__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan 8/1/2020


BROWN SCHOOL FALL PLANNING COMMITTEE Mary McKay, Neidorff Family and Centene Corporation Dean of the Brown School Danielle Bristow Assistant Dean for Student Affairs Leo Cabassa Associate Professor Siomari Collazo-Colón Associate Dean for Administration

Sarah Kang Student, MPH Candidate '21, Student Coordinating Council Representative Maura Kepper Research Assistant Professor, Prevention Research Center

Tonya Edmond Associate Dean for Social Work

Jacque Martinez Pullen Chief of Staff and Assistant Dean for Strategic Initiatives

Dan Ferris Assistant Dean for Policy Initiatives

Nancy Mueller Assistant Dean for Planning and Evaluation

Susan Fowler Library Director

Renee Parks Project Manager, Prevention Research Center

Amanda Gilbert Student, MPH ‘20

Rodrigo S. Reis Associate Dean for Public Health

Michal Grinstein-Weiss Shanti K. Khinduka Distinguished Professor Associate Dean for Policy Initiatives

Amanda Rhodes Executive Administrative Coordinator

Sunghei Han Manager of Operations Jenni Harpring Assistant Dean, Field Education Angela Hobson Assistant Dean for Public Health Lora Iannotti Associate Professor Sue Imhoff Executive Coordinator for Academic Affairs

Zach Romo Assistant Director for Student Engagement Jesse Smith-Appelson Student, MSW/MPH Candidate ’22, Student Coordinating Council Representative Atia Thurman Associate Director, Clark-Fox Policy Institute Manager of Brown School Initiatives Cheryl Valko Associate Director, Prevention Research Center


Table of Contents Part I: Overview .................................................................................................................... 2 Prioritizing Public Health .................................................................................................... 9 Part II: Public Health Measures ............................................................................................ 10 Personal Protective Measures ........................................................................................... 11 Environmental Measures .................................................................................................. 16 Part III: Infection Response and Recovery ............................................................................ 19 Appendices ......................................................................................................................... 26 Appendix A: About the Coronavirus Disease ........................................................................ 27 Appendix B: Key Terms and Concepts ................................................................................. 28 Appendix C: Appropriate Use of Face Coverings .................................................................. 29 Appendix D: Workplace Scenarios and Procedures during Campus Visits............................... 30 Appendix E: Core Services .................................................................................................. 37 Appendix F: Failed Screening Protocol ................................................................................ 38 Appendix G: Protocol on Responding to COVID-19 Positive or Presumed Positive Employee... 40 Appendix H: Communicating with WashU Community members diagnosed with COVID-19 ... 47

1


PART I PROTECTING THE HEALTH AND SAFETY OF OUR COMMUNITY: AN OVERVIEW

The Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan will guide plans for moving forward with a Fall 2020 semester. Rooted in our professional values and ethics and driven by evidence, the plan takes into account a complex set of priorities as we navigate the evolving circumstances of a global public health crisis.

2


Protect | Protecting the health, safety and well-being of our community is paramount Prevent | Preventing exposure, spread and incidence of COVID-19 takes precedence Preserve | Preserving the excellence of our academic and research missions is vital The Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan is a comprehensive guide for returning constituents to campus and maintaining Brown School facilities and operations, in the wake of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Drawing from the best available current scientific evidence and public health guidance, the plan establishes new protocols that promote health and safety, while preserving the continuity of mission critical operations in education, research, and community partnerships. As we learn more about COVID-19, we expect that the federal, state and local guidance and our Plan will evolve.

Our number one priority is to protect human health and life. During the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, Washington University in St. Louis took significant steps to help slow down the spread of the virus and to reduce the risk to its community and the region at large. Plans for gradually restoring and maintaining operations at the Brown School will continue to apply evidenced-based knowledge to prioritize health and safety.

3

“Your commitment to protecting the health and safety of each other, supporting and connecting in times of challenge and uncertainty, and your willingness to be flexible, patient, calm and positive in a crisis demonstrate a set of shared values that is inspirational.” – Ma ry McKa y, Nei dorff Family a nd Centene Corpora tion Dean of the Brown School, Sta tement of va lues, March 18, 2020


Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan The Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan is a practical guide for a phased return to operations and scenario planning beginning in the summer of 2020 for the 2021 academic year. It was developed by a committee of faculty, staff, and students representing expertise from the School’s three disciplines: social work, public health, and soci al policy. Protocols within our plan align with the overall university plan and policies (per the WashU Together Plan for Fall 2020), and takes into account federal, state, and local public health leadership and guidance. The Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan:   

Provides science and value-based guidance for instituting public health measures that protect our constituents Prioritizes and implements protective health measures and protocols Establishes minimum safety standards and procedures for operation

Rooted in Values, Driven by Evidence The cornerstone of the Brown School is a caring and engaged community driven by our commitment to justice and equity. The intersection of social work, public health, and social policy allows us to draw on the best practices and evidence to advance positive social change. Plans for returning to campus reflect the values and ethics that guide our professions. Public health science and evidence-based practices will inform our decision-making, and we will draw on our strengths as changemakers to cultivate new behaviors and practices. Guiding Principles    

The health, safety and well-being of our community, and region, is paramount. Individual and group behaviors are key to ensuring the implementation of public health measures. The Brown School vision of social justice and equity will guide us and help ensure equitable access to health and safety across our community. Science and evidence-based practices will inform our decisions.

Evidence-based Practices According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), protecting the public's health depends on implementing proven strategies to improve health outcomes. Proven strategies, also known as best practices, are evidence-based, effective, and ethical. They are rooted in systemic research and have been evaluated for their replicability, feasibility and sustainability. Often, best practices reflect transdisciplinary collaboration, as well as community relevance and input. These practices are subject to change based on new evidence and information.

4


Sources of Information The COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly developing public health crisis. The urgency to combat this global threat has accelerated learning and the assimilation of research into practice and policymaking. The fastpaced response to the pandemic has also given rise to misinformation. It is critical that we rely on credible sources of research, data, and intelligence to inform our decision-making. As such, plans and protocols will be updated as needed to reflect the latest knowledge and best practices from the following agencies and organizations.

World Health Organization (WHO) | WHO's primary role is to direct international health within the United Nations' system and to lead partners in global health responses

public's health and to achieve equity in health status for all Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services | Serves the citizens of Missouri by working to improve the health and quality of life for Missourians of all ages

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | The nation’s leading science-based, data-driven, service organization that protects the safety, health, and security of America

Washington University School of Medicine | Leaders in medical education, research and patient care; among the top medical schools in the nation

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) | The Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness (NIOSH is part of the CDC, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis | Top-ranked school of social work and programs of public health and social policy, facilitated by nationally recognized faulty, researchers, and public health experts

Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) | Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance

State of Missouri’s Show Me Strong Recovery Plan | State authorized plan for reopening and economic recovery St. Louis County Government and Department of Public Health | Local government agency issuing orders and information regarding COVID-19

American Public Health Association | A national organization for public health professionals working to improve the

City of St. Louis Government and Department of Public Health | Local government agency issuing orders and information regarding COVID-19

5


Public Health Measures The virus that causes COVID-19 is transmitted mainly from person-to-person via respiratory droplets. Transmission is possible from individuals who have no symptoms or signs of illness, as well as from surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with COVID-19. The most effective method of prevention is to avoid exposure to the virus. Limiting contact with others is the best way to reduce the spread. The CDC and other public health officials have prescribed the following public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission.

Decreased density | Population density is a metric of physical distancing feasibility. The smaller the population, the less risk for exposure and potential spread of the virus. Physical distancing (also known as social distancing) | Maintaining at least 6 feet between yourself and other people (about two adult arms’ length) is one of the most effective tools in reducing exposure. Screening for symptoms | Regularly monitoring for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 is key to early detection and minimizing transmission. Hand washing | Frequently washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds is one of the most important precautions available. Respiratory etiquette | Hygienic practices that include covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze and not touching your mouth, nose, and eyes must be maintained. Masks and face coverings | CDC recommends the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Cleaning and disinfection | Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces, with strict adherence to manufacturer instructions and safety precautions, can help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Staying home | Avoiding close contact with people who are sick and remaining home if you feel ill helps to reduce exposure and spread. Familiarity with symptoms and access to medical attention might be necessary. Testing positive for COVID-19 requires specific protocols. There are currently no drugs licensed for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19, and until a vaccine is available, the above public health measures are our best defense against the disease. For more information about the virus, symptoms, and transmission, see Appendix A: About COVID-19. A list of key terms is available in Appendix B.

6


Key Considerations for Campus Operations The Brown School’s community of changemakers – faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners – has always had far-reaching impacts, well beyond the boundaries of our remarkable campus facilities. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, our goals have not changed, but our ways of operating have. Creating a healthy and safe learning and working environment has taken on a new meaning, one that consists of unprecedented complexity. Resumption of campus operations will involve careful consideration of many factors including public health conditions and institutional capacity. Monitoring and surveillance | Systems that detect the emergence and spread of infection is standard protocol for reopening. In alignment with university guidance, all faculty, staff and students will have to participate in regular self-screening and follow explicit quarantine and isolation protocols if they become ill or are exposed to someone else who is symptomatic or tests positive for COVID-19. Public health metrics | Testing, healthcare system capacity, and local incidence criterion will have substantial influence on determining the selection and timing of mitigation strategies. University and government guidance | Managing the safe return of employees and students to campus will occur in accordance with university guidance and resources. The University will continue to coordinate with local public health departments, healthcare systems, and will adhere to state and local public health orders. Workforce | Authorized staff and faculty will be permitted on campus for specific tasks. Individuals recalled to campus must fully comply with new health and safety protocols. Scheduling will depend on capacity to maintain physical distancing. Most of our workforce will remain under remote work conditions; HR policies have been adjusted to encourage telecommuting and flexible work hours. However, departments should consider contingency plans in the event of employee absenteeism. Academic instruction | To create an environment that is as safe as possible, a significant portion of graduate instruction will occur through virtual platforms during the Fall 2020 semester, with select courses held on campus. The Office of Field Education will coordinate guidance on practicum activi ties for students (which we expect to be a combination of remote and in-person field activities). Supplies & equipment | New safety protocols and changes in operations require use of specific supplies and equipment (e.g. personal protective equipment, hand sanitizer, and disinfecting products). Availability of and access to these resources will affect our capacity to resume and maintain on-site operations. Vulnerable populations | Some members of our community, or members of their household, are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Additional precautions may be available to further enhance their safety and consideration will be given to how they might engage in learning and working activities remotely. Managers will refer to the Human Resources Management Guidance for Employees Returning to Danforth Campus for detailed guidance. Compliance | The success and effectiveness of this plan is reliant upon our personal and unified commitment to protect one another. Each individual is responsible for helping to uphold our standards and expectations of safety and public health. All faculty, staff, and students will be required to complete training and a community pledge. 7


As Washington University ramps up for the 2020-2021 academic year, the Brown School’s fall semester is set to begin on August 24, 2020. Plans for reactivating campus operations will be executed according to two phasing frameworks: one driven by the academic calendar; the other base d on public health conditions. This means that campus-based activity is contingent upon health metrics that determine that the prevalence of disease is low enough to operate safely. University Alert Levels The university will operate under an alert system that uses four levels to indicate the severity of COVID19 transmission in the St. Louis region and/or on campus. These levels will determine the nature of campus operations. Very High Alert (Red): Stay at home orders are in place High Alert (Orange): Limited activities occur on campus Moderate Alert (Yellow): Open with many protective measures still actively in place Low Alert (Green): New Normal Factors that could raise or lower the alert level include: Transmission rates, accessibility to testing, availability of personal protective equipment, contact tracing capabilities, capacity of health care systems, and rate of compliance with public health requirements, both on- and off-campus. A shift to Very High Alert (Red) indicates the need to limit activity on campus and potentially to significantly reduce campus density. If this were to occur, the Brown School would attempt to provide as much advance notice as possible to its students, faculty, and staff. University COVID Monitoring Team A COVID Monitoring Team has been established to oversee the implementation of the alert level system. The team, which includes campus experts in medicine, public health, emergency management and logistics, will coordinate the collection and review of data related to COVID-19 prevalence in the university and St. Louis communities and recommend the appropriate level of campus operations based on current conditions. More information about monitoring and containment is available in the third part of this protocol.

8


PRIORITIZING PUBLIC HEALTH Human relationships are at the cornerstone of the Brown School culture. We have been strategic and deliberate in making our physical environment inclusive and engaging. However, safeguarding the health and well-being of our community demands a cultural shift that reorients our behaviors around public health priorities. Given the transmission patterns of the virus, infection prevention depends on avoiding exposure and reducing close contact between humans. In the foreseeable future, our community will experience a substantial reduction in campus-based and personal interactions, signaling a shift in culture, and opening the way for new opportunities in how we facilitate learning, conduct research, engage with our community, and perform administrative duties. Teaching & Learning Students will continue to participate in robust learning through a combination of campus-based and virtual options. Attending class on campus will require adherence with public health measures as outlined in this protocol and according to university guidance. Full-time faculty will be teaching additional sections and courses, and will be prepared to deliver enhanced learning experiences. Faculty and staff will host virtual office hours and meetings with students. Community building activities will take place online; in-person interaction is reserved for campus-based courses only. Communal spaces will not be available for use; student groups will be encouraged to engage across web -based platforms and social media. Academic Affairs will work with student-led groups, organizations, and affinity groups to explore new ways of building community and maintaining relationships in light of these measures. Research During the fall semester, research activities will gradually ramp up, according to university guidance and public health conditions. Principal investigators should continue to support remote operations and adapt processes to reduce reliance on campus access. In addition to following updated guidance from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, staff that require the use of campus-based resources will follow public health measures for returning to campus. Community Partnerships Community engagement has quickly shifted to digital and online platforms and will continue to do to so throughout the 2021 academic year. According to university guidelines, there are to be no visitors at this time. Event spaces will be closed to the public. Our community partners and campus visitors will have access to many of our resources, but not to the physical premises. Additionally, public health measures outlined in this protocol are applicable to activities with our community partners. Administration The majority of staff members will continue to work remotely. Unit directors will implement new processes to support virtual and web-based execution of administrative responsibilities; departments will work with staff to ensure they have the resources needed to maintain remote operations. Employees who are returning to campus will minimize time spent on campus and may have staggered schedules to accommodate physical distancing. They will adhere to new public health measures and must ensure compliance with physical distancing requirements (maintaining 6-feet between each other at all times).

9


PART II PROTECTING THE HEALTH AND SAFETY OF OUR COMMUNITY: PUBLIC HEALTH MEASURES

Adaptations in how we interact with each other and the physical environment will help to facilitate a safer school environment. We require, trust, and appreciate that every member of our community will embrace these changes in order to preserve human health and life.

10


OVERVIEW Public health guidelines call for judicious and prudent strategies for gradually reinstating on-campus operations. Efforts to resume campus activities must be measured against the risk of spread and exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19. The overarching goal is to protect the health, safety, security, and well-being of our community. The Brown School will rely on evidence-based public health measures to decrease both the likelihood and consequences of transmission. Our strategy is two-fold: Personal protective measures – which aim to limit person-to-person spread, protect individuals, and reduce contamination of frequently touched surfaces (e.g. physical distancing, handwashing, masking, and respiratory etiquette) Environmental measures – which focus on preventing transmission between infected individuals and those who are not infected, and shield those at risk of developing serious illness (physical distancing, decreased density, staying at home, working from home) Implementation of these measures has the power to reduce the spread of the virus and associated illness and death. Adopting new public health measures is a demonstration of our values and professional ethics. We trust that the members of our community are motivated to comply with these protocols, if only to protect their health, and the health of everyone in our community.

HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR LEARNING AND WORKING ON CAMPUS: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE MEASURES The Public Health Protocol Plan provides guidance on new procedures and policies to help facilitate the movement of evidence-based practices into routine behaviors; behaviors which focus on protective and preventative measures. Personal protective measures  

 

Screen for symptoms Practice physical distancing

Wear a mask or face covering Practice healthy hygiene

Self-Screening All persons coming to campus must complete a screening prior to entering any university buildings; this includes faculty, staff, students, and any authorized visitors, such as vendors and contractors. University employees and students must complete the screening questionnaire by visiting screening.wustl.edu and logging in with their WUSTL Key. Self-screening is required before every visit to campus and will need to be completed no earlier than two hours before arrival. Washington University Access Screening (subject to change based upon federal and local guidance): Today or in the last 24 hours have you experienced new or worsening symptoms of any of the following? Select all that apply. 11


     

 New or worsening diarrhea (not consistent with chronic medical conditions)?  None of the above  Have you been exposed to a household or close family member/intimate partner who has tested positive or is suspected of having COVID-19 in the past 14 days?

Feel like you have had a fever? Chills? Unexplained muscle pain/body aches? New or worsening cough? Trouble breathing? New loss of sense of taste or sense of smell?  Sore throat, different from your seasonal allergies?

Anyone showing symptoms or otherwise failing the daily screen will be required to stay home and contact University health services (Habif Health and Wellness Center for students and Occupational Health for employees) for further instructions. If an employee does not pass the screening protocol, their direct supervisor will be notified by Occupational Health and can expect to receive follow up information and instructions. Supervisors should keep the information confidential and not share information about the health of any specific employee. Occupational Health and Habif will oversee protocols for monitoring, screening, and responding when necessary with quarantine, isolation and contact tracing within our university community. Appendix F includes further information if a student, faculty, or staff member does not pass the screening protocol.

If you experience symptoms and do not pass the screening protocol: Faculty or staff contact Occupational Health’s COVID-19 hotline: 314-362-5056 Students contact Habif Health and Wellness Center: 314-935-6666 Students and employees who do not pass the self-screening protocol are not permitted to come onto campus until they have been cleared to return to campus by Occupational Health or Habif Health and Wellness.

Physical Distancing At a minimum, physical distancing means maintaining at least six feet separation (about two adult arms’ length) between yourself and other people. Also known as social distancing, physical distancing is one of the most effective tools in reducing exposure and transmission of the virus. Physical distancing also encompasses practices that reduce the density of people and personal interaction. The Brown School community is adopting a very broad definition of physical distancing, and encouraging its students, faculty, and staff to remain off campus, and work and learn from home as much as possible. When on campus, constituents are expected to comply with physical distancing requirements at all times and adhere to signage and environmental cues. University Guidelines for Physical/Social Distancing:  Maintain at least six feet of separation from other people at all times in all indoor and outdoor campus environments.  Avoid or minimize in-person meetings.  Talk to your manager about your area’s plan for staggering operations, etc.  Do not congregate in common areas (break rooms, conference rooms, common equipment rooms, etc.)  Wash your hands before and after entering a common area. 12


In addition to university guidelines, the Brown School will employ a mix of adaptations, including, but not limited to the following:  Minimize the number of courses offered on campus.  Limit the number of employees working on campus; continue to support remote operations.  Stagger schedules; limit duration of time that employees work from campus.  Discourage activities that facilitate personal interaction, such as eating and gathering in communal spaces.  Institute contactless delivery of goods and services.  Reconfigure the physical environment to support physical distancing. During the fall semester, we will not convene groups or host events open to the public. Community partners, guest lecturers and speakers, visiting students and other campus visitors will not have access to our buildings; this includes family members of our faculty, staff, and students. Face Masks/Coverings COVID-19 can be spread by asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic coronavirus carriers – people who are infected but do not know it and have not developed symptoms. Wearing a face covering can limit the transmission of the virus by providing an extra layer of protection from the respiratory droplets that travel in the air from one person to another. Face coverings by themselves are not sufficient protection against the illness and must be used in combination with other protective measures.

According to the CDC: A cloth face covering may not protect the wearer, but it may keep the wearer from spreading the virus to others.

Anyone physically present on campus must wear a mask or face covering that fully covers their mouth and nose at all times, unless they are alone in an individual closed office space or are outside and able to keep at least six feet between themselves and other people they do not live with (this includes multi-person offices; hallways; stairwells; elevators; meeting rooms; classrooms; and restrooms). Masks should not be removed to eat or drink without maintaining a 6-foot distance away from others. University Guidelines for Face Coverings (Cloth or Disposable):  Wear a mask that fully covers your mouth and nose at all times while on campus, unless you are alone in an individual closed office space or are outside and can maintain six feet of physical distance from others.  If you do not have a mask, see the CDC’s guidance on creating one with or without sewing.  Wash your hands before placing and removing your mask.  Store your mask in clean area when not in use. Face coverings must be used appropriately in combination with physical distancing and healthy hygiene; however, the most effective way to slow the spread of COVID-19 is to ALWAYS wear a mask when physical distancing is not possible. See mask requirements for the Danforth Campus; for detailed instructions on masks and face coverings, see Appendix C. In the event that a faculty or staff member cannot wear a mask due to a medical condition or other concerns, they should contact their supervisor or academic dean. Students should consult with their academic advisors.

13


Healthy Hygiene Small changes in our personal hygiene practices can have significant effects on infection prevention. University Guidelines for Good Hygiene:  Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.  Alcohol-based disinfectant can be used if soap and water are not available.  Review CDC guidance on hand-washing.  Avoid touching your face.  Do not share headsets or other equipment that is near your face. In addition, constituents are advised not to share office equipment or supplies such as phones, keyboards, computer accessories, headsets, pens, paperclips or binder clips, reusable kitchen items (flatware, dishes, and cups), and cleaning items (sponges, brushes, and towels). Cleaning and Sanitation Evidence suggests that the virus that causes COVID-19 can remain viable on a variety of surfaces from several hours to multiple days, therefore cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces is recommended. In addition to routine and enhanced cleaning performed by custodial crews, individuals will be responsible for cleaning commonly used surfaces after use, particularly those that might be shared with others (e.g. classroom computer keyboards, audiovisual equipment, copiers, light switches, phones, etc.). Instructions for sanitizing technology equipment can be found here. University Guidelines for Cleaning and Sanitation:  Clean and disinfect highly touched surfaces frequently. Facilities will be cleaning offices and common areas, but you should use cleaning supplies provided to keep your workspace clean.  Clean and disinfect common areas after use. Ask your manager or refer to specific guidelines for your office, lab or workspace. Cleaning supplies are provided to each department for individual use when necessary.

Practicum and Internship Activities It is important that students maintain public health measures while engaged in field education. Students are not required to return to their practicum sites solely based on the l etup of sheltering orders. If practicum and internship experiences can accommodate work-from-home activities, we recommend students exercise this option. If the student and site agree that in-person work is necessary, students must meet with a field faculty member to discuss their plans. For students beginning a new practicum you will be asked to submit a COVID-19 safety plan as part of your Educational Learning Agreement (ELA). If you have questions please contact the Assistant Dean for Field Education, Jenni Harpring (jharpring@wustl.edu) before returning to a site in person to discuss their plans and determine the following:  Scope and nature of in-person learning activities and whether they are essential

14


The organization’s plan to minimize the spread of COVID-19, including; provision and proper use of PPE; physical distancing at the site; and other preventative measures.

In addition, we will discuss the student’s responsibility in preventing the spread of COVID-19, including:  Monitoring symptoms regularly using the screening checklist provided by the Brown School;  Remaining home if you have symptoms;  Reporting exposure at the site to the school;  Reporting exposure to the site; and  Limiting activities that increase exposure to COVID-19. Students must adhere to any organizational, local, state, or federal policies regarding travel restrictions. Students are expected to monitor shelter in place orders and be prepared to complete practicum activities remotely. The Brown School will communicate regularly with students and share critical updates regarding local public health conditions and university/school protocol. Students and practicum supervisors should prepare for a possible resurgence and develop contingency plans for field education.

Key Considerations Public health protocols are in place to protect our community – compliance is not optional but we understand that situations call for compassionate and flexible responses. Deans, directors, managers and supervisors will lead their units in the adaption of personal protective measures and new practices adopted during alternate operations. In addition to compliance with Human Resource policies, consideration will be given to individual circumstances, maintaining confidentiality, advancing equity, and reducing stigma. Additional considerations pertain to vulnerable populations, reasonable accommodations (ADA), attendance policies, and resources for supporting employee and student wellbeing. Managers and supervisors should refer to Human Resource’s Return to Campus Manager Guide. Unit leaders should also consult with Siomari Collazo-Colón, Associate Dean for Administration.

Communication & Compliance The Brown School dean’s office, communications department, and Academic Affairs team will be responsible for communicating relevant updates, new information, university guidelines, and changes to public health measures through a multitude of communication channels. New protocols have been integrated into student and employee orientation and training. Signage has been installed throughout the three buildings to communicate expectations and provide instructions. Unit and department leaders will be responsible for keeping their teams informed and helping them successfully adapt to the changes. The Preparedness Team and Fall Planning Committees will remain active to help assess the effectiveness of the plan and make adjustments as needed. To facilitate understanding and compliance, employees must complete the Return to Campus Training and make their pledge to commit to keeping our campus community safe. Students must also complete an online public health training and acknowledge the community pledge through a Canvas module. In the event that any individual fails to complete the training and pledge, they are not permitted onto campus and disciplinary action may be taken. 15


HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR LEARNING AND WORKING ON CAMPUS: ENVIRONMENTAL MEASURES According to occupational safety and health guidelines, the best way to control a hazard is to systematically remove it from the environment. In the case of COVID-19, environmental measures play a critical role in augmenting personal protective measures to minimize spread and infection.

Hierarchy of Controls Controls in the physical environment and safe work practices help to prevent the transmission of COVID19 among faculty, staff and students. The primary objectives of workplace controls are to:   

Minimize risk by reducing the duration, frequency, and intensity of exposure in the workplace Promote preventative safety practices that lower the risk of infection Protect high-risk populations

Hierarchy of controls is a concept used by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a framework for identifying controls for potentially harmful workplace conditions. These principles are useful for assessing the effectiveness of controls for COVID-19 and for understanding the range of impacts those measures can have on decreasing the likelihood of transmission. NIOSH hierarchy of controls, prioritizing the most effective measurements available: 

 

Elimination – physically remove the hazard; eliminate working conditions that threaten safety, health and well-being Substitution – replace a given hazard with something less hazardous Engineering controls – redesign the work environment; isolate people from a hazard Administrative controls – change the way people work, includes changes in policies or procedures to reduce or minimize hazard exposure such as limiting occupancy in the workplace Personal Protective Equipment – use of personal protective equipment (PPE) worn by individuals to reduce the effects of exposure to a hazard

16


Elimination & Substitution Controls These are the most effective controls and entail eliminating exposure to the hazard. Since there are currently no drugs licensed for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19, elimination strategies remove the opportunity for transmission (e.g. working from home, redistributing responsibilities to reduce contact between individuals, contactless delivery of services and goods; and isolation and quarantine protocols). Engineering Controls Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurs primarily through prolonged, close contact, thus physical distancing is a critical component in prevention. Workplace modifications (e.g., physical barriers, design modifications) should maximize physical distancing and limit interaction between staff, faculty, and students; provide clear communication and signage; and ensure adequate supplies to support personal hygiene, cleaning and disinfection practices. Physical Distancing | No more than one person should be in a shared workspace unless at least six feet of distancing can be consistently maintained and all people are wearing masks. Classes will take place in larger venues and have been configured to maintain as much distance as possible between students. Access to common areas will be restricted, furniture will be removed. Depending on width, some hallways will be converted to one way. If necessary, physical barriers, such as clear plastic sneeze guards or Plexiglas barriers, will be installed at highly visited areas. Signage | Instructional signs, visual cues, wayfinding and floor markings will be installed throughout Brown, Goldfarb and Hillman halls. Digital boards will display hygiene and sanitation protocols. Equipment and Supplies | Restrooms will be stocked with an adequate supply of soap, water, toilet tissue and paper towels; hand sanitizer dispensers will be located throughout the buildings, particularly in high traffic areas. Disposable face masks will be stocked and distributed discriminately. Cleaning and Sanitation | Custodial teams will follow university guidelines for enhanced cleaning protocols. Rooms that host more than one class per day will be equipped with cleaning supplies, such as disinfecting wipes. Ventilation | Consideration will be given to the role of ventilation in reducing the spread of the virus. When feasible, doors will remain open to increase airflow and to reduce touching door handles. Administrative Controls Administrative controls consist of changes in how work is performed, such as minimizing contact among workers by replacing face-to-face meetings with virtual communications and implementing telework when feasible. Administrative controls also refer to infrastructure supports that facilitate safe work practices (e.g. wearing a face covering, practicing healthy hygiene, and cleaning workspaces). The efficiency of environmental measures is contingent upon human behavior and involves providing safety and health resources to enhance individual knowledge. All employees and students coming to 17


campus will be oriented in the new public health protocols and environmental modifications. Constituents must demonstrate comprehension of and commitment to these new practices.

Environmental measures for a healthy and safe school Prior to ramping up on campus operations, the physical environment will be modified to facilitate optimal safety precautions and serve as a test for the gradual increase of population density. At any given time, the Brown School aims to maintain the lowest possible population density on its premises, so as to adhere to physical distancing standards and not to exceed density thresholds. Environmental Measures    

Reduced density Designated entrance and exits Limited elevator use Classrooms configured to maintain maximum distance between students

 

Workspaces arranged to maintain a minimum of six feet between employees No communal or congregational areas Event spaces converted to classrooms

Redesigning the physical environment to offer optimal protection and safety for our constituents is the cornerstone of these workplace controls and the practices they are designed to elicit. Therefore, the overall recommendation is to take conservative measures to eliminate the opportunity for transmission and adopt controls to deter behaviors that increase risk and to encourage behaviors that improve safety. Detailed procedures, environmental modifications, and scenarios are outlined in Appendix D.

18


Part III PREVENTING SPREAD AND PROMOTING RECOVERY: SUPPORTING BROWN SCHOOL STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF WHO CONTRACT COVID-19

In the event that a member of our community tests positive for COVID-19, we will exercise care and compassion in supporting recovery, and in fulfilling our responsibilities to protecting the health and safety of the Brown School community.

19


OVERVIEW While preventative measures will be in place to minimize the risk of infection for Brown School community members, the reality is that students, faculty or staff members may become ill due to COVID-19. Our constituent groups have different risk factors, as well as exposure to systemic and structural forces that are driving higher rates of infection and worse outcomes for those infected wit h COVID-19. Stigma and fear of repercussions are threats to successful preventative and recovery practices and community wellbeing. Effectively supporting our Brown School community members who become ill and clearly communicating these efforts are essential both to promote health and support recovery from infection. The primary objectives of this protocol are to:  Describe the type and level of supports the Brown School is prepared to provide to individuals  Describe the process for assessing and accessing supports  Outline the response to a probable or confirmed case of COVID-19 at the Brown School A confirmed case refers to individuals with a positive COVID-19 test result. Probable cases include individuals exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms who have not yet been tested, who have not yet received their test result, or who have an inconclusive test result. The CDC defines probable cases as meeting clinical criteria and epidemiologic evidence with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID-19; or meeting presumptive laboratory evidence and either clinical criteria or epidemiologic evidence. Any Danforth Campus employee, student, contractor or visitor who is currently diagnosed with COVID19, is experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19, or has had direct contact with a person with a confirmed or suspected COVID-19 diagnosis should not come onto campus. Students, faculty and staff are expected to adhere to daily screening protocols as outlined previously in the section on public health measures. If an employee or student fails the screening protocol, they must immediately contact the appropriate university office or center and follow their instructions:  

Employees contact Occupational Health at (314) 362-5056 Students contact Habif Health and Wellness Center at (314) 935-6666

Occupational Health and the Habif Health and Wellness Center will operate as centralized offices for case management and any additional steps related to testing, contact tracing and medical care will be facilitated through them. Appendix F includes further information if a student, faculty, or staff member does not pass the screening protocol. Appendix G is the Danforth Campus Protocol on Responding to COVID-19 Positive or Presumed Positive Employee, dated July 14, 2020. For more information on WashU reporting and response to COVID-positive cases or exposures, click here. If a member of our community tests positive, is presumed positive or has been exposed to someone with COVID-19, that individual must report this information to Habif Health and Wellness Center (students) or Occupational Health (employees). Their confidential health information should not be shared. The University has obligations under HIPAA, FERPA, ADA and other federal and state laws, and, depending upon the circumstances, such disclosures may constitute a violation of these laws and University policy. The University will have a process in place for sharing information about the general health of our community, including de-identified positive cases. 20


Connecting to Resources and Support In alignment with the values and culture of the Brown School, we will be prepared to offer additional support to students, faculty or staff members who have been diagnosed with COVOID-19. If said constituent would like to voluntarily share their situation with the appropriate Brown School contact, they will be referred to additional resources according to their needs. This service does not include dispensing any medical or health-related assessments or advice. Students The Brown School is committed to supporting the academic success and personal well-being of its students. Our approach to assisting confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases that occur amongst our student body will align with current models for addressing student health and academic performan ce. Students can voluntarily initiate support, or faculty or staff members can refer students to the Brown School Academic and Student Support Team. All reports of concern or requests for support will go through this team, which includes: Danielle Bristow, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs; Zachary Romo, Assistant Director for Student Engagement; and Miriam Joelson, Academic and Student Affairs Coordinator. Once contact has been initiated, a liaison from the team will confirm that the student has already notified the Habif Health and Wellness Center and is following all protocol according to university requirements, and then will assess whether the student needs support with the following:     

Accessing medical and mental healthcare Identifying resources for the provision of essential goods (groceries, medicine, etc.) Understanding safe health practices according to public health and university guidelines Informing faculty of their status (if requested) and negotiating accommodations in courses (e.g. extensions) Evaluating academic options such as withdrawing from a course, taking an incomplete, and requesting Medical Leave of Absence

Liaisons will provide ongoing communication and follow up until it is determined that the student is no longer in need of support. According to the WashU Together plan for Fall 2020, the university plans to offer:   

Isolation housing for students who test positive unless they are able to isolate in an off-campus location; Quarantine housing for students who have been directed to quarantine due to exposure, pending test results or other circumstances; and Help with meals and other essential services – including cleaning – to meet needs of students who are quarantined or isolated on- or off-campus.

Additionally, the Crisis Response Fund will res-stablished for undergraduates and graduate students who are facing financial difficulty.

21


Faculty & Staff If you learn that you or someone you know at the university has tested positive, is presumed positive or has been exposed to someone with COVID-19, there are protocols you must follow. Employees who meet any of the following conditions must contact Occupational Health at 314-362-3528 or occupationalhealthservice@wusm.wustl.edu, and follow their instructions:    

Is ill or reports symptoms of COVID-19 Fails the self-screening Thinks they have been exposed, but have not tested positive or been told by their health care provider that they are presumed positive Tests positive test from an outside entity are the supervisor of a person who has tested positive or has been told they are presumed positive for COVID-19

Once notified of a positive case, Occupational Health will:  

 

Communicate with the appropriate local health department and initiate any required contact tracing as directed by the health department. Notify individuals in the university community identified as a close contact of the individual and advise them of next steps, including any required preventive measures such as testing or quarantine. Contact the person’s supervisor or dean to advise on any necessary follow-up within the school or department. Advise and coordinate enhanced cleaning and disinfection of affected areas, if necessary.

Occupational Health will provide stay-at-home expectations and information on next steps, including monitoring of symptoms and isolation at home, cleaning and disinfection guidance, and the protocol to receive clearance to return to work. See Appendix G for the Danforth Campus Protocol on Responding to COVID-19 Positive or Presumed Positive Employee (dated July 14, 2020), and Appendix H for guidance on communicating with WashU community members diagnosed with COVID-19. Aside from initially notifying Occupational Health, supervisors should not share information about the health of any specific employee. Occupational Health will provide information to the supervisor if further communication with or instructions to other employees is necessary (e.g., sending employees home, restricting certain office space, etc.). Please respect the privacy of your fellow colleagues and peers; if you become aware of an individual who has tested positive, is presumed positive or has been exposed to COVID-19, do not share their confidential health information with others. Washington University provides support and resources for its employees and should a faculty or staff member be in need of additional assistance, they have the option of consulting with their supervisor and/or the school’s human resource administrator to discuss specific needs. General supports include:  

Guidance on navigating WashU Human Resources policies (e.g., sick leave, FMLA, vacation time, COVID-19 paid leave time) Information about WashU’s Health Care Benefit Resources for all employees, available through the WashU medical plan, including: 22


 

 

COVID-19 testing coverage; virtual medical visits and telehealth coverage; prescription drug home delivery  WashU’s United Health Care nurse advocate who can help connect the staff member to health services, including virtual doctor’s visits Resources available to help with family care needs, including Work-Life Solutions (EAP) Mental health and wellness supports available through Human Resources including:  Access to 24/7 mental/behavioral health support through UnitedHealthcare  Move into Mindfulness program  WashU’s Work-Life Solutions (EAP) program  “Coping with COVID-19 Hotline” through the School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry: 314-286-1700  Zoom peer support groups and sessions, including a “Quarantine Support Group”  WashU’s HR COVID-19 Employee Well-Being Support page Support networks that aid in the provision of essential goods (groceries, medicine, etc.) Connection with Information Technology on telecommuting supports (e.g. hardware, software) should the employee plan to work during isolation and quarantine

Instructional Supports Teaching considerations for faculty and staff instructors affected by COVID-19 may require supports and contingencies specific to course instruction. In addition to connecting to our school human resources contact, faculty and staff instructors should be referred to:  

The appropriate academic program Associate/Assistant Dean who will support teaching and course contingency planning related needs. Lorien Carter, Associate Professor of Practice, (lcarter@wustl.edu), lead for the faculty instructional coaching initiative, is available to support instructors with additional strategies and best practices

Faculty and instructors should develop plans and options for a potential course disruption. These contingency plans should be submitted with course syllabi to Sue Imhoff, in advance of the start of the semester. In the event that course disruption is likely to occur, instructors will coordinate with the Academic leadership team to select the most appropriate alternative. Determining which option to exercise will depend somewhat on whether an instructor is in quarantine due to close contact with a person with COVID-19, is exhibiting symptoms, and/or has tested positive for the virus. Options available include: • • • •

Move the course online (if it was originally being offered in-person) Reschedule or transition to asynchronous online (see options below for suggestions) Enlist support from another instructor as needed Follow grading contingency plans (e.g. grade submission deadline extension for non -graduating students, alternate grading supports, etc.)

23


Classroom time missed should be rescheduled if possible, using one of the following options: 

Add a new day/time to cover the missed content (recognizing that some students may not be able to attend, therefore, attendance at that new class date should not be tied to attendance or participation grades) Add up to 30 minutes to the beginning or end of your remaining course sessions until you’ve made up the time and content missed (also recognizing that some students may not be able to arrive early or stay late, therefore, attendance for those additional time periods should not be tied to attendance or participation grades)

Instructors may determine that it isn’t feasible to make up the class time, in these cases, an instructor can assign appropriate alternative work commensurate with content and time allotment for the cancelled class session(s). Options available for alternative course materials include:   

Webinars (especially those that are free to students) focused on similar topics TED Talks with experts in the discipline sharing information on similar topics Supplemental concentration and specialization specific ideas and resources may be collected and will be made available in the Brown Faculty Teaching Resource Canvas site when possible.

Similarly, if there is disruption to time limited skill labs and short courses (typically 1-credit/15 contact hours), the alternatives include identifying a replacement instructor or rescheduling the class.

Steps for Brown School Departments & Centers Continued outbreaks of COVID-19 may result in prolonged staff absenteeism. Employees who become sick with COVID-19 or need to care for a sick family member may be unable to perform their job duties for weeks or even months. Each Brown School department and center should consider alternative staffing plans to ensure we can continue to support our mission. Each department head or research center director should develop a plan to continue essential functions in case of employee absenteeism. This should include plans to: o o o o o

Outline all critical and essential functions of the department or center. Designate a back-up point person for key responsibilities or personnel. Designate an alternative supervisor for employees managing other staff or students. Cross-train staff to perform essential functions. Outline how you will support staff with child care needs as they arise (e.g., schools/daycare center remain closed).

Additional scenarios to consider: 

A faculty or staff member has recently relocated to the St. Louis region and does not have proximate access to family or community support networks.

24


Steps for Brown School Administration If a case of COVID-19 is confirmed on campus premises, the School will need to follow university, local, state, and federal guidelines. The following steps are adapted from the CDC Interim Guidelines for Administrators of US Institutions of Higher Education and are provided as an initial starting point.  Coordinate with university and local health officials to determine mitigation measures (e.g. whether the cancellation of classes and closure of buildings and facilities is warranted and the duration of the closure).  Communicate with students, staff and faculty as necessary in collaboration with university and local health officials about the possible COVID-19 exposure and any dismissal decisions.  Clean and disinfect thoroughly areas used by the infected individual.  Implement contingency plan to continue education during building closures.

Case Investigation and Contact Tracing According to the CDC, case investigation and contact tracing are trusted public health tools and an essential strategy to prevent further spread of COVID-19. Case investigation is part of the process of supporting people with probable or confirmed infection and involves working with them to identify those who they have been in contact with during the infection period. During contact tracing, qualified tracers track down contacts so that they can be informed and take action to prevent further spread, such as isolation and quarantine. In coordination with the St. Louis City and County Departments of Health, Washington University Occupational Health and the Habif Health and Wellness Center will help conduct contact tracing and notification within the university community for COVID-positive individuals and their close contacts if affiliated with the university. Individuals who are confirmed or presumed positive will be expected to participate in the contact tracing process. Learn more about contact tracing here.

Monitoring and Containment In an effort to control the spread of COVID-19 within the campus community, the university is implementing monitoring and containment protocols. In addition to daily screening and contact tracing, the university is developing free testing for students, faculty and staff who fail self-screenings or present symptoms, as well as individuals designated by Habif Health and Wellness Center or Occupational Health for purposes of contact tracing. If a WashU constituent seeks testing at a non-University site, they must report all results (whether positive or negative) to the university. The university also plans to establish isolation and quarantine housing for students. In the event that an outbreak occurs in the Brown School, senior leaders will coordinate with university officials, Occupational Health, and the Habif Health and Wellness Center to monitor the situation, assess the risk of spread, and manage mitigation measures (such as: short-term cancellation of classes; closing off areas used by an infected person; or moving classes to remote instruction). These decisions will be determined with consideration to local public health procedures and public and population health metrics, including number of new cases on campus or in the community. Deliberation and decisionmaking will reflect the highest regard for confidentiality and public safety. Every step we take will be informed by public health guidance with the safety and well-being of our community as our top priority. 25


APPENDICES

26


Appendix A: ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS DISEASE

General Information  Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause respiratory illness.  Coronaviruses are common in people and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats and bats.  Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus type 2 (COVID-19) is a new species of virus that had previously not been found in humans and is the cause of COVID-19.  As a result, before its emergence in late 2019, humans had not developed immunity against COVID-19, leaving the entire global population susceptible to infection.  Its health impact is currently being closely monitored internationally, nationally and locally by the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and local 

health departments. Person-to-person spread is the primary source of transmission.

Transmission Routes of COVID-19 

Transmission occurs primarily between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

Transmission of COVID-19 is possible from individuals who have no symptoms and are not showing any signs of illness.

 

Surfaces and objects may be contaminated with COVID-19. Shared equipment such as keyboards, phones, pipettors and writing utensils are examples of surfaces and objects that could be contaminated.

Symptoms include:        

Fever Coughing Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Chills Muscle pain Headache Sore throat New loss of taste or smell

 It may also be possible to contract COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic. In late March, the United States became the epicenter for the virus, surpassing a million cases in late April. According to the World Health Organization, most people who become infected experience mild illness and recover, but there is a risk of severe illness, especially in older people and those with underlying conditions such as heart disease, lung disease or diabetes. At present, there are no therapeutics or vaccines proven to treat or prevent COVID‑19. In the absence of a vaccine, prevention is the most effective course of action to combat COVID-19.

27


Appendix B: Key Terms & Key Concepts

ASYMPTOMATIC: Showing no symptoms of disease. Asymptomatic transmission refers to transmission of the virus from a person who does not develop symptoms.

MITIGATION: Actions that persons and communities can take to help slow the transmission of the virus in communities. PANDEMIC: An epidemic that has spread over several countries/continents, usually affecting a large number of people. (Source: CDC)

COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION/SPREAD: Infections identified in a given geographic area without a history of travel elsewhere and no connection to a known case.

PHYSICAL DISTANCING: the practice of maintaining a greater than usual physical space between oneself and other people or of avoiding direct contact with people or objects in public places during the outbreak of a contagious disease in order to minimize exposure and reduce the transmission of infection

CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19): The name of the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). CLOSE CONTACT: For COVID-19, close contact is defined as anyone who has been within 6 feet of a person infected with the virus for a prolonged period of time, or has had direct contact with the infected person’s secretions. (Source: CDC)

PPE: Personal protective equipment including masks, face shields, gloves, gowns and other coverings used to prevent the spread of infection. PROBABLE CASE: a case that is classified as probable for reporting purposes Suspect case plus supportive lab Suspect case plus epi link like contact with confirmed case.

CONFIRMED CASE: Someone tested and confirmed to have COVID-19. CONGREGATE SETTINGS: Public places that can get crowded and where contact with infected people can happen. This includes places like malls, theaters, and grocery stores.

QUARANTINE: Separating and restricting the movement of people exposed (or potentially exposed) to a contagious disease.

CONTACT TRACING: The process of identifying, assessing, and managing people who have been exposed to a contagious disease to prevent onward transmission.

SCREENING: A basic series of questions posed by medical personnel to determine if someone should be tested for a particular disease or condition. In the case of coronavirus, screening may include taking your temperature, and questions about possible exposure to someone with confirmed or suspected COVID-19.

DROPLET TRANSMISSION/SPREAD: A mode of transmission for a contagious disease that involves relatively large, short-range (less than 6 feet) respiratory droplets produced by sneezing, coughing, or talking.

SELF-QUARANTINE: Staying home and away from other people as much as possible after exposure.

EPIDEMIC: An increase, often sudden, in the number of cases of a disease above what is normally expected in that population in that area.

SUSPECTED CASE: Clinical signs and symptoms but no laboratory evidence.

FLATTENING THE CURVE: An attempt to slow the spread of coronavirus and prevent a dramatic increase in the number of infected individuals. By practicing physical distancing, avoiding unnecessary travel, and taking basic precautions, healthy individuals can help slow the spread of the disease — or “flatten the curve.”

VIRAL SHEDDING: The period of time after the virus has replicated in the host and is being emitted.

28


Appendix C: Appropriate Use of Face Coverings CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings. Cloth face coverings may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Washington University expectations and guidelines regarding face coverings:    

Wear a mask that fully covers your mouth and nose at all times while on campus, unless you are alone in an individual closed office space or are outside and can maintain six feet of physical distance from others. If you do not have a mask, see the CDC’s guidance on creating one with or without sewing. Wash your hands before placing and removing your mask. Store your mask in a clean area when not in use.

Instructions for appropriate use of a face covering  Putting on the face mask/covering

   

Taking off the face mask/covering

Care, storage and laundering of cloth face covering

  

  

 Disposal of face masks 

Wash hands or use hand sanitizer prior to handling IPH mask & sanitizer video Ensure it fits over the nose and under the chin The nose wire (in disposable masks) should be snug against the nose Either tie the straps behind the head and neck or loop straps around the ears Avoid touching the front of the face mask/covering Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth when removing it When taking it off, loop your finger into the strap and pull the strap away from the ear or untie the straps. Wash hands or use hand sanitizer immediately after removing mask/covering Keep face covering/mask stored when not in use Cloth face coverings may not be used more than one day at a time and must be washed after use To disinfect, launder cloth face coverings with regular clothing detergent before first use and after each shift. Only use disposable face masks for one day and then throw away in the trash receptacle Do not use a mask if it is visibly damaged and throw it away

29


Appendix D: Guidance for specific workplace scenarios and procedures during campus visits Pre-arrival & Arrival | Before arriving on campus, employees and students must be cleared to return to the premises, adhere to self-screening protocol, and follow necessary registration processes in advance. All are expected to follow procedures for parking and entering buildings through designated entrances. Pre-arrival procedures Registration

Staff should register in advance by signing up for a 2-hour window to access the premises and confirm that adequate workspace is available for maintaining physical distancing.

Screening

Self-screen before coming to campus. Note: All persons coming to campus will be required to conduct a self-screening prior to each campus visit. All personnel and graduate students coming to campus are required to visit screening.wustl.edu and complete the self-screening survey before arriving on campus.

PPE

Be prepared to wear a mask that fully covers your mouth and nose at all times while on campus, unless you are alone in an individual closed office space or are outside and can maintain six feet of physical distance from others.

Arrival Access Physical distancing Hygiene / PPE

Use your id to enter the building (all campus buildings will be accessible only by card swipe with a University ID; compliance with building capacity will be tracked through campus card access and other technology). Enter through designated entrance(s) only (one-way entrances and exits will be designated in many locations to avoid congestion). Clean hands upon arrival either with sanitizer or by washing hands in a nearby restroom; confirm use of face mask or covering.

Signage

Follow signs posted on exterior doors with information about entrance protocols, pre-screening measures, restrictions and hygiene guidelines. Digital signs will include updates, healthy practices, and physical distancing and cleaning mandates.

Welcome station (as needed)

Host a welcome table to verify completion of pre-screening, check for face coverings, and remind employees and students to sanitize their hands.

30


Movement (in, through and between buildings) | Employee and student movement through the buildings should comply with physical distancing practices. Constituents should access only the spaces they have been cleared to use to conduct essential functions and should not congregate in communal areas. All are expected to wear a face covering when occupying spaces outside of their office.

Movement Hallways

Follow signs for one-way hallways (some hallways may be converted to one-way to adhere to physical distancing requirements)

Elevators

Limited access and use / take the stairs (limited to constituents who need to use the elevator). Maximum occupancy is one to three persons per elevator (depending on elevator size and user relationship; occupancy limits will be posted near/in elevators). If using the elevator, follow protocol:  Avoid touching buttons (use elbow or tissue and discard after use).  Wash or sanitize hands after leaving the elevator.  Follow signs for maximum capacity, safe zones, and hygiene.  Wear masks and face coverings.

Stairs

Post signage to encourage the use of stairs. Use physical markings to split stairways for up and down movement. Use signage and physical barricades to make one-way.

Doors

Where and when possible, open doors to suites and between office areas to reduce touching door handles and to improve airflow and ventilation. Incorporate use of touchless door handle devices where necessary.

During your visit | While employees and students are in the buildings, they will follow a set of protocols to protect their health and minimize the risk of exposure and spread. Single Occupancy Offices Access Occupancy Cleaning and Sanitation

Keep office doors closed when occupied; to improve ventilation, door may remain open if desk/workstation is at least 6 feet from entrance. Limit to one person at a time. Follow cleaning instructions established by your unit, department, center or course instructor, which may include cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched or shared surfaces.

31


Shared/open office spaces

Access

Arrange workstations to be 6 feet apart where possible. Identify additional facilities to host workstations that maintain physical distancing requirements (e.g. Hillman Hall garden rooms, serenity rooms, meetings rooms).

Occupancy

Limit occupancy to one person when possible, or the number of employees that can maintain 6 feet distance from one another (this may require staggered schedules). Try to have at least one workstation separating workers and reconfigure workstations so employees do not face each other.

Signage

Follow posted signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates.

Cleaning and Sanitation

Follow cleaning instructions established by your unit, department, center or course instructor, which may include cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched or shared surfaces.

Workforce adaptations

Stagger work schedules to reduce density and length of time employees are in proximity to one another.

Classrooms – Alternative office space Access

Occupancy

Signage Cleaning and Sanitation Workforce adaptions

Designate limited number of classrooms to be used as alternative office space if needed. Limit occupancy to one when possible, or the number of employees that can maintain 6 feet distance from one another (this may require staggered schedules).

Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates. Follow cleaning instructions established by your unit, department, center or course instructor, which may include cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched or shared surfaces. Schedule use; faculty and staff must register in advance for available shifts.

32


Classrooms – Remote instruction Access Occupancy

Signage Cleaning and Sanitation Workforce adaptions

Designate limited number of classrooms for this function. Depending on classroom size, limited to three people at a time for the minimal amount of time necessary to perform essential tasks (not to exceed 90 minutes) Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates. Follow cleaning instructions established by your unit, department, center or course instructor, which may include cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched or shared surfaces. Schedule use; faculty and staff must register in advance for available shifts.

Classrooms – In-person instruction Access

Occupancy

Signage

When possible, doors will remain open while students enter and exit to reduce use of door handles. Only occupy designated seats. Rooms will be arranged to maintain maximum distance between students; floors decals may designate a specific zone limited to instructors. Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates.

Cleaning and Sanitation

Clean surfaces touched during class, including tables, chairs, equipment, doors handles, and light switches (disinfecting wipes will be stocked in classrooms that will be used for more than one course in a day).

PPE

Wear a mask that fully covers your mouth and nose at all times while on campus, unless they are alone in an individual closed office space or are outside and can maintain six feet of physical distance from others. Individuals whose health is compromised by wearing a face covering may be exempt from this policy. Consideration will be given to alternative masks, such as clear masks, for instructors, or other clear barriers. Library

Access

Restricted access; Library Services will offer alternative operations. The Reading Room and stacks will remain closed and repurposed by library staff as a quarantine area for returned materials.

33


Restrooms Access Occupancy

Will remain open and will be converted to gender-neutral restrooms. Limited to one person at a time.

Hygiene / PPE

Wash hands upon entering and after using the restroom. Use paper towels to open the door without touching the handle when exiting (unless doors remain open or foot pedals are available). Wear masks or face coverings inside restrooms.

Signage

Follow posted instructions to indicate occupied/unoccupied. Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates.

Supplies

Use provided tissue, paper towels, soap and cleaning products, which will be restocked regularly.

Cleaning and Sanitation

Schedule frequent and routine cleaning by custodial team (facilities manager).

Copy / Supply Rooms

Access

Use designated supply rooms and copiers as assigned (based on the physical location of your workstation). Supply room doors should remain open to reduce contact with door handle and to maintain ventilation. Some printers may be decommissioned. Note: Avoid printing when possible and limit the number of pages as much as possible. Think critically about paper usage.

Occupancy

Signage Cleaning and Sanitation

Limit occupancy of supply rooms to one person at a time; floors may be marked to denote 6 foot spacing from printer/office equipment in the event that more than one employee is waiting to access the resource. However, congregating is discouraged and should be minimized. Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates. Clean and disinfect surfaces touched such as copier lid, office supplies and cabinet handles.

34


Common spaces – Goldfarb Commons Access

Occupancy

Signage

Restricted access, must comply with physical distancing standards. Limited to comply with distancing standards (the printer and some furniture will be removed; remaining furniture will be reconfigured according to physical distancing standards). Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates.

Common spaces – Nussbaum Plaza Physical distancing

Ensure that outdoor furniture is arranged to comply with physical distancing standards.

Common spaces – 2nd Floor Garden Rooms in Hillman Hall Access

Restricted; rooms will remain closed and locked. Alternatively, these rooms could be reassigned as office space if needed.

Kitchens (Hillman Hall, Goldfarb Commons; and Brown Hall)

Access

Restricted; microwaves, coffee pots, dishes and kitchenware items will be removed. Refrigerator access is restricted (employees will be discouraged from keeping food items in the refrigerator unless necessary; some refrigerators may be decommissioned). Note: Meals should be taken alone or outside with a distance of at least six feet from others.

Occupancy Signage

Limit to one person at a time. Follow signs for cleaning, hygiene, and physical distancing mandates.

Grounds for Change Access

Limited service; if GFC opens for the Fall semester, it might offer grab and go options only.

35


Serenity Room Access

Restricted; room will remain closed and locked.

Nursing/Lactation Room Access

Restricted; room will remain closed and locked. Requests by employees or students will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Showers / Employee & Student Lockers

Access

Restricted; closed until further notice. Water fountains

Access

Restricted; water refill stations will remain in use and include signage regarding hygiene practices. Vending machines

Access

Restricted; remove supplies and unplug machines.

Departure Constituents will be expected to adhere to the following protocol as they conclude their visit and prepare for departure. Exiting offices, common spaces, and buildings Cleaning and Sanitation Physical distancing

Communication

Follow cleaning instructions established by your unit, department, center or course instructor, which may include cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched or shared surfaces. Discard trash in bins located near exits (do not leave food trash in your office). Depart buildings through designated doors marked for exiting. Make note of the following before departing: time spent in building, spaces occupied (including restrooms), and interactions with other people (other than passing someone in the hallway). This information is important to assist with contact tracing should it become necessary.

36


Appendix E: Core Services

Business Office / Financial Services Services offered through the Business Office continue uninterrupted with the use of new electronic documents and a general office email address. Contact email: Brown-Finance@email.wustl.edu Dining Services Grounds for Change may operate with limited service, offering grab and go options only. Information Technology / Media Services Information Technology will continue to offer support and services remotely. Requests for service or reports of problems and other incidents should all continue to be routed centrally through the IT Helpdesk (314-933-3333). WashU IT has created a pickup/drop-off process at their central office location at 4480 Clayton Avenue. New hardware and accessories, loaner laptops, and repaired equipment is able to be picked up curbside or shipped to your location. Media Services will offer support for on-site instruction and remote activities, such as Zoom webinars. Constituents should continue using ServiceNow to request services. Library Services The library has transformed its services to make resources available online. In lieu of drop -in, in-person services, the library will offer users the following:   

Request books via email and schedule a time to pick them up. Schedule a time with librarians for assistance locating articles. Ask questions via email and schedule a virtual session with librarians for reference support.

Additionally, librarians are available to provide pre-recorded and/or live sessions for virtual and inperson classes. Course reserve service is available for course -required materials that are available electronically. The Reading Room and book stacks will be closed to public access. Contact email: brownlibrary@wustl.edu

Service Center The Service Center may operate in a limited capacity during the fall semester. Mail operations will continue through the Center; mail will be received and distributed throughout the week, but not daily.

37


Appendix F: Failed Screening Protocol All students, faculty and staff must complete a daily self-screening to monitor for symptoms of COVID19 before coming to campus: screening.wustl.edu. Anyone showing symptoms or otherwise failing the daily screen will be required to stay home and contact University health services (Habif Health and Wellness Center for students and Occupational Health for employees) for further instructions.

Guidelines for students who do not pass the screening protocol: 1. If you are ill, display symptoms of COVID-19, or fail the screening protocol, you must contact the Habif Health and Wellness Center at 314-935-6666 or habifnursing@wustl.edu 2. If you test positive or are presumed positive, you have the option of contacting the Brown School Student Support Team for additional assistance (this step is completely voluntary and not required). The team includes: Danielle Bristow, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs; Zachary Romo, Assistant Director for Student Engagement; and Miriam Joelson, Academic and Student Affairs Coordinator. Students who voluntarily reach out to the Student Support Team will be contacted within 24-48 hours to determine the following: Access to medical care

Access to mental health care

Support network/ essential needs

Connect student to Habif for direct service or referral to off-campus provider within students’ insurance network

Connect student to Habif staff, case manager, and/or self-search tools (wustl.rints.com) based on student preference

Identify support network/methods for obtaining essential needs Provide information on additional resources for support and recovery (e.g. food/grocery delivery volunteers) Assess student’s support network; identify contacts who can offer recovery support and assistance

Academic arrangements and accommodations Work with student to identify which classes/assignments are affected, then contact faculty for extensions/alternative arrangements for coursework Help student navigate options for withdrawals, incompletes, or leave of absence

The Support Team liaison will confirm that the student understands public health guidelines for maintaining personal health and safety for themselves and for others, and that they are not permitted to return to campus until they have received clearance from the Habif Health & Wellness Center.

The Academic and Student Support Team will remain in communication with the student throughout their quarantine/isolation period and help to coordinate services as needed.

38


Guidelines for faculty or staff who do not pass the screening protocol: 1. Do not come to campus; remain at home and physically isolate from others. 2. Contact Occupational Health at 314-362-3528 or occupationalhealthservice@wusm.wustl.edu

If the employee has not already done so, Danforth supervisors should have the employee contact Occupational Health immediately after receiving the following notifications from an employee: a) Failed self-screen b) Positive or presumed-positive COVID-19 diagnosis If you are ill or think you have been exposed, but have not tested positive or been told by your health care provider that you are presumed positive, please contact the Occupational Health COVID Hotline immediately at 314-362-5056 and follow their instructions. If you have a positive test from an outside entity or if you are the supervisor of a person who has tested positive or has been told they are presumed positive for COVID-19, contact Occupational Health at 314-362-3528 or email occupationalhealthservice@wusm.wustl.edu If you are at work and develop COVID-19 symptoms:  Contact the Occupational Health COVID Hotline immediately at 314-362-5056  Close your office door and do not allow anyone into the office space  Go home immediately  Wear a mask when leaving campus If you are a faculty member, please also contact your program associate dean to discuss any modifications that will need to occur regarding course instruction. Once made aware of a confirmed or presumed positive employee, Occupational Health will notify the employee’s immediate supervisor of employee if the information did not come from the supervisor initially. IMPORTANT: If you become aware of an individual who has tested positive, is presumed positive or has been exposed to COVID-19, please respect the privacy of your fellow colleagues and peers and do not share another person’s confidential health information with others. As a reminder, the university has obligations under HIPAA, FERPA, ADA and other federal and state laws, and depending upon the circumstances such disclosures may constitute a violation of these laws and university policy.

The employee may voluntary consult with their supervisor to plan for possible absences. Employees also have the option of contacting the School or University Human Resources administrator to discuss additional supports. 39


Appendix G: Protocol on Responding to COVID-19 Positive or Presumed Positive Employee The Danforth Campus Protocol on Responding to COVID-19 Positive or Presumed Positive Employee(s) Updated July 14, 2020

Purpose To establish a protocol for a situation in which the university is notified that one of its employees on the Danforth, North, West and Tyson Campuses (collectively “Danforth Campus”) has tested positive or is presumed positive for COVID-19. This protocol is intended to help ensure an effective response by Washington University to (i) support the employee and members of our community and (ii) minimize the spread of COVID-19 on campus and in our community.

Assumptions ● ● ●

● ●

There are resources in place to support Occupational Health Services who are responsible for notification and response outlined in this protocol. Communications in general for response will be relayed as soon as reasonably possible. The Occupational Health Services will notify or confirm that the St. Louis City or County Health Departments have been notified by the lab responsible for testing, and the university will follow their guidance and directives in responding, including any directives to close certain buildings or to contact certain employees or other individuals who may have been in close contact with the employee who has been reported ill. The employee has been diagnosed by a medical professional as positive or is otherwise presumed positive for COVID-19 and that employee or someone on their behalf has then notified a university manager or an Occupational Health Services professional. Certain actions outlined in this protocol may also be appropriate in responding to an employee who failed their daily self-screen. The Danforth Campus is open in some capacity and accessible to faculty, staff and graduate students returning from alternate operations and working from home. If the campus returns to strict alternate operations where only essential employees are on campus, some of these action items may be unnecessary. This protocol may change when the Danforth Campus is more fully operational.

Immediate Actions 1. If the employee has not already done so, Danforth supervisors should have the employee contact Occupational Health immediately after receiving the following notifications from an employee: a. Failed self-screen


2.

3. 4.

5.

6.

b. Positive or presumed-positive COVID-19 diagnosis Once made aware of a confirmed or presumed positive employee, Occupational Health will notify the following: a. Immediate supervisor of employee if the information did not come from the supervisor b. Executive Director of Habif Health and Wellness Center if a student is involved in any way c. Director of Facilities Planning & Management to initiate any cleaning and disinfection protocols. d. If appropriate, the Office of Insurance and Risk Management to initiate the worker’s compensation process Occupational Health will contact or confirm contact with the appropriate health department, initiate any required contact tracing and determine next steps. The supervisor should send the employee home immediately if the employee is at work. If the employee is unable to go home immediately, isolate them in an office location that does not expose other employees or community members. a. Provide the employee an isolation mask to use when leaving campus. b. The employee should avoid using public transportation to return home. The person picking the employee up from campus should also be advised to wear a mask. c. Close the office door and do not allow anyone into the office until it is cleaned and disinfected pursuant to Facilities Planning & Management Policies. d. If advised by Occupational Health, work with Facilities to determine other office or campus spaces that need to be cleaned and disinfected. Aside from initially notifying Occupational Health, the supervisor should not share information about the health of any specific employee. Notification including follow-up on contact tracing will come directly from the health department or Occupational Health. Occupational Health will also provide information to the supervisor if further communication with or instructions to other employees is necessary (e.g., sending employees home, restricting certain office space, etc.). Communications from the supervisor to other employees regarding a potential unnamed COVID-positive employee should follow the Communications Protocol. Occupational Health will provide stay at home expectations and information on next steps, including monitoring of symptoms and isolation at home, cleaning and disinfection guidance, and the protocol to receive clearance to return to work.

Return to Work Criteria and Clearance Before returning to work on campus, the employee will be instructed to contact and receive clearance to return from Occupational Health, 314-362-3528. Occupational Health will notify the supervisor if an employee has been cleared to return to campus. Employees will be required to meet the CDC criteria below or the local health department criteria, whichever is more restrictive, before being cleared to return. If the employee is the subject of a local Department of Health order, Occ Health must receive a


written release from the local Department of Health releasing the university from the order and clearing the employee to return. 1. At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared ; AND, 2. At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery; defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications AND 3.

Improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath)

4. ** If employees without symptoms were tested and found to have laboratory-confirmed COVID19, they may discontinue home isolation and return to work when at least 10 days have passed since the date of their first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test if they have experienced no subsequent illness or symptoms within those 10 days.

Occupational Health Contact Tracing and Notification of Co-workers or other WashU persons in Close Contact with Employee 1. Occupational Health, in coordination with local health department, will gather the following information, a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

What are the employee’s symptoms? When did the employee begin experiencing symptoms? Where has the employee been on campus? With whom has the employee been in close contact? Has the COVID-19 diagnosis been positively confirmed? Has the employee sought medical treatment or consulted with their physician? What phone numbers or other contact information (i.e., physical addresses) may be needed?

2. Occupational Health, in coordination with the local health department, will confirm which entity (local health department or WashU) will conduct contact tracing and, if necessary, Occupational Health will notify those individuals they have identified as having close contact with the employee while the employee was on campus. 3. All communications should include referral to medical and mental health resources available to employees.

Cleaning and Disinfecting of Area Occupational Health will determine locations that will need cleaning and disinfection, and notify Facilities at (314) 935-5544 to have those locations cleaned and disinfected.


Communications with Washington University Community The Office of Public Affairs in coordination with Medical Public Affairs and Office of General Counsel will determine if any messaging is needed and what information should be communicated to members of the University community and, if appropriate, to the news media. In any messaging to other members of the community, it is critical to maintain confidentiality of the student or staff member as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, as applicable. These messages must follow communications protocol and be coordinated with and approved by Public Affairs and General Counsel prior to being sent.

Contractors Contract service providers (e.g., Bon Appetit, Flik, WFF, Focal Pointe, etc.) are expected to notify their university liaison or point of contact if one of their employees fails the Danforth Campus daily selfscreen, tests positive or is presumed positive for COVID. All contract workers are expected to stay home and are not permitted to be present on campus until receiving clearance to return from Occupational Health.

Follow Up Actions After the immediate actions taken above, Occupational Health will identify others to assist in appropriate follow-up. It is important that leadership be kept informed of the status of all actions being taken.

APPENDIX: SEE ATTACHED.


APPENDIX A. COVID-19 Positive Employee Protocol Checklist Occupational Health/Habif Health and Wellness Checklist Task Contact employee’s immediate supervisor. Contact the Executive Director of Habif Health and Wellness Center if a student is involved in any way. Call the local Health Department, if not already done. Conduct contact tracing in coordination with public health department. Send employee home immediately if the employee is at work. Instruct employee to close office door and not allow anyone into the office space until it is cleaned. Provide isolation mask to use when leaving campus if the supervisor does not already have one available. Gather information from employee to determine last date on campus, symptoms, date of onset of symptoms, offices and buildings in which employee visited while experiencing symptoms or 48 hours prior to experiencing symptoms, and provide resources. Contact Card Access at 935-7703 or cardaccess@wustl.edu and Facilities to gather and relay office and building information for purposes of initiating cleaning and disinfection and assisting the employee in identifying their possible contacts. Provide employee with stay at home expectations and information on next steps, including monitoring symptoms and isolation at home, cleaning and disinfection guidance, and return to work protocols (see COVID-19 Positive Employee Notification and Instructions) Determine whether office spaces or buildings should be temporarily closed and locked down for safety reasons, in consultation with the Dean/Unit Director, Facilities, and the local Health Department. Notify Insurance and Risk Management in the event Worker’s Compensation protocols should be initiated.

Facilities Checklist Task


Determine whether office spaces or buildings should be temporarily closed and locked down for safety reasons, in consultation with the Dean/Unit Director, Occupational Health, and the local Health Department. Determine areas in need of cleaning and disinfection, in consultation with Occupational Health, and initiate cleaning and disinfection protocol If Occ Health determines disinfection is necessary, determine if an outside cleaning contractor or WFF is needed for cleaning and disinfecting Notify Dean/Unit Director when cleaning and disinfection is complete and re-entry is allowed. Have local HVAC units cleaned and returned to service.

Provost/School Dean/Unit Director Checklist Task Send employee immediately home if experiencing symptoms. If employee is unable to go home for any reason other than a medical emergency, isolate them in an enclosed office until they are able to obtain transportation home. Contact Occupational Health immediately. If employee is on campus and in office, provide isolation mask to employee. Tell employee to wear isolation mask while on campus. Refer employee by phone and email to Occupational Health line. Determine whether other office space needs to be secured and cleaned in consultation with Occupational Health and Facilities. In consultation with Occupational Health and Facilities, determine whether to send other employees home if they may have come into close contact (less than 6ft) with positive employee. If you are considering emailing a message of care and concern to alleviate anxieties, outline cleaning and disinfection protocol and office restrictions, and reiterate hygiene and social distancing expectations, you must follow communications protocol and coordinate with Public Affairs and General Counsel prior to sending communication.

Card Services Checklist


Task Run card access report to determine which buildings employee may have entered Email report to Occupational Health


Appendix H: Communicating with WashU Community members diagnosed with COVID-19 Communicating with WashU community members diagnosed with COVID-19 (confirmed or presumed) or who have failed the daily self-screen

General messaging points

I’m sorry to hear about your diagnosis (or symptoms or failed self-screen, whatever their situation is). Thank you for letting me know.

We are concerned for your health and well-being.

The most important thing right now is for you to take care of yourself.

Have you already spoken to the University’s Occupational Health office (employee) or Habif Health and Wellness Center (student)? Occupational Health (314-362-3528) or Habif (314-935-6695) is overseeing the university’s COVID response protocols when one of our community members fails their screen or is positive for COVID. They will need to speak with you ​as soon as possible​ so that they can:

talk to you about your symptoms or screening

determine what contacts you have had here at the university; and

determine whether we need to initiate any cleaning and disinfection protocols or quarantine protocols.

[If the person is ON CAMPUS when they disclose this information to you as their manager] Because of this diagnosis (or began experiencing symptoms or failed the screening), you will need to go home immediately. Do you have transportation to get home? If not, can someone come pick you up? ○

Send them outside or give them an isolated office to stay in that doesn’t expose them to others while waiting for transportation.

Provide the person with an isolation mask to use when leaving campus.

The person should avoid using public transportation to return home. Occupational Health or Habif Health and Wellness Center may be able to assist managers with a non-emergency medical transport back to the person’s home. If that is not available, managers should assist in calling for a ride.

Close the employee’s office door and do not allow anyone into the office until it is cleaned and disinfected by Facilities.


[If the person lives OFF CAMPUS] Before coming onto campus, you’ll need to receive clearance from Occupational Health (employee) or Habif (student) to return.

[If the person is a student living on campus] Before leaving your residence hall room, you will need to receive clearance from Habif.

If there’s anything we can do to offer support, please know we’re here for you.

Because you aren’t able to come to campus right now, we should talk about what you have been working on and how we can help you after you are home and have spoken with Occupational Health.

We will be thinking of you and sending all our best wishes for a full and speedy recovery.

Please reach out if we can be of any assistance to you while you are recovering at home.

This is probably an unsettling and stressful situation for you. Here are some resources that are available if you need support:

Faculty and staff may contact the university’s employee assistance program, Work-Life Solutions​, 844-365-4587 (available 24 hours/day)

Students on the Danforth Campus may contact ​Habif Health and Wellness Center ​at 314-935-6695 for assistance.

Students also may utilize ​TAO, Therapy Assisted Online​ for additional support related to anxiety, depression and other common concerns.

IF ASKED: Now that there is community-wide transmission in the St. Louis region and we have multiple cases here at the university, we do not plan on notifying entire departments or our larger community each time we are made aware of a case. If we are contacted by the Health Department as part of any contact tracing due to close contact you may have had with another member of the university community, there may be obligations we have to follow from the Health Department. If you have further questions about that, I would suggest that you call Occupational Health (314-362-3528) or Habif (314-935-6695). (For students) In addition, if you are seeking academic or other accommodations, we may have to notify your professors or other individuals who need to know in order to help implement those accommodations.

Profile for Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis

Brown School Public Health Protocol Plan  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded