Wenonah Yearbook - 1934

Page 1



• ...i


\

L


The • WENONAH

1934


Copyright

1934 HELEN HAMMOND Managing Editor

MARIE BURMEISTER Editor in Chief

STAN LEY ARBINGAST Business Manager

•


'· I ~, I

The WENONAH •

Published by the

GRADUATING CLASSES WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE WINONA/ MINNESOTA


II

ARTHUR, T.~ FRENCH


Dedication He deduces formulae, but no fonnula can be deduced to show the warm charm of his personality. He demonstrates the constancy of mat hem a tical truths, but· the constancy

of his convictions demonstrates his integrity. He diagrams rhomboids and the like, but no diagram can show to what extent he wins that non-mathematical figure, the heart.

ARTHUR T. FRENCH · •


Foreword

THE college stu~~nt whos~ life consists solei~ of book~, graphs, and wntmg tools rs a mental vegetanan. Ultrmately he will find that the peas and beans of literature are often hard; the spinach of philosophy will bring, not healing in its wings, but sand between his teeth; mathematics will appear as soulless as shredded wheat; the facts of history will prove as evanescent as a lettuce salad. The undergraduate who fills his days with frantic participation in extra curricular activities is a carnivore. He subsists upon the meat of public approval, and basks in a glow of accomplishment. But his sleep is often disturbed by the nightmare of lost prestige and miscalculated politics. A balanced diet will bring integration to the personality of the college student. He -vvill find happiness when he partakes of scholastic research and varied activities, the two complementary factors which comprise real education .

•


• Order of Books Administration Classes Activities Athletics Features


LIBRARY DooR

IN

SHADOW

•


SIDE ENTRANCE CoLLEGE HALL

•


LIBRARY

II


SuGAR LoAF

II


Wisdom shafts the darkness here and there, Like scattered lamps in unfrequented streets .

-Edwin A. Robinson

•


ADMINISTRATION •



II

PRESIDENT GUY. E. MAXWELL B. A., Hamline University M.A., Columbia University Ped. D. (Hon.) Miami University Ped. D. (Hon.) Hamline University

II FRANK A. SHEEHAN RESIDENT DIRECTOR


WILLIAM A. OWENS PSYCHOLOGY

B.S., Univ<:'rsity of Chicago Nl. A., University of Chicago

DOROTHY CLARK FINE ARTS

B. S., Missouri State Teachers College B. A., Missouri State Teachers College

WILLIS E. BOOTS Er--:cus11 AND PsvciiOLOGY 13. S., North Dakota:'Agricultural College i\1. A., University of Wisconsin

WILLIAM ll. MUNSON SciENCE

B. S., Olivet College

ROBERT R.IREED EKGLISH

B. A., University of Minnesota M.A., Columbia University

NELS MINNE CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

B. A., St. Olaf College M. S., University of Wisconsin Ph. D., University of Wisconsin

FLORENCE L. RICIIARDS LITERATURE, DEAN oF V.'oME~

Ph. B., University of Michigan M. A., University of Michigan

ARTHUR T. FRENCI-I MATHEMATICS

B. S., Harvard University M . A., Columbia University


RAY J. SCARBOROUGH GEOGRAPHY B. A., University of Nebraska M. A., University of Nebraska THEDA GILDEMEISTER EDUCATION B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University M.A., Columbia University

GLENDON E. GALLIGAN PHYSICAL EDUCATION B. S., University of Washington M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University ROY B. TOZIER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SociAL SciENCES B. A., Park College M. A., University of Illinois Ph. D., University of Iowa

HELEN A. PENDERGAST PHYSICAL EDUCATION B. S., Peabody College M.A., New York University ERWIN S. SELLE SociOLOGY AND GovERNMENT B. A., Washburn College M.A., Columbia University Ph. D., Columbia University

JEAN TALBOT PHYSICAL EDUCATION B. A., University of Wisconsin FREDERICK A. JED ERMAN HISTORY, DEAN OF MEN B. A., University of Nebraska M.A., University of Nebraska


JEAN BRADY JONES SPEECH AND DRAMA

B. A., Huron College M.A., Boston University Ph. D., University of Iowa STANLEY J. PAWELEK INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

B.S., University of Minnesota M. A., University of Minnesota

WALTER GRIMM Music B. S., Indiana State Teachers College ROLAND M. TORGERSON INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

B.S., University of Minnesota M. A., University of Minnesota

JANET R. ROHWEDER VoiCE AND APOLLO

Winona State Teachers College B. S., University of Minnesota ETTA CHRISTENSEN RuRAL EDUCATION

B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University

AGNES BARD PIANO

B. E., Winona State Teacher' College GRACE SELLECK RuRAL EDUCATION

B. E., Winona State Teachers College


GRACE M. MUIR J uN IOR HIGH ScHOOL

B. E., Winona State T eac he rs College

MILDRED BARTSCH RuRAL EDUCATION

B. E., Winona State T eachers College

GLENN E. FlSJ IBAUGIIER J UNIOR HI GH SCHOOL

B. A., Cornell College

MARGARET B. MILLER REsiDENT NuRsE

Kahler School of Nursing, Rochester

MARION DAVIS JuNIOR HIGH ScHOOL

B. A., College of St. Teresa

CHARLES L. SIMMERS DmEcToR, TRAINING ScHooL

B. A., Iowa State University M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University

MARTHA DALLMANN INTERMEDIATE GRADES

B.S., University of Minnesota M. A., University of Minnesota

BEULAH BRUNNER SuPERVISOR, JUNIOR HIGH ScHOOL

B.

E ., Warrensburg, State Teachers College B. S., Columbia University M. A., Ohio State University


LESLIE GAGE SUPERVISOR, PRIMARY GRADES

B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University ELLA C. CLARK SuPERVISOR, INTERMEDIATE GRADES

B. S., University of Minnesota M. A., University of Minnesota

JEANNE S. BROUILLETTE PRIMARY GRADES

B. S., University of Minnesota

CATHRYN CRAMER INTERMEDIATE GRADES

B. A., Iowa State Teachers College

LAURA 0. FOSTER PRIMARY GRADES

B. S., Iowa State Teachers College

VALETA JEFFREY MusiC, TRAINING ScHOOL

B. M. Ed., Northwestern University

LOUISE C. SUTHERLAND DIRECTOR, KINDERGARTEN

B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University FLORETTA MURRAY ART, TRAINING ScHOOL

B. E., Winona State Teachers College


HELEN B. PRITCHARD REGISTRAR

B. A., Vassar College B. S., Simmons College BERTHA B. SCHWABLE SuPERVISOR, KINDERGARTEN

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University

ROSALIE VOELKER AccouNTANT

EVELYN SEMLING KINDERGARTEN

Winona State Teachers College

VIOLET KOCHENDORFER OFFICE AssiSTANT

MILDRED L. ENGSTROM LIBRARIAN

B. E., Winona State Teachers College

ANN SIELAFF OFFICE ASSISTANT

MINNIE ZIMMERMAN AssiSTANT LIBRARIAN

Ph. B., Hamline University VIOLA M. BEERY DORMITORY MANAGER

B. A., Kalamazoo State Teachers College M.S., Teachers College, Columbia University


From you The substance of my dreams took fire, You built cathedrals in my heart, And lit my pinnucled desire. -Siegfried Sassoon

"TIMES change, and we change with them"; it was a wise man and a poet who first said that. It was another wise man, another poet, who said, "The old order changeth, yielding place to new". Perhaps this second poet was wiser, for he added: "And God fulfills himself in many ways". While it is true that this life of ours seems to be a restless, unstable, changing thing, it is more emphatically true that among ali its flux and flow there are some things which stand fast-changeless and unchangeable. High among these eternal verities stands inspired service to one's fellow mortals, whereby both God and man are fulfilled. Today, as in times past, the world and the people who make up the world, remember and appreciate the help and the service of the unselfish ones- remember and treasure not only the service but the contributing, inspiring spirit back of it. It is thus that we of Winona State Teachers College shall remember and appreciate one whose influence among us will last, though she goes from us this year-Miss Theda Gildemeister. Truly, she hath fulfilled.

II

I

~


Theda Gildemeister's life has been one of constant activity in the field M ISSof education. In she came to Winona State Normal School, having

1898 previously taught in the high schools of Hillsboro, Dixon, and in Carbondale Teachers College in Illinois. •

For thirty-six years Miss Gildemeister has been a member of the Winona State Teachers College faculty. During this time she taught a number of classes in education and acted on the placement committee, the curriculum committee, and the committee on classifications. Miss Gildemeister served as president of the Minnesota Education Association in 1921. She has been a member of numerous committees of both the state and national education associations. Her work on the state teachers' retirement fund bill continued through three legislatures from 1925 to 193 r. The bill was passed and Miss Gildemeister is now a trustee of the Minnesota Teachers' Retirement Fund Board. The state department of education employed her in 1916 to prepare a course of study for Minnesota. This course of study was used in Minnesota and other states for many years . At a sectional meeting of the International Congress in Brussels in 1910, Miss Gildemeister spoke on the subject, "The Place of Literature in Character Building". She has been in much demand as a speaker, having given addresses as far nqrth as Winnipeg and as far west as California. Retirement from active. teaching does not mean the end of service for Miss Gildemeister. Her's is a life that will always be devoted to educational endeavor.

II


May we learn That not in seeking but in giving forth The best whereof our life is capable, We help others and enrich ourselves. We grow by giving: who loves most, gives most.

-William J. Price

II


(LASSES •



STANLEY ARBINGAST ..... ................ Brownsdale

ETHEL ASCOTT ..... Winona

HISTORY, EDUCATION

John D ewey 3; Kappa D elta Pi 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Die-No- Mo 4; Mendelssoh n 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, President 4; College Choir 3, 4; Prlmary Club 4·

Winona n Staff 1, 2, 4, Assista nt Editor 2; Wenonah Staff 2, 4, Business Manager 4; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 4; Die-NoMa 2, 4; Joint Finance Committee 2; Alumni Relations Committee 4; Homecoming Committee 2, 4; A Cappella

Choir 4; Junior High Club Epsilon-N u '• 2, 4.

1,

HISTORY, EDUCATION

2; Mu-

HILDEGARDE BACHMAN . . ................... Winona

MARGARET BOTTOMLEY. . .................. Winona ENGLISH

ENGLISH, ART

John Dewey 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Wenonah Staff 3, 4, Literary Editor 4; Art Club 4; Public Relations Committee 3; Prom Committee 3; Maso n Music C lub I, 2; A Cappella Choir 4; French Club I, 2.

Winonan Staff 3; Wenonah Staff 3, Pic,_J;ure Editor 3; Wenonah Players 2, J, 4; Class Play 3; Art Club I, 2, 3, 4; DieNo-Mo 2, 3, 4; Kinde rgarten Club I, 2 3, 4, President 2.

JOSEPH BRASCUGLI . .. . .... . ...... . .... Eveleth

RAYMOND BROWN . Winona

MATHEMATICS, INDUSTRIAL ARTS

Wino nan Staff 2, 3; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Art Club 1, 2; Dic-No-Mo I, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Clu b 1, 2, J, 4, President 4; College Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Mason Music Club 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Orchestra ~. 4; Newman Club r, 2.

Junior High Club 3, 4; Industrial Arts Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Arrowhead Range Club 3, 4, Sccrctary-TreasurerJ.

MUSIC, ENGLISH

DAPHNE BUCK ..... Winona PHYS I CAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH

John D ewey 3; Kappa Delta P i 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Wenonah Stan· 2, 3; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; I ntcrn ationaJ Relations Club 3, 4; Junior High Club 1, 2; Physical Education Club I, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. I, 2, 3. 4·

RUTH BUNG ........ Winona MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Junior High Club r, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club I, 2, 3, 4; 'N . A. A. 2, 3, 4·


MARIE BURMEISTER ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winona

DOROTHY BURROW ...... . ..... . .......... ... Winona

MATHEMATICS, HISTORY

ENGLISH, ART

John Dewey 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4, President 4; \Vinonan Stan路 4, Assistant Editor 4; Wenonah Staff 4, Editor-inChief 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4, Secretary 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Senior Class

Wenonah Staff 4; Art Club 3, 4; Intermediate Club 1, 2.

Secretary; Joint Finance Committee 3; International Relations Club 3, 4;

Honor Teacher 4; French Club 1; Junior High Club 3, 4路

LUELLA CARPENTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plainview ENGLISH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

FLORENCE BUTLER .. .... . ................... Winona ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Wenonah Players

Club

2;

1,

Newman Club

2;

Intermediate

1, 2.

CONSTANCE CHRISTOPHER ....... . .. ..... Winona

Winonan Staff 4; Wenonah Staff 3, 4, Women's Sport Editor 4; Wenonah Players 4; Chapel Committee 3; Mendelssohn 2, 3, 4; College Choir 2, 3, 4; Junior Hig h Club r, 2, 3; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Social Chairman 4路

ENGLISH, H ISTORY

MAXINE DICKERSON ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winona

Winonan Stafl' I, 2; Wenonah Staff 4, Characterization Editor 4; Junior H ig h Club 3, 4; Intermediate Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 3. 4; League of Women Voters

Art Club 3, 4; Prom Committee 2, 3; Intermediate Club I, 2; Primary Club

3路

ART, ENGLISH

3.4-

JOSEPH GERM ...... Gilbert SOCIAL SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

FRANCIS GILSDORF ...... . .. .. . ............. Wabasha

Junior High Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Arrowhead Range Club 3, 4, VicePresident 4; "W" Club 3, 4; Mu-Eps ilon-Nu J, 4; Football 3, 4; Basketball 3; Track 3, 4.

Apollo Club 4; College Choir r, 2, 4; Mason Music Club J, 4; Band 4; Orchestra I, 2; Mu-Epsilon-Nu 1, 2, 4.

MUSIC, EDUCATION


JOE GISLASON ............ . ... .... ... . .... Minneapolis

HIRAM GRIFFITH ...... . . . . .... Rochester

SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

HISTORY, SCIENCE

Intramural Board 3; J oh n Dewey 3;

Wenon ah P layers 1, 2, 3, 4; D ie-NoMa 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Fres hmen Class Vice-

Kappa Delta Pi 4; Wenonah Staff 3, 4, Sport Editor 4; W enonah Players 4; Debate 2, 3, 4; Dic-No-Mo 3, 4, President 4; In tern ational Relations C lu b 3, 4; "W" Clu b 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu 2, 3, 4; Football2, 3, 4·

Presiden t; H omecoming Commi ttee 4; Committee on Asse m bly a nd Cornmcncemcnt. 4; Apollo Club 1 2; MuEpsi lon-Nu 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Track I, 2; Athletic M a nager 3, 4· 9

HELEN HAMMOND. Winona ANITA GROOSE . . ... Winona MUSIC, ENGLISH

Mendelssohn 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 1, Vice-President 2; College C hoir I, 2, 3, 4; Mason Music C lub 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 4; Band 4; Orchestra 2. 3, 4; International Relations C lu b 4; G irls Scouts I, 2.

ENGLISH, HISTORY

R epresentative Counci l 2, 4, Secretary 4; John Dewey 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4, Historian a nd R eco rde r 4; P u rple K ey 2 , 3, 4j Secretar y of A ssociated Students 4; Wino nan StaA' T, 2, M a n aging Editor 2; W enonah Staff 2, 3, 4, Editor-in-

Chief 3, Managing Ed itor 4; Wenonah Player s

1, 2,

3, 4; Die- No-Mo

2,

3, 4;

H onor Teacher 2; All-College Publicatio ns Committee 4; All-College Social Committee 2; Public Rel ations 4; 1-rench Club 1, 2; Junior High Club 2, 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3.

THEODORE HRDLICKA .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stewartville I NDUSTRIAL ARTS, P H YS I CAL EDUCATION

Wenonah P layers 1 , 2, · 3; Industrial Art Club r, 2, 3, 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu r, 2.3,4;"W"Club 1,2,3,4, Treasurer4; Football 2; Track 1, 2, 3 , 4, Captain 4;

Athletic T raincr 4; Junior Hig h School Track Coach 4·

KATHRYN JON ES ........ . .... . ............ Red Wing EDUCATION, MUSIC

Wenona h Staff 4; Mendelssohn 4; College C hoir 4 ; M a.son Music Club 3, 4; Intermediate C lub r, 2, 3, 4; Primary Club 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. r , 2, Vice-President 2; Girl Reserves 2; Morey Hall Vice-President 4·

VIOLET KUDART ... Winona ART,

ENGLISH

Winon an Staff 3, 4; W enonah Staff 2, 3; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Art C lub 1 , 2 , 3, 4; Prom Committee 2, 3; A Cappella C hoir 4~ Junior Hig h Cl u b 2.

GEORGE McCLUSKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmington INDUSTRIAL ARTS, HI STORY

Representative Counc il J, 4, President 4 ; In t ramural R oard 4; Dic- No- Mo 3, 4 ; General Manager of Die- No- Mo S how 4; Jun ior a nd Senior President; Homecomin g Comm ittee 3 . 4; l ndustrial A rts Club 1, 2 , 3, 4, President 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu I , 2, 3, 4; Athletic Committee 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Track 1.


HILDA MAHLKE .... Winona HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Representative Council 3; Wenonah Staff 4, Feature Editor 4; Die-No-Mo I, 2,

3, 4, Brush

2;

All-College Social

Committee 3, 4; Art Club 2, 3; Mendelssohn I, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2;

JERELENE MILNER .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Meadow HISTORY, ENGLISH

Junior High Club

2, 3, 4; Country Life Club I; Y. W . C. A. 2; League of Women Voters 3, 4.

College Choir 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4.

FRANCIS O'NEILL .. . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pipestone HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Wenonah Staff 4: Die-No-Mo 4; Junior and Senior Class Vice-President; Junior

High Club 2; Fifth Year Normal Club "W" Club 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2.

2;

HAROLD ROGGE .... Winona MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Dic-No-Mo I; Co!lcge Choir 3; Junior High Club 2; "W" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; MuEpsilon-Nu l, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, President 4 .

WINNIFRED SNYDER ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winona PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH

Wenonah Players I, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 4; Junior High Club 1, 2, 3; Physical Education Club I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; W. A. A. 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary l.

AUDREY PROTZ ......... . . . ......... . . . ... Clinton, Ia . MATHEMATICS, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Wenonah Staff 4; Die-No-Mo I , 2, 3, 4. Spark 2, Voltage 4; Dance Director of Die-No-M_o Show 4; Mendelssohn I, 2,

3, 4; College Choir 2. 3, 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4.

FLORENCE SCHROTH ... . . ... . . . .. .. ....... . . vVinona ART, EDUCATION

Wenonah StafT 2, 4, Art Editor 4; Art Club 4; Prom Committee 3; Mason Music Club 2; Primary Club I~ 2, 3, Treasurer 3·

MABEL WEYGANT . . St. Paul EDUCATION, ENGLISH

Winonan StafT 3, 4; Wenonah StafT 4; Primary C lub 3, 4; League of Women Voters 3, 4.


VIOLET WILLIAMS. ... Winona

LEONARD WIENER . . . . Sleepy Eye

SOCIAL SC I ENCE, HISTORY

HISTORY, SCIENCE

Debate 4; Band

1, 2,

Junior High Club

3, 4; A Cappella

1, 2,

3, 4.

Choir 4; Track 3, 4·

ROBERT WISE . ..... Winona

ERNEST WINTER . ... Eyota SOCIAL SC I ENCE, HISTORY

HISTORY, SOCIAL SC IE NCE

" W" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 3; Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4·

Winonan Staff 4; W enonah Staff 4;

Die-No-Mo 1, 4; Country Liff" Club Mu-Epsilon-Nu 1, 4·

1;

Seniors Whose Pictures Do Not Appear PAUL BERKMAN .. . . . Chisholm MATHEMATICS, SOC IAL SCIENCE

John Dewey 3; Kappa Del ta Pi 4; Purple Key 3, 4; W eno na h Pl aye rs 3, 4; Class Play 3; Debate 3, 4; I ntcrnat io nal Relations Club 3, 4; Foothall 3·

MARY GARTLAND . .. . ... Esmond, So. Da k. SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

League of W o me n Vote rs 4·

ELSIE GRIME .......... St. Pa ul

SOCIAL SCIENCE, E DUCATIO N

KI ND ERGARTE N -PRIMARY

2;

Junior Hi g h Club

2,

4

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY Secretary of Junior Class 3; I nte rnationa I

R elatio ns Club 4; Junior Hi g h Club 3; MuEpsilon-Nu 2. 3, 4; Tennis 4·

MELVIN OPEM ...... Zumbrota

CLARICE DORMADY ........ . ......... . ..... Spring Valley In ter mediate Club

DOMINADOR LANDITCHO .. . . .. ........ Phillipi ne Isla nds

M en delsso hn 4 ; Kinderga rt en Club 4.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY

Die-No- M o 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mu-Epsilon-Nu 1, 2, J, 4; Sportsmanship Committee 4; Football 2, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 4. Co-Captain 4·


II Top Row- S. Weinberger, W. Roth, H. John~on, E. Zakraishek, J. Fuhlbruegge, A. Berg, W. Owens, J. Kozlowski, D. Zimmcrhakl, L. Erwin. Second Row-S. Sucker, J. Weich, P. Weisman, L. Appeldorn, B. Meshke, M. Weisman, H.~English, C. Lindgren, G. Enger, B. Miller, H. Wyman. Tbird Row-L. Shira, S. Schmidt, B. Johnson, Bernice Schaffner, I. Downing, Beatrice Schaffner, M. Wilson, L. Peterson, E. Kruger, L. Hundley, F. Nelson.

Bottom Row- V. Herman. F. Wachowiak, F. Moilanen, J. Hawkins, R. Beseler, L. M. Selle, H. Roth, J. Bucholtz, I. Ciseska.

Ambrosen,~M-~Mclntire,

The Junior Class

T

HE Junior Class is again taking a major part in college activities. Seventeen of the class hold offices in various clubs. This shows that, although working for a degree, the juniors believe in the old adage that begins, "All work and no play". It is the modest opinion of the graduating classes that this third year class will accomplish big things next year when they are sedate seniors. Good luck to them! May they continue the pace they have set. The size of the Junior Class presents a living proof that the desire for education is growing, and that the four-year course is ever becoming more popular. The officers of the Junior Class are: Lloyd Ambrosen, president; Ruth Beseier, vice-president; Dominador Landitcho, secretary; Luverne Appeldorn, treasurer; and Grace Enger, junior member of the representative council. Dr. Selle is the class adviser.

•


Junior

Class :vlcDERMOTT, CLAmcE

ALLEN, lVlARJORIE

MciNTIRE, MARION

APPELDORN, LuvERNE

MESHKE, BERNICE BERG, ALVIN

M!LES, HAROLD

BERG, EvELYN

MILLER, BETTY

BESELER, Run-I

MOILANEN, FRED

BoYD, RoBERT

MouRNING, VIRGIL

BRANT, DoROTHY BRUEGGER, MARIE

NELSON, FERN

BucHOLTz, JoHN

NELSON, GERTRUDE

BuRKE, CELESTE

NIEMI, WALTE R

CASSIDY, MARY

OwENS, WILLIAM

CISESKA, IRENE PEAKE, FRANCES

DowNING, IsABEL

PETERSEN, LORRAINE

DuNCAN, JESSIE

PHilLIPS, KATHERINE

DUNN, RAYMOND

REDEPENNING, EwALD

ENGER, GRACE

RoscH, HERBERT

ENGLISH, HELEN

RoTH, HAROLD

ERWIN, LYLE

ROTH, WILLIAM FoRTNEY, CoRA

RYDMAN, RALPH

FUHLBRUEGGE,JOHN ScHAFFNER, BEATRICE GRONVALL, CECIL

SCHAFFNER, BERNICE

GusTAFSON, LuciLLE

SCHMIDT, SIDNEY SELLE, MARJORIE

HAJICEK, GEORGE

SENS, HILBERT

HAWKINS, JOHN

SHIRA, LEWIS

HENDERSON, AuGusT

SNYDER, MARTHA

HERMAN, VERNE

SucKER, SuzETTE

H _OPP, MARGARET HUNDLEY, LouisE

VIEZBIEKE, VINCENT

JoHNSON, ANNE

WACHOWIAK, FRANK

JOHNSON, BETH

WALTERS, BETTIE

JOHNSON, HERBERT

WEINBERGER, STANLEY WEISMAN, CHARLES

KARLSTROM, EM I LY KNOPP, PHILIP

WEISMAN, MARY JANE

KNUTSON, JEANNETTE

WE ISMAN, PEARL

KozLOWSKI, JoHN

WrECH, JuuA MAuD

KRUGER, EDNA

W I LSON, MILDRED WYMAN, HELEN

LAAKSO, MARTIN LAUGEN, BERTRAND

ZAKRA I SHEK, EDWARD

LEE, MARGARET

Z r MMERHAKL, DoN

LEHMKUHL, GEORGE LINDGREN, CoNSTANCE

II


ELEANOR AMES ....... Weaver

AMELIA ANDERSON ... Whalan

UPPER GRADES

INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff 2; Junior High Club 2; Physical Education Club 2; W. A.A.2;Y. W.C.A.2.

Intermediate Club 2; Country Life Club 1.

BETTY BARSTOW .. Brownsdale MRS. MARIE ANDERSON ..... ................. , . Cannon Fails

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club r, 2.

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 2; League of Women Voters 2, President 2.

EDYTHE BOWEN .... Lake City PRIMARY

ELEANOR BAUER ... Albert Lea

Primary Club 2; League of \IV omen Voters 2.

UPPER GRADES

Winonan Staff I, 2, News Editor 2; Junior High Club 1; Newman Club 2.

LILLIAN BOARDMAN . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Galesville, Wis. INTERMEDIATE

HELEN BENSON ...... Chatfield

Intermediate Club

I.

PRIMARY

Primary Club 2, Secretary 2; Y. W. C. A. 2. ELVERA BRATRUD .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stewartville PRIMARY

RUTH BOYD ......... Plainview

Art Club I, 2; Primary Club I, 2, Vice-President 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club Club I, 2.

I,

2; Newman

CHRISTINE BREYER ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arcadia, Wis. UPPER GRADES

LAURA BREITKREUTZ .. Olivia INTERMEDIATE

Y. W. C. A.

2.

Winonan Staff 1; International Relations Club 2; Junior High Club I, 2; Physical Education Club I, 2; W . A. A. I, 2; Y. W. C. A. I, 2; League of Women Voters 2.


JANET BROWN ........ Winona

ANNA JANE BUCK ... . Winona INTERMEDIATE

UPPER GRADES

Homecoming Committee r; Committee on Lectures, Plays and Recitals I; Junior High Club I, 2; Y. W.C.A. 2.

vVcnonah Staff 2; Wenonah Players 2; Art Club I , 2 , Secretary-Treasurer I; Mendelssohn 2; College Choir 2; Intermediate Club 1.

LAURA BUNGE ....... Caledonia

ELFIE CHRISTENSON ....... . .... ..... ..... . Red Wing

INTERMEDIATE

Band I, 2; Intermediate Club W.A.A.I,2.

2;

MARY FRANCES CREED ..... .. . . .. .............. Rochester KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Art Club I; Band 2; Kindergarten Club I, 2; Newman Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club

2;

Y. W. C. A.

2·

LAURA CUFFEL ..... Lake City RURAL

Country Life Club I; League of Women Voters 2.

CATHERINE ERICKSON ..... . . . . . . . . . . Maple Plain INTERMEDIATE

FERN M. DRAPE .. .. . R a ndolph RURAL

Primary Club

1.

ALICE FIEGEL .. . ...... Kasson PHIMARY

Mendelssohn I, 2; College Choir I, 2; Mason Music Club I, 2; Primary Club I, 2; Y. W. C. A. I, 2.

Wenonah Staff 2 ; Wenonah Players 2; All-College Social Committee 2; Interm-ediate Club I, 2, Vice President 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

CORA FORTNEY ........ . . . . . . Readstown, Wis. INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 2; Country Life Club I, 2; League of Women Voters 2.

KENDALL FULLER . . ... Altura UPPER GRADES

Mu-Epsilon-Nu

I, 2.

HAZEL GROGER .... St. Charles I N TEHMEDIATE

Intermediate Club

1.


CATHERINE IIAGER . . . Kellogg

DOROTHY HIGGINS ... Winona

INTERMEDIATE

A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club I, 2; vV. A. A. I, 2; Newman Club I, 2; Y. W. C. A. r, 2; Girl Reserves I; Girl Scouts I.

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club Life Club I, 2.

I, 2;

Country

EUGENE JASPERS . . .. Shakopee UPPER GRADES

MABEL HOVDA. Grand Meadow UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club

2.

EVELYN JOHNSON ... Winthrop

Freshman Class Vice-President; Apollo Club I; College Choir I; A Cappella Choir 2; Newman Club I, 2; "W" Club 1; Football I, 2.

VIRGINIA JOIINSON.Red Wing

INTERMEDIATE

INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff I, 2; I ntermediatc Club I, 2; Y. W. C. A. I, 2; League of Women Voters I, 2.

Winonan Staff I, 2; Wenonah Staff 2; Wenonah Players I, 2; Die-NoMo 2; Mendelssohn I, 2, VicePresident 2; Orchestra I, 2; Intermediate Club I, 2, Vice-President I; Morey Hall President 2.

DO ROT I IY KALKBRENNER . . . . . . . . . . . Lake City INTERMEDIATE

Mendelssohn 2; College Choir 2; Band I; Orchestra 2; Intermediate Club 2; Country Life Club r.

KARYL KEMPLE ............ . . ... ...... Watertown, So. Dak. UPPER GRADES

Winonan Staff I, 2; Junior High Club I, 2; Girl Reserves I; Girl Scouts r.

AGNES KELLER .... Rosemount RURAL

Junior High Club 2; Country Life Club 2; Newman Club 2.

HAZEL M. KING ........ Dexter INTERMEDIATE

A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club I, 2; W. A. A. I, 2; Y. W. C. A. I, 2.

ELLA KROCAK .... Montgomery DORIS KLING .. . . .. ... Winona UPPER GRADES

Art Club I, 2; Ju.nior High Club I; Y. W. C. A. r.

INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff 2; Band 2; Intermediate Club 2; W. A. A. 2; Newman Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.


RUTH KUHN ... . Grand Meadow INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club

1,

2; Y. W. C. A.

I.

FLORENCE LARSON . . ....... . ................... Rose Creek KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

ALICE L. LOW ... .... . Faribault UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club I; Newman Club

LOUIS LA CASSE . ........ . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White Bear UPPER GRADES

A Ca ppella Choir 2; Junior High Club I, 2; Newma n Club I, 2.

CHRISTINE LIST ...... Windom UPPER GRADES

Y.W.C.A.I ,2.

FLORENCE MADSEN ... M yrtle UPPER GRADES

Winonan Staff I, 2; Junior High Club 2.

I, 2.

HELEN MIXICH .... So. St. Paul JOSEPHINE MARTIN ........ . ...... . . . . .. . . . . . Worthington PRIMARY

Primary Club

1,

2; W. A. A. 2.

ALICE NORSKOG ... Bird Island UPPER GRADES

INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff 2; Art Club I, 2; Intermediate Club I, 2; W . A. A. I, 2; N ew ma n Club I, 2; Y . 'vV. C. A. I, 2, President 2.

RUTH NUSBAUM . .. Morristown PRIMARY

Junior High Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

Primary Club 2; N ewman Club 2; Y. W.C.A. 2.

MARY ELLEN O'NEILL. .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Paul

MARGARET ORDEMAN ..... . .... .... ... .. .. ... Minneapolis

UPPER G RADES

A Cappella Choir 2, Treasurer 2; Junior High Club 2; Newman Club 2; League of Women Voters 2.

INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff I; Art Club 2; W. A. A. 2; League of Women Voters 1, 2; Twin City Club 2.

L

I


ALICE POGUE . .. .... Media, III.

MILLICENT POLLEY ... Winona UPPER GRADES

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club

I,

2; Y. W. C. A.

2.

Wenonah Players I, 2; Die-No-Mo I, 2;Mason Music Club I, 2; Orchestra I, 2, Secretary-Treasurer 2; Junior High Club 2; W. A. A. I; Cheer Leader I, 2.

MARGARET PETERSON .. . .. . , . ..... .... ........... Rushford INTERMEDIATE

Winonan Staff 2; A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club I, 2.

MARGARET QUIGLEY ....... . .... .. .... . .. . . .. . ... Wabasha INTERMEDIATE

A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club I, 2; W. A. A. I, 2, SecretaryTreasurer 2; Y. W. C. A. 2; League of Women Voters 2. RUTH RICHARDS ... . Rushford INTERMEDIATE

Sophomore Class Vice-President; Orchestra I, 2; Intermediate Club I, 2 ; Y. W. C. A. 2 .

LENORA ROBLE ..... Caledonia RURAL

Band

HELEN ROGERS .... St. Charles UPPER GRADES

Physical Education Club I, 2; W. A. A. I, 2, Social Chairman 2.

MYRTLE RUGRODEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Richland UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 2; League of Women Voters 2.

I;

Country Life Club

I,

2.

ELIZABETH ROSING .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cannon Fails KINDERGARTEN- PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club

I,

2.

FORREST SADLER ..... Preston UPPER GRADES

Mu-Epsilon-Nu I, 2; Football Basketball I; Track I, 2.

I,

2;

MARY ELIZABETH SCHNEIDER ........ Milbank, So. Dak. OLAF SANDEN ........ Houston U PPER GRADES

Band I, 2, President 2; Junior High Club 2, Mu-Epsilon-Nu I, 2.

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn I, 2; College Choir I, 2; Kindergarten Club I, 2, Secretary 2.


JUNE SCHROEDER . .. ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring Valley INTERMEDIATE

LAURA SCHUH .. .. Rollingstone UPPER GRADES

Newman Club

1, 2.

A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

ELLA SORUM . .... . . .. . Preston ZULA SMITH .. ... ... . . . Winona UPPER GRADES

Winonan Staff I, 2, Editor-in-Chief 2; International Relations Club 2; Junior High Club z; Intermediate Club I; Newman Club I, 2; Y. '0.'. C. A. z.

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club

1, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

2.

MARGARET SOUTHWORTH .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glencoe KINDERGARTEN-

HELEN SOUHRADA . .. ... . ... . ... .... .. . .. . .. ... . Chester, Ia. INTERMEDIATE

PRIMARY

Winonan Staff 2; Wenonah Players I, 2; Kindergarten Club I, 2, President 2.

Representative Council 2; Wenonah Staff z; Intermediate Club I, 2; Y.W.C.A. 2.

VIRGINIA STOPPEL. . Rochester PRIMARY

CATHERINE SPELTZ .... Altura UPPER GRADES

A Cappella Choir 2; Primary Club 2, Vice-President 2; W. A. A. 2; Y. W. C. A. 2.

Junior High School Club 2; Newman Club 2.

MONA SUB BY . ...... Albert Lea UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club

I, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

DOROTHY SUTERA .... .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Huron, So. Dak. KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Orchestra

I, 2;

Kindergarten Club

I, 2.

!.

HELEN SWENSON . . . Lanesboro INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 2.

I, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

CY SYVERSON . .... . ... Ormsby UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club I; Mu-EpsilonNu I, 2.

-


LEONARD TOLLEFSRUD ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring Grove

GERTRUDE TORGRIMSON ... .. .. .. . .... .. .. Grand Meadow

UPPER GRADES

PRIMARY

A Cappella Choir 2; Country Life Club I; Secretary I; Mu-EpsilonNu I, 2; Intramural Basketball 2; Track I.

Primary Club

I, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

1.

DORIS VOORHEES . . .. .. Elkton INEZ UGLUM .......... . Adams

PRIMARY

Primary Club

INTERMEDIATE

I, 2.

Representative Council 2, VicePresident 2; Wenonah Staff 2; DieNo-Mo 2; Art Club 1, 2; Intermediate Club I, 2, President 2; W. A. A. I, 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, Treasurer 1, 2.

NORMA WESTMAN ... . Winona UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club I, 2; W. A. A. 2; Y. w. c. A. I, 2. MARGUERITE WAKEFIELD .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winona PRIMARY

Primary Club

I, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

2.

MILDRED WILSON .... . . Dover UPPER GRADES

DOROTHY WILER . .. Red Wing INTERMEDIATE

.Winonan Staff; A Cappella Choir 2; Intermediate Club; Newman Club; League of Women Voters.

NEOMI WILSON .. .. ... Preston

Junior High Club 1, 2, 3; International Relations Club 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Girl Reserves 3; Wino nan Staff 2; Wenonah Staff 3; Joint Finance Committee 3·

BEVERLY WOLCUTT... Waseca

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club I, 2.

I

·I

1, 2;

Y. W. C. A.

PRIMARY

Primary Club I.

I;

Kindergarten Club


Sophomores Whose Pictures Do Not .A.ppear MARION ABRAHAMSON ..... . .................. Harmony PRIMARY Mendelssohn 1, 2, 3; College Choir Primary Club 1.

1, 2,

2, 3; 1, 2 .

Junior High Club

ALICE MAX ........... St. Paul PRIMARY

Junior Hig h Club

Primary Club

2;

Country Life Club

I.

1;

ELEANOR HORI I-LAN. Lanesboro INTERMEDIATE I ntcrmcdiate Club Newman Club 2.

2;

I, 2,

Treasurer

2.

ELIZABETH OlSTAD .. Harmony INTERMED IATE Band

2;

Intermediate Club

2.

Country Life Club I ;

ARTHUR CARLSON .. .. Houston UPPER GRADES Apollo Club 2; College Choir High Club 2.

I, 2,

3;

ALICE ANDRES .... Montevideo UPPER GRADES Die-No-Mo T, Newman Club

MILDRED HERRICK ..... Utica UPPER GRADES

KENNETH OTT ... Granite Falls RURAL

Junior

RUTH KOLSTAD ... Minneapolis RURAL LOIS DIEPENBROCK ........ . .................. Red Wing INTERMEDIATE Die-No-Mo z; Intermediate Club

Primary Club

T;

Country Life Club

2,

Vice-President z; Leagu e of Women Voters I.

A Cappella Choir 2; I ntcrmediatc Club 2; Y. w. c. A. I, 2.

1, 2.

BETH HARTIG ............... . ........... Miles City, Mont. INTERMEDIATE Intermediate Club z; Newman Club z; Y. W.C. A. 2.

LILLIAN PETERSON. Lanesboro • INTERMEDIATE

GEORGE LEHMKUHL.. Perham UPPER GRADES

JEANNE THOMPSON ... Winona KINDERGARTEN--PRIMARY

Mu-Epsilon-Nu

Kindergarten Club

2, J;

Footballz, 3; Track

2.

I, 2;

Newman Club

Sophomore Degree Students BEAN, JAMES BIGELOW, WILLARD DuFF, RoLLAND HARDT, RuTH HENN, RuTH HoovER, LoUis KREUZER, CARL

1,

LYNNE, WALTER MAcPHERSON, KERMIT McDoNALD, RuTH MoRsE, WILLIAM MuENCH, FREDERICK O'GARA, JAM ES PAWELEK, ALA N

RoBINSON, RoBERT RoTHWELL, THEODORE ScHNEIDER, ALTON SIMON, DELOS SHIRA, CHARLOTTE THOMPSON, WILLIAM

1, 2 .


I. I

Freshman Class s.

AGUSTIN, URBANO

ERICKSON, CARL

AMBROSEN, RuTH H.

ERICKSON, MARJORIE

AMES, GLENNA

EvENSON, BoRGHILD

L.

AMos, RosAMOND

EvERS, CLARA M.

ANDERSEN, KATHERINE

L. FAILING, BETTY JANE

ANDERSON, LoRRAINE A.

FARR, ETTA

AscoTT, PEARL

s.

FEDDERN, DoROTHY BARRETT, JEANETTE

M.

FINKELNBURG, ELSIE

BAEUERLEN, CARL

FINNEY, VERNA M.

BERG, EvELYN

Foss, MuRIEL

c.

BERGRUD, TINKA

C.

FosTER, GRACE

BERVEN, MARGARET 0.

FRANZMANN, WILLIAM

BIANCHI, JOHN GARBE, JEANETTE

BIESANZ, CHARLES WM. JR.

GATZLAFF, LEONA

BJORGE, CAPTOLA

GEHRLICH, JuANITA D.

BLACKWELL, THEDA MAE

GIBBONS, EMMETT F.

BLANK, EARL

GJSLASON, VICTOR

BLATNIK, FRANK P.

GoMBERT, A NITA

BoEKE, CAROLYN BRACE, CHARLES

I.

GOEDE, FERN

BLATNIK, SoPHIE M.

GoTHAM, DELORis M.

\V.

GRAF, RosE RnA

BRAUN, EMILY

GREENING, DoROTHY J.

BREVIG, BERNICE

GREGOR, BEULAH R.

BRowN, DoROTHY L.

GRIEsE, RoY

BRUNNER, ELSIE MAE

GUILE, CLARK

BuRKE, ELIZABETH BuRNS, EsTHER W.

HAACK, LORRAINE F. HAMPEL, 0RIET

CARLSON, RuBY M.

HANKE, THEKLA A.

C.

HANSON, PEARL E.

CASWELL, PAUL E.

HANSON, VIRGINIA

CHASE, HORACE J.

HARTIG, FLORENCE M.

CHRISTENSON, JAMES G.

HIGHUM, CHARLOTTE E.

CosTELLo, URsuLA D.

HILL, ALYCE M.

CuLBERTSON, JEANNETTE CURRAN, MILDRED

N.

GRIEVE, ELDORA F.

BuEHLER, MARGARET M.

CARROLL, RosE

L. L.

HoEL, MARTHA E.

L.

HOFFMAN, MARIE M. DALE,

L.

MARION

HosTETTLER, HATTIE C.

DANIELS, BAYONNE A. DAsCHLER, DoROTHEA

HowARD, EuNICE M.

L. JAKOBITZ, WILFRED

DAVIDSON, SYLVIA M.

JOH NS, ELIZABETH E.

DoBLAR, HAZEL A. DuGAN, DELLA

JoHNSON, EvELYN (MRs.)

I.

JoHNSON, ISABEL EDSTROM,

"I

.•

ii

EvERETT

L.

JOHNSON, ORLAND L.

I.

ELLINGSON, SOPHYNE M.

JoHNSTON, RuBY

ENGLERTH, GwENDOLYN L.

JONES, MARGARET

ENGSTROM, GEORGE M.

JoRDAN, E. RuTHANNE

II


II

KANTHACK, MAXINE KEENAN, MARY E.

RAUK, FRANCES M. REDMOND. EDWARD

c.

KENT, JUANITA

RICHARDSON, RACHAEL N.

KEOUGH, MARY AGNES

RoBB, VIRGINIA

KISSLING, FRED

RoGERS, ARLENE F.

KocH, AN NA M.

RoscH, HERBERT

KRAGE, HARRIET G.

Ross, Lms MAY

KREUTZ, ETHEL SAARI, ARVID LE GROS, MARGARET

ScHOLTEs, M. CLETA

LEGROS, MAXWELL

ScHULTZ, AvA E.

LENTON, MARIAN E.

ScHULTA, FRANCES L.

I.

LERUM, ARDUS

SIMON, DoROTHY E.

I.

LIDGERDING, VIOLA v.

SKARE, MAy

LYoN, RuTH M.

SMALL, RoBERT J. SMILEY, MARGARET A.

L.

MAHLE, LUCILLE

SMITH, GARLD J.

MALLORY, DoROTHY M.

SNYDER, MARIAN F.

L.

MAREK, HELEN

STEFFES, BERNADETTE

MATTI, KATHRYN

STELLMACHER, DOROTHY

MEAD, ELIZABETH M.

STREATER, HAROLD

MILLER, FRANCIS J.

STRONG, BETTY

MILLER, LuciLLE MoE, MYRTLE

STULL, EDWIN L.

L.

STUSSY, MAXINE R.

MoRKEN, IRENE

SUILMAN, REGINA F.

MuLLER, ANNAT.

SuLLIVAN, DoROTH Y

MuRPHY, ELLEN JANE NAYLOR, MARGERY

SWALWELL, VERNE

L.

TENTIS, ETHEL

NELSON, HAROLD

I.

THALDORF, RoBERT

NELSON, JAMES

THOMAS, ORVILLE M.

NELSON, 0. JEWELL

THURLEY, RoBERT J.

NESLER, WILMA G. NuPEN, MARGIE

TOMMERSON, MARIE V.

L.

ToRGRIMSON, CoNSTANCE

O'DELL, GEORGE E. O'FLAHERTY, CATHERINE 0GROSKY, EvELYN D.

.J

M.

UELAND, WALTER H. vALENTINE, ALICE F.

OHLSEN, MERLE M. OLSON, GERTRUDE M. 0MODT, G. MARION 0RAKER, MARIE

I.

O'REILLY, MARGARET A.

WAcHs, JoHN T. WALERAK, JosEPHINE WARRINGTON, WILLMAR W. WELCH, CLARA WooD, LoREN E.

PEJAVICH, RoBERT

WooD, VIRGINIA J.

PETERSEN, MARIE

WRIGHT, SARAH

PETERSEN, MYLES H. PETERSON, 0RVILDA F.

yATES, VIVIAN M.

PoLLEY, HESTER M.

ZABEL, ELEANOR v.

PRENns, RoY C.

ZIERDT, ELEANOR

PRIEBE, CAROL

L.


Not dalliance, but life! Let us be men that dreamNot cowards, dabblers, waiters For dead Time to re-awaken.

- Ezra Pound.

I

"/

..• {I

II


ACTIVITIES •


·.


II Top Row- Mr. Boots, Miss Muir, Miss Richards, G. Enger, Mr. Jederman. Bottom Row-L. Ambrosen, I. Uglum, G. McCluskey, H. Hammond. 0. Johnson.

Representative Council Council was organized in the spring of to settle situaT HEtionsRepresentative under dispute and questions of vital concern to the activities and life of 1927

the college. Any such questions are brought before the council and treated with thoughtful consideration and justice. Membership in the representative council consists of the following twelve persons: the dean of women, the dean of men, and three other faculty members elected annually by the faculty; a man and a woman from each of the three upper classes, one of these two being the class president, the other being elected from his or her class; and the president of the freshman class,_after the fall quarter. Officers of the representative council are: George McCluskey, president; Inez Uglum, vice-president; and Helen Hammond, secretary. Other members are Lloyd Ambrosen, Grace Enger, Kermit MacPherson, Orland Johnson, Florence L. Richards, F. A. Jederman, Grace Muir, W. E. Boots, and C. L. Simmers.


II Top Row- F. O'Ne ill, F. Schroth, S. Sucker, A. Berg, R. Wise, W. Owens, M. W cygant, S. Blatnik, S. Arbingast, G. Enger. Second Row- V . Jo hnson, H. English, D. Burrow, H. Mahlkc, I. Uglum, H. Souhrada, A. Buck, C. Erickson, A. Pro t z. Bottom Row- E. Finkdnburg, D. Wiler, L. Carpenter, K . Jones, C. Ch ristopher, T . Blackwell, M . Burmeister, E . Thru ne, J. Gislason, H. H ammond.

The Wenonah Managing Editor . ... .. ................. . ....... .. ... . ..... Helen Hammond Editor-in-chief. ...................... . . . .......... . ....... Marie Burmeister Associate Editor ..... ... ...... . . ... . . . ......... . ............. F ra nees Peake Art Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... . .. . ....... Florence Schroth ~ Assistant Art Editors. . . . . . . . . . . Helen Souhrada, Dorothy Burrows, Maxine Dickerson, Anna Jane Buck Literary Editor ... .......... . ......................... Hildegarde Bachman Assistant Literary Editors . . . .. .. .. .. ..... . ..... Sophia Blatnik, Suzette Sucker Men's Sport Editor .... .... .... .... .... .. .. . ........... ..... .. . Joe Gislason Assistant Sport Editors . . . . . .. ..... ... . .. .... Francis O'Neill, Carl Kreuzer Women's Sport Editor .. . . .......... . .. ..... . ... . ..... . .... Luella Carpenter Assistant Sport Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................... Grace Enger Feature Editor. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . . . ......... Hilda Mahlke Assistant Feature Editors . . . . Eugene Thrune, E lsie Finkelnburg, Frank Blatnik Snap Shot Editor ...... .. . ...... . . ...... . . ... ... .... . .. . .. ... . .. Alvin Berg Assistant Snap Shot Editor .. ... .... . . . ... .. ...... . ..... . ..... Audrey Protz Picture Editor .... .... . .... ........ ... . .. .... . . .. . . .. ... Catherine Erickson Assistant Picture Editors .... . ... ... .. .. . . .... .. . Inez Uglum, M abel W eygant Characterization Editor ........ ... .... ... . ............ Constance Christopher Assistant Characterization Editor .. . . . .. .. . . .. . .. .. . ..... . . . . . Kathryn Jones Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... . .... Stanley Arbingast Assistant Business Managers ... . . William Owens, Charles ¡W eisman, Robert Wise Theda Mae Blackwell, Dorothy Wiler Editing T ypist ...... . ...... . .. . . .. .. ....... ...... . .. . .. . . . . Mildred Wilson

I

'I


II Top Row- R. Brown, M. Erickson, V. Lidgcrdi ng, W . Snyder, M. Wcygant, E . Ames, F. Madsen , R. Wise, L. Hoover, S. Arbingast, F. Wachowiak. Second Row- S. Davidson, R. Small, H. Mixich, M . Peterson, V. Robb, C. Breyer, K. Kemple, M. Foss, G. Ames, E. Johnson, E. Bauer.

Tbird Row-G. Englert h, J. Barrett, R. Beselcr, R . Hardt, H. Wyman, V . Kudart, H. English, V. J ohnso"• G. Enger, B . Schafl ner, L. Caq::enter.

Bottom Row- L. Anderso n, E. Zabel, D. Wiler, E. Krocak, B. Mes hkc, Z. S mi t h, S. Sucker, S. Kelley, E . Finkclnburg, T. Blackwell, P. Ascott .

The Winonan Managing Editor. ... ................ . ... ....... . .. .. . . . . . . ......... .. .... Suzette Sucker Editor-in-Chief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zula Smith Associate Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernice Mesh ke Feature Editor ... . ...... . . .. .. . ..... . . . . . .. ... .. . . .. .. .... . . . .... Frank Wachowiak Assistant Feature Editor. .. . ....... . . ... .... . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . .. .. Frank Blatnik Men's Sport Editor . .. ....... .. .. . ... .. . . ................... . . . Carl Kreuzer Assistant Sport Editors .. . .... .. ...... .. .. . . . .... Lloyd Ambrosen, Robert Small Women's Sport Editor . . . ........... .. . . . ... . . . .. ..... ... . . . ... . . ... . Grace Enger News Editor. .... . .. . . .......... . .. . .. . . . . . Eleanor Bauer Assistant News Editor ... .. ... ... .. ... . . .. E velyn Johnson Rewrite Editor ... . . . ..... .. ... .. .... . . . . Florence Madsen Alumni Editor ... ..... . . .... . . .. . . .. .. . . . Stanley Arbingast Music Editor ............ . .. . ......... . . . . . . Beatrice Schaffner Editorial Writer. ......... .. .... . . . . . . Cecil Gronvall REPORTERS Christine Breyer Muriel Foss Ruth H ardt Gwendolyn Englerth Karyl Kemple Viola Lidgerding Margaret Peterson Sylvia Davidson

Virginia Robb Luella Carpenter Eleanor Zabel Helen Mixich Mabel Weygant Marjorie Erickson Lorraine Anderson

Glenna Ames Violet Kudart Sereta Kelley Eleanor Ames Margaret Southworth Elsie Finkelnburg Helen Wyman

Typists . .... . . .. . . . . ... . ......... . . . . . . ..... Dorothy Wiler, Ella Krocak, Luella Carpenter Business Manager. . . . . ... . ............ . ...... . ... . . . . .... . ...... . ... .... . . Louis Hoover Associate M anager . . .. .... . ....... . . . . . . . . ..... .. . .. . .. . . . . . . ..... .. . . . . Jeanette Barrett Circulation Managers . ......... . . . .... . .. ........ . . . .. 'Theda Mae Blackwell, Helen English


Top Row- F. Murray, J. Saari, C. Gronvall, P. Bcrhman, W. Owens, A. Sampson, Mr. S immers, Counsellor, E. A sco tt.

Second Row- H. Hammond, E. Swcazey, M . Uggen, Beatrice Schaffner, Bernice Schaffner, D . Buck, F · Peake, J. Gi slason, M. Burmeister. Bottom Row- G. Selleck, L . Appeldorn, H . Bac kman, A . Tait, Mr. 1\1axwell, T . Anda, E. Hassi nge r, M .Selle.

Kappa Delta Pi Gamma Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor society in education, T HE was installed in the coilege at a special ceremony and dinner in the parlors of the First Congregational Church on February ro. Initiation and instaiiation ceremonies were conducted by Dr. T. C. McCracken, Ohio University, who is Executive President of this national society. Twenty-five students who have achieved high scholarship, given evidence of ability in leadership, exhibited worthy educational ideals, and manifested adequate personal, social, and professional qualities, were initiated. Seventeen of these are charter members. President Maxwell was initiated as honorary member. The establishment of this chapter in the college climaxes three years' efforts of the John Dewey Club. Membership in that organization was based on practically the same requirements as those needed to become a member of Kappa Delta Pi. Marie Burmeister is president of the chapter; Da phne Buck is vice-president; Ethel Ascott is secretary; and Helen Hammond is historian-recorder. Mr. Simmers is the counsellor.

I

•J

'·


Top Row- E . A scott, P . Berkman, L . Hoover, W. Owens. Second Row- H. Hammond, L. Appeldorn, B . Schaffner, l\1 . B urmeiste r. Bollom Row- !. Uglum, V. Johnson, A. Tait, F. P eake, A. Buck.

Purple Key in Purple Key is based upon promise of unusual service in the M EMBERSHIP field of education. Election to membership in the organization depends upon high scholarship, participation in not less than four elective extra-curricular activities, and social and professional attitudes becoming to a teacher. Of those qualified in these respects, the highest in scholarship, not to exceed ten in number, become members of Purple Key. Election to this group is recognized as one of the highest honors bestowed by the college. The majority of Purple Key members belong to Kappa Delta Pi, honorary educational society for upper classmen, but st~dents in the last quarter of their sophomore year are also eligible on the same basis as juniors and seniors. New members elected to Purple Key this year are: Marie Burmeister, Ethel Ascott, Beatrice Schaffner, Luverne Appeldorn, Frances Peake, Inez Uglum, Anna Jane Buck, Louis Hoover, and Virginia Johnson. Joe Gislason was also elected but does not appear in the picture. Last year members who attended the college this year and who. do not appear in the picture are Daphne Byck and Cecil Gronvall.


II Top Row- W. W a rrington, M . Dale, E. Za krai shek, C. Weisman, E . Gibbons , E . Fisher, C. Gronv all, M . Thrun, B. Simon, T . Hrdlicka . S econd Row- H. Roth, W . Jacobitz, 0. Johnson, E . W ebber, R. Tha ldorf, J. W ac hs, C. Biesanz, R. Griese, D. Simon, W . Thompson, F . Moilane n. Third Row-L. McCown, K. Ott, C. Sy verson, C. Baunlen, W. Ueland, L. Shira, P . Berkm an, L. LaCasse, J. Bucholtz, R. Small. Fourth Row- V. Herma n, L. Wood, l.. Funk, U . Au g ustin, C. Brace, J . Kissling , J. G erm, F . O'Neill, E . Thrune, W . Ly nne, W. Niemi. Bottom Row- W . Gebhard, G . H a jicek, M. Bunn , P. C aswell, R. Bro wn, E. W inter, A. B erg, P . Knopp, J. Kozlows ki, W . Owens, D. Zimm erhnkl, W . Bixby.

Mu-Epsilon-Nu compose=! of all the men in the college, was organized in T HE Mu-Epsilon-Nu, Its purpose is to promoteprofessionaladvancementand to foster the growth

1923. of good fellowship among the men of the college.

Last year, for the first time, the Mu-Epsilon-Nu undertook to carry on the men's intra-mural sports program. This met with so much whole-hearted approval and enthusiasm that the program was enlarged this year. It has been made available to nearly all the men of the college by including a great variety of sports. Some of these are volleyball, basketball, boxing, tennis, and kittenball. The club each year elects an Intra-Mural Board ¡which takes charge of the extensive intramural program. Mr. Jederman, dean of men, is the adviser of the organization. Officers are: Harold Rogge, president; Ernest Winter, vice-president; and Joe Gislason, secretary-treasurer.


T op Row- H . Sout hwo rt h, C. Guil e, G . O'Dell, 0. Thom as , R. P re ntiss, H . Ch ase, M. La Gros, G . Engstrom~ J. B ea n, V . Gi s lason. S econd Row-E . Edstro m, F . Gil sdor f, G. Sm ith, E. R edmond, 0. Sa nden, E. J >S pe rs, A. C a rlson, E. N eeb, R. Wise, W . Bigelow. Third Row- C. Kreuzer, J. H awkins, R. Thurley, L. Ambrosen, D. Landitcho, G . Lehmkuhl, F. Kissling, F . W acho wiak, K. Fuller. Fourth Ro w-H . Miles, C. McDonell, A. Schn eider, L. Erwin , W. Morse, H. Edstrom, J. O'Gara, S . Nelso n, M . Ohlson, M . P eterson .

Bottom Row- H. Sens, E . Stu ll, K. MacPh erson, A. Henderson, J. Brasc ugli, H . J o hnson, J . Gislason, H . Griffith, A . Tai t, S. Arbingast, A. Pawelek.

function of the Mu-Epsilon-Nu is to see that all freshmen are proA NOTHER perly orientated into the life of the college. Each freshman is required to wear a small purple cap and to perform certain unpleasant tasks assigned to him by the upperclassmen. This individual initiation is followed by a formal initiation of the entire group. After all have been duly initiated, they are formally welcomed . into the club at the annual men's banquet. This year the banquet was held in November at Morey HaiL Mr. Jederman acted as toastmaster and Dr. Minne was the principal speaker. The college quartet composed of Ray Brown, Edwin Neeb, John Kissling, and Walter Lynne, sang a number of songs. On March 24 the Mu-Epsilon-N u sponsored a successful all-college party. An eight-piece orchestra furnished excellent music for dancing. Facilities for playing cards were furnished for those who did not care to dance.


II Top Row- F. O'Neill, G. McCluskey, H. Edstrom, H. Griffith, R. Wise, J. Fuhlbruegge, W. Owens,) ..Kissling, S. Arbingast, R. Brown¡.

Second f-.oA~~~-¡ Fre nc h, E. Edstrom, V. Gislason, E. Ascott, W . S ny der, M. Polley, M. Selle, B. W alters,

Tbird Row- Miss Giklemcister, M. Mcintire, R . Sevcrud, B. Miiier, F. Peake, M . Bottomley, I. Uglum, G. Enger, F . W ac howiak, E . Thrunc, S. Weinberger. Bouom Row- Mr. Reed, Dr. Selle, M. Burmeister, A. Protz, H . 1\1ahlke, D. Buck, J. Gislason, A. Tait, A. Pawelek, H. Ha 1nmond.

Die-No-Mo Club BOOSTERS with a capital "B" and PEP ali in capitals, are the two main characteristics of the Die-No-Mo Club members. The purpose of the club is to give active support to ali college activities and to create and stimulate interest in them. This year the club fostered a Booster's code. Numerous student activities, such as pep meetings and programs before athletic contests, are directly under the supervision of the Die-No-Mo Club. Besides this year's Die-No-Mo production, "Up Your Sleeve", the club also gave, after the homecoming game, a buffet supper for its club members, alumni members, and members of both footbaii teams. Membership in the club is composed of students nominated by other clubs and elected by the Die-No-Mo Club. This year's officers are: Joe Gislason, "High Voltage"; Audrey Protz, "Voltage" ; Marjorie Selle, "Brush"; and Bettie Walters, "Spark" . Advisers are Miss Gildemeister and Messrs. French, Se!Je, Reed, and J ederman.


II Top Row-S. Weinberger, E. Ogrosky, H. Griffith , E. Zakraishek, J. Wachs, F. Gilsdorf, J. Kissling, S . Blatnik, S. Arbi ngast. Second Row-M. Southworth, M. Polley, R. Beseler, C. Erickson, M Bottomley, V. Kudart, B. Mills, M. Selle, E. Neeb, R. Brown. TbirdRow-L. Carpenter, F. Peake, A. Buck, M. Foss, W. Snyder, C. Weisman, F. Wachowiak, B. Walters, H. Roth, E. Thrune. Bottom Row-S . Davidson, E. Shirven, A. Pawelek, A. Schultz, Dr. Jones, Adviser, D. Buck, A. Tait, J. Gislason, H. Hammond, M. Burmeister.

Wenonah Players you faint gracefully, make love charmingly, or rave furiously? If you can, CAN the Wenonah Players will snatch you up. If you qualify after the tryout and the initiation banquet, you will become one of the members of this dramatic organization. Its purpose is to create a keener interest in dramatics. It encourages self-expression and aids the members in training t~eir dramatic ability. The club meets regularly on the first and third Monday of every month. At the program meetings, one-act plays, directed by the members, are given. An annual play is presented each fall. This year the play, under the direction of Dr. Jean Brady Jones, was A. A. Milne's "Mr. Pim Passes By." The president of the organization is Daphne Buck and the vice-president, Ray Brown. Marie Burmeister is the secretary-treasurer. Dr. Jean Brady Jones directs the club¡ activities.


Top Row- E. Burns, E. Christenson L Breitkreutz, lVl. Kanthack, N. Westman, S. Ellingson, E. Ogrosky, V. Robb, N. Wilson, F. Larson, C. Hager. Second Row- R. Henn, A. Pogue, E. Oistad, W. Snyder, E. Ames, B. Mcshke, L. Peterson, J. Garbe, H. Swenson, E. Karlstrom, E. Johnson, D. Daschler. Third Row-L. Appeldorn, M. Quigiey, R. Nusbaum, M. Buehler, H. Marek, D. Brown, H. Wyman, V. Yates, C. Christopher, M. Wilson, C. Lindgren, J. Wf'ich. Fourth Row- A. Norskog, A. Wakefield, F. Hartig, B. Failing:, D. Gotham, G. Foster, B. Hartig, C. Breyer, M. Wakefield, C. Shira, P. Ascott, D. Sutera. Fi]1b Row- C. Priebe, M. Lenton, L. Mabie, M. Foss, R. Graf, C. List, A. Fiegel, J. Schroeder, H. Souhrada, E. Sorum, H. King. M. Creed, H. Benson. Bottom Row- T. Blackwf'II, Z. Smith, E. Krocak, C. Ericksqn, I. Uglum, !vliss Richards, Adviser, H. Mixich, E. Murphy, S. Kelley, D. Greening, V. Stoppel, E. Zabel.

The Young Women's Christian Association a membership of sixty women the college chapter of theY. W. C. A. W ITH has created a closer bond of good fellowship and co-operation among the women of the college. It sponsored a course in training for Girl Reserve leadership, which was attended by seventy-four women and led by Mrs. Chalmer Jackson of the city Y. W. C. A. Social activities during the year included a splash party, "Pal" party, and Christmas and Valentine parties. The members also sponsored a hot dog stand at the World's Fair party. Interesting programs were furnished by a discussion of campus problems and a talk on his trip to Europe by Mr. Scarborough. Officers of the organization this year are: Helen Mixich, president; Sereta Kelley, vice-president; Ellen Jane Murphy, secretary; Inez Uglum, treasurer; Theda Mae Blackwell, social chairman; and Luverne Appeldorn, finance chairman. Miss Richards is the adviser.


II Top Row- B. Simon, E. Redmond, M. Thrun, D. S imon, E. Jaspers, H. Roth, L. Funk, E. Fisher. Second Row- M . Buehler, M . O 'Neill, A. Valentine, B. H artig, E. Horihan, C. Scholtes, K. Phillips, M. Weisman, E. Gibbons. Third Row- L. Schuh, M. O'Reilly, F. Hartig, E. Johns, M. Keenan, R. Griese, J . Bean, R. Nusbaum, E. Burns, B. Steffes. Fourth Row-E. Bauer, E . Krocak, R. Boyd, R . Gra f, J-1 . Mixich, C. Hager, W. Snyder, D. Wiler, A. Low, M. Jilk, C. Speltz. Bottom Row- J. B arrett, M. Curran, Z. Smith, Miss Clark, Adviser, U. Costello, E. Za kraishek, A. Hill, E. Burke, L. Miller, I. Down ing:, A. Pawelek, F. Wachowiak.

Newman Club over the weii-fii!ed pages of the Newman Club scrap book, we ONcomelooking across interesting records of book reviews, talks, musical programs, games, and refreshments. These are some of the attractive features of the meeti.ngs held on the third Sunday of every month at the St. Thomas School. Over sixty Catholic students take part in the spiritual, ~ducational, and social activities of the club. These activities vary from quarterly communion breakfasts to sleigh-rides and dancing parties. We read that for a number of years the club has been a member of the Minnesota Federation of Newman Clubs, and as such it sent delegates to the convention which was held this year in Minneapolis on February ro. Frank Wachowiak is the president of the club. Other officers are Alan Pawelek, vice-president, and Edward Zakraishek, secretary-treasurer. The adviser is Miss EI!a Clark. The Reverend Louis O'Day is spiritual adviser.


Top Row-F: Miller, J. Brown, C. Speltz, M. Mcintire, E. Kruger, K. Phillips, H . English, E . Ames. J. Barrett, B. Barstow, H. Von Wald, M. Subby, M. Hovda, A. Tait. Second Row-Z. Smith, E. Christenson, C. Breyer, R. Bung, D. Brant·, B. Johnson, E. Ogrosky, J. Milner, M. Anderson, M. Rugroden, B. Daniels, V. Yates , D. Brown.

Third Row-V. Gislason, A. Norskog, R. Hardt, E. Bauer, F. Madsen, D. Mallory, A. Pogue, C. Christopher, P. Weisman, M. Polley, M. Snyder, D. Stellmacher, R. Prentis. Fourth Row- K. Ott, C. Torgrimson, A. Andres, M. Nupen, E. Zeirdt, B. Failing, C. Scholtes, M. Burmei· ster, M . Wilson, S. Ellingson, G. Enger, A. Carlson, K. Kemple, M. O'Reilly, K. Anderson. Bottom Row- E. Redmond, C. Syverson, D. Landitcho, B. Meshke, M. Weisman, C. Weisman, H. Wyman, M . Berven, M. Skare, L. LaCasse, M. O'Neill, 0 . Sanden, E. Zakraishek.

The Junior High School Club a membership of approximately seventy students, the Junior High W ITH School Club plays an important role in the activities of the school. Their meetings are held every third Wednesday in the month, and are usually part social and part program. The January meeting was a supper meeting, while the March meeting was purely social. · Among the many interesting numbers on their year's program was a talk, "Where Are We Going?", by Miss Brunner, and a talk on creative writing by Miss Muir. The club's contribution to the World's Fair Party was the travel and transport exhibit. The aims of the club are to study the problems of the junior high school and to develop interest in the junior high schools of the state. The officers of the organization are: Charles Weisman, president; Bernice Meshke, vice-president; Mary Jane Weisman, secretary; and Helen Wyman, treasurer. Miss Brunner is the club's adviser.


II Top Row- B. Hartig, J. Weich, A. Schultz. M. Oraker, K. Jones, L. Peterson, H. Mixich, N. Wilson, M. Bedtka, V. Robb. Second Row- H. Marek, D. Duggan, M. Keenan, C. Hager, H. Souhrada, l\1. Quigley, J. Schroeder, E. Johnson, C. Fortney, E. Horihan.

Third Row- E. Berg, M. LeGros, 0. Peterson, H. Greger,

L. Boardman, E. Oistad, H. Swenson, M.

Peterson, E. Shirven, D. Daschler, G. Englerth .

Fourth Row- L. Bunge, C. Lindgren, R. Boyd, H. King, A. Valentine, A. Anderson, L. Mahle, J. Garbe, E. Sorum, M. Kanthack. Bottom Row- D. Wiler, E. Zabel, E. Krocak, Miss Clark, Adviser, F. Schultz, C. Erickson, i\1iss Cramer, Adviser, L. Appcfdorn, I. Uglum, R. Kuhn, I\liss Dallmann, Adviser, R. Richards.

Intermediate Grade Club Intermediate Grade Club is one of the largest clubs of the college this year, T HEhaving a membership of sixty-five. Regular meetings held on the third Tuesday of each month are attended by the students who are maJonng m intermediate grade teaching. Topics such as speech, health, and music, wjth emphasis on the significance of each in the intermediate grades, were discussed at several meetings. One meeting took the form of a general discussion of the 1933 World's Fair, with interesting reports by visitors there. Musical numbers added entertainment to the meetings. In order to vary the type of meetings and to increase their value, a special committee was appointed for every month. Social activities in which the members engaged were a picnic at Bluff-side park, a Christmas tea, and a spring picnic. At the World's Fair party, the Intermediates contributed a unique Minnesota exhibit. Officers for the year are: Inez Uglum, president; Catherine Erickson, vicepresident; Frances Schultz, secretary-treasurer. Miss Ella Clark, Miss Dallmann, and Miss Cramer are advisers.


II Top Row-M. Gi [man , E. Bratrud, M . Erickson, D. Voorhees, E. Ascott, M. \Veygant, l'vl. Dickerson, M. Abrahamson, M. Hoei. Second Row- B. Gregor, F. Dra pe, G. Torgrimson, K . Jo nes, C. Lindg ren, M. Wakefield, G . F oster, R. Nusbaum.

Third Row-M. Keough, M. Stussy, S. Davidson, M . C urran, T . Blackwell, B . Olcott,

J. Martin, M.

Peterson, M . Le nton.

Botlom Row- A. M ax, H. Benson, V. Stoppel, E . K arlstrom, B. Miller, A. Fiegel, C. Highum, Miss Gage, Ad viser.

Primary Club purpose of the Primary Club is to promote educational interests and to T HE encourage friendship and good fellowship among its members. The particular problems and projects of the first three grades are the topics of discussion at the meetings. Speakers at various meetings have been Miss Beverly Kenevan, instructor of corrective speech in the Winona Public Schools, who gave an illustrated talk on "Defective Speech", and Emery Leamer, director of training from the La Crosse Teachers College, who had as his topic, "Penmanship". Other activities of the club are the annual spring picnic and the ail-college party at which the club entertains. At the World's Fair Party the Primary Club presented a reproduction of Ripley's "Believe It or Not Odditorium". The officers of the club are : Betty Miller, president; Elvera Bra trud, vice-president; Virginia Stoppel, second vice-president; Helen Benson, secretary; Alice Max, treasurer; and Charlotte Shira, news reporter. Advisers are the Misses Gage, Brouillette, and Foster.

•J

,...


II Top Row-F. Hartig, M. Abrahamson, E. Grime, F . Larson, M. Bottomley, D. Sutera, M Creed. Second Row-E. Rosing, R. Graf, R. Amos, E. Howard, E. Farr, A. Muller, F. Nelson. Third Row- Miss Semling, Adviser, L. Gustafson, L. Ross. I. Downing, Miss Sutherland. Adviser, M. Jilk, M. Naylor, Miss Schwable, Adviser. Bottom Row-E. Murphy, M. Schneider, M. Southworth, D. Greening, C. Priebe, R. Lyon, R. Richardson .

The Kindergarten Club

T

HE Kindergarten Club meets regularly every thirdTuesday in the month for a business-social meeting. Among the numerous activities and social events enjoyed this past year were the Auld Lang Syne party, the "Christmas Sing" in the candle light, the spring college party, and the annual May Fete. The club's contribution to the World's Fair party was the Enchanted Island. To raise money this year for the Kindergarten Scholarship Fund, Christmas cards were sold as usual. The ways and means committee is continually trying to devise new methods by which to add to the tre¡a sury of this fund. The cooperation of the Kindergarten Mothers' Club has been splendid in this field of activity. Margaret Southworth is president of the club; Mary Jilk, first vice-president; Ellen Jane Murphy, second vice-president; Mary Elizabeth Schneider, secretary; and Dorothy Greening, treasurer. The advisers are the Misses Sutherland, Schwable, and Semling.


II Top Row- W . Jacobitz, E. Jo hns, H . Dobla r, F. G o ede, C . Bjorge, E . T e n tis , C. F or t ney, M . T o m mcrson, K. O tt. Second Row- R. Jordan , B . Stron g, R. Kolsta d, B . Brevig, D . SuiiL va n, A. Rog ers, T. B ergrud, I. M o rken, R . Johnston.

Third Row- L. Roble , 0 . Hampel, C . E ve rs , H . Hoste ttle r, M. Sny der, E. Gri eve, J. Culbertson, M . F oss,

J. N elson. Bottom Row- V. Finney, P . Hanson, R . Carlson, B . Mills , G. Smith, Miss Christ ensen, Adviser, E . Brunner, F . Rauk, M . Smiley, L. Haack .

Country Life CI ub Country Life Club was organized primarily for those students who are T HEinterested in rural teaching. Its meetings are held twice a month, and an entertainment is provided at each one. This entertainment may take the form of games, a program, or any amusement which is not included in the regular rural school course of study and which will aid the rura l teacher in her work. Various members of the faculty as well as townspeople, are frequently invited to talk to the club on certain phases of work which tend to broaden the student-teacher's knowledge of rural life and rural schools. This club also provides a yearly entertainment to which the entire college is invited. On January 13 it sponsored an all-college party which proved a great success. A new set of officers is chosen at the beginning of each quarter. Miss Christensen and Miss Bartsch are the advisers of the club.

,. (I


II Top Roiv-C. F o rt ney, M. Ordcman, D . Brant, M. W cyp;a nt, M. Rugrodcn. Second Row-C. B reyer, E. Johnson, E. Bowen, M. Quigley, M. O'Neill. Bottom Row- D . W iler. Miss Richards, Adviser, V. Lidgcrcling, J. Milner, M. Anderson.

League of Women Voters become better informed on all political questions, as well as present T ophases of government, is the purpose of the college bra nch of the National League of Women Voters. Varied subjects of political and social interest have been studied and discussed at the monthly meetings of the club. A different chairman presides over each. As their contribution to the World's Fair Party, the league of Women Voters had charge of the quaint and charming Belgian Village. Lime punch and a lmond cookies, the favorites of the late King Albert of Belgium, were served. Five delegates from the Winona College League attended the third conference of College Leagues, held last fall at Macalester College, St. Paul. The delegates were Dorothy Brant, Mrs. Marie Anderson, Christine Breyer, Edith Bowen, and Jereline Milner. Officers of this club are: president, Mrs. M a rie Anderson; vice-president, Jere!in e Milner; .and secretary-treasurer, Viola Lidgerding. Miss Richards is adviser.


II Top Row-J . Gi slason , C . W eis man , J. B ea n, L. Wi e ner. Bottom Row- H . South worth, S. Bl atnik, Dr. MinnC. Adviser, A. T ait, C. Gronvall.

Debate debate meet which will remain fresh in the minds of the stuT HEdentsoutstanding was the Cambridge debate. Michael Barkway and Alastair Sharp of Cambridge University, England, took the affirmative on the question, "Resolved: That the League of Nations is the only guarantee for World Peace". Henry Southworth and Arthur Tait took the negative stand. The debate was a non-decision one in which both teams deserved high honor and praise. Another debate was held at St. Paul and one at Eau Claire. In February, Winona, represented by Henry Southworth, Joe Gislason, Cecil Gronvaii, and Paul Berkman, participated in a tournament at St. Cloud. Winona and River Falls tied with the highest rating. The Winona negative team lost the final debate by a close margin; however, it was judged the best negative team at the tournament. The final meet was held with St. Olaf. The St. Olaf negative won one debate and the Winona negative won one. Under the excellent coaching of Dr. Minne, the squad enjoyed an interesting and l::eneficial season .

~¡,.


II Top Row-G. McClus key, J. Bu choltz, H. C hase, lVlr. T o rgerson, Adviser, W . Roth, A . Schn ei der, T . H rd licka. Bottom Row- M r. Pawelek, Ad v iser, A. T ait. W. Uel and, J. O'Gara, J. Fuhlbrueggc, W. B.ig d o w, A. Pa\\ Cl_ck.

Industrial Arts Club

THE

industrial arts department, established in rgr5 under the late J. H. Sandt, has developed from one room in the old building to its present six-room department, in which many activities a re carried on. The students in this field know, as does everyone, that a man who can take raw materials of wood and metal and make of them an article of use and beauty is as much of an artist as one who can write a perfect book or paint a lovely picture. At the regular meetings of the Industrial Arts Club, problems relating to industrial arts, and those that are not dealt _with in class work, are discussed. One yearly activity of the club is to assist in decorating for the prom. Mr. Pawelek and Mr. Torgerson are advisers of the club. The officers are as follows: James O'Gara, president; John Fuhlbruegge, vice-president; and Walter Niemi, secretary-treasurer.


II Top Row- Z. Smith, S. Sucker, P. Berkman, Or. Minn ~, Adviser, M . Selle. Second Row-M . Burme ister, D . Buck, M . Wilso n, C. Brey er, A. Groose. Bottom Row- D. Landi tcho, L. Ambrosen, H . Southworth, J. Gislason, Dr. Selle, Ad viser.

International Relations Club

T

J:IE follo;vin~ is the purpose of the International Relations Club as stated in rts constrtutron:

a. To study intelligently and discuss broadmindedly those national and international events and issues which are daily transpiring within and without our national borders and which vitally concern our American life and institutions. b. To cooperate with the authorities of Winona State Teachers College in striving to afford to the students of this institution every opportunity possible for impartial enlightenment upon international and national issues of our time. c. To align the Winona State Teachers College with other educational institutions of our immediate vicin ity, which have the interests of national and international life at heart. d. club.

To maintain a creditable scholastic standing among the members of this

One regular meeting is held each quarter; other meetings are called at the discretion of the executive committee. The officers of the club are: Henry Southworth, president; Joe Gislason, vicepresident; Lloyd Ambrosen, corresponding secretary; Dominador Landitcho, recording secretary; and Dr. Selle and Dr. Minne, advisers .

,.•


II Top Row-M. Petersen, F. O'Neill, R . Thurley, R . Prentis, J . O' G a ra, E . J as pers, D. Zimm erhakl, G. L ehmkuhl, B. La ugen. Second Row-W. Thompson, F . Moilanen, 0 . Johnso n, J. Brascugli, L. M cCown, J. Gislason, V. Viezbicke, W. Morse, D . Simon. Bottom Row- V . Herman, J. Germ, J . Kozlowski, W . Gebha rd, Mr. Galliga n, Ad viser, E. Winte r, A. Berg, W. Owens, A. Tait.

The "W" Club

T

HE membership of the "W" Club is restricted to include only those men who have earned a varsity "W" in one of the major sports: football, basketball, or track. The object of the organization is to give active support to college activities and to promote both major and minor sports. Every loyal member of this club wears this "W" sweater on all Tuesdays and Thursdays between October fifteenth and April fifteenth. A gold "W" set with nine half pearls is worn as an emblem by members. An effort is made each year by the club to donate to a worthy cause. This year a subscription to a periodical was sent to Bernard Welch, a former member, who has been in the Buena Vista Sanitorium at Wabasha for some time. To Leo Funk, basketball player injured enroute to La Crosse, the club presented an honorary "W" sweater. Verne Herman serves as president this year. Alvin Berg is vice-president, and Theodore Hrdlicka, secretary-treasurer. Mr. Galligan is adviser.


II Top Row- A. Andres~ S. Ellingson, A. Hill, R. Bung, B. Johnson, G. Enger, E. Ames. Second Row-A. Protz, H. Rogers, H. Krage. C. Breyer, E . Burke, M. Nupcn. Bottom Row-R. McDonald, H. Mahlke, W. Snyder, Miss Pendergast, Adviser, D. Buck, Miss Adviser, L. Carpenter.

Talbot~

¡

Physical Education Ciub

S

INCE I92I, under the leadership of Miss Lewis, Miss McKinley, and at present, Miss Pendergast and Miss Talbot, the Physical Education Club has rapidly grown to be an active, worthwhile organization. Girls who are majoring in physical education, and others especially interested in this field, may become members. Meetings are held on the fourth Monday of every month. Some are "play-meetings", at which the girls come dressed to play volleyball and other games. At other meetings current sport topics are discussed. A week-end camping trip is sponsored by the club each spring, and, then also, the club members present a demonstration of physical education work. New members of the club this year are Harriet Krage, Grace Enger, \Vinnifred Snyder, Ruth Bung, Audrey Protz, Marjorie Nupen, Alice Hill, and Elizabeth Burke. Winnifred Snyder is the president of the club; Hilda Mahlke is vice-president; and Ruth McDonald is secretary. Miss Talbot and Miss Pendergast are club advisers.

,.' (I


II Top Row- G. Eng lerth, N. W estman, L . Bunge, M . Erickson, E . Og rosky, E. B urns, V. Robb, E . A mes, J. Barrett. Second Row- I. Downing, D . Mallory, E. Johns, B. Johnson, H. M ixich, R. Bung, M . Kanthack, E. Christenson, C . Hager, A. Hili.

Third Row-V. Stoppel, C. B reyer, E. Hartig, M . Foss, R. Graf, H. King, C. Scholtes, V. Yates, B . D aniels. Fourth Row- 1. Ciseska, M. Nupen, M . P eterson, E. Krocak, W. Snyder, G . Enger, 5. Ellingson, E. Burke, H. Krage, D. Stellmacher. Bottom Row- D. Buck, E. Zabel, B. Failing, H . E nglis h, H . R ogers, R. M cD onald, Miss Pendergast, Adviser , I. Uglum, M. Quigley, Miss Talbot, Adviser, L. C a rpenter.

Women's Athletic Association

"WE

supply a team for every girl and a girl for every team"; "we do not play to win, but we play because we like to"-are the slogans of the W. A. A. Any woman of the college may become a member and is urged to be active in a variety of sports, thereby securing points.

These are the activities carried on by this organization: field hockey, tennis tournaments, hiking, swimming, skating, tobogganing, archery, golf, basketball, volleyball, and kittenball. Once a month the club meets for a social-business meeting. An annual banquet terminates the year's events. On October 30 of this year a Ballowe' en party was given in honor of the new members. To active members having a specified number of points gained by part icipation in the above listed activities, letters ore hevrons are awarded. Miss Pendergast and Miss Talbot are advisers of the association, and Ruth McDonald is the president. The secretary-treasurer is Margaret Quigley, and the social chairman, Helen Rogers.


II Top Row-M. Dickerson, F. Schroth, H. Mixich, D. Zimmerhaki, R. Sevcrud, M. Ordeman. Second Row-D. Burrow, A. Buck, E. Karlstrom, I. Uglum, V. Kudart, B. Miller. Bottom Row-E. Finkelnburg, M. Creed, Miss Clark, Adviser, F. Wachowiak, B. Mills, M. Bottomley.

Art Club

M

EMBERSHIP in the Art Club is determined by means of try-outs, the number of members being limited to twenty-five. New members admitted in the winter quarter were: Rose Rita Graf, Martha Hoe!, Rosamond Amos, Ruth McDonald, Cleta Scholtes, Sylvia Davidson, Ethel Kreutz, and Donald Zimmerhakl.

Among the activities in which the Art Club engaged this year was the making of puzzles and dolls at Christmas. These gifts were given to the Good Fellows for distribution to the poor children of Winona. The Art Club also undertook to catalogue the pictures in the college halls. The most important work of the club this year, as every year-, was that of planning and executing the decorations for the Prom. Near the close of the spring quarter the Art Club assisted at an exhibit of the representative work of the various art classes. Frank Wachowiak is the president of the club, Betty Miller is secretary-treasurer, and Miss Dorothy Clark is adviser.


II Top Row- D. Brant, F . Gilsdorf, P. Knopp, R . G riese, E. Edstro m, H. E dstro m, M . Po lley. Second Row--B. Walters, E. Mead, K. Jones, I. Johnson, G. Ames, C. Lindgren, B ernice Sc haffner, R. Brown. Bottom Row-A. Groose, A. Feigel, Beatrice Scha ffner, Mr. Grimm, Ad viser, J. Rohwede r, A . B ard, M . Stussy.

Mason Music Club

THEcentury Mason Music Club was named in honor of Lowell Mason. This eighteenth composer believed in instilling the love of music into a child's hea rt at a receptive age. As this could not be done satisfactorily through the heme, he introduced music into the public schools. To students interested in music the cluL offers an opportunity to gain a deeper and more appreciative understanding of music than is given in the curriculum. At the meetings musical compositions and their composers are discussed. Music, in the form of organ rolls, vocal solos, instrumental numbers, and group singing, is also featured at the meetings, which are held ¡the second Monda y in the month. Members of the club participate in these selections, thereby deepening their own appreciation and acquiring technique in appearing before an audience. Mr. Grimm is the adviser of the club. The officers are: Beatrice Schaffner, president; Edwin Neeb, vice-president; and Anita Groose, secretary-treasurer.


II Top Row-R .. Bro wn, H. Edstrom, W. Bigelow. F. Gilsdorf, C. Gronvall, A. Carlson. Second Row- H . Mil es, T . Rothwcil, F. Blatnik, J Ki ssling, E. Eds trom, M . Bunn , R. Prent is. Bottom Row--1. John son, Accompanist, Miss Rohw ede r, Director, C . McDonell, L. Wood , E. T hru n C". E . Neeb, W . Lynn e.

Apollo Club

A

LTHOUGH a comparatively young musical organization, the Apollo Club has managed to make itself known to such an extent that it is constantly in demand . The Apollo Club has this year sung at the Kiwanis Club, the Rotary Club, and the "First Round-up". It has also sung at Houston,Wabasha, and La Crosse where the club broadcast a program. At a later date the club sang at the La Crosse "Shrine Frolic". The Apollo Club left in the middle of April on its annual tour. Some of the towns included were Rochester, Mora, Biwabik, Winthrop, Chisholm, and St. Cloud. Programs were broadcast from Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth. After returning from the tour, the annual concert was given in the college auditorium, April27. Janet Rohweder is the director of the club, and Isabel Johnson is accompanist. The officers are: Ray Brown, president; Edwin Neeb, vice-president; Walter Ly nne, secretary; and Cecil Cronvall, business manager.

,.

I•


II Top Row-R. Brown, T. Rothw ell, M . Bunn , H. Edstrom , W. Bigelo w, F. Gilsdorf, J. Ki ssling. C. Cronvall, A. Carlson. Second Row-L. W ood, W. Lynne, E. Neeb, R . Prenti ss, H . Miles, F. Blatnik, C. McDonell, F.. Thrun e. Third Row-A. Protz, H. Mahlke, D. K olkbrcnncr, M. H opp, E. Ascott, B. Walters, D. M al lo ry, V. Johnson, A. Buck . Fourth Row-K. Jon es, V . Mourning, E. Murph y, L. Mill er, T. John son, E. Mead, M. Abraha mson, F. Peake. Bottom Row- A . Bard, Accompanist, A. Groosc, C. 1-lig hum, V. Wood, A. f't~igei, Mr. Grimm, Director, M. Oraker, M. Schneider, L. Carpenter, J. R o hweder.

Mixed Chorus

A

FEW years ago the Mendelssohn Club, the Apol!o Club, and some other interested individuals united to form another musical organization, the mixed chorus. This chorus practices twice a week under the direction of Walter Grimm. It sings sacred and secular music of both the serious and light type. Most of thes e songs are taken from oratorios, operas, light operas, and musical comedies. AI- • though usual!y singing with accompaniment, the chorus a lso sings a cappella music. The mixed chorus made many appearances during the year: at Commencement, Easter, Christmas, Armistice Day, and other special days. It broadcast a program from station WKBH in La Crosse, and for two evenings it assisted in the La Cross e Shriners' Crippled Children's Benefit given in the Teachers College auditorium at LaCrosse. Agnes Bard accompanies the chorus. The officers are: Clark Guile, president; Bettie Walters, secretary-treasurer; and Elizabeth Mead, librarian. Walter Grimm is the director.


II Top Row-A. Protz, M. Hopp, E. Ascott, E. Grime, B. Walters, R. Henn, E. Murphy.

Second Row- H. Mahlke, L. Miller, D. Kalkbrenner, D. Mallory, E. Mead, A. Buck. Third Row- K. Jones, V. Mourning, I. Johnson, V. Johnson, M. Abrahamson, F. Peake, M. Schneider. Bottom Row-A. Bard, Accompanist, A. Groose, C. Highum, V. Wood, Mr. Grimm, Director, A. Feigel, M. Oraker, L. Carpenter.

The Mendelssohn Club

T

HE Mendelssohn Club will this year complete its thirty-fourth year of activity in the college. Twenty-seven women, chosen by means of try-outs at the beginning of the year, belong to the organization.

This year the club appeared several times before the college. It also sang at Spring Grove and Faribault. In February the Mendelssohn Club broadcast from station WKBH at La Crosse. The grand finale of the year's activities is the spring recital. This year the recital was given May I I, with Johannes Fossum, assisting violinist. The young women usually wear dark blue robes for singing, but for the spring concert they wear evening dresses in pastel shades. Grouped informally about the piano, they present a very pleasing picture. The officers for I933-'34 are the following: Ethel Ascott, president; Virginia Johnson, vice-president; Frances Peake, secretary-treasurer; and Charlotte Bighum, librarian. Mr. Grimm is the director and Agnes Bard is accompanist.

\'


II Top Row- S. Weinberp;er, W. Jacobitz, H. Roth, E. Zakraishek, C. Bcisanz, R. Griese, J. Wachs, J. Bean, H. Johnson, H. Sens, L. LaCasse. Second Row-E. "Kruger, G. Enger, L. Ambrosen, L. Wiener, E. Jaspers, S. Arbingast, V. SwalweU, D. Zimmerhakl, L. Downing, M. Skare, E. Welch. Third Row--F. Rauk, L. Anderson, V. Kudart, M. O'Neil1, D. Su1livan, I. Morken, D. Fcddern, A. Hil1, D . Greening, A. Valentine, J. Nelson. Fourth Row-T. Blackwell, R. Lyon, F. Schultz, M. Lenton, M. Stussy, Mr. Saetveit, director, C. Welch• J. Shroedcr, H. King, V. Stoppel, H. Wyman. Bottom Row--M. Peterson, L. Roble, E. Karlstrom, C. Lindgren, I. Faber, T. Bcrgrud, M . Quigley, C. Hager, F. Hartig. M. Tommerson, J. Culbertson.

A Cappella Choir music means literally music "before the chapel hour". As a form A ofCAPPELLA singing it is very old, but in the past decade much interest has been renewed in it throughout the world. Mr. Eileif Saetveit, an experienced director of Galesville, Wisconsin, organized the college a cappella choir at the beginning of the fall quarter.

.

From the 130 persons who tried out for the choir, fifty-five were chosen as members. Russian numbers and arrangements by F. Melius Christensen were featured by the choir at its many appearances throughout the year. Numbers were presented by the group at chapel programs, the Christmas program, the alumni banquet, and at Galesville where members of the choir were guests of the Gale College Choir. College credit is given those who regularly attend rehearsals held three or four times a week. Although the a cappella choir is the newest musical organization in the college, it has made an outstanding record in this year's activities and promises a brilliant future. The officers of the choir are: Edward Zakraishek, president; Lloyd Ambrosen, vice-president; Emily Karlstrom, secretary; and Mary Ellen O'Neill, treasurer.


II B ac: k Row- M . Bu e hJ er, A. Groose. Second Row- H . Eng lis h, S. S uc ker, V. Y ates, M. N upe n, M . W eis man . Third Row- B ernice Sch a ffn er, G. S mith, L. Woo d, B eatrice Sc haffn er, M . Bun n. Fourth Row- R. Bro wn, V. Swa lwell, 0 . Thomas, A. P a welek, F . Mill er. F ifth Row--E . Gibbons, F . Gilsdorf, H . W y ma n, I. Downing , G . Lehmkuhl. Sixth Row-D . K alkbre nn er, R. Pejav ic h, W. Bixby, D . Zimmerh a kl, E. Edstrom. S eventh Row- R. Griese, E. W elc h, C. W elch, J . Bia nc hi, H . Mil es. F ront Row--Q. Jo hnson , R . Am os, R. Pre ntis, 0 . Sa nde n, W. J aco hi tz. B an dm aster- H a ro ld E ds t ro m .

The Band

T

HE zealous leadership of Harold Edstrom, combined with increased interest, has made the band this year a larger and more competent organization, cooperative in its efforts a nd pleasing and stirring in its results. New instruments and new uniforms add to the efficiency and appearance of the group, extending its appeal to the eye as well as to the ear. The band has furnished music at all hom e football and basketball games, track meets, and several chapel programs. They also made a number of trips out of town, accompanying the football team . The first band originally contained about twenty-five persons, but members of th e second band becoming eligible, the end of the second quarter found the ranks swelled to nearly fifty . This year's officers are Olaf Sanden, president, and Muriel Foss, secretarytreasurer.

\• \'


II Top Row-(Standing) A. Groose, Mr. Grimm, Director. Second Row- B. Lindsay, S. Blatnik, 0. Johnson, Bernice Schafl.ner, H. Wyman, E. Edstrom, H. Edstrom, D . Kalkbrenner, R. Richards, M. Foss. Third Row--V. Jeffrey, A . Henderson, R. Brown, IVI. Buchler, 1\1. Polley, V. Johnson, Beatrice Schaffner.

Orchestra

T

HE orchestra is one of the leading musical groups of the college. It was first organized in 1923 by Mr. Grimm, who, since that year, has been its director. The members of the orchestra are accomplished musicians, and all who participate in playing receive many educational and social values. The orchestra appears throughout the year in connection with various school activities, which include plays, Christmas programs, and recitals. This year credit toward graduation IS given to all members who attend the regular re-hearsals held twice a week. Beatrice Schaffner is the president of the orchestra and her sister, Bernice Schaffner, is the librarian. The vice-president is Ray Brown and the secretarytreasurer, Millicent Polley. As one of the many musical organizations of the college, the orchestra adds much to the artistic and cultural growth of its players and audience.


Seated- E. Neeb, W . Snyder, B. Mills. Standin g-F. Gilsdorf. M. Burmeister, F. Wachowiak.

"Mr. Pim Passes By"

U

NUSUAL and sympathetic characterization marked the Wenonah Players' presentation of A. A. Milne's well-known comedy, "Mr. Pim Passes By", Friday, December 8, I933¡ The play was directed by Dr. Jean Brady Jones. The entire action of the play took place in the morning room of the Mardens' English country home. The play covered a day in the lives of seven people, who relived their past and peered into the future by the chance conversation of a queer, harmless old gentleman, Mr. Pim. Gay humor and youthful banter were furnished by Dinah and Brian, charming gentility and cleverness by Olivia, humor and philosophy by George Marden, delightful whimsicality and exasperating forgetfulness by Mr. Pim, and dignity by Lady Marden. The cast was as follows: Mr. Pim, played by Francis Gilsdorf; George Marden and his wife, Olivia, played by Edwin Neeb and Barbara Mills; the young lovers, Dinah and Brian, played by Marie Burmeister and Frank Wachowiak; Lady Marden played by Winifred Snyder: and Anne, the maid, played by Elizabeth Shirven .

.

,.


II STROLLING THROUGH THE PARK

Die-No-Mo Show

T

HIS year's comic musicale, entitled "Up Your Sleeve", was presented in three fast moving acts, each with its share of choruses, songs, and comic dialogue. The staging and lighting of the show were unique and colorful. The costumes were striking, being unusually adapted to the atmosphere. Of course there was a boy (Fred Kissling) and a girl (Isabel Johnson). The girl had an aunt (Margaret Southworth), and the aunt had a husband (Francis Gilsdorf). The four took a trip to France, and rollicking complications immediately set in. The travelers hustled to get ready for a "bon voyage", enjoyed the genuine atmosphere of the streets of Paris, wept at the tragedy of the Apache da ncers, were cheered again by the singing gendarme, and joined in the hilarity at the opening of a Parisian night cafe. The annual Die-No-Mo Show is always written, directed, and enacted by students. The directors of this year's show were George McCluskey, Audrey Protz, Frank Wachowiak, and Hiram Griffith. Harold Edstrom directed the orchestra which played for the production .


II DOING THE FAIR

World's Fair Party

A

FTER having traveled for forty years, the light from the planet Arcturus finally reached the Teachers College auditorium at S:oo P. M., Saturday, February ro, just in time to start the World's Fair Party. The great observatories of the world caught the beam of light, flashed it to the fair grounds and the World's Fair party was officially opened. Crowds streamed down the Avenue of Flags and visited the modernistic art exhibit. Long lines waited for admittance to the Horticultural exhibit and Believe lt or Not. In the gymnasium, couples danced at the A and P dance paviLion, while barkers hoarsely shouted to them to stop at the Midway and view the amazing contents. Multi-colored lights twinkled over the Minnesota booth. Ticket punchers, stationeel at the bridge of the Enchanted Island, invited all to forget their troubles and enjoy childhood pleasures again. Strains of folk music wafted frequently from the stage as Belgian lads and lassies danced for the onlookers. When the fair grounds were officially closed for the season, the visitors departed, eager to endorse the campaign for another World's Fair party.


II SOFT LIGHTS, SWEET MUSIC- A CHINESE STREET SCENE

The Prom

A

passive-eyed Buddha, gazing from a temple doorway, kept watch over the scene of the annual prom, Saturday evening, April 14. Striking black and white street signs, deep yellow lanterns, fantastic masques, and brilliant and vivid flags transformed the college gymnasium into a Chinese street scene. Surprisingly modern melodies, which blended well with the fantastic decorations, were furnished by Irving Franckey's eleven-piece orchestra of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Beautifully costumed tea girls lured curious visitors into a quaint tea room for cooling refreshments. Chinese lanterns and opalescent street lights lent a wierd and. festive air. The pervading scent of incense was the last touch needed to put the guests completely under the spell of the orient. . Members of the prom committee were: Luverne Appeldorn, chairman; Frank Wachowiak, John Fuhlbruegge, Maxine Dickerson, Doris Kling, Anna Jane Buck, Betty Miller, Florence Schroth, Elsie Finkelnburg, and Alton Schneider, decorations committee; Mildred Wilson, refreshments; Suzette Sucker, publicity and invitations; Emily Karlstrom, programs; and Lloyd Ambrosen, orchestra .

.

.


Ill THE PASSING OF THE THIRD FLOOR BACK

"The Passing of the Third Floor Back"

T

HE 1934 class play, presented May r8, was "The Passing of the Third Floor Back" by Jerome K. Jerome. The scene is a rooming house in London at which a number of disreputable characters are staying. A stranger coming to the house, takes the vacant room on the third floor back. Under his influence the characters change, becoming honest with themselves and with each other. The play was admirably cast and well directed by Dr. Jean Brady Jones. The change brought about by the stranger was clearly shown by every member of the cast in dress, words, and actions. The cast was as follow s: Joey Wright. a retirÂŁd bookmaker. . . ...................... Willi a m Morse Christopher Penny, a painter. . . . .. . . . ........ . .. . .. . .... Ernest Winter Major Tompkins, retired. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................ . .. . Sta nley Arbingast Mrs. Tompkins, his wife. . . . . . .. ... . .. .. .. .. . ... Margaret Southworth Vivian, his daughte r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . .. ........ . . Catherine Erickson Jape Samuels, of the city. ......... . ..... . ... . . . .......... Hilbert Sens Harry Larkcom, his jackal. ......... . .. . . . .. ... . . .. . ....... Edwin Neeb Miss Kite, unattached .......... . .... . .... . ............ J e reline Milner Mrs. Percival de Hooley, cousin to Sir George Tweedle, Bart ..... .. ....... . .... Ba rbara Mills Stasi a, the slavey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . ..... .... ..... Maxine Dickerson Mrs. Sharpe, the landlady. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ...... Winnifred Snyder The Stranger. .................... . ...... . .............. . ........ James Bean


Concerts HE first number on our Community Concert Course this year was the Hall T Johnson Negro Choir which appeared in our auditorium the evening of November 27. This choir is composed of southern negroes and is led by a conductor born and brought up in Georgia. The colored choristers sang negro spirituals and other racial songs which were outstanding in emotional quality. The audience was impressed by the irresistible blend of quaint humor and pathetic appeal. Eunice Norton, whose reputation has named her the outstanding pianist to arise in America in the last decade, was the second in the series of concerts, her recital being on January 3 r. Her program was varied a nd charming; her technique was plastic, forceful, brilliant, and mature. She showed complete mastery of the instrument from which she produced an exquisitely beautiful tone. Third in the series of concerts was the Hart House String Quartet. This quartet has taken its place among the leading ensembles of the world. The members of the quartet blended their instruments in perfect harmony. The audience was especially appreciative of the fact that their program contained only music of the highest order. The last concert was that of Wilbur Evans, young Philadelphia baritone. He satisfied everyone in his audience because of his delightful music and personality. The program covered a range of music from operatic arias to a lyrical satire entitled "Vodvil". The concert course this year, under the management of Mr. French, has been an especially pleasing one, affording music lovers of the community an opportunity t o hear some of the best artists.

II


Whether we win or whether we lose With the hands that life is dealing, It is not we nor the ways we choose But the fall of the cards that's sealing.

-Richard Hovey

II


ATHLETICS •



\,

,j II COACH GLENDON E. GALLIGAN


II Top Row- L. Funk, D. Simon, A. Berg, F. Sadler, K. Fuller, L. E rwin, C. Syverson, S. Schmidt. Second Row-E. Alberts, R. Prentis, W. Tho mpson, P. Mack, J. Fuhlbrueg;ge, C. Weisman. B. Simon, E . Gibbons. Third Row- M. Peterson, F . Moilanen, F. O'Neill, 0. Thomas, E . Jaspers, W . Warrington, V . Gislason, H. Griff1th . Fourth Row-B La ngen, V. Herman, J. Germ, J. K o zlowski, E. W inte r, H . R o g ge, W . Gebhard, I. G ap pa. Fi]tb Row- W. M orse, J . Gislason, 0. Johnson, H . Chase, W. Uela nd, V. Viezbic ke, R , Thurley.

W. S. T. C. Football Schedule 1933 Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.

22- There 30-There 6*- Here r 4- There 2 r- There 28- Here 4- Here rr - There

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 1933 Stout ____ _____ _____ __ 6 Winona ___ __ ____ ____ _ o Bemidji ___________ __ _ o Winona ___ ________ __ _ 7 ~oorhead _______ _____ 6 Winona ______ ________ I2 Winona __ ___________ _ 7 La Crosse-- -- --- -- - - -33 St. Cloud ___ ___ __ _____2r Winona __ ____________ o ~ankato _______ ___ ___ 9 Winona __ ______ ___ ___ r2 Eau Claire __ __ ____ ____ o Winona ____ ____ ___ ___ 25 Rochester J. C. ___ ____ _ o Winona __ ___ __ ______ _ 6 Total __ __________ ____ 69

Total _- - - - - - - - ----- -- 75

*Night Game FOOTBALL AWARDS Football letter awards were given to: Fred ~oilanen "Peg" O'Neill Horace Chase Joe Gislason Orland Johnson Bert Laugen George Lehmkuhl Two year sweaters were awarded to: Joe Germ Gene Jaspers John Kozlowski \·.,.

Three or four year certificates were awarded to: Ernie Winter Harold Rogge

~yles

Peterson Bill Thompson Robert Thurley Elwin Alberts Irwin Gappa Delos Simon Roy Prentis William ~orse Vince Viezbicke

Verne Herman Bill Gebhard


Ill

Football 1933

T

HE 1933 Football Squad proved to be one of the best in many years. When the season opened, prospects weren't very bright for a winning team. While a number of good men were back, there were some very important positions to be filled. Among the veterans returning to the backfield were Ernie Winter, Harold Rogge, and Vince Viezbicke. In the line were Gene Jaspers, John Kozlowski, Bill Gebhard, and Joe Germ. When Coach Galligan issued the call on the opening day of school, about forty men responded, and they soon showed that they were out for business and meant to play football. WINONA 0 STOUT 6 After two and one-half weeks of practice, in which the team managed to take the kinks out of their backs and legs and learn a few plays, they journeyed to Menominee, where they met Stout Institute on the afternoon of Saturday, September 23. Although the Teachers will go on record as having outplayed Stout throughout the entire game, they were defeated because Stout blocked a punt. Stout took advantage of the break to J. Kozlowski win the game by one touchdown. Honorary Captain WINONA 7 BEMIDJI 0 On the following Saturday the Purple eleven opened their Northern Teachers College Conference games by defeating the Bemidji Teachers 7 too at Bemidji. At an opportune moment in the game, when Winona had the hall on the 50 yard line, Rogge dropped back and threw a pass to Winter, who took it on Bemidji's 20 yard line and raced over for the touchdown. Rogge's place kick for the extra point was successful. Vince Viezbicke and Ernie Winter did most of the ball carrying for Winona, getting away for some good gains. WINONA 12 MOORHEAD 6 Our first chance to see the Purple in action and also to witness a night contest came when a powerful Moorhead team invaded Winona, Friday, October 6. Moorhead had previously defeated Cqncordia of the State College Conference, but Winona rose to the occasion and won the game. Winona made ten first downs to the Dragon's seven and completed five passes to the Dragon's one. The Winona team totalled 68 yards, as compared with Moorhead's 40 yard total. WINONA 7 LA CROSSE 33 The most disastrous defeat of the season came upon the Purple when they met an extremely powerful and high classed La Crosse Teachers College football team. La Crosse, which was rated as one of the best teams in the Wisconsin Teachers College C<mference, was awarded the Conference title. It wasn't Winona's turn to click. WINONA 0 ST. CLOUD 21 The purple then traveled to St. Cloud to play their third conference game of the season, only to have their IOOO percent rating marred by a defeat. This was really the conference championship game. St. Cloud won the Northern Conference title, while Winona, with this, their only defeat, took second place. During the first half of the game both teams were playing even-up ball, each making five first clowns. The score at the half was o-o. However, with Joe Germ and Harold Rogge going out of the game on injuries, the Purple weakened in the last half of the game. St. Cloud made one touchdown in the third quarter and two more near the end of the game.

II


II " THE POWER AND THE GLORY " HOMECOMI N G GAM E,

1933

WINONA 12 MANKATO 9 Pep fests, bon fires, alumni gatherings and other events marked the annual Purple Homecoming game with Mankato on Saturday afternoon, October 28. Things looked bad, with Harold Rogge and Joe Germ out of the game because of injuries received in the St. Cloud game. But the Purple and White went out on the field all primed to win against Mankato, a rival of long standing. This victory may be attributed to the smart football which the Purple displayed. In the final period, with the score 9 to 6 in favor of Mankato, Winona pulled a trick which will go down in local football history . The Purple had the ball on Mankato's 25 yard line, second down and five yards to go. On the next play Vince Viezbicke plunged into right tackle and stopped dead. Vince lay on the ground as if injured until someone helped him up. He limped back toward his position, but as he was going backward, the Winona team lined up on the ball and snapped it back to Winter. Behind perfect interference, Winter ran 30 yards for a touchdown. WINONA 25 EAU CLAIRE 0 The Purple met Eau Claire Teachers on their own field in their semi-wind-up game of the season. Ernie Winter and Myles Peterson proved too much for the Wisconsin Peds, and as a result Winona chalked up a 25 too victory. WINONA 6 ROCHESTER JUNIOR COLLEGE 0 In the final game on Armistice day, with Rochester J. C., the Winona Teachers successfully ended their season. Winona won the game by completing a forty yard pass, Harold Rogge to Bud Morse, for the only touchdown of the game. Winona made 16 first downs to four for the Jaysees. They also had four chances to score, to Rochester's one. Notwithstanding the fact that the Purple overpowered Rochester, they couldn't push the ball across the goal line. A summary of the football season shows five games won and three lost. The team placed second in the Northern Conference and made a total of 69 points to 75 for their opponents. Winona had a fighting football team this year. Although outweighed by all their conference opponents, Winona lost only to St. Cloud, winning the other games by fight, smartness, and by team spirit. Next to Coach Galligan, a great deal of credit should go to the fine spirit and smart generalship of Johnny Kozlowski, who was acting captain in nearly all the games. The squad showed its appreciation by electing John, Honorary Captain at the end of the season. Johnny also placed on the All-Conference Team.


II Back Row-V. Viezbieke, rh; E. Winters, fb; H . R ogge, !h. Middle Row-V. Herman, qb. Front Row- W . Morse, re; E . J aspe rs, rt; J . Kozlows ki , rg; H . C hase, e; W. Gebhard, lg; F. O'Neill, It; J. Germ, Ie.

In addition, recognition should be given to many others. Ernie Winter closed a brilliant career as fullback, scoring most of the points for the Purple, and winning a place on the All-Conference Team. Harold Rogge also closed a long and eventful career as one of the mainstays of the Winona backfield. Joe Germ and Vince Viezbicke came down from the Range and played two years of real football for Winona. Many freshmen and sophomores deserve mention for what they did, but they'll be back again next year showing the same fight for the Purple and White. ALL-CONFERENCE TEAM Hoerr, Mankato ............ R. E.

Kutzman, St. Cloud ......... L. T.

Bailey, Moorhead ....... . ... R. T.

Whiting, Bemidji ........... L. E.

Harsh, St. Cloud ........... R. G.

Gorman, Duluth ............ Q. B.

C.

Winter, Winona .. . ......... R. H.

Kozlowski, Winona ......... L. G.

Rengel, St. Cloud ........... L. H.

Reider, St. Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . .

Krueger, Bemidji __ __ F. B. FINAL CONFERENCE STANDINGS 1933 W. L. T. St. Cloud ... , . . . . 4 Winona . ...... . . 3 Duluth .......... r

o

W. L. T.

Pet.

o

r.ooo

Bemidji .........

0

·750

Moorhead ..... ..

0

·500

Mankato ........

0

2

0

Pet. ·333 .orr

4

0

.000

*WINONA WINS NoRTHERN TEACHERS CoLLEGE CoNFERENCE

Because St. Cloud violated eligibility rules, they were forced to forfeit all 1933 football games, the championship thus going to Winona State Teachers College.


II Top Row-Glen Galligan, Coach, Managers: S. Schmidt, E. Gibbens, H. Griffith. Second Row- A. Pawelek, W. Warrington, F . Moilanen, V . Herman. Third Row-V. Gislason, W . Morse, J. Christensen, W . Owens, L. Hoover. Bottom Row-B. Laugen, E. Winter, J . Wachs, A. Berg, W. Ueland, L. McCown.

W. S. T. C. Basketball Schedule 1933-34 There There Here Here Here Here Here Here There There There Here There

Dec. 7 Dec. I4 Dec. r8 Jan. 5 Jan. TO Jan. I3 Jan. 20 Jan. 27 Feb. 2 Feb. 3 IO Feb. Feb. I7 Feb. 24

La Crosse T. C. .......... 3 7 Rochester Jr. C. .. .. . . ... 30 St. Mary's . . . ..... .. . .... 32 Rochester Jr. C. ......... 22 St. Mary's .. . .... .. ..... 38 Bemidji .... .. ..... .. .. . . r8 Mankato .. ... ... . .... .. . 25 ~1oorhead . ... . . ......... 40 Duluth ..... . . . . . . . . . . . ·50 Bemidji .... . . .... ... . . . -34 Mankato .. ......... .. ... 3I St. Cloud ....... . .. .. ... 24 St. Cloud .... . .. ... - - ... 43

Winona ... . ........ 21 Winona ............ 29 Winona ...... .. .... 23 Winona . ...... .. ... 23 Winona .. .. ........ 15 Winona ............ 19 Winona .. .. . .. . .... 21 Winona . . . .... .... . 22 Winona ..... .. .. . .. 19 Winona ........... -33 Winona ......... ... 28 Winona . . ...... ... . 2_5 Winona .. . . .. .... - -34

BASKETBALL AWARDS Blankets

Letters

VERNE HERMAN

ALVIN BERG

WILLIAM MoRSE

ERNEST wINTER

BERT LAUGEN

WALTER UELAND

LuTHER McCowN


Basketball 1933-34 attempting to produce any alibis, let it he said W ITHOUT that Coach Galligan's basketball team had a I933-'34

highly successful season. Disregarding games won and games lost, this year's team was made up of a fine bunch of young men, fighting every minute of the time they played, and playing clean and sportsmanlike ball in every game. WINONA-LA CROSSE On December 7 in the first game of the season, Winona put up a good fight against the highly touted Maroons of La Crosse. The play was even the first quarter, the Purple holding the lead at one time against a team they have never beaten in basketball. McCown, Laugen, and Berg shared scoring honors for Winona, with Carsten, giant La Crosse Center, being the scoring nucleus of the Maroons. The game ended 37 to 2I in La Crosse's favor. WINONA--ROCHESTER J. C. In a fast, nip and tuck game at Rochester, the Rochester Junior ALviN BERG College gained a 30 to 29 victory over Winona on December q. CAPTAI N E L ECT 1934- 1 935 Both teams started fast, hitting the basket for twenty-one points between them the first quarter, with Rochester leading by one point. The ball game became a real thriller when in the last minute of play, conversion of a two shot foul gave the Yellow Jacket quint its victory. Winter and Berg led the Winona scoring, with nine points each. WINONA- ST. MARY'S In a renewal of the rivalry existing between the Winona State Teachers and St. Mary's a closely contested benefit game for Leo Funk, injured Teachers College athlete, was played before a capacity crowd of I500 persons at the high school auditorium, December I 8. Both teams played rather ragged ball, particularly the first half. Except for one scoring rally in the third quarter by the Redmen, the teams were evenly matched, the Purple making a good many long shots from well out on the floor. · The score at the close of the game stood 32 to 23 in favor of the Redmen. WINONA- ROCHESTER J. C. Stinging under a defeat on their opponent's court earlier in the season, Winona outplayed Rochester in the second half of a return game to win a 23 to 22 decision on January 5· Starting fast, Rochester looked impressive, but the Galligan men never faltered and were rewarded by sweet revenge for their former one point defeat. Winter led Winona's scoring with six points, while Ranfranz scored eight for Roches~er Junior College. WINONA- ST. MARY'S Failure to score but four points in the last half was the deciding factor in the Purple defeat by the Redmen in the second game of the city tournament, held January IO. The Teachers also failed to check St. Mary's hard driving offense in the last half, allowing them to run the score up to 38 to I 5· This game gave St. Mary's the city championshipalong with the trophy which had been donated. McCown was high point man for the Teachers with five points. Molloch led the St. Mary's scoring with ten points.

II


II ALL SEI?

WINONA- BEMIDJI Never losing their fighting spirit although trailing most of the time, the Purple overcame a Bemidji lead in the final period to win the first game of their conference schedule, January 13. Ability to make free throws was the deciding factor in the game. Winona converted seven out of sixteen free throws while Bemidji made only two out of eight. Winter and Berg were the leading scorers for Winona with six points each. Kruger and Mittelholtz scored like numbers for Bemidji. WINONA- MANKATO On Saturday, January 20, the Purple Cagers were handed their first conference defeat by a small score. After failing to hit the basket the first half of the game, the Purple came back the third quarter in a fine rally which continued through the last quarter of the game. Shortly after the opening of the frnal period, the score was tied 2 r to 2 I. With but two minutes to play, Mankato scored with two gift shots and a field goal, ending the game 25 to 2 I in their favor. WINONA- MOORHEAD Starting with a rush which carried them to a 15-12!ead over Moorhead Teachers at the end of the first half on January 27, the Purple appeared to be well on their way to a victory. Reserve power on the part of the Dragons enabled them to overcome this lead in the second half and finally win 40-22. Robinson, Moorhead's flashy forward, led the scoring with thirteen points. Winter and McCown scored six points each to lead Winona's scoring. WINONA--DULUTH Meeting what Coach Galligan called "the best team in the conference" the Purple and White fell before the Duluth cagers at Duluth to the tune of 19 to 50, February 2. The last half was a replica of the first, with Duluth continually piling up their lead while holding Winona to a few scattered points. Enrico lead the scoring for the Duluth team with five field goals. Winter was high scorer for the Purple with three baskets and two gift shots. WINONA- BEMIDJI Showing that determination, which was the distinguishing feature of this year, Winona invaded the Bemidji court and lost a hotly contested game to the Northerners in an overtime period, by a 34 to 33 score on February 3¡ The Purple led through the first half only to have the score tied r6-r6 at the half. At the end of the regular playing time the score stood, Winona 30 and Bemidji 30. At the end of the overtime period Bemidji was ahead 34-33. Herman was high point man for Winona with nine points. WINONA- MANKATO Mankato was forced to go two over-time periods to defeat the Purple at Mankato, February ro, and were successful only after two of the Winona Teachers had been put out on fouls. The game was an uphill affair with Winona trailing through


II To p Row-S. Sc h n~ idt , M a nager, E . Win ter,\ÂĽ. Uela nd, L. McCown, Glen Galliga n, Coac h. B otto m R ow- - B. La ug c n, \\1. Mor se , A. B e rg, V . Gis laso n, V . Herm a n, Capt ain.

the first three periods, but a last period rally n early won them the game. Ern ie Winter scored the most for the Purple with ten points. Nolan, Mankato center, led for Mankato, with nine. WINONA- ST. CLOUD Play ing their best game of the season, February I7, the Purple defeated St. Cloud Teachers 25-24, to score one of the greatest upsets in the conference. Thi s was the second defeat for St. Cloud and literally put them out of first place in th e conference. Winona succeeded in maintaining a small but interesting lead throughout most of the game. Berg led the Winona scoring with eight points while Winter and Ueland followed with six each. Doane caged four nea t shot s to lead for St. Cloud. WINONA- ST CLOUD B y a 43 to 34 score, the Purple and White ended their 1934 basketball season at St. Cloud, February 23, with a defeat. Luther McCown was high point man for the purple, scoring six field goals and a brace of free throws for fourteen points. Ernie Winter followed with eight points and Walt Ueland and AI Berg with four each. The game with St. Cloud marked the end of Captain Verne Herman's and Ernie Winter's b asketball careers at Winona Teachers College. Captain Herman will be succeeded by Alvin Berg, capta in-elect for the r934-'35 season. Hiram Griffith, Sidney Schmidt, and Emmet Gibbons were the efficient managers of this yea r's team. With the expected return of all basketball men except Winter a nd Herma n, the prospects for the 1934-'35 team are exceptionally bright. FINAL CONFERENCE STANDINGS W Duluth . .. . .. . . . .. . . ... .. . . ..... . .. . 5 Mankato . ... . .... . . . ... .. .. . . . ..... ¡ 5 St. Cloud . .. . . . . . . ... . . . .. . ... ... . .. 4 Moorhead ... .. ....... . ... . . .. .... . .. 3 Winona . . . ... . . . .. . . .. .. .. . . .. . .. . . . 2 Bemidji . ...... . ........ . ..... . . . .. . . r

L

3 6 8

Pet. .833 .833 .8oo . 500 .250

. rrr

A. Berg was placed at guard on the All-Conference second tea m .


II Top Row-T. Hrdlicka, G. Engstrom, C. Bauerlcn, J. Kissling, E. Fischer, 0. Thomas, K. Fuller, J. Nelson. Second Row- E. Gibbons, Manager, 0. Johnson, D. Zimmerhakl, E. Winter, W. Owens, J. O'Gara, H. Chase, L. McCown, M. Peterson, Coach Galligan. Bottom Row- M. Laakso, B. Simon, W. Thompson, H. Roth, E. Stull, W. Franz man, L . Weiner, W. Bixby.

Track Schedule, 1934 April 27-Drake Relays, Des Moines, Ia. May

4-Dual Meet, La Crosse T. C.

May r 2-Triangular Meet, Luther College, La Crosse T. C., at La Crosse. May rg- Dual Meet, Mankato T. C. at Winona. May 26-Dual meet at Winona. E. WINTER Co-Captain 1934

June

2-State Meet, Minneapolis.

TRACK AWARDS r933 Certificate- E. Winter, T. Hrdlicka, H. Rogge, K. Svee. Letter- J. O'Gara, L. McCown, J. Brascugli. T. HRDLICKA Co-Captain 1934

Sweater-A. Kohler, A. Berg, W. Owens.

Certificates are awarded to men winning their letters three years; sweaters, to those winning their letters two years; letters, to those winning their letter for the first time.


II L. \Vcincr,J. Kissling, 0. Johnson.

1934 Track

W

ITH the graduation of five 1933 track point winners, Glen Galligan had to do some building to produce a well-rounded 1934 team from the nucleus of returning veterans. About thirty-five men comprised the team, with Ernie Winter and Ted Hrdlicka, consistent scorers last year, as co-captains. Winter was entered in the 220, 440, and the discus throw, and Hrdlicka was counted on for points in the javelin. Other men on hand were; Bill Owens [n clashes and broad-jump, AI Berg in the mile, Fred Moilanen in the pole vault and clashes, Joe Germ in the discus, Elmer Fischer and John Fuhlbruegge in the h[gh jump, and Orland Johnson and John Kissling in the hurdles. For the first time, in the initial meet of.the season, the Purple and White traveled to Des Moines, Iowa, to take part.in the Drake relays, April 27. Coach Galligan used the veterans, Ernie Winter, Don Zimmerhakl, Bill Owens, and James O'Gara, for his relay team. On May 4, a dual meet was held at La Crosse with La Crosse T. C. On May 12, a triangular meet was run off at La Crosse between La Crosse and Winona T. C. and Luther College. Mankato traveled to Winona on May 19 to participate in a dual meet between Winona and Mankato. The State meet in Memorial Stadium in Minneapolis, held on June 2, provided an opportunity for Mankato, Duluth, St. Cloud, Bemiclj[, Moorhead and Winona to participate.


II 1933- 1934 I N TRAMURAL BA SKETBALL CHAMPION S A. Tait, W . Jacobitz, L. Am b rosen , F. O' Nei ll, Captain, T. R othwell, E. Edstro m, H . Edstrom, J. W achs.

Men's Intramural Basketball

T

HE Intramural Board sponsored a l::asketball t ournament during the winter quarter, in which eight tea ms totalling fifty-six men participated. The tournament was won by the Lilies, captained by Francis, "Peg", O'NeilL The Lilies defeated the West Lodge Daisies 2 I to I I to win the championship. However this wasn't sufficient proof to the Daisies that they were not the best team and the Lilies had to beat them again by a score of 38 to 7 to prove their superiority. The tournament was managed by William Thompson. On the suggestion of Coach Glen Galligan and the Intramural Board, the referees were selected from the varsity basketball team. This ar~angement was made to encourage sportsmanship a mong the contestants and to give experience to the varsity members. FINAL INTRAMURAL STANDINGS Team Won Lilies ............. . ...... . .. .. .. . ...... . ........ . .. -5 Sweet Peas .. . . .. . .............. . . . .. . . .. ..... . ...... 4 Forget-Me-Nots ............. . . . . . .......... . ........ 4 D aisies . .. ... . .. . ....... . ....... . ... . . . ............ -4 Pansies .. . .. . . . .. . ...... . . .. ...... . .... . ......... . . -3 Buttercups ............... . .................. . ....... 2 Cowslips ... . ............. .. .. . ................... . .. I Tulips ....... . ....... . ....... . .. .. ..... . ............ I

Lost 2 2 2

3 4

5 5

Pet. .833 .666 .666 .666 ¡500 ¡333 .I67 . I67.


II 1934 INTRAMURAL VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONS L. Weiner, F. O'Neill, G. McCluskey, V. Gislason, Captain, L. Hoover, C. Syverson.

Men's Intramural Volleyball

T

HE first event on the spring volleyl:all program was an all-men volleyball tournament in which fifty-five men participated. The men were arranged into eight teams and chose bird names as their team names. Alvin Berg captained the Cranes; Vic Gislason, the Crows; Harold Roth, the Sparrows; Ted Hrdlicka, the Bluejays; Forrest Sadler, the Robins; Ted Rothwell, the Cardinals; Gene Jaspers, the Finches; and Delos Simon, the Hawks. Instead of figuring percentage rating by the number of games won, the Intramural Board decided to total the points and designate the team with the highest total as the tournament winner. The tournament was won by the Crows, with 302 total points. Harold Roth's Sparrows came close to defeating the Crows by totalling 298 points. FINAL VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS Total Points Team Crows .............. . .......... 302 Sparrows ............ .. ......... 298 Cranes ... .... . . ........... ... .. 278 Hawks ......................... 232

Team Total Points Robins .............. ... ........ 2I2 Bluerays ..... .. ... .... ......... I89 Cardinals ..... . ................. I92 Finches ............ . .. . . ..... . . 106


II 1934 TENNIS TEAM T. Rothwell, L. Hoover, D. La ndi tcho, A. Pawelek .

Tennis Schedule 1934 April 27 -

Rochester J. C., here

May

4 -

La Crosse T. C., there

May

I

r

Rochester J . C., there

May

r2

Mankato T. C., there

May r8

La Crosse T. C., here

May 26

State Meet, St. Cloud

WITH Louis Hoover, Domiriador Landitcho, William Owens, and Alvin Berg back from last year's strong tennis team, along with Ted Rothwell and other promising new members, the Teachers 1934 net squad presented the most formidable line-up of its career. Landitcho assisted Coach Boots with the team as well as with the annual college tennis tournament. Tennis as a minor sport carries with it a monogram as a reward for making the t eam.


BOXING 1934 enjoyed keen popularity during its second season as an intramural B OXING sport of the college. The class was again conducted under the able tutelage of Dave Honnig. A tournament was run off in the gymnasium of the Library building. Members of the class, and anyone in the college who wished to, participated. During this tournament Mr. Honnig acted as referee and Mr. Owens, Dr. Tozier, and Mr. Pawelek as judges. E. Winter won the heavy-weight championship; C. Guile, the light-heavyweight title; A. Berg, the welter-weight title; R. Thurley, the middle-weight title; H. Roth, the lightweight title; A. Pawelek, the feather-weight title; and R. Small, the bantam weight title. The keen interest shown and fine spirit maintained is a very deserving credit to our well established intramural system. GOLF SQUAD 1934 Golf, as a minor sport at Winona T. C., has hac! to carry on under the difficulty of having no college-owned field. This has eliminated the possibility of having outside teams here for competition. In spite of the handicap, Coach Arthur French had a number of experienced men out for the squad this year. As in the past two years, the West field course in the west end of Winona gave without charge to any eight members the privilege of playing at specified hours of the day. The Teachers College this year purchased six tickets for the same course, instead of the usual four to afford more squad members and students of the college the chance to play. The girls of the college used three of the tickets and the young men the other three. This year the squad got its usual chance for intercollegiate play when it participated iH the annual State Conference Tournament run off at the University of Minnesota on May 26 and in games played with La Crosse and Rochester. The 1934 squad was made up of Orland Johnson, James O'Gara, William Bixby, Alvin Berg, Delos Simon, and William Owens. JOINT COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS The duty of supervising major and minor intercollegiate sports including finance, schedules, awards, and handling of the games, falls to a joint studentfaculty committee on athletics. The full charge of handling all the games and receipts fell again this year to Glen Fishbaugher. The 1933-'34 joint committee was composed of: Coach Galligan, chairman, W. E. Boots, Glen Fishbaugher, George McCluskey, John Fuhlbruegge, Alan Pawelek and John Wachs. MANAGERS Probably the one connecting link between the different branches of seasonal athletics is the position of manager. This year the duties were divided between Sidney Schmidt and Emmett Gibbons. Needless to say, the service rendered was excellent; although the life of a manager is apparently anything but pleasant, the members of the squads believe that the duties were very faithfully fulfilled. As neither manager had served two years in this capacity, no sweater was awarded. Hiram Griffith, who was remunerated for his work as equipment manager, was of valuable service to the coach, squads, and college and very capably filled this position.


II Standing-L. McCown, G. McCluskey. Seated- 0. Thomas, Coach Galligan, S. Schmidt.

Intramural Board

T

HE Intramural Board is composed of five men, Mr. Galligan, ex-officio member, and one man from each of the four classes. This year's members, chosen by the Mu-Epsilon-Nu, are: freshman, Orville Thomas; sophomore, Luther McCown; junior, Sidney Schmidt; and senior, George McCluskey. The board, at the meetings held on Thursdays, arranged schedules for an elimination tournament and a round robin tournament in volleyball, inter-class volleyball and kittenball. All questions and disputes arising in connection with the tournaments are settled by the intramural board, which also elects the tournament officials. Anyone, except a member of the varsity squad, is eligible to play in the elimination tournament. Anyone who has earned a letter in a particular sport or played in two or more inter-collegiate games is ineligible to play in any round-robin tournament involving that sport.


II Frank Wachowiak, Eugene Thrunc, Millicent Polley

Cheerleaders Any basketball or football game. SCENE: "Come on, gang, let's cooperate! Get the old pepper, the old zip in it! HAVE YOU GOT IT?-YEAH BO!. W-I-N-0-N-A, W-I-N-0-N-A, WINONA, WINONA, Yeeeaaay, TEAM!" Amid much applause the white clad cheerleaders take their seats, and the student body awaits the signal for more cheering. In a few minutes the cheerleaders are at it again, arms and legs flying. Eugene Thrune ("Skinny" to us) is a regular old maestro at cheer-leading. He means business, and he gets results. His partner, Millicent Polley, proves that coeds may also lead cheers. She and "Skinny" work together with perfect rhythm and precision. Frank Wachowiak, although a new cheerleader this year, has plenty of "wim, wigor and witality", and can he make us laugh! Chearleaders are chosen by means of competitive tryouts before the student body. That's how we know the cheerleaders we have are the "cream of the crop".


II

Women's Athletics the year, the women's athletics, under the able 'supervision of T HROUGHOUT Miss Pendergast and Miss Talbot, have been carried out in a well organized and sportsmanlike manner. Intra-mural teams were chosen in such sports as hockey, soccer, kittenball, and basketball, and the games were played off in each with a feeling of cooperation and good spirit. Other activities such as tennis, golf, and hiking, were entered into enthusiastically by a high percentage of college women eager to gain mastery of the intricate skills which each sport afforded. The majors in physical education had special lessons given to them at theY. W. C. A. during the winter quarter.. These lessons enabled them to earn life-saving badges and to aid in the teaching of swimming. Any member of the college who watched a round-robin tournament game in one of the major sports during any quarter, can vouch for the benefits and the skills derived from the activities. Ail in all, this past year has been a most successful one in the physical education department.


II :!

Fall Sports

THEma;or.year's work began in the fall quarter with golf, soccer, and tennis as the sports. Soccer, which has led in the women's major sport activities of the college for many years, is rapidly increasing in popularity. This is shown by the fact that with each succeeding season more girls enter the soccer battlefield. Soccer is a sport in which many girls can participate for love of the game. It fosters the learning and development of many fine skills, all of which have a carry-over value jn future life activities. Two teams were organized under the captainships of Ruth McDonald and Helen Rogers. Of the three games played, the latter's team was successful in winning two and tying the third. Golf, the individualistic sport, has been gaining in popularity more slowly but is gradually making a name for itself. Bettie Walters took charge of golf for the fall and arranged for those interested, to meet twice a week in either the beginning or advanced classes under Miss Pendergast. Tickets for playing at theW estfield golf course were secured, and many took this opportunity to develop further their skills.


II BASKETBALL

Winter Sport s BASKETBALL, perhaps the most popular sport for women during the entire year, was entered into in a whole-hearted fashion during the winter quarter. TheW. A. A. offered basketball for both beginning and advanced players. About thirty-five women reported to advanced basketball and fifteen to beginning basketbaiL The beginning division was divided into two teams with Beulah Gregor and Jewell Nelson as captains. The former's team won two out of three games. The advanced group played off a round-robin tournament. Popular radio station calls were chosen for the four teams participating. Sophyne Ellingson's team, the W-H-O'S were the champions, having won all three games played; Margie Nupen's team, W-O-W's, had the ill luck of losing all three. Ruth McDonald's K-F-L's won two and lost one, while Laura Bunge's W-L-S's won one and lost two. These games were refereed by physical education majors and were well supported by students of the college. The participants displayed strong cooperation and good sportsmanship. Among the other sports, indoor volleyball, deck tennis, both interpretive dancing and tap dancing, and recreational games, constituted the general make-up of the winter's activities.


~-.

II TENNIS

Spring Sports is becoming a prominent spring sport for women. Under the direction T ENNIS of Miss Talbot, a large number of beginning tennis players gathered twice a week for practice in the fundamental skills of the game. The experienced players, under the leadership of Maxine Kanthack, played in the matches. Evelyn Ogrosky ably filled Ruth McDonald's place as W. A. A. president. Under her supervision, volleyball, kittenball, hiking, golf, and swimming were organized. Beth Johnson arranged for volleyball. Thirty-two girls composed four teams: the CWA, PWA, NRA, and the CCC, all of which engaged in a tournament. Miss Pendergast, assisted by Millicent Polley, offered a series of instructions in golf. For the more advanced players, tickets were supplied at the Westfield course. Kittenball was capably captained by Gwendolyn Englerth. A tournament was also played in this outdoor game with a great deal of interest and skill portrayed. Hikes and splash parties at theY. W. C. A. added to the success of the spring season. ¡


I knew them, and I may have laughed at them; But there's a laughing that has honor in it.

-Edwin A. Robinson

II


I

I

FEATURES •



II

A little of this, A little of that, Not taken from A magic hat, An outgrowth of Some frantic mind, So when you read, At least be kind!


JUST ROOi\1MATES (Nocturnal Notes) "GraYel'': Leave both alarms as set (..J.:oo A.M. ) tell me in \\Titing \Yhen you ,,¡ant to get up, eh? Paul (i\Iore notes- same night) Paulic: Arouse me from the arms of Morpheus at 7:15 A. M., April q. i\ly felicitations in return for this kindness, you rat!! Cecil (Still more- next morning

2:00

A. i\I. )

Dear Paulie and Gravel: Nuts to you both! I had a late elate and loud clanj!i~g of supposedly civilized alarm clocks is not sweet music to my ears. I wish to enjoy the dreamy, langorous, aesthetic beauty of that elate, so . . . . . I turned off both alarms. Therefore my deepest and sincerest feelings are extended to both of you barbarians when you miss several classes this morning. Don't trouble yourselves to wake me up and call me names, please. I can't hear. She boxed my earsgood morning, tut-tut, and a cheerio. Frank THE PUPPET SHOW (By Willy, age six) I \\ent once to a puppet show To see some dolls do acting. They all had hair as white as snow And manners most exacting. The heroine was pretty- but She's just a rilarionette, And anyhow I'm much too young To think of marryin' yet.

I can't resist a pretty girl alone in a canoe Again I say I can't resist a girl like thatCan you?

"LOVE" The ancients knew the wordIt stirred their hairy chests. Men's hearts went thump-a-thumping, Before they'd heard of vests. A caveman carved on a chunk of stone Those magic words, "I love you." And so, perhaps you will agree That love is nothing new. A Chinaman did the same On a beautiful hunk of jade, And thus he saved another girl From being an old maid. Oh, love! they all have had it, The Chinee, Turk, and Jew, The Arab, Swiss, and Slovak, And alas- I have it too! SOCIAL PROBLEMS vVhat's the difference between a hobo, bum, and tramp? A hobo is a migratory " ¡orker; a bum is a migratory nonworker; and a tramp is a non-migratory non-worker! (What does that make you, dear reader?)

"JUST BECUZ" I don't know whv I love her (My brain is just a fuzz) And so let's sav the reason is Well, maybe- } ust becuz!

DITTY FOUND IN A TEXT-BOOK (Author unknown) Go to school Act a fool Bluff along and then Graduate Rusticate Fall in love Two menYou decide Plav the bride Ma~-riecl!ife

Amen.


W. S. T. C. DEAD LETTER OFFICE Gentlemen: When I was in N. Y. the other day I sent home a Louis XIV bed. I now find that it is too short for my husband. Please send a Louis XV at once. Very truly yours, Helen H. Dear Sir: Your letter came. Glad you bought a team of horses. Lena is sick. She has diphtheria and will die I think. Clara died this eve. She had it too. We are quarantined. Five of Fisher's family have got it. If this thing gets worse we may have to get a Dr. Them trees are budding good. Everything is 0. K. Lena's Husband Dr. Geo. Kohut Columbia Grammar School 5 West 93rd St. New York, N. Y. Dear Sir: I read a book three years ago. Is it time yet to read another? Lois D. Dear Nellie:Us kids are learning stuff on sticks, you know like what we used to do with broom handles (they call 'em "wands" here.) They told me here, I should be a "Phy Edder" on account of I looked like I could do tricks. We do dancing too- it ain't so bad carryin your feet around but when ya gotta carry a veil, that beats everything. Gotta go now and show 'em how to do some a them things. L. Audrey Dear Sir: Received your sample of coffee and think it is fine. i\ily boy friend called this evening and I made a cup for him. It must be very good coffee because he kissed me twice before he went home after he had the coffee. If that is a sample, let me have two cans. Money order is enclosed. Please rush! Sylvia D.

Dear Frank: I thought that I had sent your marks to you long time ago, but I guess that I didn't. Here thev arc: Bin Psvch; C in the other three sub.jects. · l\.la pulled off a bright one when she saw three C's. C. C. C. She said that she knevY that You were working for the government but she didn't know that ~·ou were one of the "C. C. C." boys. Dad

A FOOLISH FABLE Once upon a time I was going somewhere, anywhere, (pick out your own favorite). I went over HILL and over DALE; finally I saw a BIGELOW house. The door was BLANK so I rang the DORMANDY BELL. "CHRISTOPHER CREED, isn't anyone home, guess I'll BUNG on the door." Finally the door opened and there stood MAC PHERSON, the BUTLER. He was dressed in BROWN. He looked so full of GRIME and GRIESE that it gave me a SKARE. I felt SMALL; my knees were FAILING. I wanted to IZLING to the LOW APPLEDORN WOOD or else BURROW my head in someone's STRONG emBRACE. MACK left and I said to myself, "Honey, T AIT so, T AIT so!" I was getting as cold as an ice BERG in WINTER. WEYGANT I go home? Some STRONG power held me. The BUTLER returned bringing me a BUNN with HAMMOND eggs. I ate them hungrily, feeling much FULLER and GUDEN warm after I was DUNN. Then the BUTLER asked if I would SELLE my SHUH or NUPEN. I replied in the negative. Then began the CHASE. 'vVe ran MILES past a CARPENTER, FISHER, and a MILLER. I turned and yelled-"! hope UELAND in that BLACK WELL. And he did. And if the BEAN doesn't jump the BUCK I'll tell you next about CARROL'S VALENTINE and ho,,· she got HERMAN!

I

I


IMPOSSIBLE SITUATIONS Dr. Minne with his hair parted in the middle. Paul Berkman: "Let that telephone ring; Barbara can wait a few minutes." Mr. Jederman: "Well class, I have a brand new joke for you today." Miss Richards: "What? Lights at the Prom! Of course not!" Mr. Owens speaking to a tardy student: "That's all right, my boy; no tardy slip is required in my class." Dr. Maxwell awarding the most skillful whistler a package of gum. Cecil Gronvall eating breakfast. Miss Rohweder during Apollo Club rehearsal: "I wish you boys wouldn't memorize music so fast." Henry Southworth whispering. Dr. Tozier: "No, I've never had an experience similar to that." Mr. Munson yelling at a pep meeting. Marie not in the activities room. Mr. Scarborough: "Let me see now, which way is north?" Hilda with short hair. Helen without Peg. No whispering in chapel. Miss Clark without a "vaze". OUR STARS FOR THE MOVIES "Counse!Ior at Law"- George McCluskey "Tarzan the Fearless"- Frank Blatnik "Alice in Wonderland"- Alice Andres "Eskimo"- Gene Jaspers "Design for Living"- Any triangle "Cavalcade"----Our four years of college "My Weakness"- Johnson and Johnson "Bombshell"- Betty Walters "Little Women"- Take four "I'm No Angel"- Winnie Snyder "'A1hen Congress Dances"- Faculty and Students

SPONGE-CAKE Skinny: "Gee, there's a swell DeMolay dance tonight. Say, can you let me have a dollar and a half?" Frankie: "Can't hear yuh; besides, I haven't got that much!"

Miss Rohweder: "Has any one a class the fifth period? We have to practice then." Gronvall: "Yeah, I got intra-mural trigonometry so I can't come!" Miss Rohweder (actually innocent): "I didn't know they were offering that course this quarter."

"TREES" UN I think that I shall never see A prof who'd make my grade a "B", A pedagogue who'd do his best To cancel every monthly test, A Bachelor of Higher Artz Who'd skip the lesson's dryer partz,

A teacher who'd anticipate A football game or concert date, A Doctor with a P. H. D. Who'd give my conference back to me. A Freshman soon becomes a Soph., But only God can change a Prof.


THING-A-MA-BOBS The smile on Coach Galligan's face when he explained the trick play used against Mankato. The reserve of Elsie Finkelnburg. John Bucholz's missing front teeth. Mr. Owens' "Let's live with this thought for a few minutes." Art Tait's scholastic abilitv. Luverne Appledorn's nose: Willard Bigelow's tuxedo at two in the afternoon. Dr. Tozier striking a "discus thrower's pose" while expounding a sociological concept. Ray Dunn's poker face. Bob Boyd's unruly hair. Miss Richard's "Good Evening". Agnes Bard's modesty. Miss Clark's hats. The "scintillating comedy" of "Up Your Sleeve". Betty Walter's "Hi, Kid". Mr. Grimm's pink shirt. Stanley "Organblast's" sideward glance from behind his glasses. Mr. Simmers' musical ability. HOW TO WIN A GIRL Some guys have gone and won their girls By doing deeds of daring, But phooey on that life for me! It's apt to prove too wearing. And other guys have jumped in lakes To save their girls from drowning. Those lucky guys get ali the breaks, My girl don't go for drowning. But when I fall in love I go And sit right down and thenInstead of deeds of daring-! Write verses with my pen. The Edstrom brothers are called "Blast and Blare". (I don't know which is worse.) Peg 0': "Speaking of cannibalism, do you know that a coach fed his team, roast dog (they didn't know about it) and ali concerned enjoyed it immensely until told about it later." Louis La. (2 minutes later): "That's what you call 'puttin' on the dog."

College is so doggone tuff In chemistry I'm zero I wish I had a fiddle I'd pretend that I were Nero I'd fry the prof upon a steak And he would be more tender Everything would then be jakeBut my chances seem so slender!


I.

As usual!

2.

Nice young couple, huh?

3 Hi, Beth

4路 "Ann"

5路 Margie and Bill

6. Mr. Pim passes by

7路 Theme song

8. Our "Irish" Twins

9路 Ernie and "Miss" Ernie

IO.

Back together again

I I.

Will you?

I2.

William!

I3. What 'cha doin', Aimer?

I4. Don't get wet.


r. What, no dumping!

2.

Grocery business?

3· Be careful, Jimmie!

4· Germ

5· Ernie

6. Five in a row make-

7· Sixteen mugs!

8. We-no-nah!

9· Winter

10.

I

Five more

r. Flat feet!

12.

The old accordin' man!

13. Do you play?

14. Gimmie a lick!


I.

Crowning the queen

2.

Eight "American Beauties"!

3路 Workin' his way thru!

4路 Both arms [ull

5路 Like father, like son

6. Pendc!

7-

("Miss" to you)

Is she always that way?

8. Practice makes perfect!

9路 Dog and two kids.

10.

1 1.

Shootin' craps

I can't play either


r. Nice hand stand

2.

How's the water?

3· Afternoon and evening.

4· Your shirts, boys!

5· Hope the limb breaks.

6. Where ya goin', Sev?

7· Maulk!

8. Yours, Aimer?

9· Howdy !

10.

I

Bottoms up!

r. Who's the horse?


r. Kermie, how could you?

2.

Charlie!

3· Two nuts and a squirrel!

4· Cave men

5· Margie, Bet, and Loie

6. Lab.

7· Tests and Measurements

8. Hockey star

9· Artificiality

I

o. Still more

I I.

"Mr." Ambrosen

I 2.

"Stanley"

I3. Double exposure

I4. Landitcho

r 5· The ice cream looks good!


I.

On your mark!

2.

Get set!

3· Go!

4· Union Labor

5· Hangin'!

6. Pretense!

7· More Pretense!

8. Long live the queen!

9· Take it and like it.

10.

Just posing

I I.

Bugology


I have no returning, onward is best, Close to the dark, sweet earth in every place; But with the sky's mark hidden in my breast, And a star's shadow falling on my face.

-Winifred Welles


'

Advertisements

THE graduating classes of 1934 heartily thank the business men of Winona 'for their contributions to the financial success of this book.

I


Printing Service PERIOR equipment and facilities enable us to offer Educational Institutions a most complete and efli:cient Printing Service. Wide experience on .College Catalogs, Annual Publications, and similar works, together with an organization of intelligent workmen under careful supervision, insure our patrons that orders will be properly filled, and that every detail of typography, presswork and binding will be accorded the attention necessary for the most effective results. LEICHT PRESS SERVICE is resourceful service. Let us submit samples to demonstrate the distinct advantage it has for you.

The Leicht Press MINNESOTA

WINONA,

Binders

Printers

---

-

--

-----,:::_="'""~~~-

--

--

--~-

---

~--

-

-


Plans and Plates IDEAS like airships, come towards us out of the haze Modern airports have every facility for the convenience of airmen and the'1r crafts. Similarly, we have every modern equipment and years of engraving experience to bnng into concrete form the ideas of o ur hundreds of dents who publish school and college annuals. Developing a theme for such issues which will thrill whenever seen, and bring back happy memories in years to come, calls for understanding, and a wide rang e of experience You will find that sort o f understanding and expe rience, as well as unsurpassed workmanship when you commit your publication to the

BUCKBEE-MEARS CO. ST. PAUL, MINN.


Supply Your Needs At- CHOATE'S

Building FOR

Tomorrow ON THE

FOUNDATIONS oF TODAY

H. Choate & Company Established I 86 I

COMPLIMENTS of

Siebrecht Floral Co.

. EAT

523 Huff St.

Can supply you with Toilet Articles, School Supplies, and Expert Koda k Work.

CAMPUS BEAUTE SHOPPE

Dolly Madison Ice Cream M anufactured by TRI-STATE ICE CREAM CO.

~trnru.anu ~ s Smart Apparel For Women "IF IT'S NEW YOU'LL FIND IT HERE"

COURTESY

HOLDEN'S

SERVICE

a nd

CAMPUS SWEET SHOP Mr. and Mrs. Sy lvester Ryan Winona, Minn.

451 Huff St.

Springdale Dairy Co. PASTE URIZED MILK, CREAM AND BUTTERMILK OF SUPERIOR FLAVOR 529 Huff St. Dial 3982


MASTER CLEANERS AND DYERS

s Phone 3030

Compliments of the

State Theatre Louis Thurow Box Factory Manufacturers of Window and Door Frames Packing Boxes and Crates Quality Mill Work Third & Wilson Winona, Minn.

THE FASHION, INC. "Tbe Store lVomen Prefer" 163 Center Street WINONA

68-70 East Fourth St.

BAILEY & BAILEY IT's A Goon PLACE To TRADE

Edwin A. Brown PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST

The Rexall Store Kodaks- Kodak Supplies New Location- 117 W. Third St.

R. D. Cone Company WHOLESALE AND RETAIL HARDWARE 66-70 East Second Street Phone 4052 Since 1855


f

rr

Pr iewert

Photos

COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE

PRI EWERT STUDIO 69 East 4th Street

Application PhotOS 25 for $r.oo 50 for $r.5o

Films Developed

Botsford L umber Compa ny Complete Line of LU MBER For Manual Trai ning PHONE 3552

It

I

wl NONA,~_j

MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF QUALIT y AT POPULAR P RICES So-IEET BAND 0RCHES TRA Mustc BooKs Music Music MusiC

Picture Framing

Compliments of

LATSCH & SON CO. WHOLESALE GROCER Winona, Minn.

REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS

W. J. DYER & BRO. ST. PAUL

MINN.

COMPLIMENTS of a

Rademacher D rug Co.

FRIEND

DRUGS-PAINT- GLASS 59 West SecondS treet

'

---

~


McCONNON & COMPANY WINONA, MINN.

1\IAL(ERS OF BETTER SPICES, EXTRACTS, AND OTI IER FOOD PRODUCTS; PURE AND DEPENDABLE FAMILY MEDICINES; RELIABLE AND ECONOJ\IICAL STOCK AND POULTRY PREPARATIONS AND OT!TER l!OUSEITOLD AND FARJ\l NECESS ITI ES OF FINEST QUALITY SI NCE 1889.

GEO.H.PLETKE STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES

NASH CLOTHING STORE

Exclusive

" H'alk a Block and Sare"

FERN DELL

QUALITY CLOTIII GAT LOW PRICES

AgPncy

Compliment s of

ALLYN S. MORGAN

Stern & Field

Jeweler

TIIE STORE FOR 1\IEN 55 W. Third

Satisfactory Service Always

\Vinona, l\1inn.

1\lAllLKE BAKING COJ\1PANY


TRAVEL by BUS 1934 YEAR OF COMMON SENSE IN TRAVEL FARES ARE LOWER EQUIPMENT IS MORE MODERN

i:! Plan Now to Visit the Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago

Four Trips Daily from Winona

You W ill See More of the Country From the Bus CHARTER A BUS AND KEEP YOUR CROWD TOGETHER - IT'S MORE FUN

SEE

YouR LocAL Bus

AGENT

PHONE

5906

OR WRITE

Northland Greyhound Lines MINNEAPOLIS

- - - - ---·


Turn In For Gas and Oil \VHEREVER YOU SEE THIS EMBLEM

( ONCE- ALWAYS }

Cities Service Oil Co.


WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE ESTABLISHED r858-85oo GRADUATES

Offers a combined general and vocational ed ucation at smailer expense to the student than · almost any other higher institution of learning.

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Elementary Scbools

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Grades and Higb Scbool

Kindergarten-Primary

Supervision, High School, etc.

Primary Grades

Fine Arts

Intermediate Grades

Industrial Arts

Upper Grades

Music

Rural Schools

Physical Education

Its four-year curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor of Education and its two-year to the diploma, with suitable and specific certification for public-school service. Send for yearbook and other literature


Lindsay Studio

THE COLLEGE BARBER SHOP

We Specialize in

Will satisfy your particular appearance GIVE US A TRIAL "We appreciate your business" C. K. SuNDBY, Prop.

STUDENT'S PHOTOGRAPHS

Good work is our motto

Compliments of

Compliments of

Mississippi Valley Public Service Company

F. W. WOOLWORTH CO. WINONA, MINN.

A Complete Line of

THE COLLEGE INN

Meats, Groceries, Picnic Supplies

450 II uff St.

WERNER & OSTROM

MEALS, LUNCHES FOUNTAIN SERVICE

519 Huff St.

Dial 2358

Wbat Can I Do Witb My Savings?

Buy Dollars for future needs or family safeguards, from a strong life insurance company Our New Booklet on Savings Explains JoHN 'vV. WILcox, Supt. Exchange Bldg. - Winona

C. J. McVey, Proprietor

FURS • Always the smartest furs in the smartest fashions. • Safe vaults for screntific storage- at low cost. • Dependable repairing by skilled fur-craftsmen.

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA Edward D. Duffield, President HOME OFFICE, NEWARK, N. J.

CONRAD'S 108 W. 3rd St.

Phone

2202


COMPLIMENTS OF

WI NONA CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION FIRST NATIONAL BANK MERCHANTS BANK WINONA NATIONAL AND SAVING BANK

TEACHERS' SERVICE BUREAU MANKATO, MINNESOTA " Personal Service in Securing a fine position for you." Rex Hill- Manager

_j

BAKER and STEINBAUER "Better Shoes" Winona- LaCrosse- Rochester

COMPLIMENTS OF THE

Winona Clinic

Winona Electric Construction Co. r 78

"Everything Electrical" Main St. Phone

FURNITURE RuGs, LINOLEUMs CHINA, GLASSWARE PICTURES, MIRRORS BAB Y CARRIAGES

COMPLIMENTS OF

Shoe

B &D

Store

"Let us fit your feet "

5802

THE GEORGE HILLYER FURNITURE CO. ESTABLISHED 1870-

INCORPORATED 1910

"The store where you find the nationally advertised lines"

r66-r68 Center St.

LAMPS AND SHADES

Winona

Minnesota


When in Winona EAT AND SLEEP At The

Buy Good Shoes and Keep Them Repaired

WILLIAMS HOTEL &CAFETERIA

A.M. BARD

Frank and John Williams, Props. Excellent Food at New Low Prices

525 Huff Street

RELIABLE INSURANCE

Compliments of

Winona Insurance Agency Exchange Bldg.

Phone 2875

HENRY G. HANSON r 58 Main Street

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairs

Students and Faculty The merchants, whose advertisements appear in this section, have

m~de

it possible for us

to publish the 1934 Wenonah. They are boosters for the college and it is up to you to show your appreciation by g1vmg these firms your patronage at all times.


AUTOGRAPHs

II


II

AUTOGRAPHS


AUTOGRAPHS

II


..