Wenonah Yearbook - 1930

Page 1

l l l~ll~ll~l lf~lflll l~i~l 1l l l ~l ~lfl l l 3 0106 00350 1110



l iP


. ..:


TI-l(,

wbnonA~

1930


II

II 1:

II

COPtdRlGWT 1930 fLORCTTA ~61ioQ.

1n

ffiURRA~ cht~F

WAROLD SlVULA BUStn<;:SS mAnAG'-R.


TH~

wbnonA~ 1930

puaL1sht.o

GRADUATlnG

B'4 rh~

CLASS~S

WlnonA STATf: Tt:AC'-lCR5

coll£GE:

w1nonA, m1nnc5orA


MRS.

T. M.

CASSIDY


DSD1CAT10n B£CAUS€ _, 1n

~1chn€S.S

OF'

pc~sonA'L1Tl.d /ln BR£A6Th And dbpTh Of' CULTURE: /tn (l£n€ROS1T\d or .SP1R1T / 1n

rm£n£ss OF' 1c5SA\.,s ,1n PA1Thrut.:nsss OF' PURPOSE:/ An6 1n WA"JS OF' PR.1£ndsh1p, Sh~ 1S 't.Uh.AT UT~ TO S€/

ASpt'R.E,

ThS ~RA6UAT1nG CLASS£5

OF

WinOnA

STAT~ T£ACh~RS colL€G~ d€61CAT£ Th1S '4€AR.rSOO'k

TO

ffiAR.GR~T

DOWD CASS1Dtd


FOR"WORD Th~

w~nonAh To comm~m-­

teao

puQpos's

ORAT~ S"V'nT~ Y~Al<S

or S~l<VlCE: An6 TO honoR. Th~ m~n An6 womm whos~ lav€: An6

. O~oTlon hRV~ mAO~

POSSlt3l'- Th~ RROGR~SS or OUR schoot.


ORD~R Of

BOOks

cAmPus AnnlV~l<S~RY

Ac3mlh1STl<AT10n cLASS~S OR~An1ZAT10ns ACT1V1T1~S

AT~l~TlCS l='~ATUR~S

•


'3 0

Hail! Minnesota Music by T. E . Rickard. '06 Minnesota hail to thee! Ha il to thee our college dea r ! Thy light shall ever be A beacon bright and clear. Thy sons and daughte rs true Will proclai m t hee near and far. They will guard t hy fa me And adore t hy name: Thou shalt be their 1 o rthern Sta r. Like the stream t hat blends to sea Like the pine t hat seeks t he blue : Minnesota, still for thee Thy sons a re strong and true. From t hy woods and waters fair: From t hy prairies waving far, At thy call they th rong With their shou t and song Hailing thee their orthern Star. -

ARTH U R UPSON,

U. M .. '05.


l

I

_____CAffiPU S___



'3 0

· Su ga r

L oaf


'3 0

College

Hall


'3 0

Ph e lp s

School


'3 0

Sh e pa r d

Hall


W es t

L o d ge


'30

Hail ! Winona Ai r : Al ma M a ter Lo, in !vlississipp i's wa ters, Blue the eternal s ky; In our hearts, 0 Alma Mater, Clear thy spi rit hig h ! CHORUS

Li ft the chorus Send it ringing Far o'er hill and va[el H a il to thee, 0 Alma Mater 1 H a iL W inona, ha il! Noble hi lls wa tch o'er t he valley Where thy d well ing lies; Steadfast hea rts. 0 Alma Mater. Gua rd thy destinies. Ever sha ll tomorrow better What today hath won; Lead thy children, Alma Mater, On, forever on I

- C. C.


AOni\JERSAR.CJ



'3 0

Seventy Years of Service HIS year is being commemorated by the Winona State Teachers College as its T seventieth year of service. Since the school opened its doors in September of 1860 as the first normal school west of the M ississippi and t he fourteent h in the United States. great changes have taken place. If we compare the earl y school with the present institution , we find that perhaps the only thing that rema ins the same is the spirit and the purpose which is never changing - that of p reparing teachers for the public schools. As a special way of celebrat ing the anniversary. a scholarship fund was begun early in the year, a special bulletin issued and the help and interest of alumni and friends of the school en listed. Seven thousand dollars was raised to be used fo r the purpose of helping worthy students. Alumni. friends. and students of the college contributed generously to the fund to make it a great success. Credit should be given to the committee members who gave much of their time and talent to this effort. It is t he purpose of this section of the Wenonah to relate some of the outstand ing incidents in the history of the school and to trace its growth to the p resent time.

..


'3 0

History of the Seventy Years years ago Winona State Teachers College had its SEVENTY beginning in the upper rooms of a hall erected by the city o f

Mr. Ogden

Winona and consisti ng of one large school room, one recitation room , a library room and a cloakroom. This was used from 1860 until 1869 when the building provided by the state was finished. From this humble beginning the college has grown in seventy years to such p roportions that it now incl udes, besides a large ma in fi rep roof building. a library and kindergarten building, a model school. three dormito ries . a n athletic field, and Carvin H eights, a rec-

reation ground. The col lege has grown not only in size but also in inAuence. Graduates may be found in almost any corner of the globe. The school has a national reputation and its students come from a ll parts of t his country as well as from the Panama Canal Zone and the Philippine Islands. The history of the seven ty years of growth is one of sacrifice and devotion of the presidents, faculty members, alumni and students who have all had a part in the shaping of its destiny. Dr . .John D. Ford of Winona is properly called the "Father of the Minnesota orma l School System.·· l t was through his suggestion that a bill was introduced into the House of Represen tatives to establish a l ormal School at Winona. The bill was amended. however, to provide for location in the city which pledged the largest amount toward the purchase of a site and the erection o f a Mr. Phelps bu il ding. The fact that the city of W inona raised within a few hours a subscription of $7.000 which was $2,000 in excess of the amount required by the act shows its desire to have the school located in the city. Ma ny t imes si nce when the school has had to face a difficult period, the friendliness and good will of the citizens of W inona has been shown. John Ogden was engaged by the Normal School Board in 1860 as the flrst princ ipa l. On September 3, 1860. two teac hers and twenty app licants m et in the upper rooms of the town hall. Three of these charter members who are still li ving, Mrs. E m ily Robertson Howe of Lewiston , Mrs. Etta H owe Hart o f Minneapolis, and Mrs. Nellie Temple Smith of Santa Rosa, California, who entered the No rma l School on t he opening day are to be awarded honorary diplomas at the specia l Commencement exercises in June. Perhaps a glimpse of early conditions and situations as told in retrospect by some of the oldest graduates of the college will g ive a clearer idea of the early school days. A letter written by Mrs. Howe g ives an interesti ng account of the fi rst school. ··1 was a mem ber of a group of you ng people gathered on the second Aoor of t he C ity bui lding on the corner of Fourth and LaFayette Streets."· she writes. "We were st rangers to each other Mr. M orey with one purpose in mind - to prepare ourselves to teach in the


'3 0

schools of the new state of Minnesota. ''The seats were benches such as you now see in the city parks. Mr. Ogden rang his bell and all started to find seats as we walked along. "I do not recall the examinat ions we had at that t ime. but I must have passed them successfully for I was assigned to my classes and began work at once. The open ing exercises were very impressive. "'The pri ncipal stt..1dies we re the three R 's - read ing, writing D r. Shepard and arithmetic. "Our recreations were few as far as the class was concerned. On one occasion we went to Rochester to the first state teachers convention in two stage loads wi t h four horses on each stage. They raced some going over Stockton hill. They w¡ere competing companies. There were no accidents. however. .. Mrs. Anna Hyde Pomeroy from the class of 1872 who now lives in Balboa Heights. Panama Canal Zone. writes: "My first knowledge of the Winona State ormal was in 1867 at the age of fourteen \\'hen I entered the grammar grade model school. "The 'ormal was in an old two story frame building near the business section. The model school was on the first floor. "Soon after t he opening of the schooL Horace Greeley came to the cit y to make a political speech in l ormal H all which was the largest building at the t ime. The senior class was seated around and back of the speaker. He looked then just like all the pictures I have seen of him since ... In 1861 P rincipal Ogden resigned his position to enter the Civ il War. His lett er of resignation gives a suggestion of t he feeling of Dr. Mdlsr>augh those stirring t imes. Winona. Minn .. Dec. 14. 1861. To the Prudential Committee of the First State :--Jorma l School of M innesota: Gentlemen: I hereby Lender you my resignation of the principalship of t he institution intrusted to my care, thanking you most sincerely for the generous support and counsel you have given me. In taking this step. it is proper that you and the pub! ic should understand the reason that impels me to it. My distracted and dishonored country calls louder for my poor services just now than the school does. I have. ever since our national flag was dishonored, cherished the desire and indulged in the determination t hat - whenever I cou ld do so without v iolation of a sense of duty - I would lay aside the habiliments of the school room and assu me those of the camp. and now I am resolved to heed that call and rush to the b reach, and with my life. if necessary. stay. if possible. the impious hands that are now clutchi ng at the very existence of our free institutions. * * lvly brethren and fellow-teachers are in the field. Some of them - the bravest and the best - have al ready fa ll en. Their Dr. M a xwell


'3 0

b lood wi ll do more to c leanse this n ation t han thei r t eaching wou ld. So will mine. I feel asha med to tarry longer. You may not urge me to st ay.

* * *

W it h these feelings. l am, with very great respect, Yours most obedient servant, jOH N 0GDEJ

Afte r Lhe res ignation of 1\ lr . Ogden, t he school was closed for two yea rs. pa rtly because of the war and partly from lack of funds. \Vith its reopening. William f. Phelps was elected p rincipa l. It was during this time tha t t he model school for practice teaching was establ ished. The school building which was erected in 1867 \\as completely destroyed by fire on December 3. 1922. The fi re occu rred during the Thanksgiving vaca tion while mosL of the students we re away. The alarm was turned in at 5:30 Sunda y morning and \\ ithin one hour Lhe entire bu ild ing \\¡as in flames. Besides the loss of the main building, the library building was damaged. T he roof was ignited by the intense heat and was destroyed. Much of the reference library consisting o f 17.000 volumes was destroyed by t he water. The model school was not da maged. The next morning without Joss of time. class wor k was resumed. Classes were held in churches and p ublic build ings generously offe red by the citizens of t he town. In September. 192-i, the new fireproof bu ilding p rovided by the Legislature was occupied for t he first time. T he n ew College Hall is modern in equipmen t and conveniences and was built at a cost of $132.000. Changes and improvements in t he cu rricu lum were continuous in order to keep up wit h the demand . In t he spring of 1921 a sign iflcant change took place when th e Legislature changed t he na me of t he school to Winona Stat e Teachers College a nd aut horized the coll ege to g rant the deg ree. Bachelor of Education. In June. I 926. the fi rst degrees were awa rded to a class consisting of t\\ o men and two women . The degree classes for each of the succeeding years have shown appreciable increases in size. The class which receives degrees this year numbers eleven. The teacher trai ning program has extended to inc lude the high school as well as t he ru ra l a nd elementary schools. T he g rowth in enroll ment in t he college has been steady . Begi nning as it d id in 1860 wit h twenty students and two teachers. we fi nd the enrollment for last yea r was 885 \\'ith a graduating class of 221 teachers including 22 degree graduat es. and a teaching staff of about forty. A college as old as Winona Teachers College has many deep-rooted and meaningful traditions. The daily chapel exercises are a pa rt of every student's life which he '' ould not care to miss. T he high standards of conduct and scholarship are outgrowths of t he influence of t he years. In short, many of t he customs a nd ideals o f t he college a re traditional. Because of the part which Lh ey have had in building these traditions and the part they have had in the development of t he school. is it of interest to know the names of the Presidents of t he school. j OH OGDEN ( 1860-61 ) I R \\'I S H EPARD ( 1879-98) W I LLI A;\! F. PHELPS ( 186-i-76) j ESSE F . 1\ It LLSPAUGH ( 1898-190-i) C H ARLES A. MoREY (1876-79) Gt;Y E. MAXWELL ( 1904-


'3 0

The Seventieth Anniversary Celebration RECOG~ IT ION

the seventieth a nni versary of our school. the Alumni SoI Nciety early in the yearof voted to create a new scholarship fund, the annual income to be used to aid "needy and worthy students." On February 7 a program in chapel fo rmally opened the campaign to secure a sum amounting to $7,000- $100 to memorialize each year. Students, a lumni, and friends of the college were asked to contribute to the memorial fund. The fund will be a perpetual tribute to the record of years gone by a nd an inspiration for the yea rs to come. At the commencement exercises in June the seventieth birthday of t he college will be fo rmally celebrated with special exercises. Honorary d ip lomas wil l be awarded to surviving members of the ll rst class. The speaker for the occasion will be Honorable W illiam ). Cooper. U. S. Commiss ioner of Education. Governor Christianson has been invited to award the diplomas to the graduates. Comm issioner of Education. J ames M . M cConnell will also be present. The comm ittees who have worked to make this celebration a success a re as follows:

GE1 ERAL COMM ITTEE Chairman, Mrs. Franc Allyn Morgan. '71. Vice Chairman. Mrs. Lucretia Archibald Botsford, ·oo. T reasurer. Ernest E. Shepard, F irst Nat ional Bank. Secretary, Miss F lorence Jackson. '09. Alumni Relations, Miss Beulah Brunner. T. C. Principal Adel ine Riedel I. · 18, John Ericcson School. Karl Holzinger, 'I I. Un iversity of Chicago. !iss Flora Trites, · 19, State Dept. of Education. Lesl ie Johnson. '27. Principal of La Crescent School. Mrs. Lucile Groff Schuler. '1 3. Winona. Mrs. J eanette Morey McConnon , '96. W inona. Mrs. Al ice Timberlake Dunmore. '98, Winona.

EXECUTIVE COMMI T TEE President. G. E. Maxwell. Chairman. Miss Louise C. Sutherland, Vice Chairman. Mrs. f-ranc Allyn Morgan, '71. Genera l Committee. Miss Theda Gildemeist er, Chairman. D irectory Committee. Art hu r T. French, Chairman Finance Committee. Miss Florence L. Richards. Cha irman Canvass Committee. Robert R. Reed. Chai rman Publicity Committee.


'30

''And It Grew and It Grew'' HEN one reviews the early record. he is impressed by the profound faith that inspired the fou nders of the ¡'First State Normal School at Winona.'¡ and he asks, " H ave the years fu lly j ustified that fa ith 7" The institution was established to serve a newly devised system of public schools, and to meet t he pressing demand for good teachers. There was no available source of trained wo rkers a nd nowhere an outstanding example to follow. There was little in the practice of that ea rl y day o r in the writings of the early leaders to guide the new enterprise. Nevertheless the school at Winona has more than fulfilled t he hopes of her founde rs. T his is perhaps best illustrated in the growth of the curricu lum. T he original course of two years beyond the eighth grade has been increased to four y ears beyond the high schooL so t hat students toda y pursue three or four t imes as much work as did h is fellows of seventy years ago. Those who developed t he curriculum have app reciated the enlarging place of the common school in the life a n d progress of the state, and have stead il y set higher standa rds of technical knowledge. expertness in execution. general culture, and that fin e expression of character called person ality. They ha ve done this under t he conviction t hat t he high gua lity of our c it izenship is our only hope of salvation . that th e most vital constructive force in our citizens hip is the p ub lic school. and that in turn the most vital element in the school is the good teache r. There is now. after seventy years of experience. a fund of expert knowledge in t eacher-training p rocedu re. gathered in hu ndreds of conferences, papers. studies and reports. It is therefore the privilege of those who now belong to the institution to m easure up to such app roved standards as will place and keep t he coll ege upon the high level justifted by t he v ital service which it is intended to ren der.

W

Pres ident Gu Y E .

MAXWELL.


•3 0

Four Year Special Graduates members of the graduating class receiving a diploma and a Bachelor of FOUR Education degree in Jun e are graduating from specia l courses. This means that throughout their four years at college, they have taken work in a special field. Leona Anderson. Esther Simpson and Ewald Kintzi will receive their B.E. degree from the music course. This qualifies them to teach and supervise mus ic in grade a nd high schools. Besides the regular music and piano classes these studen ts have studied m usica l instrumen ts. Each is able to play a t least one reed instrument. one brass instrumen t and one string instrument. All are known throughout t he college fo r their participation in musical activities. Leonard Reishus has finished four years of work in the industrial education department and will recei ve a deg ree from that course. This qualifies him to teach manual training and industrial arts in high schools. In offering these diplomas. the college is taking a s ignificant forward step in its teacher tra ining program. Th is is the fi rst yea r that music specials have completed the four year course and been granted a degree. Several students have received degrees from the industrial arts course a nd a re no w teaching.


'3 0

Fair Winona (Tune: Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms) Fair Winona, thy children in love turn to thee Whil e ou r hearts with old memories glow, Recalling the lessons we learned at t hy knee And the spirit which thou didst bestow. We shall never forget thy nu rturing care, Thy wisdom, t hy zeal for the right We turn to thee now, p ledge allegiance anew Fa ir Winona, we greet thee tonight.

-E. S. S.


~----======~~-

ADffilnt!>TRATIOD

------



'3 0

PRES IDENT GUY E. MAXWELL P cd. D. Miami University, 1920 Hamline University, 1929

MINISTRAT IV E affairs of the college are efficiently executed by President A DGuy E. Maxwell. who is this year completing twenty-six years at Teachers College. The duty of p residing at the regular chapel exercises is one of the things performed by the president of the school. During the yea r. P resident Maxwel l attends certain conventions for educators for the purpose of finding and using the most up-to-date methods of teaching. Mr. Somsen. the resident d irector. is one of the members of the Teachers College Board which dete rmines the policies of the Teachers Colleges in the state.

STL':PHEN SOMSEN. L.L.l3. DIR EC TOR


'3 0

WILLIAM H . M UNSON 13 S .. Olivet College

FLORENCJ:; L . RICHARDS A .M . U. of Michigan

ARTHUR T FRENCII A.M .. Columbia U.

SCIE:-.ICE

Dhi\N OF WOMEN

11.1 1\ n 11--.MA II CS

Physics, botany, zoology, biology, hygiene - all these subjects in science are ta ught by Mr. Munson. The college is well equipped with laboratories and other facilit ies. Four yea r students are requi red to take some work in science. Miss Richards. dean of women. in addition to responsibili ties one in her position has to filL teaches classes in Engl ish literature. Mathematics courses taught by Mr. French include arithmetic. Jun ior High School mathematics. analytics a n d trigonometry. The college offers in its va ried program a course in French under Miss Coleman. Mr. Reed teaches classes in E ngl ish a nd literature. Sha kespeare and others for whom students show a preference. ln the dramatic field, M iss Watts teac hes courses in simple and advanced wor k. In advanced dramatic work students coach and put on plays for the student body.

HELE COLEMAN B S . U. of Minnesota

ROBeRT R. REED A M . Columbia U.

RUTH BETI I \V A'ITS ME. Boswn U

FRENCH

EN<.:I..I!-111

DRAMATICS


'30

WILLIAM /\. 0\VI:':NS AM . U. of Chicago

T i lED/\ G ILDEME ISTER 1\ M . Columbia U .

EDWIN S. SELLE A.M .. Columb1a U

PSYCI IOLO(';Y

EDUCA'r JON

.SOCJOLQ(; y AN O C0VFR.Nll-·1 hNT

Since the study of education is so important in the teaching field. several educationa l courses are offered a t W inona T eachers College. T he two outsta ndi ng in this field are Psychology in wh ich Mr. Owens specia lizes and P rinc iples of Education and History of Ed ucation taught by Miss Gi ldemeister. Mr. Selle's course covers interesting problems in Sociology and Government including both local a nd national gove rnment. C urrent events are an importan t part of the course. Mr. Sca rborough teaches m ethods and facts in geography. Excursions to places o f interest add to t he prac t ical value of the subject. Information a nd help in t he library are g iven by t he ass ist ant li brarian. Miss Stech. and M iss E ngst rom . the li brarian. who a lso teaches li bra ry met hods. a pract ical course in t he work.

MILDRED ENGSTROM B.E .. W.S.T .C.

R/\ Y J . SCAR BOROUGH 1\ .M .. U . of Nebraska

LIBRMUAN

GEOG RAPHY

E R N/\ STI:':CH B.A .. U . of Wis. ASSISTANT LI B RARIAN


'30

JOliN II SAI'DT C..olumbio T. C.

PloARLE f. MALLORY

INDUSTRIAl Fl>lJCATION

PENMANSH IP

[3

E . W.S.T.C.

ROLAND TORGERSON 13 S . U . of Mmncsota INDUt.,llt.lAL l.OUGi\ liON

The college offers industrial courses under the su pervis ion of Mr. Sand t and Mr. Torgerson, who also supervises work in the training school. Miss Mallory. who has dev ised a handbook for the teaching of the Palmer Method of handw riting, supervises a nd teaches penmans hip. Students may take a course in penmanship superv ision under he r di rection. Several courses in Music are g iven. M r. Crimm teaches besides t he regular music classes, harmony and app reciation of music. Miss Rasmussen has charge of piano cl asses. To further mus ic are man y o rganizations- the band, orchestra, glee clubs a nd the Mendelssohn Club. Courses in ancient history. modern history and contemporary history are taught by ifr. Jederman, who also ser ves as dean of men .

\VAI.TI:.R G RIMM

FLORENCE RASMUSSEN

I ndtunu Stare Normal Oh1o Stutc U.

\Vest ern Univcr<;,Jl v

M US I C

PIA NO

FREDI~RICK

A. JEDERMAN A.M .. U of Nebraska

t ll"iiORY. DEAl'.

rw MEN


'3 0

FLOR E>JCE i\ ld( I N L EY l3 S . U. of l llor10JS

GLEKDON E GALLIGAN A.M., Columb on U

PIIYS I CAI IU\ ICAT I ON

PIIY .... I CI\ 1 I · Ol l( \TION

JEA TALBOT l3.A .. li. of \V osconson W ell.,lcy College PH YSICA L P.DU..:ATION

Because athletics a re such a v ital part of our college life, courses are offered not only to promote the practical phys ical side but also methods of teaching are given. In t he (Ield of rural education, classes a re conducted in rural methods and natu re study by Miss Christensen with the ass istance of M iss Ba rtsch. Rural students are given an opportunity to do pract ice teaching in the ru ra l schools which a re altll iated wit h the Teachers Coll ege. Several courses are given in literature. Mr. Boots teaches Literary Types, G rammar. Engl ish Composit ion and also Psychology.

M I LDR ED 13ARTSCII \V !>.T.C.

W ILLI S 1.:. B OOTS l\ I.A .. U o f \Vi,con" n

ErrA 0. CHRISTENSE N A.M .. Columb ia U .

R U RAL LO UCA I JON

LNG I4J:,It A,... I) PSYCIIO L()('; Y

RURAL I!DUCATION


I1'

•a o

I

DOROTII Y CLARK

r-VEL Y'l E LLINGSON . R :--.!.

A B. Warrc n<burg 1\l•.souri T C

Aclv. l),p .. W S.T C

DRAWl}'..(;

Preo.byterian llospJtal . Ch•cago

E LLA M Flf7 1ELD BE .. W.S T C 110M£ ECONO\IIC)

RESIDGNT NURSE

Students interested in art find ample opportuni ty for their interest in the art courses taught by Miss Clark. H istory of art. drawing. primary handwork. design. and classes in representative a rt are some of the subjects offered in this line. Miss F ifield supervises Home Economics. a subject offered to Junior H igh School pupils in the train ing school department. Miss Ellingson . the college nurse. has her office in t he lib rary bui ld ing on the g round Aoor. The k inderga rten. too. is in t he lib rary bu ilding on t he first floor. The entire Aoor is devoted to the tra ining of child ren in their fi rst year at school. The k indergarten cou rse has a la rge enrollment of college students who in tend to teach in that department. Miss Sutherland is directo r of th is department and is assisted by Miss Schwable and Miss Semling.

LOUISE C SUTIIERLAI"D A.M .. Columbia T. C. OIRECTO~ .KINDERCARTEN

EV I ~LYN

SEMLI NG W .S.T .C.

KI NOERGARTEN

BERTI lA SCHWAI3LE B.S .. Columb•a T. C. SUPERVISOR, KI!'-OERGAR I Cl'."


'3 0

CHARLES L. SIMMERS AM . C'.olumb ia U .

B EULA! I BRUNNeR AM . Ohoo So ate U.

D IRL:.CT O H. , PHELPS SCHOOL

SUPERVISOR . '!" RAI N ING SC HOO l.

GLEN~

E. f" ISHBAUGHER A.l3 .. Cornell College J UN IOR HI GH SCHOOL

In order that the practice teach ing in t he t rammg school may run ef-ficiently and smoothly. supervision is necessary. Mr. Simmers is the director of t he Phelps school. The Junior high school. which is in the north western wing of the college build ing is d irected by Miss Brunner with the assist ance of M iss Muir and Jvl r. ris hbaugher. who is also the college debate coach. T his departmen t is up-to-date in every detai l - equ ipment. method, and activ ities. Miss J effrey supervises mus ic instruc t ion in the Phelps school and also teaches v iolin to college and elem entary classes. M iss Speckman has for many yea rs taug ht drawing in the train ing school. The high quali ty of work done by the st udents unde r her d irection is exhib ited in the school hal ts during the yea r.

G RACE M M UIR 13 E . W S T.C.

VALETA JEFF REY B M . Northweste rn U .

BERT H A T . SP ECK MAN M ass. Normal Art School

J UN IO R HIG H SC HOOL

M US I C , 1RA I N I I"<'C SC I lOOt.

OR..t\ W INC. TRA IN ING SCI-tOOL


I

I

I'

,3 0

CL I\Ri\ STROUD A.M. Columb•a U .

MARTHA D ALLMAN B.S .. U. of Mmnesota

:-i.UPl :. RVI SO R, T RAI NING SCI-tOOl.

TRAI:-JINC SCI IOOL

LESLI E GAGE !3.S .. C..olumb•a T . C. SUP ER VJ~OP.,

I RAII'..: I l'!G SCHOOL

Miss Stroud as supervisor of the intermediate depa rtmen t of the Phelps School teaches intermediate grade methods in connection with her work. Miss Dallman is t he fifth grade supervisor. and Miss C ramer has charge of the fourth grade. Miss Gage officiates as supervisor of the primary grades. Miss Samuels has charge of the second grade. and M iss Strohbehn. the fi rst. Each critic teacher is supplied wit h an honor teacher selected from the student teachers to assist he r in her work. All student t eachers a re requ ired to a t tend critic. where helpful suggestions are g iven, problems of the school room are d iscussed and assignments made.

CATHRYN C RAMER B.A . Iowa Slate T. C.

f7RA SAMUELS B.A .. I owa Stale T. C

LOUISE STROHBEHN !3 .S . U. of Iowa

TRA I Nlf'.'(.. .SCIIOOL

TRAINING SCH OOL

P R it..·I ARY GRADES


'30

HEI.El'- B PRITCHARD i\.1-\ .. Vassar College

M RS. W. M. POTTER UOR~iTORY

MANAG hR.

ROSi\LI E VOELKER ACCOUN.r.o\,._T

SC:.CRE I ARY AND Rl:.<; I S I RAH.

The college office is alwa ys a scene of work and act1v1ty. Much of the routine work necessa ry with a school t he size of Winona Teachers College is taken care of by a competent office force. who have been speciall y trained in their own particula r lines of work. Miss Pritchard is secretary and registra r. l'vliss Voelker, the accountant, in addition to o):her duties has charge of the funds of the va rious school organiza t ions. Serv ing as stenog ra phers and office clerks are Mrs . Meyers and Miss Sielaff. M rs. \V. M . Potter. t he dormi tory manager looks after the interests and business of the three do rmitories- Morey Hall, West Lodge and S hepa rd Hall.

MRS DEAN MYERS

ANNA S IELAFF

0 1 ri CC ASSISTANT

OI'"FIC C ASSISl ANT


~---------------------------------------------------------------------~~-===~~~~~~--~

I

I'

'3 0

I

I, 1.

Ai r : U. of M. Rouser Song W i-no-na where we like to be J oily pals all boosting for victory Wi-no-na that sounds good to me We're fu ll of fun and pep and fight We'll a lways battle for the right Winona a n d Victory.


CLASSE.S



'30

IN/\ CAE I< Ir"G "I C"

Winona SOCIA L SCI EKCE

Junior High C lub L 2: Winonan 2, 3. 4 : /\rt Club 2. 3. 4 ; Le Cercle Francais 4. Pres. 4: Wenonah Players 4: Wenonah S taff 3. 4;."Tha L's It"; " Lady Windermere's Fan.

"Attention! Le Cercle Francais ...

HAROLD M. S !VUL A

CWALD K INTZI

"/-Ia{"

"£"

Eveleth

Moun tain Lake

SO\.IAL SC IEKCE

MUSIC COURSE

Wenonah P la yers 3. 4; Junior High Club 3. 4 : Oie-No-M o 3. 4: R epresenta ti ve Council 3. 4; Range C lub 3. 4 ; Men's Clu b 3. 4 : Pres. J unior C lass: Pres. Senior Class: Wenonah SLaff 4 ; Cheer Leader 3.

Mason M usic C lub I. 2. 3, 4, P res. 4: Wenonah Pl ayers 2. 3. 4. P res. 4: Art C lub 3. 4 : Orchestra I. 2. 3. 4 : M ixed Chor us 2. 3. 4. Pres. 4 : Wenonah Staff 2: Winonan Staff 2. 4; Men's Club I, 2. 3.

"Don't start an argument with me or you might get a surprise...

.. \'(ihere does his talent stop ...


'3 0

LEO>"/\ A. DERSON

ADELE BRADY

··Nonie"

""A/3""

Rochester

f-"ort Worth. Texas

MUSIC COUR.$1';

PHYSICA L EDUCAT ION

W.A./\. I. 2. 3. 4 ;Girl Scouts I. 2; lntermcdiarc Grade C lub I. 2; Le Ccrclc Francais 3; Scc"y Junior Class; Mason Music Club 3. 4. Pres. 4; Mendelssohn 3. 4; Mixed Choru~ 3. 4.

P hysical Education Club I. 2. 3. 4: W./\.A . I. 2, 3. 4: Primary C:lub I. 2; Junior High Club 3. 4: Girl Scouts I. 2. 3; Newman Club I. 2. 3. 4: Y. \V.C./\. I. 2.

" r\lways willing to do her part."

" 1\s graceful as the nymph that dances in the moonliJ:ht ..

0/\VID COHE

EMMA LOU ISE BOBZIN

"Douch"

G rinnell. Iowa EDUCATI ON AND

League of Women Voters 3: I lonor Teacher 3: Junior High Club 3. 4. Pres. 4: Preccptress of Morey f lail 3. 4: Y \V.C.t\. 4. "A/y

duty comes first ...

E.vclcLh

I~NGLI S II

SOCIAL SCIENCE

R ange Clu b 3. 4; Junior Hi gh Club 3. 4: Men 's C lub 3. 4. .. I'm

alway.~

jolly and full of fun."


'30

REGit A J<c:LLY .. Kelly'"

BER 0-:IECE SE IO LI TZ

Bloomington

\V inona

""Btm ny'"

ENGLI SH COURSE

Twin Cit y C lub I. 2. 3. 4. Sec. 4 : Girl Scouts 3. 4 : Intermediate G rade C lub 3. 4: Jun ior Hi gh Club I. 2.

junior H igh Club I. 2. 3. 4: F rench C lub 3. 4, Pres. 3. Sec. 4. ·· \'Chy does she seem so quiet''"

'"Quiet and reserved.··

LEO ARD RE !SHUS '"Bram·· Ru~hford I N D USTRI A l. ARTS

Oie-No-Mo I. 2. 3. 4. Pres. 2: \Vinonan St a ff 2: Vice-Pres. Sophomore Class: ··w·· Club I. 2. 3. 4. Vice-Pres. 4 : \l!embcr of Athletic Board 4: l!ldustria l Ed. qub I. 2. 3. 4: Represen tat ive Council 4 : Men s C lub I. 2. 3. 4: Footb nll I. 2. 3. 4. i\ss"t Coach 4. ··Truly an athlete from the start."

ESTH E R M. S I MPSO~ Chatfield MUSI C COURSE

M endelssohn I. 2. 3. 4 : M ason Music C lub I. 2. 3. 4: Primary C lub I. 2: Le Ccrcle Francais 3. 4: Mixed Chorus 3. 4 . '"Always her m usic comes first. ..


'30

Tot' How- STEN SRUD, Second /{ow Third Row -

MORSE, SAM P SON, WJBYE , F tSCHER, THOM PSON . CH II~DERS.

1-IAL S'rE:NR UD, K £ LLY, N O R DVOLO, FROEL ICH, MADER . ANDIZRSON Roaa:-.CHON, MATZ, CLA R K, KRAMER , KAPSCH, ScHROEDER, PETERSON .

The Junior Class

T HEmeasu re of the approximate size of the Senior Class next yea r is t he Junior Class of this year. The J unio r Cl ass t his year is the largest in the h istory of the college. 1t exceeds by one hundred percent or more the Junior C lass of last year. If a large per cent of this y ear's Juniors return, Winona may well expect to have a la rger Senior Class in 193 0-3 I than ever before. T h is means t ha t the fou r-year course is becoming mo re and more popular, and that we have a fine start toward this bigger and better four-yea r program. The Jun iors are exceptionally well represented in all activ ities of the college. R epresented in a thlet ics a re seven Junior Cl ass letter men . two of these participating in each of the three major sports. Severa l J un io rs are membe rs of the O ieNo-Mo as well as of the Wenonah Pl ayers. The debate team . the An nua l staff and the Winonan staff also count able members from t he J unio r Class among t heir worke rs. . . . .. . President . . . Vice President C ARLENE CLARK . . . . . . ... ... . . .... .. ... .. .. . .. . Secretary- Treasu rer MR. OwENS . . . . . . . . . .. . . • . .. ... . . . .... . ... .. .... Faculty Adviser BERNARD KRAMER . .. .. . . .. ... . • . . ' ' .... . .. . .

INEZ ADAMS . . . . . . . . • .. .. .. .. . .... . . . . .. . . . .


'30

Junior Class ADAMS, INEZ

M d<IB BEN . WENDELL

ANDERSON, Q u i RENE

MADER, GLADYS

BARTSCH, M ILDRED

MATZ, DAMIA N

BIANCHI, DEWE Y

MOR I ARITY, j O H N

CH ILDERS, FLORENCE

MORSE, FRAN CES

C LARK , DONA LD B.

MoYE R, WI LLIAM

f<I SCHER, CARL

NORBERG. FLORENCE

FROEL IC H, WILMA

NoRDVALD. H rr.DA

GARLOCK, MAXINE

ODEGAARD. A LPHA

GREENE, E L EANOR

PET ERSON, VERA

I- l ALSTENRUD, E D ITH

Rr ccro. T o NY

HAVERLAND, LESLIE

R OB ISCHON, ANNE

JAMES, C LIFFO R D

S T. JOl-IN, FER N

jENKS, MI L DRED

SAMPSON. ANTH ONY

j OHNSON, ESTELLA

SCHROEDER, WI LL! AM

j UENEMA • R IC H ARD

SELLECK, G RA CE

j

USTMAN, EDNA

SoLosKr . TH E ODORE

KAPSCH, MARIAN

SPANTON, VIRG I N IA

I<E LLEY. ALICE

E.

STE S R UD. ALMEDA

KRAMER. B ERNA R D

THO MPSON, MA R y ALICE

KRE NZI<E, H E LEN

VELTUM, OL LIE

KROP IDLOS KI, N INA

VORHEES, jOSEP H

KUJ ATH . ARNOLD

WEI

L OVELL . ARDATH

W I BY E , KAL

McDoNALD. Gw ENDO LYN

ZELL E R , PAU LI NE

'EVANGEL !

E


'3 0

J\['.;N ALLAN. ........ . .

. . R edwood Falls

JUI'-IOR lllt.H COU RSE

Junior High Club I. 2: Y .\V .CA. I : Girl ··Bring on the math problems ...

Scout~

I.

HORTENSE BARTLETT ''Ten se··. P er ry. Iowa JU N IO R H IG II COURSE

J unior High Club I. 2: Girl Scouts 2. "Many real treasures are hid in those we know but little." CLAR A AMUNDSON "Ciar" ..

. . Bricelyn

INTERMEDIATE COU RS E:

Intermed iate Grade Club I . 2: Coun try Life C lub 2: Y.\V.C.A. I : Girl Scouts 2 : Camp F ire Girls I . "Good-natured. industrious. ever ready to help." ELIZABETH BENTLEY "Betty" . S tc\\'artvillc. INIC:RMEDIATC:: AND 1-'I IYSICAL EOUCATIO

Physical Education C lub I. 2: \V.A.A. I. 2: Wenonah Pla vcrs 2: Band I. 2: Librarian : Orchestra I . 2: Girl Scouts I . 2: I ntermcdiate Grade Club I : Y.W.C.A. I : \Vinona n 2. "A bundle of pep and /tm " GERTRUDE AMUf'.:DSON "Gert" .. Stil lwater INT E RMI·.Oii\TE COU RSE

Imcrmcdiatc G rade Club I . 2: Y.\V.C.A. I : Country Life C lub 2: Girl Scout<; 2: Camp F ire Girls I . "No 1 /'m no relation to Clara(' DEWEY GIA['.;CI II .......... Mountain Iron J U NIOR HI C:I I <..OU RS L!.

Rangers Club 2: Football 2: Ba~ kctball 2: Junior High C lub 2 . Newman C lub 2 . "just give me a basketball and I'll show you my l111e ... MA RGAR ET AR "OLD "Pel(· . .. Elroy. \\'is. JU~IOR

HI C H <..OURS£:::

French Club I. 2: Jun1o r I li gh Club 2. "Neither too studious. nor too carefree." AI31GAIL BLISS " /Jab" . .. Fargo. Kl

1o.

Dakota

UERGi\R I Ei' . PRIMARY COURSE

l<indcrga rtcn C lub I . 2: \Vinonan I : Dic-NoMo 2: Wenonah Pla\ crs 2 : "Ladv \\'indermerc's Fan" : " High Hat". ·Y.W .C.;\ . 1.. 2. "A smile for everyone ... AG:"-JES BARD ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Winona JUNIOR III G H AN D MU!> IC COU RSES

Mason Music CIL•b I. 2 : Mixed Chorus 2: Junior High C lub I . 2. "Do brown eyes and happiness go together'" DONALD BOHN .....

. . Wabasha

IN I>U!> IRI AL ARI!>

Track l\ lanagcr I . nu~kc tball Manager 2. "Don't make m e blush."


'30

CARIT1\ G~ EVlt:=:VE BOYCE .. Minneapolis PRIMARY COURSE

Primary Club 2: Girl Scouts 2. French Club 2: T win City Club 2. ''To study hard bnngs its rewards."' CATHER ! E

BROO!<N~R

''J<iuy··

StcwarLvillc K I NDERGJ\RTEN-PHIMARY COURSE

K indergarten Club I. 2: Girl Scouts I : Y.W.C.A. I. ··I can work hard but I can play harder.·· CHLOROuS M. BOYD ··coa·· ....... . .. Wells INTERMCOIJ\TE COURSE

Countrv Life Club 2: Intermediate Grade C lub 2: League of Women Voters 2. ··My height never wornes me:· RE A BRuST ._ ......... .

. ... A,·oca

JU!'--IOR IIICH <.Ol.Rse

J unior High Club I, 2: Y.\\'.C.A I. 2. League of Women Voters 2 . .. She_'~ not aggressive but she has a mrnd of her own. MARIE BOYD. . .

. ..... . . . . . ~clson.

Wi~.

PRIM1\RY COl Rsl·.

.. Friendly to all. hosttle to none."' FLORE~Ct:=:

13USCI IOW ·-no ........... Wells J UN I OR HIG H COURSE

Junior High Club 2: League of Women Voters 2: Honor T cacher 2 . .. Sober. but not serious. Quiet. but not idle ... GLADYS BOYER ................. Fai rmont JUNIOR H I GII AI'D PIIYSI CAL I:.DvCATI ON COURSES

Junior High Club I. 2: Y.W.C.t\. I. 2: Cabinet Member 2: Physical Education C lub 2 . .. Glad is happy: happy is Glad ... DOROTHY V. BYLUND .. Dot...

tvlinneapolis

PRIMARY COURSI

Primary Club 2: Mcndcl,,ohn C lub 2. Twin Cit\ Club 2: \V.A.A. 2: G1rl Scouts 2. "lJ;illiance rs a grft. .. LOU ISE 1. BRI TZ "W1ee: ... . . . . . St. Charles I NTERMI:.I)IJ\TE COURSE.

Intermediate Grade C lub I. 2: Newman C lub I. 2: Girl Scouts 2: Basketba ll 2 . .. J'mfull of tricks!'' ALTA R UTH CATUN .. Rusty ...... . Faribault I NTJ:':RM E DIATE AND MUSIC COURSES

Mendelssohn Club I. 2. P res. 2: \Vinonan 2: Wenonah Staff 2: Mason Music Club I. 2: Y.\V.C.t\. I. 2: Music C hai rman of M orey H a ll; Orchestra 1. 2: Mixed C horus I , 2. Intra-Niural Volleyball 2: .. l ligh Hat .. 2. "She's everybodv's friend. To !<now her is to love her... · - -


,3 0

SOPHI E M. C H ERP '' Cherp ie·· . ...... Ivanhoe P R IMARY CO U RSe;

Twin Ci t y Club 2 ; Newman C lub 2 ; Y .W.C.A. 2: Primar y C lub 2: Gasket ball 2; Archery 2: T ennis 2 : Volleyball 2. '"Always an original resp on se.""

A N MARI E C R ONQUI ST . ... . ... Fa ribaul t IN T E RM E D IA T E AND P H YS ICAL EDUCAT ION COU RSe;

Int ermediat e C lub I. 2. P res.: Physical Educat ion Club I . 2. Vice-P res. 0 ; Y .W.C. A. I. 2. Treasu rer 2; W. A. A. I. 2: Winonan 1: Wenona h Staff 2. "'I could s it all n ight and read.""

BESS IE E . C H ILDERS ' "Bess· · ...... . . . . . El y J UN IOR HI GH COU RS E

.Junior H igh Clu b I. 2: Ran ge C lub 1_. 2 ; Girl Scouts I ; W.A.A. I. 2 : Basket ba ll 2 : Volleyba ll I. 2: Baseball I. 2. ""Of cou rse the South will do but now where I com e from -

..

FRAN K C UI N INGH AM "' Fra nkie"". Janesvil !c J UN IOR H IG H A N D INDUS TR IAL ARTS COU RS ES

M en ·s C lub I. 2: Tndustria l Ar ts Club I. 2: F oot ball I . 2: Newman C lub I . 2; Boxing: J u nio r High C lub I. 2. ··oon"t count m y height against. m e.""

V!RGT t 1/\ SYD NE Y C LEME IT "'Ginnie·· "'Panama "'. Balboa . Cana l Zone KIND E RGART E N AND P R IMA R Y COURS ES

Kindergarten Club I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2: W.J\. A. I. 2; S hepard Ha il Li brari an I. 2; Y.W .C. A. I. 2. Cabinet Member I. 2: "'High Ha t"'; Basketball 2. .. N ot m any of

LI S

take ocean voyages to college ...

NOR /\ L. D ALY "Daly"' . ... . ....... . Winona J UN IO R H IG H COURS E

J u nior H igh C lub I. 2: N ewman Clu b I. 2: G irl Scouts 2 : Band 2. "'I always think of p ractical things ...

J ANET COLL! t " jan."' .. . . . . . . . . . R ochest er I<I N D E RC ART IO:: N AND

I'R I M i\I~ Y

CO URS E S

K ind ergarten Club I. 2; Winonan I. 2; Wenonah S taff 2: French Club 2: D ie-N o-Mo 2 : Y. W.C.A. I. 2. Cabinet Member 2. "" ] want to be your f rien d ...

R UTH M . DEC KER "' Decker" . . . Zumbro Fa lls PRIM A RY CO U RS E

Primar y C lub I. 2; H onor Teacher 2 ; W.A.A. I ; Y.W.C.A. I. " Do you ever feel s illy . too'"'

ET HEL COWLES "' Cowles .. . .

.Elgin

IN T C: RMED I ATE COU RSE

Intermed iat e G rad e Cl ub I. 2 : Y.W .C. A. I. 2; 13askctba II 2. "A big heart. a big sm ile ...

P EAR L DEPU Y .

. . ...... . . . ... St . Charles

J U NI O R H IG H CO U RSE

Junioi· High Clu b 2 : G irl Scout s 2. "'She m ay not say m u ch but she k nows a lot ...


'3 0

K ATHERINE D ESM IDT "Kay Dee" Minneapolis K I NDE RGARTEN PRIMARY COURSE

Kinderga rten Club I. Secretar y 2: Shepard Hall P res. 2: cwman C lub I. 2: Twi n Ci ty Club I. 2:Art C!ub I. 2: Wenonah St aff. ;\n Editor 2: Oi e-No-Mo I. 2. ··such an artistic nature(' C LEO ENGLISH ... ... . . ........ . Albert Lea PRIM ARY COU RSE

Primar y C lub 2: French Clu b 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Y.W.C.A. 2. ··cay. pleasant. studiotiS. f riendly - how else would we describe her?'' CATH ERINE D lCKENS . .. ......... Marble INT ERME DIATE COU RSE

Wenonah Players 2: Inter mediate Grade C lub I. 2: H onor Teacher 2: G irl Scouts 2: R ange Club I. 2 : " H igh Hat" . ··come on! Le(s dance!'' JACQUELINE H. FARRELL '"jack ie·· St. Charles INTERMEDIATE COU RSE

Mendelssohn C lub 2: Intermediate C lub 2: "H igh Hat" ·. ' 'A brilliant mind that probes deep into m any channels.·· CYLA M. ELLIOT 'Stump·· . .... .

. Dassel

IN T E RMED IATE COURSE

Intermediate C lub 2: Newman C lub 2: W./\.A. 2: Girl Scou ts 2. ·-rm happy and carefree."' /\ LYCE FRAN KSON .......... . Spring Valley P RI MARY COURSE

Primary Clu b I. 2. "f laugh and look on the bright side of life ." J EAN ETI-E ELLI S "jan ... . . ... .

. .. Mabel

J UN IOR H IGH COURSE

Junior High C lub I. 2: Girl Scou ts I : W .A.A. 2: Le Cercle Francais I. 2. "If there's work to do. you can depend on m e... G R ACE FOSS ... .. . . . . .

. .. Houston

P R IMA RY COURSE

Prima ry Club I. 2. "I live every day of m y life.·· WALTER ENGER "Wally" ....... . Hardwick JUN IO R H IG H A D P HYS ICAL E DUCATION COU RSES

J unior High Club 2: !VIu Epsilon Nu I. 2: Football M anager 2: Basketba ll I. 2. "Deliberate in his actions ... BO IT/\ B. FU LLER "Bonny" . .. ... Lewiston G irl Scouts 2 : Cou ntr y Life C lub 2. "Thou has not time for boys or fame ; A m ere diplom a is thy aim."


'3 0

I<ATHR YN GAR VEY .. l<iuy·· . ..... .. Dexter IKTERME D IA I I-.

COU R~I o

InLcrmedia t e Club 2 : Newman C lub 2: League of Women Voters 2. "A smile for all... R OBERT G R IFF ITH "13ob" ........ Faribault f'IIYSICAI... E DUCA l iON COU RSE

Football I. 2: Ba~ketball I. 2: Track I. 2: Men·~ C lub I. 2. Sec. and Treas. 2: "W" C lub 2: junior High Club I. 2. "I may act quiet but don't get me wrong ... TILL! ETTA G EER DES "Tillie" .. Edgerton .. INTERMI£DIATE COU RSE

W.A.A. 2: Y . W.C.A. 2 : Girl R eserves 2 . .. Modesty often hides ones true worth ... LUC ILE IIALL "Sis" ............ .... . LeRoy PRIMARY AND MUS IC COURSES

Primar y 2: W.A.A. I. 2. Mason Music Club I. 2: Winona n 2. "Love isn't logic. give m e logic." R UTH G R AY . . . ..... . .. . .. . . . .. Claremont JUNI O R HI G H COU RSF.

Junior High Club I. 2. Scc.-Trcas. 2: W.A.A. I. 2: Honor Teacher 2 : Y.W.C.A. I : Basketball I. 2: Volleyball 1. 2: T ennis I. 2. "A f riendly smile is hers ... ALI CE E . HANSEl" "AI" ........ Forest Lake IN rt,:RMEDIA I'E COU RSE

Girl Scouts I. 2: Intermcdiate Grade Club I. 2: Y.W.C. A. I : Bas ketball 2: W.A .A. 2; Camp f7 in; G irls I . .. I'm highly eh'Vated - f rom the floor." VINA CRADSDALEN ...

. . . .. Albert Lea

PRIMARY COU RSE

Countr) Life Club I. 2: Primary C lub 2: League of Women Voters 2: Y .W.C.A. I. "Suit the action to the word ... ELEANOR M. I JANSEN . . .. .. . .. . .. St. Paul I<INOERC ARTE

COU RS E

Kindergarten Club I. 2: Oie-No-Mo I. 2: \\'cnonah Staff 2: Winonan I. 2: Art C lub. Sec. 2: Doctor of Lonesome Folk 2: " Lad y Windermere's Fan": 2 Wenonah Players 2: "lligh H at" 2: Y.W .CA I. 2. Cabinet 2. "Don't tempt m e. Silly streaks cat1se. too much hysteria.·· M ABEL A. G R EEN "Mae" . ..... lvlinneapolis JUN IO R lliCH COU RSI-.

junior High C lub I. 2: Winonan I. 2. Asst. Editor l . 2: Wen onah Staff 2: D ebate 2: Twin C ity C lub I. 2: Gi rl Scouts 2. "Oh. but she could argue - in debate ... RAYMOND HAPPE "Ray".Spirit Lake. Iowa. JUN IOR HI C II A D I NDUSTRIAL. ARTS COURSES.

Wenonah Players I. 2: Men 's C lub I. 2: Newman Club I. 2. Pres. 2: Vice-Pres. Freshman Class: P res. Sophomo re C lass: R epresentative Council I. 2: Junior High C lub I. 2: Industria l f\rt~ C lub I. 2. "He makes the most of every opportunity.··


'3 0

EDi'!A H ARRI S ..&ld1e ............... \

c..~ta

PRIMARY C:OURSi o

French Club 2: Prima ry C lub 2: W.i\.A. 2: Y.\V.C.A. 2: Basketba ll i: Baseball 2: Tennis 2: Volleyball 2: Archer y 2. ··Ready for pleasure but her work is always don e.· · DELLA M . HEEREN "Del ..... Port Byron. Ill. INTERMEDIA I E COURSE

W.AA2. "Originality com es natural to some people.'' GOLDIE M . HARR IS "Goldie" ........ . Vesta INTERMI.':OAITE COU RSE

Country Life Club I, Pres. I : W.A.A. I. 2: Intermediate Grades Club 2. Sec.-Treas. 2: Basketball 2: Girl Scouts I : Baseball 2: Archery 2: Volleyball 2. "So much 'life·. \'(/here does she get 11 a//?" R UTH HILLEMA PRIMARY t\

I . "Ruthie" . D M USI C COU R5E.S

\rlington

Primary Club I. 2: Mason Music Cl ub I. 2: Girl Scouts I. 2: Y .W.C.A. 2: W.A.A. 2: Camp Fire Girls I : League of Women Voters 2. Pres. Morey Ha ll 2. " I can certainly make the piano ·talk' ... COR A B. H ARRISON "Cody" ...... Zumbrota I NTERM ED I A I 1"': COURSE

Girl Scouts 2: Cmmtrv Life C lub 2: Y.W.C.A . 2: League of Women Voters. Vice Pres. 2: Honor Teacher 2. •'Still water runs deep.'' RITA HIRSCHFELD ............... Winona I< INDERGARTEN COURSE

l<:indergartcn Club I. 2: Die-No-Mo 2: i\rL Club I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Wenonah Sta ff 2. "/\ charming personality." VERNA HAL..:GEN . . . .

_. ... Kenyon

PRIMA R Y COURSE

Primary C lub 2: Girl Scouts 2 . .. You can manufacture blondes. but red harr comes naturally." JEA

R . HOBART "jean" . ... ..... St. Pa ul KI N D ERGARTEN-PRI MARY COU RSE

Kindergarten C lub I. 2: \Vinonan 2: 1\rt Club 2: Die-No-M o 2: Twin Cit y C lub I. 2: Y.\V.C.A. I , 2.

" Indi vidual in her manner and dress ...

DOROTHY MARIE HAWKS "l)ot" Red Wing I NTERM EDIATI·. COU RSE

Intermediate G rades Club I. 2: W.A.A. I : Wi nonan 2: Country Life C lub 2. " A sincere girl we'll all agree... ELIZABETH HOEGH "13euy" .. . Spring GrO\c INTERMED I ATE COURSE

.. \'('hy aren't all people born u•ith such a sweet disposition?"


'30

MARY HOFFNER .................... Elcor I TERME:DIAT£ COURSE

Intermediate Grades Club I. 2: Range C lub I. 2: Newman Club I. 2: \V .A.A. I : Basketball 2: Girl Scouts I : Morey H all T reas. 2: Art C lu b 2: Camp Fire Girls 2. ""\'<lhy don't you let us know you better?··

CLIFFORD C. JAMES ··auf!··...

. . . E veleth

JUNIOR JJI G H COURSE

Ran~c

Club 2: Art C lub 2: Junior High Club 2 : Men s Club 2. ""For lack of information to impart. f-Ie multiplies his words with all his heart.··

MAXI

E HOLDE1 ""Max· · .......... Winona PRIMARY AND M US IC COURSeS

Primary C lub I. 2: Mendelssohn Club I. 2: Die-I o-Mo 2: Mason Music C lub I . 2: Cheerleader 2. ··\'<Ihere have we heard that giggle before?··

MRS. VIOLA McGU IRE JOACHIM "'.fokie·· Waseca INTERMEDIA fE COU RSE

W.A.A. 2: Intermediate G rades C lub 2: G irl Scouts 2: 1ewman Club 2: Country Life C lub 2. '"Earnest in every endeavor.··

VIDA HOLDER "'Red'' ........... . C rookston JUN IOR HI CI I COU RS I"O

Junior High Club 2: Girl Scouts 2: W.A.A . 2. ··one who will ever be worth while in life.··

GE EVIEVE JOI-li SON '"john'' ... . Hayf1eld INT I': RMEDIATE COU RSE

Intermediate Grades Club 2: Mendelssohn Club 2: Girl Scouts 2: Y .W.C.A. 2. ··silence is the greatest of virtues.··

MARGARET HOPP '"Mugs·· . ........ Preston J UN IOR H IG I I AND MUS IC COURSE

Mason Music I. 2: Mendelssohn Club I. 2: Junior High C lub I. 2: Girl Scouts I. 2: Y .W. C.A. I. 2: Country Life C lub 2 : Die- 'o-Mo 2: \V.A .A. I. 2: \Vinonan 2: Honor Teacher 2 : Band 2. ''My fi ngers '1/opp" right over the piano keys.· ·

ISFOLD S. JOSEFSO ........ .. .. . M inneota JUNIOR HI C II COU RSE

Junior High C lub 2: Country Life C lub 2: Girl Scouts 2. ''! \ sunny smile and a cheerf ul disposition .· ·

MUR IEL HOYME ··1-/oyme·· ....... .. ... Hills PHYS ICAL EDUC A I"ION AN I) IN I t::RM E.DIATECOURSES

Intermediate Grades C lub I. 2: Physica l Education C lub 2: Y.W.C.A. I. 2: W.A.A. 2: Winonan I : G irl Scou ts 2: Intramura l Basketball I. 2. .. I'm a good shot -

in basketball ...

ALf-'1 II LD J ULSETH '"1\l"" . .. . .. . Minneapolis JUNIOR I II GH

CO URS~;

J unior High Club I. 2: Girl Scouts I : Wenonah Players I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2 : Dic-No-Mo 2: Twin Ci t y Club I. 2. Pres. 2. '"Such grace of m a nner. spe<ch. and dress ...


'3 0

WALT ER f< ANGAS .. \'<Ially" . ........ K inney IND USTR I AL ARTS COU RSE

Ind ust rial Arts Club J. 2: Di e-No-Mo I. 2: Men's C lub I. 2: Range Club I. 2. Pres. 2: Band I. 2. Librarian 2: Mixed Chorus I : Orchestra 1: Tennis 1. 2: "Kitchen Cabinet ... "!\ prom inent member of the bachelor's club. IDA f< ILE

"lder" ...

. .Lakefield

PRIM ARY COURSE

Primarv Club I. 2: Girl Scouts 2: Y.W.C.A. 2. "Short ·~nd sweet. .. DOROTHY KATER "Dotty"..

. .. Pine R iver

PRIMARY COURSE

Primary C lub 2: Lc Cercle Franca is 2: Girl Scouts 2: W.A .A. 2: Band 2: Orchestra 2 . .. I play a baby sax ... !ONA f< IRCH "J<irchie" . . . .

. Lake City

P!-IYS!CA L EDUCATION OCURSI::

Wenonah Staff 2: W.A.A. I. 2. Sec.-Treas. 2: Y.W.C.A. I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Winonan I. 2: Junior H igh Club I. 2: D ie-No-Mo I : 2. Art Club 2: P h ysical Education Club I, 2. "Studies never worry me." LUELLA I<EITHAHN "Wow·· ... ... Fairmont jUNIOR H IG H COU RSE

Junior H igh Club 2: Country Life Club 2: Girl Scouts 2. "Oh. it's good to be alive ... J OSEPH It E K.J E LLAND "Jo" .. . .. .St. Paul K INDERGARTEN-PRIMARY COURSE

Winonan StafT I. 2: Wenonah Players 2: DieNo-No I. 2: Kindergarten C lub I. 2: Art C lub I. 2: W.A.A . I. 2. 'Brimful of pep and m ischief." LI N DA E. KETr lE R "Lindy" Canova. So. Dakota PRIMARY COURSE

Prima ry Club 2. " A winning way a pleasant sm ile." IR VIN KOPREN "frv" . . Sherman. So. Dakota JUNIOR l-II G H COURSE

Men's Club 2: J unior High Clu b 2. .. 'Tis better to have com e and bluffed, T han not to have come a£ all." SELMA A. KETT IER "Sammy" Canova. So. Dakota PR IMARY COU RSE

Primary Club 2 . .. Live and energetic." V IOLA K R AMER "Vi'' ... PRIMARY COURSE

Primary Clu b I. 2: Y .W.C.A. I. "A good time is my aim."

.Hayfield


'30

BE RTH1\ I<R ET ZSCHMAR ..

. .. . Rochest er

PR IMA RY COU RSE

Primarv C lub I. 2: Winonan I. 2: Wenonah Staff 2: League of Women Vote r~ 2: D ebate 2: I lonor Teacher 2 : Class Pla v 2. "I find tim e to study and still tahe part in a host of act ivities ... MARION LEHMA J UN I O R

.. Winona HI G ~I

COURSE

junior High Club I. 2: G irl Scouts I. "Qu iet and unassuming... R lJTH KROCI<O\V .. Ruthie" .. . .... . Rushford PHYS I CAL E D UCAT I O N COU RS E

Primm·y C lub I. 2: Y.W.C. A. I. 2. Cabinet 2: Phvsical Eudca tion C lub 2. Scc .-Trcas. 2: 13askcrba ll 1. 2 . .. I always get m y work don e... O RMA Ll C H TTENECC ER .

. .. Gaylord

PR I M AR Y COU R SE

Primar y C lub I. 2: Girl Scouts 2: Y .\V.C.1\ . 2: League of Women Vot ers 2. " 1/er ways are pleasant ways ... AlJCliST A LARJ< IE.

. ... Minneapolis

PRI M A RY COURSE

Prima r y Club 2: \Vinonan 2: W.A.r\. 2 : Girl Scou ts 2: Newman Club 2: Country Life C lub 2: Twin C it y Club 2. "A deliberate and practical thinker." LILLl A.

Ll G E F ELT E R .

. Lewiston

I N TIO:RM E D I A fE COU R SE

Intermediate G rades C lub I. 2: Y.W.C.A . I. 2 . .. S he doesn't make herself known." B ARBAR A LEE " B abs" ........ . Spring Grove I NTERM ED I A TE COURSE

Basketball 2. " She e:xcells in many things." AR V ILLA LUD W IT ZKE " B ill" ... . Lake C ity I N T E RMEDI ATE COURSE

Intermedia te G rades C lub 2: G irl Scouts 2 : Y.W.C.A . 2. " Truly fond of athletics ... ELEA OR E LEG RID "Curly" .... . . Appleton PRIM A R Y COURSE

Prima ry Club 2 : W.A.A . 2: Y .W.C: A 2: League of Women Voters 2. "B lessed with curly locks ... RONALDI NE M AcC ILVR AY " Ronnie" Trempea leau. Wis. JUNIO R HIC II COURS E

Girl Scou ts I, 2: Junior H igh Club I. 2: Country Life C lub I. 2: Y.\V.C.A. 2. "She spreads cheer all around her."


'30

MAR Y M . 1\ lc:CAl 'LEY ............ . S t. Paul I N 'I I·:RM ED I A I " COURSE

Intermediate C lub 2: Iewman Club I. 2. Honor Teacher 2 . .. C:t•er courteous and well bred ... MADALENE M . M EA D ............... \Ve il ~ I NTERMI-.D I AT E COURSE

Coumn · Life C lub 2: Intermed iate Club 2: Y .\V.C~A. 2. " I wake up with a sm ile and carry it through the day ... ETHEL Mc:lvll LLAN ...

. . ... H ou~ ton

PR IMA RY COU RSE

P rimnn Club 2. "She does her own thinking ... L!\VONE M E LLQlJ IST . ....... . . . . Gaylord P R I MARY COUR SE

Primary Club I. 2: Girl Scouts 2: Y.\\'.C. \ . 2: League of Women Voters 2 . .. \'0 10 does not envy her. school-girl co,m fl/ex ion _?.. MARGAR ET

!eVE l 'S "Marg" . .. P ipestone

I NTr.RM E Di t\1 1': COURSE

lntennediatc C lub 2 : W.A.A. 2: Y.W.C.A. 2. " D im ples show when one sm iles. \~e see her di m ples m uch of the time... RUT H L. M E RRELL "Deed" .. .... Lake City J UNI OR I IIGH

COU RSt~

Junior H igh Club 2: League of Women Voters 2. Sec. 2: M ason M usic C lub 2: Wenonah Staff 2. "1\mbition like hers is extraord inary ... CORDELl\ MALA. TO . . . . . . . . . . ... Petcr~on PR I M A R Y COURSE

Primary Cl ub 2 . .. S he keeps to her work ." DOROTHY M ESSERSM ITH "Dot" T rinidad. Colo. PI I YSICAL E D UCAT I ON AN D I N I'ER MEDI ATE COU RSES

Intcrmediate C lub I. 2: Ph vsica l Educat ion C lu b I. 2: Y .W.C.A . I. 2. soCia l C ha irman 2: Die-No-M o I. 2: " H igh H at " 2:. " I may be small btiL I get places ... D i\M IA . M i\T Z " B um" ....

. ... . Waseca

J UNI O R IIIG H COURSE

Wenonah Pl aye r~ 2: \V inonan 2: Men's C lub 2: . Iewman C lub 2: Junior H igh C lub 2. "No sin ner or no sa int. .. D ELLA f.'. MEY ER "Del" ..... . Spring

Vall e~·

PRI M A R Y COURSE

Newman C lub I. 2: Y.\V.C.A I. 2. "/\ mile a m inute is good speed, but a wink u minute gels more action ...

...


'30

ESTHER MOH

"Es" ........... . Lakesville

INTERMEDIAT I; COURSE

Intermediate C lub I. 2: Girl Scouts I : Y.W.C.A. 2: Girl Reserves 2. ··1 do m y best and leave the rest:· E BBA 1-<. F. NELSON ...... ..... .. H astings PRIMARY COURSE

Primary Club 1. 2: French Club I. 2: W.A.A. 1. 2. ""Harh 1 Do I hear an airplane?"" JOHN M . MORI AR ITY ""jack·· ...... Eveleth JUNIO I\ H IG II COURS E

Wenonah Players 2: D ic-No-Mo Club 2: Junior I ligh C lub 2: Range C lub 2: Newman Club 2: Debate 2: Wenonah Staff 2. ""An all around fellow who has many f riends.·· HE -lELI A NELSON ""Milly·· . ..... . Litchfield INTERMEDIATE COURSE

Intermediate C lub I. 2: Y .W.C.A. 2: Girl Scouts I : League of Women Voters 2. "" \Yiith an air of inde pendence she makes her way su ccessfully:· VIRG I lA M UELLER ··cinny"" .... . Ga ylord PRIMARY 1\ND M US IC COURSES

Primary Club I. 2: Mason Music I. 2. Sec. 2: G irl Scouts 2: Y.W.C.A. 2: League of Women Voters 2. ""To know her is to appreciate her ability."" HELEN E . OLSON ... . ........ Cannon Falls INTERM F::I) IATE COURSE

Intermediate C lub 2: French Club 2: Y .\V .C.A. 2: Girl Reserves 2: G irl Scouts 2: Honor Teacher 2. ""She is unassuming:·

FLOR ETr A MURRAY ............ .. Winona PHYSICAL E DUCATION AND JUNIOR III C H COURSES

Art Clu b I. 2. Pres. 2 : Physical Education Club I. 2. Pres. 2: Wenonah Staff I. 2. Art Editor 1. Ecl.-in-Chief 2: \Vinonan I. 2. Art Ed itor I. 2: Die- 'o-Mo 2: French C lub 2: Junior High C lub I. 2: D ie- o-Mo Show 2. ·· \Yiork and more work .'" J A !JCE C. OLSE

·· jan ·· . ............ Elcor

INT ERM E DIAT E COU RSE

Intermediate Grades Clu b I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2 : R ange C lub I. 2. Sec. 2: Wenonah Players I. 2: Gi rl Scouts 1: Volleyba ll I: Die- o-Mo Show 2. ··sure. f"m game for anything.·· DOR OTH Y NE LSON ""Dot" ... . . ... Litchfield JUNI O R HI G I I COURSE

French C lu b 2: Gi rl Scouts 2: J unior Hi gh Club 2. ""Mild and gentle.·· LUC ILE OLSON ··cy·· ..... . .... . . Red Wing JUN IO R H IC II COU RSE

Junior High C lub 2: Country Life C lub 2: W.A.A. 2. ""You "ll have a good time when f"m in the crowd.""


'3 0

\!fARJORIE J M I!ES ··Marge"" ......... . . . El y JUNIO R H I(.; H COURSE

Junior High Club I. 2; R ange C lub I ; C lub I. 2; H onor Teacher 2. "If only all of us could be so brilliant ... ELOISE PARK !

1ewman

" Park ie........... . Kasson

PRIM ARY COURSE

P rima ry Clu b I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2; Y. \V .C. A. I ; Dic-No-Mo 2 ; Art C lub 2; Honor T eacher 2. .. A girl who is neat is hard to beat ... EVELETH OST RAN DeR .. Ev ... ... Albert Lea PR IMARY COU RSE

Primary Club 2; Ar t C lub 2; Die- 'o-Mo 2 . .. To know her is to have an. ever-faithful f riend... ALICE P ATRIDGE ..... Milban k. So. Dakota Kli'DERGARlt-.N PR IMARY COU RS E

Kindergarten Club I. 2. Pres. 2: Girl Scouts I ; Camp Fire Course I ; Y.\V .C.A. 2. "!\{ways sweet and kind to everyone.·· OLAF OTTERNESS .. Ole" ..... . Spring Grove JUI' IOR t-IIGH

COU RS~;

Junior High Club 2; Country Life C lub 2; Mixed C horus 2; Band 2; Men's C:Iub 2 . .. A gentleman in the true sense.·· JEAt NE B. P E H R SO

.. ja y ... ...... Winona

JUN IO R III C H COU RSE

Winonan 2; Junio r High Club I. 2; Girl Scou ts 2 . .. Com e on. gang. let's play bali ... R UBY P ACEY .. Irish ... ......... Sauk Center INTERMED IA f E COURSF.

Intermediate G rades Club 2; Girl Scouts 2: \\' .A.A. 2. "Mischief lurks 1n her sparkling eyes ... JESS IE PERRY "jerry" .. ......... Fanbault MUSIC AND INTERMEDIA

rl~

COU RSES

Mendelssohn Club I. 2. Sec. 2; Mason Music C lub I. 2: Mixed C ho rus I. 2; Die-No-Mo 2; Intermcdiate G rades C lub I. 2; Winonan I. 2; Y .W.C.A. I. 2; League of Women Voters 2;Gi rl R eser ves 2: Volleyba ll I. 2. "She's pepp y. she's jolly. and she's gay ... AUNE P ALMGAR D .................... El y KINDERGART E N PI\IM ARY COURS E

Kindergarten Club 2; R ange Club I. 2; Art Club 2. ..A f riend well worth having... HAZEL E . PFISTER ................ P reston JUN IOR H ICI I COURSE

Junior High C lub 2; Coun try Life C lub 2. " I do what 1 can and do it well...


'3 0

GEORG INA PRAIZLER "Georgie ... . . .. Auslin JUNIOR HI G II COU RS L-;

Junior Hi gh Club 2: Girl ScoutS 2: Country Li fe C lub 2: Y .\V.C.A. 2: Girl Reserves 2: Le<n,TUe of Women Voters 2. 'Tm a telltng you ·· ARD IS RODSJ\TER ............. Albert Lea INTERMEDIA 1 E COURSI-:

lntermediale Grades Club I, 2: W .A.A. I. 2: Wenonah Players I. 2: Girl Scouts I: Die-NoM o 2 : Honor Teacher 2 : Doctor of Lonesome Folk 2: Di e-No-Mo Show 2. ''1\sfond of 'dates· as an 1\rab." AR DIS PRINZII"G ''Ahdis"'. PRIMARY

Ru~hford

COURS~.

Primary C lub I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Art C lub I. 2, Vice-Pres. 2: Y.W.C.A. I. 2. Cabinet Member 2: Die-No-Mo 2: Wenonah Players 2: Wenonah Staff 2: Honor Teacher 2. · " A poster or a sketch.' 1\sk Ardis." JOSEPHII"E ROTHMAN ")o" . ...... Aurora INTERMEDIA IE COU RSG

Intermcdiate I. 2: Range C lub I. 2: Newman Club I. 2: Girl Scouts I : Die- 'o-Mo Show 2. "It's the roommate who pays ... HELEN REIMERS .. ............ Zumbrota JUNIOR IIIGH COURSE

French Club I. 2: J unior High C lub I. 2: Y.W. C.J\. I. 2 : League of Women Voters I. 2. "Fair. demure. and gentle." LUC ILE ROWELL "CeeC . ....... Farmington PRI MARY COURSr:

Primary Club 2: Y.\V.C.A. 2. Girl Scouts 2: Gu·l Reserves 2. "I\ light heart goes all the day ... MARY

AN~

REINARTS "Mae ....... Winona PR IMARY COURSE

Art Club 2: Primarv Club I. 2. Sec. 2: Winonan I. 2: Wenonah Staff 2: Newman C lub I. 2. "The world was made to enjoy ... HOW 1\RD ROY .................... Kellogg PIIYS ICA I.- eDUCATION COU RSJ:.

Track I. 2: Football 2: Baskelball 2: Wenonah Players 2: Men's C lub I. 2: Junior High Club 2. "f-Ie doesn't make a splurge but we all hear about him ... A:--.lTHONY RICC IO "Tony" ....... . Mt. Iron J UN IO R H IGH COU RSE

Range Club 2: Junior High Club 2: Men ·s C lub 2: Newman C lub 2 . .. 1 hardly look lihe a 'college· man ... J\LMt\ L. SCH WICHTENBERG "Swit:y .. l\ lorristown JUI'IOR HI C II COU RSE

~unior

High C lub 2: Country Life Club 2: G irl

2. "I take l({e seriously ...

ScOLi l S


'30

1-!AZEL SCOTT · ·scotty .. . ...... R ed wood Falls M U SIC A ND PR I MARY

\.OU RSE~

M endelS!>ohn I. 2: Mason :-vtusic C lub I. 2: P rima r v Cl ub I. 2. Pres. 2: Die-No-M o I. 2: Wenona h S taff 2: Vice-P res. Sophomo re C las<; 2 : M ixed C ho rus I. 2. Scc . -Trca~. 2 . .. 1/appy. JOlly. f ull of f un. She·s a fr iend to ever yone.··

H E LE

SM!TI I .. S mitty .... . . . Ga lesvi lle. I< I N DERGA R'I EN-PRI ,"IAR Y

W i~.

CO U RS~

l( indcrga rten C lub I. 2. Treas. 2 : W./\.A. I. 2 : Y.W.C. A. I. 2:Cirl Scou ts 1: Die-No-Mo I. 2 . .. High Hat ... Intra mura l Basketball 2. .. Ottr idea of a dancer.··

FREE D1\ SEAR LES ............. .

. .Lyle

P RIM ARY COURSC

P rima ry Club 2: Country Life Club 2. Girl Scouts 2: Y.W .C./\. 2: Gi rl Reserves 2 . .. Her snappy eyes w in her a hosl of f riends··

M ARJ OR IE SM ITH .. Marf!.ie ... ... . Faribault J UN I O R H I G H COURs l.;

J un ior H igh C lu b I. 2: Y .W.C.A. I. 2: W.A /\. I : Gi rl Scouts 2: Art Club 2: Honor Te,lcher 2. G irl Reserves . .. M y rosy cheehs are 'Nature·s· f!.ift. ..

G R ACE A. SE LLEC K . . . . . . .

. . \\'inona

PRI M A R Y COURSE

Primarv Club 2: Honor Teacher 2: League of Women Voter~ 2 . .. Teaching com es natural to som e... TH EOOOR~

R . SOLOSK I .. T ed ..... . M t. Iron

J U N I OR H I\. I I COU RSE

Range C lub 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Junior High C lub 2: Cheer Leader 2: Deba te 2: Dic-No-Mo 2: Mu Epsi lon i':u 2. .. Com e on gan g1 Did you gel m e.'··

SAR A S ILL .. Sarie ... ..

. .... \\'inona

J UN I O R H i GH COU RSE

Die- o-:V!o I. 2. High Voltage 2: Winonan I. 2: Wenonah 2: Newman C lub I. 2. Vice-P res. 2 . Wenonah Players 2: Jun ior H igh Clu b 2: Art C lu b 2. ·· 1 can m anage a n ything.··

IDA t\. SP ALDING ................ Wanda IN'! E RMCD I/\ T E COUR SE

lntermcdia Le C lub 2: Cou nt r v Life C lub 2: W.A.A. 2 ; League o f Wo men· VoLcrs 2: Girl Scouts 2 . ..A sm ile lhat P.ladden s our whole day ...

K AN E R VA K . S TPOLA .. l< enny ....... . G ilbert I<l t-.DE RC ARTEN-PR I M A IW COU RSE

Kind ergarten Clu b I. 2: R angers I. 2: Wenonah SrafT 2: Gi rl Scou ts I : Intramu ra l Basketball I : .. High Ha t. .. .. \'Chose bell ' ..

ELLAtvff\ E S PR AGL:E ............ Lake C iLv I

IERMt.D I A1 E COUR:,E

Y .W.C.A. 2; lmcrmediate Club 2 : Countn Life Club 2. · .. Conscienlio11s. stea<((ast. and ready /o SIICCeed. ··


'3 0

F LOR E ICE STE NBAC!< ''Fiossie''.St. Charles INTERMED IATE COURSE

Intermediate C lub 2: ewman Clu b 2: Girl Scou ts 2: League of \Vom<.:n Vot ers 2 . .. Pleasant and agreeable.路 路 I<ENNET I I L. SVEE .. Bud ... ....... Zumbrota .JUN IOR H IG I I <.:OU RS !;:

Mu Epsilon Nu I. 2: Junio1路 High Club I. 2: Track I. 2 . .. rm fa r f rom bashful ... MARJOR IE STEPH ENSO

1

''Marge .. Spring Val ley

JUN IOR H IGH AND PHYS ICAL EDUCATION COURSeS

Y. W.C.A. I : Junior High C lub I. 2. ''I'm off for a good time ... Mi\R Y /\LI C E T IIOMPSON ..... Minneapolis K IND!::RCARTEN PRI MA RY COURSE

Kindergarten Club I . 2: Twin City Club I . 2: Wenonah Players 2: cwman C lub I. 2 . .. Always has she the latest modes ... LUCI LLE STEVE NS .. S tevie ...... St. Charles IN 1'1->RMEDIA fE CO URSE

Intermediate C lub 2: Newman C lub 2: Girl Scou ts 2 . .. I never have time to be idle ... M ABELLE A. TOMPKINS .. Tomm y .. St. Johnsbury. Vermont IN I I::.RMEDIATE COURSE

.. She gets at the botlom of thin gs ...

INEZ M. STORLIE . ........... Spring Grove JUNIOR I II G H <.:OU RS !路:

C ountry Life 2: Y.W.C.A. 2: Junior H igh Clu b 2 : League of Women Vot ers 2 . .. Rather quiet but an admirable friend... MARY GLADYS Vi\NSTROM .. Mary C .. Lynd PRI~IARY

COURSE

Primar y C lub I. 2: \V.i\ A. I, 2. .. I ?.JOY seem qwet at fi rst. but get acquainted with n1e.

JAN IE STREET ER .......... ... ..... Delhi JUN IOR IIIG II AND MUS IC COURSES

Junior H igh C lub I. 2. Vice-Pres. 2: Mendelssoh n I. 2: Mason Music Club I. Sec. 2: Art C lub 2: Di c-No-Mo C lub I. 2: Representative Counci l 2. Sec. 2: Y.\V.C.A. I, 2. S<.:c. 2: College Choir I. 2 . .. /fer sunny disposition spreads sunshine all around her ... C LARI\ VENBERG .. Pepper ......... . Eveleth PRI MARY COU RS r:

Primary C lub I. 2: J\rt Club 2: Di c-~o-Mo 2: Range C lub I. 2: C heer Leader 2: Wenonah Staff 2: \V.A.A. 2: l lonor Teacher 2 . .. Plenty of pep. vim. and vigor ...


'3 0

JUNE WAHLQU IST ............... M arshall PRIMAR Y COURSE

Junior High C lub I. "Do you see the merry twinkle in her eyes'· · HELEN WEST ............ . ... .. Pine Island PRIMARY COURSE

P rimary C lub 2; Country Life Club I. 2; Ass't Guardian of Camp Fire G irls in J r. High School2. "Love makes you feel good all over. Ask m e." DOROTHY WAKEY "Dot" ....... . . Fairmont PR I MARY COURSE

Primary C lub 2. Sec. 2: League of Women Voters 2: W.A. A. 2; Countrv Life C lub 2. Pres. 2. " P ep ' Pep! For sale here." ULYSSES WHITEIS "Useless" ......... Wells MUSIC AND JUNIOR H I GII COURSES

\Vinonan 2: Athletic Committee I ; Orchestra I. 2; Band I. 2. P res. 2: Mason Music C lub I. 2; fen's Club I. 2: Football I. "f-Ie put the '//arm· in llarmony." MARY WALSH ................. Farmington ADVANCED RURAL

League of Women Voters 2. Pre . 2: Country Life C lub 2. Pres. 2 . .. Wle marvel at her ready wit." DESSYMORE WHIT ! lG "Dess" Redwood Falls M USI C AND JUNIOR H IGH COURSES

Junior High C lub I. 2: Mason Music C lub I. 2: Wenonah StafT 2: Die-i'!o-Mo 2 : Y .W.C.A. I. " \Y'e/1 - any way it was fun ny ... MARY C. WARDWELL ............ \Vi nona PRIMARY COURSI·.

Prima ry Club I. 2: Newman C lub I. 2: Girl Scouts I ; Wenonah P layers 2: Y.W.C. A. 2. "On with the dance." GENEVA W I IITTI NGTO

"Cen"

C laremont I NTERM CD I A 11; COURSE

Intermediate Club I. Gi rl Scouts I . .. Everybody's friend ... MIRI ;\M WATILO "Mims" .... ........ . E ly INTERMEDIATI~

CO URSE

Intermediate I. 2: Range C lub I. 2; Girl Scouts 2: League of Women Voters I . .. I'm conscientious but always ready for fu n ... MARGERY WOLF "Marg'· .. ...... Windom I 'I fE itMEDI,\TE COUR E

Intermediate Gr·ades C lub I. 2: Y.\V Ci\. I. 2; Gi rl Scouts 2; Honer Teacher. "It isn't only my hair that's bright. "


'30

SYB IL K \VR JG I IT "f<ay" Trempealeau. \\'is. \I USIC 1\

D JUNIOR III(;H COURSES

Junior High Club I . 2. ila•on Mu<;ic Club I . 2: Girl Scouts I. 2: Y .\V C.A. 2: Countr y Life C lub 2 . .. f"m always willing La help ...

CDITH FULLER ............... /\dams. \\.is. PRI MARY COURSL

P rimar~ C lub 2: Countr y "My m alta is Service.'·

Life Club I.


' 30

l3E:RNAIU> \VE LCII

GLA I>YS LUNI>I'

Pres1denl

T rea~urer

Eoa11 WHJn n ; R \ ·,cc-PresKie:nL

HtNRY SouTHWORT H Secrctar~

The Freshman Class ftrst year class is a n interesting and successful grou p of studen ts who have T HE become well ass imilated in to t he college student body. T he class n umbers a t rine below two hund red young m en and women. The class has taken pa rt in all school act ivities. the members ha\·ing j oin ed t he clubs and ot her acti vit ies as soon as these interests were ini tiated at t he beginn ing of t he yea r. Members of the class pledged about two h undred dollars to the Seventieth Year Ann iversary Fund dur ing t he campa ign for that unit of effort. T he officers are:

Bt::R. ARD WELCH .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. President

Vice- P resident SouTHWORTH .......... . ...... . .............. . .. Secretary GLADYS Lu D I N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . Treasurer

ED r r H WH I T TI ER ... . . • . . . . • . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . H EN R Y


'30

Freshtnan Class and Classification K I DERGART Et COURSE AYSI IFORD, ISABE LLE

joHNSON. E TH EL

B onOMLEY, MARGARET

MILLER, MARGARE I

S HARDLOW. LuELL A S rROUD. AUDRE Y

CtSEWSI< I , H ELEN

O H NSORG. D o R OT HY

SwA N. MARJORI E

H AND. Evt::LYN

R o

lNG. THELMA

PH YSICAL EDUCATION Buss. R u TH

KRAGE. LUCILLE

S J<ARO. L I L LIAN

BRtNCGOLD . LYMAN

L u

SouTHWORl H. HATTIE

D I N. GLADYS

DALE. ES'I H ER

NORBY. ALLEN

S wor-FER. GRETCI I EN

EBERT . BERTHA

O'DeA. j o 1IN

VERMI L Y EA. SrANLEY

ELZENGA. A NN

0PEM. MELVIN

WELC! I , BERNARD

E RWI:-.1. LYLE

ORR. DARYL

H AMMOND . DONALD

ScHE LLEN I~ ERG, LILLI AN

PRIMARY COURSE BOARDMA'J. CELIA

GRANGER. j uNE

SEVAREID, TRYPHENA

Buto:HLt:.R. tvhLDRED

H ARKN E SS. ADELINE

SHAW. MARGUERITE

B uRNt tAM. EuzABE'ttt

)ENSON. ESTHER

SIMONS. H ELEN

Ct IF.RP.

) ENSON, MYRTLE

SoBECK. MILDRED

C I RESF.. HELEN

KINTZ!. ERN!\

STEPHENSON. L uciLLE

CuNNINGHAM . HENR IETTA

McL EOD . DoRoTHY

STROUD, DOROT HY

ERtCI{SON. HELEN

MuNSO~'<. D oRoT HY

YuNGEN. ELLA

SoPHI E

FuCKINGER. GLADYS Gtu'loE. BoRGHILD

I EWCOMB. FERN 0 RKE. SELMA

INTERMEDIATE COURSE ARMSTRONG. P EARL

H EISE. DoRoTHY

BRroz u ; . EoNA

HANSON. A LICE

PFISTER. LIJC ILLE QuiGL EY, MARY

BuRRI3SON. HA z i~ L

j OHNSON. VERA

R E DMOND. TER loSA

CoOKt;, EvELYN

l<LEEIJERGER. EvELYN

R o w E. H E t, EN

D ouGLAS. ERMA

McKINSTRY. A RI,ENI':

ScH ROEDER. DORIS

DRI SCOLL. MI L DRED

McM uRRIN. ADELE

SMITH, MARGARET

DowNEY, M I NERVA

MILLER, GERTRUDE

STEENBERG . PEARL

Du i,AN E Y, D oROTII Y

NoR ovoL D. AucE

SuNNESS. f7 LORENCC

F REEIU{SON. EsTIIER

NYGARD. MA RTHA

VANDER SYDE. HELEN

I IM~CEI\TY, tviY RTLE

0ECI I , M I LDRED

\VESTFA L L. ELIZAIJETH

GARDNER, DORIS

P ETf~RSON. GLADYS

W!!tPPLE. GLENETTE


'3 0

MUS IC BA RNES. CLARA

H t:::GDAL. Mt,RION

KRATZ. GRETCH EN

BEAR. GoRDON

llt ES'Ii\ND. H AR R IET.

OLSON, E THEL

C LI NE. D oRA

(( UN I'. KA I I ILEEN

R EESE. MYRNA

GoA R. EvELYN

jO!'.ES. CoRwi N

SEVERUD. Rlil l-1

CROOSE. MRS. E~t MA

jONES. LA VoY

T1nEDc, Auc:E

INDUSTR IAL EDUCATI ON DUERRE, Tt iOMAS

f-IAMNESS. j UST IN

NE LSON, R ALPH

SAND. V INCENT

RURAL AN DERSON. ADEL INE

H OEU<E. R UTH

R EN KEN, M ARGRETA

ANDERSON. A Mt:L IA

H OVLAND, AL FR ED

R o w E. HELEN

B E HNKEN. ELLA

j AC013SON, EVELYN

SCI IE tD EGGER. D oRm HY

D RAGVOLD. j OSlE

j OSEF SON, H ELGA

SciiOTT. MABEL

El3NER. EvELYN

KING. DOR IS

SMITH . T HELMA

EvA ·s. F RA!'.(.ES

KING. MARW IN

STENSON, GRACE

F RANZMANN. R ENATA

I<UEIIL, FREDA

SULLIVA . KATHERINe

HAPPE. ELEANOR

MANION. MARGA RET

TIERNAN, MARJORIE

Hr::ASIC:R . P AULI NE

MARI<EGARD. MYRTLE

W INI<LEI-IORST. jEANETTE

H EN R Y. GRACC

OLSON, ALICE

\VINSAND. MRS. MAM IE

J UN IOR HI GH SCHOOL COURSE ALLEN, IRENE

HURLEY. LEO

R AMOS. DoM INGO

BERG, LuCILLE

KASTEN. MARGA RET

R HOAD£$. G ILAERl

BOYS E N. llw 1N

I<NUlSON, jEANETTE

R OGGE. GEORGE

B RACE. B IRDELL

KUDART. VIOI.CT

R YAN. EVELYN

B ROWN, A t-FRED

LuFI. DoROTH Y

R YA N. MA RGARET

BURROWS, KATII ER INE

L USKOW. A LI C:E

SUNDBORG. CARLA

F UE RTES. MAURI'

L US I(OW. R UTII

VO RIIE!OS. R ALPI I

GERDTS. FR ~.DA

MANN. FRANC:cs

W IENER. LEONARD

GE RRY. G RACE

MILLER. MARJORI E

WH ITTIER. Eo !Ti l

GREEN, ESTIIER

NEEl3, FRANKLIN

YATES, RAMO, A

H ALLSTROM, \V u_FRED

NE t.SON. SYl3!L

ZABEL, MARYON

H AMSNESS, j UST IN

O LSON, ELEANOR

I-I ANSON, I RENE

Pr-tSTER. HAZEL

COLLEGE COURSE BLAKE. FLORENCF

MARTIN. CLAYTO!'.

BOYD, LA R RY

]\rf iLLr::R. j MtES

TAIT, ARTH UR

BROWN, CLEMENT

PAUL. T I IEODORE

TILLMAN, EMIL

H ASSINGER, ELEANORE

Soun tWORTtl, H ATTIE

W CIGHT, V LADIMAR

SoUTI IWORTH. HENRY


'3 0

Air: On Wisconsin 0 , Winona, 0. Winona, That's the place for me, Fairest College in the State That's what she' ll always be ( rah! rahl rah i) Sing her graces, shout her praises Show the world we're wise. We'll boost our fa ir Winona To the skies.




' 30

Top /{ow - I Bottom Row -

lAP PE , REt!'>IIUs . StMM~Rs. St\'ULA

l300TS .

RtCI-IARDS, STREETER, SAMP SON, KRAMER. jEDERt.tA t-: .\.1UtR

The Representative Council

T HE Representative Council was fou nded in t he spring of

1927 . It is now a n active co llege organization composed of twelve members, five of whom are chosen from the faculty, and seven from t he student body. At the meetings, wh ich a re held regularly every t wo weeks, situations under dispute and questions of vital concern to the activities and life of the co llege are brought before th is counc il. Each member considers such matters seriously and thoughtfu lly, and renders a just solution or decision. In t his way, the high moral and scholastic standard of the college is maintai ned, d ifficult situations are solved, and precedents for standards of the future are set up, thus serving t he purpose o f this organization in promoting and bettering in every way all those interests connected with the life a nd activ ities of the col lege.

ANTH ONY SAMP SON .. . .. ... . ... . BERNARD !<.RAMER ..

. . . . . ... . , . . .......... President . ... Vice-President

JANIE STREET ER .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . S ecretary


.3 0

The Wenonah FLORETTA M u RRAY . .. . ....... . .. . .. .. .. . . . ... . ... Edit o r-in-Chief KANERVA S 1POLA .. .. ........ . . . ...· . ......... .. . . Assistan t Edi t or HAROLD S I VULA . . ... . . . .............. . . . .. . ... B usiness Manager DESSYMORE WHIT ING . . ... . . . .... . .. ... Ass ist a n t Business Manager ANTHONY SAMPSON .. .... . .. . . . .... . ... Ass istant Business Manager BERTHA KRETZSCHMAR . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . ......... .... Literary Editor MABEL GREEN .... .. ......... .. . ...... . . Assistant Literary Editor SARA S I LL .... ........... ... . ... ... . .. .. Assist an t L iterar y E d ito r HAZEL ScoTT . .... . . . . . ................ . ..... . . . . Feature E ditor AN CRONQUIST ... . .. . . ..... . .. . . .. . .. .. Ass istan t F eatu re Editor joHN MoRIARITY .... . . ... .. . . ............ Ass ista n t Featu re Edit or ELEANOR HANSEN ..... . . . .. ...... .... . ............ P ict u re E ditor JANET COLLIN ..... .. .... . ... . . . ... .. . .... . .. . . . Sn apshot Edi to r BERNARD KRAMER .. . . . ... . . . ... . ... .. . ....... .. . Men's Athl etics l o NE KIRCH ...... . . .. . . . . . ... . .............. . Women's Athletics ALTA R u TH CATLI . . . . . . .... .. .... . .. .... Characterizati on Edito r KATHER I E DESMIDT ....... .. .......... .. . . ... . . . .. . . Art E d itor ARDIS PRI NZING .. .... . . . .... . ... . ....... .. .. Assistant Art Editor CLARA V E BERG .... .. ....... .. ...... . ... . ... Assistant Art Editor I NA CA E K I NG ... . .......... ...... ... ... . ... Assistant Art Editor W ILMA FROELICH ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . ........ . . . ...... Typis t R uTH M ERRILL ....... . . . . . .... . .. ... .. . ... . . . ..... . ... . . T y p ist ELEANOR HAPPE . . .. ... . . .... ... . ... . .. .. . ........ .. .. . . . Typ ist MARY REI • ARTS ............ . ... . . . ...... .. . .......... ... Typist MR REED ........ .. . .... . .. . .... .. ............ . . Facul t y Adviser M R. FRENCH . . ....... . . . ... . ... .. ... ...... . . . ... Facul ty Ad v iser MRs. CAsSIDY AND M 1ss C LARK .. . . . . . .... .. ... .. F acul t y Adv isers


'3 0

The Wenonah

F 1. 0RETTA MuRRAY

E Wenonah, college an nual, is a tradition o f many yea rs stand ing. Each yea r T aH staff is selected by a student and faculty committee. Heretofore. only sophomores were eligible fo r positions on the staff. but last year. seniors were also added to those who might make application for a staff position . Previous experience on annual work is not requi red. Interest and writing abilit y are first considerations. For man y years. Mrs. Cassidy. Mr. Reed a nd Mr. French ha ve su pervised the annual work and each year they ha ve worked with the staff to make the Wenonah better than the previous year. The 1929 Wenonah received the All-American H onor Rating in competition with other college annuals. thus setting a still higher standard for the book of 1930 to attain. Almost from the day school opens until the last day of the spring quarter. staff wor kers a re fou nd at the ir respective duties. The "busiest" season. however. is the winter quarter. and all effort is made to get the greater sha re of the work done before the opening of the spring qua rter. This arrangement always insures an early edition and delivery of t he book to its subscri bers.


'30

The Winonan . . . . . . . .. . . . . . E ditor-i n-Chief . . Assist ant Ed itor . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... Assis t an t Ed itor .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Sport Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sport Editor ........... .. . . . . . . . .... . . Ar t Editor . . Art E ditor

EVANGELI NE WE I N . . . . . . . . MABEL GREEN .... . SARA SILL ...... . . . . . . EuGE NE P oLLARD .. HENRY SouTHWORTH . . FLORETTA MURRAY . EwALD K I NTZ ! . . . .

REPORTERS B ERTHA KRETZSCHM AR

.JESS I E PERRY

HATTIE SO UTHWORTH

LARRY BoYD

fRANCES MORSE

.JOSEPH INE KJELLAND

j EAN P EHRSON

I NA CAE KL G

AvGUSTA L ARKIE

lv!ARYON ZABE L

A LTA R uT H CATLIN

ELEANOR HA NSEN

ELI ZABETH B E NTL EY

j E A.

A.

L UC ILLE HALL

JANET CoL L IN

H O BART

' CRO. QU IST

loNE K IRC H

A RT H !_; R TA IT

BUS !NCSS ST AFf<' . . . ....... Business Manager . . .. C ircul ation Manager . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . ............... Ass~ta nt

MARGARET H o P P .. .. .. . . . . . . . . U L YSSES WH JTE IS .. D AM I A

lv!ATZ ...

.ASS ISTANTS L UC ILLE STEP H ENSON

WILMA FROELI C H lv!ARY REI NARTS

DoROTHY HAWKE


'3 0

The Winonan

T

HE Winonan. b i-weekly publ ication of the college. combines the functions of an official school organ and a student ne,vspaper. It is edited and pub! ished en tirely by a student staff. The school paper has many func tions. It ser ves as an expression of student opinion. provides information . promotes school enterpr ises. keeps a permanent record of school activ ities. fosters school spirit and perpetu a tes traditions. ¡ The benefits derived from work on the school pa per are man y. Practical experience in editorial writing as well as business problems is gained. The best writing abil ity of the school is utilized on the Winona n staff. Contributions from t he whole student body are. however, encouraged. Stories and book rev iews a re often su bm itted by the composition classes. For the past three yea rs E vangeli ne Wein. member of the junior class, has filled the position o f ed itor-in-chief. H er ta lent and ability in th is work have well fitted her for this position . T he cooperation of an able staff has done much towa rd mak ing the twenty-four issues publisher! worthw hile.


'3 0

Top Row - G. Second J<owBottom Row -

RoccE, TAIT, R 1c E , VOORHEEs, WE ~CH,

H . RoccE,

R1sl' Y , Kn_AMER, SAMPSON , NORBY, W1BYC. ,

P 1sK,

0PEM.

JuENEMAN,

tv1uLLE N.

GR I F F ITH , I3RINGGOLD, Mci<ID13EN, REISH US, F tSCHER, KERN, B I ANCHI.

"W,, Club week on Tuesday and T h ursday is a "purple letter" day fo r the lucky EVERY " W" men . H aven' t you noticed that on those two days throug hout the school year loyal "W" men of the "W" Club a lways wear their " W" sweat ers? The yea r 1929 marks the beginni ng of t his organ ization . wh ich was founded to fi ll the need of an at hletic club. to increase the interest in athletics, and to deve lop t he idea ls of its members. T h e club constitution requires t hat prospective members m ust have earned a letter in one of t he major sports- football , basketbalL or t rack. T he club emblem is a "W" pin set with n ine ha lf pea rls.

WENDELL McK I B B EN . .. .. ... . ... . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P resident L EONARD RE ISHUS .. . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . .. ... . . • .. . ... . Vice-President

Secretary- Treasu rer . . . . Facu lty Adviser

CAR L l- ISCH ER . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. MR. GALLIGAN .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .


'30

Top I<ow MADO:m , FROELI CH , B O Y!), MAYAN , GERDTS. REIMERS. Second Row - DOTY, SJ:MPSON , I IA~SINCER, KRENZKE, HARRIS. Rom sCI ION. Hollom Row -

l<ATI.i"-, KING, ELLIS, Scmt.ITZ, CoLc M A~< , ENGLISH.

Le Cercle Francais , CERCLE F RA CA IS was organized in September. 1928. by a g roup of LEforty students interested in the r rench language a nd litera ture. The p rincipal a im of the club was to make better known to the students as pects of French life and to encourage the use of conversat ional F rench. At the monthly meet ings f7rench games were played and refreshments were ser ved. French plays and skits we re g iven dur ing the year. Among the presentations were: a scene fro m the play "Le Voyage de M. P errichon" by Labiche and Martin. a humorous d ia logue by the Ju nior m embers of the club. and the play " Mada me Recoit" by Maurice H ennequin. T his year the French Club in cooperat ion with t he T win C ities Club undertook a n all-college entertainment. A Paris scene was simulated. The mem bers of the club were d ressed in the costumes of F rench peasants of " Normand ie" and "Bretagne. " Later in the school year, programs fo r the club mem bers included a F renchto-E ngl ish scene from Shakespeare's play " H enry V", a scene from t he "Le l!edecin Malgre Lu i.. by Mol iere. the greatest of F rench comedy writers. and a scene from Victor Hugo's "Hernani." I NA CAE KING . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . .. . President CLEO ENGLI SH . . . . . . . .. . . •.. . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • .

Vice-President

BERNI C E S E!DLITZ . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary

jEANETTE~ ELL IS ... . .. . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. • . . . . . . . . .

Mrss

Treasurer Adviser

CoLEMA:--J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . .. • ... . ... . . . Faculty


'3 0

Tap Rou• )GOER\.fA" SJVVI .A SoLOSKI. REJ SH US, :vtcKuuJEN SouTHWO RTH SA \tt>SON. Ju,Es. I I Roccr:: Bt:.Aft. S.-t:onJ !~ow SOUI IJ WORTH, St."<) I I , LACRA r-T, H1R SCHH;;1 u , VENBER(~, Bu ~.s . j uL.'iETII , Lovmt., COII.IN , \VHITJ N<;, Rr:En ·rhud Row Zl! l.l £R, I .A V Eu a , ! loT l)h.N, DE SMt rn , HoBART, MuRRAY, l { S Mtll l , KIRCJJ , BRACt:., MEs.:-.ER:-.MtHt , !lAND B.Jttom U.ou•

.SEll E. FRE!'lCt-1, PRI NZ INC: f'v1AXWt:.LL

R, ,-ry S 1Lt , Ju~TMAN . I<JEU .ANO. GIII'>E.I\ U:.: J"''' E R,

STREE 'thlt ,

IIAN:-.EN.

Die"No"Mo O ie-:'-Jo-Mo Club is recognized by everyone as the pep and booster club of T HE the school. Each Friday during the football season. t he club puts on a pep fest after chapel exercises. These pep fests annou nced enthusiasm and were extremely entertaining. Last October. when plans were being made for Homecoming. the Oie-:'-Jo- !o Club was t he organization chosen to sponsor and arra nge all of the H omecoming activities. :Monday. November 25. t he Die-1\'o-Mo ente rt ai ned members of t he football squad and championship t eam at an Athletic Banquet at the Hotel Winona. :VIr. R. Smith. director of int ra-mura l a t hletics a t the University of linnesota. and !iss Gildemeister \\'ere among t he speakers of the evening . The Oie-No-Mo also had charge of the try-outs and elections for cheer leaders and song leaders. The studen ts elected were automaticall y made members of the club. On february 21. the Die-No- 1o put on the musical sho\\ "High-Hat... supervised and coached entirely by student club members. Die-l'-:o-Mo means "dynamo", generator of pep and energy.

1/igh Voltage . . Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brush D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... . S fJarh

SARA SILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. VER .

Eo;-.JA

o ·

R ISTY . .

. .

J L..STMAN . . . .

jOSEPH I E

l(J ELLA .

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M ISS G!LDEM E!STER, MESSRS. FRENCI-1. REED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

JEDERMAN,

SEL LE. AND

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..

In sulators


' 30

Top Hem- - \VARnwm L SouTHWORTH , STEPtt~NSO:-.t ,\'erond R.ou• - OLSEN, PRINZil\.l.. Ron~A n;;.R IIAPP ti. Tltrr<i H.ou• Ro~st . BRJ:-..~ccot o MATZ tvfoRIARITY, Hallum

/~oil' - DICKEt-:ct, KING. LAVEt.Lb. , \VA'

rs

SuJJI\'AN , ~1rss \V11rTTIER . S1u .. McLEOD. L o\·Eu

Jo··-iES. GRUE:-.4 CHILDERS. BENTLEY HAPPE. SoctHWORTH, SI\'ULI\, MoYER. KING

K1Nt!l

just \-iAt-.:

juL:--El"H, BEAR , TJ-tOMI'SON. I(JE.II.ANO, 11.' \NSt::N

W enonah Players WELVE yea rs ago some of the students interested in dramatics met and o rga ni zed a d ramatic club. In 1918 they presented three plays for the L ittle Theatre, the proceeds of which were used in purchasing a Liberty Loan Bond . In the fa ll the old members entertain ed the new mem bers at an Initiation Banquet known because of its theme and deco ration as the "doggiest party of the year." The Player's annual production. "Lady Wi ndermere's Fan·· . was successfully p resented in November. On Thu rsday. December 21. t he students and facu lty of the school enjoyed an impressive symbolical pantomime. "The Doctor o f Lonesome f'o lk ", also presented by the club. During the early part of the spring term. three one-act plays were p resented to the pub! ic. The plays coached by members of the club were: "The Baby Carriage .. directed by Florence Childers. "Thank You, Doctor" directed by Ina Gae King. ''Dwellers in t he Darkness" directed by Edith Whittier and Sara Sill .

T

A One-Act Play Contest was held in May for the high schools t h roughout the state. Secur ing contest judges. getting s tage equipment for the sett ing of each play, a nd ar rangi ng the schedule - for all these - t he clu b members were responsible. The pa rticu la r success of the past year has been due, in part, to t he enthusiast ic gu ida nce of our adviser. Miss Ruth Beth Watts. EwALD l<r"lTZI.... .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J ULSETH ..

. . . . . . .

ALFHILD EDNA

If ISS

J USTMA

. . .

. . . . . . .

\VA TTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ..

. . . . President Vice-President . . . .. . . . .. Secretary-Treasurer ... . . . . . . . . . . . Faculty Adviser . . . . . . . . .

.


Top

l~o"

-

I<JEI.LANI>. PALMC:ARD. V I,NnER<; .

Ron 1

I( INTZ I PARKIN. S11<1oETEO<

S econd l?..ow- O~TRANDU.R , PRINZINC, YuNGEN . CAS5I OY , lVI U RRAY, /Joltono H.ou. - HOFFNER, I< 1RCH, HoR»CHFEI o. 1<"-LLY, I< oN<;.

Do:;

SMonT, Pooot !>ONIUS

LAVELLE , HA:-.l:,EN.

The Art Club HE Art Club was organ ized in 1923 unde r M rs. Cassidy. ou r for mer art inT structor. Although t he membersh ip of t he cl ub is limited. an opportun ity is given any student to t ry out. In these t ryouts t he a rtistic ability of t he applicant is tested in t hat he is asked to make a poster. a design . or perhaps a stage setting. Once in t he club. each member is given amp le opportun it y to carry out h is ideas and interests. The program t his yea r has been an interest ing one. Individual or group p rojects inc luded clay modeling. tying and dyeing sca rfs. soap carving. stencil ing. block prin ti ng. and poster work fo r all t he college p roduct ions. One of t he most important p rojects of the year is decorati ng the gymnasium fo r the annual Prom . This yea r the point system was adopted. After ten points in certain a rt activities have been earned. each cl ub member is ent itled to a guard for h is club pin . The guard is in the form of a min ia t ure brush. Presiden t Vi ce-President . .. . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . Secretary .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. Treasurer . .. . . . . . . . • . . . . . Faculty Adviser

FLOR ETT A Mu RR AY .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ARDIS PR I z 1 c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. E LEANOR H ANSE

. . .. . .. .. . . . . . .

RITA H IRSCHFELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M ISS CLAR K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


'3 0

Lf..jllo R ,g/11 - 8o11:-.: . ToRCE RS0:-.4

~txnv , DuiZRflE, G . Rc><x.a~: . Rt CE , TA tT,

Cot

\iAN. Ct..a ..,;zo-.JNGI I AII>·t . REI SHUS, KAt-..:GAS,

HAPPE. SANDT

Industrial Arts Club ""TH E study of industrial arts should develop primarily ind ustrial intelligence. insight. and appreciation , subordinating skill in mani pulation to thought content." - Frederick G. Bonse. T he Industrial Arts Club was organi zed in 1915 under the direction of M r. J. H. Sandt. The department has developed from a s ingle room in t he old bu ilding to a six room department carry ing on t en varied lines of work. As a gu ide to t he preparation of teaching. two principles ha ve constantly been kept in mind. First. the end is to be found not in t he perfection of the project, but in the development of the child through the maki ng of the project a nd through h is apprecia tion of the materials. tools. and processes wh ich are involved. Second, the ac ti vities of modern society a re man ifold but they are after a ll . only the variations of a few typical industries which can be easily understood : and, a lthough the processes \\ ithin each industry a re \·aried and comp lex, they a re at the same time the outgrowth of a simple a nd funda menta l operations which can be performed by the c hild . Guided by these princip les. the industrial arts cou rse involves the mak ing of projects whic h illustrate t he fun da mental st eps in the transformation by man of raw materials - \\·ood. clay. metal. a nd fibers - in to t h ings o f greater value which a re to he used for t he furthe r satisfaction of human needs.


'3 0

l Top

l~ou:

BtA"--CHt

Rtccto YIORIAR.ITY

) t\Mt:~ SA \1P~<>N , Lu~DSTROM, t"YCARO CHtLDER::,, Pt::!:>AVC."-'10

s~:cortd R..ow- REED \VA-111 .0 , RoTH\.tA'l. OA\'1 5, v~f'SERC, St.-.OLA PALI\ICARlJ DtcKENS_ MAKI.

Bottom R.ou• - THOMAS .

.SOLOSKI. KA'-'\.A';, Ot .SEN S t\ UI.A , C..ot tE", l-1111 n~R~. jAII.H::s.

The Range Club COMBAT that "home-sick" feeling. ou r miners of the north organized "The T OR angers Club" eight years ago. Its pu rpose is pu rely social, but the peppy and enthusiastic group do much to keep that school spirit alive. All students from the Ar rowhead Countr y are eligible for mem bership in this organization . Two meetings are held each month. one for business and the other for soc ial actl\'ltleS. A great deal of extra fun is thro\\'n in for good measure. This yea r. Mr. Reed. the adv iser. gave a party at his home. In addition. severa l other parties ,,·ere sponsored by the club. \V ALTER KANGAS . . . . . . THEODORE SoLOSK J . J AN ICE OLSON .. MR. R EED ... .

. . . . . President . . Vice-President . .... Secretary- Treasurer .. .. . Faculty Adviser

....

I


'30

Tot) Row

-

I(Eu .t.::Y. HOYC:E, E. GR EE N , SL-,tO:-.ts, Lti'TX;REN, LuNDIN. SvNf\.:ESS. \ V HITTJER. DE SM IDT , )oH.:-.lSON , LARKIE.

Second /{o w lbttom l<o1~ -

BYLUND.

M. G Rr~I::N ,

C OLMAN, juLSETH,

I.

HANSO!'o: , 1-ionART,

E.

HANSEN,

S·t .

jo1 1N, C:OLL IN.

M c D:)."'AI.L>, McCAULEY . THOMP~ON. S·Tt::E.I'..:BERG . i(JEI LAND.

The Twin City Club HE purpose of the T\\'in City Club which was organized in 1921 is that of foster ing a friendly feel ing between the students from Minneapolis and St. Paul. The function of t he club is purely social. A ,,·einer roast " ·as held early in the fall to welcome the new members into the club. Later the club \Vas entertai ned a t a tea by the F rench Club. Here plans were made for the "Night in Paris· · party which was sponsored by the two clubs . The a ll-school party with a Parisian setting was pronounced a success.

T

ALFHI L D

j

ULSETH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. ....

GLADYS LuND!~ . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . REGINA l<ELLY.. MISS COLEMAN.

. ..... . ... .

President

Vice-President . . Secretary - T reasurer .. Faculty Adviser


'3 0

Top !<ow - r A IT, Huccs, M Or< IAR11Y , O'DeA. MULLEN, H . R occu. \ViBYE, W E L CH , !31XOY, RH0/\1}1,:,, KRAMI;I<, G. Roc:c:e Second l~ow - HRAN r>l , PAUL , D u Er<RE , T AYLOR, I' NCER, RICE. BROWN , HA PPE. CuNNING H AM, B I ANCIII . Thcrd Rou• I<INC, PESH ON, BROWN. O TTER NESS, CoLMAN. H ~\M SNE.SS, BoliN, RoY. Fourth Rou 13RI'!CGOLD, Rossi, I(Ar-.:GAS, jueNE\1AN, I~EJSHUS, fvfcK n:sBEN, tviATZ, SoulliWORTH, HOvLAND, Po u ..AR D. F•flh R o u• - FLERTE,, HEASUR. WHJTU", )O,..ES, ) AMES, F1sc11ER , KOPREN, WoLF, KELLY, IIOJ .~TRLM . HuRLEY. Bollom Row - l3nAA., RrcCIO, SoLO~KI . SIVVLA, ) EDERMA:-.. RI "-TY. SAMI"SO~. COHEN, VERMILYEA, ~ f \RTI N , ERW I N.

"Q

R-R-R - Women no ad mission". is t he grow l o f Mu-Epsilon-l us watchdog. Being an organization made up solely of the men in the student body. a nd rather secreti ve at that, it serves as food fo r chats a t the coeds' tea-parties. The club was o rganized in 1923 to promote professional advancemen t a nd fos ter growth of social acti vities and good fello\\'sh ip among the men in college. The initiation ceremon ies a nd the spring banquet make up its social activ ities. " T hat's a ll we know about it. girls. Isn't it t hrill ing?" VER

·oN RI STY ... . .• . . . . . . . .. . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President

H AROLD RoGGE . .. ... . .... . ... . . .... . .. • . . ... . . ...

Vice-President

ROBERT GR I Ff'! T H ... ... . ... .. . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . S ecretary-Treasurer

M R. ) EDERMAN .

. . . . . . • . . • . . . . . . ... . ... .. .. .. . . . . . Faculty

Adviser


'30

)L'..IOR I IICII ~CHOOL CLL B G~-t t r:Ftl tt M o:-t iARi iY jur-:~EMAN E:-.~c. P.R . BL'<;<.'-1. OnF'~"'~""·

'fop Rou• Sf!cvnJ /{vu. Thcrd Rou:

Fourth

/~ott

Y\lc.:-. Rtsl y

-

Mc.:GtLLIVJ.t.AY

l3RL ~T Gn~..,E. S\11111

\MES. HARTLETT

DAt

Y

Btxov

KA"'iiE'

G R<x;cr:;, BtA~CII I Ot SO"-.'" R _ P t·TSTER

J I Ro<;.cE ,

RYA:-.1 ,

~I!..RRAY Ft ~(HI•.R, s~l 111\\0RTI I , PrHR.50~. )l;LSETII, LO\l~.. L L

C H ILDER'. F t sHBAUC t-lb.R, I I At..STIUJM. !>n~Pi tl::f\.')O'l .

I I OPP

)AME~. I<FLLER,

Sn L't..A,

R ICCIO.

Spirit of Education W it h gu idance as ligh t as from sunshine S he leads t hem fro m da rkness into ligh t Hers is the voice of r u rity Of kindness. of \\"Ort h a nd migh t. S he is E ducation. going s lo\\'ly So to ca tch the need Of every child and that ch ild"s brother. S he was builded this. her creed:-· "Teach t hem to love Cod, T o keep their bod ies clean a nd st rong : Inspire love of one another : Let t hem j udge t he right from \\' rong. · · - S ARA SI L L.

KNu 1 ~N

13Rt.''-ER , !\.fl·JH.

CoHEN

SoLo~K I . IJEAU..


'3 0

Top How- )ACOBSI:::N,

CO\VLE S, STENBACH , LINGENF ELTER , R t.. ISS, LuowiTZ.I<J , HANSON, DALE, SoRE-l'JSON, MeAD.

Second Row -

PF r STER, PACEY, OLSEN. i3AKE R .

LINDCR~N , WHIPPU:::: , BoYD , MARTIN , RoDSATER, CA TLIN ,

Third Row- G . AMUNDSEN, C. AMUNDSEN , BnrTz , Fou rth Row - ALLEN , SEVERUD, I\1JLLER, \Vou:E,

S.

NORL>VOLD , RcoMONO,

H.

MARTIN , CooKE , LUNDSTROM. CLARK , GARVEY , VANDt::R S IDE , SPAI~DING.

WATILO, RoTHMAN , PERRY, MELLQUI ST, ScHROEDER, I<ELLY , I-for'"FNER,

jOHN SON , BENTLEY.

F tfth /~o w - MESS I::R SM ITI I, STROUD. SPANTON, A . NoRDVOLD, JoACHIM , liAwKE , DI C KENS , HARRIS , NELSON, SPRAC. UE, EsEtn·, jeNSEN. Si xth R o w - SATHER, MOtiN, KROPIDLOSI<l , f-'ARRELL, CRAMER, I L N EtSON , WHITTING T ON, DALLMAN, STEVENS, OL SEN, CRONQUI ST, ARM ~'fRONG , ELLI OT, M cCAULEY.

The Intermediate Grade Club H E Intermediate Grade Club was started in the fall of 1925. Miss Frances T Smith. who was then supervisor of the third and fourth grades, organized the club for student teachers in her department: The purpose of the club at that time was dramatization. The following year Miss Maude Kavanagh. then supervisor of the sixth grade. continued the work with varied activities. In 1926 the club was opened to anyone interested in the work and projects of the intermediate grades. During the fo llowing yea rs the club also assumed the responsibility of giving several all-school parties. The purpose of our club now is to promote the special interests of teaching in the intermediate grades with emphasis p laced flrst upon dramatic work and then upon such other work as the club may consider worthwhile. When the club doors were opened this fall to anyone interested in this department, nfty-six people responded to the ca ll. These members have regular meetings throughout the school year. The faculty advisers have helped to make this club a worthwhi le organization. ANN CRONQUIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President JANICE OLSEN. GoLDIE HARRIS. . . .

M1ss

Vice- President Secretary- Treasurer ... ... Faculty Adviser

. ..... . ...... ....... . .......

. . . . . . . . .

STROUD. ·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . .

. ..


'3 0

Frr$1 Row.-

FRAN'5~' . S. I<ETTr-.'ER, GR.AO:-tDALEr-.: , CIRI !>t. . C . jOIIN"'tt'-1,

LAKK IE , jOIINSO:--.. ,

IIAt.L., R . jr;:N~e:-.: , HAIU,....H. ~s

STROUD. ERtCK!)ON, 0RKI3.

Second Row Th~rd R ow Fourth How

CARLSON,

Dorv

SHA\'V, IIARRJs,

McLEOD, Mu>~SON, Y u>~GEN SEARLES

L.

J<t::. J I NIZR. , I<JNTZI , S l\.fO N S, Si!\'ARE IO, BYLU NI> . LEGRJD. MALAND.

B o vCL<, SwoHo>P. , SKA~<O, FLICKENGEo<,

I. KILt<,_ , MAKI , L IEBE , KP.AMER, MEYER, WARD\\ I'LL , SELLECK,

J•~'~EN.

S. N E LSON, WEsT, L AC P.AF"f, A K u ~<N ,

Bo<A !J>~, DoUCJ.AS, GILBO!>, HOLI>EN, L u.:H r -

'JENEC:GER.

KATE R, P ERSONJUS, WAKEY, SJ ETT~ACiteR, Oa.>ECAARO, K tl.BOURN E , !<ROCKOW .

Ftjt11 Row -

Suth /~ow - Mueu... t:; R ,

S·aROBEH N ,

M E LLQU JSi, REINAH 1s , YENl31ZRC,

Hn

RowEu

STE NSRUD, VANSTRoM .

NEt.~N. Gu.a:E:N,

LEM AN, PR I NZING, ScOT 1 , DECK UR, P A RKI N, SAMUEL~,

GACE,

ZELLER.

The Primary Club

"Q r CE upon a time 1 heard a lot of noise in t he P helps school gym , .. said a very little inqu isitive city mouse to his country cousin. "Of course I in vest igated , and what do you suppose it was 1 Rows a nd rows of girls having a H a llo\\ e'en party. I t ried to sl ip away unnoticed. but one of the g irls espied me and gave ven t to a horrible shriek. All the rest of t he pa rty likewise seemed afraid of me, so, s ince [ had them cornered. I intended t o nnd out \\'hat they were. Ve ry timid ly. they assured me they were the Primary C lu b, wh ich had been o rga ni zed by M iss Gage 'way back in 1923. They said their purpose was to p romote educational interests in p rimary education a nd to encourage friendship and good fel lowship among their members. They told me they were a li ve organization wit h lots of good-will. cooperation, and pep. After t hey fed me some cheese, I left them. "At their Ch ristmas party I vis ited t hem again, but when they gave their big a ll -school party on February 15, 1 was quite d isrega rded. In spring they d idn 't even let me know abou t their picnic on the bluffs ." "Oho," sa id the little country mouse... 1 saw them on the bluffs, but l was afraid of them. Nex t time I' ll know bet ter. .. HA ZEL

ScoTT ......... . . . ... .. .. ... ...... . ... . .. .. ..... P resident

M ARY REINARTS .. ... . ... . . . . ... . . .• . . . . . • . ... . . . . . . . . . Secretary L AVONE MELQUIST .. . .. ...... . ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Miss

Treasurer Adviser

GAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... • . . . . .. . . .. . .. ... . Faculty


'30

'To/> /~ow -

S JPOLA , CJSE.WSI<I, STROUO, 0HN"0RG, AYSHFORO. B ROOJ<Nt::. R,

ScJ tWASI £ , £3oTTOM L E Y ,

SecOtld How -

Dt:.

Buss,

HoRART, Mu.LI3H., Sr::!v! t. JNG, SUTIIERLANO,

SM JnT. BoARDM AN. PALM GARD. GoM MEI~.:r. 13A t. Dw i N .

l - lANO, S H AROLOW, 5'1, jOH N , GoARI}, l<JEU..,\ND, HANSEN, s~tn II COLLIN , PATiUD( a::. SWAN . Jot-1:-...IS()N, PJ ~SA­

\'£NTO. GRANGER , McD oNALD. C1~EMEt-: T.

Third Row -

Ros£RT:o.. MosT. T HOM PSON , HrRsCi lFE.U>, I"r.::wEu .

The Kindergarten Club At t he end of vaca t ion each fri end and relation Bids each of us g ir ls fond ad ieux. And he re we a ll a re. from near and from fa r J ust shouting a g reeti ng to you' 'vVith the help of our teachers we' ve put through some featu res Providing both profit a nd fun . And the freshmen will t ell of a sophomore fa rewell . W hen t he tale of our sc hooldays is run. To our loved " C hristmas S ing" ea ch mem ber did bring A spi ri t of joy a nd of mi rth. And our C hristmas card sale could neve r spell fail Wi t h a cause of such mer it a nd wo rth . We wou ld pay t ri bu te here to ou r C:ollege so dear, W h ich has spu r red us to what we have won: We \v iii a lways rejo ice if. in rnem' ry, t hy voice Still utte rs t he commen t, "Well done." AucE P AT R IDGE. JANE T CoL LI N.

. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .

!V!A RJORJE SwAN. . . . . . . . . . . ETH E L

JOH t SON. . . . . . . . . . . . .

H E LEN SM ITH. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ...

. . . . . . . . . President Fi rst Vice-President . . . . Secon d Vice-President . . . . ... . . S ecretary . .. . . . . . . . . ... . Treasurer . ...

Jvi iSSES SLJTHERLA~D. SCH \\'ABLE. SEM LI ::--.JG , AND ELLINGSON

. .. .. . . . . F'awlty Advisers


'3 0

Top /~ow- Nvc.ARD, SMITH, Sect>tJ<il~vw

B-\l(l:-1\., I<ATF.R

Pt-:I IRSON

II. f'm

'ON_

A

HANSEN.

Bus~.

OLSEN

GREEN,

Rolll~fAI'.',

01Ch.E,...S, 13E.NTI E.Y.

PEti-:.H.~O"'· STEVENS, Llt:.IIIEN'-It::.C.ER , H O PP , )ACOii!->E~

P ,\CE.Y , z.\ti£1. , v

IIAII.

)0'-I!FSON ,

SIPOI .J\

Third Hvu

SeARl r -.. ) O AUII:\1 , BRAUN f),.J>lJY

Bovee.

EBERT, P1·1 s lER, L u'lO~TRO" G1E:-.E. CARl ~1'-."

Cu no~::, II Joo;;;F.:ro~

'0}'>...

Fourth Row

I Ktc

hN

RoBI~HON,

SE\'A IU~ II>. BYI.u,...,·o

( .. ARK IE,

GF.RRY. IIAPPI::., Sc.I IWICltrENBERC;,

E1.1.101 1

jONi_,:,,

PRAIZ.I ER , VAI'>..:DER-..11)£

Ft/lh l~o"- 'lll lloOE.I<H LH, Ro\\ELL. II£,,""'

R. Sixth Row

J''""'"' SKARO, McGu. I . I VRA Y , MAK I , II

p,,,.,.._:,o,.,

OI ~SON,

HARRISON.

E.

J"-NSE.., , l< oNTZI , RE"h E,.., SPALDING,

SOUTHWORTH, T i!OMAS,

Et t~INGSON,

E 0Lso".

FRO£LJ CI I, GEI\OTS. Hui.EMAN,

)OIJ"l'oON lVfPI I Ql!l~ l . BA RTLETT.

Girl Scouts years ago the White 8irch Troop was organized to meet a grow ing demand F IVE for teachers who would be capable not only to ca r ry on their regular school

activities but also able to take charge of the civic needs of the girl. The type of recreation in which the school girl today spends her leisure time is recognized as a vital part of her educat ion and greatly inAuences her later usefulness and happiness as a human bei ng, home-maker, a nd cit izen. Therefore. the young college women are being encouraged to pay the ir civic quota of volu nteer service t hrough becoming t he friendly and understand ing leaders of the younger girls. Although such work requires suitable training and intel ligent application on the part of the student , the course is an extra-curricular acin·ity and Joes not offer credit. !lowe\ er, it is of great benefit to anyone since it gives a future teacher a wider scope in her application fo r a position. Among the activities of the year \\'ere breakfasts. suppers. and moonlight hikes besides the regular weekly meetings. a t which each member is given actual pa rticipation in t he program. In Febr ua ry a very interesting Leaders· T ra ining Course ,,·as offered under a competent instructor. The ofllcers this year are as fol lo,,s: Captain First Lieutenant ELLE~ LUNDSTROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . Scribe \.1 1ss ELL I NGSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. Pawlty Adviser

W I LMA FROELI CH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FREDA GERDTS ... ... . .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . .


'30

Top Row - B/\I{ER . A. K11 .£N , ZA BE L , RE I Mr:::i\.S. D. N ELSON, 8 1.- I SS, L lJDW!TZKE, ALLAN. Second R ow - GREEN , P t:::-SAVEN 'ro, Sou·tHWORTH , Pt::R RY STEPI-t£NSON, PR AIZ LER , RENi<E N , Th ird Row - 1\MUNDSEN. I. l< t LEN , P ERSON I US, CoW LE S, PRINZING, ELL I NCSON, BoYER, ENcu

Fourth Row -

E.

)A<:OHSCN, H1 Ll- EMAN, BE RG.

.sH, L ECRID, EuERT, PF I STER .

II J\NSEN, COLLIN , Sn\.£ETE R, C RONQUIST , RICIIARDS. ADAM S, K I RCH, J<R.OCK O W , LAC RA F T, MESSERS MITH,

CLE!\·IEfX T .

Y.W.C. A. THE opening day of coll ege. the friend ly spirit of the Y. W.C.A. was maniO Nfested by its members in meeting trains and busses to welcome new students. In September "Friendship D ay" was sponsored to further p romote the spirit of friendliness among t he college students. Miss Sutherland who spoke on "Friends hip" summed up t he qualities which one seeks in a friend as sincerity. unselfishness, a spi rit of tolerance. a sense of humor, and a spir it of friendliness . The flowers d ist ributed by members of the organi zation and worn by st udents and facu lty symbolized the spi rit of the day. T he Y.W.C. A offered its members a practical course in leadership in Gi rl Reserve work under the supervis ion of Miss Buckley, Girl Reserve Secret ary of the city Y.W.C.A. The girls organ ized themsel ves into a Gi rl Reserve group an d carried out the p urpose of the club which is to develop girls mentally. physically, a nd sp iritually by work ing out severa l projects. On a rainy November night thirty-nine members donned their slickers and galoshes and hiked t wo miles to W inn T ee Pee Lodge where a social hour was enjoyed before the cheerful fi replace, followed by a delicious hikers · supper. At Christmas time four cars of carolers drove to the County Farm and made happy the poor and unfortunate by presenting t hem gifts and singing Christmas carols.


'3 0

Toj> Rou'- S11.u 111, L JNDCRt:;N, ROARD~1AN. PARK I N . J IOPP , \VHJTTIER , McLEOD , I i S MITH, K JE.Lt..AN O Second Row V . PEu::tt~ON , S. f':OROVOI... I>, 5£.1\fll.. ES. Lrt-JC~"J .. £LDER. L3t..l!>!>. H ARRIS. IIOBART. LICHTENNE<.:E:R,

\VHITING

Thud Row - MEAD. II. O LSON, CATLIN. C. AMUNDSEN, WoLFC:. HARRISO>I , PA 1RIDGE, MoHN, G AMUNDSI::N Fourth Row - SoH.bN'iON J I NELSON, f'.! YGAARO, MAKI , McVENr::s, Ht::.t.J~bN, GERDt::s, l:3RUST, DECKER. p,jth J<uw R owm r., ~1d.~JLLI\'RAY, Gn~:-,t , C joH...,SON , BoveE. Pr-ISTER , S PRACll l't, MEYt:R , \VARDWCI 1 . lvlt.LLQUI ST .

Y. W.C. A. rec ital was sponsored in October by the Y. W. wh ich was said to A NbeORGAN one of the most successful affa irs of its kind held at the college. No one who attended cou ld help but feel upl ifted. Through a yea r's program of varied acti,·ities our college Y.W.C.A. tries to emphasize the alt ruistic spirit in developing friendliness in the college and in studying how to be wise leaders of the yout h who will come unde r our charge. I NEZ ADAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President IONA K I RCH....

. ... • . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .. . Vice-President

JANI E STREETER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . • . . . . . . . . Secretary

A

N CROt Qv iST......

MARGARET

LA

ARDIS PR I ZJ

. ... . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . . ..

CRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Finance

c ............. . ..... .... .......... Poster

D oROTHY MESS ERSMITH . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social ELEANOR HANSEN . . . . . . .. •.. • . . .... . .. . .. . Social

Service JA COLLI s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership VJRCI IA C LEME T. . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . Bible R uTH I<ROCKOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... .. .... Program GLADYS BOYER . . . . • . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Y. W. Room 1ET

Treasurer Chairman Chairman Chairman Chairman Chairman Chairman Chairman Chairman


'30

Tofl l<.o ·w -

MEAD, J lol.DER , C:~tONQU IST , L I CHTENNECER, SwoFPER , SCH ELLENBERG, P£TERSON, r-'RANI<SON .

Second Rou;~ MILLER, I-IOPP, M u RRAY, SEVE RUD , Bovo. R ooSATliR, E . NELSON, L. ANDERSON, DECI<EH. , C 1RtSE . T hird R.ow - PACEY , Eu.IOTT, E. jOHN SON, BoT T011.·1LEY , A . NoROVOLD, ll ~c.; oAHL, H rLLCMAN . G t::ROES, S l 'ORLIE , jOIINSON. Fourth Row- Ro~ISCHON, PER~ONI VS, \V ,,I<EY, T H n::oE, SKARO. LEC.RID, tvtcVENES, HEEREN , l ln::~TAN D, BROOKNER, B E N TI... EY.

Ft/th

CARPENTER, I<J£1.LAN D , VANSTRO~. K I RCH ,

Row -

Cl

S:-..ur.-t.

YENBERC

McKINLEY , Mo~t:-.c, S T ENSRUD

I1RADY, I IA LL,

F.MENT,

Women,s Athletic Association HE purpose of the Women's Athletic Association is to fos t er t rue sportsmanT ship. to promote health and physical efficiency, to stimulate a nd maintain an interest in Athlet ics by providing recreational activi t ies, a nd to encourage good fellowsh ip among the women of this college. The wide and va r ied program offered to t he women of the college by the W.A.A. each year makes it possible for everyone to maintain her membership in the organizat ion. Everyone participating in the activities sponsored by the organization is ever learning how to better live up to the club motto : "Play U p: Play Up - And P lay the Game." FRANCES ivfoRSE . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... President

V ice-President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Secretary- Treasurer McK JJ'.;LEY . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fawlty Advisers

ALMEDA STENSRt;D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . I ONA K I RCH ... .

MISSES TALBOT,


'3 0

.,,,p /~o u.· - But-":H L C.R . S{!cond l~ o u•

V

\V111PPLE , GE"-OTs BLI"i;o..,

PETr!.RSON ,

H

""''ELSON

E

Ll

ow11 Zt\.E . FROELIC H . BLAKE.

H ARI"U S.

l\.1

MARTIN . I< A<;TE"' .

CLARK, R

PFtS1ER, ~~~•u Ell.. R~ E'-.E

Bvu;Nt}.

S t:SAREIO.

Thlftl Row

LARI<IE. )0\ C:III~f . IIA\\KI-.....

O i .SO'S ,

G

IIARRI ~. l<AJf'R , C 11IID£R:O, , R :> YER. M r\Rli N , J,'\COnM~~ . CPF R t . ll.

( \t~N

Pmutlt Row - H ot DBR . 1v1cL~:.oo , Fl/tlt l~t>W ORI<E . S OUTI I\\ O RTII

l(RATZ, \Vu.tGHI , CLAI.t.K SPAt DIN'C.,

1...

1 iAL s re,...:Ruo,

lJA\'IS, I<Roc:Kow . StPO t. A. SIJARnLo w. P E~A V l:.:NTO.

Pf'l:')IER. BoARDMAN. [)AI E , L U NDI"'· GRAY ZABEl.,

G . ) OHN~r-.: .

c:

jOIIN ~"'

11H.Al N.

Women's Athletic Association ACT I V I TJ ES 1929-30

l inclusive a nd ,·aried .A.A. program was officially started when T giHCrls alenthusiastically hiked around Birch Trail and had a camp fire supper

91 by moon light. Later the new girls were del ightfu ll y entertained by the old W.A.A . members in the play " The Life History of Sonny Sports·· \\'hich was written and direc ted by one of the clu b members. Adele Brady. Other e\·ents of the year \\'hich were pa rticipated in by all who desired to take part included such events as splash parties. moonlight hikes. a skating pa rty. initiation ceremonies. in tramural tournamen ts in tennis. basketball. baseball. and classes in golf. tennis. a nd archery. f\ \'ery s uccessfu l year \\·as en ded with the an nua l A ll Sports banquet. Letters and pins a re awa rded at the banquet to those girls who du rin g the year ha ve earned the necessary I00 o r 200 points . \V


'30

Top RoiP -ScHELL~NnERC. MARit N . EBERT, DAvi S, E L zE.NGA, T3u ss. L uND I N . Sotnl-t WOH.TH . D ALE, S t<r\ RO. Second Row - B E NTLEY, M O RSE , l ! ALSTU NRU O , C L ARK. Si£N sRUD, RRAD Y. B oYER , M ARTI N, S w OF FE R , C o o K E , K R AGE . Third Row - ) OIINSON. M ESSE.H~MITII, I<.JRCH , T ALBOT, C RONQU I ST , MCKI NLEY, M uRRAY, KROCI<OW , STEP ilENSON , CAR.P EN-r£R.

The Physical Education Club 1 the Physical Education ··spec ia ls" orga nized the Physical E duca t ion I NC lub192 under t he leadership of Miss Lewis. who was d irector o f P hysica l E d ucat ion here a t that t ime. The purpose of t he club is to coopera t e with the D epartment of P hysical Edu ca tion in promoting physical and menta l efftciency. and encouraging high st anda rds in socia l beha vior. T he club mem bers are charact eri zed by the enthus ias m d is p layed in a ll club acti\'it ics, as wel l as by t he good sportsm ans hip and coopera t ion eac h one shows . T he girls try to live u p t o these ideals in o rde r that they may make t rue t he ai m of t he clu b, "A sound mind in a sound body." Because of the efftciency of t he di rectors and the cooperation o f t he mem bers, the c lu b has sponsored a va ried program. A " get acq ua inted " breakfast was g iven to the F reshmen P hysica l Education "specia ls" by the Sophomores . E a rly in t he fa ll t wo week-end ca mpi ng trips we re thoroughly enjoyed. The annua l D a nce Recita l was presented in the spring q uarter. T hroug hout the year. meetings were held a t wh ich topics of ge nera l in terest to the mem bers were discussed. FL.OR E TTA M UR R A Y .. . .. . . .. .. . .. . .. .. ... . .. ... .. .. . . . .

Presiden t

AN. CRo Q U IST . .. ·.. . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . ..•. . . . . . . . . . . Vice- P residen t R uTH I< ROC KOW ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. Secreta ry M 1ss M c KI N LEY . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . .. . Faculty

Adviser


'3 0

Top How - A . KILEN, SHARDLOW , .STRE~TER, CLARK, LACRAFT, K I L~OURl"E, AMES. Second Row- ScoT·r, l-lOLDEN, HOPP. FROELICH, ANDERSON . BYLUNU, HANS EN, OoEC:AA RD. Third Row - f\tfiLLER, Soun !WORT!-1, S J.\1PSON, FARRELL, THmor::, ScvAR£ID. McDoNALD. Fourth Row - REESE , CHILDERS, BRACE, CATLIN, GRIMM, HuNT, PERRY, ZELLER .

T he Mendelssohn Club Mendelssohn Club is composed of twenty-five women students. Since T HE 1900, when it was founded by Caroline V. Smith, it has done much in promoting better music in and out of the city of Winona. The Annual Recital each spring is an important event in the year's program. The efficient directing of Mr. Grimm and the earnest work of the members o f t he club make this recital one of the finest musical programs of the year. One of the happiest events of the year has always been the M endelssohn Club banquet. This year it was held at \Vinona Hotel. With the club president as t oast mistress, the toasts were made to the four ages of music: the Classical, Rom antic, Modern, and Future. Each of these ages was also represented by a musica l selection given by the individuals of the club. The club uniform consists of a \\'hite dress, purple tie, white hose and black slippers. This is Mr. Grimm's seventh year as director of the club and head of t he college music department. His personality and spirited enthusiasm ma ke the club work a pleasure. ALTA RuTH CATLIN. I<ATHLEEN HuNT .. .. . ..

Bm

DEL BRACE.

MARGARET

HoPP ...

. . . ..... ... President .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-Presiden t . ...... . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . Secreta ry- Treasurer . ....... Accompanist


'3 0

To/1 l<o u·

K!NTZI , \VJ-IITEl$, VERM I LYEA . FISCHER, OTTERNESS. ) . VoO RHEES , rv1 ru .ER , Jo~ES. REAR .

Second Ho1r- T1 TIEDt, G. jOHNSON , CATLIN , S TREE.'J ER, H oPP, FROE LI CH, L u ~KOW . Om::GAARD. Thtrd How CHILOGR~ . l_)tRRY, HoLDEN , SL\.fPSON, SHARDLOW, HuNT, FARRELL, Sco T T, SouT I-!\\'OJ{' JI I , /Joliom How - BrtACE , Sr::vEREJD, OLsON , HANSEN , GRII\IM , BYLUND, t-v111.LER , R EESE, ZELLER

I ~ A..CRAF1

The College Choir College C hoir is one of the newest coll ege orga ni zations. It is considered T anHLoutgrowth of the a ll-college mass s ingi ng This p ractice was formerly carried on every Thursday afte r chapel exercises. but because of the lack of t ime when chapel hour was changed last year. it had to be abolished. The College Choir is now open to any student especially interested in music \vork . Th is year t h irtyfive were selected at the try-outs. Besides appearing at several of t he college programs during t he school year, the College choir sings at the Graduation Exercises. It is not only in p reparation for these appea rances. but also for the enjoyment of si nging. that t he chorus holds regu la r meetings every Monday and Thursday afternoons. At t hese ti mes t he Tower room is t he scene of a hard practice hour. To a casual observer. however. it \vou ld appea r to be just an enjoyable song fest. This is due in part to the sp ir ited en t hus iasm of the d irec tor. Mr. Grimm , and to the cooperative attitude of t he s ingers. ln such an atmosphere it is not surprising that even the most d ifficult selections are well defined.

E WALD K I :--JTZI.

PAULIN~ ZELLER ... . . .. ... . . H AZEL ScoTT .

. . . President . Vi ce-President . . . . . . S ecretary- T reasurer


' 30

'Top l?..<w - I I J:::LOA HL, Sco·1T, I lu::S IA NU CAl LIN, I loPP, J c~ JMAN , LACRAF t , ST REETER. Second P...ow- Lur1, GRUESE. Dov<;I., A~ . HOLDEN, \VHITIN<;, \Vru c. arT. KRATZ. DorY. josEr..,oN Thtrd Row - 1 JuNr, T!IIEOE, BARD , )ONE~. HARN E S. OLSON. PERRY , l(u . nOURNE_ HJLLEMA:-.. l'uurth l~au' REESE , 13EAR, 1<1-...JlZI , , \NDIZR. ~ON MuELLER, joNES, \Vt-UJUI~, GRI MM , l-iM L , ZEr

u rn

Mason Music Club "M

USIC hath charms to soothe the savage breast. to soften rocks, or bend a

knotted oak" -and should such an occasion arise. t he mem bers of the Mason Music Club feel sure they could meet the situation. T he name selected for one of the important clubs in the college needs explanat ion . Many years ago, there lived a man who agreed with William Cong reve·s quotation introducing this "write-up... H e probably regarded children's passions not so savage as uncult ivated, therefo re, to instil the love of music into the chi ld 's heart at a receptive age. or to encourage it in a ch ild whose hom e surround ings were not appropriate, he succeeded in introducing music into the public schoo ls. This man was Lowell Mason, from whose example the Mason club members hope to gain a true appreciation and fondness for the best of music. a wider knowledge of musical composers and artists - in s hort, a deep unders tanding of the beauties of music. . . President . .............. \lice-President VIRGINIA ?vh .J ELLER . . . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . Secretary MR. GRIMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . Faculty Adviser

LEO:-.JA ANDERSON .

CoR WIN jONES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


'3 0

Top Row- MEAD,

LACRAPT, STREETER, BoYD, KEJTHAHN , ScoTT, WAKEY.

G.

Second Row -

W!i!TJNG, HILLEMAN, P RIA ZLER, REIMERS ,

Bottom Row-

S EARLES. M ILQUIST, W,\LSH, HARRISON , ADAMS, .SPALDIN\., l'vl uCLLER.

jO IINSON, PERRY.

League of Women Voters Winona State Teachers College League of Women Voters was reorgan ized T onHESeptember 20 by Miss Helen Horr. field secreta ry. The purpose of t h is organization is to promote interest in pol itical questions among women voters and the aim is to prepare women for intelligent voting. It is a non-partisan orga nization. The college club has a members hip of seventy. The L eague has been addressed by various m embers of the Winona League and other prominent speakers. Among these were Mrs. Guy E . MaxwelL M rs. J . D. Mo rrison and Mrs. Abbott. The p lan fo r the year's activities incll..lded an open meeting to the public and one meeting centered on the wo rk of each of t he three depa rtmen ts. The three depa rtments of the organ ization are the departmen t of efficiency in government, the department of international cooperation to prevent war, a n d the public welfare department. These are headed by Crace Selleck. Ma rga ret La Craft and H azel Scott. At the stat e convention of t he League of Women Voters held in St. Paul, October 30. 3 1. and November I, Mary Walsh of Farmington and J eanette Gribble of Minneapolis -represented the g roup. Upon the ir return, t hey gave an account of their trip to the student body at chapel. The League sponsored a tea ea rly in May to which a ll the women of t he college were invited . This closed t he program for t he yea r. President Vice-President I NEZ ADAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . .. ... Treasurer R uTH MERR I LL . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . Secretary MISS RICHARDS, MR . SELLE. . . • . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Faculty Advisers

MARY WALSH .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . CoRA H ARR ISON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . .


•a o

Top Huw -

SEARLES.

Second Row Tlu rd Rnw

I I. PFI STER,

Lu:-.~osTR0.\1 H ARRI !-.ON BoYu,

0

n ERNES:;, FISCHER, A DAM S, I<ALOUN ER , B REZIE, BEHNKEN.

Et:J'-IER, KING, s~tiTti , RENKEN, KIET HAHJ'..; , NoROVOLO, SK ..\RO,

L.

PFJ !)TER,

C.

A M U NDSEN , jO~EFSON.

McG•LLI\'RAY, EvENS, I lEi SER, STE NSON, RowE, PRAIZI ER, F!l.ANZ MAN , I IAWKE, J osEPSON, Mt.AO,

G

A M IJNI>-

s gN.

Bottom Row- \VA K EY,

LARKIE, SPALDING, T111EOE, H O PP , Su L LIVAN

11,\PP£, C HRI STENSEN , \ VAl SH, DRAG\.OLD, BAR'I !:.CH .

The Country Life Club H E Coun try Life Club, organ ized in 19 18. exists fo r t he p urpose of g iving stuT dents who plan to teach in t he ru ra l school, a nd others interested in rura l education. socia l recreation . insight into some of t he p roblems and knowledge of var ious means of solv ing t hese p roblems. Under its auspices. rural Pa rent T eacher Associations are assisted in their programs. An Associated Schools Play Day and an educational conference to which are invited the count y superintendents and t he high school t ra ining teachers of the Southeastern M innesota Educational Association distr ict are given in the spring quarter. T his year meet ings were held the second and fourth Thursday in each month. The use of the Club Room added .much to the enjoyment of t he meetings . Each meeting opens \\' ith songs suitable to community meetings and closes with Tars: " D ay is done. gone the s un, F rom t he lake. from t he h ills, from the sky. All is well , safely rest. God is n ig h." MARY WALSH . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . President

FRANCES E vA!'.:S . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Vice-President

MARVIN K I NG . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . . Secretary - Treasurer M ISS C HR IS T E L S E · . . . . . . . . . • . .. . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . .. .

Faculty A dviser


'3 0

Kindergarten D epartment TRAINl t C SCHOOL entire ftrst (]oor of the Library Bui lding is devoted to housing the College·s T HE two Kindergartens. Sixty little children between the ages of four and six spend happy morning hours pia) ing seriously and \\Orking happil y in bright sunshiny well-equipped rooms. A carefully selected lunch. brisk out-of-door play. and free activit ies in the gy mnasium keep them physical ly ftt. We find these little people engaged in such interesting activities as caring for the kindergarten doll. providing for animal pets. learning to handle tools and equ ipment. expressing baby interests through the use of such materials as sand. clay . blocks. paints. crayons and scissors. o student should leave the coll ege without having spent a morning in the kindergarten. To see Lhe .. learning .. p rocess at its beginning is· ,,·ell worth while.


'30

The Primary Department TRJ\l Nl

rc

SCHOOL

T HEP r ima ry D epartment consists of grades one. t\\¡o and t hree.

T he t h irt een rooms a re su nn y and pleasant ones, occupy ing t he sout h end of t he P helps b uildi ng .

M ovable fu rn iture made to orde r was placed in th e secon d-g rade room las t year. A window. co ve red fo r yea rs. was opened . mak ing t he roo m muc h mo re attract ive. T he nrst g raders were ha ppy when a p lay house was g iven to them . The ch ild ren gave an entertai nmen t for t heir pa rents in . ovem ber. each number be ing taken from t he regu lar work. In l'vlay. t hey agai n entertained t hei r pa rents wi t h a can ta ta wh ic h was a s uccess from t he point of view of costum ing. d ra matization. s tage setting. and mus ical select ions. At t his t ime. t he a nnual exh ibit of chi ld ren's wor k was show n in t he halls.


'30

The lntern1ediate Departn1ent TRA IN ING SCH OOL H E Intermediate Department consists of grades four, five a nd six. Under the T supervision of tvliss Clara Stroud, Miss l'vla rtha Dallman. and !iss Cathryn C ra mer those students specializing in intermediate grade work do their practice teac hing here. In add ition to the regular grade subjects, classes in indust rial a rt a re given twice a week. Miss Bertha Speckman superv ises t he fine art instruc tion. In gymnasium wo rk. t he pupils a re taught organized gam es. The girls a lso learn clog da ncing. while the boys learn feats in tumbl ing. The child ren have their citizensh ip a nd read ing c lubs which meet regu larly every week. Their programs have included a puppet show, original plays. and discussions on good citizenship. A school ga rden last spring proved to he a ve ry worth wh ile project, furn ish ing material for many interesting lessons.


'30

The Junior High School Department TRAINING SCHOOL HE Junio r High School divis ion is a n important depart ment of the Phelps T Training S chool. Superv ision is under the direction and guidance of M iss B eulah B runner, M iss Crace Muir, and Mr. Glenn Fishbaugher. T he Phelps Junior H igh is located in the southwest corner of the college build ing. and includes the seventh. eighth. and ninth grades. Academic subjects which are taught are social science, English. F rench. mathematics, general science and Latin. Those pupils who des ire vocational training have an opportunity to begin th is work by electing a ny of the fo llowing subjects: bookkeep ing. printing. shopwork. and domest ic sc ience. Extra-curricular ac ti vit ies are stressed to develop leadershi p and cooperation. Athletics. mus ic. work on t he newspaper. and club activities a ll serve to develop t h is phase of school life. T his group of children have had a ve ry successful athletic year. All of the boys participated in some spo rt - foo tball. basketball. trac k, tu mbling, and swimming. The girls have swimming. clogging, basketball , volleyball. tennis. and 'interpretati ve dancing. The music department, under the efficient d irection of M iss Valeta J effrey, organized a mixed chorus. glee club, and orchest ra . Miss Clark supervised art instruction for the girl s. Other activities include the Civics League. G.A.A., Camp F ire Girls, Boy Scouts, the Phelps Herald. a short story contest and a song contest in which everyone participated . The enrollment of the Junior H igh varies between s ixty and seventy pupils.

J


'3 0

Song Come on Winona. let's cheer l\o\\. that we all a re here We'll give them the fight Of the purple and white And the team that has no fear R a h l Rah! Rah!

The sp irit of the rurp le a nd the white Is the spiri t of " Fight 1 Team Fight!" We do not fear defea t As our t eam can't be beat It's the spirit of W inona. Ra h! Ra h l Rahl Ra h !


\

'---ACTl\)lTIES__



'3 0

A Night in Paris 'Let us go buye;:, ces (leurs. n'est-ce pas 7 " "Qui. we go achete some bon-bons. aLtssi ...

odd accents and dialects of f' rench we re heard in t he Place de !'Opera M Aon· yJanuary 18. A Frenchman might not have known his native tongue but he wou ld have been dull indeed had he not recognized the Cafe de Ia Paris. Lhe P lace de !'Opera. a nd the Ban que de F ranee. Each guest was given a handful of centimes with which to buy £lowers, bon-bons. and with which to tip the maitre d'hotel. Gordon Bear made a ,·ery "gnosse gendarme ...

\

A program was given between dances by membe rs of the two clubs. A skit hy the Twin City club showing a group of American girls in Paris opened the program. Gordon Bear as a French gendarme sang "Singing in the Rain .. with a French interpretation. Corwin Jones. Ardath Lovell and Joseph Mayan ga\'e an Apache skit and dance number. Pacifico Carpio and Edna G reen danced a Spanish Fandango in costume. Mauno Fuertes. P io Doron io and Pacifico Ca rpio sa ng a native Filipino love song. A Spanish serenade with Edna G reen on the ba lcony and Ewald l< intzi as a strolling minst rel concluded the p rogram. Our .. , ight in Paris" was made possible by the combined successful efforts of Le Ccrcle Francais and the Twin City Club.


'3 0

High Hat HEN Lhe Die-. o- fo Club and its fr iends went High H al on February 21. this group received enthusiastic applause from everyone who witnessed the production. The entire project was written and planned by student members of the clu b. The theme of the musical comedy revealed that two young men, a rich chap and a n earnest architect a re both in love wit h a very charming girl, ancy Ja rvis. She loves the ,,·ealthy suitor but does not believe h im to be worthwhile. He goes away for a time, returns a clifferent man and is accepted by the young woma n. J anie Streeter \'ery ably interpreted the cha racter of ·ancy J arvis. Leonard Re ishus took the part of David La'' renee, t he man '' ho redeems h imself in the eyes of ancy: Corwin .Jones was the arch itect who was disappointed in love: Miss Florence Richards p layed the part of Au nt Ma rgaret, the lovely and generous aun t of a ncy a nd t he twins. The show got off to a peppy st art when t he H igh H at chorus appeared wi th their clever steps and catchy song. Other attractive dance choruses were the ""Little by Little .. chorus. the Waltz Chorus. and t he Jungle Chorus. There we re several clever features. They included an attractive. old-fashioned skit by four faculty mem bers, a twin song act, t he Peter Pan number. a ··sister song ... the ··bu tler Blues··. two popular impersonations. a tap dance act and the ""shush, s hush·· solo. The comedy was w rit ten by tliss Quirene Andersen. The cast of seventy began practice under her direction. Afte r her departure to accep t a teach ing position. Sara Sill took over t he di rection of the production. Margaret Hopp accompanied all musica l numbers. Much of the music and words used in the play were original. The proceeds from the sho\\' were used by the Oie-No-Mo Club to sponsor the F riendship Tours which took place d uring April and May.

W

\


'3 0

CAsT or- C H A RACTERS

David I lamil LOn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ Leonard Rei shu ~ f erry Carter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Corwin J ones _ord Ripley ..... ..... . ... . .... .. . .. .. . ...... . . . . Harry Mc(Jrath Juno ................... ..... . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . .. . .... . ..... .. ... .... . . ......... Vernon RisLy Jupiter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . ..... . ... . .... . . .. . .. . . .. .. .. ... . Gordon Bear M aster of Ceremoni es.. ........ ........ . .. .. .. . . . . ..... ulysses Whit eis Kay Marvin . . ....... ........ . . Kav M arvin Nancy J arvis. . . Janie Streeter Mrs. T ennant. . .. . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . .. .. . . . . .. . ..... ..... ... . ... Miss Florence Richards Mrs. Blair. . . . ... . . . . . .. . . .. . ... . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . Hazel Scott Mrs. H amilton . . . . . ............ . . Mary R einarts ScENES

Act I. -Garden of Mrs. Tennant Act I I. - Garden of Mrs. Tennant. Act I I I. - Garden of Mrs. Tennan t. C H ORUSES

H attie Sou th\\'orth Ardis Rod~ater Anne R obbchon j anet Co li m D orothy Mc~scr>.mith lona Kirch J anice Olsen Mary Wardwell Erna I<imzi R uth Scverud Gladys Peterson Orma Lichttencgcr Ruby Pacey

H igh-Hat Luci lle Stephenson Doroth y Wakey Doroth' l!unson Ella Yungen Alta Ruth Catlin H elen Simons Chant of the Jungle Helen Smith Virginia C lement C leo English Little by Little Eunice Most Catherine Brookner Ardis Prinzing

E.dith Whittier Grace Foss Elizabeth Burnh<lm

Waltz Dorothv Bylund Ramona Yates Jacqueline Farrell

R uth Beth Watts Dorothy Kater Ard is RodsaLer C lara Venberg

Ted Solo~ki Al ice Luskow Ruth Luskow Luella Shardlow

Clara Venberg Florence Ch ilders Luella Carpenter Evclvn H and Bir Dell Brace J oan Kovaniemi Eveleth Ostrander Tryphena Sevareid Doroth y McLeod Kanerva Sipola Luella Shardlow Mary G ladys Vanst rom Cat herine Dickens Violet i<.udart E b ba Nelson J osephine Rothman

F E Al URI:. ARI I SIS

Ebba Nelson Florence McKinley Louise Strohbehn Theda Gildemeister


'3 0

The One--Act Play Contest l\JA Y , 1928, the Wenonah Players sponsored the first d ramatic contest for the I f\:high schools of southeastern M innesota. A set of rules for the contest, along \\ ith a letter, was sent to va rious high schools wh ich might be interested. F ive of them indicated their interest by entering the contest. Last yea r the contest was held again . It was in every wa y a .success. The fi ne enthusiasm shown by the entrants and by the members of the Wenonah P layers made it an established fact in the furtherance of good drama in Minnesota h igh schools. The contest took place early in May last yea r. The high schools of Rushford, Red Wing, South St . PauL G lencoe, Stillwater. La Crescent and Winona were represented. An elimination contest took place during the day. and the fi nals we re played in the even ing of the same day. Red Wing was awarded fi rst place, S tillwater drew second place and Glencoe was a\\'arded t h ird p lace. This year the contest took place on May 9. A num ber of schools signified the ir interest by entering the contest. Red Wing rlaced fi rst: Winona second: and St ilh\¡ater, third. To t he untiring efforts o f M iss Ru t h Beth Watts. drama tics instructor, is due much of the success of these contests. The interest a nd ent husiasm \\'h ich a re being sho\\'n in the project not only prove that good d rama is holding its own in our high sc hoo ls, but a lso indicate that the work will be carried on and advanced by the Wenonah Players.

\


'30

··L ADY Winderm ere's F an· ·. a charming comedy by Osca r Wilde, was p resented by t he Wenonah Players on November 26. 1930. The play is a swiftly moving intrigue concern ing Lady Windermere and her husband, Lord Windermere whom she suspects of being interested in M rs. Erlynne. a mysterious woma n wo rking her way into recognition in society. The plot reveals that Mrs. Erlynne is Lady Windermere's long-vanished mother who sacrifices her recent ly won recognition for her child's happiness. Pat hos and humor so charmingly clothe the tal e that no one recognizes the fa milia r t heme. The play was attractively and beautifu lly presented by the able cast.

CAST O F CHA RACTE RS

Lord Windermere . . . .. . . ... . . . . . ... . ......... ... . ..... . ... .. .J ohn Moriarity Lady Windermere ... . . . .... . .... . . .... . .. . . . . . ........ .. .. Catherine Su llivan Lord Darlington ..... . . . ..... . .... .. . . .......... .. .. .... ... Ly man Bri nggold Lord Augustus Lorton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H enry Southworth Mr. Cecil Graham .. . .. . . ... .. . . . . . .. .. . .. . . . ... . ...... . .. ..... . Cordon Bear Mr. Dumby .. .. ... ....... . . .... . . ... . . . . ·. . . .. . .. .. . ... . ..... William Moyer Mr. H opper . ..... . ... . .. . . ..... . ... . ... ........ . ......... . . .. . George Rossi Parker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . Howard Roy The Duchess of Berwick . . . . . . ... .... .. . .... . . . .... . . . . . ... Edna J ustman M rs. Erlynne. ... . . . ... Ab igai l Bliss Lady Agatha Carl isle ... . . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . .... . . Ardis Prinzing Lady Jedbu rgh . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. ........ .... .. . . . . . ..... ... ... Sara Sil l Lady Ply mdale ..... . . . ........ . ..... ... . .. . . .......... ...... Ina Cae King Lady Stut fie ld ......... . . . ... . . . .. .. .. . ... .. . .... . . . . . . . .. ... . Ardath Lovell M rs . Cowper-Cowper . . . . . .. ... .. .. . .. ........... . . ... ... . .. Florence C hil ders Rosalie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eleanor Hansen \


· --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------~

'3 0

Annual Prom

A

\

'EPTU. E setting with an iridescent background of underwater scenes was provided for the fou rth annual prom held in the gymn asium of College H all on Apr il 26. Radiating fro m a large yellow wa ter lily in the center were streamers of green. blue and lavende r which d ropped down ward at the sides to form a cu rtai n surrounding the dancing space. Above a ridge of gray stones ris ing from t he floor was a water background with fish of all shapes. Beyond a rocky a rch refreshments were sen ·ed in a sea ca,·e. The orchestra was provided wit h a special p it lined with green moss and su rrounded hy gray sea stones. The low colored lights playing on the scene added to t he rea !ism . The programs which were blue wit h handpainted fish helped to carry out the general decora tion scheme. The grand ma rch whic h began at nine o'clock was led by .Janie Street er of Redwood Fal ls and E wald I<:intzi of Moun tain Lake who were elected as the most rep resentative s tudents of the coll ege. They \\'ere followed by the class presidents \\'ith their guests and by the stLidents and t heir guests. About 300 students a nd guests attended the pa rty wh ich was one of the most elabo rate ever give n at t he college. l'vlusic was fu rnished hy Burmeister's orchestra. Katherine DeSmidt of Mi n neapolis was general cha irman of the deco ration comm ittee. Other chairman were Frances Morse. Minneapol is. refreshmen ts: Ardis P rinzing. Rus h ford . program : E\\'a ld Kintzi. Mountain Lake. music: and Wendell McKibben . Lamberton. invitations. Miss Florence L. Richards acted as chairman of t he joint fac u lty and student comm ittee. Jame Streeter and E wa!J KintZI


'3 0

The Class Play ¡¡TH E D ev il in the Cheese" by Tom Cushing was chosen for the sen ior a nd sophomore class play . May 29 and June 4 were selected as t he dates for the two performances of the play. The second showing is to for m part of the Commencement week program. The pla y. a delightfuL sparkl ing three-act comedy. includes a large cast of cha rac te rs a nd is d irected by Miss Ruth Beth Watts. Unusual as it is in its bri lliant humor a nd en tertaining in its clever lines. the amusing little p lay natu rally dema nds a n unusual setting. This is p rov ided in scenes rang ing from t he monastery of t he tl rst act to a ship scene. desert island and a f=' ifth Avenue mans ion in the second act. CI l i\ RACT ERS .Jimm ie C ha rd ... . .. . ... ...... . .................... . ......... . Howa rd Roy Dr . Pointe!! J ones .... . . ... .. ....... . ................ . .. . .... . ) ohn Mor iarity Mr. Quigley .... .. .. . . . . .. . .. .. . . . ......................... Joseph Voorhees Mrs. Qui~ley .. . .. . .... . .. .. ..... . ............. . .......... Jacquel ine Farrell Gold ina (_{uigley . ..... .... . . ........... .. ..... . . .. . .... . Bertha Kretzschmar C hu bbock ....... ... ...... . . .. .. ............. . ....... .. ..... Leslie H averland Fa the r Petros...... . . . . . . . . .. ... .................. .... .... Ewald K intzi Const a ntinos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. William Moyer The Little God Min . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Raymond H ap pe G~l dina's F riends . . Edna H a rris, E lizabeth Bentley. Alfhilcl J ulseth. Ard is Rodsater Shepherds .......... . . . ... .. ....... Mary R eina rts, Catherine Dickens, Sara Sill. Janice Olsen. G lenette Whi pple Monks ..... . .. . . . ... . Kal Wi bye. David Cohen. Robert G riffith. Olaf Ottern ess. 1\nt hon y Sampson. Joseph Mayan Canni ba ls .. . ... ....................... . .. . . Walter Enger. Frank Cunn ingham Theodore Soloski. Wendel l McKibben Fri ends of Jimm ie .. . Ulysses Whi t eis, Bernard Kramer. George Rossi, Gordon Bear Gorilla .. ......................... .................... ... . Henry Southworth CAST OF


'3 0

Lt/111) Righi-

J<RF.TZSCHMAR, SCHROEI)ER, SOLOSKI , M O RIARIT Y, BÂŁAR. FJSHBAUCIIE R, GREE N.

Debate

THEfou rth year of college debating with Mr. Glen Fishbaugher as coach has

\

been a successful one. This yea r no regu la r class was organized but debate was put on an extra-curricular basis. Before Christmas vacation tryouts were held and six students were chosen for the debate squad . The qu estion for debate t his y ear was. " R esolved: That t he U ni ted States should adopt a policy leading to com plete disa rmament except for forces needed for pol ice protection ." Both the aff1rmative team. cons isting of Cordon Bear, Mabel Green a nd John Moria ri ty and t he negative team consisting of T heodore Solos ki. Bertha Kretzschma r and Will iam Schroeder took part in intercollegiate debates wit h W isconsin and M innesota Teachers Colleges. T he first deba te of t he season was held February 7 when Moorhead T eachers College sen t t wo representatives to uphold t he negative of the q uestion. Bertha Kret zschmar a nd William Schroeder rep resented Winona . On Februa ry 13. both teams debated aga inst the affirma tive a nd negative t eams of Eau Cla ire T eachers College. R iver Falls sent its n egati ve team to Winona. Februa ry 14. On Februa ry 24. Winona upheld the negative against La Crosse T eachers Coll ege here while t he affirmat ive debated a t La C rosse on Feb ruary 19. The W inona-R iver Falls debate a t R iver Falls on February 28 closed the season, the success of wh ich was clue in no small measure to the a ble coaching of Mr. F ishbaugher.


'3 0

Health Week E p lay " Ins ide Stuff ' g iven in chapel Monday morning st arted t he I Iealth T HWeek acti vities. Februa ry 24 to M arch 1. The programs were sponsored by t he physica l educat ion depa rtmen t and individual gymnastics class. The week's demonst ra tions was well begun with a demonstra tion of the effect of unbalanced m eals. Diet was not all that was considered dur ing th is week, however. One day was deYoted to shoes a nd feet. A stage presen tation of t he part t ha t s hoes play in t he events of every li fe was shown. T ags we re g iven to t he mem bers of the stud ent body and faculty who were found wea ri ng t he p roper low- heeled and straight inner-bordered s hoes a nd who toed stra ight ahead when t hey \\¡a lked. Another day was d evoted to post ure. T here were postu re tags for those who demonstra ted good posture unconscious ly. Later t here was a posture con test in whic h Esther Da le a nd Fra ncis Morse scored high poin ts. \ The a ll school annual physica l education demonstration closed the week's healt h p rograms . This demonstrated a ll types of acti\'ity which one may participate in du ring coll ege days and a fter col lege for healthful ends as well as fo r t he fun and happiness ga ined t hrough particifo'ronc es Morse and 1-: st hcr On\e pating.


'3 0

Left

IV

Rcg/11

CArLl!', W H I T EIS, H uNT, 1-iAI.L, B EI'T I.b Y, K I NTZ!, K A T ER, 0Lso,.., GR I MM. McKIBBEN. )EITREY

The College Orchestra college orchest ra was organ ized s ix yea rs ago wi th M r. G rimm as the d iT HE rector. The purpose of t h is organization is not only to familiarize students wi t h orchestral work. but also to be of service to t he college by play ing at various functions . It p roduces music of the best type a nd has accomplished much in qu ickening t he interest of the coll ege in music. The orchestra has not on ly contri buted much to the ac t ivities of the college. but it has ente red into man y of the affa irs of the city. It is composed of t hose who a re in terested in m usic and ha ve som e ab ility in playing m us ica l ins t rumen ts.

\


'3 0

To!> Row - OTTERNESS, HuNT, R. VooRHEES , BEAR , WJ-IITEI S, KANGAS. Second Row - DRAGVOLD, BÂŁNTLEY . OLsON , Pmu<~..Y 1 HAu. , Md( IBBE:-.I . &uom Row - Hu:oAII L, y ATE:S, RÂŁESE , T A l "f, MANN rc, TE.R , , .~ROE.LICH .

The Band A

LTHOUGH t he band is one o f the college's lat est organizations, it has gro\vn into a n ac ti ve a nd va luable part of the co-cu rricu lar life at T . C. Its growth from a sm a ll beginning to the present mem bers hi p o f thirty-five is outstand ing ev idence of its progress. This increase in mem bersh ip is largely due to the opportunities offered: fo r any student who is interested in band work can secure an instrumen t at ve ry low cost, or may be loaned one by the depa rt men t . T his y ear, t he band was divided into t wo groups: t he Senior band consisti ng of those who have had p rev ious exper ience, and t he Junior ban d , better known as the "beginner's band_,. M any hours o f zea lous p rac t ise were spent in tha t the ban d might do its part to win a football game. M r. Orv ille W. Reese d irected the ban ds t his fo r making the band not only an instruct ive but college life.

that north west corner room, so game or "pep up" a basketba ll year. H e deserves much cred it also a very interesting part of

President ... Librarian- Treasurer

U LYSSES W HI TEIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . W ALTER KANGAS . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . .


'3 0

Get Way Down and Over Their Line We're the College crowd Yelling so loud And we're all a-feeling fine. Pick up the ball Touchdown is all Get way down and over their line. Don't you hear us yell Clear as a bell We're out for a jolly old time. Pick up t he ball Touchdown is al l Get way down and over their line Cheer! Cheer I up to t he skies so blue Cheer! Cheer! we're standing up for you . Wi-no-na is the place for me - Wi-no-na We're the college crowd Yelling so loud And we're all a-feeling fine Pick up the ball Touchdown is all Get way down and over their line.


ATHLE.TICS



'30

Top Row - lCRWtN, Ross t , )ONI':S, DEZEu., Rov, HAMSNESS, Btxsv, ENGER, MANAGER. Second Roru -1<13-R:-.t. G. R OGGE, Ve.RMILYEA, HALLSTROM, I<RAt.t ER, R I CE, GRIFFITH , J I. R oGGE, RI STY, Cu:"-~NI NCI-IA "-.f. Bollom Row- RE:"HUS, AssT. CoACH, O'DEA. )UENEMI\N , MuLLEN, Fti>CIIER, WtAY E, Mcl<tBBE:N, W OLcE, WELCH, GALLil.I\N , COi\Cil.

W.S.T.C. Football Schedule, 1929" 30 Septem ber September October October October October November N ovember

\

2 1 Stout .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 La C rosse. .... .. . ... .. .. 5 Fort Snell ing . . .. .. ...... 12 R ed Wing. .. . .. . . . 18 Mankato . . 26 St. Cloud. 2 Mason C ity - Cancelled II R ochester . ....... ..

0 18

6

W inona. .... ..... 12 Winona . ........ .... .. .. 0 Wi non a. . .. ... . . . . .. . 12 W inona. . . 39 Winona .... . ... . . . . . . . .. 7 Wi nona. .. . ..... .. ... . . . 12

0

W inon a ....... . . . . ... ... 20

Total. .. ..... 33

Tota l ... .. . .. I 02

7 0 2

'+


'3 0

C OACH GLENDON

E. GALLIGAN


T. C. Football STOUT -WI NONA ROM the tune the gun sounded until t he fmish the boys stri ving for th eir letter kept up a chatter that \\a~ unbeatable. Though rather crude. it was a good game although fumbles were frequent. Ple~y was kept in Stout's territory during the first half With Winona sho\ving plenty of dnve but lacking the necessary punch when ncar the goal line. In this period O'Dea had the misfortune of being inju red which didn't add to Winona's chances of v ictory. Griffith came to the rescue and ga\C one of the nicest exhibit ions of line plunging to be seen. With the general feeling that Stout rea lly wasn't so good the boys took the ball in the early pa rt of the third q uarter and demonstrated just how poi nts cou ld be scored . T aking a pass from midfield Kern raced to the one yard line where. on the next play. Rogge crashed over. The extra point after touchdown was wide. A blocked punt and recovery b y Winone~ brought another score earl y in the fourth quarter. From where it was recovered on the 18 yard line. a series of short p lu nges With R ogge again scoring made the score 12 to 0. Stout was offside on the pla y resulting in the attempt for the point after touchdown. and Winona was awardecj the point making the score 13 to 0. That ended the scoring for the d ay with Winona playing a stro ng defensive game for the rest of the t ime. Th e reserves were used in the last live minutes so that a ll were given a chance to share in the frui ts of victory. In the line C<Jptain Mullen at end and McKibben at t<Jckle both played strong games whi le.: !<.ern ·s d irecting of the team. returning of punts. and open fi eld running was commendable. R ogge and Griffith gave promise of playing havoc with opposing lines.

F

LA CROSSE-Wil"ONA We came. we saw. a nd were conquered is probably the local "peds" modern version of Julius Caesar's famous words. Wisely may it be applied to t he clash of the rivals. La Crosse and Winona. Admittedl y going out of their class. Winona succumbed to the combined efforts of the La Crosse machine. Perhaps the breaks were against Winona. and without a doubt they were out weighed. still La Crosse played the best game and consequen t ly should have won. As the game opened we lind that from the spectators point of view it took on the uppearance of a punting duel with here and there a brilliant burst of open field running. So end ed the first half with a total of zero representing the combined effort s of both teams. Sad to relate we lind on the second play a La C rosse player blo::king a pass. and without coming to a halt. taking the ball on its downward fl igh t a nd continuing on With nothing but the gou l posts to stop him. The kick was broken up and it left the score 6-0. La Crosse ;;cored the second t ime in this qu arter through the completion of a ;;c.:ries uf passes e~nd final!) carried the ball o\·er. T hey <~gain fai led to make the extra point. Now comes the humorous s ide of the stor y. In the ftnal quarter we fmd a gen uine replica of the fi rst touchdown and t he scoreboard read 18-0. Winona came forth in t he last live minutes of play and un leashed a pas~ing attack that literally swept their opponents off their feet. Completing pass after pass they mO\ cd forward from their own 20 yard line to the La Crosse end zone where Captain M ullen in catching a pa<.s stepped outside of the end zone. Bringin g the ball back and with but th ir ty seconds left W inona attempted two short passes but both were grounded . The game finally ended with the score read ing 18-0. The giant tlci<.ibben was a gain 111 every play and Reishus wasn't being shoved around \·cry much either. The sparring of passes by R ogge. Captain Mullen. and Kern brought applause from both the Ass' r CoACi i "BRAM .. RLlSii US home a nd rival supporters.


'30

FORT S:--..ELL1NG-\V IN00;A Without the usual weapons of war the husky squad from Fort Snelling was met and defeated on their own battle ground. W ith the goal line as their designated object. the .. ped .. team led by Captain Mullen took the only weapon offered. the ball. and with a concentrated attack swept down toward their objective on ly to be stopped by a counter attack from the Soldiers. \Vith this. Snelling took time out and consu lted with one of the many generals present. outlined a n ew p lan of battle whereby t he Teachers were driven back with considerable loss of ground. All of the man to man conflict was confined to t he center of the battle field for the first half with many chances in the offering where a master piece of strategy might have meant a victory for either team. Shock troops were gradually being thrust into the fmy by the Army. Finally. late in the third quarter. Snelling sent a volley through the air in rhe form of a forward pa~s that loomed into 'icw as Winona·s Waterloo. Taking the pas~ the ..defenders of the nation·· "·ent across the goal line for the first score of the game. The try for point wa~ l.JlllCkly convened lnLO another point for a total of :,even. ivlavbe the armv was content to rest on Lheir newlv acquired laurels or pe•·haps the prospective teachers·loyalt~ was aroused. but the fact is. after Captain Mullen called a conference. thcv opened up an offensive that could not be denied . With \Velch and R ogge in the form of siege guns pounding the enemy line. il was split wide open many times. In the man co man conflict with only a ya rd of no m<m·s land separating. the Purple and \Vhite line easil y outcharged and outfough t the Soldiers. It was simply a matter of condition determini ng the winner. Rogge took the ba ll over for the first touchdown on u short line back. but when the smoke had b lown away. the Army sLill had a 7 to 6 advan tage as t he plc1cc kick wu<; blocked. Shortly after. t he /\rmv directed their efforb toward an air uttack and were succcss(u l until. after catching <1 pass on Winona ·s twcntv vard line. a soldier fumbled it and T. C recovered. \\'ith eighty yards to go and gaining from four to si x yards at a t ime. the ball was carried to the four yurd line where. after three efforts. Welch took it over on the fourth /\gain t he place kick was missed. With three minutes to go the Army received and confined thcmseh cs to air rna-


' 30

neuvcrs. With the exception of one of t he passes. a ll were knocked down or grounded. In the back fie ld Rogge and Welch "¡ere the "Big Berthas" while Ca ptain M ullen and !<ramer at ends. and Juencman and R ice aL guard and center respectively played stellar games. RED \V !1 G-Wil"'ONA Pla ying the f1r~ t home game before a rather limited crowd. the prospect ive teachers played both good and poor football. Their end runs ga,¡e promise of develop ing into ground gainers whi le their forwa rd passing attack showed promise of counteracting against such a possibliity. Winning t he Loss and choosing to have the wind in their favor. Winona kicked off. H olding R ed Wing on their first series of line plunges. they were compelled to punt which resulted in the wind carrymg it back with a fifteen yard loss. Winona took the ball and with an end run Kern carried iL to the two yard line. where Welch carried it o,¡er on the next play. l "he kick after tOuchdown was blocked. Kicking off again. the "" Peds" again held Red Wing fo r downs and taking th e ball carried it over again for <l touchdown . Anoth er touchdo wn was added before t he quarter ended with the score 18-0. \\'ith the wind in thei r favor. Red \\'ing impro' ed in their play and as a result an even battle was wi tnessed and the ha lf ended 18-0.

T. C. scored again " h en Kern on an end run ran fiftyfive yards for a tOuchdown. Beautiful interference and another iden t ical ru n with both points completed brought t he score up to 32-0. F rom a poor R ed Wing punt a short run around end brought the score to 39 when Ceorge Rogge kicked goa l. Determ ined to score. the Blackbirds opened up their aeria l attack to complete a series of passes that took the final on e across the goal line onl y to have the receiver drop it. W ith iL wem their la~t chance Lo score as the game ended shortly after. lvl/\ K/\TO-\VI

ro

IJ\

Opening up their conference schedule on the ho me gr idiron . with Mankato a5 opponents. Winon a scored a 7-2 v ictor y but only after on e of the most stubborn battles ever


'30

Witnessed Clearly outweighed lrom ten to fifteen pounds per man t he Purp le and Wh ite line was subjected to fearful punishment in the first and second quarter. Mankato chalked up a score firs t scoring a safet y when the officia ls ruled t hat !<ern ga' e t he impetus to the ball to force it over the goal line where he was downed . Attempts to score b y either tea m were b locked for the rest of t he quarter and Wino na retired to the fic ldhou se d uri ng t he intermission on the shor t side of a two to noth ing score. They came back in the second ha lf. however. and a long pass brought the ba ll to the twelve yard line. F ro m here a series of line p lunges p laced it over with Rogge furn ishin g the n ecessar y force. Kern k icked goal su ccessfully for t he ext ra point. This ended t he scor ing wi t h Mankato threaten ing in the las t quar ter only to be turned back by an intercepted pass. In the backf1eld Welch . Griffit h . Kern and R ogge d ivided honors. whi le in the line Rice. Kramer. and \Vibye pla yed good games. ST.

CLOU D-W I NO~A

Before an estimated crowd of three t housand students. alumni and townspeople. the gr id men of \\ 'inona T. C. combined together in establishing their r ight to St. Cloud's goat for at least another year. Under ideal conditions for a game. the "fr iendly enemies" of t he Nor th bowed to defeat in the finest game played on the local field th is season . T he closeness of t he score tells the talc of wh at a classic it must h ave been. Both teams est ablished themselves in the fi r~t quarter as being d et<o:rmined to pla y the best game possib le and there wasn't any dou bt as to their intentions when the quarter ended 0-0 . Beginning in t he second qu arter with a slashing attack R ogge. Risty, Welch and !<.ern carried the ba ll on ru m averaging bett er than ten ya rds each with Kern fi nal ly taking it ove1¡ for tht: fi rst touchdown of the game. St. C loud brok<o: through and broke up the attempt for point . T h is ended t he scoring for the half. During the inter mi ssion the famous G er man Band of Winona rendered a group of thei r favorite selections and kep t the crowd in good humor. W ith the opening of t he second half St. C loud unloosed a bar rage of passes that over whelmed the Ga ll igan men 's

j


'3 0

defense and resulted in Sr. Cloud tying the score. but their plunge th rough the line was stopped LO the relief of Lhe Homecoming crowd . Winona received t he kickoff and following a wide end run. Kern completed a shoe s tring pas_~ to !<ramer for another touchdown. This completed the scoring of the day. as the line failc;d Lo hold out t he charging St. Cloud for ward wall. and the kick was b locked. Playing a purely defensive game in the last quarter to ho ld their lead. the local "peds" were often pushed back into their own territor y: but t he goa l line was endangered onl y once and St. C loud lost the ball on downs. In the closing minutes of play. Rogge intercepted a St. Cloud pass on their thirty yard line and carried it to their eight yard line before being run out of bounds. In three plays it was carried to within one foot of Lhe goal but the roar of the gun ended the game and another victor y was credited to Winona . Risty gave a nice exhibi t ion of open field running while Wo:fe and Juencman played stellar games at l hc guard pos i tion~ ROC H ESTER-WI 10

A

Journcyin~ over to the horr.e of t he Medics. the Teachers defeated the Junior College and for the second consecutive year became champions of the Southern Div is ion and cochampions of t he State Conference. R ated fat¡ above their opponents. Winona StaLe Teachers Col lege went over there and were given the surprise of the season when they were held to a b-0 advamage at the end of the ftrst half. Overconftdcnce and an ins pired R ochester team were responsible for the limited scoring on the part of Winona. Kern scored the first touchdown. bur failed to kick goa l when it was blocked. With t he d etermination of showing an improved scoring attack. Winona pus hed over two rouchdowns. both by Risty, and added both points through the completion of pas_~es to Mullen and Kramer. This brought the total up to twenty to zero where it remained to the end of the game. Long runs were often and promising but th ey were generall y of no aid as penalties neutralized them. Risty. although sma ll and light. came to the front as one of Winona's outstanding ball carriers. For Wibye and Juencman it meant t he finishing of their collegiate football ca reer and as a result both played good games.


'30

Top

/~ow - CoACII GALLI GAN, BRO WN, WELC >t , M c KmBE N, NOR BY

S.cond /{ou /Jollom Ro 1v -

R ossi , f' 1S1<. K RAMER, O'DEA . 131ANC>tl , I<ER N, BRINGCO LI>,

Rov, GR IFFITH .

W.S. T.C.

Basket Ball Schedule, 1929,30 December Decem ber D ecem ber .January January J a nuary Janua ry Janua ry Jan ua ry Feb ruary Febr uary February February February

l

7

Dover Bisons ... . .... . ..... I 0 R ed Wing J. C. . .. . . . ... . . . 18 La Crosse T. C. .. . .. ... . . . . 3 I La Crosse T. C. .. . . . ... .. .. 33 Rocheste r J . C. . . . . . . .. . . . 19 Concord ia ... . ..... . . ... . .. 3 1 Mi nn . Aggies .... . ........ . 17 24 Man kato T. C. ... . . ... . . . . . 35 31 S t . Cloud T. C. .. ..... . . . .. 36 I Reel Wi ng J . C. . . .......... 28 7 Rochester J. C. . .. ... ... . . . 3 I 15 Mankato T. C. . . . .. . . .. .. .. 27 19 St. Cloud T. C. . . . . . .. . .. .. 41 22 Concordia .. . .. . .. . . ... . . . . 3 5

Winona ... . . ... . .... .. . . .. 28 Winona .. .. ... .. . .. .... . .. I 5 Wi nona .. . . . . .. .. . ... . . .. 23 Wi nona .. . . .. .. . . .. ... .. .. 23 Winona . . . .. .... . . ... . .. 20 Winon a . . . . . . .. . . . ...... . 34 Winona . . . . .. .. ... .. . . . .. . 37 W inon a .. . . . . . . ...... .. .. . 27 W inona . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ... 26 W inona . . . . . ..... ...... .. . 39 Wi nona .. . .. . . .. . . . .. . ... . 28 Winona .. .. . . . . . ... .. .. .. . 20 W inona . .. .. . . .. .. . . . ..... 23 Winona .. . ..... . . .... . .. . . I 7

Tot al. ... . .. . 392

T ota l . . . . . ... 360

13 17 6 10 II 17


'30

T. C. Basketball HE season of 1929-30 ended in on e of the most disasterous seasons that the Purpl e and White P eds have ever participated in. With only two reserve letter men left from t he S t ate champion team of the year before. their showing was not to be wondered at. With McKibben a nd Fisk to serve as a nucleus the t eam was outstanding in the fact that Freshmen predominated in the squad. Wi th a t least ftve lettermen of the group being Freshmen . bigger and better things ma y be looked forward to. After a bsorbing some of the fundamentals of the game, Coach Gall igan's team opened t he season with a n unimpressive victory over the Dover Independents b y the score of 28-10 . F isk led the scoring wit h a total of nine points. One week later Red \Ving Seminary came into the Teachers' gym on the s hort odds in the wagering and pulled a surprise att ack and d efeated W inona 18-15. Leading 12-11 at the end of the first half. the T. C. basketeers were outscored in the second half 7 to 3. For Winona. McKibben was hi gh point man with two fi eld goals a nd three free throws .

T

Succumbing to the La C rosse Peds in the next two games 23-31 a nd 23-33 respectively. nevertheless t he tea m d isp layed some of the fmest basketball of the season . Bianchi's work as a Aoorman was outstan ding as the diminutive forward on a large floor compa res with that of any of h is larger oppon ent s. W ith a displa y of dexterity and agility Bianchi swept around h is guards for four field goals and from t he free throw line scored ftve t imes fo r a total of thirteen points. T he star ting lineup was Bianchi and Fisk. forwa rds. McKibben, center. and Kern a nd Kramer gua rds. With the opening of th e con ference season the P eds started the season as if to repeat last year 's record, when they downed the R ochest er ). C:. 's b y the margin of a 20-19 victory. All members of the team shared in t he scoring with the powerful McKibben good for seven points. Wi th " R ed" Opem going in as a reser ve and emerging as high point m a n with a t otal of 14 points, T. C. marked up their third victory of the season aga inst Concordia of St. P a ul. T. C. ¡s diminutive t eam was outclassed in both height and weight but sank th e ba ll through t he basket often enough to secure a 34 to 31 vic tory. K ern and McKibben fol lowed Opern wiLh 9 points each. The Minnesota Aggics were the n ext victims and they were severely trounced 37-17. E ver y m ember of the squad enjoyed the scoring with t he mighty McK ibben leading with 12 a nd the minute Dewey Bianchi following with 8 . Outreached, outjumped, outshot, in fact outdid in everything except trying, the P u rple and White lost their firs t conference game to M ankato 35-27. Dianchi. Opem. McKibben, Kern, a nd Kramer all s ha red in the scoring with 5, 8, 6, 6, a nd 2 points respecti vely . Again stature played a n importa nt part in the 36-26 victor y of the St. C loud P ed s over Winona. The local mid-


'3 0

gets were covered well and as a result their score wa~ held down . Scoring wa~ evenl y dist ributed with Kern and Bianch i scor ing 9 points each . T he hopes for a successfu l season received encouragement when on t he fo llowing night Winon a journeyed to R ed Wing and won 39-28. This was done on ly aft er the P urple and White men on the small end of a 21- 13 score at the ha lf. Ar t K ern speedy gu a rd , broke forth as the high point man for one gnme. when he t a llied 17 counters. Standing from the m idd le of the cour t Edi<>on a nd Schwarz. R ochester's two aces. sank 12 fi eld goals between them to force Winona to relinquish all hopes of a conference championship. T he fina l score result ed in a 3 1-28 victory for Roches ter. l\ la nka to. St. C loud. and Concordia were all met and were victorious O\ er \Vi nona. \!lanka to won 27-20. St. C loud 41-23 and Concordia 35-17.

Winona T. C. basketeers ranked in the fo llowing order in regard to scoring for the 1929-30 season in Conference Games . F.G. F.T. T.P. M cK ibben .. . .. ... .. . . ... . ... .. 15 10 40 K ern .... . .. 14 7 35 B ianchi .. . 6 8 20 Opem ..... .. . . .. .. . . ......... 5 2 12 Crirnth .... .. .... . 2 3 7 () K ramer ... . . .... ... .. . . . 3 6 Welch .. . ... ....... . 2 5 Brown .. . ...... . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . 2 5 Norby. 3 Bringold ... . ... . . .... . . . .... . . . ..... .. . . 3 Fisk ....... . ........ .. . . ...... . ... . .. . . . 3


With Fisk and 13inachi the only lettermen to be graduating the prospects for a successfu l team for next year are good. To the midgets of 1929-3 0 we can only say. "Well Done."

All Southern Edison. Ko; tcr ... . Tull y ... Wendt Deets ..

. . Rochester ..

. ... . Forward

. . Mankato ... . .St . Cloud ..

. . . . Forward

.. St. Cloud . Mankato ..

Center .Guard .Guard

All Northern Jaksha. .

. . . . . ... . . .. \'irginia .. .

Taddi c. Broman

. .. Hibbing. . . . ... . . Eveleth. Urick ......... .. .. . .. Virginia.

M atson .. .

~' eleth.

. . Forward . . Forward . . Center . Guard . . Cuard


'3 0

To /> Row - TA!T, WELCH, FISCHER , Mn...LER, McKIBBEN, WEIGHT , GA LLIC. AN . Second Row- BRINGCOLD, S AM PSON, G. R OGGE, IRWI N, SvEE, NoRBY. HoUorn Row - GR I FFITH, R ossi , PARTOSAN, RoY NIHA RT, RISTY, KERN .

April

5 -Minnesota Relays at Minneapolis

May

9-

La C rosse T. C. at La Crosse

May 16- Southern Division May 24 -

o[

Little Ten at Minneapol is

State Little Ten at Minneapol is


.3 0

Track~ r929" 30 the 1929 season with what ap peared to be only an average squad. STARTING Coach Galligan developed his third Southern div ision Little T en Conference cham pionship team. Beginning t he season by accepting t he invitation to the Minnesota R elays, Winona won the Junior College mile relay. the only e\'ent in which t hey entered. Following this success t hey a t tended the H amline Relays winning two events and establishing fast time in both the mile and two mile relays. With two weeks in wh ich to p repare, Captain Wibye led his team to the championship of the Southern div is ion. Mankato, Rochester and St. C loud also participated. The following week La C rosse defeated the Winona track men on the La C rosse field. As a cl imax to the season the State Meet was held. With Winona lead ing t hroughout the whole meet t hey were nosed out by Hibbing in the final event. Hibbing won first place, Winona placed second and E veleth third. Some of the outstand ing men on the Winona team we re Capta in Wibye in the hurdles and weights, Harold Rogge in the quarter mile and javelin, Risty and Loughrey in the quarter mil e and Niha rt, Sampson, and F ischer in the d istance events. The spring of 1930 opened up with the Minnesot a R elays on May 5. Winona with G. Rogge, lorby , Risty, Kern as their relay team placed third trailing Eveleth and H ibbing. La C rosse was scheduled for the fi rst week in May. ~ext came the Southern divis ion in Minneapolis. The State Meet again ended the season. Men who helped to make the season such a success were Captai n Harold Rogge, George Rogge, Kern, Risty, Norby, McKibben, Svee, Ni hart, F ischer, and Sampson. Something new is to be t r ied th is spring when Coach Gall igan announced that a , ovice track meet was to be held for the men of the school. Those who have n ever gone out for track are eligib le to compete. The interclass meet will he held aga in t his yea r.


'30

Intra, Mural BASKETBALL defea ting five ot her basketball teams. B yGeorge Rossi led his Mystics to the cham pionship of W. S.T. C. by winning every game played. He was ably assisted by G riffit h. Doronio. G. Rogge. Irwin and James. By losing only one game. the team piloted by "Moon" Mullens was a close second. The interclass ri valry p robably reached its highest pitch during mid-winter when basket ball held sway. Contra ry to expectations, the F reshmen defeated the Sophomores a lthough Fisk and G riffith did he roic work for the latter. As a result o f t his game. the Freshmen met the upper classmen. In the F reshman lineup were Bringgold, Brown. No rby. Welc h and Ross i. Opposing these men were Kujat h. Bianchi. J ames. Rowell. Riccio. McKi bben. J ueneman. Solosk i. and !{ ramer. In a game in which the first quarter ended 8-6 fo r the Freshmen with a 12- 12 tie at the end of the half. it was only natural that t he play be fast and furious. When the final whistle was blown. the scoreboard revealed that the Junior-Senior combination had won another championship by a 23-20 score. the winning points being scored in t he last minutes of play.

VOLLEYBALL In accordance with the winter intra mural program, volleyball was introduced soon after the close of the basketball season. T en teams entered including one composed o f faculty members who two years p reviously


'3 0

had won the championsh ip cup. In t he el imination tournament. however. they we re defeated in t he semi-finals which left M cK ibben 's "Big Shots" and Rice's "'A ll lations" in the finals. These t\VO tea ms battled th rough t hree games which ended in a 36-36 tie so it was necessary to play a n extra game. McKibben finall y led h is tea m to victory. Following this t he c ha mp ions hip of the classes was left to be decided. T he F reshmen a nd Sophomores were the fi rst opponents with the Sophomores victorious. Conceded an easy victory over the uppe r classmen a n upset was achieved when t he combined forces of t he J unior-Sen ior classes scored a 40-31 victory.

T EN r IS W ith twen ty-seven men indicating t he ir in terest in ten n is. the season started out impressively. Last year matches were held with Mankato T eachers Coll ege a nd t he La Crosse Peds . Although never successful in \Vinn ing as a team. some of the individuals were victorious in their efforts. Henry. Ka ngas. a nd McKibben established themselves as being outstand ing. With the return o f both McKibben and Kangas. T. C. should aga in be well represented . Matches are being arranged wit h coll eges in the vicini t y. On May 2. S t . Mar y"s College sen t two representatives to defend their laurels in a doubles ma tch . Wal t er I-<:angas and Vladmir Weight were chosen to up hold t he posit ion of W .S.T.C. in the tenn is wor ld. After playing t h rough t h ree hand sets. t he college athletes were v ictorious in t wo of them. A triangula r match with La Crosse T. C.. St. Mary's College. and Winona T. C. is pla nned as a cl imax to the tennis season. In the tournament t hat is being run off.


'3 0

l<a ngas. MacKibben . Weight. and Kra mer are the survivors and enter into the semifinals. Each has decided on the p lace t he trophy. which is a\\'arded to t he victor. is to be placed. \\"it h the result that t he spirit of battl e has run h igh.

LITTLE OR N OTH ING

i

1 0

~~ -<:'

-

Rogge. Risty. and Roy are t he three ··R·s·· of T. C. who speed around t he cinder track every night during track season. We can· t help but feel sorry for those poor feiiO\\ s w ho run . run. run. and run and yet afte r completing one round a re just where t hey started from . Questioned closely by one reporter. they all admitted that their g reatest de light \vas to k ick cinders in an opponent's face. As a form of hobby. Rogge a lso excels in t he broad j ump. javel in . and discus. At t he bottom of the page we find one of the T. C. pyram ids. T hese are known t hroughout t he world to rival those of Egypt . Their s trengt h. symmetrical lines. faci ngs a nd abil ity to s tand wea r and tear give promise o f even outlasting Egy pt's monuments to civilization. Whether or not stores of hidden knowledge are to be fou nd in t he modern one as a re found in those of t he ancient world rema ins a secret, although some of the studen ts are J uniors a nd Seniors. Those quai nt ligu res \\"ith t he rather abbrev ia ted costumes are in reality students of T. C. In normal life and poses they s ign a ll exa rnination papers as Ted Solosk i a nd Maxine Holden. However. t heir worth is not to be measu red by t he amoun t of space which t hey have been a llotted on this page. They represent the "'Minutemen of Wenonah'" for it takes only a moment's notice a nd t hey. \\'i t h a \\'ild flou rish of extremit ies have turned a limpid crowd into a seething


mass of turbulent humanity. With a wild up roar. their message of inspiration has been broadcast to the ears of t he earnest athletes. The blank spaces on the page rep resent the photographs of some of our prom ising young athletes after some dignified p rofessor has asked for the "Law of Vividness" o r the "M issouri Compromise." If perchance some of you should wonder why "Bern ie" Welch has trouble keep ing his ha ir combed it can al l readily be traced back to Coach Galligan. lt was. and is the Coach's plan to have a portable dressing table a n d beauty shop so constructed t hat it is easily access ible for t he ath letes. T hose who wonder at such procedure have only to turn to thei r psychology books and !mel that one of the fundamen tals of study is to have t he individual at ease. Norby says. " If I had my way about it. t hey would have a coffee shop at every field and in their coffee shop would be coffee a nd loaf sugar... Norby is one of the strongest exponents of the Swedish method o f coffee drinki ng a t the college. As usua l Sampson has on that contin uous blush of his. May he live to see the day when the guaint and coy blush comes back into sty le and is recogn ized as an accomp lishmen t supreme. Exclusive rights are held and recognized on the picture of Captain Harold R ogge. Being of a shy and demure nature. Harold has offered the statement that it is really his first p icture taken (we fail to see why an alibi shou ld be offered.) Here again \ve see the T. C. athletes blotting out mother nature by buildi ng a pyramid. (Look ho,,¡ Roy gently massages Cohen's c ranium.)


'30

Wotnen's Athletics girl s ha ve been interested in athletics M ORE this yea r than ever before . At t he very beginning of the year a meeting of the Women's Athletic Association was called. This included a ll the girls who were wo rking for points and wished to join as soon as they could. Seventy-eight g irls came out to the m eeting. This is only the first ev idence of the g reat interest. Most of our sports ma y be divided into th ree groups. namely: fall. win ter. and spring activities. Which s hall we take first 1 Here's a baseball game in progress. Needless to say that's one of the major spring activ iti es . Intramu ra l teams a re organized. and a n interesting, exciting tournament is run off. Later t he classes organize teams and see whether freshmen, sophomores, or upper classmen a re going to wi n the battle. Wha t about tha t second picture? Oh! Yes, archery! There's someth ing interesting to a ll of us. In the spring class instruction is g iven. Each person is a llowed t he fun of making her own bow and arrow down in t he workshop. The bows a re made of hickory or lemon wood and come already shaped. The mem bers o f the class sandpape r the bows first, then put on the horns a nd the handle. Then the handle is wrapped and t he ends a re bound in va rious colored stri ngs. The final process is the var nis hing. The arrows are made


'30

of the same wood and have spl it fea thers on the end. T he piles or steel tips a re also put on t he other end, t hen arrows are varnished. T his sounds like a great dea l of work but anyone wi ll tell you that it's not only fun but is very beneficia l.

Here we have a picture of lleld hockey, one of the major sports of the yea r, and it certa inly is one reason why so many girls a re inte rested in a thletics . 1'-:o game cou ld prove more exc it ing than hockey. What in the world have we here 1 lt¡s merely one of the stun ts Miss McKinley taught us to c.lo during those long winter months indoors . This is a feat that is rather hard to accomplish and requires some s ki ll a nd p ractice but with a good instructor and dil igent s t udents it d idn¡t ta ke very long to learn the art. Below this another baseball p icture. This is a sport no one can help enjoying during t he glorious spring afte rnoons when it's just right to ma ke one feel like hitting the ba ll just as hard as it is poss ible. H e re we see some h ikers. Hiki ng seems to be one of the mai n a nd never failing d iversions of t he studen ts. It surely is no wonde r either. as no one could fail to explore some of the glo rious beauty spots around W inona. A person who has n ever seen a bird's eye view of the city and sur-


'30

rounding count ry after climbing to the top of Garvin Heights has surely missed out on som ething. Or perhaps B irch trail is rnore enticing to some. T his trail \\ it h its va rious windings and crooked paths ma kes one feel tha t he wants to foll ow it to the end and see wha t is there. If he does fol low he won 't be disappointed in the way it ends .

Interpretative dancing is one of the most expressive activities tha t everyone wants to take part in. It has a great aesthetic as well as physical value. What can t hat next picture be 1 It's nothing other than a soccer game taking place in t he snow down on the f1eld. Here is something that is reall y fun and sport. Playing soccer is a lways fun - but when you try it out in the cold air and in the snow nothing could be better sport. The game is played wi th the same ru les as regu lar soccer but there is a decided d ifference because you can't wait for the ball to corne rolling up to you. When it comes down it stops at once as the soft snow preven ts any roll. T h is makes the game very exciting. Th is particu la r game was of special interest as it took p lace down on the field when there were a great number of spectators, and not only looke rs-on but a sound-motion p ict u re machine


'30

reco rd ing a ll t he yells. noise, and a lso the action go ing on . The ga me was between t he Phys ical Education majors and Sophomores. Everyone \\"aS interested in t he outcome but t he final score was a tie so no one lost a nd no one won.

Just look a t all the "W's... Each girl t hat has her p icture on one o f t hose W's has wo rked harder t han you could ever imagine. It mea ns she has earned one hund red points during the year a nd has been awarded a purple letter. T hese points a re earn ed by tak ing part in various a thl etics such as hiking. tennis. skating. skiing. a rchery. baseball, etc. Some of t he people ha ve attained two hund red points wh ich means t hey will be awarded a gold "W .. pin . The other p icture shows two g irls clogging. In the winter c lass instruction was given in t h is and it certa inl y was fun. At the end of the t erm each couple gave an origina l c log before the rest of t he class. The class then chose the th ree which they liked best from the whol e number an d t hese th ree were given a t t he Phys ica l Education demonst ration. All t he clogs were done in costume. The t hree that were selected were the Dutch. the W estern. and the K idd ies clog. The Demonstration s howed all th e fields of


'30

work that were taken part in dur ing the year folk danc ing. stunts. exercises. games. and other occupations for leisure time as q uoits. deck tenn is. and baseba ll.

S wimming is som ething that everyone enjoys and it is certainly the most beneficial of all our activities because it brings into p lay all of our muscl es. The physical education majors received class instruction both the fa ll an d spring terms under the supervision of Frances Morse. A few of the girls acquired their life saving badges. This was. indeed. something to be very prou d of because it was hard to earn, and required considerable ability. During the \\'inter term basketball is. of course. the most outstanding sport a nd more gi rls a re inte rested in it than in any other one thing du ring the yea r. An intramural basketball tou rnament is p layed at the close of the season. At the beginning ninety-seven girls came out to be on tea ms. The group elected captai ns and these people chose the teammates. A schedule was worked out fo r a tournament for a ll the teams to participate in. All the games were very interesting. but when it came to t he finals then the excitement began. Mu riel Hoyme's team played Ruth Severud to decide \\'hO would be the champions for the yea r. Can you guess

I


'30

who won 1 ]'(either could we, but the fmal score s howed Mu r iel's team to be the proud \'ictors.

What else have we to offer ? So many t hings t hey can't all be d iscussed but as a t this season interest in tennis is supreme one might wa nt to know about competition in that fi eld. A class is organized for t he benefit of those who don't know how to play and wan t to learn. For the beginner's class a ladder tou rnament is held. each one challenging t he person above in an effort to get to the top of the ladder. And what for the adva nced? An elimination tournament open to a ll the g irls in school. The winner of th is is the champ ion of the col lege and it always proves to be a thing of intense interest to all. During the spring, classes in go If are also organized. T he Women's Athletic Associa tion always purchases four tickets for membership at the Golf Club. These tickets are available to everyone so that the peo ple can have actual playing experience without much cost. We can a ll be proud of t he interest that is ta ken in athletics and of the wide va riet y of activities that are of benefit to us - especially in our leisure time, fo r we all want to have somet hing worth while to do instead of merely idling or wasting awa y whole aft ernoons.


'30

A Toast for Teachers College Air: Old Black .J oe (0 ) Time holds t he wo rld o'er the d im abyss of space, Li fe p lunges on its m ist enshrouded race. But love is sure, and our love for her is strong. So here's a toast fo r Teachers College and a song:

CilORUS

We love her! We love her! And our love sha ll never fail, So here's a toast for Teachers Coll ege, H a il, a ll ha il ! Long may she live in a still eternal youth, Lay s ton e on stone of a n everlasting t ruth, Building t he house that was neve r built with hands. So here's a toast to Teachers College from all lands.

C H ORUS

We love her! \Ve love her ! And our love shall never fail, So here's a toast for Teachers Coll ege H ail, all ha il.

- J.

L.

s ..

1909- 17.




'30

~

C!a"d \...

Cllt:l:::R LEADERS


'3 0

EWALD KINTZ! Representative Man


'3 0

JAN I E STREETER Representative Woma n


'3 0

~ / /..-{ \\.\.. d-.. "'0<\ILV\.~ ~

f~~[ !Vu..~

~ j_ "·-~ ~\..'LL~\ iL~

0

r~~\\U £~j_"-.'\..f:V\,.


'3 0

"'\"..l_ . \""'_.) _,,·r

\ c.""" i\',tvllf

J\w~ (~ ~\ ~o:~:x./ A,

'"-~&,_0,.~-.


'30


'3 0


.3 0

!l It

\,


'3 0


'3 0

~'Lu\l

~~ ~~~ ilv'V-.t.


'30


'3 0

~~~

~'V'<~ii:

~")~ X~y

..).

J '


'30


'3 0


'30

;

~\~ xc.J\.~V) )(..

.-------


'30

\

\

CL.J\

~\( ~c.):.;..i..A c.L~'

~ U.U\.V\tL ~'\_ Jw.u,~(l}\


' 30

ll ilo, I Ia\\ aii

Dear \Venonah : Greetings from the Paradise of the Pacific' H awaii is truly a paradise'' ith its many tropical flowe rs. fru its. and palms. One bright sunny day has follo\\'ed another so that all year has heen glorious spring ,,·cather. ~1ore wonderful still arc the Hawa iian moon light nights that can't be descr ibed and are never forgotten. Hilo is beautifully situated in a crescent shape along the bay with snow-capped \.launa Kea above it and the deep blue ocean belo\\·. lt is very clean and modern although most of the buildings are frame: bus sen· ice is splendid. On the streets nati\'e J apanesc. Chinese. and r:ilipino costumes are \\Orn as commonly as Amer ican clothes, a nd on ra iny days all carry Japanese paper umbrellas. Our Junior High School building \\'as completed in September, lQ29. It is s ituated about th ree- fourths of a mile up the mountain side '' ith school grounds coHring 11\'e acres of land. The enrollment in our school is approximately eleven hundred. the majority of which are Japanese. In the entire st udent body there arc probably not more than t\\ enty-f1ve white ch ildren or haoles as they are called here. Our school hours are from 8 a. m. to 2:50 p. m . At first I thought I should never learn the names of my students. The foliO\\ ing are a fc\\' of the t hree hund red on my class record : Tadayoshi Yoshimi, Cucufate J\ le\·ado Tatsuharu lseri. Yok P ung Chang. and Chu Fook Chu 1-\.it. The Island of H a\\aii offers almost e\'ery conceivable type of scenery from cactus covered desert land to the tropical fo rests or snow-capped mountains overgrown" ith Austra lian Pines. and from the steep. rock cliffs of the east coast to the ,,·hite sand heachcs along the ''est coast. I am anxiously a,,·aiting ~lay Day. for MayDa: is Lei Day in 11a,,aii. and the celebration is most beautiful I am toiJ. T he gi,·ing and \\Caring of leis, flo,,e r \neathes. is a heautiful custom no ,·isitor to the Islands can e,·er forget. In closing I send you all llawaii's best J\ loha. Sincerely, Eu:ABEII-1 i\ltLLA:Vt.


'30

Just For Fun

If you thmk these jokes arc bad. ~ou ou ght sec those we didn "t u~c. If you can "t laugh at them. at least respect their uge . LO

SHORT Sl lOR Cram- Exam -

r

Flunk

.. There\ ten dollars gone from the Boss drawer and you <~nd I arc the only ones who touched it."" Soloski - .. \Veil. let\ each pu t in (J,·e and sa~ no more about it.··

STORY T runk. O EF I t\ large

bod~

I T I O~

OF ,\ FACL LTY

of men surrounded

b~

red tap<.:.

NIOREY I li\LL ' \\ <llll-css- · · ~ I ilk or '"atcr' .. Lucille - .. Don"t tell me. Let me guess.· · J ohn l\ t ori ari t ~ had made an <:m fu l rccitauon authors of whom he knew nothing and books of '"hich he knew le<..s. Present!~· l\hss Richards asked. ""Did V<>u read Romeo and Jul iet, .. John floundered hclplc"IY and then said. · . , . \ c read Romeo.··

dJ~cu,s in g

Stc\-cnson - 13ut surely. vou didn"t tell him right out that you lo\ ed him, .. P acey - .. Goodne"s. no he had to '<.Jueezc it out of me:·

Curiosit~

dm:sn"t kdl all cah- some of them

th rh c on 1t

l .i\ cs of se111ors a ll remind us \\ c should st rive to do our bc-..t \nd dcp<~rt ing lcm e behind us \:otcl:xx>b that wil l help thc re-..t

Ga lligan ~

.. Did

)OU

ha\"C vour breakfast

el , ..

l\ ld(ibhen -

.. Just one ··

l\lr. Rccd lh1s cs"1' on \\Oil1Cn Jsn"t \CJ"\ g<xxl D1d you get an~· data, .. E.nger - Yes. but they were <J II h lind data:·

OPI'-.:ION C'r M\NY STl DENTS It "s better to ha\ e come a nd bluffed thun not to h<l\ c come at all.

Sp anking a flapper wouldn"t do any good P addling a canoe docs not reduce it., speed. \OLI know.


'3 0

DON''! BELIE\'E IT

Tl II NCS Tl lXI' t"E\'ER HAPPEN

Moon gets headaches from ~rudy in g so hard C\'Cr\' night james once took a pri=e a-. the mo-.t beaut iful b11b~· at the county fair. ,\rdi..; Rodsmer s<Jys she cnjo,·s the meal-. at \ l or~.:y I !all and gained fj, c pounds in thL: lust t\\o yea rs due to thl' food she rcc~.:i\Td then:. Bram. l-\.intz1 and Cohen once slept three in a bed. I<cnny Sipola thinks the boy~ at T . C arc t<x> modc..,t and retiring.

~ 1hs Ric hards playing a harmonica. J\tlr. Owen-. g i,·ing an "mtellig1blc" test

tl,lr Scarborough runni ng out of worth\ thoughts . Student-. contradicting "Pn;x\ " in chapel \lr jcdcrman silent on l he subject of j c;m for a whole week :'vtlr. French talking about Math 1n his clas,es instead of srocb and bonds . .Jucncrnan in his regular see~ t in chapel Hcnr~ ha\ ing lc" than two ~mnounccmcm s

R i\:VIBLES \VITI I SERIOL 'S TIIIN I<: ERS "The fa n room ain't ''hat it

u~ed

to be ...

"Bram".

"Orcrator. gi'c me number l-IN aprroxi.. "Scarb~ ... " I think I'll he a baker he loafs a round <JII day and yet makes dough ... - Cohen . "They say coffee has a long d1stance to tnl\·cl Some of 1t is still weak from the trip ... - Goldie "\ve plan to add a new course to our curnculum . J\11 the women will stud y dome'>tie ~ilcnec ... - \tlr. Jcdcrman. "Most girls like to be nattercd - the rest <lrc the «a me way... Ro.,si . " 1\lthough I rna~ not get a d iploma. I intend to graduate m the course of time ... - Rogge "Lme hour~ ma' not be good for one. but the~ 'rc fmc for two ... " R ed" H and matel~

The rca«on they used Henry a« the gori lla they wouldn 't ha\(: to rent a costlli11L:.

Dumb Dora "I don 't like this room 1t's too sma ll and it hasn 't an~· windows ... Bell I lop Cmon, get in. lad~ !'his ain t Your room It·, the clc\ator. "

Till~

OLD LINE

Place- T. C. part~. Ray !Iappe is dancing With !-.fold J o,cfson. H e - :VIy, you're a "'ell dm1ecr She- Oh. I'm not Cit a ll. lie- You certainl y arc. She - Lot' of gi rl" here a rc be tter dancer' the~n I am. I le - Who f'r instance ' (i\t this point Carl Fischer cut' in ). lie - H elloShe Hi , Ce~rl. You were an angel to rc-,cuc rnc I lc - I '>CJ\\' the di'>trc<>s signa l. She - \\'dl . I couldn't help it ·1 he b1g oa r was s tepping all over rnc and telling mi.' \\hat a di\·ine dancer I was. lie - H e\ right about th<ll - Oh. P<ll'don m~ feet. She (wmcing) - .\ nyonc could dance we ll '' ith ~·ou I lc (treading on her foo t ) I lm\ so ' She - Because (a'> the\ ' t umble ) JTI\ ' fault. lie - Cec. \'ou ' rc a wonderful dancer.

13i II Collector mone~.

lone "Oh. some of mine "

I"

that <JII

I thought \ ou want ed

\\ ·.s .·I .C. - rhe largc't agncu ltura l college west of the :V1iS'issipp1.


'3 0

:\ "- \L IOBIOGR,\PI-IY One lime dean of the LOnsikctonl\ 'chool m R<x.:he,tn ''Doc' \!un'Dn \\as thnl\\n on 111 ' o\\ n ,Jl th<: age of fony-two One tl<l\ he \\anJcrcJ into thL hlufh and slcepmg for t went~ Ja~' ht: gre\\ older m cr night and founJ hm1self (o,l Om· da\ '' hlle spilling a cun e into the \\ md. a "him ' ic=cd hun \\ hen tht· whun had rclc·a,cd ih hold. he found he had hccomc an author. fkmg hungr) he munched sc\ erul rages of h" manu..,crirt but found the material mJ1gcst1hk I lc has fulh recon~red and 1s agam kno\\ n "' h" true ,elf.

Cordon Rear •·[ low long can a man h\ e \\ 1thnut brains, .. \ lun,on " I don't knm\ I lo\\ oiJ arl' \oU' '

Customer at 13on Ton - "I'J like to tr~ on that one ll\ er there." Ollie\ eltum " I'm sorry. madum, hut that s the lump 'hade ...

\\ d ma 111\ t'stment

l'rct.la \\ ilma 1-'reJa "() Deil L~ro\\11

"D1d You reali=e ;Ill\ t hmg on your , .. "Oh. ) cs ... "\\'hat did you rcal1 :c , .. "\\'hat a f(x)l I'J been."

I lm e ,·ou am· close relm ion', .. " YL''· all of them"

\h-... R1ch<Iru,-"\\hy d1dn't you cal l mL' \\hen that young man tried to ki-... YOU,. Dorothy- 'I u1dn't km"' you \\<llltn.l to he ki"cd. ·

\!orris ~pant on - "That dog_ of mine is worth two thousand dollar,." \I an \lice "Oh. but htm couiJ a htlle uor~ hkL that Sa\ c up so much mone\ , ..

Opcm \OU 1•·

\1cCruth the gr<1' c. Opem " I ha\'c a prcs,lng neeJ for two huck'. I larr\· "Don 't \\I liT~. it is a' though I h:1d h\.'ard nothmg ··

\rdis - "Tell me. do men like the talkati\c g1rb a~ well as the others, .. Enger .. :\s well as what mhers , ..

\ 1r 1-'rcneh says that school teachers nrc like Fon.l curs the\ gi,·c the most ;;en IC C for the lca't monc~

1\ lr Sunmers- " ,\ fool can a'k more qucs1ion.., t hcJn a \\ I"'C 111~1n can un...,wcr ··

R1t.1 I I our t.'\.c.Ul'l"' ...

""-.o \\onJer "' man\ of

ti'

llunk


'3 0

'-otc the aho,·e ptcturc~ arc not bona lkk fll<.:t ures of an\ memhas of our facult\. \\c dra'" th" to \our attcntton to s;t\l' \ou from an\ error. \\ h;Jt the Facult' C.haracteri:atton Blanks \\ould i<~>k ltke tf the student' made them \ deep studcnL - too deep fot· most ol us I It~ rdkxcs <Jre linked so ci<hl h '' ith the sttmult whtch cau'-<.: him to react th;tt hts a"<x:tatiH: ~>\H'fs arc often mtxed \s a student tn a math cia" when "'ked tl he could pro\ L a problem he an-.wen.:d "Pro\·L is " strong '"ord. I won l -.a, I can pro\ c tt hut I C<tn render tt htghh probable ... \\'e fc<tr students "til m<tke themseh C'- too f rec 111 hts cla-.s stncc he "so It' eh und cntcrtatnll1g. Robert Reed lnstcml of teaching lttcraturc he should have hcen u trm elltng salcsm<Jn. Some of h" qortl'' arc almost funn). For a long t11m: tt ''''" fe<tretl that Robert "'" a literar) gen1us. It '"as \\lth rel1cf that hi-. folk' tliscmcred that he got th<tt wu' from w ritmg home for monc' Dunng the summer he til\ ttle-. ht' tlmt· t 1'\ mg to im eigk students to attend r c und eumpmg 111 tht '-orth wo<x.ls 1-l" pnJCtiCC teachmg '' coming ;tlong fine I lc.: ''til soon he carn111g his

the fair st'.' Lo fm·or male <.,tudent~. I caching not to he recommended hccaust· of the "cc·kh p<tpc·rs h..: demands I lis "tories of '-l\\ York e~n: founJ to hL" "nl<Y·-t an1u . . ing··. I"' ca-..•h thl most handsome member of the facult\ Rmht:r m<x.lest dunng the f<xllhall season '-ot rL·com · \pfX<trs mcntlc·d ft>r summu· · ·,nap" courses <111nualh w llh \ Ia\ hrce::cs in a new su1t \ ltss Rtch<trds 1\ ltss R1churds ts " personable woman of high moral charact<:r guarantl'ed h\ Clght\ACH'n .<>hcpmd H<Jil g~rk \\ e w "h to mform that -,he has the latest data on the c·tiquettc on scn1ng l<.:a _\t present sht: IStakmg;~n ex tens" c course 1n college dramatics preparing herself to tnterpret a ll "aunts .. of fut urc drama I kr tl'Hchmg " \Tr\ sucee«sful She " known to d~Sapprm <.: of l<1tc hours anti ch<:ck-to-check dancing She is somettmes rdcrrcd to <t« dean of women but is more common I~ kno\\ n ;ts d1airman of the soctal committee

"-alar\

\ lr French I his promising \Oung ~tutlenL has man\ good ttlcar-. Qu1tc u fmancli.ll genius and un cxput on msurunce Cun be recommcntk:d U' hc111g <I good d1scipl111unan ha\ 111g shouted do\\ n three of the unruliest l:x1\·s \1 though profictcnt 111 figure'. he can't understand the L~1g 3. 1\ lr. Sc<trhorough - ,\ .. " orth\.. <,tudcnt Rather dlf'ficult for him to get propcrl~ oncntut cd hut 1f he ft~ces cast. turns a somcrsuu lt and hops three t 1mes well, figure it out Fond of star gazing e\ Ln w tth a class of bo,...,, ,\rn1\ \lphas haH: no terrors for him H1ghh· recommended Clcndon Calligan Galligan is a \'Cr) snious \oung chap from the west. Has a thoughtful manner and digntfied demeanor. Is accused h\

\1r. ~~~ll' ·{~1\ ·c me a scntt'ncc usmg the \\·ortl a" u re .. ( .ohLn \w;m:. aw arc has 111\' little dog gone 7' ·

I lapp..: ' \\ ould 'ou he surprised 1f I gir ·\'in ps\ch 1 " ~lr Owens "I d he suspicious."

:111

Sara "Some d;l\ I'm going to speak 111\ mmd . \lahel · Ye;th untl \\hen you du. t h,· sen· t' nt·c \\ til hl· madd..:nmg


'3 0

The Prom O ~00'\.. as 1t gt,·s noti: that de annual dance h\ de spring prom ''as to he formal and glf., nescessit) of sou11 and rlsh c lothes h) de hoys immediately "us there mad rushes and scram hies to get de roxedos. I ~a' alreud~ I laff up 111) punt leg to thmk of Bram Retshus "ho should try to get into :\hte Bcur's 22.50 h.\ de instullmcnl plan size H suit. It Itt perfect all hut de coat and pants.

S

De alterations \\aS so oxtensi\c that :\Jr. \lax\\ell ga'c h~ de student hoJy a fife minute lecture for so much cutting up. ·1 he guests "ere all met h~ de offtctal deception committee \\ hich told them to hcf a good time. In full bloom on the occasion was the faculty. Jedcrman had on a good toxedo hut the rest all had their O\\ n clothes. I he flame room was all fixed '' tth fish and sea\\ eed to gifc the appearance like an uquarium. ·1 he people. instead of fish food like was expected to he gi' en were sen ed pret:els :md punch. ( ~aLtght \ \ lr. ~carhorough to pour punch Jo" n :'\I iss Richaro..fs hack. llo\\ could you done it' It ain't perlite). I o add h~ de c(fect of the landscaping of de "ails for de opening of Je grand smash the orchestra struck at that popular \\altz ··,\sleep in the Jeep ... \t the singing of the closing h\ mn the guests "as all deported and a happ) good nite "as satd mtt all

Secret Frats and Sororities Cll it is against the rules to ha' e sororities or fruternities at T C:. A LTIIOL the) do extst. The Delta I Ianda Poka frat is the mos t flourish mg "hile the

l·:ua Pieca l)i so rority is a close second . Others include Gotta CeLLa l)ogon L.

1\

and ~igma

I hese organi:mions arc all reported to he as acti\'e as the \ Ju Cpsilon :\u.

\ 1r ~colt \\rotc thl' on un J1<>'-l card Io I I<1:Ll I h1' poctUI'l '' the ' tcep cldl the anc1cnt' ll'l'J to thn"' thcor unruh chiiJn:n mer \\ ''h \Oll \\~l'l herL. It i' hctttr to make fnl·nJ, fu-.t than to makl' f;1-t fncnt.l'.

· Bet rc:r hu\ 'omc fict1on Damoan \1 I )aJ - '()h no. 'ou II he \\ ritmg to mo.: 'lx>n."

I cachcr "\ 1rgmoa. Jo \ou honJagc I',. \ ',rgmlil · l3ondagl' '' "h<Jt 111\ (mgcr ''hen 11 '' cut

knm\

"hat

"r<~r

around

\nt.l then there·, the ,,,J l<llc.: of IlK college -tudent \\ho.> "'"'riding horne" llh all h" notch<K>k' \\hen <1 riacL gu't of \\II1J hie" them ull 'l'' aY )3d ore he laimo.:J he groan~J '()h l.ord. thero.: goe·, 111\ colkge ,Jucauon


'3 0

From the W . S. T . C . Library The Three Musketeers - Moriartv. 13ear. and their l-ord . Up Against I t - Club dues. The Cuarded Room - l\lorey H all. Adventures of a Modest :VIan - :--.1r . .J eLicrman. The Curiosity Shop - Acti,路ities Room . Sta rs of the Desert - Office force. Comedy of Errors - !'vir. O"路ens Psych. tests. Imaginary Conversations - Before we go to Miss Richards' olrlce. Saint's Progress - "Moon .. :V1ullens. Student Prince - "Bram .. Game of Life and Death - Students , 路s. h1cult y. The Magic Carpet - "Prexy's" Office. All for Love - Allen :--..;orhy. Romeo and .Juliet - Henry and Sara. Encyc lopedia Bri ta nnica- William Schroeder. L3i rds 1 !lave !<:no\\ n - Sampson. l~angas, Moyer. and !Iappe. Age of Innocence Ralph Voorhees. Utopia - Lake Park on a spring evening. Satu rday's Child - Evangeline Wein. The Big City - The Campus Tent. T wenty Thousand Leagues Under t he Sea - Damian Matz. Sweethearts on Parade - Carl Fisher and lsfolcl Josephson. Ladies in Hades - Mendelssohn Club. The Lost Chord - Mr. C rim m. A Connecticut Yankee in Ki ng Art hu r's Court - !\!iss Talbot. Pollyanna of the Hospita l S taff - M iss Ell ingson . Sherlock H olmes- The Janitorial Staff. Si lver Slippers - Alfhi lcl J ulseth. Giants in the Earth- Cohen. 13ram. 1\.intzi. !Iunger- Aune Palmgard. Pleasure Pirates - County Life Club. :.Jobodys Boy - Harry :tv!cCrath. Up from SJa,路ery - The Annual Staff. Th is Singing World - C hapel Exercises. Gentlemen Prefer L31ondes- l.::bba 1\.:elson. Student' s Dictiona ry - T elephone Book. Tale of Two Ci ties - Rochester and Winona. The Seventh Chair - The Wastebasket. The Descent of :-.Ian- H enry. They Stoopecl to Polly Glen T a.vlor. Forever Free - Abigail Bliss. Burn ing Beauty- Mcl<.ibben . Student's Bible Studen t Directory .


'3 0

The Annual Staff In '' ind). \\ ct or stormy "eat her There'' e sat plotting together \\ orking on thi" feature -;ection \\ 1th much thought and introspection. ,\nd I idly che\\ed a pen ,\nd '' ondered \\hat would rh~ me "ith "'hen .. : "-c1ther "rooster .. \\Ould. nor "'cat". ~o '' c let it go at that. "-o" "e must dra\\ a funn\ face Or make a rh\ me ahout the place \\'c must "rite or" e must dra\\ Or obey the pnnter's Ia\\. Oh. the inkpots and the papers J\nd the editor's rare capers "-o'' a "'coke" and then confection lime haL! thc1r hand 111 this \.{UCCr section! -

~MRA

Sru.


•3 0

ADVERTISEMENTS

W Eextend our Lhanks

to Lhc

liheral minded, puhl1c spirited business men, and to the Winona Association of Commerce \\hose heart) cooperation has helped make this publication a success. Our appreciation of :'>our helpfulness is un limited.


'30

I

The PioneerJe'lveby Store of'Winona HEA RT1 LY CO -OPtn{A'fli:S WITH THJ i: W.S.'J'. C ., THE PIO NE l ~ R SCHOO L. ll 't! art' t'ager to

Jt'l"'i't'

yo11

ALLYN S. MORGAN f)

0 I R

II,

I ~

1: NA I

II

JE\\'El , ER E ST.\ B L T S TJ E

II M

I H G2

8 JEWELRY STORE

G][

H E

e

I

II II

A I

~ I cy

OcR

:"\TE \\' FE .\ TCRE is ''Can d y n ox"

H ome :\fade candies al SOc a pound.

.\l cet

your frien d s al thi s popular place w here we sen·e th e b est l ee Crea m s and Lu ncheon s .

/Ve ·u:i/1 be g!arlto Jl'l''i't' JOII

1Pc:>

()

;x

THE CANDY JBOX ~


'3 0

DRlUE Rl(3HT UP To The ffiain Entrance qhe Door ffien who (3reet lJou are

l.]our Personal Servants and will gladly assist you with your bags, with the placing of your car or with any desired information. A Travel Bureau, too is available in the Lobbtj and will give t)OU correct highwatj information wit h.out charge.

qhe

Curtis Hotel minneapolis


'3 0

To know Furs better, know

Fll{ST \\"! NO~.\

RO C H.EST.EH.

D ULCTll

;\!TI\NESOTA S L. I'ERTOR

L:-\ CROSSE

.E.\ C CL 1\IRE

\U SCOXSU\

RELL\J3LE

J

N SU R AN C 1

1 :

\Vinona In sur a n ce Agency Exc hange Bldg.

*

Star Shoe Shining Parlor & Rep ai r Sho p Parlor and Repair Shop I()() :.l ain S lrccl

\;fr. J cJerman - You had better \Vatch your step in my c lassroom . :..:or by \\'hat·s the matter'! flooring loose. sir 1

l3ca r - I low's your brakes 1 \ loriarity- You should \\'O IT). my car'

It's

/\ ccording to the new census - '' e no"· ha \'C the ne" ages of "omen. Sixteen - Goodbye, I just had the nicest lime. ~ineteen - B) e-B)e. T,,·enty-t,,·o - When wi ll I see you again, T"·cnty-l1ve- Don't go.


'30

Picture yourself "on t op of the world" - bubblir¡g over with excitement, thnlled by the grandeur d nature . . . bills already paid, guides looking after your travel details. How marvelous is this new, carefree, escorted, allexpense t ou r idea. So many places to go. so many things to see, so much to do along the scenic route of the new OLYMPIAN, electrified fo r 656 sootless. cinderless miles over four mountain ranges. There is Yellowstone through the thrilling new Gallatin Gateway (170 mile motor trip with:>ut added cost ), Inland Empire (Spokane), Rainier and its mighty g laciers, Seattle and Tacoma, world ports, Olympic Peninsula, America's last frontier, Puget Sound cruises t o oldEnglish Victoria and Vancouver, challenging Mt. Baker. And your tour can include Alaska, Canadian Rockies, California or Colorado. You can travel fo r a fortnight in this wonderland, all expenses paid, for as little as $225 from the Twin Cities. Other tours, 10 days to 3 weeks, $145 and up. L et us t ell you in detail about "Top-of-the-W orld" vacations. L. W. Smock. Passenger a nd Ticket Agent Phone TriState 1198, \\ inona. Minn. J. J. Oslie, Assistant General Passenger Agent St. Paul, Minn. s-o

9heMILWAUKEE

ROAD

Electrified over the Rockie s to the Seo


' 30

p,~,ewcrt CO~l P . \Rt:

Photos

THE QL'ALTT\"

CO:'IfP.\RE TilE PRI CE

PRIEWERT ST UDIO li!l East ..Jth Street

Film;, D c,·eloped

.\ pplicat ion Photo;. :2.-, for :-:1.00

P icture

F ramin~

.iO for :-:I. .j(l

Baker & S te inbau e r {or " BETTER SIIOE S"

llrii/QI/IIG!ttming liT~ DrY Cleaners. OVers and Hatters I I H E. Third St.

Phone I 7.->

Coach Remember that fooLhall de'elops leadership- no". get m there and do as I tolJ you

:'\lr \ tunson t\nd to "hat cause ma_y he attrihurcd the shortened posture of many specimens of genus homo' I I Roy The rumhle scat.

I lelen \\ "Just suppose t:.dison ne' er inYentcJ the electric I ighL ... Ralph R . "\Ve"d he ha,i ng a good t1mc'"

_) ack l\ 1. d reamed I died last mght. Eleanor I I What "oke you up, J ack - The heat.


'3 0

WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE l,liOO GR .\Dl'.\ II.~ )

( E~T.\llUSIII.D 1 /-i.-)~

Ojj;•r.r a combined genertt! tlllfl 'i.'OCflliont~l editcation at .wlfl!!er t'xjJell.rl' to the st11rknt tlwn a/1110.rt

ffll}

otha l1igln'r illslillltion ~l learning.

T\\'0-\' 1-: .\ R CC RR 1(.T IX.\ I S

F O U~ - YE . \ R

For G rades and H igh School

For Elementary Schools St

K I :\ IH . RC \RTI . :\- P RDI \R\

f' R I \1.\ R \

CTRR I CL' Ll' .\ IS

(; R \ D F ~

I'I . R\"ISIO:'\, ll H~ II SCIIOOJ..

F"t-:

.\ RTS

Srt<I.\L . \ I{ · ~

( :\TE R \I I·: I> I \ r I. (; ILIIH S

I \IH

l "I'I'ER (; R \IH ~

~ l l "I('

RL

l' ll\'- 1( \I. E IH ( \Ill>\

R .\ L S!'IIOOI.'-

Its fou r-year cur riculum

lead~

to the degree Bafhc lor of Ed -

ucation and ih two \car to the diploma, with certification for puhlic--.chool

~en·icc.

Send for Yearbook and other literature.

ETC.


'30

THRIFT~ and hig he r education are a necessary combination fo r a succcs~ful career. ,\ cquire the T hrift habit ea rly in life and be prepared for t he many opportunities.

WINONA CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION F l R~f

1'\ \TIO:o-

\L

B \'-"

If your Sweet Tooth says CANDY You r \Visdom T ooth says

"CH OCOL:\ TES''

Com pl i mcnts ~~r

··t_. I

11.1

Jil your f••l'"

.Judge Ho" far were you from this spot ''hen these cars collided? Cunningham- Eighteen feet and ten inches. .Judge I Jo,, do \ ou kno\\ it '' u'> c'ucth that di-.tancc' Cunningham- Because 1 rnc<t..,urcd 1t. thinking some fool might ask me the distance.

It happened at Phelps school. "\V c ''ill study root \ egetahles"" se;11d the teacher. ··Bring some to school anything such as carrots, radishes. heets or turnips. One child appeared '' ith a s4uash " llo'' come: .. or its equi\alent. asked the teacher. ··1 looked around the house.·· sa1d the \Oung "un. ""and this 1s \\hat turn ups


'30

::J({EMBERS of the Winona A ssociation of Commerce as listed below, having contributed to the financial success ofthis public ation, will apprecia te your patronage.

SlhaiT~r

Cleaning \\'orb

I !irsdt Clothing Cu.

'\or I h~rn Fidd Seed Co

\\ inon.l Lied ric CotblntLiion ('o.

\\ inona :l!otor Co.

H 1'. Stansfield Knitting :\I ill,..

:I! iss. Valky Public Sen·ice Co.

!l. D. Foss Co.

Jom·s &

K roq~cr

Co.

:ll adison Silo Co.

\\' .. \. llodgi ns Tra nsfl·r

Bay State :\! illin!' Co.

!'t•erlcss Chain Co.

S tandard Lumber Co.

\\'inona Thtatre Co.

] . R. \\'atkins Co.

II Choate & Co.

Gate City Laundry

:llrConnon & Co.

L. T. Stl'\Tibon 's Inc.

!:-.. S. h rl'sgL' Co.

Chas. h Olstn

\\ inuna t'lcanin!' \\ orb

c;l'O. l! illyL·r Furn. Cu.

\\ ill iam:; Book & Stati<JilL'I'Y ( 'o.

The Fashion

,\l urphy Transfer Co.

\\'. F.

!' ~l7.<'r

Eustcrman B rother;;

]{. l>.

Co n ~

I !old \\ inona

Stcn~nson

\ \ illiams l!otel

O'Brien Lumhrr Co.

Co.

Coal Co.

\\ m. :11. H ardt

\\'inona Battt·ry Co.

\\'i nona l'ai n t & Glass Co.

Brown & Smart

J.

J lintgen's Hl'ady to \\'car

C. l't•nnt·y Co.

T he Continental

Reese Fu rni lu rc Co.


'3 0

COJ\1 PLDJ E:K T S

FOR STL' LH : "'TS t·an a lways be found at

Wruck & Gates ' ·FOOT

ll osil'ry

FJ TT /~ NS' '

Soc ks

,,-, \\'. Third St.

fo r

OF T il E

'Dairy /jtnch

for

\\'omen

\\" r-;o;-~

\ , i\lr :--x.

J\l c n

HOLDEN'S Can s upply you with T oikt \rt ir ks, Scbool Supplit·s, and

I·:xpcrl

Kodak \\'ork.

<ON CE - ALWAYS)

Til l·: :\ lOST

CO.\ I I'LE T I~

FOO l> S il O!'

1:\' T I LE C LT Y

Our lll'lil'alt·sst•n Department b Complete OR Ill'

can

' l ' r\ t·

lho,l' 1klicat it•s in

THE CAVEIZN

\ 1r ~ellc ( m Co, l ) - " I ' 1.., 1ted ~ u ll­ \\ aler ~l a t e P n son t h ree ~cars ugo fo r the las L tim e."

KI SS I.I .:-\(; 'S FOOD S IIO J>

.

O pposite l'os l Ollin:

REI>LT ED PRI CES I N OC R KOl> .\ K I> E 1'.\ RT .\ 1E?J T

[ 6]

Cl o:-;,.. l' rinb for [

25c ]

ST L' DlOS OF

G. E. GRIFF IN

1\ l cet Y our F rien ds

at

KRATZ CAK DY SH OP l li l .:\l a in St reet


'3 0

Western Grain & Coal Co. I >eale rs in

Fuel Oil, Coal and Coke TCE & FEED

T

E L E P II 0 ~ E

\ lr. Jederman ··\lone;, talks. all right- hut all 1·, c e\·er heard it say is "CoodhYc·.··

I

~ ~

EAT TRI-STATE Ice Cream

Congress Cafe \II. \1.'-,,

1.[;:\CHE~

and

I Cll '\T \1:\ :,ER\ I( E

Botsford Lumber Company Complete Line of

Tlll'

\~l'll<:) ·.., lntcn.~ ... t

o\nd Your ... art• ldl'lllical

('"'"";~,ion

only ~ ',

IJ U J\l B E R

THE

for :.\Ianual Training

.\lidl a nd T c hrs . .\ gcy.

Phone 090

\\' inona, J\linn.

I :!I "'iout h Third St rt.'t'l \II\"'\ I .\POLis

)It''


'3 0

The Stager Je~vehy Store .\ ppreriatrs thr H earty Patronage of \\' 11\01\ .\ T l·: \CTTER S COLL I·: (; I-: S' ITl>El\TS \\'. _1.

\\' \R\11:'\(:Jo\

Corner Third and ;. l ain

,\ gc I

l'ccthing rings.

. \ gc

I~-

Door hell rings.

J\gc 5.

Bah) rings.

J\gc 20. - L:.ngagement rings.

,\gc I 0. -

L:.mhroiJer: nngs

Age 2b.

I clcphonc rings.

, \gc

\gc I (1

-

2~

\\' cJJing rings. Clothes rings.

JONES & KROEGER COMPANY PR.INTEl{S- BINDEI{S STATION El{S Pri11ters

of the I9JO

lf7el/Ol1ah


'3 0

Hotel V e11dotne 25 o

ROOMS

STRlCTL\' l\IODERN FlREPROOFED One

Rate Schedule \\' ith La \ a ton'.

Two f>l' r,o ns Sl.:!.-, S:!.OO 1 ..-,() :! ..)()

P er~on

\\'ilh l'ri \ ale Toilet \\'it h Pri \ at<' Bath

I. 7:,

:UIO

C.\ IU.GE S ER \-I CE

Minneapolis Seidlit7.-Schvvab & Co ., In c. JH:.\t. HPll.l>T:\'e SE R\'J(' I•: Call l's for \our Carp~nll'r, :\la,on or Concrete \\'ork

Clcncttc \ \ . - .. , pnl\Cd ror night." R. \'. -

!OLI

last

"'-:c:-;t time telephone."

I Iiii \\ c:-;t Second St red

Tl!crr is

'fhe \ Vi no na Ta-xi Co. II !l :\lain St.

W li ,S O N Equipment for l'i'rry Sport

\\'ill \ p p n·ciate Teachers Colkgc Pat rona~c

Fully Co\·cred by [n,urancc Let ll,; ll aul \'our llaggagt•

Phone :!fi I


'30

Springdale Dairy Co. For Quality .11 ilk ond (·rca 111 \ 1 \111. 1\.E B.\1\.fK(; C0\11' \:\ Y

'-I'OR"II :--<; (;Q()IJ._ 01" \LI. I.. I\ ll'-

Sindelar Hardware

-,:!!1 I l ull St .

Von Rohr's Ph ar m acv (h R '-'s•ttl \I. I\

Ill P \RT\IE:\ I '- TORI

.\\I)

I:, I Ea:-t Third St rt•t·l

HliLEt I'R EI'\R\ 110 '\'i" I

llunl Strt•t·l

1 ndependent Prov isio n Co.

("0.\II'LL\11·::\TS OF TilE

I' l ' R 1·: I

\\' inona Clinic

()()I l

\\ hule"dc ancl Rl'lail \\J'\ 0:\\ ,

\\'c Spccialilc In PEIDI.\~EKT

'

PRE'-'< RII'TIO\ >;Jo:R\ 11' 1

\II'' ·

SPURGEON'S

\\' .\\' I ' (;

Tltrift Slt•rc nf U inlllhl

II\ rs ... ll.lo.. L'\DER\\E\R IIO.., I LR\, El l'. '- I\ 1.1 '- H l'O\T'-. llRI·:'-"E'

Girard Bea u ty Sh o ppcs ~~7 :,

\~T .

F. Pelzer

Cl'STO~ I

lOti

T \I LORI\'(,

Ea~l

Thi rd St.

Ropairill!( 1111d

Phont.· (i 17

F. It h

\ V AN T E D Salt·:-.m;tn and S;,d .....tadk.., to ... t•ll

KOCH PROilL' ('TS

Koc h. Vcg . Tea Co.

f'r,.,.,jllg

Burmeister' s Band I > \ \' <' 1·:

\ :\ D (' 0 :\ (' I : In' ORl' II I~S 1'1<.\

II I>. " ll al" Con·y. l>irt·< tor

l'hont" :!:!:! 1

\\ '1-..:0' \, \11'' ·

BURGS I:'\ ( 1.1. I\ R \\0:\ l \lli·:R\\ I \R \ \1) I' L R I " I L J:.. II 0._ 11 R \ ,11

Prin: .. that l>t:lh:ht


'3 0

Phone :1:1

\t\1 m . R adem a c h c r

1:1:1 F

l"hinl !'!reet

GEO. H. PLJ r l'KE

\\ IIOJ.I·:s \I.E \'\ll IU: I \II. llRll(;(;I~T

Ed"'in A. Brown PRF:S('RII'TIO~

BAI Llt:Y & B.\ I LEY

llRL'(,(.t'> l II ·s \ (,O()D I'L.\1'1 : l'O TR.\I>L

ne !it~ .rrore 1\.odaks

1\.od;.\k Supp)it_...,

Salet's Department Store li:~ \\ c""l

Third

~trl'Cl

Bevcrstedt Bros. Cab

'Jli;.:hnl Qua/it.\' \larlwncliH at tf,•doatc l'rtcn" DRY (;()OilS, RE.\D \ -TO II E \R

1'110:\'E

So- J

\llLLI~ERY

\\ c (;u;trante': t:n•ry .\rtic1t• Th.,t \\ c ~wit Ynur mont') \\ill be chceriully rdundt"d on any urhati~f~u.:tor) pun·has~:

Spend your h+.. urc hour .. at the

CCL\ I PLDII·::\TS 0 F Till·:

Y. M. C. A. Soft \\ .ltl'r "lwwcrs ~wimmin,IC Pool llandball

Collegiate Lunch Oppm•itc Teachers Colkge

P honl' 11 ~)

~

I f I tear a fr. French piece of raper tnto four. \\hat do I gct 1 Risty- Quarters. ~ lr. French \nJ if I Ji' ide tt into eight' Rtsty- Eighths. t'vlr. French J\nJ if I di\ iJe it into eight thousand rarts' R1st_\ - Confetti. sir. Some c lasses in college a rc just like dreams you ha\'e to go to sleep to enjoy them

N.W. 0UT-00R STORES

-

" H eadquarter:-; for Sporti ng

Good~


' 30

WtsTERN TEACHERS-~ ExcHANGE "'tr/"'

· ·

'

M t- \t

f

R S

0

' \

r

1

l

•, -' 1

l

'-

4. t

I A. 1 I

l'l'

.t,

4.."'~ ~

ll F

1 J A l

U l- K "'

A

<-•

l 1'.: (

I t !t

THE PLYMOUTH BUILDING ~IINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

Good will, experience and the ability to perform a needed service arc th e intangible requisites of a first-class teac~~ :z,ency.

ufj~v~ ~Maowg<·r

1;11~S~E§:~~~~~;

c II l c A G 0

I' I lll' ll '

1: . .J. "You knm1·. I l1ke \CHictv. It's the spice of life.

L. .J .

" \\'ell - nw ml<.kllc name '"

lie in: ...

. I Ll I N 0 I

( ,\S

s

DEN v E R'

Ill ILDI:->t.

c

0 L 0 R A DO

(;A, & FLLCT IUC llllll D I NG

'''d's I it ~tud. fair\ rules ...

- " l-cr-a-1\ant c;omc

\!Jss ~tcch-"You can' t fool me. \Otmg fello11, I guess I kno11 that faines h<n en 't an~ t ai lc; ...

College da~·s lla1 e th eir delightc;

l)ut the:- ca n 't compare \\ ith College n1ghts .

COLLEGE 1 N :'\ I l '\( Il l'~ 1'\ll \IFII.'-, J( I I Rl 1\1 l l"ll\ 1'\'ll \1 \(, IZI'\1·..; \lr anol " ''· (. ] . \lrl'<•)'

1\ .I R\1 IIR Jl'R'\\('ES l 'urn.tn· Pipe and l 'ittin~ .... Rc~i .tcr..:. o\<:: hc.;.tcli Produ"·a..., (;ah·anizccl lrnn Ullll .\II Kind.;, of Kol)linJ!

Jo:..;,timatc.;, l"urni:·ht·d I n•c

112 La fa) t t r :-.1 I 011 E ~n11nd

Oppo• ilt· \Iou•y II all

It j, Our Bu,int:.;,.;, lo J{cpair

\riXOX .\ HE .\TIXG & YEXTIL\TTNG CO., Tnc.

't.

\~ou r

....,IHH'"

1\ ,. llouhk Their l.iic

BAR HER SIJOP •I

do it. ,, l)llf: c.an'' Hair a ~pt·rblly

"·r ftln't Bohhin~:

A.M. BA R.D

l'ELI : PII0\ 1·: \Ill

Sn tH.'\1" TRHH

"nt.tun.n

.\RT ROCKOW 1.-,j' )Jain "i.Lrcct

J


' 30

~["1(-E:.,. ,',PARJ(Ul\'G J,\'D/\ 'JUUAL/T)'- l'ou find rl in f3uresu- ~~-~.,.. /Jeouty of D.,;g,- Q,,,/,ty of £,Jgrrn·ing-Di&lin~tiou o f 71Jeme. ... Don't merely dre,uu of •u<fr on Annuof. Let DUR£AU. C/UJ../·T lrc/p you ma/1e it • /~e../ity. \\ 'c: invite your corre•pondenct". Let u1 tell you • .fro I BUR£ \I '·

/wilt A,,.../, . .....

Cif;n;';~po/is MINN


,. '3 0

Autographs


'30

Autographs


'30

Autographs


'3 0

Autographs


'30

Autographs


--:a

... •



----

--..__- -- - ----- -- ____.,..,.