s image. We treat all people equally. We dedicate ourselves to promote respect, mutual understanding and cooperation. Faithfulness Faithfulness means providing support that our beneficiaries can count on, honouring our commitments and being dedicated and accountable to them. Faithfulness means that we remain involved in conflict affected communities until they are ready to walk on their own again. Stewardship Stewardship encompasses both people and their environment. We promote solutions that are sustainable for both the people and their habitat. At the same time we seek to be good stewards of the resources delegated to us by using resources effectively and efficiently. Justice ZOA stands up for vulnerable and marginalized people. Through our programmes we combat injustice in the

South. In the North we promote awareness of injustice and we call on our constituency to do right.

Our sectors ZOA’s sectoral focus is on livelihoods and food security, WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and basic education. In the context of conflict affected fragility, livelihoods comprise how people access and mobilise resources that enable them to pursue the goals necessary for their survival and longer-term well-being, thereby reducing the vulnerability that is created and exacerbated by conflict. Given our specific experience and expertise in realising household shelter solutions in emergency situations, ZOA also focuses on ‘shelter’ in its emergency programming.

Dimensions of change ZOA uses a framework comprising three dimensions of community level change, to enable us to stay focused on what our work is really about. These dimensions are: Ǧ Access to basic resources and services Ǧ Community governance and inclusion Ǧ Peace and stability

Our constituency ZOA could not exist without a committed constituency of more than 40,000 private donors, companies, Business Ambassadors, schools and churches.


RELIEF

HOPE

We provide RELIEF to people affected by conict or natural disasters.

We contribute to a new perspective of HOPE in which people work together for a promising future in dignity and mutual trust.


RECOVERY Together with the affected communities, we work on the RECOVERY of their livelihoods.


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3. Executive’s Report We are grateful that ZOA’s work could progress ‘as usual’ this year, though ‘as usual’ hardly applies while working in fragile environments, with people affected by violent conflict and disaster. I am very grateful that our staff did not experience serious security incidents, though many of them are working under harsh and sometimes dangerous circumstances. Through their committed work in difficult and remote areas, we were able to assist nearly two million people to rebuild dignified lives. We are very much aware of the extreme need of many of our beneficiaries. They lack basic services such as clean water, food and health care. They face violence, loss of beloved family members, trauma and poverty, quite often resulting in loss of hope. Through everything that we were able to do as ZOA in relief and recovery, our aim is: to contribute to a new perspective of hope by standing beside people. On a daily basis our staff are communicating to the most vulnerable, most marginalized, that they are worthy in God’s eyes, and that we are there to support them in regaining dignity in their lives. As the people in Hudet, a remote area in Ethiopia, said: “We know ZOA as the people’s organisation.” The economic situation certainly is precarious. It affects our constituency in The Netherlands, faced, for example, with rising unemployment percentages, and it affects most of our institutional donors worldwide. This challenges us even more to give full account to our donors of what we are doing, to explain which needs we are addressing and what our added value is. Such being the case, I am glad to observe that in 2012 we were again able to connect with new donors, both institutional and

private, donors who are committed to the cause of our beneficiaries and have joined forces with ZOA.

Fragile environments Through 2012 we phased out of Cambodia, closing down the programme at the end of December. In Thailand the programme is preparing the phase out planned for 2014. More and more we are specializing in working in fragile states, while phasing out of programmes where our added value is less than elsewhere. In 2012 we initiated new programme areas in Hudet, (southern Somali region, Ethiopia), in Deh Sabz, (Central Afghanistan), and through CDN in Kayin State (eastern Myanmar). We also started with Disaster Response programmes in Pibor and Juba (South Sudan) and Yemen. Institutional donors are hesitant to spend bilateral funds on fragile states, which is understandable because the weak governmental structures and lack of good governance in these countries are contributory to – and sometimes even the cause of - the problems of vulnerable people. However, the position and possibilities of NGOs to work in fragile states is seen and appreciated by institutional donors, giving us access to funds to work in these fragile areas.

Security Due to our mandate we work in fragile and often insecure situations. And yet we always succeed in finding committed people who want to do this work and to support those who are faced with these insecure situations in their daily lives. As an organisation it is our

utmost responsibility to protect our staff. Our security officer visits all ZOA teams to provide security training and briefing, to review local security plans, to maintain day-to-day contact with staff in risk areas and to support staff in case of security incidents. The responsibility for the security of staff certainly is a limiting factor for the humanitarian sector, meaning we sometimes cannot start working in areas where needs are high. Inherent to being a humanitarian organisation is being aware of the immense needs and feeling the passion to support those who are most vulnerable. We are confronted by daily dilemmas in which we try to operate with wisdom. One of the positive decisions we were able to take was the start of a Disaster Response programme in Yemen in 2012.

Reconstruction call The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced a call for proposals focusing on reconstruction programmes contributing to human security, to be submitted in March 2012. It was such a joy to see our committed ZOA-staff in Afghanistan, Burundi, Uganda, DR Congo, Ethiopia, South Sudan and Sudan putting so much time and energy into seizing this opportunity and producing high quality proposals with innovative cross-border programme approaches. The approval of all four proposals was a highlight of 2012.

Organisational and professional development Through 2012 we devoted special attention to professional development of our management staff in the country teams. We organised training in the Netherlands for Ma-


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nagers General Affairs as well as for Programme Advisors and Programme Managers. These two training courses proved to be very instrumental in improving knowledge levels. The personal contacts and sharing of experiences of staff in similar positions within ZOA worldwide were very positive and motivating as well. A personal development plan was formulated with each of the participants of the two training courses, and couching routes were set out. An external consultant evaluated the functioning of the support structure in the ZOA-Netherlands office over the last five years. The support structure used to be based on country support from different angles: programmes, finance and fundraising. This support structure has been transformed to support from sector specialists, starting from January 2013, in order to implement our work more efficiently and effectively.

An attractive employer In April 2012 an employee satisfaction survey at ZOANetherlands was implemented by Effectory. The results of the survey were such that Effectory nominated us for the award of Best Dutch Employer 2012. We were very pleased to find ourselves in sixteenth place on the list of 269 competitors, in the category ‘companies with fewer than a thousand employees’. The results are based on the opinion of the employees, so there is no official jury report. In particular the survey looked at overall satisfaction and commitment of employees. However, the employee satisfaction survey gave some points of attention regarding accommodation and working conditions in The Netherlands. This will be taken up in 2013. The trainee programme for young expat professionals, launched in 2009, gives young adults a chance to acquire professional experience and gives ZOA a chance to

Executive’s Report

recruit experienced staff within a reasonable period of time. In 2012 ten trainees were active for ZOA. Nine former trainees worked with ZOA in junior management positions, of whom two moved on to full management positions. We are very enthusiastic about these positive results of investing in young professionals.

Partnerships In our programmes ZOA usually enters into a broad variety of partnership arrangements with various organisations, including CBOs, local and international NGOs, local government agencies and knowledge networks. Collaboration with local and international NGOs helps ZOA to focus on its own expertise and experience, and to make optimal use of the capabilities of others, for the benefit of our target groups. In The Netherlands and in Europe, we cooperate with partners in recruiting funds, in raising awareness among the public, in sharing knowledge on implementation and security and in lobbying among policy makers. The Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation is a good example of the diverse advantages of such cooperation, in the complementary implementation of our programmes as well as in sharing knowledge and lobbying for support of rehabilitation in fragile states among politicians and the Dutch public. Another example of positive cooperation is the Christian Emergency Relief Cluster; a consortium of five Dutch Christian NGOs involved in humanitarian relief. Not only can we prevent an overlap in relief activities but we also save money by cooperative fundraising and increase income by approaching our respective constituency. For a complete overview of our partnerships, we refer to page 21.

Setbacks in 2012 As mentioned before, our constituency faces the consequences of a worldwide financial crisis in their daily concerns. We are very touched by the great loyalty of many private donors who really do not easily cut in their contribution to the plight of people in need. Yet our income from private donors in The Netherlands was lower than budgeted, which forces us to adjust the budget for 2013. Through 2012 we have investigated the possibilities to start up a longer term programme in Pakistan after the three year Disaster Response programme (2011 – 2013) has ended. However, this has not yet been successful, due to constraints in resources and the very tight security situation. Since we redefined our programmatic approach in 2011, we intended to develop a multiple year programmatic plan for each of our programme areas. While doing so, we developed the format for this multi-annual plan, and examined the desirability of the various parts of it. It is a much more time consuming process than anticipated. However, we did succeed in establishing the long term objectives for each programme area along the lines of the dimensions of change. The further translation of these objectives will be translated into all programme documents in 2013.

Looking forward to 2013 In the coming year we will pay special attention to: Reporting ZOA wants to improve how we provide insight into the community level change in our programme areas. This change is at the heart of our projects and programmes. To enable us to report on such change, we need to im-


CHAPTER 3

prove data collection and analysis. Staff with experience in data collection and analysis will be appointed in several programme countries in 2013. Learning ability Specific attention will go to strengthening the learning ability of ZOA. We want to further improve in learning as an organisation, for example from evaluations, reviews and audits. We also want to improve the learning capacity of individual staff, with more attention for development of knowledge and skills. It is a two-way responsibility: staff is challenged to continue learning and developing, but at the same time they are stimulated to actively share knowledge and experience with colleagues. The learning ability will be strengthened informally but also by organizing several courses in the programme countries and in The Netherlands. Organisational development The organisational changes that were prepared in 2012 will be implemented and fine-tuned throughout 2013. The main objective is to be able to provide more effective and efficient support to the country teams and monitor the programmes, and thus enable further growth and development of programmes in a responsible manner in the coming years. We will implement integrated audits in every programme country in 2013 to get the points of attention clear. The audits – agendas for improvement – will take quite some time, so we expect the fruits of organizational development to be fully visible from 2014. With our heartfelt wish to continue income growth among our constituency, we plan to investigate the structure of the Funding and Communication department in 2013. Any necessary changes will be implemented that same year, in order to be prepared for the future

Executive’s Report

and to be able to continuously providing maximum added value to those we support and those who support us. Specific attention will go to the programmes in Liberia. A growth in the donor portfolio is necessary to be able to continue the Liberia programme.

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4. Report from the Supervisory Board The Supervisory Board is a body that represents the constituency. The members contribute expertise from various fields. The Supervisory Board has formal responsibilities, such as appointing the Chief Executive Officer and approving the budget. It also provides general supervision and advice. The Chief Executive Officer is responsible for executive decisions and daily management. The Supervisory Board ensures that the policy implemented by the CEO corresponds with the (multi-annual) policy plans and budgets that have been adopted and approved.

Dr. ir. H. Paul MPA, chairman. Head of Agency, Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority J.W. Boogerd, retired banker Drs. B. Brand MCM, town clerk/general director of the municipality Oldebroek Drs. J. Kamphorst, independent interim manager and management consultant Mr. B.J. van Putten, retired mayor

Supervisory Board members receive no financial compensation for their work. They can claim expenses incurred in the course of their duties as Supervisory Board members. The same rules apply to their claims as those that apply to ZOA employees.

Ing. K.A. de Vries MEd, geography teacher at Prins Maurits Christian Highschool in Middelharnis

Members of the Supervisory Board

Two members, including the chairman, form the so-called remuneration committee, while the audit-committee consists of three members of the Supervisory Board.

The Supervisory Board members serve a term of five years, and can be re-elected once, making their maximum term ten years. Our website www.zoa-international.com lists the members by name and indicates their period of service, as well as indicating additional offices that members hold.

Drs. A.W. Westerveld, MPH, physician. Works on preventive healthcare for Provincial Health Care Fryslân.

The Supervisory Board in 2012 The Supervisory Board began a process of further professionalisation in 2012. This includes reconsidering tasks and responsibilities, size, competences, frequency of meetings etc. Pending this process the current members were asked to stay in office. Finalisation of the professionalisation

process is planned for the end of 2013. The Supervisory Board met five times in 2012. The regular items appeared on the agenda: Ǧ approval of the annual accounts for 2011 Ǧ budget and annual plan for 2013 Ǧ salary and additional offices of the CEO Ǧ quarterly reports from the CEO Ǧ risk analysis and risk control Ǧ good governance check Ǧ long range budget Ǧ meeting with the Works Council (twice) and the Management Team (twice) Specific subjects that were on the agenda in 2012 were the Employee Satisfaction Survey and an investigation carried out by an external consultant on the support structure in the ZOA-Netherlands office. The Supervisory Board gave support to the proposals for organisational change, following this investigation. Members of the Supervisory Board met with the International Management Team during the Inter Regional Meetings in March and October. The audit committee focuses mainly on strengthening the internal audit function. The audit committee met four times in 2011, twice together with the external accountant.


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Salary and additional offices of the CEO The remuneration committee conducts performance interviews with the CEO. This committee also sets the salary of the CEO. The remuneration committee meets at least once a year. The Supervisory Board has, upon the recommendation of the Remuneration Committee, determined the amount of the management remuneration and additional benefits to be paid to the CEO. The remuneration policy is reviewed regularly, most recently in 2011. In determining remuneration policy and remuneration, ZOA adheres to VFI’s advisory scheme for the remuneration of management of charitable organisations [Adviesregeling Beloning Directeuren van Goede Doelen] and the code of governance for charitable organisations [Code Wijffels] (see www.vfi.nl). Under the advisory scheme, a maximum annual remuneration is determined on the basis of weighted criteria. The position of CEO within ZOA was classified by the Supervisory Board in group J in the so-called basic score for management positions [Basis Score voor Directiefuncties – BSD]. This corresponds with a maximum annual remuneration of € 140,046 (1 fte / 12 months). In 2012 the actual income of the CEO was within the maximum set by VFI, namely Euro 100,051. For an exact overview, we refer to the financial statements, chapter 11 page 120. Each year the Supervisory Board examines whether the additional offices held by the CEO are compatible with those of CEO of ZOA. The Board has found that the additional

Report from the Supervisory Board

offices of the CEO are compatible with his responsibilities for ZOA. In 2012 the additional offices of the CEO were: Ǧ Board member of EU-CORD Ǧ Board member of Co-Prisma Ǧ Board member of the Bakker- de Jong Fonds (a fund which enables young people to study at a theological college)

Approval Annual Report The audit reports prepared by the auditor KPMG were presented in the meeting of the Supervisory Board on 16 April 2013. The Audit Committee reviewed these reports comprehensively in the presence of the independent auditors and internal auditor. The independent auditors reported that there were no major weaknesses in the organisation, internal audit work or risk management system. The Supervisory Board concurs with the results of the audit. Following the final findings of the examination by the Audit Committee and by the Supervisory Board, the Supervisory Board has raised no objections. In view of this approval, the Annual Report including the financial statements prepared by the CEO is accepted as submitted. The Supervisory Board would like to thank all the ZOA employees in ‘the North’ and ‘the South’ for their good work and commitment during 2012.


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Organisation chart Supervisory Board

ZOA Netherlands supports the country organisations with policy cohesion and continuity, quality control, exchange of knowledge, financial management, fundraising, communication and staff recruitment.

CEO

The country organisations have their own Country Management Teams and operate largely independently, enabling them to accommodate local developments.

Internal Audit

Programme Department

Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (MFS-2)

Security Support

Human Resources Department

Monitoring and Policy Department

Fundraising and communication Department

Finance Department

Programme Countries

Disaster Response Unit

Ha誰ti

Yemen

Pakistan

Afghanistan

Burundi

Cambodja

DR Congo

Myanmar

Sri Lanka

Sudan

South Sudan

Ethiopia

Thailand

Liberia

Uganda


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5. Organisation Organisational structure See figure on page 17. The country organisations have their own Country Management Teams and operate largely independently, enabling them to accommodate local developments. The International Management Team meets half-yearly during the Interregional Meeting. The meeting is instrumental in sharing best practices and policy development. ZOA-Netherlands supports the country organisations with policy cohesion and continuity, quality control, exchange of knowledge, financial management, fundraising, communication and staff recruitment. Support teams at ZOA-Netherlands provide support for the country programmes. Each support team is comprised of members from the three operational departments Programmes, Finance and Funding, as well as one member from the Monitoring and Policy Development department. Upon request a member from the Human Resource department will attend support team meetings. In 2012, an external consultant evaluated this support structure that functioned for the last five years. Based on his findings, the consultant advised to transform the support structure to sectorial support from sector specialists, in order to implement more efficient and effective. This advice is adopted by the CEO, and will start from January 2013.

Staff In 2012 an average of 69 people worked at head office in Apeldoorn (approx. 59 fte). Male-female ratio is 50-50. There were 31 expats (trainees and junior staff excluded) working in fifteen programme countries. With trainees and junior staff included, 44 expats were working with ZOA during at least a part of 2012. ZOA-staff in total is 906 at 31 December 2012, with local staff accounting for the majority of this group. Volunteers Volunteers add considerable value to the organisation and their contribution is very much appreciated. Fourteen volunteers worked at the office of ZOA-Netherlands. Three volunteers were involved in translating English reports into Dutch for our donors, and a few dozens of volunteers were involved during the Walk4Water event.Six accountants from an accounting company in our constituency were available for unpaid internal audits in the programme countries. In The Netherlands 568 local volunteers (twelve more than in 2011) organised a door-to-door collection in their communities. It is a time-consuming job to organize this, and we are happy with the committed people involved. All together they motivated 16,949 people nationwide to go door-to-door. The huge numbers of people involved and the financial result makes the door-to-door collection a valuable campaign. However, the number of collectors decreased 1,6% compared to 2011. It requests more and more investment to attract and retain volunteers for this kind of voluntary commitment.

Statement of accountability ZOA subscribes to the following principles: Ǧ Within the organisation, supervision (adopting or approving plans and carefully reviewing the organisation and its results) is kept separate from governance i.e. execution; Ǧ The organisation strives continuously to allocate resources optimally to enable ZOA to operate effectively and systematically to achieve its objectives. This is set forth in our quality and control model; Ǧ The organisation aims to optimize relations with stakeholders. ZOA focuses on information provision to gather and register wishes, questions and complaints. Both in the Netherlands and in the areas where ZOA operates, the entire organisation is in constant contact with stakeholders to make ZOA’s work possible. The detailed statement of accountability appears in full on our website www.zoa.nl (in Dutch).

Quality standards and codes ZOA has committed itself to the following codes of conduct and standards: Ǧ Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief Ǧ Sphere Standards; Ǧ People in Aid Code of Best Practice in the Management and Support of Aid Personnel Ǧ The Good Governance Code for Charities (Wijffels code) Ǧ The VFI fundraising code of conduct Ǧ 2010 Humanitarian Accountability Partnership (HAP) Standard on Accountability and Quality Management.


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Organisation

ZOA’s quality management is certified according to the ISO 9001:2008 standard. Re-certification was realized in 2011. ZOA possesses the hallmark of the Central Bureau of Fundraising (CBF).

Partnerships and networks We cooperate with other NGOs wherever possible, proposing for funds, raising awareness among the public, sharing knowledge on implementation and security and in lobbying among policy makers. Among all the partnerships we highlight here the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation as a good example of the diverse advantages of such cooperation. Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation ZOA is lead agency of the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR), with CARE Nederland, HealthNet TPO and Save the Children Netherlands. Through DCR we have access to the co-financing system of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 2011 the DCR started implementation of a five year rehabilitation programme in six fragile states in Africa: Burundi, Democratic Republic Congo, Liberia, Uganda, Sudan and South-Sudan. Together we work in complementary sectors for rehabilitation of communities: health care, education, water and sanitation, food security, development of economic activities and re-enforcing civil society. In The Netherlands we cooperate in knowledge exchange, advocacy, and awareness raising on the importance of support to fragile states through the website www.dcr-africa.org (English, French, Dutch). In October 2012 a press trip was organized to the DCR-programme in North Kivu, DR Congo. Two journalists joined and published extensive and impressive articles on the needs in Eastern Congo and the work and results of the Consortium.

Partnership developments in 2012 In May 2012 ZOA became a member of the Agri-ProFocus network. Agri-ProFocus is a partnership with Dutch roots promoting farmer entrepreneurship in developing countries. The network operates both at Dutch level and at developing country level, the latter in so-called AgriHubs. On country level, there are connections in Uganda, Ethiopia and South Sudan. We also expect to increase our network in agriculture/agribusiness in The Netherlands, possibly leading towards interesting partnerships. In September 2012 a documentary about the work of the Dutch Consortium Uruzgan was published and parts of it used on national television; rare material because filming in Uruzgan is very sensitive. The film can be found on the common website: www.dutchconsortiumuruzgan.nl (in Dutch only). In November 2012 we received the ‘special consultative status’ with ECOSOC, the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. ECOSOC is the principal organ that coordinates the economic, social and related work of the fourteen United Nations specialized agencies, functional commissions and five regional commissions. ECOSOC provides ZOA access to all kind of UN meetings, for instance major conferences on Millennium Development Goals, climate change and refugee issues. This will enable ZOA to receive more information and to be part of specific high-level discussions on topics that relate to our work and mandate. The Platform Humanitarian Action, a platform of Dutch NGO’s active in emergency relief established in 2011, puts common issues pro-actively on the agenda of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The initiative is successful; in 2012 the Platform is asked by the Ministry to participate in a working group preparing an alternative for tendering.


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21

Organisation

ZOA Networks and Partnerships National networks

Ǧ Member of Partos – Association for Dutch NGO’s working in international aid.

Ǧ ZOA is member of People In Aid - an international, not-for-profit membership organisation.

Ǧ Member of Prisma – Association for Dutch Christian NGO’s working in international relief and cooperation.

Ǧ ZOA is member of HAP International

Ǧ Member of VFI – Branch Association for Dutch fundraising organisations

Dutch Partnerships

Ǧ Member of steering committee of the Dutch Security Network – network of 34 Dutch NGO’s with a focus on security.

Ǧ ZOA is member of DCU - Dutch Consortium Uruzgan. In this consortium ZOA partners with Save the Children Netherlands, Cordaid, HealthNet TPO and Dutch Committee for Afghanistan in activities in Uruzgan, Afghanistan.

Ǧ Member of Agri-ProFocus (APF), a partnership of Dutch organisations and companies that promotes farmer entrepreneurship in developing countries.

Ǧ ZOA is the lead agency of DCR - Dutch Consortium of Rehabilitation, consisting of ZOA, Save the Children Netherlands, CARE Nederland and HealthNet TPO, funded by the Dutch government, implementing programmes in six African countries for the period 2011 – 2015.

Ǧ Member of PSO, a network of Dutch humanitarian organisations, aiming at capacity building of civil society in development countries. Ǧ ZOA participates in the Platform Humanitarian Action – Netherlands (PHA-NL), a platform of Dutch NGO’s active in emergency relief. European networks

Ǧ Together with Red een Kind and Woord en Daad, ZOA forms CDN – Consortium of Dutch NGO’s, working in Myanmar.

Ǧ Member of EU-CORD – a platform of 22 European Christian relief and development agencies.

Ǧ ZOA cooperates with Red een Kind, Dorcas, Woord & Daad and Tear, in a Dutch Emergency Relief Cluster of Christian NGO’s.

Ǧ Member of VOICE - Voluntary Organisations in Cooperation in Emergencies, a network representing 82 NGO’s from 18 European countries, active in humanitarian aid worldwide. International networks

Ǧ ZOA organises with Woord and Daad the “Be Fair” campaign, an awareness raising campaign at high schools on sustainability.

Ǧ Member of ICVA – International Council of Voluntary Agencies. A global network of NGOs that advocates for effective humanitarian action in UN-led humanitarian reform discussions (UNHCR, UNOCHA, IASC).

Ǧ ZOA is a member of the steering committee with Aqua for All, AKVO, Simavi and Amref Flying Doctors, for organizing ‘walk for water’, a fundraising and awareness raising event in Dutch primary schools once a year.

Ǧ ZOA has a special Consultative Status with ECOSOC - Economic Social Council of the UN. Ǧ ZOA is an Observing Member of ALNAP – Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action.

Ǧ Participating in IS-Academy on Human Security in Fragile States - a collaborative research project between Disaster Studies at the Wageningen University, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the five Dutch NGO’s Cordaid, ICCO, Netherlands Red Cross, Oxfam Novib and ZOA.

Partnerships (international)

Ǧ ZOA has Memos of Understanding with World Renew (Canada / USA), Medair (Switzerland) and Stromme Foundation (Norway).


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Organisation

A learning organisation

Environmental responsibility

The Department for Monitoring and Policy Development has played a key role in facilitating ZOA as a learning organisation. The development of thematic policy guidelines, based on field based knowledge and experience, together with implementation tools and training are aspects for continuous improvement of the quality of the programmes.

As stewardship is one of our key values, ZOA focuses on being responsible in the resources we use. In our programme countries, our target group is affected by environmental degradation in their daily lives, that is why we include environmental protection in our programmes.

Main subjects the department worked on in 2012: Ǧ a policy paper on peace building describing the ZOA vision and approach on contribution to more peace and stability in the communities we work in; Ǧ an ex-post evaluation of former ZOA-programmes in Rwanda, Albania, Angola and Cambodia, providing input for the development of phasing out guidelines for ZOA; Ǧ development of an auditing framework including programmatic aspects to be used for the auditing of country programmes; Ǧ revision of monitoring and evaluation guidelines and corresponding tools.

Compliance risks are carefully monitored. Projects with a budget of more than € 400,000 are subject to a comprehensive audit.

At ZOA - Netherlands we include environmental consciousness in our office management, among other resulting in use of FSC-certified paper and environmentally friendly waste management and power consumption. In 2011 ZOA decided to engage in a long term project aimed at the compensation of CO2 emissions caused by ZOA’s intercontinental travel. This project focuses on tree planting and maintenance in Ethiopia, and was prepared for in 2012.

A full-time security officer is responsible to deal with safety risks. Security procedures, training courses and day-to-day contact with field staff in risk areas are given full priority.

Together with Woord en Daad ZOA started the Wees Eerlijk (Be Fair) - campaign, an awareness raising campaign at high schools on sustainability and impact of our lifestyle on other parts of the world.

Anti-fraud and anti-corruption

Risk management Resulting from the re-organisation of the support structure in The Netherlands, the Department for Monitoring and Policy Development will be dissolved from January 2013. Its responsibility for maintenance of thematic policy, learning and exchange between the various ZOA programmes will be taken over by the Programmes Department. For ZOA’s key sectors, sector specialists will take up that role and actively support the country programmes. The responsibility for strategic evaluation and internal auditing will be taken care of by a new department: Audit and Evaluation, covering both finance and organisation as well as programmatic aspects. The results of those audits will be the starting point for further enhancement of the programmes, thus feeding the process of continuous improvement.

Implementation risks are carefully monitored by close supervision of compliance with internal procedures.

Risk management has been formalized within the organisation’s operational procedures. Once a year an extensive risk assessment is carried out. The aim of the risk assessment is to assess all elements of the country programmes and the organisation in the Netherlands and to make an estimation of the risks. Risks, including the mitigating measures taken, are registered and classified. The risks should be followed up immediately; either with mitigating measures or by deliberate acceptance of these risks. The results of the risk assessment give direction to the execution of new country policy plans and are input for the annual internal audit procedures performed by the internal audit department.

A continuity reserve offsets financial risks, and continuing efforts are made for diversification of donors. ZOA assesses each situation of possible reputation risks.

Anti-fraud and anti-corruption policies are in place and communicated with staff, partners and other stakeholders. An effective fraud framework is incorporated in the management control structure. ZOA operates in fragile environments where fraud risks are high. To enlarge the fraud awareness under staff additional training is given at management level and in the countries. Fraud instances are reported to the CEO and based on the nature and extend of the issue it is decided what measures are taken. This can be internal or external investigations. Stakeholders are informed if that is required. Five cases were reported in 2012 (2011: also five). All these cases have been followed up by the CEO and additional procedures are performed. The following examples of fraud can be given: Ǧ In North Afghanistan we received fraud accusations. We have requested an external audit firm to investigate these accusations and based on their findings none of


CHAPTER 5

these accusations has been supported with evidence. Ǧ In South Sudan one of the directors of one of our local partners absconded with ZOA funds. Based on internal investigation and discussions with the Board of this partner it was agreed that the Board was fully responsible for this action and will compensate the costs involved. ZOA is currently working with them to come up with a solution on this matter. Ǧ In Uganda we are confronted with a collusion issue, which resulted in materials purchased for beneficiaries are missing. The matter was identified through ZOA staff and investigated. Based on the outcome of this investigations sanctions to involved persons were put in place successfully.

The Works Council The Works Council represents ZOA staff members with a Dutch employment contract and stands up for their interests. The Works Council regards members of the management teams in the programme countries as constituents as well, regardless of whether they hold Dutch or local employment contracts. The Works Council as a representative of ZOA staff is involved in several organisational and policy developments within ZOA. The Works Council has a diverse range of rights. It has the right to be informed about issues concerning the organisation, such as financial policy. It has the right to approve or disapprove measures concerning staff policy. In other aspects they have an advisory role. The Works Council consists of five members. Three work at ZOA - Netherlands, and two work abroad (Uganda and Congo). The main subjects the Works Council was involved in in 2012 were the Terms & conditions for International Management Members, the results of the Employee Satisfacti-

Organisation

on Review, and the Organizational Development trajectory. The latter caused a number of changes in ZOA’s organizational structure. The Works Council repeatedly asked attention for Human Resources issues during this process. The Works Council also played an active role towards the CEO in representing the employees’ concerns and questions. The Works Council was also presented with the financial statements, the results of 2011 and the budget for 2012. The results of the meetings with the CEO were presented to ZOA-staff in the OR-talks, quarterly newsletter of the Works Council.

International Management Team per 31 December 2012 Ǧ Johan Mooij, Chief Executive Officer Ǧ Director of Programmes, vacant (per 1 January 2013 Arco van Wessel) Ǧ Dirk Koelewijn, Director of Finance Ǧ Leo den Besten, Director of Audit and Evaluation Ǧ Ewout Suithoff, Director of Funding and Communication Ǧ Wil Omlo, Director of Human Resources Ǧ Joop Teeuwen, Country Director Afghanistan Ǧ Marius Stehouwer, Country Director Burundi Ǧ Š—“ŽŠǏŠŽ‘‘ƽ”š“™—žŽ—Šˆ™”—†’‡”‰Ž† Ǧ Jan Huls, Country Director DR of Congo Ǧ Maureen Graybill, Country Director Ethiopia Ǧ Tsjeard Bouta, Country Director Liberia Ǧ Simon Langbroek, Country Director CDN-Myanmar Ǧ Kevin Beattie, Country Director South Sudan Ǧ Bernhard Kerschbaum, Country Director Sri Lanka Ǧ Bart Dorsman, Country Director Sudan Ǧ Duangporn Saussay, Country Director Thailand Ǧ Guido de Vries, Country Director Uganda In February 2013 Guido de Vries became Country Director ZOA Sri Lanka and Gerard Hooiveld became Country Director ZOA Uganda. In April 2013, Geoff Andrews became Country Director ZOA Burundi.

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6. Our Approach Fragile environments ZOA works in countries known as fragile states, where society has been disrupted by conflict, violence and natural disasters. Factors that determine whether to start working in a country are: Ǧ Conflict and instability as well as the lack of capability in communities and on the part of authorities in dealing with local conflicts constructively. Ǧ Lack of access to basic resources and services, particularly among poor and vulnerable groups. Ǧ The level of support that the local authorities or organisations are able to provide for the population. Ǧ The number of persons affected.

Programmatic approach We implement our programmes using a programmatic approach. Without aiming to be exhaustive, the following characteristics of the programmatic approach can be mentioned: Ǧ Focus on a specific geographical area, and awareness of its specific context Ǧ Ownership and community participation including accountability to beneficiaries Ǧ Shared vision between ZOA, beneficiary groups and partner organisations on desired changes Ǧ Focus on outcome defined as change at community and beneficiary level Ǧ Added value of collaboration with other actors Ǧ Building local capacities and resilience for future risks. In most of our programmes we cooperate with local partners. This has several advantages, such as that they

have knowledge about the local context and the dynamics between all actors. Through working together we contribute at the same time to building their capacity in for example planning and management, and to the sustainability of the programmes because these local partners are there to stay after ZOA will have left.

Three dimensions of community level change To program, monitor and evaluate change at community level ZOA uses a three-dimensional change framework. The three dimensions enable us to remain focussed on what our work is all about. Ǧ Access to basic resources and services Households should have sufficient access to food, water, education, health care, shelter and clothing. Under this dimension, there are four aspects that deserve specific attention: food production and income, basic services, public information, and resilience to external shocks and adaptation to long term changes. Ǧ Community governance and inclusion This dimension examines social organisation at a community level. Without community level organisation, social cohesion and the active inclusion of the most vulnerable and otherwise excluded people in community-based organisations, improvements in livelihoods are unlikely to reach the entire community. Ǧ Peace and stability Apart from the larger (political) conflicts that affect many of the communities that ZOA works with, conflict-induced social disintegration and scarcity of resources like land and water can lead to a host

of local conflicts that, in turn, can seriously undermine people’s opportunities to rebuild their lives and livelihoods. This third dimension examines these local conflicts and focuses on two complementary aspects: conflict management and peaceful coexistence. ZOA considers contributing to peace a crucial strategy for strengthening livelihood opportunities among people living in situations where conflict is closely linked to livelihood restrictions.

Core sectors Within the larger framework of our programmatic approach, we have developed some specific fields of sectoral expertise and experience. Livelihoods and food security ZOA’s main contribution to community level change is in the field of livelihoods and food security. In the context of conflict affected fragility, livelihoods comprise how people access and mobilise resources that enable them to pursue the goals necessary for their survival and longer-term well-being, thereby reducing the vulnerability that is created and exacerbated by conflict. ZOA’s focus on livelihoods and food security covers three main clusters of activities: Ǧ Œ—Žˆš‘™š—Š•—”‰šˆ™Ž”“˜š••”—™ Ǧ “ˆ”’Š˜š••”—™ Ǧ †—Š™˜š••”—™ We are aware that our contribution to private sector development is modest, because processes of economic development require ongoing involvement in long term development programmes. Nonetheless, we believe that we can make an essential contribution to the engage-


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CHAPTER 6

ment of households and community organisations in economic processes, and help them shift their mindsets from daily survival to economic recovery. Basic education ZOA believes that education is crucial for the promotion of independence, hope and long term improvement of livelihoods. Our overall vision for education, therefore, is that all school-age children within a community receive education. In order to achieve this, communities should have access to sufficient and sustainable resources for education, and they should actively participate in the planning and monitoring of education services. Moreover, local government agencies often need support in order to be able to take responsibility for education. ZOA’s main focus in education is on basic education, both formal and informal, which includes primary education, lower secondary education, and functional adult literacy. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) ZOA strives to promote equitable access to safe drinking water and sanitation , and the practice of hygiene within communities, at a level that is conducive to living healthy lives. ZOA’s focus in this respect is on safe and basic water, sanitation, and hygiene. This includes the construction or repair of water points and latrines, and the formation and training of WASH-related community-based organisations (CBOs) to manage and maintain common facilities and promote and monitor their equitable access and use. Hygiene awareness training is also included. Sector choices in relief ZOA’s sectoral focus on livelihoods and food security, education, and water and sanitation applies to both rehabilitation and emergency programming. Given our specific experience and expertise in realizing household shelter solutions in emergency situations, ZOA also focuses on shelter in its emergency programming.

Our Approach

Gender equality Communities in fragile settings are confronted with a variety of common social issues and problems that go beyond sector-specific areas of attention. With respect to these so-called cross-cutting issues ZOA pays specific attention to gender equality in its programmes.

Environment Many of the target group’s problems arise from being extremely vulnerable to forces of nature. Drought, floods and scarcity can cause upheaval. That is why we contribute to averting the exhaustion of soil and depletion of wells by protecting the natural environment and by diversifying sources of income.

Multi-stakeholder approach ZOA applies a multi-stakeholder approach: ZOA formulates programme objectives together with all of the stakeholders. In each situation ZOA determines how best to work towards these objectives and complement what is already there. ZOA works with local authorities, with local organisations, companies or groups of farmers, while in other situations it works primarily with its own staff. Local presence with own staff generates a major advantage in the development of knowledge about, and sensitivity to the local context and the dynamics between all actors present. A local presence also provides us with the flexibility to launch and implement programmes in areas where no suitable partner organisation is present.

Beneficiary Accountability ZOA became a full member of HAP International in March 2011. The objective of beneficiary accountability is to give the target group a voice. ZOA intends to use the HAP Standard as a tool to assess and improve accountability to and interaction with its beneficiaries.

In Sri Lanka, the baseline results that were obtained in 2011, formed the basis for the development in 2012 of a number of tools and guidelines for strengthening beneficiary accountability: a ZOA Accountability Framework, Information Sharing Policy and Format, and the further improvement of complaints procedures and practices for beneficiaries, partners and other programme related stakeholders. The Accountability Framework was approved by the International Management Team, but left a few gaps, mainly with regards to the stakeholder group Constituency. These gaps will be filled in 2013. ZOA DR Congo became the second country that started to work on implementation of the HAP Standard in its processes and procedures. A self-assessment to the HAP Benchmarks was conducted by ZOA’s HAP coordinator during a field visit. In preparation for that field visit, several training materials were developed in French. As part of the process of complying with the HAP Standard and working on quality management, the ZOA Code of Conduct was revised and the Human Resources Department is working on an internal complaints procedure for staff. Support has been given to the Disaster Response Unit to promote beneficiary accountability in the work of ZOA and its partners in Yemen. Empowerment of beneficiaries is an essential aspect of restoring lives and livelihoods. Accountability to beneficiaries is therefore at the heart of ZOA, because it will empower beneficiaries, by giving them control over projects and activities that concern them and by including their vision and capabilities. In that way the quality of ZOA’s work will further improve.


CHAPTER 6 8

OURApproach Our PROGRAMMES

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CHAPTER 7

7. Funding and Communication ZOA is funded by more than 40,000 private donors in the Netherlands, by institutional donors, partner NGOs and external fundraising organisations. Within the group Private donors we distinguish individual donors, companies and funds, churches and schools. Account managers maintain contact with these various groups to raise funds and communicate results of projects to which they donated. Fundraising usually has a strong awareness raising component too. Among our institutional donors we find the Dutch government, the European Commission including ECHO, the Australian government through AusAID, the US government with USAID, as well as multilateral agencies like UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP and WorldBank. ZOA is pleased to maintain good relationships with partners that organise external fundraising campaigns for ZOA-projects, like Draagt Elkanders Lasten (DEL, Carry Each other’s Burden), EO-Metterdaad and Happy Gift.

Besides the crisis there are two other reasons that can be given for not realizing the budgeted income. One is that no major emergency relief campaign was launched during 2012. With emergency income being between 1 and 2 million Euros in the previous years, this accounts for at least part of the shortfall in income.

However, the number of companies involved with ZOA as donors still grew. Worth mentioning is the substantial growth of the number of ZOA Business Ambassadors, from 39 to 51. These ZBAs commit themselves to a certain country programme for at least three years and 5,000 Euros per year.

The door-to-door collection raised € 925,207, nearly € 90,000 less than the budgeted € 1,015,000. Main reason is the decrease in the number of collectors by 1.6% compared to 2011. We conclude that it requires more and more investment to attract and retain volunteers for this kind of voluntary commitment.

Among major donors (private donors donating more than € 1,000 per year) and legacies we also observed a growth in numbers and income.

3,4% 4,2% Expenses ZOA in 2012

Funding 2012 Private donors in The Netherlands In 2012 the consequences of the worldwide economic crisis affected ZOA’s income for the first time. We were unable to realize the budgeted income growth, especially among private donors and companies.

We conclude that the commitment among our constituents is still high, and we are very grateful for it. At the

92,4%

Spent on objectives 92,4% Fundraising costs 4,2% Costs of management and administration 3,4%


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CHAPTER 7

Funding and Communication

The website www.zoa-international.com gives more general information and updates on ZOA’s programmes. 19,7% 4,4%

Income ZOA in 2012

75,9%

same time we see that we have to invest more time and money in attracting and retaining donors and volunteers. This in part explains the rise in the CBF-percentage (percentage costs / income from own fundraising) from 14.4% to 17.4%. The other - main - reason for this increase is due to the fact that there was no major emergency relief campaign in 2012, which resulted in lower income from own fundraising activities against a comparable level to last year of expenses on own fundraising. At any rate, the maximum set by CBF is 25%, so ZOA is well within that limit. Campaigns In the Fairplee and Spicy Nuts campaigns in 2012 we actively sought cooperation with companies among our constituents. A ZOA Business Ambassador from the Cambodia team committed himself to the Fairplee campaign by donating a euro to sanitation projects for every ‘Like’ on Fairplee’s Facebook. For the annual Spicy Nuts campaign we joined forces with a national bakery company, with hundreds of selling points at local markets nationwide.

Income own fundraising activities 19,7% Income from third party campaigns 4,4% Project Grants 75,9%

Institutional donors and funds Despite the challenging economic circumstances, we observed a growth in our institutional funding. Main contributors to this growth were USAID / OFDA that provided considerable funds for our programmes in Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, DR Congo and Sudan, and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs with its fund for reconstruction programmes in Afghanistan, Burundi, Uganda, DR Congo, Ethiopia, South Sudan and Sudan. We invested further in building relationships with foundations and charities in the United States of America. This has not yielded financial result so far, but we realize that relationships are a long-term investment. We certainly expect positive results from these investments for the coming years.

Reporting The method and frequency of reporting to institutional donors, partner organisations and partners in external campaigns is usually laid down in the contract. Regular reporting as well as possible field visits by donors are usual ways to inform them about progress and results.

Partners in external campaigns like DEL (connected to a Christian newspaper) and EO-Metterdaad (connected to a Christian broadcasting organization) are invited to visit projects. Private donors committed to a specific project, such as companies, schools, trust funds and major donors, receive progress reports, according to the agreements made. If they prefer, the reports are translated from English or French into Dutch by voluntary translators. All other private donors are informed on developments and results of our programmes through general channels like the Dutch website www.zoa.nl, the ZOAmagazine three times a year and a monthly email newsletter. In 2012 we organized a meeting on the emergency relief campaign for the Horn of Africa in 2011, in combination with our partners in the Emergency Relief Cluster, Woord en Daad, Dorcas and Red een Kind. We also organized three regional meetings on ZOA in general. Though these were very valuable meetings with our constituency, the number of people attending was quite low, twenty at most. Worth mentioning is that we perceived great trust in our work among those who came to these meetings, which is remarkable since the general feeling in The Netherlands towards humanitarian NGOs tends to be quite negative. Reporting is an essential aspect in maintaining and expanding the relationship with our donors. The process as well as the content of reporting is a specific point of attention for 2013. We are investigating how we can provide better insight into change in our programme areas to all of our donors, institutional as well as our Dutch constituency.


CHAPTER 7

Funding and Communication

Communication Using detailed mail request registration, we serve our constituents with information according to their wishes. The ZOAmagazine is sent three times a year to our individual donors. Circulation is approximately 50,000 copies. Though we receive positive reactions now and then, we want to invest in structural feedback from the readers in 2013 to attune the information more to their wishes. We continued to contact media whenever we had interesting information from our programme areas. Highlight was the press trip to the Democratic Republic of Congo, where two journalists visited the programme of the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation. Both wrote extensive articles in their newspaper / magazine. The contacts were also rewarding when rebel forces approached Goma a few weeks later. The two journalists used their recent contacts with local ZOA-staff to be informed and publish about the worrisome situation.

36% 64%

We are aware of the positive impact that social media can have in keeping the constituency informed and to enable two-way communication. However, we have not yet fully integrated social media into our usual communication channels. We have realized some increase: 1448 Facebook friends (2011: 1196) and 1367 Twitter followers (2011: 936). Especially around events (Walk4Water) and campaigns (spicy nuts) social media proved to add value by creating attention and enthusiasm. In November we raised awareness about circumcision of girls, following the showing of the film Cut that thing from ZOA Uganda at the Berlin Film Festival interfilm. Worth mentioning is the more active use of ZOA’s YouTube channel, resulting in touching, beautiful short films that call for action and show ZOA’s work in the field. These films are also useful with fundraising and constituency meetings. The YouTube channel is not yet being used to its full potential.

Income designation in 2012 Income with specific designation 36% Income without specific designation 64%

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Complaint management ZOA has a formal procedure for dealing with complaints by Dutch constituents. In general ZOA will respond by telephone. Explanation of a situation and swift resolution of the problem usually proves to be satisfactory. In 2012 ZOA Netherlands received 434 complaints, a substantial increase (2011: 176). For an important part this increase was caused by the 187 complaints about the Walk4Water-website not functioning properly. In the first half of 2012 we received 29 complaints about telemarketing and 46 on sent mailings. Reasons were investigated and appropriate measures taken, resulting in respectively 4 and 3 complaints in the second half of the year.


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8. Awareness raising Besides our programmatic objectives in the programme countries, we also have a statutory objective to raise awareness in The Netherlands regarding the plight of victims of violent conflict and natural disasters. Public awareness entails increasing awareness of the underlying causes of inequalities and conflicts in the world, as well as affecting people’s attitudes and choices in daily life. In our globalized world with its increasing interdependency, we believe that promoting public support in the Netherlands can contribute to the well-being of people in fragile countries, probably in the long run. Raising awareness is closely related to raising funds. Often – though not always – activities to raise awareness are combined with a fundraising component. Fundraising activities themselves have an awareness raising component. The Walk4Water event is a good example. This event developed over the years in a real family outing, and does not only raise funds for WASH-projects, but also created awareness about the importance of clean drinking water among the more than 1,000 participants in 2012. Activities to raise awareness are primarily aimed at primary and secondary schools and churches. We feel the importance of educating young people about the world they grow up in, and teach them that they are connected with children and people worldwide. With church members we appeal to the Biblical vision that God calls us to do justice and to protect the weak and the vulnerable.

Awareness raising in 2012 Primary schools Primary schools and secondary schools can call on ZOA to provide lessons focused on the situation of children in our programme countries, in combination with own fundraising activities like a fair or a sponsor event. The number of schools in action for ZOA increased from 206 in 2011 to 257 in 2012 (planned: 250). This is mainly due to the increasing number of schools participating in the ‘Wandelen voor Water’-campaign: locally organized ‘Walks for Water’ for primary schools. ZOA is a member of the steering committee, together with Simavi, Akvo and AMREF Flying Doctors, a cooperation that results in a well-known nationwide event. In 2012, 82 schools participated for ZOA in Wandelen voor Water, many more than anticipated (2010: 24, 2011: 48). All 82 schools also used the materials provided on the theme ‘water’ from the WWkidz-series of thematic children’s books. Secondary schools For secondary schools we developed thematic lessons on poverty, entitled Just Care, in cooperation with our partner organisation Woord en Daad. The lessons were all reviewed and updated in 2012. From 2011 – 2014 we also organize the campaign Wees Eerlijk (Be Fair), again in cooperation with Woord en Daad. The Wees Eerlijk campaign inspires young people to live sustainably and fair, and to translate Biblical concepts such as justice and stewardship to everyday

choices. The number of pupils reached – 3,790 pupils in 16 schools - lags behind the objectives – 6,500 -, due to a longer preparation period than anticipated and due to a lower number of pupils per school. We enjoy a long term relationship with one particular high school, de Driestar. Every year they organize a 24 hour–lesson marathon as a fundraising event with third year students, preceded by awareness raising lessons. A group of pupils with the highest proceeds visit the programme area in Uganda and are involved in preparing the next year’s campaign. Churches Since 2011 ZOA is a participant in the Micha Campaign, part of the international Micah Challenge. In 2012, together with Light for the World, Tear and the Evangelical Alliance, we participated in organizing the Micah Sunday, in which churches paid attention to inequality and injustice worldwide. We offered liturgical suggestions and Biblical reflections on the theme, to be used in services and worship. More than 750 churches made use of the materials or paid in any way attention to the theme (a 100 more than anticipated). This activity is closely connected with our core value justice and contributes to raising awareness among our constituents of the underlying causes of inequalities and conflicts in the world, as well as affecting people’s attitudes and choices in daily life.


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9. ZOA Worldwide

AFGHANISTAN

MYANMAR

SUDAN

HAITI

PAKISTAN LIBERIA SOUTH SUDAN DR CONGO

CAMBODIA

YEMEN ETHIOPIA

BURUNDI

THAILAND SRI LANKA


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CHAPTER 9

Afghanistan


CHAPTER 9

37

Afghanistan

Afghanistan Supporting victims of war, drought and floods towards better livelihoods ZOA has been active in Afghanistan since 2000. The many returnees are straining the resilience of the already impoverished population. In our programmes in the North (Saripul and Jawzjan Provinces), the South (Uruzgan Province) and in Kabul Province, we focus on WASH activities, livelihoods and occasionally emergency relief. We also pay a great deal of attention to capacity building of local NGOs and local governance structures at village level.

Twenty-five farmer groups with 25 members on average received training and good quality seed under the Kitchen Garden Project. This project was a success, and complementary to the Horticulture and Livestock Project under the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (World Bank funded). The HLP has, however, ended and it is as yet unclear whether there will be a next phase, which is a pity because the Kitchen Gardening Project is too small to run independently.

ZOA Afghanistan in 2012

We started a new programme in Kabul province. This has been challenging because the team is – except for one member - completely new to ZOA. It is encouraging how well the team has started implementing WASH activities in Deh Sabz district.

The North was hard hit in 2012: first the people were faced with severe drought which led to a serious reduction in harvest. Then came the floods which swept away many houses, especially in Saripul and also in Uruzgan. Both the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and the constituency in The Netherlands responded quickly to enable emergency relief. We were able to build 363 shelters for vulnerable families whose houses were destroyed in Saripul, to repair roads and irrigation channels and distribute food and non-food items to affected people in Saripul, Jawzjan and Uruzgan. In the North ZOA is supporting Community Development Committees in implementing their activities under de National Solidarity Programme. The training of and cooperation with these CDCs in the past few years is bearing fruit; their capacity in managing projects has been enhanced. In Saripul we continued to facilitate the National Solidarity Programme with 54 CDCs, and started two new rounds of the NSP with 252 CDCs and 360 CDCs respectively.

Two local partners have been implementing ZOA’s WASH programme in Uruzgan. Besides hardware activities such as constructing new wells and repairing old ones, ZOA staff focused on hygiene awareness and capacity building of local Water Committees and mechanics to ensure that wells are being looked after. It is really encouraging to see that there are more and more opportunities for women to be involved in hygiene training, as trainers or as participants. ZOA is also building capacities of all nine local partners involved in the Dutch Consortium for Uruzgan. Training topics were, among other: project management, project planning, reporting, finance and monitoring and evaluation. Staff from the local Department of Rural Rehabilitation and Development, and the Department of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock also participated in the training.

Disaster and emerging local governance Joop Teeuwen, Country Director ZOA Afghanistan: “Having lived in Afghanistan for more than twelve years, I am still amazed how flooding can wreak such havoc in an otherwise so dry land. I firmly believe that being there as ZOA with the communities when disaster strikes, has helped cement relationships. It was also very neat to see one of our partners in the South quickly being on the scene of flooding, to help victims whose houses were destroyed. Local organisations acting alongside the communities are a true sign of strengthening local governance and cohesion”.


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Afghanistan

ZOA Afghanistan Worked in:

Southern Programme: Uruzgan province | Northern Programme: Jawzjan and Saripul provinces | Central Programme: Deh Sabz district in Kabul province

Focused on:

WASH | Emergency relief | Special attention to local governance by capacity building for Community Development Committees and local government

Results included the following:

Northern Programme: Facilitated National Solidarity Programme through 54 CDCs in Saripul, co-funded through the ‘spicy nut’ campaign | Start of the new round of NSP with 252 CDC’s in Saripul Province | 363 shelters were built for vulnerable families whose houses were destroyed in the spring floods in Saripul | 5 new wells constructed | 24,700 drought affected people received assistance through Cash for Work in Saripul | 325 households (approx. 2,000 persons) flood affected people received food and non-food items in Saripul and Jawzjan | 800 male and female farmers received seeds and training | 25 male and 15 female farmer groups (with 20 farmers on average) received farmers’ training. Southern Programme: 155 households (approx. 1,000 persons) flood affected people received food- and non-food items | 107 wells constructed and 243 rehabilitated, water committees trained for each well, all wells are functioning | 600 latrines constructed | 8,480 households received hygiene training | 64 CDC-members received training on resolving local conflicts. It is reported they are applying their new skills in addressing community issues. Central Programme: 16 wells constructed, 19 rehabilitated, and water committees trained | 100 latrines constructed | 831 households received hygiene training | 7,5 km irrigation channel rehabilitated | 6 culverts and 4 diversion dams constructed

Worked with:

The local departments of the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) in all four provinces | In Central and South ZOA also deals with the Provincial Governor | ZOA’s South Region staff works with two local NGOs: ARPD and NERU | For reporting purposes ZOA reports to the Afghan Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of Economy and the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development | In Uruzgan ZOA continued to work with the Dutch Consortium for Uruzgan

Staff 31 December 2012:

161

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | WorldBank (via MRRD and MAIL) | Royal Netherlands Embassy | ZOA Netherlands (spicy nuts campaign, emergency funds) | Aqua for All | USAID / OFDA | AusAID

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 4.348.014

Budget 2013:

€ 3.735.527


CHAPTER 9

39

Afghanistan

“I learned the importance of washing my hands and the impact of hygiene on our health”. A house and an income Abdulmanan from Imami Kalan village in Saripul Province is only 11 years old, but already the man in the house since his father died. His mother is not strong, but she sews clothes and hats to earn some income for her and her five children. The loss of his father was very hard for Abdulmanan. Then, in spring 2012 the family faced a new disaster when the floods destroyed their house. During the survey in the villages, ZOA-staff identified them as eligible beneficiaries for a new house. Not only did they receive a shelter, but the mother also received a small amount of money. Tears were running down her cheeks, when she told us: “This is the best gift I have ever received. I am going to use this money as best as I can.” She told us that she would purchase a new sewing machine to be able to make more and better clothes and hats to sell.”

Now look: children wearing shoes! ZOA supports vulnerable families in Deh Sabz by raising awareness on hygiene issues, thus preventing diseases. During hygiene training people learn about food safety, the importance of clean drinking water, hygiene en sanitation. 55-year-old Shah Khanom learned about personal hygiene and the importance of wearing shoes. “Our mothers used to tell us that walking on bare feet would make us happy – the more paces, the happier you’d be. We weren’t aware of the fact that walking on bare feet can cause disease, because of bacteria being able to penetrate through your skin. We and our mothers were not aware of hygiene. And now look: today all our children are wearing shoes!” Sayd Ayob, a shop owner in Pay Monar village: “The main thing that I learned was about the importance of washing your hands and the impact of hygiene on our health. I am happy I took part in the training!” Wearing shoes, washing your hands – it’s the simple things that can make the difference.


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Burundi


CHAPTER 9

41

Burundi

Burundi Share and produce ZOA began funding Burundian partner organisations in August 2010. ZOA Burundi obtained legal registration and was able to start its own operations in 2011. ZOA supports people who returned to Burundi after a prolonged stay in refugee camps in Tanzania, and at the same time their ‘counterparts’, those who occupied their land for decades and are willing to relinguish part of it to the repatriates.

ZOA Burundi in 2012 Land rights and productivity Peace in Burundi is closely connected with the sustainable resolution of land conflicts. ZOA started its programme with the objective to improve food security for 2,700 households that shared their land-under-conflict. The starting point is to sort out land rights. Returnee and host farmer together come to an amicable agreement on how to divide the land they both have rights to, without needing to take the matter to court. ZOA provides assistance to them through its partners, in having these agreements laid down in official documents with the Commission National des Terres et Autres Biens. After this procedure they are provided access to assistance to improve the productivity of their plots of land, for instance the improvement of structure and fertility of the soil, training, distribution of tools and access to improved seeds. The direct benefit for the farmers concerned in solving their land conflict this way is called ‘peace dividend’. The approach to connect land security with increased land productivity is much appreciated by the national and district government.

Post-harvest The next step in improving food security is to reduce the considerable post-harvest loss. The four storage areas built in 2011 help people to keep their seeds in good condition for the next season, and to manage the moment of selling surplus at an opportune moment. In 2012 local producers sold 40 tons of beans after eight months of storage, at double the price, benefitting the associated farmers. The combined use of fertilizer and manure has led to enormous yield increases, when other requirements were respected: sound sowing, weeding and respecting the time table. The improved seeds for beans and maize are much appreciated and farmers are surprised by the huge production increase. Especially the new technique of sowing in lines is new to them. The clearly visible difference between the results of the new and the old techniques motivates others to make the step towards these new technique as well. Business Ambassadors The Burundi team of ZOA Business Ambassadors contributes to the quality of the project that they support financially and through their technical expertise. In 2012 their contribution enabled the design and implementation of adult literacy, which gives our beneficiaries the very practical ability to calculate amounts of seeds and fertilizer, change and profit.

Both food and peace Marius Stehouwer, Country Director ZOA Burundi: “During meetings with repatriates and host population problems are discussed openly. People agree that overpopulation, hunger, lack of arable land and hatred are reasons for conflicts. But there is also a broad consensus on the necessity of solutions. Without these solutions farmers will not invest in their land, productivity will remain low and hunger will continue to nurture vulnerability and violence. Under guidance of ZOA’s partners, pain and hope are openly talked about, until people together are committed to finding a resolution and cooperating by working towards a better future for both of them.”


42

CHAPTER 9

Burundi

ZOA Burundi Worked in:

Makamba province: communes Mabanda and Vugizo

Focused on:

Livelihoods | Special attention to peace and stability

Results include the following:

In total 616 households that have settled their repatriation-related land conflict have been assisted (manure, fertilizer, improved seeds, new farming practices) to increase yields for beans and maize, in 8 communities. Effect: on the average households have 100% increased their yields whereas quantity of seeds sown has been reduced with 40% | 276.000 trees planted and watershed management for 100 hectares in Karonge, Vugizo district to prevent future erosion | seed production of irish potatoes on 3 hectares and conduct of various experiments, under supervision of Agrifirm crop expert | 84 people followed a course of 60 hours on applied numeracy for agricultural production and post-harvest management | co-manage the four community food storage rooms in conservation of seeds and cooperative marketing of 40 tons of beans

Worked with:

MiParec | Consedi I RĂŠseau Burundi 2000+ | Agrifirm I District government authorities Vugizo and Mabanda | Provincial government and Provincial Agricultural Services | Commission National des Terres et Autres Biens (CNTB) | DCR partners

Staff 31 December 2012:

8

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) | Swiss Development Cooperation | ZOA Netherlands (ZOA Business Ambassadors, EO-Metterdaad, private donors, spicy nuts campaign ) | Agrifirm

Expenditures in 2012:

â‚Ź 622.869

Budget in 2013:

â‚Ź 1.706.111


CHAPTER 9

Burundi

43

Both families now produce enough to feed their children.

Back home

A home for Jean Baptiste

After spending more than half her life in a refugee camp in Gatumba (Tanzania), Disse Ndabiyaho returned to her home country Burundi. Life in Gatumba was hard, fourteen of her eighteen children died, mainly from malaria. “We were a family that once would go home again”, Disse remembers. Now, after 36 years, she is back in Burundi. She returned to Samvura, to the plot that belonged to her late husband. Another family had worked the plot for a long time, however. In short: now they share the land. Participating in ZOA’s programme gave Disse hope, because of the assistance aimed at raising the production level by the use of quality seeds and organic fertilizer. Both families now produce enough to feed their children. Though Disse still worries a bit about the fertility of the land, she lives in peace, staying with her youngest son and her grandchildren.

Jean Baptiste (28) hasn’t had a home for a long time. He was born in Rwanda, where his Burundian parents had fled in the early seventies. After they left him there with his grandparents, many years of insecurity followed. In 1994, Jean Baptiste and his grandparents fled the genocide to Tanzania, but they were forced to return to Rwanda in 1996. Ten years later the Rwandese government decided they would no longer take care of Burundian refugees and many others, Jean Baptiste was expelled to a camp in North Burundi. Alone, because his grandparents had died and the whereabouts of his parents was unknown. Today, Jean Baptiste is married and a father to three year old twins and a baby. In the mornings he takes part in a vocational training and in the afternoons he tries to make some money for his family. He dreams of his own business. After many years of insecurity, this would be his chance to build a stabile future.


44

CHAPTER 9

Cambodia


CHAPTER 9

45

Cambodia

Cambodia The end of our mandate ZOA started working in Cambodia in 1992, after working with Cambodian refugees in camps in Thailand. ZOA supported them in rebuilding their lives after they returned to their broken country. The remote northern province of Oddar Meanchey attracted returning refugees and many others looking for a place to live. This resulted in an explosive growth in population, while basic facilities were insufficient and social cohesion was lacking. ZOA has been working in Oddar Meanchey since 1999, aiming at agricultural improvement and disaster risk reduction. Special attention was paid to inclusion of vulnerable groups like single mothers and the handicapped.

ZOA Cambodia in 2012: phasing out Since the target area has reached a point of peace, community governance and access to basic resources, the end of ZOA’s mandate became imminent. We have closed down our programme in Cambodia as of December 2012. Over the last five years we have been actively working towards that moment. Development needs continue to exist and much effort has been put by us into finding opportunities for the work to continue. Attracting other international NGOs We have tried to attract other international NGOs to Oddar Meanchey province, to continue longer term development. However, the world economic crisis has restricted funding for most of the development agencies in Cambodia. Expansion into new areas like Oddar Meanchey was often seen as something they would like to do, but not now.

Building local capacity For that reason we have concentrated on capacity building of partners. The implementation of the first DIPECHO funding (Disaster Preparedness ECHO) helped greatly in building confident Village Disaster Management Committee structures. In a next round we convinced the French Red Cross to partner with the Cambodian Red Cross in ZOA’s place, specifically for Oddar Meanchay. This action was highly appreciated by DIPECHO and helped to further our reputation that we take a longer term sustainable view. We facilitated two local partners (KBA and RCEDO) to become partners on the FAO project under the Food Facility call. This formed the basis for a longer term relationship, resulting in confirmed funding until at least 2015. Attracting institutional funding In 2009 a proposal on land management was made to the EU, with the Government of Oddar Meanchey being the applicant and local NGOs and ZOA as partners. The new application to expand these activities has been approved for three years, starting in 2013. Business development In advocating for development assistance for Oddar Meanchey, we met with International Development Enterprises. They will start a project with a focus on market links and value chains, exactly what is needed now that farmers are producing excess for selling. ZOA Business Ambassadors (ZBA) have been very loyal since 2005 and have contributed significantly to access to basic resources programmess for newly established villages. ZBA will continue to support our local partner CIDO for a few more years.

Change: step by step process Bernie O’Neill, Country Director ZOA Cambodia from 2007 (working with ZOA Cambodia since 1999): “Cambodian families have suffered a lot of hardship due to war and poverty. Starting from scratch is not easy, and change is a step by step process. Now we are delighted to see the change compared to the start of our programme. There is no hunger anymore, people are self-sufficient and resilient to external shocks, and children are going to school. The target area has now reached the level of basic services, peace and local governance where we could phase out. The capacities of our local partners have in our years of working together increased to where they can advocate for their remote province and get access to funding for the continuing development needs.”


46

CHAPTER 9

Cambodia

ZOA Cambodia Worked in:

Oddar Meanchey Province

Focused on:

Livelihoods | Special attention to capacity building

Results include the following:

Capacity building support to 650 CBO’s | Irrigation support to 220 communities | Income generation support to 40 families | Drinking water supply to 500 families | Support to 4 NGO partners and 4 Government partners

Worked with:

Local NGO’s: CIDO (Community-based Integrated Development Organisation, KBA (Khmer Buddhist Association), RCEDO (Rural Community and Environment Development Organisation) and CDA (Cambodia Development in Action) | Local Government departments: Water Resources, Agriculture, Land Management, Disaster Management | NGO/Government network DANGO | Commune councils | Village committees and CBO’s

Staff 31 December 2012:

Phased out

Received donations from:

EuropeAid | ZOA Netherlands ( ZOA Business Ambassadors, emergency funds, private donors)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 383.521


CHAPTER 9

47

Cambodia

A kick-start that provided them with hope and motivation to improve their Self-sufficient and selfconfident

Spirit and structure of ZOA remain

Since 1975 the families of Mrs. Keo Pheak and Mr. Ngin Poung had constantly been uprooted, losing many of their family members. They spent a period of time in refugee camps in Thailand, and started a new life in Oddar Meanchey after the armed conflict. ZOA, in partnership with KBA, started working in their village in Anlong Veng district in 2007. In 2008 Mrs. Peak borrowed 400,000 Riels (€ 100) from the new Disaster Risk Reduction Fund to expand the rice field and set up a small shop. She paid back the loan in two years, and had the confidence to borrow another 800,000 Riels in 2010. She expanded her shop and diversified crop production by including fruit and vegetables. After paying off the second loan, she started investing her profits in chicken raising and a sewing machine for her daughter, who now has an income as a dress maker. The initial small loan from ZOA was the ‘kickstart’ that provided them with hope and motivation to improve their livelihood.

As of January 2013, things will be different for Ratana Oeurn, executive director of CIDO in Cambodia. But even after ZOA phases out, its mission and vision will very much be part of CIDO’s approach, as Ratana explains. “I worked for ZOA from 2004 until 2006. I was impressed by how ZOA adjusts its programme according to people’s needs. CIDO and ZOA have been cooperating ever since CIDO was established in 2006, sharing resources, time and energy. “Everything we did together served a common goal: to change the lives of poor people in Cambodia. ZOA did just that: change the lives of vulnerable people, especially internally displaced people. Their needs were met, and they received hope beyond their needs. We are sad to have lost ZOA as a partner. However, ZOA’s mission has impacted the communities of Oddar Meanchey for many years, and the spirit and structures of ZOA are part of CIDO. We intend to follow the way ZOA worked and to build from there.”

livelihood.


48

CHAPTER 9

Democratic Republic of Congo


CHAPTER 9

49

Democratic Republic of Congo

Democratic Republic of Congo Return and recovery in a fragile situation ZOA has been working in the Democratic Republic of Congo since 2008, supporting returnees, IDPs and the host population in improving their livelihoods in South (Fizi District) and North Kivu (Lubero District), where the consequences of war continue to affect people’s lives. The basis for food and income for many households is very weak, due to lack of means and lost skills following displacement. On top of that, conflicts in communities easily escalate as most people only have witnessed conflict resolution through violence. Continuously promoting community governance, inclusion, peace and stability in these fragmented communities is a challenging but essential part of ZOA’s programme.

community leaders and the government, on poverty reduction, inclusion and conflict mitigation. Working via local partners In line with our strategic choices, we implement our programmes through our local partners – ten NGOs in 2012. Within the Congolese context this is a challenge that requires time and energy, but has significant advantages. Working with partners contributes to the local capacity which is so much needed for recovery of Congolese society. They are also able to work in areas that are inaccessible for foreign NGOs, where needs are huge. In this way we can reach people that would otherwise lack any assistance.

ZOA DR Congo in 2012 In both Fizi and Lubero we focus on food security and livelihoods. We were very pleased with the results of an external evaluation in April 2012 of our project ‘Profit’ in Fizi district. The conclusions of the evaluation were that during this twenty month project, funded by the Belgian government, agricultural production of more than 4,000 households (25,000 people) increased till three times its earlier volume, and they continue to raise production year to year. Others received training on small livestock or starting up small businesses. Another major positive development was the approved proposal for a four year-programme in Uvira region, together with ZOA Burundi. In this border region we will focus on groups that cause considerable unrest within society: unemployed youths, ex-soldiers and outcast women. We will work across borders in cooperation with

Security The security situation is constantly monitored. In Baraka staff had to evacuate in April, due to confrontations between armed groups and the Congolese army. They were able to return one week later. Staff in Goma had to evacuate in November, due to the arrival of rebel groups. Though these groups withdrew ten days later, staff had to do their work from various locations in DRC and abroad for several weeks. Business ambassadors We would like to emphasize the positive impact of the ZOA Business Ambassadors commitment. In several cases they were important as strategic co-funding partners or they financed pilot projects to prepare a new approach. Not only did they support the programme themselves, they also raised the interest of others to become involved.

Hold on to hope Jan Huls, Country Director ZOA DR Congo: “When I started working in Congo in 2009, it struck me that so many Congolese seemed to have given up hope for peace. We did not want to give in to this! But since then we have seen conflicts flare up again and again, and it is hard to hold on to the hope that once people will live in peace in Eastern Congo. Still, we confess and pray that God will show His might and will bring light in the darkness. In the meantime, as ZOA we can support vulnerable people in a very practical way to improve their livelihoods in this very fragile situation.”


50

CHAPTER 9

Democratic Republic of Congo

ZOA DR Congo Worked in:

South Kivu: Fizi District | North Kivu: Lubero District

Focused on:

Livelihoods | Basic education | Special attention to community governance and peace and stability

Results included the following:

Fizi District: 5624 vulnerable or extreme vulnerable households received seeds, tools, goats or other small livestock, combined with agricultural training or training in non-agricultural income-generating activities | 742 households received 75 $ for income-generating activities; 6853 households received seedlings and seed, 89 % of them now earning an income sufficient for daily needs, 75 % of them use the new techniques and prevention measures for pest and plant diseases and 65 % use techniques against floods and erosion; 2493 pupils followed formal basic education | 12 CBO’s are trained and supported in management structures, 24 local Project Management Committees are trained, and actively involved in selection of vulnerable beneficiaries, planning, implementation and evaluation of project activities; 119 local leaders and other key persons have been trained in conflict prevention and peaceful conflict resolution, and 4 local committees for peaceful conflict resolution have been installed, with 5 committees from previous year still functioning well. 146 cases of 225 identified cases have been peacefully resolved. Lubero: 2956 households in 32 villages received agricultural tools and seeds. Harvest improved with 50%, and 5280 households in these villages profited from training and knowledge improvement; 153 households having been trained on multiplication of seeds | 46 CBO’s are trained on peaceful conflict resolution, as well as local leaders in 5 villages, who afterwards started peace clubs | 124 marginalized youth, including 50 former combattants and 50 young single mothers received vocational training, management of small production unit, literacy and peaceful coexistence.

Worked with:

Local NGO’s: Asmaku (Association Maendeleo Kujitegemea), Bureau de Reboisement 8me CEPAC, CEPROF (Comité pour l’Education et la promotion feminine), Geades (Groupe d’Etudes et d’Action pour le Développement Economique et Social), Humanité en Action (HUMAC), Action Durable pour le Développement (ADA), ACPDI (Action des Communautés Paysannes pour le Développement Intégré), CEAPRONUT (Centre d’Appui à la Promotion Nutritionelle), COOKENKI (Coopérative Centrale du Nord-Kivu), SOFEJEP (Solidarité des Organisations des Femmes et Jeunes Producteurs), SYDIP (Syndicat pour la Défense des Intérêts Paysans), FOPAC (Fédération des Organisatons des Producteurs Agricoles du Congo) | Provincial government: IPAPEL (Provincial Inspectorate of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock) | Tearfund UK, Tearfund Belgium, Tear Netherlands | DCR-partners

Staff 31 December 2012:

41

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | La Coopération Belge au Développement (DGD) | USAID / OFDA | ZOA Netherlands (ZOA Business Ambassadors, churches, private donors) | Turing Foundation

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 2.483.735

Budget in 2013:

€ 4.166.555


CHAPTER 9

51

Democratic Republic of Congo

She learned new techniques and received seed potatoes. She is This year five bags!

A second chance

Dessanges (32) gets up every day before sunrise to see her children off to school. She then goes out to work on her plot. Feeding the children is a daily concern. This year Dessanges took part in ZOA’s agricultural training. She learned new techniques and she received seed potatoes. She is proud and delighted: “Last year I harvested one bag of potatoes, this year five off the same piece of land”. She knows exactly how she will use the proceeds of each bag: “Two bags I sold at the market, so I can pay the school fees for my children. One bag will provide for the rent of the land and the rest is for our own use, both to eat and to sow”. Together with other women in the village, she has taken the initiative to build a common storehouse, where they can store the extra revenue and seed potatoes. Dessanges has faith in the future!

Johan Mooij, ZOA’s CEO, about his visit to ZOA’s teenager education programme in Mboko: “The whole school yard was full of young people of varying ages welcoming me with wonderful singing. These children did not have the opportunity to get regular schooling, due to war, displacement and poverty. Now they can follow a 3-year basic education programme, and eventually continue with high school. The biggest challenge of this programme is the huge number of students, up to 70 in a class, showing the great need among the children. They are taught by volunteers, usually teachers from regular schools taking on this task for a small allowance. The lessons are in school buildings during free hours. It is wonderful to see these children, who would otherwise have no education at all, now getting a second chance and learning to read and write, for only 10 Euros per child per year.”

proud and delighted, and has faith in the future now!


52

CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia


CHAPTER 9

53

Ethiopia

Ethiopia Relief and recovery ZOA Ethiopia has been working with people displaced due to conflict or natural disasters, and their hosting communities, since 1994. ZOA concentrates on emergency response and disaster risk reduction through action in the sectors of livelihoods and food security, WASH, education, and environment.

ZOA Ethiopia in 2012 2012 was a successful year for ZOA Ethiopia. While addressing numerous pressing needs of the beneficiary populations, ZOA built organizational capacity, and developed strategic alliances necessary for long term planning. Hudet In early 2012 ZOA Ethiopia established a new field office in Hudet, in the southern part of the Somali region, to assist people displaced by clan-based conflict and victims of the Horn of Africa drought. Timely support was provided for the urgent needs of those who were displaced through the distribution of non-food items, donkeys and jerrycans. A small amount of cash was provided for pressing unmet needs, so that the non-food items would not be sold. Shelter construction was accomplished late as a design change was needed when it was determined that the grass to be used for the roofs was unavailable due to the drought. Dolo Ado In Dolo Ado, the second program area of the southern Somali region, ZOA assisted refugees and host communities with improving the level of household income and livestock production, access to education in the camps, and decreased environmental degradation. As 60% of the refugee households are female-headed, significant effort was made to involve women. The results were encoura-

ging however the coverage is low compared to the needs, particularly with regard to livelihoods interventions. ZOA has been invited to assist in a sixth camp which will be opened in 2013. Jijiga ZOA Ethiopia has been involved in an innovative ‘sequential return and reintegration’ project for a large population of people who have long been internally displaced. Working with the regional and local governments and community leaders from the both the displaced population and the areas of return, the returnee households are becoming stable. The people are again involved in animal husbandry and crop production, and their household income levels are increasing. They now have access to social services, their children are attending school, and they have increased access to potable water. Women actively participate in community recovery and development, and their voices are well incorporated. Gambella Forty households participated in a pilot in which they were provided oxen and ploughs, and trained in improved agriculture techniques. These households harvested significantly more maize and vegetables than previous years, and had surplus to sell on the local market. Eight Disaster Risk Reduction committees were trained and performed well in constructing dikes and channels. Though they have support from the Woreda Agriculture Bureau, they are at early stage of capacity development and need continued support. In general, the Gambella program was run with minimum resources in 2012, however, two significant proposals were approved toward the end of the year and a third is likely for 2013.

The people’s organisation Maureen Graybill, Country Director ZOA Ethiopia: “Hudet is an area of extreme need, impacted by clan-violence and significant drought. The population of Hudet doubled with the influx of a large population fleeing clan violence, however there was little information on them. Our ZOA/DRU support officer went door to door in the beginning of 2012, interviewing every household and then holding focus group discussion. We were then able to address the most urgent needs, and are now moving into a two-year programme. Our team won the trust and confidence of these communities, and we heard people referring to ZOA as the ‘people’s organisation’. This really touched me, because that is what we aim to be.”


54

CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia

ZOA Ethiopia Worked in:

North Somalia Region, Jijiga | South Somalia Region: Dolo Ado and Hudet | Gambella

Focused on:

Livelihoods | WASH | Emergency relief | Special attention to environmental protection and peace and stability

Results include the following:

North Somalia Region, Jijiga: 207 returnees received small business training and start-up | 740 returned households received farm tools and seeds and 20 goats, and all households are raising livestock now | 47 returnees to Babile received oxen as well | rehabilitation of Hafir dam finalized, serving over 6,500 households. For the first time in years no water trucking was necessary | two wells and one roof catchment provide 624 community members and 362 school children with potable water | CLTS is being acted upon in 47 villages | water management committees and community reintegration committees were established. South Somalia Region: Dolo Ado: 324 families participated in business skill training and started up small business. 80,2% successfully improved household income | 446 households participated in small husbandry or irrigation agriculture | schools in Kobe and Hilaweyn camps provided with sanitation and hygiene materials | establishment of 2 emergency education centres and constructing and equipping 3 primary schools (Melkadida, Hilawey, Kobe), enabling over 3,000 children to attend school | 11,814 Fuel Saving Stoves distribution and training. Hudet: 4,500 households (3,375 IDP’s and 1,125 host) received non-food item kits | 410 shelters constructed for vulnerable | IDP households (completed early 2013) I 2314 women in groups of 15 - 30 women received 1 donkey and 1 chart, jerry cans and water storage container each | 101 elders and officials were trained on conflict resolution, 2 elders from each of the four communities Borena, Garri, Gabra and Guji entered into agreement to advocate for peace and the peaceful sharing of resources. Gambella: 8 Disaster Risk Reduction committees were trained on DRR-measures, dikes were constructed, mango seedlings have been planted to prevent erosion | 40 households received oxen and ploughs | 15 bio-sand filters for 4 communities constructed, the results appear promising

Worked with:

Save the Children | UNICEF I UNHCR, Gambella Bureau of finance and Economic Development | Local NGO’s: Save the Environment, IDURUSDWA | Local and National Government: ARRA, Somali Region Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Bureau | Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock | Somali Region Water Bureau | Hudet Woreda Administration

Staff 31 December 2012:

71

Received donations from:

UNDP | UN OCHA/ HRF | TEAR Australia | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | Royal Netherlands Embassy | Help2Change Foundation | ZOA Netherlands (ZOA Business Ambassadors, churches, private donors)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 2.425.155

Budget in 2013:

€ 4.281.764


CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia

55

“I am safe, I am healthy and all my children are here. I am happy now.”

Changed for the better Mako Omar Ali arrived in Kobe camp from Somalia in 2011, after her husband had been killed. Two of her children were still in Somalia at that time. She appeared twice in the ZOA-magazine, sharing her story with the Dutch constituency. The first time was shortly after arrival in the camp. ”I have cried so much”, she told then. “Now we just await better times.” One year later she told that her situation changed for the better. She participated in ZOA’s business training, learned bookkeeping and used the start capital to start a tea shop, and trading grain. When she volunteered in the distribution of fuel saving stoves, she was noticed for being an active, cheerful and sociable person. She was then asked to join ZOA’s team as a Community Animator, visiting families in the camp and checking out their needs. “I am safe, I have a job, I am healthy and all my children are here. I am happy now.”

Daily survival is a struggle Abiba Ali Dida and her husband Alo fled from Borena to Hudet four years ago, forced by tribal conflicts. They had to leave their camel, goats and cows behind. “The people here are very friendly, we were welcome in their villages and they share their possessions”, Abiba explains. She lives with her husband and eight children in the hut of a family that left the village. Alo is a daily wage laborer now, and hoping to earn some 50 Birr (2.70 USD) a day. Abiba collects firewood, tree bark and incense in the forest for selling purposes. Daily survival is a struggle, and ZOA’s relief items were a great help. “I received non-food items like blankets, pans and jerrycans, and an amount of cash. The money I used to buy notebooks which my children need in school. I hope that next year I will have cattle again, and maybe a house with a tin roof,” she summarizes her hope for the future.


56

CHAPTER 9

Liberia


CHAPTER 9

Liberia

57

Liberia Improving livelihoods in fragile peace ZOA has been working in Liberia since 2003. The fourteen years of civil war in the country, as well as violence in the neighbouring countries, caused massive displacement. Liberia is still suffering from the many consequences of war. Severe poverty, tribalism, corruption, political instability, illiteracy and lack of employment opportunities continue to undermine the fragile peace. ZOA started its work in 2003 with emergency relief to refugees and displaced persons. From there the work evolved towards rehabilitation.

ZOA Liberia in 2012 In 2012 ZOA Liberia concentrated on the implementation of the MFS programme in which ZOA together with CARE and Save the Children supports around 100 communities in agriculture, livelihoods, primary education, and community governance. At the same time, ZOA started up two agricultural-focused projects in the same geographical area, Montserrado and Margidi County. After having finished a multi-year WASH programme in and around Monrovia, ZOA aims to continue its WASH programme for rural and peri-urban communities. In the rural areas ZOA aims to focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), together with the improvement of hygienic practices as well as the repair or construction and management of drinking water sources. In peri-urban areas, where CLTS is not applicable, ZOA intends to concentrate on the availability and use of public latrines. Improving livelihoods is mainly achieved through a number of related activities such as provision of agricultural seeds and tools, training in sustainable agricultural production methods, piloting a project on cassava production/processing/selling, establishment of village savings

and loan associations (in partnership with CARE), training farmer groups on how to market more of their agricultural products, and functional adult literacy. The relationship between agricultural staff of ZOA and its partners and the communities has been instrumental: staff and farmers working together and learning modern agricultural, storage and marketing techniques, acquiring knowledge that has been lost due to the war. Support for community governance has been prominent on the 2012 agenda. Social cohesion is very weak because so many people have been displaced. ZOA is making a special effort to rebuild social structure. In 2012, ZOA started supporting village development committees (VDCs) in about 40 communities, discussing how they see their development in the coming years, what they can contribute to this themselves, what they can expect from NGOs and the Government. In 2012 ZOA also worked in a number of communities on issues such as access to land and land rights and peace building - ways to bring stability and cohesion to the community. Throughout 2012 ZOA continued to support a small project for 100 girls taking vocational training, and a small project on facilitating dialogue among young people through the organisation of sports tournaments, among other. In 2012, ZOA also completed a water and sanitation project for refugees who arrived in Liberia from Ivory Coast. A growth in the donor portfolio is necessary to be able to continue the Liberia programme. This will be a specific point of attention for ZOA Liberia 2013.

Basic resources contributing to social cohesion Tsjeard Bouta, Country Director ZOA Liberia: “The efforts made under the MFS programme are starting to pay off. People involved in different activities see and appreciate the linkages between them. Women involved in the project’s functional adult literacy classes were now able to write their initials on their bags of produce so that these do not get lost on their way to market. Men participating in a village and loan system could obtain a loan to employ labourers to clear the land they now use for the cultivation of vegetables. These two anecdotal experiences illustrate people’s improved access to basic resources as well as an improved sense of community belonging and cohesion.”


58

CHAPTER 9

Liberia

ZOA Liberia Worked in:

Margibi and Montserrado counties: Todee, Kakata and Careysburg districts, Greater Monrovia (Paynesville) | Grand Gedeh county: Gbarzon district

Focused on:

Livelihoods | WASH | With special attention to community governance

Results included the following:

Livelihoods: ZOA supported 40 communities with: sustainable agricultural production training | improved seeds varieties and basic tools | orientation towards ‘farming as a business’ | Functional Adult Literacy classes I village saving & loans systems (in partnership with CARE) | ZOA also provided vocational training to 140 girls / young women. WASH: 4 new and 4 existing hand dug wells done | 3 new and 4 existing wells established | 8 hand pumps repaired | 18 family latrines and 3 school latrines including hand washing facilities constructed | 8 schools reached with hygiene promotion | 3 pump repair technicians trained Community governance and inclusion: Supported and cooperated with village development committees (VDCs) in 40 communities, on the development of village development plans and training in EEC (Enabling Effective Citizenship) | worked on land rights in 20 communities | engaged in peace-building in 40 communities | jointly implemented projects with 6 local organisations.

Worked with:

Local NGO’s: National Adult Education Association of Liberia (NAEAL) | Self Help Initiative for Sustainable Development (SHIFSD) | Foundation for Human Rights and Democracy (FORHD) | Liberian Study Group and Community Empowerment (LSGCE) | Universal Empowerment Missions (UEM) | Evangelical Children Rehabilitation Program (ECREP) International NGO’s: CARE | Save the Children National authorities: Ministries of Agriculture, Education, Health & Social Welfare, Public Works, Lands, Mines and Energy | County Development authorities in Margibi and Montserrado counties

Staff 31 December 2012:

22

Received donations from:

UNICEF | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | World Renew (former CRWRC) | ZOA Netherlands (ZOA Business Ambassadors, churches, schools) | Van Oord | Hofstee Foundation

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 1.215.720

Budget in 2013:

€ 1.470.685


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Liberia

Everything changed for the better when Edward started participating in ZOA’s Farmer Field Thank you!

A life-changing opportunity

Edward Dartue (49) farmed the way his family had always farmed, concentrating on crops like cassava and corn. Despite working hard, the yields were meager. “We just subsided at a basic level. There was no money to afford clothes or reasonable housing.” Everything changed for the better when Edward started participating in ZOA’s Farmer Field School. “It was the first training in agriculture I ever had. I learned about growing crops commercially and to save the soil and the environment at the same time. Even though I cannot afford insecticides and fertilizers, the yields are much better already. Now I can send my children to school and I was able to build a three bedroom house. With the extra money I earned, I was able to buy an extra plot of land on which I plan to raise chickens and pigs. I say ‘thank you’ to ZOA for what they have taught me and for what I can now do for myself.”

Victoria Diah (32) has been through many hardships before she was able to take control of her life. As a child she was forced to marry an older man, with whom she had three children. The family travelled from the village to the city to find work. When this did not work out, Victoria’s husband left her and the children. As a last resort Victoria ended up crushing stones to make a little bit of money to feed her children. At this low point in her life she was offered a life-changing opportunity. “I was lucky enough to be chosen to take part in a ZOA training course. I am now training as a beautician. I enjoy what I am doing and I want to do this to the best of my ability. I hope to be a manager of my own beauty salon, and to be able to help other women in need.”

School.


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CHAPTER 9

CDN Myanmar


CHAPTER 9

CDN Myanmar

61

Myanmar (with CDN) Food distribution and food security CDN, Consortium of Dutch NGOs, has been working in Myanmar since early 2008. CDN is a cooperation of three Dutch organisations, Red een Kind (Save a Child), Woord en Daad and ZOA. With permission of the Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation in Nay Pyi Taw, CDN started with emergency relief after the devastating cyclone Nargis hit the Ayeyarwady Delta. Presently, CDN is also involved in assistance to victims of displacement and natural disaster in Rakhine, South Shan and Kayin State. CDN focuses on food security and WASH, and is involved in emergency relief activities as well. CDN cooperates intensively with the local and central government.

CDN Myanmar in 2012 Relief activities The great challenge for 2012 was CDN’s involvement with food distribution and WASH activities in the camps for the internally displaced in Sittwe, starting in June 2012. CDN conducted multi-sectoral rapid assessments in collaboration with UNOCHA, WFP and other agencies. Subsequently, CDN assisted more than 10,000 people with food assistance. Addressing food security gave more opportunities for the IDPs to engage in livelihood activities. CDN assistance in Northern Rakhine State to victims of the 2010 landslides and the cyclone Giri was suspended for several months in 2012 due to violence.

Improving livelihoods South Shan State is a very dry region. CDN implements programmes for both the improvement of food security

and the water and sanitation situation. Four rainwater catchment tanks and eight latrines have been constructed, combined with training on proper hygiene practices. In this very dry zone the introduction of a drought resistant potato variety for consumption and commercial purposes will contribute to food security. The first batch of potatoes at the HeHo Research Center has been harvested and stored, the 280 farmers will start to plant the crop in early 2013. In Kayin state CDN implemented a programme through local partner BMB to improve access to education, and water and sanitation for 347 children from internally displaced households and 192 children from the host population in the Thandaunggyi township. Through the support, including provision of stationery and school materials, students from eight schools in seven villages were able to attend school regularly. The construction of 29 latrines and eight rainwater collection tanks with a 5,000 gallon capacity each, the upgrading of spring sources and health and hygiene training contributed greatly to healthy conditions. In Ayeyarwady Division CDN especially focused on the landless and poor people. 75 Farmers and 75 tenants were selected for re-establishing the old system that farmers rent their land to the landless. CDN has provided the necessary agriculture inputs, and will establish seed banks in four villages. A start was also made with training on multi-storage gardening for people without access to agricultural land. This project will continue, reaching a total of 500 families in 2013.

Tons of food and hygiene training 2012 was characterised by much emergency relief in Northern Rakhine State. CDN was in a position to obtain the right permits to get access to the camps for internally displaced people. Together with the World Food Programme and UNICEF, CDN was able to distribute tons of food and could construct latrines and washing facilities. Through ZOA and Red een Kind the constituency in The Netherland made a contribution for the distribution of seeds to those who were also victimised due to the violence. Regular project activities were suspended during that time.


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CDN Myanmar

Myanmar (with CDN) Worked in:

Ayeyarwady Division | Shan State | Rakhine State

Focused on:

Livelihoods | WASH | Emergency relief

Results include the following:

Ayeryarwady Division: In the 4 project villages in Bitut and Myint Pauk yields per acre improved with 30% for Paw San Yni rice and with 55% for Sin Thwal Latt rice | 3 water ponds were extended and fenced | 100% of landless beneficiaries grew vegetables with multi-storage gardening, decreasing debts and 20% of them earning an extra income. Shan State: 2,500 students received school sanitation | 800 students receive drinking water | 67% changed personal hygiene practice like hand washing before meals), 30% share their knowledge at home. Rakhine State: Construction of 11 cuts of drains | 12 irrigation weirs | 100 boreholes | 2,155 households have access to water | 1,717 households received farming tools | CDN has been able to cover gaps in humanitarian assistance to reach more than 10,000 IDP’s that received very limited support in more remote areas with food distribution and improve WASH and livelihoods situation.

Worked with:

Local NGOs: Myanmar Heart Development Organisation Government agencies: Water Resources Utilization Department I Myanmar Agricultural Services | Irrigation Department | Minister of Border Issues | HeHo Research Center International NGOs: World Concern | Save the Children | Solidarité International

Staff 31 December 2012:

18

Received donations from:

ECHO | EuropeAID | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | AusAID | ZOA Netherlands (Emergency Funds) | Red een Kind | WFP | UNOCHA | UNICEF

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 1.570.159

Budget in 2013:

€ 1.712.244


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CDN Myanmar

63

25 Volunteers, trained as Behaviour Change Agents, visited the households in the camp one by one. Clean and healthy in an IDP camp One of the projects CDN implemented for IDPs was a Unicef-funded hygiene campaign. With open defecation and no bathing facilities the health situation was truly poor in one of the IDP-camps near Sittwe. In a three-month project 70 latrines, 4 water points, 14 hand washing facilities and 8 bathing facilities for women were constructed, 22 latrines and 17 water points were repaired. Important for the success of the project was the effort of 25 volunteers, trained as Behaviour Change Agents. In total they visited 1083 households to demonstrate hand washing, the use of latrines, and the use of the distributed ceramic filters and child potties. On 31 December 2012 an environmental cleaning day ceremony was celebrated. IDP camp volunteers and communities participated in cleaning the whole camp together. In a project closing ceremony the implementation of health activities was officially handed over to camp leaders.


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CHAPTER 9

South Sudan


CHAPTER 9

65

South Sudan

South Sudan Continuing the path of recovery in a nascent nation In 2012, South Sudan commemorated its first year as a new-born nation. Numerous efforts towards establishing functional state institutions were continued in the course of the year. ZOA South Sudan played its rightful role in sowing seeds of hope in various communities and in different phases of relief, return and recovery, focusing on the recovery of civil society, with primary attention for food security and livelihoods, water and sanitation, education and capacity building.

ZOA South Sudan in 2012 Relief Early in the year we were confronted with the huge needs of people in Jonglei State, resulting from the violent interethnic clashes between Murle and Lou Nuer at the end of 2011. We were able to deliver emergency relief on water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion to 4,500 displaced households in Likuangole, Pibor and Verthet payams. From May we were involved in providing basic water and sanitation services to the 12,000 returnees from Sudan staying at a transit point near Juba. In addition, 50 returnee hygiene promoters were trained; this was much needed because basic knowledge about hygiene was lacking, for example on how to use latrines. Some 1,700 returnees were unable to trace their family roots and were relocated to settlement plots in Koda in Terekeka County. ZOA supervised and ensured that hygiene and sanitation were maintained both near Juba and at Koda camps. Water, sanitation and food security In the Terekeka and Bor South programme, 32 new boreholes were drilled to provide clean and safe drinking water. ZOA ensured that the local government authorities and

local community leaders were trained in maintaining the new and the existing water points. Community Led Total Sanitation, in which households are encouraged to construct household latrines and avoid open defecation, was the key approach. Through an EU Food Security and Livelihoods programme in Katigiri, 2,375 farmers in 92 farmer groups were facilitated with tools and seeds, and training in effective farming techniques given by 14 agricultural extension workers who were trained first. 13 Grinding mills and 4 honey-press machines were purchased for various micro-enterprise and ten bee keeping groups. 40 Women groups were supported in various micro-enterprises that have led to the emergence of several road-side market stalls. Through outreach and at static Voluntary Counseling and Testing centres, ZOA was able to carry out testing of over ten thousand people. The Lainya programme (within the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation) In the Lainya programme area, 33 Farmer Field Schools were established and provided with farming inputs for over 800 farmers. Twenty Village Savings and Loan Schemes (VSLAs) and 25 adult literacy groups were established. Eight WASH committees were trained to maintain two new boreholes and the already existing water points. Five schools were either constructed or rehabilitated. Fifteen teachers from these schools were sponsored for a recognized Teacher Training College to improve their teaching skills. The PTAs of the five supported schools were guided on school governance and development of effective education management.

“Look how clean it is!” Kevin Beattie, Country Director ZOA South Sudan: “I talked to a woman who was using one of the boreholes and I asked her what difference it makes to her. She said with great satisfaction that she now has lots of time to do things in her house and with her family. She said that before she had to walk almost three kilometres several times a day with jerry cans to a dirty spring and now the borehole is close to her house. She was so excited! She kept splashing water on her face saying: ‘Look how clean it is! It’s so clean I can drink it.’”


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South Sudan

ZOA South Sudan Worked in:

Terekeka | Lainya | Juba West | Maridi | Jonglei

Focused on:

Livelihoods | Education | WASH | Emergency relief | With special attention to community governance and inclusion

Results include the following:

Terekeka: 6 Water Harvesting Units including tanks with 5,000 liters capacity installed at primary Health Care facilities | 150 slabs constructed, 134 distributed to households that finished a latrine, by lobbying of ZOA a by-law was passed for every household to have a latrine, utensil drying rack and rubbish pit | 8 Water Users Committees trained, one for every new borehole | 23 water troughs constructed for cattle | workshop organized on Sustainable Water Resource Management for 16 stakeholders, including the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation and the Payam Water Department | Lainya: 33 Farmer Field Schools trained, maintained, received agricultural inputs and modern farming training | 5 hand tractors procured and in use | 7 new Village Savings and Loans Associations, making a total of 27 groups with 665 members, with total savings of 70,000 SSP (12,500 euro’s), and 57 small scale retail businesses have been set up by members | 9 centres for skills practice established, youth trained in production of modern bee hives | 10% increase of pupils in 5 schools I 207 FAL participants can read, writ, count and add well | 1640 households received hygiene training | 5 school WASH committees and 8 Water User Committees trained | Juba West: 92 farmer groups functioning | 40 women groups received advice on crop management, post-harvest loss reduction and livelihood diversification | 17 micro-enterprise groups established in the field of agro-processing | 4 honey purifying machines and training provided to a cohort of beekeepers | leaders from 6 payams trained on peaceful conflict resolution and local conferences and dialogues are organized around disputes | Maridi: HIV/Aids prevention by Voluntary Counseling and Testing | Emergency relief Jonglei State and Kosti returnees: Emergency relief on water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion to 4,500 displaced households in Likuangole, Pibor and Verthet payams | providing basic water and sanitation services to the 12,000 returnees from Sudan staying at a transit point near Juba | 50 returnee hygiene promoters were trained

Worked with:

Local NGO’s: Serving and Learning Together (SALT) | Christian Mission Aid (CMA) | Nile Hope Development Forum (NHDF) | ACROSS | The Salvation and Light Development Action (SLDA) | Compass | Taya | Community Action against Poverty and HIV/AIDS (CAAPH) | Sudan Health Association (SUHA) | Institute for Promotion of Civil Society (IPCS) | Relief Development International (RDI) | Agency for Social Transformation and Development (ASTAD) Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation | Payam Water Department

Staff 31 December 2012:

74

Received donations from:

EuropeAID | WFP | TEAR Australia | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | ZOA Netherlands (Emergency funds, churches, private donors) | Hofstee Foundation

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 2.673.902

Budget in 2013:

€ 3.462.610


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South Sudan

The mills initiated other economic activity too, like saving groups and tea shops. Waiting for the future to begin

‘Lazy women’ transformed their communities

“Where do I go from here? Where to begin? And how will I end up?” Santulina Peter (45) is haunted by insecurity now that she has arrived in the relative safety of the South Sudanese transit camp, with five children and two grandchildren. “This is where I originally come from, but I haven’t been here in thirty years. I had to leave my husband and everything we own in North Sudan.” While she waits for the local authorities to decide whether she can have a plot of land, ZOA offered Santulina the opportunity to work as a health worker. Every morning, Santulina works as extension worker on hygiene issues in the camp, emphasizing the importance of hygiene in preventing diseases in this crowded place. Santulina’s wishes for the future are simple: “I wish for a place to live, for schooling for the children, and health care.” This strong woman is convinced there will be a solution so that she can start a new life in the youngest country on earth.

It is a strong local belief; a married woman should toil, and grind by hand to show that she is hardworking and industrious. A few brave women in Katigiri, however, took the risk that others would think they were lazy; they responded positively to ZOA’s suggestion of a grinding mill. Mary Keji, one of these brave pioneers: “The mill changed our lives. Before, we spent two to three hours a day on grinding flour and cassava, using stones. Now, it takes about half an hour to have enough for the whole week! The saved time I use for knitting table cloths, a welcome addition to the household income.” That first mill was followed by twelve mills in the neighbouring communities. The mills initiated other economic activities too, like the sale of surplus flour, the start of cooperative saving groups and of tea shops next to the mill. The women also have more time to play a bigger role in community decisions. The initiative of a few brave women has changed thirteen communities in Katigiri forever.


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CHAPTER 9

Sri Lanka


CHAPTER 9

Sri Lanka

69

Sri Lanka Development after civil war and natural disasters ZOA has been working in Sri Lanka since 1995. Since the end of the civil war in 2009, ZOA has supported returnees and host communities in the sectors of livelihoods, community enhancement and shelter/infrastructure in its programme areas in the North and East of Sri Lanka. 2012 marked the closure of Menik Farm, a camp that used to shelter over 300,000 internally displaced people. In the North, however, over 100,000 individuals still remain displaced. The families who have returned home struggle to access their lands, receive little assistance and often live in make-shift tents with few sources of income. Recurring natural disasters such as drought and flooding have a negative impact on the resettlement process and the mindsets of the people.

ZOA Sri Lanka in 2012 Three years after the war ended, ZOA Sri Lanka has almost completed shifting from relief- to developmentoriented programming. Livelihoods In 2012 ZOA paid special attention to business and economic development from a value-chain approach, assisting subsistence farmers and fishermen to add value to their products before they go to market. ZOA’s warm relationships with its ZOA Business Ambassadors have been key in linking producer groups with better markets. One ZBA project, for example, supported fishermen in Jaffna to settle debts with middlemen, so now they are free to sell their produce to other buyers at better prices. Community enhancement At the heart of ZOA’s strategy is the inclusion of the

excluded, such as female-headed households or families with a disabled family member. Entire communities are sometimes discriminated because of the common caste or village location. For this purpose ZOA implements an AusAID funded project ‘Reclaiming a Peaceful Future’, with ZOA staff living five days a week in over 40 villages. This approach has enabled us to discuss issues of exclusion in the villages and helped to mobilize civil society to lobby for basic services with the government. Shelter / Infrastructure Kilinochchi and Mullativu districts were the last areas to reopen for resettlement in 2012. ZOA was able to attract considerable funding from USAID and ECHO to support these families with their transitional shelter needs and to restart livelihood strategies families had prior to displacement. In other programme areas ZOA repaired and constructed community infrastructure such as health centers, (pre-)schools, wells, irrigation tanks and roads, in order to catalyze change processes related to community enhancement. Beneficiary Accountability ZOA Sri Lanka concluded a baseline study in March 2012 on the HAP accountability benchmarks. According to the report, ZOA Sri Lanka would have been certified if it had applied for HAP certification on its own. Following the recommendations included in the report, ZOA produced a leaflet with information about ZOA, the donor and the project, distributed to targeted households in every project. Providing this information to the beneficiaries also strengthens the feedback system as communities can better understand what to expect from ZOA.

Former IDP’s planting and fishing again Bernhard Kerschbaum, Country Director ZOA Sri Lanka 2009 – 2012: “I’m very pleased with the changes we observed in Sri Lanka in 2012. The former IDP camp Menik Farm was finally closed, and its former inhabitants could return to their home areas. Across the North and East returned families are replanting their paddy fields, setting up small businesses, and fishing the seas again. Despite these achievements we find that villages struggle to re-create a sense of ‘communitybeing’, and hardly organize themselves towards traders or the government. ZOA Sri Lanka therefore decided to have a local presence in over 40 villages, five days per week, to catalyze these processes, and will continue to do so in 2013.”


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Sri Lanka

ZOA Sri Lanka Worked in:

North: Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mullativu, Mannar, Vavuniya and Anuradhapura districts | East: Trincomalee, Batticaloa, Ampara and Polonnaruwa districts

Focused on:

Livelihoods | WASH | Shelter and infrastructure | Education | Special attention to community enhancement, gender equality, people living with disabilities, inclusion of the most vulnerable and downward accountability (HAP standards).

Results include the following:

North: 593 households provided with livelihood support | 350 households supported with agricultural input | 144 culvert construction | 1 fish landing site developed | 1 aquaculture pond constructed | 108 common wells constructed | 368 common wells rehabilitated | 26 km of drainage repair and construction | 864 latrines constructed / repaired | 6 school buildings constructed | 1868 semi-permanent shelters constructed | 275 shelters upgraded to semi-permanent | 8 community halls constructed | 1 medical infrastructure constructed | 40 leaderships trainings for CBO-leaders | 9 playgrounds constructed East: 94 households provided with livelihood support | 138 households supported with horticulture kits | 2 km of irrigation channel rehabilitated | 1 market constructed | 3 culvert construction | 80 trainees trained on improved crop management | 6,5 km of road constructed | 18 common wells constructed | 16 common wells rehabilitated | 68,5 km of drainage repaired and constructed | 4 school buildings constructed | 20 semi-permanent transitional shelters constructed | 131 trainees trained on life skills

Worked with:

Governmental partners: Departments of relevant Ministries (Agriculture, Fisheries, Irrigation, Education) | Government Agents (GA) | Divisional Secretariats (DS) | Grama Niladharis (GN) | Predesiya Sabhas (PS) Local NGO’s: MDT | Center for Rehabilitation of Alcoholics and Drug Addicts (CRADA) | Mannar Association for Rehabilitation of Differently Able People (MARDAP) | Organization for the Rehabilitation of the Handicapped (ORHAN) | Familian | YGRO | ESCO | LEADS | Federation of Social Development Organisations – Sri Lanka FOSDOO) | PUHALIDAM | Eastern Community Resource Development Foundation (ECRDF) | JUGAS | ELUWAN | Amanthy Thendral. CBO’s: (Women) Rural Development Societies and 80 other CBOs including farmer organisations, fisheries societies, livestock breeder cooperative societies and self-help groups.

Staff 31 December 2012:

168

Received donations from:

EuropeAID | ECHO | USAID | AusAID | FAO | ICCO/KiA | Skantrae | CERF | World Renew | Woord en Daad | ZOA Netherlands (ZOA Business Ambassadors, Heemskerk) | Draagt Elkanders Lasten

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 4.571.662

Budget in 2013:

€ 4.184.134


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Sri Lanka

“These are great achievements for our community.”

Toilet with a ramp

Just some quotes…

Thirteen-year-old David cannot stand, sit or walk on his own and is unable to communicate. His mental and physical handicaps posed almost insurmountable difficulties for himself and his family. When the war reached Skandapuram, his home area in the jungle of northern Sri Lanka, the family was forced to flee. For nine months, David’s father carried him on his back until the family reached Mullativu, from where they were transported to Menik Farm. They were able to return home in 2010. In 2011 David received a wheelchair from Handicap International. Since then, David also gets regular checkups and physiotherapy. Thanks to funding from ECHO and Havonos, ZOA could install a toilet for David and his family, constructed with a ramp, so his parents can ride David’s wheelchair inside. The toilet means a huge improvement for the

“If not for ZOA’s facilitation, we wouldn’t have been able to take a stand against caste discrimination. ZOA stood up on behalf of us and assisted us in obtaining equal facilities.” Kanapathy Nagaraja (50), a junior school principal in Parasankulam, Vavuniya North “I never thought that I would ever have a stone house. All these times we were living in shackles. And it’s not just the house, but ZOA also created awareness on how to reach the attention of public authorities and move forward in life.” D. Jayantha Pushpakumara (26), paddy farmer in Maha Irikewa, Anuaradhapura. “Our group started simply with collecting money and providing loan facilities. Since July 2012, we have more than Rs 60,000,- and we are moving forward to bigger scale investment. A few members had chosen to start grocery shops, a few on making their home gardening in bigger scale. In the future, we plan to have a rice mill for our community. These are great achievements for our community.” Sinnati Kandasamy (55), president of Rural Development Society of Maravilluapa, Vavuniya North.


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Sudan


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Sudan

73

Sudan Supporting education and livelihoods, promoting peace ZOA has worked in Sudan since 2004, starting in South Darfur. It expanded its activities to North Darfur and to Gedaref in 2011. In the same year South Darfur was split into two states with East Darfur emerging from it, resulting in ZOA being now active in three Darfur States. There is enormous need in the conflict-affected villages. ZOA supports the sustainable recovery of conflict-affected rural communities, focusing on education, WASH, food security and livelihoods. In Gedaref, ZOA contributes to improved food and economic security for rural communities.

ZOA Sudan in 2012 Access to basic services was the most important part of the Darfur programme, with the main emphasis on education. Much attention has been devoted to improvement of both the hardware - design and quality monitoring -, and the software – capacity building of Parent Teacher Associations and teacher training. The programme remains successful in the realisation of improved education facilities and learning materials for the rural communities in Darfur. Water is a scarce commodity in Darfur and often the reason for health problems and conflict. We continued to rehabilitate water points in rural areas. ZOA Sudan developed a new water harvesting strategy for - in particular – the schools in Darfur. Rains are often sufficient in the Southern part of Darfur to provide a school with year round drinking water and water for school hygiene. Rainwater harvesting structures have been designed and are being built. The PTAs are trained to keep the water reservoirs clean and healthy. Food security and livelihood activities contribute to food and economic secure households that are resilient to shocks in food supply. This part of the programme in Darfur

has a strong peace-building component, because it explicitly also aims at reducing the number of conflicts along nomadic routes by improved access for nomads to pasture and water. The first season for the agriculture intervention in Gedaref, a programme established in 2011, has been assessed. The results are satisfactory bearing in mind the complex operational environment and the managerial challenges faced. However, excessive rainfall in the last part of the season and ineffective weed control resulted in setbacks compared to the expected results after the first part of the season. The water part of the Gedaref programme progressed satisfactory. With our staff we have worked on defining a new agriculture strategy, with more emphasis on recovery and own participation by the beneficiaries. How to enhance community participation in a changing humanitarian environment from relief to recovery was a point of particular attention for staff development throughout the year. Challenges Our target group is experiencing the current harsh economic climate with its adverse effects on livelihoods and resilience. In certain parts of Darfur they are also affected by deteriorating security due to increased levels of combat between rebel groups and the government forces of Sudan and by tribal disputes. Threats by criminal activities remain high in Darfur. Traditional donors have, moreover, become hesitant to continue the donor relation with Sudan after the separation of South Sudan. Sudan is, for instance, no longer a priority country of the Dutch government.

From interaction to interdependency Bart Dorsman, Country Director ZOA Sudan: “Bringing communities together after the Darfur conflict is our general aim when doing peace building activities via workshops and conferences. Sometimes the contacts are unintentional and result from other activities. For instance, PTA members from different, previously hostile communities who meet during a training course. Or trainers from a certain area who dare to visit a previously hostile area to give training, or the interactions on shared water points and economic activities. My dream for Darfur is that all these interactions will lead to trust and harmony and in particular that the economic interactions will eventually lead to a situation of interdependency, with harmony and wellbeing as a result.”


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Sudan

ZOA Sudan Worked in:

Darfur: South, East and North | Gedaref

Focused on:

Livelihood | Education | WASH | Special attention to harmony & cohesion

Results included the following:

Darfur: Livelihoods: 152 persons received business training, 46 small business grants were issued | 2 community forests were maintained | 2 veterinary clinics were established | 2,649 households received fruit tree seedlings, 7,720 farmers were provided with seeds, partly via seed fairs | 5 grazing corridors have been improved and 150 farmers and 650 households received agricultural training. Education: 39 permanent classrooms constructed | 5,612 students received student kits and 1,620 school furniture items constructed | 125 participate in Teacher Training | 122 PTA members are trained. WASH: 30 water sources are rehabilitated | 34 school hygiene promotion campaigns were held | 34 permanent latrines, 127 hand washing stations and 6 school rainwater harvesting systems constructed | 11 Wash committees trained and 7 PTA’s trained on rain water harvesting. Harmony and cohesion: 2,440 reached with harmony & cohesion activities. Gedaref: Livelihoods: 422 farmers received fertilizer, herbicides and related training, and their in total 709 hectare was deep chisel ploughed and harrowed. WASH: 5 water systems rehabilitated, providing 2,500 people with reliable drinking water | 5,000 people benefit from a 44,000 litre steel water tank | 1,000 people are connected to existing water systems | 6 school latrines have been constructed | 2,400 people have been reached with hygiene promotion | 7 water committees are trained

Worked with:

Solo | PODR | Child Development Foundation (CDF) | Voluntary Network | JMCO | Ma’an

Staff 31 December 2011:

92

Received donations from:

EU | USAID/ OFDA | Common Humanitarian Fund | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | Royal Netherlands Embassy Khartoum | ZOA Netherlands (schools, Walk4Water event, private donors)

Expenditures in 2011:

€ 2.757.025

Budget in 2012:

€ 3.995.000


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“Wonderful! Teachers from various villages and tribes spent three days together. Peace For the sake of our children Abdalla Eltahir Mohammed (50) is a member of the Parent Teacher Association in Gosbeina in North Darfur. The PTA takes all major decisions regarding the school. However, it is not always easy to reach good decisions in an amicable manner. Abdalla explains that the president of the PTA was quite domineering without consulting the other PTAmembers. “But during training by ZOA all the Gosbeina PTA members learned how we can effectively conduct ourselves as PTA, and what role we can play in improvement of school environment for the sake of the education of our children. Our chairman was actively participating in the discussions, particularly about the rules and regulations. Suddenly, he came to us and apologized for not listening to us, and thanked us for being so kind to him. Then we agreed to respect the ideas of every member, for the sake of our children’s future. Thanks to ZOA and the Ministry of Education for making this training possible and for investing in our capacities!”

Peace building is possible For the new subject in the basic education curriculum ‘Technical Education’, ZOA and the Ministry of Education organized teacher training for 35 teachers from different villages and tribes. ZOA staff approached the inhabitants of Sag Elnaam village, to inform them about the planned training and to ask them to accept the participants from Wadaa and other villages with whom they had clashed in the recent past. Much to our joy they responded cheerfully and said “we are ready to accept all participants, to protect them during the training period and provide anything required from us.” One person provided two generators and fuel for free, the community provided the participants with food and drink for all meals. Teachers from various villages, tribes and ethnic backgrounds who did not talk before, met and spent three days together. “Wonderful! This training, regardless of its importance in education service, proved that peace building is possible”, according to the Director of the participating school from Kalimando.

building is possible!”


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CHAPTER 9

Thailand


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Thailand

Thailand Education for the future ZOA has been assisting refugees from Myanmar residing in camps in Thailand since 1984. After 1997 the main focus has been on basic education. Since 2008, ZOA has been preparing to phase out in 2014 and to hand over its activities to other organisations. The Karen Refugee Committee Education Entity is now overseeing and supporting the coordination of education in the camps. The necessary support has been found for KRCEE after ZOA ends its work in Thailand. A transition will begin in 2013 to oversee a smooth handover of work.

ZOA Thailand 2012 Throughout 2012 ZOA Thailand provided construction materials, furniture and teaching materials for schools, as well as stipends, training and capacity building for over 1,200 teaching personnel. In addition, ZOA assisted in strengthening collaboration with health agencies, as well as improving the established links with the ZOA agriculture project to improve the school environment. In addition, connections were made with water and sanitation agencies to support improve WASH facilities in schools. Additional support has been provided for teaching staff in camps through the training support of ZOA teacher trainers and in the form of head teacher support, provision for Parent-Teacher Associations and technical input from the Thai Ministry of Interior for school inspections and supervision. Living in the restricted environment of the refugee camps has for many years resulted in a dearth of some essential agriculture skills and knowledge. ZOA Thailand has implemented a skills training course as part of the Agriculture and Livelihoods Project. Additional technical

support for modern and organic techniques was provided by the Thai Agriculture College and the Livestock Department. Management skills were also provided for the project participants. This has been to support the management of the work on the farms at the refugee camp sites to be a progressively more independent model than before. The farms are now developing as income-generating entities. The approach is to break the cycle of dependency that is common in refugee settings. Production groups work independently but still use the training centre to assist them as they engage in their own activities. Individual refugees can also retain their knowledge and skills on agriculture and animal husbandry, which were acquired when participating in ZOA livelihoods training. Phasing-out in 2014 To assist in the transfer of the education programme to others, ZOA Thailand has focused on finding established agencies. During 2012, ZOA Thailand assisted with the development of a mutually agreed strategic plan for education agencies cooperating within a consortium. Plans and roles and responsibilities for each agency have been worked out and there will be a gradual transition of education activities, resources and partners to the consortium. This will be done up to March 2014 to ensure that there is a sound hand-over to the new agencies. Planning meetings and discussions have also been held for the handover of the livelihood projects to other agencies.

Preparedness for change Duangporn Saussay, Country Director ZOA Thailand: “We have seen that the involvement of communities in managing camp education has increased, in line with the focus on community governance and inclusion. However, the high turnover of camp teaching personnel, caused by the impact of resettlement and low level of stipends, impacted on the ability to enhance community capacity. It has been necessary to provide ongoing support to the refugee community at central and camp levels. As many involved in education have now been trained and are able to do their job, the challenge for new agencies taking on these activities, has been made easier. ZOA Thailand will therefore be able to work smoothly with a group of partners in the education sector in handing over the activities.�


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ZOA Thailand Worked in:

Mae Hong Son Province: Mae Ra Ma Luang and Mae La Oon refugee camps | Tak Province: Mae La, Umpiem and Nu Po refugee camps | Kanchanaburi Province: Don Yang refugee camp | Ratchaburi Province: Tham Hin refugee camp

Focused on:

Education (Primary and secondary support) | Livelihoods (agriculture and income generation activities)

Results included the following:

Provision of basic services (teaching & learning materials, school construction, etc) to 67 basic education schools and 35,000 students in 7 refugee camps | Support on teacher training, capacity building to CBOs and 1,300 education staff and 4,000 parents | Provision of English language training to nearly 1,000 adult refugees and computer training to around 900 individual refugees | 500 refugees and local Thais benefit from skill development and income generation activities of agriculture, non-agriculture and food processing production

Worked with:

NGOs: Committee for Coordination of Services to Displaced Persons in Thailand (CCSDPT) | Drum, Handicap International | Maltheser International (MI) | American Rescue Committee (ARC) | Première Urgence-Aide Médicale Internationale (PU-AMI) | International Rescue Committee | Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) | Catholic Office for Emergency Relief and Refugees (COERR) | Solidarités International | Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA) | The Border Consortium (TBC) | Right to Play | Save the Children International (SCI) | Livelihood Working Group (LWG) Governmental agencies: Ministry of Education | Ministry of Forestry | Ministry of Interior | One Tambon One Product (OTOP) | Agricultural Training College | Royal Project | Livestock Department | District Agricultural Department CBOs: KRCEE (Karen Refugee Committee Education Entity) | Karen Women Organisation (KWO)

Staff 31 December 2012:

38

Received donations from:

EuropeAID | ECHO | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | PSO | UNHCR | ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, churches, companies, schools, private donors)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 2.556.340

Budget in 2013:

€ 2.171.425


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“I am glad I can share my knowledge with other refugees.”

Less dependent on aid Tun Shane Khine (33) is a refugee from Myanmar who has been living in a refugee camp on the Thai border for several years now. “Although I grew vegetables back home in Myanmar, I hardly had any knowledge of agriculture and animal husbandry.” Tun took part in ZOA’s project ‘Income Generation from Agriculture’. “In taking part in the project I have gained new knowledge and skills. Because of this project I now have a better income and my family eats organically grown vegetables.” Tun took part in the project in 2010. Today he trains other refugees. “I am glad I can share my knowledge with other refugees, because it makes them less dependent on aid. I thank ZOA and the donors for supporting this project.”

High motivation among her staff Naw Moo Day Keh, headmistress of high school no. 1 in Umpium Camp, is grateful. Things in her school changed for the better in 2012. “With ZOA’s support, we were able to build a big building for teaching and learning. We have furniture for classrooms and offices, which improves teaching and learning as well. We also received school and office supplies.” To be a headmistress of a high school in a refugee camp is not an easy job. It’s hard to keep teachers motivated when they can earn much more elsewhere. This explains why Naw Moo Day Keh is especially proud of the high level of attendance and motivation among her staff and students. “The teachers are committed and they are a role model to motivate the students to attend classes regularly.”


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Uganda Livelihood recovery and community rehabilitation ZOA Uganda worked in three areas in 2012: Pader and Agogo since 2007, Amudat since 2009 and Nwoya from 2011. The people in these areas went through periods of violent conflict resulting in massive displacement. ZOA supports returnees in rebuilding their lives, focusing on education, water and sanitation, food security, economic development and civic education. In 2012 the country went through turbulent political times, where boundaries of the constitution and freedom of gathering and speech were tested. Fortunately the ZOA-programmes and our relationship with the Government of Uganda were not affected.

ZOA Uganda in 2012 The Nwoya programme that started in 2011 is in full swing now. The approach is to work with farmer groups and community based organisations, focusing on food security, WASH and education. In the education and WASH component much attention went to the hardware: construction of class rooms, houses for teachers, wells and latrines, combined with hygiene training. The food security component is approached via the 24 existing and 28 new Farmer Field Groups. In Pader we continued the food security and economic development work with farmers. There was special focus on increasing yields and value addition on farms, as well as on establishing and training market committees and strengthening market linkages. In the education sector we moved from hardware-focused to training/software-focused skills; the capacity building of Parent Teacher Associations and School Management Committees was done through our local partner Fokapawa. In the WASH sector the Community-led total

sanitation resulted in villages remaining to be a healthier place to live and work. In Amudat the programme focusing on agro-pastoral food security is starting to bear fruit. We established 56 Agro-Pastoral Field Schools, and more than 2,000 farmers received training, agricultural inputs and seeds. Due to ZOA’s intervention since 2009 the people in this area are more resilient to shock, no longer being solely dependent on their cattle for survival. The biggest challenge this year was the construction of subsurface dams, which faced many technical problems. However, water availability increased with the construction of 9 water ponds and 2 sub-surface dams. In the fight against Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) we asked the Ugandan film maker Matt Bish to produce a short movie with the fictional story of the Pokot girl Chimat (see page 83). This film, Cut that thing, is shown in villages and followed by group discussions. Uncircumcised Pokot women together with their husbands are involved in the campaign to explain the health issues, and that you can be happily married. Girls are told their rights under anti-FGM law and explained where they can go for help. More than 23,000 people were reached in this way, and more than 80 girls have sought assistance to prevent circumcision. ZOA Uganda invested much energy in strengthening the human resources and the internal organisation to be prepared for future developments. Emphasis by ZOA Uganda will be more and more on cooperating with partners instead of own implementation, and we worked with staff on what is needed to be ready for this development.

The most beautiful change Guido de Vries, Country Director ZOA Uganda from 2007 – 2012: “When we started working in Pader in 2007, I would talk to people and ask them what their plans were, what they were dreaming of. But many people were traumatized and all lived in daily fear that the violence would start again. All they could think of was just a few days ahead. Now, when I ask that same question, I see sparkling eyes and hear plans about building a new house, or add tin roofing, or buying a motorbike, or expanding the field, using mechanical tools and fertilizer. They are full of energy and plans. It is the most beautiful change I could ever imagine.”


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ZOA Uganda Worked in:

Pader | Agogo | Amudat | Nwoya

Focused on:

Livelihoods (food security and economic development) | Education | WASH | Special attention to community governance, and to prevention of Female Genital Mutilation

Results include the following:

Pader and Agogo: 8,113 farmers participated in agricultural activities, 85% of them in commercial farming. 34 groups trained on business skills, 40 groups on VSLA, 80 groups supported with income generating activities such as bee keeping and piglets, 124 Farmer Field Schools functioning and received agricultural and business training | 4 joint marketing association of farmers groups formed | 2,050 farmers supported with input tools and training, 2,400 farmers received vegetable start up kits and training on nutrition | 1,015 drop-outs of youth trained in agricultural production skills | vegetable demonstration gardens established at 5 schools | 320 pupils received Children’s Hygiene and Sanitation Training | 15 boreholes rehabilitated and 1 new drilled | 9 villages declared Open Defecation Free | 677 household latrines constructed, 446 handwashing facilities constructed | 502 ideal homes out of 924 | Amudat: 2610 farmers in 87 groups trained on agronomic practices, post-harvest handling and received tools and seeds | increase from 8 to 29% of households now meets basic food needs, availability of water has increased milk production | 660 households established kitchen gardens | 2 sub-surface dams constructed | 44 new Agro-Pastoral Field Schools established, making the total 56, all APFS trained on Community Disaster Risk Management | 9 FAL classes with 489 adult learners | 23,217 people (15,836 women, 7,381 men) reached on anti FGM-law, hygiene sensitization and go-back-to-school campaigns | 10 watersheds constructed | Nwoya: 28 new Farmer Field Schools (FFS), making the total 52 | 20 groups started economic activities such as fish farming and piggery rearing | 24 groups trained in VSLA | all 52 groups developed their business plans | 2 cooperative networks established and supported | 10 classrooms constructed for 720 pupils | 4 teachers houses constructed for 8 teachers | Newspaper In Education in 10 schools | 477 ideal homesteads in 10 villages (80%) | 574 out of 602 households now having latrines (95%) | 57 groups (farmer groups, school committees, WUC) trained on advocacy, governance and conflict resolution

Worked with:

Christian Counselling Fellowship (CCF) | Fokapawa | Kwal Ryeko | Pokot Zonal Integrated Development Programme (POZIDEP) | AIDI | Kica Ber | Local government (district and sub county level | Ministry of Education | Ministry of Agriculture).

Staff 31 December 2012:

137

Received donations from:

FAO | EuropeAID | World Renew | Diakonia | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | MWH Foundation | Liberty Foundation | Wees een Kans Foundation | De Koornzaayer Foundation | ZOA Netherlands (Driestar college, schools, churches, private donors)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 2.233.234

Budget in 2013:

€ 2.643.981


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ZOA’s training for teachers helped us to create a child friendly environment. Cut that thing Cut that thing tells Chimat’s story, who is abused and humiliated by her stepmother. All because of, as her stepmother repeats every day, ‘that thing’ between her legs. Chimat gets so desperate that she asks her friend to take a razor blade and cut whatever looks strange between her legs. As a result, Chimat gets badly hurt. The film illustrates the plight of many Pokot girls. Even though FGM is forbidden by law, it is a Pokot tradition and hard to root out. ZOA, along with local organisations, religious leaders and women’s organisations, work hard to create awareness on the health risks of circumcision. ZOA also suggests alternative rites of passage. The fact that 87 girls refused to be circumcised is a positive result after the first year of this project. The film was also presented at the Berlin Short Film Festival interfilm in November 2012, and created quite some activity on social media in The Netherlands, raising awareness and support among the constituency (facebool.com/zoa.nl).

Teaching in a child friendly environment The returnees in Nwoya have established community schools for their children, since they returned to their home areas where no education was available anymore. Labworomor is such a community school, started by the community and built on land donated by one of the local families. Akech Everlyn, head mistress, explains that most teachers are unqualified and that their salary depends on the contribution from the parents. ZOA provided Labworomor school with three class rooms and latrines, and organized training to both teachers and parents. Akech: “ZOA’s training for teachers helped us to create a child friendly environment. The training of parents has enhanced their participation in school activities a lot. I now find teaching very interesting, as we have a good relationship between teachers, parents, children and the community at large. I feel that, with the support from ZOA, the school will soon meet the required standards to be taken on as a government school, which would make it sustainable.”


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10. Disaster Response The fragile countries we work in are often prone to substantial natural or conflict-related disaster. When this happens in a country where ZOA is already involved in longer term rehabilitation programmes, relief can be embedded within the country programme (for an example of this approach we refer to the South Sudan chapter on page 65). In areas where ZOA is not involved and has no plans to do so, ZOA can decide to provide relief and set up disaster response operations, adding value because we are an experienced partner in the implementation of relief programmes in areas affected by conflict and natural disaster. If local capacity is limited or lacking, ZOA can make disaster response capacity available, while at the same time seeking active collaboration with partners. New strategic alliances are also established with international partners seeking implementation capacity in disaster response initiatives outside regular ZOA countries. Depending on the nature and magnitude of the disaster, ZOA’s involvement in disaster response programmes may last up to three years. These programmes are under direct supervision of ZOA Netherlands. In order to maintain an appropriate balance in our programmes and to fulfill our dual mandate of relief and recovery, the combined volume of disaster response programmes is limited to a maximum of 25% of ZOA’s total activities. Disaster Response Unit To increase ZOA’s disaster response capacity a Disaster Response Unit (DRU) was created in 2011. The DRU enables

us to provide relief for a maximum of three years in countries where ZOA has no long term presence. Besides relief aid and shelter, the unit is involved in all sectors ZOA works in (livelihoods, WASH and education). Having this special unit allows for an increase in disaster response involvement without affecting the long term programmes. Support is provided to country teams, based on their request, in managing disaster response activities embedded in regular country programmes. The first countries where the new approach was implemented are Haiti after the earthquake of January 2010 and Pakistan after the floods in August 2010. In 2011 a Disaster Response programme was started in eastern Ethiopia, during the severe droughts that hit the Horn of Africa. The Disaster Response Unit supported ZOA Ethiopia in scaling up the Dolo Ado programme in response to the acute needs of Somali refugees.

Disaster Response in 2012 The DRU came to full strength in 2012 with four staff: a manager, a programme officer, a general affairs manager and a communication officer. DRU also has access to short term staff (three to five months) to be able to respond quickly in times of sudden crisis. Ethiopia Besides continuing to support Somali refugees in Dolo Ado focusing on livelihoods, education and environmental protection, ZOA Ethiopia started emergency relief in neighbouring district Hudet as well.

South Sudan In 2012 two Disaster Response programmes were set up in South Sudan. At the beginning of the year we were confronted with the huge needs of people in Jonglei State, resulting from the violent interethnic clashes between Murle and Lou Nuer at the end of 2011. We were able to deliver emergency relief in Likuangole, Pibor and Verthet payams. This was a combined programme that involved IOM, Tear Netherlands, TEAR Australia and ZOA. From May we were involved in providing basic water and sanitation services to the 12,000 returnees from Sudan staying at a transit point near Juba. Yemen ZOA started a programme through DRU in Yemen in 2012. This country - the poorest in the Arab world - has suffered severely from conflicts between ethnic groups and the government, which caused massive displacement, especially in 2011. Many of them returned, but found houses, wells and fields destroyed. Syria Throughout 2012 we kept a close eye on the situation of Syrian refugees, and investigated possibilities to start a relief programme. In February 2013 we joined Dorcas in relief activities in Jordan. For more information on our disaster response programmes in Ethiopia and South Sudan, we refer to the country pages. Information about Haiti, Pakistan and Yemen can be found on the following pages.


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ZOA Haiti Worked in:

Leogane: sections Grand Riviere, Palmist a Vin, Fond de Boudin, Petit Riviere, and Petit Harpo.

Focused on:

Livelihoods | With specific attention to peace and stability

Results included the following:

Micro Credit Program: 802 families received micro loans; 253 male, 549 female | almost 1,200 new informal jobs were created. Business Development: 31 small and medium entrepreneurs (SMEs) who completed the 12-day business sessions | 35 new jobs were created. Sustainable Agriculture: 2,780 farmer-families assisted by LEAP | 17 Farmer Associations are functioning | 17 Local Agricultural Technicians are trained | 165 community leaders received different training on how to run their association and care for the environment | 49 local veterinarians were trained | 9 communities conduct regular veterinary clinics | 14 functional seed banks | 17 communities are now implementing Sloping Agricultural Land Technology (SALT) | 10 communities have their own communal vegetable gardens | 13 community nurseries established

Worked with:

World Renew – International Disaster Response. ZOA’s programme manager for the LEAP-programme is seconded to of the World Renew- Disaster Response team | Leogane local CASEC government | Farmers Associations | PWOFOD: Program Formation Dyak | PWW (Partners Worldwide) – Haiti

Staff 31 December 2012:

1

Received donations from:

Stromme, ZOA Netherlands (Emergency Funds, EO-Metterdaad)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 62.538

Budget in 2013:

€ 90.000


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Haiti Recovery from disaster, hope for the future ZOA implements a three year programme in the Leogane area, the epicentre of the January 2010 earthquake: Livelihoods for Earthquake Affected People (LEAP). Shortly after the earthquake many people from Port-au-Prince came to stay with their relatives in the rural areas of Leogane. This was a heavy burden for these poor families, sharing their resources to feed additional mouths.

and Medium Enterprises already received loans, and are paying back according to plan.

The objective of ZOA’s programme, that started in January 2011, is to assist 6,700 families till they have the same level of income as before the earthquake – and preferably above that level.

2013 will be the last year for this programme. All 17 farmer associations have their own Local Agriculture Technician, who received training and regular coaching from our agronomist. In 2012 a new technology has been implemented called Sloping Agricultural Land Technology (SALT). This technique prevents soil erosion, replenishes soil nutrients, provides forage to animals and ensures continuous harvest of different crops. Seventeen communities are now implementing SALT.

ZOA Haiti in 2012 The three major components of the LEAP-programme are: micro-enterprise development, business development and sustainable agriculture. Business activities are increasing in Leogane. By now, 802 micro-entrepreneurs received loans, with the majority of this group (549) being female. Most of the entrepreneurs (93%) are involved in small trading, while others are bakers, tailors and restaurant owners. Second loan cycles have been extended to 175 of them. Almost 1,200 new informal jobs have been created through the programme. Thirty-one small or medium entrepreneurs (SME’s) completed the 12-session business training course, of which 16 in 2012. They are now able to make business plans and their profit and loss statements. All these entrepreneurs receive ongoing coaching. The course is a prerequisite for any financial assistance. Most SME’s are still preparing their business plans, while five Small

The sustainable agriculture programme has reached a total of 2,780 families, which received different kinds of assistance to replace their assets lost from the earthquake and to help them augment their income.

We also trained 165 community leaders on how to run their association and care for the vulnerable environment. The 49 local veterinary agents that we could train this year will also contribute to the development of these communities. Nine communities conduct regular veterinary clinics besides the usual assistance. There are 14 functional seed banks, 8 more than last year. Farmers return their seeds in the seed bank to be assured that they have continuous supply of the much needed seed which is usually difficult to find during planting season. It is a joy to see ten communities having their own communal vegetable gardens with eggplants, cabbage, carrots and peppers.

Most significant change Jeff Cosico, ZOA’s programme manager in Haiti: “I asked the people what they define as the most significant change since LEAP started working in their communities. Here are some of their answers: The seedbank: ‘It helps us save seeds for the next planting season. During planting season it is difficult to find seeds and the price is high. SALT: ‘This is a new technology to us, we can cultivate different crops without losing the soil. Farmers from other communities ask us now about this technology.’ Vegetable gardens: ‘We were not used to grow vegetables, but now we have additional food and it provides additional income.’ On the SME-programme: ‘The credit programme not only helps affected earthquake people to survive, but if you know how to manage the loans, it is also an opportunity for us to start realizing our dream.’


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ZOA Pakistan Worked in:

13 Union Councils of Rahim Yar Khan, Southern Punjab

Focused on:

Livelihoods (agriculture) | WASH | Emergency response (shelter and Disaster Risk Reduction | With special attention to capacity building of civil society and peace and stability

Results included the following:

Training and agricultural support for 250 CBOs | Agricultural support to 100,000 beneficiaries (13,858 families) | Support of national NGO I-LAP | construction of 753 One Room Shelters and 753 latrines, benefitting 5,271 people.

Worked with:

Local NGO ‘I-LAP’ | Educational Institute Charity

Staff 31 December 2012:

2

Received donations from:

ECHO | ZOA Netherlands (Emergency Funds, churches)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 1.667.461

Budget in 2013:

€ 622.753


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Pakistan Restoring livelihoods after devastating flooding ZOA started a Disaster Response Programme in cooperation with local partner I-LAP (Interfaith - League Against Poverty) in Pakistan, following the flooding in August 2010. Together they initiated an early recovery mission to assist in preparing the fields, repairing the irrigation system of the most vulnerable flood affected people, and establishing Community Based Organisations (CBOs) in order to socio-economically empower the people of Rahim Yar Khan District. In the programme we assist 8,700 families through 250 CBOs, and support them to resolve their livelihood problems. These families are tenant-farmers or owners of less than five acres. The early assistance has been of considerable support, because it has prevented them from getting into deep debts that would have been almost impossible to pay off.

ZOA Pakistan in 2012 Continuing the construction of One Room Shelters (ORS) for vulnerable families was an important part of the programme in 2012. Selection of the beneficiaries was a time consuming but careful process done in close collaboration with our CBOs. The field team visited each family to verify the damages and vulnerability. Since the start of the programme in 2011, in total 753 ORS with a latrine have been built, benefitting 5,271 people. The potential for future flooding has been accounted for in the design strength of our shelters which are built of fired brick and on raised platforms.

Working with CBOs During this year, it was noticed that not all of the 400 initially participating CBOs were actively cooperating. It has always been the ethos of ZOA to work with people and support them when they need and want help. So we decided to focus on the cooperating and motivated CBOs. Out of 400, 250 CBOs proved to be dedicated and are now receiving our full attention and dedication, to take their organisation to the next level. Attendance of training programmes has never been higher and monthly membership fees (0.80 Euro) exceeded 90%. The 250 remaining CBOs are now growing in knowledge and strength as they understand how they can improve their lives by working together. Education levels are low and they are very vulnerable for exploitation by unscrupulous landowners and loan agents who can charge up to 360% interest on loans. A major objective of our programme is to make these groups more resilient, to be able to avoid exploitation and to cope with natural disasters. ZOA, through its partner organisation I-LAP, supports and trains these CBOs every step of the way. Parallel to the CBOs that consist exclusively of male farmers, Female Based Groups (FBGs) have been set up to work with female members of our CBO households on hygiene, home gardening, small livestock, a healthy diet and the importance of education for their children. Our actions continue to assist large numbers of flood affected people to move from insecurity to stability.

Dry clothes now One of the owners of a One Room Shelter is Nazir (40).”We are proud to have a brick home including a latrine, wash room and septic tank. We lived in the heat, the cold, the dust, we never had a suitable home. I am very happy to stand in front of this house.” Nazir’s daughter ads: “We had to wear wet clothes since our roof leaked. Now we have a secure shelter for when it rains.” With the support of ZOA and I-LAP, the family received seeds and joined the CBO. Nazir: “My husband receives agricultural training and he can save money on the CBO account. I am member of a women’s group where I learn about water, sanitation and hygiene.” Her daughter is happy: “My mother teaches us what she has learned in the training course. And she brought a hygiene kit so we can brush our teeth and wash our hands properly.”


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ZOA Yemen Worked in:

Sana’a Governorate: Arhab district and Bani-Garmoz sub-district

Focused on:

WASH | With specific attention to community governance and capacity building of local organisations

Results included the following:

Set up new Disaster Response Country Programme | Registration with the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation in Yemen WASH Approved donor funding for an 1,5 year WASH programme in Sana’a Governorate | Global Hand washing Celebration 2012: campaign for 4 schools in Sana’a, 18 villages in Arhab and Bani Garmouz and 56 villages in Hajja and Hodeida | development of a curriculum for schools and training community mobilizers and teachers to raise awareness on hygiene | 9615 children and adults joined the Global Hand Washing campaign and 7000 practiced to wash their hands.

Worked with:

International NGO Vision Hope International (VHI), implementing partner | Community Based Organisations: Jamaiyya Arhab and Jamaiyya Bani Al-Harith | GARWSP (General Authority of Rural Water Supply Project)

Staff 31 December 2012:

1

Received donations from:

UNICEF | Royal Netherlands Embassy | ZOA Netherlands (Emergency funds, private donors)

Expenditures in 2012:

€ 86.646

Budget in 2013:

€ 1.199.491


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Yemen Recovery from conflict, restoring living conditions Serious problems erupted in Yemen as the result of the Arabic uprising which manifested itself happened in various Arabic countries in 2011. The Yemen political crisis made headlines in the world media for a time. But this crisis is related to other crises, connected to continuous refugee influx, tribal conflicts, overpopulation and depletion of resources. These contribute to an ever increasing crisis that is simply forgotten en hardly receives attention from international media. These other crises have caused severe and widespread chronic vulnerabilities in Yemen, particularly with regard to nutrition, food security and access to water, social welfare and healthcare. Yemen is one of the most water stressed countries in the world. Its aquifers are being mined at such a rate that groundwater levels have been falling by three to six meters annually.

ZOA Yemen in 2012 In June 2012, ZOA started a three-year Disaster Response operation in Yemen in Sana’a Governorate in June 2012, in cooperation with Vision Hope International (VHI). Focus will be on improving the living conditions of the conflict affected communities in Arhab and Bani Garmouz (sub)districts through a WASH intervention. In 2012 ZOA started up a local office in Sana’a and organized activities related to the Global Handwashing Day (see box). A contract was signed per the first of December with the Dutch Embassy for a WASH intervention of 1.5 years in Arhab and Bani Garmouz. Currently the inception

phase is in full swing. This period will also be used to recruit more Yemeni staff, such as a M&E officer, administrator and a capacity builder of Community Based Organisations (CBOs).

Arhab district and Bani Garmouz sub-district These districts experienced violent clashes and fighting in 2011. Many families had no other option than to seek safety elsewhere. Fights between the government army and tribal groups have decreased, but the situation is still tense. Most of the people have returned to their homes. ZOA will focus on families who are struggling to resume their lives. Infrastructure was damaged and wells have been destroyed, making it very difficult for these people to support themselves. The depletion of sub-surface water resources and ever growing dependency on water trucking calls for more sustainable solutions like rain water catchment and storage. Hygiene conditions are a major concern in many communities. Awareness raising, preferably through women can help change behavior. CBOs will be used to implement the project activities, they will be trained to improve their organisational capacity. Seventy unemployed youths from the target area will receive vocational training related to the WASH construction activities in which they will participate. Farmers also rely on well water to irrigate crops. Although the main focus is on domestic water use through improved rainwater catchment methods, we will make sure that farmers will also benefit from the repaired wells to restart cultivating their land.

A simple thing like hand washing Related to the Global Handwashing Day on October 15th, ZOA organised campaigns for four schools in Sana’a and 74 villages in Sana’a, Hajja and Hodeida governorates. ZOA developed a curriculum for schools and trained community mobilizers and teachers to raise hygiene awareness. Corine Verdoold, Country Representative ZOA Yemen: “Games and conversations teach children to wash their hands with soap, before a meal and after using the toilet. 9,615 Children and adults joined and 7,000 practiced washing their hands. They are now aware how a simple thing like washing hands can reduce diarrhea and other diseases. Hand washing with soap is the cheapest and most efficient way to protect children from diarrhea and respiratory diseases. Every student received a bar of soap to take home and to teach their parents and be an example.”


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11. Financial report 11.1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION In 2012, the total income of ZOA excluding MFS-2 partners’ income grew to a new historic level of more than ₏ 34 million. This is 5,8% higher than 2011 and 3,5% higher than budget. Income of ₏ 8,1 million of MSF-2 funds is received on behalf of the partners in the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation. ZOA is legally responsible for this programme as a whole and is therefore reporting the annual income 2012, including the contractual income of the consortium partners Care Nederland, Save the Children and Healthnet TPO. This way of income recognition is in line with interpretation of Dutch accounting principles. Income from own fundraising decreased with ₏ 1,3 million compared to last year. The decrease is mainly due to the large emergency relief fundraising campaign organised in 2011 for the countries in the Horn of Africa. During 2012 no large disaster respons campaigns were held. Total expenditures spent on objectives increased to a level of ₏ 40,9 million, including ₏ 8,1 million spent for MFS by DCR partners. Excluding these expenditures, ZOA’s expenditures spent on objectives increased with 10,8% to a level of ₏ 32,8 million. ZOA’s countries abroad realised their programme objectives in 2012 resulting in a limited country office deficit of ₏ 0,3 million (less than 1% of own spenditures

abroad) while a deficit of â‚Ź 0,4 million was forecasted in the budget. This distinctive performance was positively influenced by professional local management, cost efficiency measurements and cost control in the ZOA countries. In the ZOA Netherlands organisation the programme costs for the support base and for monitoring and evaluation of programmes increased in 2012, mainly

due to additional staff allocated to this cost category. The CBF percentage (own fundraising costs) of 17,4% increased mainly due to the fact that there was no large campaign in 2012, which resulted in lower income from own fundraising activities against a comparable level to last year of expenses on own fundraising. The administration and management costs of 3,4% declined as a share of the total expenditures.

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   '%*&%&"*!,))&*&*#.'%!*+()

  

 







    









 

  



  

      

      

 

   

    

  

   

      

 

 (&"* (&"* (%*)(%*) *!&% ('(*!) *!&% ('(*!) (&"* (%*) -%+%(!)!% -%+%(!)!% *!&% ('(*!) -%+%(!)!%



 

   

 

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

  



 

 











 

   

   

     



 

 

  

 

   

 







 





  

 

In 2012 ZOA realised again a higher percentage spent on objectives. In 2012, ZOA spent 92,4% (2011: 91,7%) of the total expenditures on objectives.


94

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Financial report

Changes in net results compared to budget Budgeted result 2012 allocated to reserves (€)

225.062

Lower operational and overhead costs in The Netherlands

365.082

Higher interest benefits

150.414

Higher contributions from countries to cover costs in The Netherlands

118.646

Higher country results abroad

22.338

Additional contribution to funds

-5.698

Negative exchange rate results

-8.529

Extra withdrawal of continuity and programme reserves Lower income without specific designation

- 89.461 -841.638

Actual results 2012 allocated to reserves

The lower operational and overhead cost in The Netherlands and the higher country results abroad can be explained by cost reductions and efficiency results that were realised by ZOA’s operations abroad. The higher interest benefits are a result of received interest from larger pre-payments of donors and will be allocated and spent on project objectives. The income without specific designation is used to cover the costs in The Netherlands of programme preparation and coordinaton and to finance projects abroad. The decrease is due to lower income on own fundraising activities. Income without specific designation decreased compared to last year and budget. The deficit as a result of income and expenses is € 1.049.464 which is in line with budget and is mainly due to exhausting programme funds. This means that for some projects the funding was received in prior years and recognised already as income, but the expenses for the projects were incurred in the current year. Therefore € 985.680 of current year’s deficit is withdrawn from the programme funds.

-63.784

The allocated reserves within ZOA are relatively low given the risks ZOA faces, particularly in the foreign countries. Therefore, it is ZOA’s objective to allocate results to the reserves, which is the surplus or deficit remaining after all liabilities have been covered. The deficit realised in 2012 of € 63.784 has been withdrawn from the reserves. Additional information appears in the explanation of the reserves.

Liquidity position ZOA has a relatively sound position in cash and cash equivalents, thanks to pre-payments by donors. Since programme funding needs to be spend on projects on a short-term basis, no large amounts of cash are available for long-term investments. The full cash position is therefore temporarily deposited on an interest-bearing account (lowest risk level) at two Dutch system banks. ZOA agreed with these banks that the money provided through interest-bearing accounts must be invested ‘wisely’ (sustainably and socially responsible).


CHAPTER 11

95

Financial report

11.2 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2012 BALANCE SHEET AS PER 31 DECEMBER (¤) Assets

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

Tangible fixed assets Building

326.417

358.752

Inventory & Equipment

222.727

262.170

Vehicles in programme area’s

612.278

345.426 1.161.422

Receivables

966.348

5.919.357

3.042.992

Cash and cash equivalents

15.148.776

16.789.919

Total assets

22.229.555

20.799.259

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

5.396.167

5.220.490

Reserves and liabilities Reserves and funds Continuity reserve Allocated reserve Programme guarantee

284.541

372.525

Disaster Response

631.006

779.638

Other

276.114

278.959 1.191.661

Programme funds

1.431.122

3.385.929

4.371.609

9.973.757

11.023.221

Short-term liabilities Taxes and social security contributions

158.872

119.734

Accruals to donors

7.171.316

6.382.488

Other liabilities and other accruals

4.925.610

3.273.816

Total reserves and liabilities

12.255.798

9.776.038

22.229.555

20.799.259


96

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES (造) Income

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Income own fundraising activities Door to door collection

925.207

1.015.000

955.885

Legacies

347.531

300.000

314.304

Contribution, donations and gifts

5.525.040

7.410.000

6.865.471

Income from third party campaigns

6.797.778

8.725.000

8.135.660

1.502.718

629.588

816.1 34

Project grants Project grants from government for MFS-2 partners

8.091.621

10.061.631

8.393.209

Project grants from government and other donors

25.729.483

23.821.145

23.404.783

33.821.104

33.882.776

31.797.992

Interest

250.414

100.000

230.838

Rate differences and other income

144.982

-

-56.487

42.516.996

43.337.364

40.924.137

Total income


CHAPTER 11

97

Financial report

Expenditures

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Spent on objectives Project spenditures through MFS-2 partners Own spenditures on objectives

8.091.621

10.061.631

8.393.209

29.698.406

28.608.241

26.696.685

Spent on objectives in countries

37.790.027

38.669.872

35.089.894

Preparation and coordination from The Netherlands

2.032.294

1.920.973

1.744.986

Education/Awareness raising

1.042.765

1.065.137

1.142.854

40.865.086

41.655.982

37.977.734

Total spent on objectives

Spent on fundraising Expenses own fundraising Expenses participation in external campaigns Expenses received project grants

1.182.625

17,4%

1.305.790

15,0%

1.174.164

84.356

83.705

74.673

223.203

341.623

209.377

14,4%

1.490.184

1.731.118

1.458.214

1.211.190

1.131.817

1.217.783

Total expenditures

43.566.460

44.518.916

40.653.731

Surplus / - Deficit

-1.049.464

-1.181.552

270.406

-985.680

-1.406.614

-241.034

Management and administration

Added to / -withdrawn from Funds Reserves Continuity reserve

175.677

375.062

410.851

Programme guarantee

-87.984

-150.000

68.959

-148.632

-

154.494

-2.845

-

-122.864

Disaster response Other allocated reserves

Total change in reserves and funds

-63.784

225.062

511.440

-1.049.464

-1.181.552

270.406


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CHAPTER 11

Financial report

CASH FLOW OVERVIEW

CASH FLOW OVERVIEW Cash flow (€)

Actual 2012

Actual 2011

Out of own fundraising

6.797.778

8.135.660

Out of third party campaigns

1.502.718

816.134

23.687.643

26.478.220

254.700

430.174

Cash flow from operating activities Received

Out of project grants Other income

32.242.839

35.860.188

Payments Programme and coordination costs

30.734.046

28.761.577

2.454.511

2.536.340

Fundraising, management and adminitration costs

Cash flow from operating activities

-33.188.557

-31.297.917

-945.718

4.562.271

-790.425

-733.068

95.000

33.912

-

2.850

-1.641.143

3.865.965

Cash flow from investments: Assets sold / - bought Desinvestment Stocks Change in cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents as at 31 December

15.148.776

16.789.919

Cash and cash equivalents as at 1 January

16.789.919

12.923.954

Change in cash equivalents

-1.641.143

3.865.965

The cash flow statement is according to the direct method. The change in cash position can be explained by spending programme funding in the current year which was already received in prior years and by investments made for tangible fixed assets.

Ratio liquidity

Actual 2012

Actual 2011

Liquidity expressed by ACID ratio

172%

203%

Receivables and cash

21.068.133

19.832.911

Short-term liabilities

12.255.798

9.776.038

Based on the liquidity ratio of 172%, ZOA has sufficient funds available to cover all obligations on the short term. The long-term obligations are covered by the total reserves and funds of € 10,0 million.


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99

Financial report

EXPLANATORY NOTES TO THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2012 General The annual accounts have been prepared in accordance with the Guideline 650 of Fundraising Organisations (RJ 650, revised 2011). All indicator percentages are excluded for the income and expenditures of DCR consortium partners with respect to the MFS-2 project. The annual accounts have been prepared on a historical cost basis. Unless indicated otherwise, assets and liabilities are presented at face value. Income and expenditure are allocated to the period that they relate to. The annual accounts are presented in euros. To further increase transparancy in the presentation of the financial results, some of the comparative figures have been presented in a different way compared to last year’s financial report. The change in presentation has been disclosed in the notes to the specific accounts where applicable. Reporting period These annual accounts have been prepared based on a reviewed period of one year. The financial year coincides with the calendar year. Transactions in foreign currencies Transactions in foreign currencies are converted against the exchange rate that is applicable at the time of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currencies are converted on the balance sheet date in the functional currency against the rate applicable on this date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currencies that are presented at historical cost are converted into euro at the exchange rates applicable on the transaction date. Differences in exchange rates appear as a result in the statement of income and expenditures.

Use of estimates The preparation of the annual accounts requires the Chief Executive Officer to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that influence the application of accounting principles, as well as the reported value of assets and liabilities and income and expenditure. The actual outcome may deviate from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are continually assessed. Revised estimates are used in the period that the estimate changes and in future periods where the revision may have consequences. Impairment If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds the higher of the direct sales value and the estimated present value of the future cash flows, an impairment is charged which is the difference between the carrying amount and the recoverable amount. Financial instruments During the normal course of business, ZOA uses various financial instruments that expose the organisation to market and/or credit risks. These relate to financial instruments that are included on the balance sheet. Receivables in the balance sheet mainly relate to donor receivables and are mainly from large institutional third parties. Therefore the credit risk on these receivables is limited. ZOA has a very limited interest rate risk, as ZOA has no interest bearing loans. The market value of the financial instruments stated on the balance sheet is approximately equal to their carrying amount. ZOA does not trade in financial derivatives.

Accounting principles for the Balance sheet Tangible fixed assets The buildings, refurbishments, fixtures and equipment and means of transport in programme areas are valued at

acquisition or manufacturing cost minus the cumulative depreciations and/or accumulated impairment losses, if any. Maintenance expenses will only be capitalized as assets if they extend the economic life of the object. Depreciations are calculated as a percentage of the acquisition price according to the straight-line method based on the estimated useful lives of the assets. Buildings: Refurbishments: Inventory and equipment: Vehicles in programme areas:

31/3 % 10 % 25 % 331/3 %

If the acquisition of a tangible fixed asset is directly funded by a donor, the investment is fully depreciated in the year of acquisition. Receivables, prepayments and accrued income Receivables are valued at face value less a provision for non-recoverability. Provisions are determined according to individual assessment of the collectability of the debts. Reserves and funds The reserves and funds of ZOA are in place in order to achieve ZOA’s objectives. They can be summarized as follows: Continuity reserve The continuity reserve enables the organisation to meet its commitments towards employees during a (temporary) stagnation of income. The restriction on spending the reserve for special purposes has been determined by the Chief Executive Officer.


100

CHAPTER 11

Allocated reserve The allocated reserves are earmarked by the Chief Executive Officer and consist of programme guarantees, disaster response activities and other earmarked reserves relating to assets in countries. Programme Funds Funds concern funding acquired with a specific use designated by third parties, but not spend yet by ZOA. Personnel remuneration/pensions Obligations relating to contributions to pension schemes based on defined contributions are presented as expenditure in the statement of income and expenditures in the period that the contributions are due. In addition, a provision is included for existing additional commitments to employees, provided it is likely that there will be an outflow of funds for the settlement of the commitments and it is possible to reliably estimate the amount of the commitments. Liabilities ZOA enters into donor obligations in the areas abroad where ZOA is implementing programmes. A donor obligation is recognised after the Chief Executive Officer has passed a resolution on this and has communicated it to the grant recipient, often the target group represented by a local organisation or government agency, which leads to a legally enforceable or actual obligation. This obligation is presented in the balance sheet as a liability if the contract value to be received of donors is lower than the programme obligation.

Accounting principles for the Statement of Income and Expenditures All proceeds are entered as income for the gross amount, unless this chapter explicitly states otherwise. Costs necessary to realise certain income are presented as expenditure in the statement of income and expenditures.

Financial report

Income from own fundraising activities Income from own fundraising activities is recognised as income in the year of receiving, or moment of signing a specific contract. It includes the income out of doorto door collection, contributions, donations and gifts. Donations in kind are valued at the actual value in The Netherlands. Legacies are recorded as income when they can be reliable estimated.

will not be accounted for in the statement of income and expenditures.

Income recognition programmes implemented by partners Income recognition related to programme implemented by partners is based on the periodically received expenditure reports.

Spending toward objectives Expenditures spent on objectives include amounts allocated toward activities designed to meet the objectives during the financial year, as well as implementation costs. Expenditures include subsidies to local partners, relief goods and food purchased, cost of deployed personnel, transport costs, local accommodation costs and office expenses. It also includes the acquisition costs of the means of transport and office inventory, which will be made available to the local partner after the programme has ended.

Income from third party campaigns The contributions from other fundraising organisations are accounted for as ‘income from third party campaigns’ for the amount received by the organisation. They are recognised in the year that the income from the campaign by third parties has been received or pledged by this third party. Campaigns by third parties only include campaigns for which ZOA does not bear any risk. Project Grants from governments Operating grants are recognised in the statement of income and expenditures of the year that included the subsidised expenditure. Losses are taken into account if they originate in the relevant financial year and as soon as these are anticipated. Project grants of MFS-2 consortium partners are fully recognised on a contractual cash basis, because ZOA acts as the legal responsible lead agency. Project Grants in kind The received grants in kind, often food and relief supplies, are valued at the cost stated in the contract relating to the goods. If the contract does not provide for this, the goods will be valued at market value at the place of delivery. If the received goods are not based on a contract and a reliable valuation is lacking, the transaction

Costs Since third parties also require to gain insight into the level and composition of the costs of fundraising organisations, the notes provide a specification of these costs in accordance with model C of the RJ-650 guidelines.

Costs fundraising organisation All costs, incurred for activities with the aim of persuading people to donate money for one or more of ZOA’s objectives, are earmarked as costs of fundraising income. This means that the costs for publicity and public relations are regarded as costs of fundraising income, unless they are awareness raising costs. The activities will often be mixed: awareness raising and fundraising at the same time. In such cases, the part of the costs relating to the awareness raising activity will be allocated to this activity. Depending on the specific awareness raising objectives, the allocation formula is decided in advance for each situation. Costs of management and administration Costs of management and administration are the costs that ZOA incurs for the (internal) management and administration and which are not allocated to ZOA’s objectives or fundraising income.


CHAPTER 11

Financial report

101


102

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

NOTES TO THE BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER Tangible ďŹ xed assets (â‚Ź)

Building

Inventory &

Vehicles

Equipment

Total

Total

2012

2011

At 1 January 2012 Acquisition value

923.787

1.263.145

1.841.802

4.028.734

3.329.578

Cumulative depreciation

565.035

1.000.975

1.496.376

3.062.386

2.579.460

Book value

358.752

262.170

345.426

966.348

750.118

10.115

92.568

687.742

790.425

733.068

-

6.993

252.000

258.993

33.912

42.450

132.011

420.890

595.351

516.838

-

6.993

252.000

258.993

33.912

-32.335

-39.443

266.852

195.074

216.230

Acquisition value

933.902

1.348.720

2.277.544

4.560.166

4.028.734

Cumulative depreciation

607.485

1.125.993

1.665.266

3.398.744

3.062.386

Book value

326.417

222.727

612.278

1.161.422

966.348

Changes in book value: Investment Desinvestment Depreciations Depreciations desinvestment Balance At 31 December 2012

Investments in inventory and vehicles are replacements of computers and vehicles directly contributing to the programmes abroad. Buildings relate to the office building in Apeldoorn, which is owned by ZOA. The offices in programme countries are rented.


CHAPTER 11

Financial report

Receivables (造)

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

European Union

1.616.990

505.833

USAID

1.572.372

60.194

MRRD (Afghan governement)

361.202

52.893

UN-organisations

322.591

147.261

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

157.168

165.809

MWH foundation

157.065

24.339

Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden

125.000

-

Woord en Daad

114.424

-

World Renew (CRWRC)

99.768

290.369

Red een Kind

85.655

105.589

Thai Birmese Border Consortium

45.000

75.000

Tear Australia

43.417

66.775

PSO

23.660

125.043

BSF

-

291.568

Other donors

279.504

262.474

208.490

177.900

-

93.055

231.986

232.393

10.546

5.000

464.519

361.497

5.919.357

3.042.992

Receivables from donors:

Interest to be received Receivable MFS-2 Partners Prepaid Partner Expenses Receivable Legacies Other receivables and pre-payments Total

Total donor receivables relate to project contributions from institutional donors not yet received by ZOA. They refer to programmes already (being) implemented and pre-financed by ZOA.

103


104

CHAPTER 11

Cash and cash equivalents (造)

Financial report

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

12.839.789

14.601.606

827.276

730.607

Amounts in euro Netherlands Programme countries

13.667.065

90%

15.332.213

91%

Amounts in foreign currencies Netherlands Programme countries

Total

ZOA aims to keep cash balances in euro if possible. US dollar contracts with institutional donors cause currency positions in US dollars that can lead to rate differences. In general, these do not influence the programmes activities, since most of the expenditures are also paid in US dollar. The decrease in cash position can be explained by spending programme funding in the current year which was already received in prior years and by investments made for tangible fixed assets.

319

104.400

1.481.392

1.353.306

1.481.711

10%

1.457.706

9%

15.148.776

100%

16.789.919

100%


CHAPTER 11

105

Financial report

Reserves and programme funds Reserves (造) Continuity reserves Total

31-12-2011

Added to

Withdrawn from

31-12-2012

5.220.490

175.677

-

5.396.167

5.220.490

175.677

-

5.396.167

ZOA aims to maintain a reserve that counterbalances the general financial and operational risks of the organisation and the specific risks inherent in realising the programmes abroad. Influenced by changing accounting principles, ZOA decided that the reserve related to pre-financing is not relevant anymore and added the complete amount to the general reserves. This has also been adjusted in the comparative figures. This change does not influence the total level of the continuity reserves.

Continuity reserve Continuity A surplus on the exploitation will be added to this reserve when the total amount of the continuity reserve does not meet the required level. The surplus on the continuity reserve will be added to the other reserves. Coverage of organisational costs To hedge short-term risks and to ensure that the organisation is able to meet its commitments in the future, the Chief Executive Officer and the Supervisory Board have determined a target amount for the continuity reserve at a maximum of 100% (VFI guideline for Good Causes: 150%) of the annual expenses of the operating organisation. This percentage is based on the risk profile of the organisation, the surroundings where it operates and the internal control measures adopted. More detailed explanations of the risk profile and internal management appear in chapter 5 of the annual report.


106

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

Coverage organisational costs (¤)

Actual 2012

Calculated reserve

Actual 2011

Calculated reserve

Own costs of the organisation ǦŠ—˜”““Š‘ˆ”˜™˜Š™Š—‘†“‰˜

100%

3.053.754

3.053.754

2.779.050

2.779.050

Ǧ•†™ˆ”˜™˜

100%

2.076.660

2.076.660

2.290.667

2.290.667

ǦŠ—˜”““Š‘ˆ”˜™˜†‡—”†‰

50%

4.408.180

2.204.090

3.342.556

1.671.278

Ǧ‹ʬˆŠˆ”˜™˜“”™—Š‘†™Š‰™”•—”Œ—†’’Š˜

50%

230.036

115.018

175.260

87.630

100%

8.183

8.183

8.591

8.591

Ǧ™Š—‹š“‰—†Ž˜Ž“Œˆ”˜™˜ Target level to be covered

7.457.705

6.837.216

Actual continuity reserve

5.396.167

5.220.490

72,4%

76,4%

Coverage ratio

The continuity reserve is covering 72,4% of the target level, based on normalised organisational costs in 2012. In the years ahead, additional resources will therefore be allocated to this reserve in order to strengthen this. ZOA does not strive for a maximum reserve as set by VFI (Vereniging Fondswervende Instellingen) of 150%,

Allocated reserves (¤)

because it does not want to block reserves unnecessarily that can be used in project activities. The Supervisory Board has established a target level of 100% to ensure that the ongoing obligations can be met. The level of the reserves is however an important point of attention for the ZOA organisation. Both from the risk perspective and subsequent to the public debate about reserves held

by charity organisations, ZOA will continue to review its policy. The coverage ration declines to 72,4% due to the increase of the ZOA organisation costs in 2012. However, currently ZOA is in compliance with the norm regarding the maximum level of the continuity reserve set by the VFI.

31-12-2011

Added to

Spent on objectives

31-12-2012

Programme guarantee

372.525

183.659

271.643

284.541

Disaster Response

779.638

62.174

210.806

631.006

Other reserves

278.959

-

2.845

276.114

1.431.122

245.833

485.294

1.191.661

Total

Allocated reserves The restriction on spending of the allocated reserve is determined by the Chief Executive Officer. It does not constitute an obligation; the Chief Executive Officer is able to change this restriction.


CHAPTER 11

Programme guarantee (¤)

107

Financial report

31-12-2011

Spent on programmes

Additional

31-12-2012

150.000

150.000

-

-

Programme Cambodia

112.976

112.976

15.000

15.000

Programme Sri Lanka

86.190

-

59.272

145.462

Programme Thailand

-

-

50.000

50.000

Programme Burundi

-

-

25.000

25.000

Co-funding SBOS

-

-

26.670

26.670

Other

23.359

8.667

7.717

22.409

Total

372.525

271.643

183.659

284.541

Programme South Sudan

Programme guarantee The Chief Executive Officer defined this reserve for specific programme risks where a guarantee is given to a country programme. Large institutional donors are funding the programmes substantially. Without guarantees there is a risk of losing these donors, which could have a major impact on the continuity and sustainability of the programme. Risks may also vary depending on the fields where ZOA operates. Even without direct external financing, some programmes may be carried out by internal pre-financing from this reserve. The guarantee for South Sudan relating to an uncertainty in future pension payments evolved in the current year to an actual liability of € 104.000 and is included under other liabilities as part of ‘Liabilities abroad’. The guarantee related to the programme in Sri Lanka is allocated for specific programme objectives. All these programme guarantees are assessed annually.

Disaster Response The Chief Executive Officer allocated this reserve given the fact that provision of emergency relief is a core activity of the ZOA organisation. That said, ZOA must be financially able to respond to requests for aid without delay. Funding drawn from the emergency relief fund is however considered to be a form of pre-financing, that has to be compensated afterwards as much as possible through earmarked donations received through emergency relief fundraising campaigns. Other Other reserves are created for specific purposes in the programme countries. These are mainly used to replace tangible assets (mainly vehicles) in the near future.


108

CHAPTER 11

Programme Funds (造)

Financial report

31-12-2011

Received money Third Parties Own Fundraising

Spent on projects

Contribution reserves

31-12-2012

Afghanistan

110.070

153.913

169.733

389.273

3.191

41.252

Burkina Faso

-

-

40.613

20.000

-

20.613

10.576

65.685

151.542

70.466

-

157.337

Cambodia

157.856

-

133.662

357.606

-82.976

16.888

Congo

28.599

45.446

136.544

94.999

-

115.590

1.467.836

712.661

392.606

1.202.763

-35.000

1.405.340

Ha誰ti

185.314

-

1.584

63.104

-

123.794

Japan

23.658

-

-

22.961

697

-

Liberia

364.733

17.883

212.236

265.111

-

329.741

Myanmar

485.039

-

76.670

439.336

-

122.373

Pakistan

637.990

15.395

5.364

382.610

-

276.139

Sri Lanka

528.845

375.485

176.338

729.736

-

350.932

31.888

111.250

140.122

264.631

-

18.629

7.908

-

235.334

67.566

-

175.676

Thailand

15.230

-

152.825

145.367

-865

23.553

Uganda

166.187

-

344.385

449.863

-

60.709

-

-

-

3.000

-3.000

-

4.221.729

1.497.718

2.369.558

4.968.392

-117.953

3.238.566

7.380

-

-1.875

-

-

5.505

SHV Fund

72.500

-

-642

-

-

71.858

J.M. Bogman Fund

70.000

-

70.000

-

70.000

70.000

4.371.609

1.497.718

2.437.041

4.968.392

-47.953

3.385.929

Burundi

Ethiopia

South Sudan Sudan

Yemen Subtotal countries Gift Certificate Fund

Total


CHAPTER 11 Programme Funds The funds for programmes include available financial means that donors or contributors have allocated toward a particular programme or project. Because donor funding is not always available at regular intervals, the pattern of income may fluctuate. That is particularly evident in the level of the allocated reserve. Surpluses and deficits will be settled as much as possible within the funds and within projects with a similar goal, if possible. The remainder will be added or withdrawn from the other reserves.

109

Financial report

Ethiopia In 2011, ZOA received € 1,7 million out of own fundraising to help the people in the Somalia region in Ethiopia. This money will be allocated to and spent on specific projects in 2012 to 2014. Haiti The funding received out of the emergency campaign of Haiti was mainly spent in 2010 to 2012 according to programme plans. Japan ZOA received in 2011 € 23.658 from its constituency to support the people in Japan after the earthquake and tsunami. ZOA spent the money in 2012.

Short term liabilities Taxes and social security contributions Concerns taxes and social security contributions due as at 31 December 2012. Accruals Donor contributions received in advance that will be spend after the year 2012 appear as liabilities. ZOA has received these payments based on programme proposals and contracts. The organisation is required to spend the money accordingly and to return the money to the donor if the commitment is not fulfilled. Significant contributions were received from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs before the reporting date, which led to an increase in the accruals.

Accruals to donors (¤)

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

4.610.472

2.466.863

EU (ECHO/EuropeAid)

990.212

1.917.565

AusAid

771.583

1.057.297

UN (OCHA/UNCHR)

332.167

225.368

DFID

112.777

-

ICCO Kerk in Actie

107.123

-

WORLD RENEW (CRWRC)

93.798

38.618

2.266

195.638

Ministry of Development Belgium

-

146.807

Red een Kind

-

66.042

Woord en Daad

-

120.858

150.918

147.432

7.171.316

6.382.488

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs

PSO

Other donors Total


110

CHAPTER 11

Other liabilities (¤)

Financial report

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

Liabilities abroad

1.941.443

1.063.602

Payable MFS-2 Partners

1.418.078

-

Programme Liability World Renew (CRWRC) Haiti

280.019

608.172

Provision Annual Leave

242.289

216.684

Programme related liabilities

241.502

161.288

Creditors

155.527

644.314

Accrual Holiday Allowance

140.633

132.133

Programme Liability World Renew (CRWRC) Uganda Liability MWH Foundation Other liabilities and accruals Total

21.436

74.120

-

102.203

484.683

271.300

4.925.610

3.273.816

Liabilities abroad These liabilities refer to project costs to be paid in the ZOA countries as well as liabilities towards local employee benefits. Creditors These include regular liabilities to suppliers, both in the programme areas and in The Netherlands. Programme related liabilities These liabilities relate to the risks of implementing projects in the areas where ZOA is working. Different kind of circumstances (security, weather circumstances, lack of resources) could cause programme delays in realising the planned objectives. This could cause a discrepancy between the budget available and the projects still to be realised. This additional contribution is expected to enable the programme to realise its objectives and consequently making the results more sustainable for the target group.

Liabilities not in the balance sheet The liabilities not presented in the balance sheet mainly relate to lease contracts of premises and cars abroad.

Liabilities not presented in the balance sheet (¤)

31-12-2012

31-12-2011

Liabilities shorter than 1 year

479.000

174.000

Liabilities longer than 1 year

203.000

79.000

Total

682.000

253.000

ZOA is the lead agency within the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR-consortium) and therefore legally responsible towards the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs with respect to all liabilities of the MFS-2 project of DCR as a whole. In December 2012 an amount of € 4,0 million has been received, of which € 2,8 million has been transferred to the MFS-2 partners relating to the financial year 2013.

This has not been recognised yet as a result in 2012. The remaining € 1,2 million is included under other liabilities as a payable to MFS-2 partners. Co-financing liabilities: A co-financing liability is a liability to fund a specific project in addition to funds provided by a main donor, with income from other resources.

From the end of 2012, ZOA has had co-financing liabilities for projects in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Cambodia, Liberia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Thailand, Uganda and Myanmar for an approximate total of € 1,6 million (2011: € 1,8 million). With external donor funding ZOA has already covered € 0,1 million (2011: € 1,0 million) of this co-financing liability.


CHAPTER 11

111

Financial report

NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES Income General

Income in percentage of total income Income own fundraising activities Income from third party campaigns Project grants Others Total

In order to respond to the needs of the beneficiaries in our programme areas, we aim to have at least also 25% income from our own fundraising and from third parties. It is ZOA’s intention that the amounts granted by one donor to one country programme should not exceed 35% of this programme, to avoid donor dependence. Due to the difficult circumstances in the market gifts and donations were behind on budget resulting in a decrease

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

20%

26%

25%

4%

7%

3%

75%

67%

72%

1%

-

-

100%

100%

100%

of the income from own fundraising and third parties to 24%. Last year the emergency relief campaigns during the summer 2011 for the countries in the Horn of Africa (income of € 1,7 million) had a positive influence on the income of own fundraising activities. A comparable fundraising activity was also budgetted for 2012, but did not occur in such extent. It is ZOA’s intention to bring back the percentage of income from own fundraising

activities and from third parties to 25% in in 2014 through renewed and additional fundraising strategy and activities. Other income of € 144,982, representing less than 1% of total income, mainly relates to the sale of some vehicles resulting in a profit of € 95.000

Income from own fundraising

Source of income from own fundraising (¤)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Door to door collection

925.207

1.015.000

955.885

Mailing actions

839.761

800.000

910.906

Legacies

347.531

300.000

314.304

Individuals

1.236.334

1.882.000

1.776.536

Churches and schools

712.035

1.723.500

1.309.202

Companies, charity funds & other

1.402.271

1.704.500

1.653.354

Private donors

1.334.639

1.300.000

1.215.473

6.797.778

8.725.000

8.135.660

Gifts and donations

Total

Income from our own fundraising activities decreased compared to 2011 and budget, because the relatively high income in 2011 as a result of the Horn of Africa campaigns. In 2012 no such emergency campaigns were held.


112

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Financial report

Income with and without specific designation

Income designation (¤)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Income with designation

2.449.189

36%

3.597.800

41%

3.428.590

42%

Income without specific designation

4.348.589

64%

5.127.200

59%

4.707.070

58%

Total

6.797.778

100%

8.725.000

100%

8.135.660

100%

Due to the influence of the exceptional fundraising income for the Horn of Africa in 2011, the income with designation in euro and also as a percentage of total income was relatively high in 2011 and therefore decreased to a relative normal level in 2012. The income without specific designation is used to cover the cost in The Netherlands of programme preparation and coordination and is also used to finance projects and programmes abroad.

Income from third party campaigns (¤)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden

475.000

-

Draagt Elkanders Lasten

346.000

-

Aqua for All

286.666

16.800

178.631

436.184

100.000

-

Happy Gift

65.065

73.087

Wilde Ganzen

35.106

15.796

Tear Nederland

10.000

-

6.250

1.250

1.502.718

543.117

Stromme Foundation

-

187.048

World Renew (CRWRC)

-

35.523

Erikshjalpen

-

25.000

Canadian Reformed World Relief Fund (CRWRF)

-

15.446

Tear Fund Belgium

-

10.000

Total campaigns abroad

-

273.017

EO-Metterdaad Deputaatschap Christelijk Gereformeerde Kerken

Other Total campaigns Netherlands

Total participation in external campaigns

1.502.718

629.588

816.134

These amounts concern income from campaigns by fundraising organisations in The Netherlands in order to support ZOA programmes and projects. Last year also contributions from international organisations or foreign donors in the private sector were included. This year ZOA’s focus was mainly on national campaigns, also influenced by the decrease of own fundraising.


CHAPTER 11

113

Financial report

Project Grants governments and other

Donors (¤) DMH/VG (MFS-2)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

4.817.783

3.483.027

227.738

-

71.034

62.948

1.732.755

2.180.180

Royal Netherlands Embassy Sudan

857.929

1.373.944

Royal Netherlands Embassy Afghanistan

839.087

1.117.644

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs-Capacity-building

239.771

671.488

DMH/VG (Reconstruction) DMH/VG (Other) DSH-HO (Emergency)

Total Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs donors

8.786.097

6.837.000

EuropeAid

3.523.202

2.920.247

ECHO

1.781.833

2.371.185

Total EU donors

5.305.035

6.270.000

8.889.231

5.291.432

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

771.546

1.172.889

United Nations Office for the Coordination of

733.679

89.945

UNHCR - Thailand

296.377

348.243

International Organization for Migration (IOM)

255.219

-

Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)

143.705

21.074

UN Emercency Relief Fund (ERF)

137.878

65.735

World Food Programme (WFP)

121.893

505.845

UNICEF - South Sudan

118.689

142.769

16.131

83.572

-

70.068

UNICEF - Liberia

83.280

-

UNICEF - Thailand

40.354

-

Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)

UN Office for Project Services (LIFT) UN Development Programme (CERF)

Total UN donors

2.718.749

3.032.000

2.500.140

Table continuing next page

Grants from governments and other institutions This income reflects contributions from the Dutch government, the European Union and United Nations organisations, such as UNHCR, UNDP, UNICEF, WFP, USAid and others. Whether donors are willing to contribute to an emergency situation during the year in areas where ZOA operates and for what amount is difficult to anticipate in the budget. Part of the grants received for the current financial year will be spend after this year. With contributions from donors that arise from spending committed under contract, the resources that yet have to be spend are presented under “Short-term liabilities” as “Accruals”.


114

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Financial report

Table continued from previous page

Donors (造) U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

3.445.598

367.541

1.521.274

1.191.457

Ministry of Rural Rebabiliation & Development (MRRD / Afghanistan)

724.100

284.459

Directie-Generaal Ontwikkelingssamenwerking (DGD)

160.482

569.089

Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom

153.536

44.074

Japan International Coorporation Agency (JICA)

25.615

40.506

Australian Embassy

17.347

-

Basic Services Fund (South Sudan)

-

899.455

German Government Fund (GTZ)

-

39.140

Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (Afghanistan)

-

59.209

Australia Government Aid Programme (AusAid)

Total foreign Governmental donors

6.047.952

6.019.000

3.494.930

TEAR Australia

830.750

154.063

Woord en Daad

582.412

442.045

World Renew (CRWRC)

548.789

1.276.906

MWH Foundation

414.000

420.833

Red een Kind

197.262

79.294

International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC)

76.959

-

Koornzaaier

62.577

-

Diaconia

59.611

-

Kerk In Actie (KIA)

41.482

425.926

7.113

92.886

50.695

337.097

Dorcas Other Total Others

Total Project Grants

2.871.650

1.663.145

3.229.050

25.729.483

23.821.145

23.404.783

Income from institutional donors has strongly increased compared to previous year partly as result of a focused and professional donor approach by the Institutional Donor Relation department of ZOA. Changes between donors can be explained by their change in priorities in the choice of geographical areas and sectors where they work. ZOA partners and collaborates with donors when their priorities meet the programme goals and priorities of ZOA.


CHAPTER 11

115

Financial report

Expenditures Cost structure of the organisation

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

83,7%

83,0%

82,8%

Education and awareness

2,9%

3,1%

3,5%

Programme preparation and coordination in The Netherlands

5,7%

5,6%

5,4%

92,4%

91,7%

91,7%

Fundraising costs

4,2%

5,0%

4,5%

Costs of management and administration

3,4%

3,3%

3,8%

100,0%

100,0%

100,0%

Spent on objectives in countries (excl. MFS-partners)

Total spent on objectives

Total costs of the organisation (excluding MFS-2 partners)

ZOA’s aim is to spend at least 88,0% of its resources on programme objectives. With 92,4% in 2012, ZOA has exceeded that level. The downward trend of the fundraising costs and cost of management and administration has also continued in 2012. Because of increasing income at approximately the same cost level, the percentage further declined. As a result ZOA currently has a healthy cost structure. Another important indicator that should be mentioned in this regard is spent on objectives as a percentage of total income:

Indicator spent on objectives (¤)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

Spent on objectives

32.773.465

31.594.351

29.584.525

Total income

34.425.375

33.276.000

32.530.928

95,2%

94,9%

90,9%

Spent on objectives as percentage of total income (excluding MFS-2 partners)


116

CHAPTER 11

Overview spent on objectives (造)

Financial report

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

4.348.014

2.338.000

1.744.480

Burundi

622.869

653.000

578.647

Cambodia

383.521

135.000

513.797

Congo

2.483.735

2.277.000

1.497.876

Ethiopia

2.425.155

1.526.000

1.326.325

62.538

300.000

1.822.681

Liberia

1.215.720

1.316.000

1.830.413

Myanmar

1.570.159

1.018.000

1.082.910

Sudan

2.757.025

3.510.000

2.604.986

Pakistan

1.667.461

1.435.000

1.203.833

Sri Lanka

4.571.662

4.180.000

4.567.709

Thailand

2.556.340

3.212.000

3.398.966

Uganda

2.233.234

2.497.000

1.986.603

South Sudan

2.673.902

2.889.000

2.537.459

Yemen

86.646

-

-

Other

40.425

1.322.241

-

29.698.406

28.608.241

26.696.685

Preparation and coordination Netherlands

2.032.294

1.920.973

1.744.986

Education and awareness raising Netherlands

1.042.765

1.065.137

1.142.854

32.773.465

31.594.351

29.584.525

8.091.621

10.061.631

8.393.209

40.865.086

41.655.982

37.977.734

Afghanistan

Ha誰ti

Own spent on objectives in countries

Total own spent on objectives Project Spent through MFS-2 partners Total spent on objectives incl. MFS-2 partners

Spent on objectives The world of humanitarian aid is dynamic. This does not only affect our own operational capacity, but also the policies of major donors for the countries concerned. The overview of expenditure per country shows that there are considerable differences between the aid that has been planned and the aid that has been delivered. The increase in Afghanistan is due to new funding opportunities in the Northern and the Southern region mainly from OFDA, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Royal Netherlands Embassy.


CHAPTER 11 Preparation and Coordination from The Netherlands This accounts for the costs of the country support teams and the disaster response team. The costs of the Programme Department and the Department for Monitoring Policy development and Evaluation of programmes are also included.

The increase of cost regarding preparation and coordination in The Netherlands is mainly due to additional staff allocated to this cost category. In 2012 the capacity of the Disaster Response Unit increased with two employees, and additional staff was hired for the reconstruction project (‘RECON’).

Preparation and coordination Netherlands (¤) Preparation and coordination cost Netherlands MFS-2 coordination costs RECON coordination costs PSO project costs Preparation and coordination Netherlands

Education and awareness raising Includes the costs for education and raising the awareness of young people at schools, the general

117

Financial report

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

1.539.348

1.501.349

1.261.085

343.126

319.621

398.740

7.034

-

-

142.786

100.003

85.161

2.032.294

1.920.973

1.744.986

public and of ZOA constituents in particular. In 2012 these costs were in line with budget and slightly decreased compared to last year.

Spent on fundraising (¤)

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Actual 2011

1.182.625

1.305.790

1.174.164

84.356

83.705

74.673

223.203

341.623

209.377

Total spent on fundraising

1.490.184

1.731.118

1.458.214

Total income own fundraising

6.797.778

8.725.000

8.135.660

Spent on fundraising in percentage of own fundraising income (CBF%)

17,4%

15,0%

14,4%

Spent on fundraising in percentage of total income (excl. MFS-2 partners)

4,3%

5,2%

4,5%

Expenses own fundraising (CBF-ratio) Expenses participation in external campaigns Expenses received project grants

Cost rate of fundraising For 2012 the cost rate of fundraising (the ‘CBF-percentage’) is at 17,4%. The increase of the percentage can be explained by the increasing efforts of ZOA to fundraise the own income. Furthermore in 2011 the cost rate was relatively low, due to the one-time fundraising actions

for the Horn of Africa. When this part of the income is excluded, this ratio in 2011 would be 18,2%. VFI is using a standard of maximum 25%.

that the organisation incurs for (internal) management and organisation that are not allocated to the objective or to fund raising.

Management and Administration Costs of management and administration are the costs

As a percentage of total cost, the management and administration costs declined to a level of 3,4%.


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ATTRIBUTION OF COSTS 2012 Attribution of costs 2012 (¤)

Objectives

Fundraising

Cost of

Programmes

Coordination

Education

Own

External campaigns

Project Grants

Management and Administration

Total 2012

Budget 2012

Total 2011

Own programmes/projects

22.340.721

-

292.904

-

-

-

-

22.633.625

21.497.323

20.720.372

Salaries/social charges

6.865.639

1.453.821

548.848

374.419

68.398

136.787

866.784

10.314.696

10.764.238

9.215.179

Direct costs (campagnes, telemarketing etc.)

-

-

-

663.096

-

54.510

-

717.606

873.601

738.695

Travel and subsistence

-

91.680

50.739

36.806

8.000

16.000

38.233

241.458

246.346

235.428

Accommodation costs

-

20.997

7.687

5.259

975

1.949

11.667

48.534

33.920

47.626

Office costs

-

47.568

113.376

82.776

1.947

3.893

66.025

315.585

269.517

255.575

Audit costs and Annual Report

-

-

-

-

-

-

98.390

98.390

93.000

94.188

Other general costs

-

372.562

16.643

11.670

2.811

5.615

100.293

509.594

679.607

400.656

492.046

45.666

12.568

8.599

2.225

4.449

29.798

595.351

-

552.803

29.698.406

2.032.294

1.042.765

1.182.625

84.356

223.203

1.211.190

35.474.839

34.457.552

32.260.522

8.091.621

8.091.621

10.061.631

8.393.209

37.790.027

43.566.460

44.519.183

40.653.731

Depreciation and Interest Total Costs through MFS-2 partners Total incl. MFS-2

Costs are allocated to the objectives, fundraising and management and administration according to the recommendation ‘Allocation of costs of Management and administration’ of the VFI. Costs have been allocated according to the following criteria: A) Cost own organisation abroad The expenditure accounted for under programmes mainly concerns the personnel costs of posted fieldworkers and the office expenses on location. This expenditure is directly related to the implementation of the programme in the countries (outside The Netherlands) where ZOA is active. Costs of own organisation abroad are fully allocated to objectives.

B) Costs own organisation in The Netherlands The costs own organisation in The Netherlands fall into two kinds of expenditure: B1) Implementation costs that are directly attributable Costs that are directly related to the implementation of the objectives. Categories that are accounted for under implementation costs that are directly attributable are: ǦŠ•—Š•†—†™Ž”“†“‰ˆ””—‰Ž“†™Ž”“”‹—Š†‡Ž‘Ž™†™Ž”“ (mainly the costs of the Programme department and the Country Support Teams) and emergency relief (mainly the costs of the Disaster Response Unit); ǦŠ‰Ž—Šˆ™ˆ”˜™˜—Š‘†™Ž“Œ™”Ž“‹”—’†™Ž”“†“‰†œ†—Š-

ness raising (education); ǦŠ‰Ž—Šˆ™ˆ”˜™˜”‹”œ“‹š“‰—†Ž˜Ž“Œƽˆ†’•†ŽŒ“˜‡ž third parties and project grants. B2) Allocated cost of management and administration This includes expenditure that could be allocated (directly or indirectly) to the objectives based on prudential criteria (number of work places, deployment of staff, etc.) and according to a steady course. These costs include the costs of Management Office, facilities, ICT and general costs.


CHAPTER 11

Cost allocation to management and administration

Financial report

%

Costs of operations at Head Quarters General

33

Finance

50

Facilities

90

IT

90

Human Resources

75

Executive Board

95

Supervisory Board

100

Standard for Costs of management and administration Based on the nature of the organisation as described before in this annual report, the Chief Executive Officer has set the standard for the management and administration costs at approximately 4,0%. In the multi-annual overview and forecast on page 124, the development in time of this indicator is displayed.

119


120

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

Remuneration Supervisory Board and Chief Executive Officer ZOA’s Supervisory Board members do not receive a compensation. The position and powers of the Chief Executive Officer (sole officer) have been determined based on a management protocol. The Chief Executive Officer bears ultimate responsibility for the operational organisation as a whole.

Personnel costs management (¤)

The salary of the Chief Executive Officer has been set in accordance with the Remuneration decree for state civil servants (BBRA 1984), Grade XVI. The fee for the remuneration of the Chief Executive Officer is set well below the guideline of the Dutch Fundraising Institutions Association for management salaries.

Employment

Number of staff As per 31 December 2012 ZOA employed 906 people based on headcount (2011: 768).

Actual 2012

Actual 2011

Kind (validity)

Permanent

Permanent

Hours / week

40

40

100%

100%

1/1 - 31/12

1/1 - 31/12

86.004

87.739

6.880

7.019

7.167

799

Total gross salary

100.051

95.557

Social premiums

8.750

7.281

Pension premiums

17.154

13.661

125.955

116.499

Name Function

PT-percentage Period

Appropriation of results The result has been appropriated according to the breakdown indicated in the Statement of Income and Expenditures.

Chief Executive Officer

Remuneration (¤) Gross salary Vacation bonus

Other information

J. Mooij

End-of-year bonus

Total remuneration


CHAPTER 11

121

Financial report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To: The Supervisory Board and Chief Executive Officer of Stichting ZOA

REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS We have audited the accompanying financial statements 2012 as set out on pages 95 to 120 of Stichting ZOA, Apeldoorn, which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2012, the statement of income and expenditures for the year then ended and the notes, comprising a summary of the accounting policies and other explanatory information. THE EXECUTIVE BOARD’S RESPONSIBILITY The Chief Executive Officer is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements and for the preparation of the Executive’s Report, both in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instellingen (RJ 650)’ of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. Furthermore, the Chief Executive Officer is responsible for such internal control as it determines is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. AUDITOR’S RESPONSIBILITY Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Dutch law, including the Dutch Standards on Auditing. This requires that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Chief Executive Officer, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS We have no deficiencies to report as a result of our examination whether the Executive’s Report, to the extent we can assess, has been prepared in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instellingen (RJ 650) of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board’. Further, we report that the Executive’s Report, to the extent we can assess, is consistent with the financial statements.

The Hague, 16 April 2013 KPMG Accountants N.V. J.A.A.M. Vermeeren RA

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. OPINION In our opinion, the financial statements give a true and fair view of the financial position of Stichting ZOA as at 31 December 2012 and of its result for the year then ended in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instellingen (RJ 650)’ of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board.


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Financial report

APPENDIX STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES BUDGET 2013 Income (造)

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Income own fundraising activities Door to door collection

920.000

925.207

1.015.000

Legacies

375.000

347.531

300.000

5.248.995

5.525.040

7.410.000

Contribution, donations, gifts

Income from third party campaigns

Project grants from government for MFS-2 consortium partners Project grants from government and other donors

Interest Rate differences and other income Total income

6.543.995

6.797.778

8.725.000

1.000.000

1.502.718

629.588

8.175.164

8.091.621

10.061.631

31.933.924

25.729.483

23.821.145

40.109.088

33.821.104

33.882.776

230.000

250.414

100.000

-

144.982

-

47.883.083

42.516.996

43.337.364


CHAPTER 11

123

Financial report

Expenditures (造)

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

Spent on objectives Project spent through MFS-2 consortium partners Own spent on objectives

8.175.164

8.091.621

10.061.631

35.438.189

29.698.406

28.608.241

Spent on objectives in countries

43.613.353

37.790.027

38.669.872

The Netherlands

2.285.239

2.032.294

1.920.973

Education/Awareness raising

1.173.006

1.042.765

1.065.137

47.071.598

40.865.086

41.655.981

Preparation and coordination from

Total spent on objectives

Spent on fundraising Expenses own fundraising (CBF-ratio) Expenses participation in external campaigns Expenses received Project Grants

1.229.666

18,8%

1.182.625

17,4%

1.305.790

87.041

84.356

83.705

325.438

223.203

341.623

15,0%

1.642.145

1.490.184

1.731.118

1.125.595

1.211.190

1.131.817

Total expenditures

49.839.338

43.566.460

44.518.916

Surplus / - Deficit

-1.956.255

-1.049.464

-1.181.552

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

-1.841.255

-985.680

-1.406.614

Management and administration

Added to / - Withdrawn from (造) Funds Reserves Continuity reserve

-

175.677

375.062

Programme guarantee

-

-87.984

-

-115.000

-148.632

-150.000

-

-2.845

-

Disaster Response Other allocated reserves

Total change in reserves and funds

-115.000

-63.784

225.062

-1.956.255

-1.049.464

-1.181.552


124

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

LONG-RANGE OVERVIEW AND ESTIMATE ( â‚Ź x 1.000) ZOA determined the financial indicators that define the quality of a country programme. This revealed that an optimal country programme amounts to approximately â‚Ź 3.500.000 and has a staff of 3 to 4 expats assisted by locals.

Indicators Number of programme countries

A country programme of this scale is able to operate effectively and is able to accommodate setbacks without compromising the leverage of the organisation. ZOA aims to have every country programme at this level.

This principle is the base for the multi-year projection. The number of countries where ZOA aims to operate combined with the cost ratios deemed acceptable by the board, help to determine the multi-year ambition.

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

12

12

12

11

12

12

12

12

2.030

2.225

2.475

3.237

3.324

3.412

3.500

3.500

35%

28%

25%

24%

25%

25%

25%

25%

17%

14%

17%

19%

16%

16%

16%

16%

5%

4%

4%

4%

6%

6%

6%

6%

4%

4%

4%

4%

4%

4%

4%

4%

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

10.150

9.126

8.696

7.807

8.250

8.500

9.000

10.000

18.611

23.405

25.729

31.914

33.000

33.000

32.000

31.000

-

8.393

8.092

8.175

10.000

10.000

-

-

28.761

40.924

42.517

47.896

51.250

51.500

41.000

41.000

(excl DRU countries) (Target) Volume per country Percentage income non-Project Grants Norm cost percentage own fundraising(CBF) Norm cost percentage total fundraising Norm costs of management and administration

Income Income own fundraising and participation in third party campaigns Project grants For MFS-2 partners Total income


CHAPTER 11

125

Financial report

Expenditures Total spent on objectives For MFS-2 partners

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

24.357

29.585

32.773

38.962

38.000

38.000

38.000

38.000

-

8.393

8.092

8.175

10.000

10.000

-

-

Spent on fundrasing

11,0%

1.300

14,4%

1.458

17,4%

1.490

18,8%

1.644

16,0%

1.600

16,0%

1.700

16,0%

1.800

16,0%

1.900

Management and

4,0%

1.107

3,3%

1.218

3,4%

1.211

2,8%

1.150

3,1%

1.250

3,2%

1.300

3,3%

1.350

3,4%

1.400

administration Total expenditures

26.764

40.654

43.566

44.519

50.850

51.000

41.150

41.300

1.997

270

-1.049

-2.035

400

500

-150

-300

1.183

-241

-986

-1.920

-

100

-550

-700

814

511

-64

-115

400

400

400

400

1.997

270

-1.049

-2.035

400

500

-150

-300

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Fundraising percentage (CBF)

11%

14%

17%

19%

16%

16%

16%

16%

Percentage spent on objectives

91%

92%

92%

94%

>90%

>90%

>90%

>90%

Spent on objectives in

85%

91%

86%

98%

>90%

>90%

>90%

>90%

250%

203%

172%

210%

225%

230%

235%

240%

Surplus / - Deficit

Added to / - withdrawn from Programme funds Reserves Total change in reserves and funds

Other indicators

percentage of income Liquidity


ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviations (not exhaustive) CBO DEL DRU FAL HAP MFS SALT SME VFI VSLA WASH ZOA

Community Based Organisation Draagt Elkanders Lasten Foundation, meaning Carry Each other’s Burden Disaster Response Unit Functional Adult Literacy Humanitarian Accountability Partnership Mede Financierings Stelsel, meaning co-financing system, funds from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The number ‘2’ (MFS-2) refers to the second cycle of funding, for the years 2011 – 2015. Sloping Agricultural Land Technology Small and Medium Enterprises Vereniging voor Fondsenwervende Instellingen, Branch Organisation for Fundraising Village Saving Loan Association Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Zuid Oost Azië, meaning Southeast Asia, the region where ZOA started working in 1973

Colophon Board Dr. ir. H. Paul MPA, chairman J.W. Boogerd Drs. B. Brand MCM Drs. J. Kamphorst Mr. B.J. van Putten Ing. K.A. de Vries MEd Drs. A.W. Westerveld, MPH © 2013 ZOA P.O. Box 4130 7320 AC Apeldoorn The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 F +31 (0)55 36 68 799 E info@zoa.nl

Text: ZOA, with regards to Inge van der Weijden en Hetty Vonk Photography: Front cover, page 20, 27, 68, 71: Grzegorz Litynski Back cover, page 18, 40, 92, 94: Jonneke Oskam Page 6, 76, 77, 119: Dolf Hoving Page 5: Carel Schutte Page 65: Jaco Klamer Other photos: ZOA Design: IDD concept.communicatie.creatie I www.idd.nu

Chief Executive Officer J. Mooij MBA ING account number (for transfers in The Netherlands): Giro 550 ZOA is registered with the Chamber of Commerce under number: 41009723

Printed by: drukkerij De Bunschoter The information in this report may be reproduced (exluding the photos), provided ZOA is notified and this Annual Report is acknowledged as the source, ZOA would like to receive a copy of the publication.


ZOA | P.O. Box 4130 | 7320 AC Apeldoorn | The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 | E info@zoa.nl

WWW.ZOA-INTERNATIONAL.COM


ZOA Jaarverslag 2012