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ZEESHAN BABAR DESIGN PORTFOLIO LEVEL 6


“The High street as we know it is dead. We can't rely on retailing to be the saviour of town centres any more. We need a more holistic solution." Bill Grimsey If the heart of every town and city is the ‘High Street’, what does the future hold for this heart if the concept we know is failing?


The high-street is more than just a place to shop. Its an experience to be entertained. It doesn not only shelve objects but it is a host for interactions and get away from the mundane of every day routine. What if we can reflect these qualities in a building?

Some of the most beautiful buildings in Leeds have been hijacked by retail. Is this because what society wants to accentuate? Commercial corporations using the best reminders of the cities history and legacy for personal gain is destructive to integrity of place and society as a whole. The shopping mall has delivers people towards values that subject them to their desires, that in long term do not fulfil their best wishes. Historically, the most beautiful buildings where devoted to places of worship since they where containers that hosted the greatest ideal. They elevated people towards their highest being.

The high-street is failing due to the increase in online shopping. People don’t see the need to go out and buy when they can order from the comfort of their own homes. Public spaces need to sell more than an object, they need to aim at selling an experience and captivate the public.

The High-street is decorated, designed to make people feel welcome and express the beauty of the city to tourists. However I think the high-street fails when it does not reflect the historical identity of the city, because it will just look like every other city centre in the world. Leeds has been renown for being a central marketplace in England but is also home to much more, such as being an integral city for the development of textiles, railways, steam engines and much more that most people are unaware of, and thus cannot come to appreciate the city in its totality except to see it as a market.

RESPONDING TO THE HIGHSTREET - HIGHSTREET OBSERVATIONS


Kirkgate Market Kirkgate market is infused with diversity from every culture. Originally being one of the oldest markets in Leeds, its home to many foreign traders that put their cultures on display for sale. The result is a break away from English routine into a glimpse of another culture. Some stalls this convey this better than others, especially when the owners take the time to decorate their stalls to reflect their cultural aesthetics. Places like this provide more that just commerce, but provide an experience.

Corn Exchange The Corn Exchange provide a host for independent shops that are all uniquely their own. Compared to other commercial stores, the service from independent stores are always more intimate, comforting and humane. There is no commercial exchange with a checkout machine, instead there is a personal relationship that develops between buyer and seller. While the high-street is on a gradual decline, it is the spaces that share unique, handmade products and express a narrative or a meaning behind them that are evolving.

Victorian Gate The new Victoria Gate and John Lewis that juxtaposes kirkgate market is the architectural diamond in Leeds. It is designed centrally around aesthetic qualities to elevate and enhance the public domain and serves as a statement to the wealth, flair and quality of the city. If the building fails in its function to advertise commercial markets, I believe the public would still visit to look and appreciate the detailing and spatial quality. These are aesthetic elements I can incorporate into my proposal.

Leeds Trinity Leeds trinity is the commercial centre of Leeds city providing a space for many outlets and retail stores. But many of those stores are found online and many customers often pop in for a look around. I think the real value of trinity is in its funky cafĂŠs that are designed to relax shoppers and bring people together on their day out. Its where people take pictures of their plate and flaunt on social media whilst looking at what they bought whilst discussing their plans for the next hour.

RESPONDING TO THE HIGHSTREET - MARKET OBSERVATIONS


1

2

N Site

Innovation and Productivity

Innovation it is the novel of ideas being put into practice to deliver new products, processes and services. Inherent in this is the sense of added value, it requires a conjunction to technical insight and skill, entrepreneurial vision and flair and consistent risk taking through failed experiments until achieved. The grounds of innovation within in the city of Leeds are unique, emerging from a distinct element in Leeds is an ecology of innovation that reaches back to the industrial period. With this initiative, Leeds endorses spaces for productive collaboration to envision and develop the future of the city.

2. Leeds Creative Labs

Leeds Creative Labs couldn’t be a better example of how you harness the potential of the creative industries. The initiative engages researchers and creative professionals to collaborate and explore global challenges from multiple perspectives and to find new ways of working together. The lab provides funding, space and time to share ideas and experiences without deadlines or targets. The match between artists and academics is based on areas of professional interest but also takes into account of a shared sense of curiosity and ambition to embark on the unknown.

Partners spin off activity & access to other funding Artistic outputs

Broaden networks

Creative practice development

Build relationships across disciplines

Engage with other partners

Build relationships within the sector Funding secured

Leeds Creative Labs

Impact on professional practice

1. Nexus Building

Nexus is to be the centre for innovation and enterprise on the university of Leeds campus. Rooted in Leeds but engaging with local issues such as climate-change and treatment of disease. Nexus is all about increasing the chances-of creating value by bringing people together with ideas, enterprise and opportunity. The physical arrangement of two universities and the council want to build on their already close relationships by forging better links through physical buildings, making it easier to work on products.

Further collaborative work

Personal/ professional development

Idea Development/ Knowledge transition

Pedagogical skills development Playful exploration Organisational development and leadership skills Resilience in sector

Leadership in sector

Increased scale and quality of funding bids

Academic research and impact

Academic outputs

CREATING AN EXPERIENCE - PRECEDENTS IN LEEDS - INNOVATION AND PRODUCTIVITY


2

Precedent Studies - Creating an Experience

N 1

1. The Corn Exchange The corn exchange is a market that hosts independent shoppers to sell their own mostly unique and handmade products or services. The corn exchange differs from the modern day shopping centre in a way that looks to give back more than a shopping experience but instead uses the existing architecture to bring a local community together. Visitors appreciated the beauty of the building that was enhanced by the individual traders that sold their handmade products, that are sometimes crafted within the shop itself.

Site

Community

The majority of promotional effort about Leeds focuses on the socially inclusive places and special open events in the city centre. As a diverse and socially collected city that considers the needs of elderly residents as well as the youth, places are designed to collectivise the population and develop the communal local district around social projects, enterprises, charities, public sector services in order to avoid and overcome mental health epidemics, promote well being and accentuate local talent to the wider community.

2. Hackspace

Hackspace is a community run workshop where technical knowledge connects with skills in self organising and DIY culture. Spaces like hackspace which are community led where membership fees sustain the premises have rapidly grown in the UK. Hackspace combine the features of workshops, studios and digital labs. They have a culture of welcoming anyone who wants to learn, share of skills and knowledge and self reliance. In relation to innovation, hackspace encourages prototyping for industrial production and contributing to regional growth. The informality of hackspace is a key characteristic, providing a sense of a place where technical ideas are free to grow and experiment.

CREATING AN EXPERIENCE - PRECEDENTS IN LEEDS - COMMUNITY


1

Precedent Studies - Creating an Experience

2

N Site

Culture & Art

Leeds is a thriving city for many who choose to study or stay on independent ventures. Notably, within the city art has expanded beyond traditional media and venues, and blurs the boundaries between creative disciplines to enable new forms of creative production. Since the 19th Century, art has profoundly informed changes in society and constantly reformed culture which caused questioning, awakened new perceptions and new modes of expression.

2. Opera North

1. Leeds Art University

Previously Leeds collage of Art, the institution traces its history back to 1846, which saw the era of artists such as Henry Moore and barbra hepworth. The school has significantly contributed to the development of art education in Britain, having pioneered in new ways to teach and to structure qualifications.

Opera North breathes new life into classical and traditional cultural structures by actively challenging peoples perceptions on music and remains a strong advocate of lesser known works, Outreach in schools help to simulate enthusiasm for learning classical instruments for singing “Virtually all the great lasting achievements of mankind have been in the arts “ - Lord Harewood

CREATING AN EXPERIENCE - PRECEDENTS IN LEEDS - CULTURE


The future of Leeds is predicated and influenced on the historical and traditional cultural narrative that has made the city what it is. Innovation, collaboration and cultural integrity have been instrumental in Leeds becoming and remaining a main motive force in the regional economy. The gradual decline of the high-street opens up an opportunity form the cities historical identity to be accentuated further into public space. To manifest this concept in architecture would mean a space that embodies a lively concentration of people with varied skills, open minds and co-operative spirits that continue to break new ground while being firmly rooted; and to manifest, the special qualities of a Leeds that has evolved over the centuries.

“Dare to let the evolve within a framework of incentives. Give people space to experiment, learn make alliances, make mistakes, coalesce and recombine. Emergent systems can be brilliant at producing opportunity for innovation and are also more resilient.� -Stephen Johnson

RESPONDING TO THE HIGHSTREET - INDIVIDUAL TALENT


Park Row

Leeds Collage

Victoria Quarter

The Hedrow

Leeds Town Hall

Bus Station

Market

N

Leeds City Station Granary Wharf

Leeds Minister

(High-street) Leeds Trinity Corn Exchange

1st White Cloth Hall

Surrounded by historical architecture/ landmarks

Currently vacent

Oldest site in Leeds

Responds to contextual and conceptual ajendas

Pivitol location

SITE LOCATION


N MARKET HOSTEL/FLATS SERVICES RESTURANTS/TAKE AWAYS CASINO/BETTING PUBS BROWNFIELD

SITE ANALYSIS - URBAN SITE CONTEXT


N OBSERVATION NOTES

SITE ANALYSIS - SENSORY ACTIVITY MAP


N Scale 1.10000

SITE ANALYSIS - EXISTING SITE


1850

1890

1910

1950

1900

1716

1841

1971

1994

2006

SITE HISTORY


Developers Rushbond are behind one of the schemes which focuses on the First White Cloth Hall, a Grade-II listed property which will be rejuvenated if approval is given. They’ll be lodging for full-planning and listed-building applications for the property including reconstruction of the demolished west wing, restoration of the east wing, new shop fronts, creation of a glazed atrium and reinstatement of the cupola. The aim would be to create space for a new shop, financial or professional services, café/restaurant, bar and office space.

“In re-establishing its historic form with the re-creation of its missing wing, the restoration of key features and the addition of sensitive and respectful new interventions, the building will provide a unique opportunity to have a major presence in the vibrant part of the city. The contemporary addition to the south also provides a strong connection to the Corn Exchange, complementing the restoration of the northern elevation onto Kirkgate itself.” A glass structure will cover the old central courtyard to ‘reveal the building’s historic form’ - and a cube on the southern elevation will link to the Corn Exchange.

CURRENT REDEVELOPMENT SCHEMES


Leeds cloth halls where buildings designed to host the cloth trade within the centre of Leeds. The first cloth hall was commissioned in 1717 however the cloth trade quickly outgrew the building and therefore needed another building to host the trade. the second cloth hall was built in 1755. Leeds has a 4 cloth halls in the city.

CONTEXTUAL CONCEPTS - HISTORICAL KIRKGATE MARKETS


Pocket space with open access towards the central space. Form is extended on both sides to contain outdoor space and maintain a distinguished environment linked to the architecture.

Courtyard plan where interior open space is enclosed by surrounding architecture from the public environment. This ensures a private space designated for users of the building.

Two orthogonal forms connected to each-other by distance and form. Between is an open space that establishes a relationship between the two forms shared by programme or outdoor events.

A series of pocket spaces that are individually segregated from other outdoor spaces in the building while all connected to a single form. A thin orthogonal element splits the form while providing multiple access routes to the building.

The building is scattered along four horizontal forms, that establish a relationship through distance, scale and order. An open space in between may be highlighted through use of material or the forms may be united under a single roof.

Similar to the previous diagram except the forms contain more space, providing more opportunity to relate horizontally and virtually. Can create more dense and concentrated outdoor spaces that specifically connect to two or more forms.

A series of horizontal bars with rectangular forms in between. Suggesting an axis crossways through the space and walking through gaps in between. Through this the visitor is open to different areas of open space that are obstructed by forms.

A series of large forms composed of two vertical forms that are connected with equal distance and order with a horizontal form that closes of the outdoor space. Gaps in between the forms create flexible movement around the space.

An enclosed pocket space, similar to a interior courtyard except a single opening that is directly exposed to the exterior environment. This opening could be celebrated with a gate that welcomes visitors into a different environment.

A melody of individual forms that are related through distance, yet connected with spaces cut out for designated spaces such as gardens and programme.

A single form with elements subtracted to create axis for openings to large space and pathways that provide a journey deeper into space.

Outdoor space can be composed through a sequence of individual forms similar to that of an urban grid. This provides an experience to explore and discover. Larger forms may be for fixated activities where smaller forms could be temporal and change over time.

CONTEXTUAL CONCEPTS- EXPLORING OUTDOOR SPATIAL STRATEGIES


Leeds was widely recognised as a central player in the cloth industry. renowned for a centre of trade where cloth was weaved in mills and brought to the city centre to sell. Material such as wool and cotton was brought to Leeds to be sorted, spinned, combed weaved and finished and then given to a clothier to sell.

CONTEXTUAL CONCEPTS - THE CLOTH INDUSTRY


Liner elements composed in a series or orthogonal directions

Fabric can be inflated with air.

Fabric can be used to create lightweight structures such as tents, that can be used as temporary spaces

Weave machines could be manipulated to create unique structures

A series of weaves in multiple directions to create an intentional pattern

Lightweight structures can be completely opaque, translucent or transparent depending on the fabric used

Fabric can be supported by pillars to cover a surface

Fabric can be threaded to cover a surface whilst creating a pattern.

Can be used to create lightweight bridges or connections between forms. Maybe for structural support or mere aesthetics

Curtains are a typical use for fabric to add privacy or a temporary facade

Weaved over a source to create a geometric effect.

Fabric can be used to link elements together

Fabric can be ties to supports to spread

Fabric can be weaved in an organic form rather than linear.

Can be used to wrap forms together and create unique surfaces

Can be used to span long distances.

CONTEXTUAL CONCEPTS - EXPLORING CLOTH AND FABRIC STRUCTURES


6. 9. 5.

16. 4.

14. 2.

3.

13.

15.

1.

10.

11.

12.

N 8.

7.

16.

2.

3.

1.

5.

6.

4. 15 7. 11.

14.

13.

12.

10.

9.

8.

SITE ANALYSIS - SITE PHOTOS


6. This is accentuated by the narrow width of individual building frontages, reflecting the medieval layout of crofts along the street.

The site has had continuous development since at least the Anglo Saxon period, running from Briggate to the Parish Church.

Kirkgate lies at a strategically crucial point in the City Centre between Victoria Gate, Kirkgate Market and the Riverside area.

5. There is an elevated railway viaduct to the east of the site, which carries trains 24 hours a day.

Kirkgate is flanked by continuous and varied building frontages rising to the west to later Victorian buildings, which create a sense of enclosure and verticality.

1. 6.

3. 2.

4. 5.

4. Waterloo House resides adjacent to the car park, which is currently vacant, but has previously been in use as food and drink, bar and nightclub uses.

3. Crown Street car park is a rough surfaced long-established use car park to the rear of the Kirkgate frontage properties, between the railway viaduct. Waterloo House and Crown Street.

1. The site is vacant following the emergency demolition of 101-102 Kirkgate in 2010.

N FIRST WHITE CLOTH HALL KIRKGATE BUILDINGS CROWN COURT CAR PARK

2. The south side of Kirkgate consists of late 18th century and early 19th century three storey-houses which have had shopfronts inserted at ground floor.

1. First White Cloth Hall

6. View from Kirkgate towards Leeds Minister

2. Kirgate Buildings

SITE ANALYSIS - SURROUNDING SITE STUDY


The cloth hall was build on the top of a medieval Hospitium and priests house: a place where attached to the church where travellers could stay.

“A stately hall, built on pillars on arches in the form of an exchange, with a quadrangular court within” -Ralph Thoresby

The current owners, City Fusion expect any repairs needed to reach £2 million pounds – not matching the building’s worth, this has put the building itself at risk

The building and surrounding area have become extremely neglected and derelict in the past 30 years

The structure was altered significantly: retail premises where build in the front courtyard, the building was extended to the rear and the original walls and arches removed.

SITE ANALYSIS - EXISTING SITE STUDY


N Scale 1/1250

DRAFT MASTERPLAN SKETCH


MASTERPLAN PROPOSAL


N

N ACCESS

HIGHSTREET KIRKGATE THE CALLS

AREA ZONES

N NOISE LEVEL

LOUD AREAS

N GRADED BUILDINGS

N

N GREEN SPACE

KEY VIEWS

QUIET AREAS

GRADE II WATERLOO HOUSE GRADE II 3-7 COURT STREET

GRADE I KIRKGATE MARKET GRADE II WESTMINSTER BUILDINGS VICTORIAN KIRKGATE

19TH CENTURY CROWN STREET

GRADE II THIRD WHITE CLOTH HALL GRADE I CORN EXCHANGE

WASTE COLLECTION AREA

PICTURESQUE VIEWS TOWARDS LEEDS MINISTER

VEICHLE ACCESS TO SITE PEDESTRIANISED ZONE ACCESS FROM BUS STATIONT ACCESS FROM HIGHSTREET

ACCESS FROM HIGHSTREET

ACCESS FROM HIGHSTREET

N MASTERPLAN PROPOSAL


CONCEPT DRAWING - TRADITIONAL VALUES


CAFE

ARTISAN WORKSHOP

LIBRARY STAGE EXHIBITION HALL OUTDOOR STAGE CINEMA

CO-WORKING SPACE GARDEN GALLERY / MULTIFUCTIONAL

OUTDOOR MARKET COMMUNITY CULTURE INNOVATION

N

PROGRAMME EXCHANGE


Exploratory environments designed to witness a variety of artistic endeavours.

BREEM CERTIFIED

CAFE LIBRARY

ARTISAN WORKSHOP

INSPIRE MOTIVATE

CONNECT

TRADITIONAL OUTDOOR MARKET

ENTERTAINMENT

INNOVATE

SOCIAL EXHIBIT

ENERGISE

GREEN SPACE

INNOVATION

COMMUNITY CO-WORKING

EXHIBITION Platforms to accentuate and celebrate local talent and innovative milestones.

COMMUNITY Nature informed spaces adjusted to physiologically impact productivity and creative output.

GROWTH REVITALISATION EDUCATION

SOLAR/ RAIN POWERED ENERGY

CULTURE

THEATRE

PROGRAMME PROPOSAL


The existing site layout is by replacing existing volumes. This retains site integrity and establishes intrinsic spaces ventilation and atmospheric qualities.

C

The main entrance is established from the existing ruins of the cloth hall which is are oriented towards kirkgate and the highstreet. A secondary entrance replaces entrance to the car park.

B

A

Direct sunlight from the south illuminates the floor space of form A while facing the south elevation of form B and C.

The north facade should reflect the 19th century Victorian buildings opposite the site to establish contextual integrity and avoid assertiveness in the historically sensitive Environment.

East elevation rises over adjacent buildings to orient towards Leeds minister that is directly facing the site.

The building interacts with the adjacent pedestrian street through programme and engagement.

CONCEPT DIAGRAMS


N

CONNECTION TO SITE


INITIAL DEVELOPMENT MODELS


CONCEPT DRAWING - EXCHANGE


Section: Hierarchy of elevation.

Section: Connecting separate structures through extended structural members.

Section: primary structure extruding beyond load boundaries to create balconies.

Plan; Disonfiguration of space through space.

Section: Exposed structure to host individual customisation.

Section: Expressing a variety of platforms through the design.

Section: Concentrated space at ground level to larger open spaces above.

Perspective: Connecting separate structures through extended structural members.

Section: Design complex presenting a range of open and enclosed spaces with cantilevering elements.

Plan: Series of enclosed spaces specific to programme connected through outdoor space.

Section: Design complex added to existing building material.

Section: Order and repetition at ground level followed by a gradual labyrinth of space with foliage growing through the building.

DEVELOPMENT SKETCHES


CONCEPT DRAWING - ARTISANS EXPERIENCE


STREET ENGAGMENT

STAGE

OUTDOOR MARKET

DYNAMIC SPARTIAL QUALITY

CAFE

LOCALLY PRODUCED COMMERCE

GARDEN ARTISAN WORKSHOP CINEMA

LOCAL ARTWORK SHOWCASED TO THE PUBLIC

VIEWS TOWARDS LEEDS MINISTER

BREAK SPACE

EDUCATION

EXHIBITION

INSPIRATION

GREEN SPACE

GALLERY

CO WORKING

INFORMATION

LIBRARY

ACCESSIBLE CONNECTION ENFORCED CONNECTION VISUAL CONNECTION

PROGRAMME ADJACENCIES


CAFE VIEWS DIRECTED TOWARDS CHURCH AND RAILWAY

GLASS ROOF OVER EXHIBITION HALL

VEGETATION EMBEDDED INTO ARCHITECTURE TO IMPROVE AIR QUALITY AND DIFFUSES LIGHT/WIND

VEHICLE ACCESS TO CAR PARK

OPEN STAGE HOST ACTIVITY FOR STREET PERFORMERS

GLASS ELEVATOR GLAZED ARCH FACADE TO REFLECT OPPOSITE BUILDINGS ON SITE

OPEN FACED GARDEN

EXITING VICTORIAN WALLS RESTORED AND FRAME OUTDOOR MARKET

EXTERIOR BALCONY INTERIOR EATING SPACE

OUTDOOR EATING AREA CAFE

WORKSHOP COMPLEX FOR MAKERS AND TRADERS

LIBRARY STAGE / THEATRE

OUTDOOR EATING AREA

OPEN STAGE

CO-WORKING SPACE

UNDER-CROFT CAR PARK

GARDEN CORRIDOR

OUTDOOR MARKET

MODEL STUDY 1.250


DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE


DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE


5

6

1

2 7

8

9

3

1

OUTDOOR MARKET

2 GARDEN 3 CO-WORKING 4 STAGE 4

5 PLANT/ADMIN 6 GALLERY/MULTIFUNCTIONAL 7 CO-WORKING 8 CINEMA 9 WC 10 EXHIBITION

N

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1.100


19

22

20

23

18

24 21

26

25

26 11 27

11 LIBRARY 12 INDOOR EATING 13 OUTDOOR EATING

17

14 WC 15 CAFE

16

16 KITCHEN 12

17 STORAGE 18 BACKSTAGE 19 WC

15

20 GALLERY 21 STAGE 22 STAFF 23 PRAYER ROOM

14

13

24 FIRST AID 25 ARTISAN WORKSHOP 26 GREENSPACE 27 ARTIST PLATFORM 28 VIEWING PLATFORM FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1.100

N

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1.100


28

N ROOF PLAN 1.100


N SITE PLAN 1.500


SECTION A 1.50

SECTION B 1.150

SECTION C 1.250

SECTION D 1.250

A

B

D

C

SECTION DRAWINGS


GREENSPACE

LINKS

STRUCTURAL GRID

TREES

WATER FEATURE

RESTORED STRUCTURE

CONCEPT DIAGRAMS


AXONOMETRIC SECTIONS


INHABBITED SECTION


INHABITED AXONOMETIC & SITE SECTION 1.500


STEEL BEAMS

ARTISAN PLATFORMS

ROOF STRUCTURE

STEEL COLUMNS

FIRST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

EXPLOADED AXONOMETRIC


8

1

RAILING

8

STAIR

7

STEEL BEAM

6

STEEL COLUMN

5

SLIDING SCREEN MOUNT

4

SLIDING SCREENS

3

TIMBER COLUMN

2

PLATFORM

1

7 6 5

4

2 3

1

Public pass directly through pod space moving between artisans.

Sliding walls allow artisans to customise exposure and navigation routes.

Artisans situated in the centre of space allow for public to pass through.

The freedom for artisans to dictate their workspace while giving the public the ability to observe.

ARTISAN WORKSHOP AXONOMETRIC & STRUCTURAL STUDY


Composed of liner panels inspired by pattererns from the cloth weaving loom, a machine that was integral to the cloth trade.

The facade is sculpted to reflect movment through the street.

The facade is composed of reused brick from the demolished kirkgate buildings. Copper is used on the parametric facade to respond to the traditional brick and will change colour in the future.

FACADE STUDY


FACADE STUDY


Public interaction with artisan pods

Public access to viewing platforms

As testament to creating an experience beyond highstreet shopping, the design cleverly brings the piublic and product makers closer together, Pods create a dynamic experiance through the space to catalyse encounters with the artisans and witness art of men at work with their craft, blurring the treshold between intimacy and observation, the artisan workshop gives the public an oppertunity to be inspired by the innovative spirit that has made Leeds the city it is today.

KEY SPACES


The live corridor seperates two structures of the complex while ting them together though open greenspace. The open enviroment grounds the complex to the outdoors and organises navigation throught the scheme. As well as providing a means for natural ventillation and wind/solar diffusion, exposure to greenspace is implemented throughout the complex to create optimised spaces for productivity and exchange between indoor and outdoor.

KEY SPACES


The exhibition provides space for local talent to be showcased to the public, increasing local exposure and expanding opportunities to young artists.

Cafe and eating spaces are oriented towards key views and natural light to create a comfortable dining experience.

KEY SPACES


The Artisan Workshop provides relaxing spaces to obsorbe and soak the surrounding energy with a waterfountain powered by a rainwater harvesting system and elevated platforms to capture dynamic views along the workshop

The Kirkgate Artisan Complex aims to engage with the local public by providing platforms for local artists and street performers to present their craft to the public.

KEY SPACES


Co working halls are balanced with exposure to natural light and greenery to create optimised enviroments for study and productivity.

The interior garden reflects the projects key concept of responding to the cloth industry and oriented towards a sustainable future.

KEY SPACES


View from Kirkgate looking towrds Leeds Minister

KEY SPACES


PROJECT ANIMATION


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Architecture Design Thesis 2019  

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