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Research and Employment Centre, Oberhausen | 2 Wrekin College Business School, Shropshire | 6 Heini-Klopfer Ski Jump, Oberhausen |12 Batelease Farm, Devon |14

International Magazine Benelux Edition ISSN 1363-0148 www.hdgmagazine.co.uk

HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

HOT DIP GALVANIZING

01 | 2020

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

Editorial Dear readers, Because inspiration is something you can never have too much of, Zinkinfo Benelux have decided to disseminate in digital form the international magazine, Hot dip Galvanizing. The publication, which has already existed for decades, has up to now been primary distributed in the United Kingdom and Germany. But now seemed like a good time to link up with our British and German colleagues, who have put so much effort into restyling the magazine. Hot dip Galvanizing appears three to four times yearly. Zinkinfo itself will now regularly contribute articles to the publication, but above all, we wanted to enable all of you to enjoy the excellent contributions from other countries which it contains.

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And in this connection, an invitation: architects or clients wishing to gain international exposure for their projects should not hesitate to contact us – perhaps your project will soon be featured in an edition of Hot dip Galvanizing! Sincerely,

Bruno Dursin

2 Hot Dip Galvanizing – An international journal published jointly by the galvanizing associations of Germany, United Kingdom & Ireland Edited by: I. Johal, H. Glinde (Editor in Chief). Published by: Galvanizers Association, Wren’s Court, 56 Victoria Road, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands B72 1SY, UK; Tel: +44 (0) 121 355 8838, E-Mail: ga@hdg.org.uk, Website: www.galvanizing.org.uk This magazine may not be copied without the written permission of the editor © 2020

Photo front cover | hiepler, brunier

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1 + 2 | Various cultivation methods are used in three climatic chambers for salads, herbs and fruit 3 | T he new building contributes to the regeneration of the old centre of Oberhausen, aiming to integrate horticulture into the urban realm


HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

Growing by Holger Glinde

opportunities Research and Employment Centre, Oberhausen

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A recent addition to the historic centre of Oberhausen has helped to reinvigorate a neglected part of the city with the unusual addition of a rooftop greenhouse. The innovative project exemplifies what a location-based, futureoriented urban development can look like, that combines work, production and public space.

The project originated from the meeting of two mutually independent organisations. While the Oberhausen job centre were looking for a central location, the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology, based in Oberhausen, were looking for a way to implement its concepts for building-integrated horticulture. The city of Oberhausen brought the partners together. The combination gave rise to the idea for the administration building with a rooftop greenhouse, within the Altmarkt area of Oberhausen.

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

The project, designed by Kuehn Malvezzi Architects, in collaboration with landscape architects, atelier le balto, sought to find a balance between its competing objectives. The new building, contributes to the regeneration of the old centre of Oberhausen, which has recently been characterized by empty properties, bargain shops and amusement arcades. The tension between physicality of the brick building and lightness of the greenhouse gives the building a special quality. A vertical garden connects the market square with the roof garden. It is an effective urban planning element that purposefully combines the old and new landscape typologies as a public space. An external galvanized steel staircase leads visitors from the tree-lined square up steps and platforms, past climbing plants and seating areas, to the roof. From the rooftop, the view opens over the historical centre of the city. The rooftop greenhouse, which was planned in cooperation with Haas Architekten, is a research area used by the Oberhausen-based Fraunhofer Institute. It is hoped that this will help to realise its concepts in the field of building-integrated horticulture and agriculture within an office environment and thereby bring this into the urban realm. Extensive use of galvanized steel is made to form the vertical garden and the rooftop greenhouse with the building designed with adaptability in mind for possible future developments in the city. With comparatively simple means, the office building can be transformed into inner-city living and workspace. The rooftop greenhouse is designed as a U-shape around the inner courtyard. It is operated by the city and is accessible to the general public. Different cultivation methods are used in three climatic chambers for salads, herbs and fruit. Research is being carried out on further technical systems and synergies to optimise local food production. Air and waste heat from the office building is directed into the greenhouse, its CO2 content can promote plant growth. The rainwater from the roof is collected in a cistern and used to water the plants. Greywater from the the building is also treated and reused as process water within the offices and for the plants in the vertical garden.

4 4 | A galvanized steel vertical garden connects the square with the roof garden. It hepls to create an effective urban planning element that purposefully combines the old and new landscape typologies as a public space

Architect |  Kuehn Malvezzi Architekten with atelier le balto Photos |hiepler, brunier

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HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020 1

Reinforcing by Holger Glinde

the past

Reinforcement of A67/A3, Frankfurt It is a well known fact that hot dip galvanized steel can be used in the construction of new infrastructure. It should not be forgotten that it can also play an important role in retrofitting structures. This can prolong the life of existing structures, increase capacity and with the work being carried out while the structure is still in use, avoid delays and additional expense.

A good infrastructure strategy will include the building of new structures with the sustainable use of resources. In addition to this, retrofitting should be considered to be an important element within this strategy. Retrofitting can often take place without any significant interference in traffic and thus avoid congestion that increases costs and have negative environmental impacts. Hot dip galvanized steel has emerged as the preferred material for the strengthening of bridge structures. Its strengths include maximum prefabrication, ease of assembly, relatively low component weight, robustness and maintenance-free durability. A example is the reinforcement of the A6/A3 feeder bridge at the Mönchhof triangle near Frankfurt. The reinforced concrete bridge transfers the feeder from the A6 to the A3. Galvanized CHS sections help to brace the concrete piers and a galvanized steel frame at the bridge abutment helps to transfer superstructure loads onto a new strip foundation.

1 | Hot dip galvanized steel provides many advantages as a material for retrofitting existing structures Photo | Institut Feuerverzinken

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

Contemporary by Iqbal Johal

interpretation

Wrekin College Business School, Shropshire A new business school for Wrekin college, set within a beautifully landscaped campus, extends an existing teaching block. Designed to provide an environment to encourage interaction with business and employers, the new facility aims to provide a real continuous business experience which links learning with students’ ideas and experiences.

To the north, the new extension forms a new frontage to Sutherland Road announcing the new business school to the public realm. To the south, the new building creates a sunny courtyard space. Wrekin College is known as ‘The School in the Garden’ owing to its extensive grounds and playing fields. The extension was conceived as a ‘pavilion’ in the landscape – so it was important that it is read as a discrete form despite being an extension of an existing building. To achieve this transition, the existing building is treated as a separate architectural element. To overcome the slope of the site, the new building is set on a plinth formed from concrete paving slabs. The external landscape essentially involved the re-instatement of the lawns around the new building – completing it as a pavilion in the garden. The form of the building is conceived as a series of discreet objects / rooms arranged on a raised plinth beneath an over sailing roof supported by ten steel columns.

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Architects | Baart Harries Newall Photos | Paul Harries

1 | T he building sits within a beautifully landscaped campus and can be viewed from all directions 2 + 3 | The exposed steel roof structure and columns were first hot dip galvanized and then factory finished with a paint system


HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020 2

The steel structure is exposed and made with great precision, with all welds ground down and all fixings either concealed or counter sunk flush with the surface of the steel. Columns are cantilevered from the base (to avoid cross bracing) and directly support a ring beam, with the roof ‘sliding’ past the ring beam and terminating with a further exposed eaves beam set along the roof edge. The aim was to create a contemporary interpretation of classical architecture – a trabeated structure realised in modern materials. A durable and refined finish to the steel was needed and all the exposed steel roof structure and columns were hot dip galvanized and factory finished with a paint system. The precise, smooth, exposed structural steel finish offers a counterpoint to the richly textured handmade red bricks used for the walls beneath the roof structure and behind the columns.

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

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Greenhouse by Bruno Dursin

effect

Private house, Belgium If the energy of solar radiation can penetrate a system almost unhindered, but the outflow of heat is restricted, this is called the glasshouse or greenhouse effect. While this effect is increasingly becoming a problem for the earth, a family house in Rekkem, Belgium is using the effect in a positive way.

Architect | Koen Vandewalle Photos | Joost Demuynck

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The architect Koen Vandewalle has designed a house that is housed in a greenhouse. The house-wthina-house also claims to be autonomous from the local energy grid and consists exclusively of recyclable, reusable or local bio-ecological materials. The building follows the idea of circular construction, in which the focus is on the reuse of materials and the maximum use of natural energy sources. The house for a


family of seven with a living space of 170 m2 was designed as a timber structure within a 12.2 m wide by 30 m long greenhouse with a ridge height of 9 m. The galvanized steel greenhouse, protects the house and garden from wind and weather, creating a balanced microclimate. The robust and resistant bolted construction can be completely dismantled if required. The house itself consists of a timber frame insulated with cellulose and wood wool, which rests on a base made of recycled concrete.

2 + 3 | The energy for the house comes exclusively from the sun. The solar elements provide the necessary energy for the production of hot water and electricity required for the house

HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

1 | T he hot dip galvanized steel structure of the greenhouse consists of a series of ten frame elements consisting of 6 m long columns and beams

The hot dip galvanized steel structure of the greenhouse consists of a series of ten, 6 m long columns and beams. “Steel was the only material that could be used for the greenhouse function,” says Koen Vandewalle, adding: “Steel is 100% adaptable, can be dismantled and recycled. Good corrosion resistance and a long service life are guaranteed by hot dip galvanizing.“ To ensure that the house is independent of public utilities, rainwater is cleaned using a lava filter and fed into three rainwater wells of 20,000 litres each. Waste water goes to a septic tank, where effluent is pumped onto reed beds.

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The energy for the house comes exclusively from the sun. Solar panels are built into the roof structure of the external frame and provide the necessary energy for the production of hot water and for electricity required for the house. So that it does not get too hot in the summer months, the glass roof and some door elements can be opened for cooling with the energy surplus of the solar elements operating the air conditioning system. The patch work of solar panels also serve as a shading system for the house. Although the initial cost for the house was higher than for a more traditional design, the architect‘s objective was to use it as a possible test case for higher density housing.

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

Where by Holger Glinde

eagles dare Heini-Klopfer ski jump, Oberstdorf The Heini-Klopfer ski jump in Oberstdorf, Germany is the third largest in the world. The ski jump, originally designed by the architect and ski jumper Heini Klopfer in 1950, was refitted in 1973 and 1986. A more thorough renovation of the ski jump was carried out in 2016, with Renn Architects commissioned to carry out the work with the remit to keep its symbolic character intact.

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HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

The initial concept of Heini Klopfer‘s design was that based on expressing the concept of flight. The abstract form of the ski jump was reminiscent of an eagle‘s nest, which has been accentuated by the renovation. The striking red band merges with the curved geometry of the jump start and expresses the start of an eagle‘s flight. The red colour is based on the corporate design of Oberstdorf. The renovation of the ski jump included the incorporation of new regulations that included increases in height of the jump slope, conversion of the existing startup structure with a new start-up curve, the re-profiling of the landing slope, the demolition and construction of the judges‘ tower, as well as the reorganisation of the infrastructure in the run-out area with the associated stadium and terrain. 2

The existing ski jump was demolished to a length of 45 m and a new galvanized steel structure was added in order to extend and increase the height of the jump slope. The new jump was built onto the existing prestressed concrete structure of the run-in tower and the profile of the landing slope was also modified and adapted to the requirements of the new flight curve. The run-out area was extended and a grandstand with standing area added. So that the entire facility can also be used for tourism, a new, barrier-free inclined elevator was built. In order to minimise disruption and limit infringement to surrounding trees, construction was contained within the envelope of the existing structure. No further areas had to be developed and the tree line could be preserved. By placing the new start-up geometry on the existing prestressed concrete structure, an economical, resource-saving implementation of the construction was achieved and the impressive prestressed concrete structure was preserved. Due to use of prefabricated components, an extremely short construction time was realised and in this way, the extremely high demands on the precision of the ski jumping superstructure could also be taken into account. The deviation being only +/- 3 mm per 120 m length.

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Architect | Renn Architekten Photos |Renn Architekten

1 | T he Heini-Klopfer ski jump in Oberstdorf is the third largest in the world 2 | Galvanized steel plays a major role for the newly extended ski jump 3 | The run-out area was enlarged and a grandstand with standing area was also added

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

Extended by Iqbal Johal

access

Batelease Farm, Devon The client had initially approached the architects in 2013 to design an extension to their grade ll listed farmhouse, on a footprint, that the house had originally stood on before being flattened by a stray bomb during World War II.

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Architects | New British Design Photos | George Fielding

At the time of submitting plans to the local council, one of the clients developed a sudden illness, which meant that the project was subsequently abandoned. Two years later the project was recommenced with a redesign that would need to tackle issues of level access between the old and new building on all floors, with lift and exterior connections designed to allow access for a wheelchair. The design was developed with Mid Devon District Council and their conservation officers, working on a series of one-to-one scale experiments with the client as a means of assessing comfort and accessibility.

Architect‘s view The primary function of the new addition started off as a service / access tower to enable level entry to the original house on both floors as well as the surrounding landscape. Once the layout of the old farmhouse had been opened up, the new scheme would satellite around this core and address other key client needs. Bringing back the farm to the farmhouse set the tone for the extension. New British Design wanted to re-establish an agricultural aesthetic that had been lost through previous renovations.

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1 | T he new extension sits on the existing footprint of the farmhouse destroyed by a stray bomb during WWII 2 + 3 | The new building was built around a galvanised steel portal frame that supports a secondary timer structure cloaked with black brick and zinc


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Working with a palette of brick, zinc, galvanized steel and larch, every detail from the doors to the king-post trusses with integrated hoists were designed to accommodate the client’s needs. Delivering a building that is specifically designed to improve a person’s quality of life was the key aspect of the brief that the architects kept returning to throughout the whole process.

HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

A contemporary reworking of the traditional attached livestock building referenced many agricultural typologies found locally from the Cob Linhay to the 20th century ‘Dutch’ barn.

The new building was built around a galvanized steel portal frame that supports a secondary timber structure cloaked with black brick and zinc. The galvanizing protects the exposed steel frame on the North and South gables that form the accessible car port and balconies and is left exposed to reflect the building’s contemporary agricultural aesthetic intentions.

Client’s View

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“So much time was spent on how it should function, what it should look like, but I could never have imagined how it would make me feel. Before, I would spend the summers largely trapped outside, or the winters stuck in a small kitchen unable to move unaided. Now I can get all around my house, on my own”.

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01 | 2020 HOT DIP GALVANIZING

Design by Akin Fajimi

guidance

Revision to EN ISO 14713 -2 2020 You may be familiar with using EN ISO 1461 for the specification of hot dip galvanizing for your steelwork. A less familiar - but just as important standard - has recently received a comprehensive revision, EN ISO 14713-2 : 2020 - Zinc coatings - Guidelines and recommendations for the protection against corrosion of iron and steel in structures - Part 2: Hot dip galvanizing

The new revision includes some important design features specific to the hot dip galvanizing process, particularly best practice covered in the informative ‘Annex A – preferred design of articles for hot dip galvanizing’. Some important updates include: • Design for narrow gaps between parts and venting and drainage in structural hollow sections. • A table giving recommended size and location of vent and drain holes for hollow sections • Recommended minimum edge distance of vent and drain holes for welded box sections • Surface preparation to ensure understanding and consistent delivery of a high-quality coating. • Process issues pertaining to single dip design and article size, and arrangements for lifting and handling of work via lifting lugs. • Adaptation of the article design and construction for the hot dip galvanizing process • Ultra-low silicon reactivity/material composition clarity – (See Table 1, note 4 of the standard) It is important that steelwork is sent to the galvanizer in a suitable condition for processing as some surface contaminants will not be removed by the normal pre-treatment process and can result in uncoated areas. EN ISO 14713-2 lists a variety of such products including oil, grease, paint, welding slag, labels, glue and marking materials. In addition, if oil based or silicone based weld antispatter sprays are used they may burn onto the steel surface resulting in uncoated areas. Silicone free sprays (water based or water soluble) are preferred. Other important aspects that need to be considered include an obvious but important point; work sent for galvanizing will fit into the galvanizers’ bath and that adequate provision is made for jigging the work by way of holes and/or lifting lugs as appropriate. Be aware that the use of low silicon steels (0.01% max) may result in the steel having a low reactivity such that a reduced coating thickness below that specified in EN ISO 1461 might be achieved.

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1 hole

1 hole

2 holes

2 holes

4 holes

4 holes

2 4 crops at crops at corners corners

4 holes of 15 mm +1 central hole

4 holes of 15 mm +1 central hole

4 crops at corners of 25 mm +1 central hole L

HOT DIP GALVANIZING 01 | 2020

Number and location of holes or crops at each end of the hollow section

Section cross-sectional shape and dimensions (mm)

Round Square

Diameter of the hole (mm)

Rect­ angular

Size of Crop (mm)

Diameter of central hole (mm)

15

15

10

10

20

20

30 × 15

10

10

30

30

40 × 20

12

12

10

10

40

40

50 × 30

14

14

12

12

10

50

50

60 × 40

16

16

12

12

10

10

13

60

60

80 × 40

20

20

12

12

10

10

15

12

80

80

100 × 60

25

20

16

16

12

12

20

15

100

100

120 × 80

30

25

20

20

14

15

25

20

120

120

160 × 80

35

30

25

25

20

20

30

25

160

160

200 × 120

45

40

35

30

25

20

40

30

35

200

200

260 × 140

60

50

40

35

30

25

50

35

50

40

300

300

350 × 250

60

55

45

40

75

55

80

70

75

400

400

450 × 250

80

75

60

50

100

75

110

100

110

500

500

600 × 300

100

90

75

65

125

90

140

125

135

600

600

700 × 400

120

110

85

75

150

110

170

150

165

Note 1 Note 2 Note 3

The shaded holes or crops indicate the hole or crop in the opposite end of the hollow section. The size of crop given in this table refers to the length of the adjacent side (not the diagonal length). Table entries that are not applicable are designated by '-'.

Table A.2 - Recommended size and location of vent and drain holes for hollow sections.

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Galvanizing Delight

The Adidas Campus World of Sports building in Herzogenaurach is the corporate headquarters of the brand. In 2019 it was extended to include a new foyer designed by Behnisch Architects. The striking, flat cuboid with its diamond-shaped facade and its inclined supports relies on a mix of different materials which includes hot-dip galvanized steel for wall cladding, partition walls and for the railings of the cantilevered stairs. It was chosen for its natural finish to counterbalance the aesthetics of the other materials. Architect | Behnisch Architekten Photo | adidas

Profile for ZEKER ZINK - ABSOLUMENT ZINC

Hot Dip Galvanizing 01/2020  

Because inspiration is something you can never have too much of, Zinkinfo Benelux ha decided to disseminate in digital form the internationa...

Hot Dip Galvanizing 01/2020  

Because inspiration is something you can never have too much of, Zinkinfo Benelux ha decided to disseminate in digital form the internationa...

Profile for zekerzink