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Interchange a WYDOT publication

July 2012, Vol. 40, Issue 7

Long-awaited Casper area project begins


Letters

Interchange Interchange is published for employees of the Wyoming Department of Transportation by its Public Affairs Office and a number of field correspondents. Interchange invites submissions from all employees. Please send them to either your district correspondents or to: Carlie Van Winkle, Interchange editor, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY, 82009-3340. The Public Affairs Office may also be contacted by phoning (307) 777-4165, faxing (307) 777-4289, or sending e-mail to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Geology helps out at Register Cliff

Chugwater rest stop a safe haven

Del [McOmie], Just wanted to make sure you know the status of the above project and to be sure to say thanks. Since our last call on Register Cliff your staff has been outstanding and have provided this agency with some much-needed expertise. The same day I called you about this Mark Falk called and shortly thereafter we met Mark and Dave Vanderveen at the Cliff to inspect. Within the following week Dave and a scaling crew were back out at the site and Dave has since provided a very comprehensive report along with a listing of potential contractors. This agency obviously does not have the expertise to do this work and it has been wonderful to be able ask assistance of WYDOT to help in a time of need. We feel this project is of an emergency nature and we’re doing all we can so nobody gets hurt. Having Mark and Dave basically drop all they were doing and provide us with the report they did was fantastic, likely added more work and stress to their already busy schedule but in the long run they have provided a direction for us to follow that could save lives in the future if we hadn’t responded. It seems like we have had a number of requests from WYDOT lately, whether its Register Cliff, flooding issues at Medicine Lodge or Ft. Bridger, vehicle registration information or just the approving of SPR monies. You and your staff have been more than helpful and very generous of your time for this agency. I would like to say its a great partnership but I’m not sure if we have ever returned the favor to you all. But, please know that all your assistance is greatly appreciated and someday maybe we’ll be in a position to help you. Please pass on our sincere appreciation to Mark, Dave and all those who helped with the Register Cliff project.

My car broke down at the Chugwater rest stop this afternoon. I had left Denver on a three-day drive with two dogs to visit my 97-year old uncle in Idaho. As I waited for the tow truck, Myron and Belinda Witt approached me, introduced themselves, and petted my dogs. They immediately put me at ease, as I am in my 60s and traveling alone, explaining they were in charge of the facility and offered an enclosed shelter for us to wait in. They helped me charge my cell phone and Belinda waited with me, even offering me a beverage until the tow truck appeared over two hours later. I had stopped there on a recommendation and found it to be very clean and I felt safe.

Delbert Blocker

Writers: Cody Beers District 5 Bruce Burrows Public Affairs Ross Doman District 1 Jeff Goetz District 2 Stephanie Harsha District 3 Ronda Holwell District 4 Dave Kingham Public Affairs Barbara Thomasee Office Services Sgt. Stephen Townsend Patrol Carlie Van Winkle Public Affairs

Thanks again. Joe Bonds, Field Support Chief, Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites & Trails

TMC signs a blessing

Photography: Rick Carpenter Public Affairs

Julia Butenas

The power of giving I would like to thank each and every one of you who so graciously donated sick time so that I could recover from my knee surgery. It made my recovery so much less stressful and helped so that I didn’t have to rush back [to work] and had appropriate time to heal. Please know that I am eternally grateful to all of you. It was very heartwarming to know that I had so many people who cared about me. You are all WONDERFUL!

Thank you! Donna Olivares-Braisted

Best kept rest stop The Dwyer rest area near Wheatland is one of the best kept rest areas in Wyoming. Please recognize the caretaker for his extreme professionalism.

I just wanted to thank those people responsible for the building and maintaining the highway traffic and weather electronic signing systems on I-80. My Continued on page 9

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Staff WYDOT Director: John F. Cox Public Affairs Manager: Doug McGee Editor/Art Director: Carlie Van Winkle


Also in this issue

Contents

Letters.....................................2 District briefs.........................4 HR Happenings....................8

7

WYDOT by the Numbers......8

6

Extra Mile Awards................9 Training at a Glance............9 Alive at 25 Graduation.....13 District news.......................14

12

In the Community.............16 WYDOT Outdoors..............17 Passings................................18 WTDEA..................................18

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6 Heroism Honored

Trooper Kirkman given prestigious award

7 Little Loaners

Highway Safety’s child car seat loaner program

10 Casper’s West Belt Loop

Long awaited area project begins

12 Recording. History. Be sure to check out the online version of Interchange at http://issuu.com/wydot.pao, or click on the link found on the employee’s internal Web site home page.

Last in the series from Office Services On the cover: Dirt moving machines kicking into high gear at the start of Casper’s West Belt Loop project. Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

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District briefs Cheyenne – In order to meet the vehicle needs for all programs and districts, the Equipment Office took a look at the vehicle criteria to find where WYDOT can reduce purchase costs. Limited monies are available for vehicle purchases each year and unfortunately, some requests are not met. If there is a reduction in the cost of our vehicles, more vehicles can be purchased with no increase in monies. This will also help with the overall budget cuts that are coming without sacrificing the needs of the programs. Purchases over the last few years have been analyzed and certain criteria for Headquarters programs have been noted. A similar criteria list has been developed for the five districts as well. The new criteria will be effective with FY2013 and for vehicles that are being replaced.

HQ

Crashes, delays drop during first year of Vandehei roundabouts Cheyenne – The number of crashes and the average wait times for vehicles dropped during the first year the roundabouts at the Vandehei Interchange on I-25 in Cheyenne were open to traffic. The roundabouts opened on May 25, 2011, 25 days ahead of schedule. Reiman Corp. of Cheyenne completed the project for $6.1 million. In the year since the roundabouts opened there have been three crashes re-

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ported at the interchange. None of those crashes resulted in injuries. During the year prior to beginning the construction that widened the Vandehei bridge and replaced the intersections on each side with roundabouts, there were 11 crashes and four people injured. When compared to the average number of crashes annually at the Interchange during the five years prior to construction, crashes dropped 54.5 percent during the first year the roundabouts were in operation. Traffic engineers consider three years of crash data the minimum needed to draw long-term conclusions about the performance of an intersection, but the data from the roundabouts’ first year of operation are considered a good start to the ongoing assessment. Studies completed before the project was designed indicated under projected traffic volumes the existing intersections with stop signs would result in average side-street delays of 37 to 45 seconds per vehicle during peak traffic. If traffic signals were installed, the projected average delay per vehicle during peak volumes was 32 seconds. “We had predicted an average delay of somewhere in the six to eight seconds per vehicle range for roundabouts, and we’re doing better than that,” said Paul Jones, WYDOT’s assistant state traffic engineer. “So these things are operating quite well and quite safely. We’re not getting long queues of vehicles waiting to enter, and the queues dissipate quickly.” However, improvements can still be made, Jones said. During heavy snowstorms, the lack of storage space for snow creates difficulties in clearing the roundabouts using conventional snow-removal equipment. Also, some drivers still are not clear on the rules for driving through the roundabouts. Drivers approaching a roundabout need to yield to any pedestrians at the crosswalk and then look to the left and yield to traffic already on the roundabout. If there is no traffic approaching from the left, drivers do not have to stop before entering the roundabout. Vehicles entering the roundabouts from the bridge do not have the right of way. They must yield to traffic already on

the roundabout, just like vehicles entering from the exit ramps or service roads. Once on the roundabout, drivers should proceed to their exit and use their right-turn signal to let other drivers know they’ll be leaving the roundabout at the next street. WYDOT has produced a roundabout animation to show how traffic should flow on the roundabouts. There are currently four roundabouts on Wyoming’s highway system, and a fifth is scheduled for completion later this year at Hoback Junction.

WYDOT sets arches, traffic will see delays Pinedale – WYDOT Pinedale construction crews set the overpass arches the week of June 11 as part of their wildlife connectivity project. Traffic was delayed on US route 191 at milepost 105, near Cora Junction, due to overpass construction. WYDOT would like to remind drivers to slow down in work zones, be alert and cautious of roadside workers. The Trapper’s Point Wildlife Connectivity Project was awarded to Reiman Corp. and consists of 29.7 miles of eight-foot deer fence, six 70-foot bridges and two 150-foot wide animal overpasses. One overpass is located close to Trappers Point, near the junction with WYO 352

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Photo: Stephanie Harsha/WYDOT

New vehicle criteria for Headquarters and the Districts

This overpass near Daniel Junction was set last year and is one of two overpasses that will be part of the project.


(Cora Road). The other overpass is nearing completion and is located about two miles north of Daniel Junction at what’s referred to locally as Boroff Hill. It is estimated that each spring and fall approximately 2000 pronghorn and 3500 mule deer pass through the area and would use the overpasses and underpasses. The project has received awards and recognition from the Exemplary Human Environment Initiatives (EHEI) and the Exemplary Ecosystem Initiatives (EEI). The Trappers Point area is welldocumented as a major wildlife migration route, but increasing traffic on US 189/191, along with ongoing development in the region, have served to disrupt migration. The project will reverse this trend and help restore diversity, health, and genetic vitality to the various big game species.

US 30 will see lane closures during construction WYDOT will be working on US 30 between Cokeville and the Idaho State Line beginning in July. Work will include milling and concrete paving. The project was awarded to Concrete Works of Colorado for $7 million. During construction, US 30 will be reduced to one lane, with the assistance of traffic signals and pilot cars. Crews will work on 2.5-mile sections at a time. Portable traffic lights will be in use 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Motorists and local residents are encouraged to plan accordingly for the travel delays and disruptions. The work will begin the first part of July and Concrete Works of Colorado will continue with similar traffic control areas through August and September. “Every effort will be made by WYDOT and Concrete Works of Colorado to minimize delays for the traveling public while ensuring safe and speedy completion of the project,” Resident Engineer Jennifer Hoffman said.

Reduced speeds on WYO 390 Teton Village – WYDOT will be reducing the speed limit during nighttime hours on Wyoming’s Highway 390 from milepost 0.0 to milepost 4.0 in hopes that it will reduce the number of wildlife collisions. Teton County has reported several collisions with moose this year on WYO 390 and wildlife-vehicle collisions continue to pose a serious problem in the area with regard to human safety, wildlife mortality, habitat connectivity, and financial costs. The current speed limit on WYO 390 in this section is 45 mph. The new nighttime speed will be 35 mph. New static signs will be installed this week to inform motorists of the reduced nighttime speed limit. A contract is currently being advertised to install flashing beacons on the signs in order to help define the exact times that the new speed limit will be enforced. The flashing beacons A static speed limit sign like will be acthose being installed along companied WYO 390. by a second sign that adds “When Flashing.” Currently, the hours of enforcement will be defined as the period of day 30 minutes after official daily sunset to 30 minutes before official daily sunrise. The flashing beacon installation is expected to begin in August and will be completed by October 31. WYDOT urges motorists to take note of the new nighttime speed and be aware that wildlife could be on the road.

Driving Tips To Avoid Collisions With Wildlife • Slow Down. • Pay attention to the road. • Scan the sides of the roads for wildlife. • Be alert to areas of high vegetation and steep banks. • Wildlife tends to cross roads more often at dawn and dusk and at night. • If you see one elk, deer or moose, you are likely to see more. • If you see an animal on the road expect the unexpected. They do not instinctively know how to react to vehicles. Give the animal time and room to move off the road. Do not try to out-run it. • Wildlife warning signs are there for a reason. Take note. • Extend your following distance through wildlife areas. Do not follow the car in front of you too closely. • Drive responsibly and defensively.

District Briefs cont. on page 9 July 2012

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Heroism Honored

had washed out the road the children were traveling on. The machine had come to a rest against a culvert with just the tires and some of the undercarriage visible above the water line. The children were submerged beneath the ATV with the exception of their faces which were near the footrest area of the machine. With their legs and bodies pinned under the heavy ATV, the children had positioned their heads so their eyes, nose and mouth remained mostly above the water. Trooper Kirkman jumped into the frigid water without hesitation, as the children struggled to keep their faces above water. Kirkman later recounted that the children must have been completely submerged at some point as both children’s entire faces and heads were drenched. Kirkman also believed the 10-year-old was holding the face and head of the 3-year-old above the water. Trooper Kirkman struggled as he waded through the water and sank into mud that went over the top of his duty boots while making his way to the children. Once he reached the ATV, Kirkman and the children’s mother once again attempted to lift it, but were unable, as they continued to struggle in the mud. Trooper Kirkman repositioned himself and, with the mother’s help, was finally able to partially lift the ATV. With the machine resting against his body, Kirkman pulled the 3-year-old from underneath the machine, and handed the child to her mother. Kirkman then freed the 10-year-old, released the ATV and carried the older child from the freezing cold water. Later, when asked how cold the water was, Trooper Kirkman responded, “It was snow the day before!” “It just happened that I was the closest guy there. There Director John Cox awarded the G. Clyde Larson Award to Trooper William Kirkman at the June Transportation Comwere a lot of really good people mission Luncheon. headed there, I was just first able to move the heavy machine and only and the closest,” says Kirkman. Trooper found themselves sinking deeper into the Jonathan Russell, arrived on scene after soft mud and nearly waist deep water. the children had been extricated and The ATV had fallen off an approxisupplied blankets to the hypothermic mately five-foot drop where the stream children. Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

Trooper William Kirkman is the most recent recipient of the G. Clyde Larson Award for saving two young lives while on duty. On the evening of April 25, first responders were called to the scene of an all terrain vehicle (ATV) crash. WHP doesn’t usually respond to such accidents, but more information started coming in over the radio, which spurred Trooper William Kirkman into action. The incident occurred on the Ratter Q Ranch, just off of WYO 487, southwest of Casper. The ATV had crashed into Bates Creek, flipped over, and two children, a 3-year-old and a 10-year-old, were pinned beneath the machine in frigid, snow-melt water. The children’s mother and older brother had unsuccessfully attempted to lift the ATV off the younger children. At the time of the radio dispatch, Trooper Kirkman was patrolling southwest of Casper on WYO 220, and being nearby, he responded quickly. Kirkman was the first of emergency personnel to arrive at the incident. When Trooper Kirkman arrived, he could hear the screams of the trapped children and could see the ATV upside down in the stream, but was unable to see the children. Kirkman met briefly with the children’s mother who was wet and covered in mud. The woman and her son were un-

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First aid care for the children was turned over to first responders from Natrona County Fire District, Wyoming Medical Center and Life Flight. The 3-year-old was transported by Life Flight to Wyoming Medical Center in Casper where it was determined the child had a broken leg. The 10-year-old was transported to Wyoming Medical Center where she was treated for hypothermia. Kirkman states, “It could have been a whole lot worse.” The children were trapped beneath the ATV for an estimated 30 minutes and likely could not have survived much longer. The heroic efforts, made without hesitation by Trooper Kirkman, prevented a tragic outcome and saved the lives of two young children. “I had almost not gone to work that night due to the death of a close friend, but then decided I would,” Kirkman explained. That family is thankful that he came to work that day, too.

G. CLYDE LARSON AWARD

In 1969, the Wyoming Highway Commission established an award program in honor of the late G. Clyde Larson. Mr. Larson was appointed to a six-year commission term in 1965 by Gov. Clifford Hansen. Larson died in July 1968, and his son, Grant, was appointed to fill the unexpired term. The award program was created to honor Larson, and its purpose was to recognize acts of heroism by Highway Department employees. The award acknowledges an employee who has saved a life or prevented great property damage, thus saving personal and governmental expense. To be eligible, an employee must be distinguished through action above and beyond the call of duty, including rendering first aid to save a life; saving a life through immediate action without regard for personal safety or subsequent results; preventing further bodily harm to others through individual action, if peril was imminent, alleviating danger through immediate preventive action at personal risk.


Child safety car seats save little lives. you know ahead of time that you will be aren’t willing to have the training, then Most of us have either seen them, have needing a car seat, just give our office a they aren’t willing to have the seat.” had child car seats in our vehicles or call,” recommends Thompson. The seats The child car seat can be on loan for currently drive around with these seats are loaned out at no cost to the borrower, the length of the child’s stay at the host’s in our cars occupied with little people. although the borrower must receive trainhome. Seven seats are currently available Statistically, car crashes are the number ing on the proper method of installation for loan at Headquarters: one infant only one killer of children ages 1 to 12 in the prior to getting the seat for their vehicle. seat (5 - 22 lbs.), two convertible seats (inUnited States. The best way to protect the Individuals are trained when they pick up fant to toddler; 5 lbs. up to 50 lbs.), two children in your life is to put them in the the seat. Thompson is a child passenger combination seats with harnesses (toddler right seat, at the right time, and use it the safety technician instructor and will give to booster; 40 - 65 lbs.), and two booster right way. training on how to properly use the seat seats (one high back, one with no back). WYDOT’s Highway Safety Program and how to correctly install the seat in The loaner seats must be picked up from supports the National Highway Traffic the vehicle. The employee will need to Highway Safety in person during normal Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) stance demonstrate their understanding of the business hours. on child car seat safety and has impleinstallation and how the seat will be used mented a child safety seat loaner program in Thompson’s presence before the seat is – Carlie Van Winkle at Headquarters in Cheyenne. loaned out. Thompson continues, “If they The yet unnamed WYDOT program in District 1 offers child car seats to current WYDOT employees (grandparents, or aunts and uncles, as an example) who may have small children visiting their household, have no child safety seats of their own and a car seat is not provided by the child’s parents or guardian. Many children, infants excluded, do not fly on airplanes with a car seat. “Being able to pick grandchildren up at the airport and have a seat available and that they know how to use becomes very important,” says Anna Thompson of Highway Safety. Child safety seats can be reserved if you know when you will be An example of the car seats that Highway Safety has available for loan at Headquarters. (from left) Combination seat, low back booster, high back booster, convertible seat, and infant only seat. having family visit. “If July 2012

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Photo: Carlie Van Winkle/WYDOT

Little Loaners


Any WYDOT employee interested in running for a political office should become familiar with the Hatch Act. The law is intended to block office holders from abusing their powers for partisan needs. It was enacted in 1939, after widespread misuse of political power, and initially only applied to federal employees. In 1940, it was amended to extend coverage to state and local employees. Currently, it applies to individuals who are employed by a state or local agency in the executive branch of government whose principal employment is in connection with an activity financed in whole or in part by a federal loan or grant. A federal loan or grant includes those grants that pass through the state or other agency, federal reimbursements or federal subsidies. Although an employee’s position may be financed by federal loans or grants, it is not necessary that the individual’s salary be paid with federal funds. The Hatch Act covers part-time, temporary or seasonal employees and also applies to individuals on annual leave, sick leave, leave without pay and administrative leave or furlough. Employees are allowed to attend and be active at various political rallies and meetings, as well as be an active member of a political party or club, including holding office in such an organization. The individual may also be a candidate for public office in a nonpartisan election, campaign for or against referendums, amendments and ordinances, and make campaign speeches for candidates in partisan elections. The Hatch Act begins covering an employee when the individual starts collecting signatures for nominating petitions or files nominating petitions, begins fundraising efforts, makes any announcement to the press, or when they put a campaign committee together. While the Hatch Act allows many freedoms, an employee may not make

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The Hatch Act

campaign promises of jobs, promotions, financial assistance, or contracts to gain office in an election. The attempt to coerce, directly or indirectly, command or advise a state or local officer to contribute anything of value to a party, committee, agency or individual is not allowed. An employee may not run for public office as a partisan candidate. A nonpartisan election can quickly turn partisan within the constraints of the Hatch Act when an individual seeking office is endorsed by a partisan party member, uses political party resources, advertises the endorsement of a political party or announces that he or she is a political party candidate. If the Hatch Act has been violated, the employee may be removed from office and the government job that the individual holds may be held liable for forfeiture of federal funding in an amount equal to two years of said individual’s salary. The individual can also be ordered removed from their position and not allowed to be rehired by any state or local agency within the same state for 18 months. The Office of Special Counsel can issue advisory opinions to employees concerning the Hatch Act, as well as investigate allegations of political activities prohibited by the law. To find out more about the Office of Special Council or find answers to questions that you may have, consult their Web site at: www.osc. gov/index. You may also find out more about the Hatch Act on the WYDOT employee’s intranet site under the Human Resources tab. Written advisory opinions about the Hatch Act may be obtained by mail at: U.S. Office of Special Counsel 1730 M Street, NW (Suite 218) Washington, DC 20036-4505 ATTN: Hatch Act Unit

Total number of employees:

as of

June 2, 2012

2,056

One month ago

2,049

One year ago

2,073

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Don’t wait... August issue submission deadline is July 20, 2012. send to: carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov


District Briefs cont. from page 5

Extra Mile

Crews install new playground at rest area

AWARDS

Buffalo – Travelers on I-90 have the opportunity to stop at the Powder River rest area at milepost 88. As of the Memorial Day weekend, the rest area boasts a new playground for younger travelers needing to burn off pent up energy. District 4 guard rail crew were the installers of the new brightly colored playset. Buffalo maintenance added their touch with new landscaping. The landscaping enhancements installed give the rest area a fresh new look. The new playground equipment replaces the previous installation.

Congratulations to the May recipients! WYDOT salutes the following Director’s Extra Mile Award recipients. The award is presented to individuals who have traveled the “extra mile” in service to WYDOT.

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Ken Link Joe Compston Chris Simon Kerry Nelson Mark Day John Wynn Marty McIntosh Dan Taylor

Ray Vigil Mike Kelley Mike Bowen Andrew Klingenburg Jody Brewer Nancy Cousins Lynn Spence David Messman

Randy Reynolds Gary Nelson Dave Vanderveen Mark Falk Ken Spear Marilee Manalo

Photo: WYDOT

For more information about the Extra Mile Award or to nominate someone, contact Janet Farrar at janet.farrar@wyo.gov or Mel Anderson at mel.anderson@wyo.gov.

Training ata Glance Here are upcoming training opportunities from WYDOT University and the Transportation Learning Network (TLN)

New playground installation being kid-tested for the first time.

Letters cont. from page 2 husband and I were headed eastbound towards Laramie wondering if we should pull off when we saw the wind warning sign. Thanks a million! We are safe in the motorhome.

Regina Cassidy

Relief Fund helped in time of need Thank you to the Relief Fund for the help in expenses on my travel to Massachusetts for the death of my brother.

Dighton Brazee

Date Class

Location

July 12

Creating Buy-In: Becoming an Idea Advocate

July 18

Team Building (WHP Records Section)

Cheyenne

July 24 July 24

MBTI and Teams The Changing Face of America: Diversity and its Implications for Managers and Supervisors

Cheyenne TLN

Coming Up in August: Aug 6-10

New Employee Orientation (NEO)

Cheyenne

Cheyenne

To register, or to find out more details, call the Training Program and talk to David Talley (777-4792), Jim Boyd (777-4791) or Rhonda DeLeeuw (777-4790). When you call, ask about the videos, books and audiotapes available from the Training Resource Library.

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Casper’s

West Belt Loop After years of design and

preparation, the Casper West Belt Loop project is under way this summer. Crews with Kelly Trucking are working to complete the project’s initial portion: construction of bridges and culverts; the moving of earth and grading.

The West Belt Loop is a new highway which will connect U.S. 20/26 on the northwest side of Casper and Mills to Wyoming Highway 220 on Casper’s southwest side. The 7.07 mile long highway is being constructed to accommodate additional Casper-area traffic. The Golden, Colo., company was awarded the contract in March with a bid of $19.2 million. This initial phase is scheduled to be completed by November 30, 2013, and the highway is expected to be open to traffic in 2015. The surfacing will be placed during a second project set to be constructed in 2015. A large share of the cost of building the route is being covered by an appropriation made by Congress. The West Belt Loop is expected to relieve congestion created as an increasing number of semis roll through Casper on their way to the mines, oil fields and wind farms. Its construction also effectively creates a “belt loop” highway system that surrounds Casper on all sides. At its junction with WYO 220 – at milepost 108.08 – the new road will feature a westbound on-ramp to WYO 220 and a northbound off-ramp from WYO 220 coupled with a controlled intersection for all other traffic. At its northern terminus, the new highway

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Project includes building 7.1 miles of roadbed for the future West Casper Belt Loop (WYO 257) along with associated bridges. Portions of Poison Spider and Roberton roads being realigned to accomodate new roadway. A second project, for paving, will be required before belt loop will be opened to traffic, possibly by 2015. will intersect with U.S. 20-26 at the Shoshoni Bypass junction just west of Mills. The West Belt Loop’s highway designation will be WYO 257. The current project includes constructing two new bridges. The larger of the bridges will span the North Platte River about two miles north of the WYO 220 junction. The bridge will consist of three spans; the center span will measure 215 feet, with the two side spans each measuring 145 feet, for a total span length of 505 feet. The deck will be wide enough to include a 40-foot clear roadway flanked by raised curbs.. The other bridge will cross an unnamed draw almost another two miles north of the river. The bridge will measure a little more than 100 feet in length and will also feature a 40-foot clear

roadway width. The future North Platte River bridge will also be the low point (just under 5,200 feet in elevation) on the route, and the current project includes building climbing lanes for uphill traffic in both directions from bridge. The road will have maximum grades of 5 percent. About a mile north of the North Platte River bridge, the road will cross the corridor of the historic Oregon Trail. A pullout will be constructed at the site to accommodate future installation of interpretive signing about the trail. Construction has begun on the realignment of Poison Spider and Robertson roads in Natrona County. The eastwest Poison Spider Road will be curved northward from its current intersection with the north-south Robertson Road ap-

proximately one-half-mile north where a new intersection will be constructed. The realignment will be completed at the end of this year’s construction season. The West Belt Loop will cross these roads near their current intersection. “We’re just at the starting point,” said Resident Engineer Jack Stone. “So far (Kelly Trucking) has begun the realignment of Robertson Road with grading and the laying of pipe. They’ve also begun to create a haul road along the (West Belt Loop) route.” Engineers estimate over 3 million cubic yards of earth will be moved on the entire project. – Jeff Goetz

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All records have a life cycle. We identify a record’s life cycle for state public records as either permanent or non permanent, and all of our records are classified per their approved retention schedules. A retention schedule is a timetable that identifies the length of time a record must be retained before destruction for legal governance and legal compliance. Record retention has been with us for a very long time. In fact, retention and destruction of records is even recorded in the Bible. A generalized version would read, “At the end of every seven years; every seventh year is a year of rest to the land, and of remission of debts to poor debtors (meaning debts were released at the end of 7 years).” To this day, most original financial/fiscal records are retained 7 years. The IRS, also used to tell us to retain our tax records for 7 years. Because records grow at such an overwhelming rate, no organization has the capability to store and maintain every document they create. Retention schedules help us to move permanent records to the state archives for permanent retention or to destroy short term or long term non permanent records when they have completed their life cycle. Retention schedules are created through the cooperative efforts of each agency and their assigned records analyst from the Records Management Unit of the State Archives. Each record series is detailed on an AR-1 form (AR is the abbreviation for “Analysis of Records”), which when completed is submitted to the Wyoming State Records Committee for their approval. The Wyoming State Records Committee, by state statute, is the only entity that can approve state records retention schedules. The committee is made of three individuals from state

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Third in a series of three.

government: one represents the Wyoming Attorney General’s Office and helps to determine legal requirements; the second represents the Wyoming Department of Audit to determine the fiscal requirements; and the third member represents the Wyoming State Archives to determine the enduring historical value. We all create records through daily business transactions, which are considered active records. But when records are no longer active, and depending on their retention schedule, our permanent records are transferred to the State Records Center for permanent storage, and once our non-permanent records have completed their life cycle, as per the retention schedule, they are eligible for destruction through recycling or shredding. Retention schedules help us to maintain governance and legal compliance by not keeping records less than or longer than their life cycle. There can be a significant liability to the state if we keep records longer than their approved retention, while at the same time, destroying records before their approved legal destruction is also a significant liability to the state. The only reason records should be retained longer than the retention schedule states, is in the event of an audit or legal action. Retention schedules are more important than many people realize. For example, the retention for our Maintenance Activity Reports (M-17’s) states; “Retain in district for two years, then forward to headquarters records section. Hold in records section for one additional fiscal

year and destroy.” If for some reason these documents were part of an anticipated legal action, then it is important that the division/section head communicate this to Office Services to place these records on legal hold to prevent destruction. This communication stops any possible destruction and these documents are placed in a secured area (if not handed over to the courts). This same action happens if a judge does, in fact, request documents, or if any documents are a part of discovery (including e-discovery for electronic records), during a legal action. Either way, the records are placed on a legal hold until released by the judge. In the event we have followed our retention schedules, and destroyed a record series prior to the knowledge of or processes of a legal action, we are still responsible to show evidence of legal compliance and that the records were destroyed per the legal retention schedule. The courts look favorably upon following the legal process. In the event the records were kept longer than required by the retention schedule, we would be required to continue to keep them even longer and to have them available for the legal action. On the flip side, if the lawsuit started, and we destroyed these documents instead of securing them, WYDOT would be in a very difficult position of possible legal sanctions and very expensive court ordered fines. A perfect example of this last


– Barbara Thomasee

First Wyoming-trained Alive at 25 instructors graduate

Photo: Carlie Van Winkle/WYDOT

scenario was the now infamous Enron and Arthur Anderson debacle. Some people think that just because various records/documents switched to or are being created by a different media (no longer hard copy and are now electronic, microfilm, etc.), that the retention schedule changes. That is not true. Nothing has changed about the document or content, only the media. This is why it is so important for the IT Department & the Records Department to work together. Everyone is responsible for the retention of all records they create, regardless of the format. Remember at the end of a record’s life cycle, it is just as important to not have these documents as it is to have them – regardless of the media! “Technology alone is not and cannot be a substitute for managing paper and electronic records. Building a solid foundation of records and information management is absolutely necessary before investing in and implementing any kind of RIM-ERM (Records Information Management/Electronic Records Management) solutions.” - Managing Municipal Records in Colorado: A RIM-ERM Toolkit. I wanted to touch on one more subject: disaster recovery. Does your department have a plan in place? Not many departments do. When a disaster strikes, how many of us are prepared to deal with the outcome in our personal lives let alone our employment? Besides panicking, do you know what to do with wet documents? Or mud soaked documents? Our Office Services are finalizing their Disaster Recovery Plan, if you are interested in looking at it, please contact Tim Tyler, Office Services manager, at 777-4380 or Barb Thomasee, Records supervisor, at 777-4494 and they will be happy to share these very important business continuity issues with you. This fall and coming spring of 2013, the Wyoming Chapter of the Association of Records Managers and Administrators (ARMA) will be presenting fall workshops and a spring seminar on this very subject. If you are interested and would like more information, please contact Tim or Barb.

Troopers Andrew Jackson, Kyle McKay, Jonathan Russell, David Homer, and Lt. Will Zilka received their graduation certifcates from Sgt. Duane Ellis, one of WHP’s Alive at 25 instructors.

The first class of Alive at 25 instructors trained by the Wyoming Highway Patrol graduated in May, with Troopers David Homer, Andrew Jackson, Kyle McKay, Jonathan Russell and Lt. Will Zilka receiving their certificates. The Alive at 25 safety education program for drivers between the ages of 15 and 24 has been offered in Wyoming since 2006, but previously the instructors were trained through Colorado’s program. Having its own instructor training program will save the Patrol money and allow it to adapt the program to fit Wyoming’s needs. Sgt. Duane Ellis completed his certification to train Wyoming instructors, and taught the five new graduates. “It’s very evident to me that you guys are here because you want to save lives, and the way you teach and the commitment that you have put into it is touching,” Ellis told the graduates. “You will not know the people that you touch. Very seldom will you have someone come up to you and say, ‘You saved my life.’ But you will save lives.” Col. John Butler commended Lt. Troy McLees and Ellis for their work in getting the Alive at 25 program started in Wyoming and the new graduates for volunteering to be a part of it. “I don’t know of a greater program that we have in this organization than Alive at 25, so you guys are part of a pretty elite group,” Butler said. “I’m looking forward to you folks taking this on and the impact you’re going to have. I congratulate you and thank you for stepping up to do this.” The new graduates bring to 16 the total number of troopers certified to teach the classes around the state. Homer is stationed in Lyman, Jackson in Afton, McKay in Cheyenne, Russell in Casper and Zilka in Gillette. Since September 2006, more than 5,700 Wyoming students have completed the class. So far, only one of those students has gone on to become a traffic fatality, and that was as a passenger. Nationally, an average of about 11,000 people between the ages of 15 and 24 are killed in traffic crashes each year. “That’s more people than we’ve lost in our military since 9-11, and those are soldiers getting shot at by people trying to kill them,” Zilka said. “These kids are doing it to themselves. So if we can give them some education, open some eyes, give them the control, we can change some of that.” There has been a 72 percent drop in fatalities among 15- to 24-year-olds in Colorado since the program began there, and that’s the kind of impact the new instructors hope to contribute to in Wyoming. “I think we’ve all seen the lives that are devastated by the poor choices that kids make, and that really motivates us to go out and try to make a difference,” McKay said. “With this program, we can get them when they’re young and help them start making good decisions so it carries over their whole life,” Jackson added. July 2012

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District news

District 1

Welcome

Headquarters

Welcome

Retirements

Christopher Kwilinski, Highway Safety; Heather Winchell, Fuel Tax-Uniformity; and Vance Lucero, Equipment Mechanics.

Michael Schulte, Geology; Cheryl Wilson, Highway Development-Photogrammetry/Survey

Edward Daniels, Laramie Port of Entry – 25 years; Vincent Birkle, Cheyenne Maintenance – 5 years; Joey Christensen, Laramie Maintenance – 5 years; Chad Varland, Cheyenne Maintenance – 5 years;

Cradle Call Proud grandparents, Shelly and Ron Erickson of Cheyenne welcome their first grandchild, Olivia Novae Erickson. She was born May 1, weighing 7 pounds, 10 ounces and measuring 19.25 inches. Olivia’s proud parents are Brian and Tiffany Erickson of Cheyenne. Brian works for the State Library in Cheyenne.

District 2

Welcome James Farrell, Douglas Construction.

Service Awards

Olivia Novae Erickson

Erin and Garth Simkins welcomed their second child, Harper Olivia Simkins, into this world on Jan. 29 weighing 7 pounds, 1 ounce. Proud big sister, Reese, is also pleased with the new addition to the family. Erin works in Financial Services at Headquarters.

Michael Chaussee, Casper Construction – 30 years; Keith Lengkeek, Douglas Construction – 30 years; Kevin Hoff, Casper Construction – 10 years; William Burt, Lusk Maintenance – 5 years.

Keith Lengkeek

Photo: WYDOT

Photo: Erin S Photography

Thomas Adkins, Planning-Programming – 35 years; Michael Janicek, Highway Safety – 35 years; Michael Reyes, Materials-Surfacing – 30 years; Jeffrey Brown, Traffic Administration – 25 years; Kenneth Spear, Contracts and Estimates – 20 years; Jared Nuhn, Geology-Drillers – 15 years; Brenden Schaefer, Bridge-Operations Design – 15 years; Kelly Yerdon, Motor Vehicle ServicesRegistration/Title – 15 years; Therese Goodman, Highway Development-Project Development – 10 years; Dennis Johnson, Materials-Surfacing – 10 years; Randy Ringstmeyer, Bridge-Operations Inspection – 10 years; Troy Tenney, Highway DevelopmentPhotogrammetry/Survey – 10 years; James Zuniga, Facility MaintenanceCustodial – 10 years; Jason Armstrong, Information Technology Support –5 years; Daniel Cooley, Highway Development-Engineering Services – 5 years; Blaise Hansen, Geology – 5 years; Leslie Jones, Driver Services-Policy and Records – 5 years; Mark Kelly, Telecom District 1 Radio Shop – 5 years; Shannon Sandoval, Equipment Mechanics – 5 years.

Service Awards

Photo: Erin S Photography

Service Awards

Matthew Haas, Cheyenne Maintenance.

Mike Chaussee (left) receiving his plaque from District Engineer Lowell Fleenor.

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Harper Olivia Simpkins

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Retirements

May and June Service Award Recipients

Keith Lundine, Wheatland Construction; and Dennis Green, Lusk Maintenance.

Congratulations

Photo: WYDOT

Photo: WYDOT

Congrats to Thomas Rowley, Torrington Port of Entry, on passing his Special Officer class on May 2.

Thomas receiving his Special Officer certificate of completion from Capt. Shawn Dickerson.

Service award luncheons are held by the Transportation Commission for employees celebrating milestones of 25 years of service or greater. Our May and June service award recipients: (back) Mike Hitshew and Jeff Brown. (front) Lanae Wynn and Mark Briggs.

Best wishes go to Shirley Rim foreman David Gillaspie and his wife, Susan, on the marriage of their oldest son A.J. to Angela Dudon. The June 16 ceremony was held at Bear Trap Meadow on Casper Mountain. The newlyweds will live in Wheatland.

Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

Due to the occasional limitation of space, service award photos (if not found here in the District News pages) can be found on the intranet at: http://employees.dot.state.wy.us/cms/achievements

A.J. and Angela Gillaspie

District 3

Service Awards

Kyle Seymour, Buffalo Maintenance; and Robbie Goodnough, Moorcroft Maintenance.

Service Awards Michael Condon, Buffalo Construction – 5 years

Retirements Terry Wiechert, Sundance Maintenance.

Michael Condon

le Afte yc

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Lanae Wynn

Welcome

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Lanae Wynn, Evanston Port of Entry – 25 years; Chancey Duncan, Rock Springs Patrol Field – 5 years; Carol Perkins, Alpine Junction Port of Entry – 5 years.

District 5

Welcome

ease Re c Pl

Photo printed with permission from David Gillaspie

District 4

William Hensel, Basin Construction

Service Awards Mike Hitshew, South Pass Maintenance – 25 years; Eric Curtin, Lander Traffic Striping – 5 years; Lawrence Griffin, Basin Mechanics – 5 years; Braeden Hyde, Highway Development-Project Development-Laramie Design Squad – 5 years; Joseph Keele, Basin Traffic Striping – 5 years; Kevin Maynard, South Pass Maintenance – 5 years.

Retirements Clifford Tillotson, Cody Maintenance.

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Bike rodeo promotes safety

The bike skills program and bike rodeo teaches kids safe riding practices and skills. This year’s event included at least one child who had never ridden a bike before. He was absolutely thrilled with this newly acquired recreational ability. All of the kids enjoyed the safety gear provided by the program so much they made a thank you poster which everyone signed.

Chugwater – The WYDOT Bike/ Pedestrian and Safe Routes To School program provided backpacks, flashing night-lights, and bike helmets to students of the Chugwater Schools to be given out for their bike skills program and bike rodeo. This program was primarily for students in elementary and middle school, but some high school age kids also joined in on the fun. About 40 kids participated in the event sponsored by teachers from the area’s schools.

Photo: WYDOT

WYDOT crews mentor student

Participants of the Chugwater bike skills progam and bike rodeo signed a thank you poster in appreciation of WYDOT’s support.

Lyman – WYDOT District 3’s construction and maintenance crews took a local high school student under their wing recently as part of a youth mentoring program in the Bridger Valley. Nicky Riggs of Mountain View High School spent the day learning what it takes to be a part of the Evanston Construction crew. Construction crew members Cindy Brown, Bob Graham and Lonny Sellers took the time to teach Riggs the ropes of working at WYDOT on a construction project in Urie last month.

Retirement spawns promotion in Geology Mike Schulte of the Geology Program at headquarters retired June 1, concluding 31 years of state service. Schulte, a Casper native, joined the old Wyoming Highway Department, WYDOT’s predecessor agency, in 1981, a year after earning his bachelor’s degree in geology from the University of Wyoming. He spent his entire career in Geology, and retired as a geology supervisor. In addition to this professional capacity as a geologist, Schulte has long maintained in interest in rock-hounding, and he is a member of the Wyoming Prospectors Association. While at WYDOT, he began a side business as a lapidary (an artisan who polishes and/or engraves gems and other precious stones); he Mike Schulte is particularly well known for using laser equipment to engrave items such as granite plaques and jade golf putters. Schulte has also been active in aviation and was a charter member of the Wyoming Pilots Association. His exploits include photographing landslide areas from the air and flying his own plane to and from Kitty Hawk, N.C., in 2003 for the Centennial Anniversary of Flight celebration. Dave Vanderveen, a 12-year veteran of Geology, was promoted to fill the opening created by Schulte’s departure. Vanderveen, who attended high school in Moraga, Calif., earned his bachelor’s degree in geology from the University of Idaho in 1997 and his master’s degree in geology from Washington State University in 1999.

Photo: WYDOT

In the Community

Nicky Riggs (left) with Evanston construction crew members Cindy Brown, Bob Graham and Lonny Sellers.

Riggs said he took interest in WYDOT after a maintenance operator came to speak at his school. “That gave me some interest in what they were doing,” Riggs said. He also said he enjoyed working outside and working with the WYDOT crews. “I could definitely see myself doing this kind of work,” Riggs said. The Lyman Maintenance crews usually mentor about two kids a year from the local high school. “We just like to help these kids out,” Maintenance Foreman Lon Richardson said. “And if we can pique some interest in working for WYDOT, we may find we have a good future hand.”

Over the Limit? Under Arrest.

Always use a designated driver. HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM

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Photo courtesy Ryan Gossens

WYDOT Outdoors

sy Photo courte

an Clint Lockm

Clockwise from top left:

Photo courtesy Clin t Lockman

• Clint Lockman, Rock Springs resident engineer, with his prize turkey at the Fourth Annual Old West Turkey Shoot. • Aaron Lockman, son of Clint Lockman, with a prize turkey near Hulett. • Ryan Gossens, Lovell maintenance crew, with his bull elk shot above Hyatville. The elk scored a 349 straight, 49 inches wide outer. • Shawn Coggins, Meeteetse maintenance crew, found these shed antlers just 25 yards apart in black timber. They are from a 330 inch bull in the Bighorn Basin. • Mike Rose, friend of Shawn Coggins of Meeteetse, found this 376 inch bull winter kill in the Bighorn Basin. • Tim Stark from Environmental Services shot these two images while on an afternoon wellness walk. The first image is of a family of geese with their new offspring. The second is of a black crowned night heron seen wading in the Cheyenne Country Club lake.

Photo courtesy Shawn Cogg

Photo courtesy Shaw n

Photo courtesy Tim Stark

Coggins

The next WYDOT Outdoors issue is October. Submit your photos no later than September 14, 2012. Photo courtesy Tim Stark

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Passings

Lemich, former foreman and commissioner, passes

As a highway commissioner, Lemich “was considered an advocate for the state’s maintenance crews,” retired Commission Secretary Keith Rounds remembered. “Since he had once been among the ranks of the Highway Department, he was, as commissioner, an ally for the crews–someone on their side.” Lemich’s community service also included memberships in the Masons, Elks, Odd Fellows and the board of directors for Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Funeral services were conducted June 2 in Lava Hot Springs, Idaho, where he had lived during retirement.

WTDEA Store

Photo: WYDOT Archive

After mustering out of the service, Lemich initially worked for Union Pacific Railroad in Green River before joining WHD in Rock Springs. He was promoted to maintenance foreman, stationed first in Farson before transferring to Rawlins. Emil Lemich, who served the old While in Rawlins, Lemich started Wyoming Highway Department (WHD), working a second job as a trailer salesman WYDOT’s predeand after leaving WHD cessor agency, first in the early 1970s, as a maintenance opened Skyline Motors, foreman and later an automobile dealeras a highway comship. He later operated missioner, died Dallin Motors and May 19 in Cedar owned other business City, Utah. He was as well. 84. Lemich subsequentLemich was ly served as a Carbon born in Rock County commissioner, Springs and grew Lemich (left) receiving his 5-year service and in 1981, Gov. Ed up in nearby award as Highway Commissioner from Leno Herschler appointed Winton. After Menghini, circa 1986. him to a six-year term graduating from on the Highway ComReliance High School, he joined the U.S. mission. He was commission chairman Navy, serving with the Seabees during the from 1983-85. Korean War.

18

Editor’s note: A clarification to last month’s Sterling Fritzler obituary, where there was an unintentional omission: Fritzler is survived by parents Conrad and Edna of Laramie, brothers Rex and Colin, and sisters Julie McGinnis and Connie Wibbens.

Cash Calendar

An 18 Month Calendar (7/2012 - 12/2013) is selling for $15. Daily chances to win starting January 2013. Contact your representative for information.

Gloves

Pigskin leather work gloves. $5.25 for members, $6.25 for non-members. Call Tina Thomas at 777-4486.

July 2013 Sunday

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Cookbook

The Roadkill Cookbook is selling for $10. Call Barbara Thomasee at 777-4494.

Hats

WTDEA State Board is selling hats. The hats are $18. Contact your WTDEA representative for more information.

If you would like your WTDEA event to be placed in Interchange, please contact Tina Thomas, tina.thomas@wyo.gov or Tony Niswender, anthony.niswender@wyo.gov

Interchange

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July 2012

Be sure to check out our internet classified site at:

http://wtdeaclassified.com


Looking for a

home equity

LINE OF CREDIT? % > Rates as low as 5.00 No closing fees APR*

> > Up to 100% loan-to-value (LTV)

All WYDOT employees and their families can belong. Call, click or stop by to join and start down Your Road to Smart Banking.

WyHy.org 307.638.4200 Cheyenne 307.234.2373 Casper 800.442.2392 *APR= Annual Percentage Rate. Rates based on approved credit and are subject to change. Maximum APR is 18%. No interest accrued until funds are used. Other restrictions apply. Federally insured by NCUA.

wyhy-2012-05-heloc-ad-altsize.indd 1

July 2012

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Interchange

Wyoming Department of Transportation 5300 Bishop Blvd. Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009-3340 Address Service Requested

Pre-sorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Cheyenne, WY 82009 Permit No. 24


Interchange - July 2012  

July issue of Interchange. The news magazine of the Wyoming Department of Transportation

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