Wenonah Yearbook - 1914

Page 1






To MISS THEDA GILDEMEISTER OuR SINCERE FRIEND AND ADVISOR THis FouRTH VoLUME OF THE WENONAH IS RESPECTFt'LLY DEDICATED


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to.·:~:

..

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* ..


The New Model School Building VERY day we watch with lively interest the work on our new model school, which is being erected as a west wing to our central building. Its length will be one hundred seventy-eight feet and its width eighty feet. As a fire-proof structure, with assembly or grade room, recitation rooms, offices for principal and supervisors, a library. a gymnasium ~~!!!!!~~ with swimming pool and lockers. a. large lecture room, and rooms for cooking, sewing and manual training, it will present ideal conditions for securing to the pupils of the elementary school itself and to the students of the professional classes, the benefits for which this department is maintained. Under the able supervision of C. H. Johnson, architect, of St. Pa4l, and with the continuance of favorable conditions it is expected that the bui lding will be ready for occupam¡y by the elementary school pupils in J anuary, 19 15.

OUR START

i


,.

Cl•.\SS COUXSEI.I.OR

To l\l1s~

SAM so~

If you would seck a willing friu1d, A help in time of ncccl: If you would ask a comrade true. A kin in thot and deed. \Ye would not ponder long to choose That st·eming hard sought one. \\'e'd tum our thots ,,;th one accord ..\ nd choost•, l\[iss Samson.


L. 1\[ANGU:-.. A. l\I. E11glish Cornell Academy, Iowa; Cornell College, Iowa; University of Iowa. VERNON

B. S. Household Arts Teachers College, Columbia University.

FLORE::\CE L. RICHARDS, Ph.

B.

Dean of Women University of 1-Iichigan.

HARRIET F OLGE R ,

D. POLLEY, B. S., :\I. s. Geography Kalamazoo College, :Ylichigan; \\'estern State College, l\lichigan; University of Michigan; University of Chicago. ARCHIBALD

jOHN HERMAl' SANDT

Manual Training East Stroudsburg State l'~orm al School, Pa.; Teachers College, Columbia University.

HARRIET CAMPBELL, B.S.

GuY E. 1\IAX\\'ELL, .:\1. A., Ph. D .

PRESIDE!'IT

Hamline University; Teachers College, Columbia University.

H. S PECKMA N Drawing Winona State :-lormal School; Massachusetts School of Technology; :--.Jormal Art School, Boston. BERTHA

9

Teacher in Elementary School Marshall College; Teachers College, Columbia University.

jA)!Es LE Rov S TOCKTO N, A. l\1. Principal of Elementary School and Pedagogy Colorado State T eachers College; Columbia University.


;\( \ ITIE SAl.! Sill K\

.lssflrialt' in Omtt'llll!,

.\rt lnslltull' of Chi!'ago. f).

IKVI'<· S."FOKU,

FR.\:-;CES S~l!Tll, L. I. Tl'adzer in Eltmrnlary .)chool Peabody Teachers Colll·gc, .:\ash,·illc, Tenn.; Tc:tt'hers College, C'olumbi:t linin:rsity.

Ph. B.

Ptl. :\l ,\[rzth~malus

Upp~r

l"''a lJniver:-itv: :'l.l'\\ York linivl·r<itv; lint\·erslt~ uf Chimg(J. ·

F. w. \IOORR, A. B. . l.lsistanl 111 lfislory and Cit•irs ,\thin Colll'f.(l', ::'vtil'higan; 1.: ni\'l'rstly of t.lidtignn.

:\f. HoL/tsc;ER, A. B. ::\1. S.. B. D. Elem. Scima, Botany and Lati11 Olivet College, ~lichigan. Yale jon~

L I' ' L. BEYER Trach.-r in F.Jnl/tnlary Srhool \\'inona State :-\ormal SchooL

Seminary. 10


HI!.L.EN

s. II. SoMSEX Rtsidrnt Director

liON.

POKD S TAPJ. E ...

Teacher ttl Elrmeulary Sthool " 'inona State Nom1al S..·h<K>l , Columbia School of Oratory, Chicago; Teachers Colkgl'. Columbia University.

~IARV SLII'h:R

Reading Emerson College of Oratory. Boston; Chi<::1go School of Civics anc.l Philanthropy.

1-IAK\" \\". ll ot.\lh', B..\., n. ~. tlssocialt: in Kmdrrgarlrn EduwJron \\'cllcslcy Collegl'; Tcaclwrs College, Columbia _ Cninr:-ity.

E. CA THERI"E

Rt' RKIIOLOE R,

Ph. B. Tearlur in Elemtmlary School Kansas State Xormal School; University of Chicago.

j OSEPU

s.

GAYLORD,

A. M.

Psychology aml IIislory of EducaWALTcK o. ,\U RA\1

.I ss1slanl in lndltslriul A rls State :-\ormal Colllogc, l owa.

HARlUS

G.

PETT

Surrtury \Yinona Stnte ~onnal Sch•><>l.

II

tion Knox College, Galesburg, rtl.; Graduate work, Yale, HarvarcJ and Berlin Universities; Oratory at Emerson Colkge.

! I. ~1. Dtn:~;K'><>"·

.\. B.,.\ . ~1., Ph. D. llistnrv, Cn·icsand Social Scirure Jllinoi~ State Xom1al t!mvcr~tty; t: nivcrsity of Jllin{Jis.


) I Eut ru D. Dt '\O:-;

E IT,\ II . I[()\\ ELl.

.-l ;sociutr ;,, K llldtrf(urll.'ll Education

Tl'uciltr ill Wt·mmlary Schon/

\\'tLL!AM

\\'inona State .t\urmal Sd10ol.

\\·inuna S~ttl' '\ormal School: \\'hn·lock Km<krgarlcn Training School. Boston; Teachers Colkgc, Columbia Univcrsity.

H.

.i\ll'I\SOI\,

B.s.

Zoology tmd Ph ysical Sdwcr Michigan State ;'l;ormal Colkgc: Olivet College; Univcr~ity of .\1 ichigan.

:\lAUlil I •. :1\1.\R\ 1!\ Trarhl'r i11 l~lt-mr 1tlary School Winona Stall' Normal Sehool

i\1.\t' nE r. S H.\ FF.R. Ph. B. ]Juthrmatics. E11glish and Prhzripal of ll1J!,h ScltfiOI ~1ilwaukc

'\ormal School; n·rsil) of \\' 1 cunsin.

EoYrut:: 1\IrCo:--M". ilssistan/ in llouuhold ;( r/s

\\"inona State :\ormal School

l"ru-

~1\R\' G R.\'OT

Librariall

FLCIR.\

Trarh··r

TR ITES

jtLI \ \\' . •\BIIUT

111 l~ll.'mtlllary

School '\ormal Sehoul, l:ni\'l'fStl\ u C'u(.1go: :'\orth \\"l.,tcrn L mn·rsity

Lim-oln

1~J~

C;t!CIIH: t:o.- \ Lo\1\IL'

Trarltrr i11 FJrmrnlary .\chool \\"inuna State ::\orm: 1 Sd1<ol. (h_ ~

(J-- ·

ec,."'

ll

(.~&.....,_.

....__..._.a..&-&.,

't'V~ _c...;..,'-4 4

~

cLc.-.

Kindergar/m Ed Ileal ion Te~chcrs College, Columbia l:ni,·crsity.

~~


{~

\


GLADYS BRUGGER

Ad v. Winona. "She knows what's what, and that's as high .As metaphysic wit can fly." II

D oROTHY KEcKEFOTH

Adv. Winona. " All th ings docth she with system." A LICE I SAACS

Adv. (/'

Winona "She is pretty to walk with, And \\itty to talk with, And pleasant to think on, too." GLADYS P t:TSCH

Ad \'. Winona "All our knowledge is, ourselves to know."

CORA SIMONS

Adv. Minneapolis "What a spendthrift she is of her tongue."

ELEANOR \\TARO

Stillwater / "For herself she hath no fears; ....__,/ For him alone, she sees and hears."

Josm

SuTHERLAND

Ekm. C hatfield " Her modest look lhc collage might adom, Sw(·ct as the primrose peeps beneath a thom."


EDNA BRt:GGER

Winona

Adv.

..B~zre :;::,:~";;;s~ltJ. 1\lARION Bt.ISS

Adv

".~\

" 'inona quiet conscience makes one so serene.''

,,.

I'll'

;

r.//'4

:\IRS. :\1. B. GRAY Spt:cial. \\'inona .. Describe her who can ,\n abridhrmcnt of all that's pleasant in woman." LA L"RA HoLKER

.\dv. Toston. :\lont. "Small strvice is true ~en·ice while it lasts.'' ADELg McCAULEY

l\linncapol is "Taste the joy That springs from labor."

BEULAH PAL~IER

.\th·. \\'inona "Capable, comfortable and conscientious."

DoRA PROCTOR

Adv.

. I

Arcadia, Wis. "Oh, this dull town; The f:lnn or the Vv est for me.'' /J

I)

(...'

15


,\d v.

DoROTHY BLA.:-.t:HARD

"Oft. on summer cYeru'n • . Lake Cit v star:-: " gs, stud1cd ~he the

Ekm. AuDREY BRE:\NAN "Cheerful all the time." Flandreau, S. D.

"J :\L\t:D BERR\' I Jl'lll ·;:: ":\h lon· for nat . Ree Hc·ights, S D (#~ ~re !,s as old as l." ·

~

:\cl\·.

~4C4~A?'~ . ~- - , .

lREXE FITZPATRICK

\Yinona " 1 am sure care is any - enemy to lifl'."

Ek•m. EuA KER NKA;'otl' "To l>c strong • is· to bc happy." St. Paul Park

...

rUvW~- ~ •ldY.

GuOYS

s.,..

sox~

.

·I h:we set mY life Winton .And I will starid the uhpon cast, azarda of the die."

FRANCES THORSTAD

lhal substantial

gri~ ~\'hcalon

~;;:.d? ~~~ to

~~r


,, Ddan~

HATTIE BARTLETT

Adv. her, nor Cu stom stale · her , .. -\<rc cannot . ,.·it her .il~flnitc vanety. / :\lARTIIA B. LACKl\IORE

Adv.

'"['Jw

li~ht

Stillwater

that lies • •. eyes · r " In woman Has been 111)s. heart's undomg.

(

~

Run-t BecKLEY ::\linncapolis Ad,·. . I." .. •\ sweet, " .·111·some, lovable gir ::\lABEL FRA:-.-x·ux . ::\Iinncaports

sleeps.~

,JJlf~ ''Shc~in::~ . 1.~ . ~....~ j,Oi,Nso~ ckh Ad,-.

• lady

,:/

. I to the sun Adv. "True as the dmh. d upon." Altho l't be not s me

ReTH RJXGEY Stewart\·ill;; Ad,·. ":\'ot much talk-a great, sweet silence.

FERN ST. ]OHJ'\

Adv. I" "0 me eye

Stillwater

17

·


ARVILLA BELDEN

.\ d,·.

Caledonia "Whatever the discussion may be, I always find room to disagree."

RuTI-t

GLUDT

Ad\. Lake City "A kincl and gentle hear t she has, lo comfort friends and foes." ELEANOR HAl:\

~linncapolis

Ach·.

"The reward of one dutv Js the power to fulfill another." P.\l'LlXE Kt:LAS

'Vinona

Adv.

"\\'ell, I was musing on that."

RUTH KELLETT

i\clv. St. Paul " Haughty, as if her eye had seen its own light to a distance thro-wn." ~~

~,.r;;;.~ ~

~rr::;;o~ :0.111\'A 0LSOX

Elcm. Winona ··care rests lightly on her shoulders."

fO~ ~-«-~ /~ JJ~e BORGHILD SAND

Adv.

to

Willmar "She has a world of ready wealth, Our minds and hearts to bless."


ELLEN GALE

Adv. Minneapolis "When she had passed it. seemed like the ceasing of exquisite music."

VERONICA Rt:SH

Adv. ::..Iontcvidco "Life is to Act, and not to Do is Death."

1IAZ£L CHAPEL Elcm. Houston "Always the same, quiet and kind."

CEO.

w.

SCHli!OKE

Adv. ·winona '"For rhetoric he could not ope II is mouth, but out there fie"· a trope."

ANA BENSON

Adv. Stillwater ''The Snob~ Too stingy to have her picture takcn." ·

I

19


BERTHA BREID

Deer River .. Love is better than Fame."

MARIE FLANAGA)If

,\d\. Rush City "Of cas,· lcmj)Cr, naturally good."_ /)

~~~~.·· CORDELl.\. KOEL::\lEL

Elem Wabasha ":\othing mean to be said about her." BE:\ETTA LIE:\

Bucvrus, ~. D. "llcr looks do argue her replete with

.\th·

modL•sty."

]ESSlE NOBLE

Ad,·.

\Yin<!om

"The soul of pr<.>cision."

J:\[YRTLE PRICE

Stillwater ":\ n1l'ny heart. the best of compan) ." ../

.\th

.;\[ARC IA Pl'LVER

l\linneapolis "I kr sunnv locks hang on her temples like a goldC'n fleece."

Spt•cial.

20


LILLIAN ..:\)'.IDERSON

..:\dv. Winthrop "Blushing is the color of ,·irtuc."

ELIZABETH COAK

Special. Persia "In her experience all her friends relied, Heaven was her help and nature was ht•r guide." ELL.\. IIniAN

.\d,·. "~Iodcsty

:\Iinneapolis nc,·cr fails to win good will."

IsABELLA :\ fARZOLF

Ad' Hastings. 'i\Iinn. "Thou art a woman, nobly planned."

BERTIIA NOBLE

M~

~~~

"Tho' studious, is oft inclined to levity."

EDWI::\.\ O'BRIEX

Ad,·. "'inona "Knows her own mind, and ta,lks like light-

ning."

~

J/1. (}1~

St·sm WAI.SER Arh·. Retwillt• "Docs good by stealth, and blushes to find it fame"

21


CYNTHIA CoRNWELL

Aclv. Faribault "Great thots, like great deeds, need no trumpet."

ELORINE FRUETEL

i\dv.

Winona "I leave thy praises unexpressed, Thy greatness to be guessed." MARJORIE

Adv.

&-. ...._.,..

HooGE

Stewartville "I care for nobody, no, not I, If nobody cares for me." I'J 1 ~ I . ~ - 1//-lt'( v.t

J _. -

j

FEMICIIA KLINEFELTER

Adv. Stillwater "Seeks to be good, but never aims t o # b c

~' J.~·~ KATHER~ 'i:~NSTEIN ~~ I

Adv. Pipestone "My tonhrue within my lips I rein; For who talks much must. talk in vain."

'· '

/ <.... (

--:;;)( (_

Z-'3-~ z'... / I

LELIA ~lEVERS

Winona "Can grow as poetical over a soggy potato as O\·er a fleecy cloud."

.Aclv.

PEARL SHAPPEE

i\dv.

22

Hamilton, Monl. "Pure at heart and sound in head."


LENORA

Elem.

M.

DvoRAK

Remilk "Too much horrified to speak She could only shriek, snriek," OLGA GIERE

Adv. Spring Valley "Wit. is t.he salt. of her conversation, but not. the food." 1AI J;L ~ ~ fc, tL.

~ -~-

LU.L IA:-1 Ht.:RLEY

.\ch·. Stillwatt•r "Her smiles arc reserved for a fayored few."

A DA KERXKA~!P

Elem St.. Paul Park "\\'hal is worth doinK at all is worth well." "~ ~ ~ "'--".._.....__....,,.llllll#l DoROTHY M c G u t CGAN

Kg.

Hagar City, \\'is. "Here's a girl who's in for fun, Romping 't.il the day is done."

EDNA PRIEVE

Ad,·. Hutchinson "What her heart thinks, her tongue speaks."

Cr.ARA ScHWIRTZ

Adv. W abashn "Her smile is her friend maker ."

~~r~~ ~ ~~-

h~o._

~

~---~

~ ! ' U~


LILY ALLEX

Kg. ~Iinneapolis "The softer cham1 that in her manner lies, l s framed Lo captivate yet not surprise."

BI':SS BRYA:\1

Kg. Yankton, S. Oak. "She smiles and wins."

)'C..-7.,. -/. vLG--vJ'-

~C.I

'·

:\I.\RGCERlTE CROt:Cil

\Yascca "Oh now what ha\·c I done? S'posc I'll have to pay for my fun." ~lARIE CROL'Cll

Kg.

Sleepy Eye "For pranks, jokes and wi l 1\Iarie's the center of it." EsTLIER KRUPPENBACHER

Kg. Preston "She strove the neighborhood to please with manners wondrous winning."

~~~~ C.~oL• t:. ~

-

GENE\"lE\'E LAWREXCI>

Kg.

Yankton, S D. "Sweet and winning is her \\'a)'; .\ smile from her is goodly pay."

R UTil SHEARER Kg. Chatfield ",\llho' she's little, her heart; is big."

2-1.


:\Lu:oE •\d\'.

BARRICK

Harshaw, Wis . "Peace rules the dav Where reason rules the mind." LLTINDA

GoLTz

Ad\'.

Winona " Was she ever known to be solemn, Was she c,·er known to be sad, :'\ot she, for she's .-always jolly. Aml make.-; all the rest of us glad." LEILA HO:\!STAD

.\d\'. "'hcaton "Her ways arc ways of plcasantnes,;. ,\nd all her paths arc peace."

IfELEX j£.\XS

Ad v. " 'ithro\\' "Pka:;urc has been the business of my life " Gt'ST JE Gt' ANRL"D

,\ch-. Spring Grow "I h·r \'Oit't' was ever soft, Gt•ntk amllow: an excellent thing in "·oman."

LILLIE Gll.\XRCD

.-\d\'. Spring Grm·e "1 t is not cnou~h to do good; one must do it in a good way."

J

,\DA G:-mERlllLL

A1h•. Stillwa tcr "Black eyes, with a wondrous witching chann To bring us good or lo work us ham1."

25


LILLIE ENGH

Elcm. "A little girl only in stature."

Rushford

LENA IlEANER

.\dv.

Stillwater "Stay ncar me-do not take thy flight, A little longer stay in sight." NELL HuoERLE

Hutchinson "With life and all in it, She seems quite content." HARRIET STAH.M ANN

Kg. Winona "The mildest manners and the gentlest heart. GLADYS FRENCH

Elem. "Silence

IS

Winona the perfectest herald of joy."

RALLA MILLBRATH

K~.

Lester Prairie " Pcrscrvcrance, her speciality."

ALlCE BRILL

Kg.

St. Paul "A girl of splendid winning ways, And oh! the number of her As."

~~·

16


EsTHER ARNE

Adv. Minneapolis "Ay; but. give me worship and quietness; I like il better than dangerous honor." 0TELIA BARTZ

Aclv.

El1->in

"MystC'rious love, uncertain treasure,

llast thou more of Pj~ f}e::.J~· Roxm BRowN Ad\·, "A face without a fro\"\"0

Is the blessing of

~liss

I Pipt•stOtw

Roxie Bro\\"0."

0LJn; BERRY

Adv.

L OUISE KEEFE

Elcm.

Eyula

"As tlll'rry as the day is long."

STELL.\ :\IELBY

Adv. 1\Iinncapolis "Very quiet, but of a sunny disposition."

L l'CILE SCHRAL'T

Adv.

Spring Vallt·y "B<' to her virtues very kind; Be to hcc fault' _:_;; ~,

27


ELIZABETH BARNHART

~Iinneapolis

.\dv.

" A maiden never hold: Of spirit still, and quiet."

).JARY COOKE

Ek·m. Hammond " ITer min:i is full of many \\'isc thoughts."

XELLJE

Doon

.\ ch. .. In no way i ri ,-olous."

"·oodstock ~

LOIS ).lt'RPHY

Kasson "The girl that luYcs and laughs must sure c1 () \\' t'll. " ).fARJO:\'

.\d \·. "To ~,If_''; ~r}P'

I!

' ls

Ronn

'

Winona

tb love her."

. ...

o~\d"" ,.ER.\ ODELL

Ekm. Kellogg "Sht_:'..; cunsC'icntious both as to her stuclief; and her friendships."

Anoka

Acl v.

"I ncycr. '"ith important air, ln cmn-crsation overbear."


jESSIE BRADLEY

Adv. Florence, :\Ionl. "I'm not in the roll of common men."

hm.

CLOt:GH

Elem. ~\mboy "A woman nobly planned, .. To warn, to comfort, and command.'/' !

{)l / Adv.

f~/ ~

- ~(J

"L-<-

d~

\,

\Yinona am I. from care I am free; \\'hy arcn 't all content like me~"

~ ·Happy

:\f.wo P OTTER Adv. "Jolly and whole :;ouled."

\Yinuna

L l'l.lJ SEIDLITZ

Adv. \rinona "Quiet and reserved but full of fun.''

C'EI.I.\ SI!CREST

Adv.

.\mboy

''In her inmost heart Fun doth ha\·e its yart."

/

~~H'··~~ . :Adv.

LOt'I\>E :\I. TRACY

Winona

"But still ht•r ton)..'tte ran on, The lessofwcight it bore, withgreatcrcase."

29


SYLVIA ANDERSON

Kg. Milan 'The unspoken word never causes trouble."

HELEN BATES

Lake City "True blue \Va}j,tl_!nf.'f I

rv'--1:v~

'•

I•

""''

0

·~

{3

HARRIETTE CHARLES

Kg

St. Paul "What she says, she mean.<;, You rna)' depend on it." FRAr-:CES GREEN

Kg. Kalispell, ".\ name, in this case deceptive."

~[onl.

jEAN I RVINH

Lake City

Kg. "As she feels, she speaks."

.\L\y

RILEY

K~.

•· .\lwavs laughter.'''

m

c,·idence

.\Iason City, Ia. \\;th contagious

ELI-A SEIOL!T7

~-

MooM

"Trim and neat, and can·ies a tidy smile."

,,0

-l-

~


CHARLOTTE

II.

AL~!Qt:IST

Elem. Houston "She has many nameless virtues."

ALTRELIA BOLES

Atk Missoula, l\font. "A loving creature she, and brave, And fondly ~~ri;7s,~her struggling frierW. tOJ

:::;;~~ BEATRICE FRENCH

Elcm.

Winona

"l\Iy own thoughts are my sole companions."

AURA HITCHCOX

Ad,·. Pipestone "She speaks, behaves and acts just as she ought." IRENE MASON

Adv. Spring Vallt' y ''Speech is groat, but silence is greater."

LOUISE REICHMAX

Adv. "A...p)easant face, A happy smile."

'"} . . _,7

/L-

~..,

/

!,~IF /

o;

... .c - 7 ~

.: c

Wabasha. _ " ' 2- ~~

~""'Z'(" ,./C

/ .HAZEL '\VooDRL'FF

Ad,·.

Minneapolis "Built for comfort, not for speed."

"~z::: ~;~~ #-c;rt 31


:\lARY AL.\IETER

.\ th. :\Iazeppa "One of those quiet, studious girls "

L ot:ETT A A wRo

Sprin~

.\elY.

Valley

"Calm, docile and easy going."

Rt:TH G.UDIELI•

. \th·. Chatfield "Life's a jest, and all things sho\\" it; I thot so once, but now I kno\\" it." EL"XICE GREBIX

EIL'm.

Preston

".\ good hearl, a generous soul."

EvALYK T H OMPSOK

.\ dv. IIult'hinson "Those who think must go\·cnl those who toil "

ll.\X:O.:.\H TiLL.\1.\:0.:

" ·inona ".\n all around girl. as merry as the tlay is long.·•

.\d\·.

F LORENCE VOELKER

Special. Winona " It mallers not how long we live, but how. "

32


~ .............~~._f ~~-~;-

K~.

Ely

...:.. ...,

"J\·c had a most rare vision."

~J..A..,..:.,i- WZ.I

(..'f-T..i < RL'T II Ht:NKINS

~

~OOM

"A lass for fun and jollity, And play:; her music frolicly." ~[~~~IE liE:\'RY

Kg.

Cresco, Ja. ''Thi:; lass so neat with smile so sweet, Has \\'On our right good ";u." LEONA KESSELL

Kg. "·inona. "One who says little, but takes m e\·crything."

Kg.

Arcadia, Wis. "Vanity fair. With never a care."

~~ ~~ -~ ~ ~~~ - ~~

LELA :\1.\XSON

Kg.

\Yinona "Good nature and good st'nse must eYer join."

ETHEL 1\' IXON

Kg.

Wells "Rart• compound of oddity, frolic and fun! Who rd ish<:d a joke and rejoiced in a pun."

b 5-f-t~

;cv ,~ L

., .J--V~~v-<Y ( :} ~7.>

~~~,.

33

t.-

i~&. 4. L L

EDEJ, ELLEFS0:-1

~ ''!.14.


Class Motto Let deeds prove.

Class Colors Crem ancl white.

Class Flowers \Yhitc sweet peas.

Class Officers ELEANOR liAIN

BoRGHILD SAND

Presiden t

Secretary

QgoiwE ScmtoKg

Sergeant-a t-arms TRAcY Treasurer

LowiSE

GENEVIEVE LAWRENCE

Vice-President

Class Yell Harum, scarum, ricket::- leen, Hear 'em, cheer 'em, white and green, Greet 'em, lead 'em, get. a big Ben, Here's to the class of four and ten.


Class History Apologies to Longfellow and Field

PRO FIT 'Tween the shores of Lake Winona And our great and mighty river, Stands a school house steeped in glory; Highly honored; known in history As the first one, yea, the great one Of all normals in the North West. THE FIRST FIT To this Normal came the Juniors, Giddy, snippy, lmowing little; Flaunting French heels, puffs, and powder. In their mesh bags they did fumble For one-fifty to be given To H . G. Pett for their pink slips.(Curses take them~) Next mom early they a.c;semblcd. Pedagogy, Psych. and l\Iethods Were the subjects to be taught them. 'Spite of all their high demeanor Soon were they to be entrapped:At a meeting held for Juniors, Unsuspecting they elected For their president a Senior. Laughed at then they were and scotTed at; "C"nsophisticated green ones~~~ But, undaunted, thev succccde!l In electing ,,;se Luc-inda. Diff'ring from the '1-!- ]union; They were not so slow and poky:In the g)m they held a party: Dr<:'SsC'd as "kidlets." cat ing candy. Guarded b\" their nurse. \liss Samson. Once more -Seniors tried to thwart them, Tried to spoil their fun \\;th darkness, But the Juniors. now ~nnn1 wiser, Spent the time in lawlcs~ dancing. ~Ionths flew by, no time for parties, Work was lightened by their fidd day; Work was heightened by their picniC" For the staid and honored Sc'nior;;. At the time of the Commem·enwnt Came the staunch and loyal Juniors, Helped the Seniors with their "Class Day," Also paid them for their meamwss; Stole their LO\;ng Cup and kept it 'Til the Seniors were distractl'd, 'Til they thot their program n•inccl, 'Til the Juniors' \\·alter Bening Did restore to them their sih·cr. •\t the Opera House they gaYe them

3.5


Shrill and lusty vocal backing, And with tears they parted from them. Seniors left a ta.<;k for Juniors; Juniors now became the Seniors.

MIS FIT Summer session loomed before them, Loomed before the "8" r<.'ccivers.

THE SECO

¡o

FIT

In the Pall. they came back Seniors, Learned in the wavs of r\onnal, ~linus all their puffs and powder, Plain of garment. strict of hair comb, r\imbly round for pink slips went they;Smiled in pity at new Juniors. Held a meeting and elected For their leader, El'ner C'. Hain. One bright morning in November, l\Ir. !\laxwell told the Seniors That hereafter all the teachers Would receive an annual pension. Then and there bright thots did filter In the brain cells of the Seniors. And a Pension Party held they In the 1onnal's big f..,rymnasium, Dressed in garb of twenty hundred As they'd look when t,rranted pensions. Spring approached, and then the Seniors Wildly called aml held a meeting For the choosing of their class rings. But alas~ the Pres;dent came not; All in vain they searched the buildingShe had gone down town ashopping. She, the one who'd called the meeting, Did forget her sense of duty,Spcnt the hour down in Kratz's. Many other meetings held they For the purpose of obtaining Money from their slender purses, For the purpose of embarking On the business of the Annual. Finger rings they then did purchase; Posed for pictures; paid for pictures To be printed in the Annual. Kow the Seniors turned to asking, "Do the Juniors give a party? Do thev honor us, their betters? Do they do as they'd be done by?" 36


Ah, the busy, earnest Seniors! Class Play tryouts, applications, Annual "writeups," flowers, mottos, Yells, and class rings, and class histories. Oft in comers you would find them Scribbling off a sonnet, poem, To be given to the "Gossip.'' They, the Seniors, thank the Juniors For their help in Class Day program, For their voices at Commencement, For applause at "1\'Iice and Men." Grasping in their hands their "sheep-skins," Now before them lies the future,Lies Bemidji, Springfield, Homer, And a bunch of fractious youngsters; And behind them stand the Juniors, Left as future Normal Seniors. CON FIT May the Seniors ever prosper; May they ever be successful ; May they brigh ten Normal's glory; Loyal to their Alma Mater: Bearing in their minds their motto"Let deeds prove." A.-G. E . :M.

Class Resolutions Preamble: We, the members of the Senior Class of 1914, in order to conform to the high standard of the Winona State Normal School, to perpetuate the dignity of the "Student Body," to absolutely abolish grievances of any nature whatsoever, do hereby resolve and set forth the following resolutions: 1st. To refrain from any communication or disturbance in tlie Assembly Hall during previously specified periods. 2nd. To refrain from cribbing or dishonestly obtaining aid from our fellow classmates during a written examination. 3rd. To refrain from taking reserve books from their special shelves and selfishly hiding them (thus wilfully ignoring an established rule of the Library)- and also otherwise abusing library privileges. 4th. We also agree and resolve to look with scorn and contempt on anyone who knowingly violates, transgresses or infringes upon the foregoing resolutions . Lastly-We the drawees of the above set of resolutions do hereby attach our signatures this 24th day of September, in the year of our Lord 1913. BORGHILD SAND, Lt'ClNDA H. GOLTZ, Secretary. (Member of Advisory Council.) We, the undersigned, as members of the Senior class of 1914-do herewith agree and resoh¡e to adopt the above set of resolutions. The above was signed by all members of the class. 37


The Senior Kindergartners PRELU DE E hereby introduce ourselves as members of a department dedicated to the training of teachers of young infants. It seems necessary to justify our existence. By those outside the fold, we are accused of assuming perpetual smiles, cooing tones, and a condescending manner. But we hold that in the teaching profession it is better to begin the race with an excess of cheerfulness, because teachers are not usually noted for having an over supply of afiability. We sometimes hear the flattering remark. "What a shame that Miss- is taking the Kindergarten Course when she has so much sense." And you say it doesn't take brains to teach a little child~ Try it !

Junior Reminiscences ONS ago-it must have been the early part of September, 1912-a score of "outwardly-calm-shaky-in-the-boots" young ladies ''"ere fairly launched in the profound depths of k-indergarten principles. Of course, there were other things to occupy our time and brains beside kindergarten principles. Long anci tedious hours were spent in laboring over our occupation books, in building block houses, in making a minute study of trees and caterpilla rs, and in kinking our brains into double-bow-knots over the social problems of the universe. The Seniors, howeYer. haYing been through the mill the preYious year. bore down upon us, canied us to the paYilion, and initiated us in a most fearful and wonderful picnic. Then followed a contest in parties which lasted lhruout the year. \Yc entertained on Hallowe'en in the gymnasium, where there were spooks and witches galore. In November, we ga,¡e, in .L\liss Smith's music room, a musicale, a happy combination of work and play. In the Sp1ing the Seniors tendered us a party in the kindergarten rooms. 'vhen.¡ we did most of the prohibited things. Of course. we could not be outclone bY the Seniors, so we entertained at a most formal luncheon in the Winona Hotel. \Ve decorated with wild flowers and apple blossoms. and wore our best bibs and tuckers. In spite of all this pomp and solemnity, we had a good time, and the crowning C\'ent of the occasion was a series of toasts in which juniors ancl Seniors \'ied with one another's wit. Scattered all thru the year were a series of teas, st'rYcd in the kindergarten rooms. At these meetings we occupied our minds by discussing \'aried, but timely topics, such as "\\'oman's SuJTrage," "Parliamentary Procedure," and the pros and cons of :\Iontessori, while our hands were kept busy with sewing, croch<.'Ling, and all other "teachcrish" pastimes. Looking l>ack to that Junior year of ours, we realize that it was a most enjoyable anti helpful one. l'\o one could have been more patient ami considerate than :\liss Dixon or :\I iss Holmes. who endured the trying ordeal of directing our efforts in making our books. Thru it all we were inspired and guided by l\liss Binzel. who was ever ready to comfort and ad\'ise.


Kindergartners

The Junior Kindergartners

0

N September third, twenty-four Junior Kindergartners entered the Winona Normal School with much the same desires and ambitions that are cherished by all beginners. Soon after the opening of school, they enjoyed a " get acquainted" picnic across the lake, given by the Senior Kindergartners. Most trying initiations were imposed upon them, but the rapidly disappearing lunch at dinner time was evidence of their thorough recovery. The Supervisor, Miss Abbot and her assistants, Miss Dixon and Miss Wholmes, created for the department an atmosphere of co-operation and true fellowship long to be felt uv each class. ¡ The Seniors and Juniors have united on appropriate occasions, such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, to sing songs and play games characteristic of the seasons. Miss Abbot's skillful directing of these gatherings a dded generally to the cordial relationship between the classes. Perhaps the greatest event on the Junior calendar proved to be their sleighride party to Rollingstone, most ably planned by the class president, Eleanor Hohaus. The clear moonlight, together with singing and laughter shortened the fourteen mile ride on a night of two degrees above the zero mark. Miss Abbot and Miss Grafton proved to he delightful chaperons. When all reached their destination they found a warm ~upper and cordial hostesses awaiting them. So full of adventures was the homeward ride that it will never be forgotten by the participants. Thus, with days of labor interspersed with many hours of pleasure, has a most prosperous year been passed. 39


HOUSEHOLD ARTS

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liE Household Arts Department of the Winona Normal School has been wide awake all year. Several new and interesting features have been added to the old course. This success is largely due to our leader, Miss IIarrieL Folger. A beautiful new table has been placed in the alcove of the laboratory, formerly known as the kitchen. All the apparatus necessary to serve meals accompany it. The winter class "broke the ice" by serv-ing breakfasts and luncheons. Any member of the faculty will testify as to their success, for at each meal served, they were guests. Why the faculty were the favored ones is still kept quiet. The honor of serving dinners has been given to the spring class. The classes in cooking have had several important facts impressed upon them. Some of the students can now distinguish between com-starch and powdered sugar, even tho they do look alike. All of the students have been able to acquire the skill of washing and wiping their dishes without getting their towels dirty, for all spots must disappear before the class is dismissed. An original concoction, developed by the girls, has been very successful. H is known as a "Normal Pudding," and is made as follows: Take a bunch of nice, green girls, sift six times, add a few teachers, and stir well for forty minutes at a time. Add to this the well beaten contents of a few text books, seasoned with a good hard test; then add note books at t he last minute and serve on a good hot diploma. The sewing class is in charge of one of our O>Vl1 graduates. In addition to the regulru¡ work in this line, there has been added a hand-work class. H ere tatting, crocheting, knitting and millinery arc being done. Some of the older and more learned members have had a considerable runount of pleasure in draping the new dress form. A large, new mirror has just been secured, which is proving both a help and an attraction to the members of the department, and its influence is even being felt by some outside the fold. The course as now offered is living up to its aim: that of teaching the girls how to become efficient in all home activities.

40


The Juniors' History With Apologies to Truth

r;:;"!!~.,...:~1

Q UR"Asfirst day at the Winona Normal as Juniors,-can we forget it! Freshmen" would be a more appropriate name since we were

all young, fresh, and verdant. After much wandering from entrance to entrance, for it seemed to us all entrance, we finally reached and ¡ entered t he assembly room, trembling and quaking. Each Junior with his arm full of certificates, diplomas, and credits, (mostly credits), ~~~ was requested to stand before a member of a dignified faculty, and present him with a dollar and a half. At the end of si.x weeks we began to show some indications of courage, and called for a Junior class meeting. We want ed our meetings to be both interesting and inspiring, and to produce that effect, we omitted the reading of the miunt..cs and roll call. By this "unheard of step, " our names will be handed down to posterity, as the perpetrators of unsurpassed originality. We acknowledge, like all other classes, that we have had parties and meetings thruout the year and, in keeping with our primitive natw¡e, they have shown much originality. The last event was the Junior-Senior reception. This magnificent affair was given in the gymnasium of the new building, and was the most gorgeous one of the year. Thus we made history. Thus we completed the race on the field of knowledge with flying colors, tho rather reluctantly, we confess, for it had been a happy year. But we looked forward to greater conquests and further courses in regions yet unknown. 41


High School NDER the kind and able guidance of Miss Shafer, the work of the High School has steadily progressed during the past year. Instead of the usual literary society an " Outdoor Club" was organized with nature study, recreation and exercise as its aim. T he chorus, in pursuance of its work under the direction of M rs. Keats and Miss Boley, has taken up the study of Verde's operas and Shubert 's songs, besides other numerous musical compositions. At the comthe study of each composer, a program was given which included a review of pletion the life and works of the composer. The students of the High School department arc almost too young and too busy to indulge in many pleasant pastimes, but their one social event, a Hallowe'en party given in the gymnasium, was "lots of fun ." Gr owling witches with their black cats, and moaning, howling ghosts were ever ywhere, amazing and terrifying the small guests, who had snuggled for safety among the corn shocks, and as close as possible to the only light- a flickering, grinning jack-o-lan tcrn, which gave them little comfort. They were assured that the shrieking demons meant no harm, b ut that they only prowled about the earth on this part.,icular night to frighten small children , and after being bribed \vith candy and pop-corn, a few of the bravest issued forth to cat ch the bobbing and swinging apples, and to join the "fanner in the dell." T he more timid ones followed when boxes of something that looked like "cats" began to circulate about. Then followed such an all devouring investigation, that the sandman found his visit much delayed. But when his dusky fonn at length appeared, all declared the witches and ghosts clever entertainers and bade them a fond farewell. 42


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A L


"On the Mississippi" (To be sung while read)

"On the Mississippi, on the Mississippi, Where those boats go puffing low; On the Mississippi, darkies all go dippy When they hear a liille bit of ragtime melody; It. seems I bear them singing, sec them buck-and-winging To the banjos ringing, Oh my heart am clinging To the Mississippi, dear old l\Iississippi, That's where I was bom." But most "Winonormalites" were not born on the :\1ississippi; merely in a valley of that name, hence there was much reason for the school, faculty and students, voting almost "to a man" to hold the annual get-acquainted reception in a novel way by taking an excursion on the celebr ated stream. The first Saturday of the school year, September 6, 191 3 was the date chosen. The craft consisted of the Steamboat Purchase and Barge. No one needs be told that during the first week all minds and tongues were busy 'IYith nautical terminology. However, no one will ever in this world have full knowledge of the struggles of the dryland Juniors as they wrestled with "maimnast," "main-topgallant mast," "mizzen-topgallant mast," "main skysail mast," "main-topgallantstudding-sail boom," "spankcr-boom topping lift," "mizzen-truck," "sheer strake," "jib netting" and many, many more, just as bad or worse and, bless you, they are all in the dictionary and are easily found under "ship" on a certain page which any Senior could have named, but he wouldn't for he thought the struggle would be a fair disciplinary substitute for the parents left behind at a helpless distance from Winona. The weather was as if made to order and the crowd large. While mostly feminine, there were quite a number of "life-preservers" (many of whom could not swim), the number from our school being augmented by some from the public school and several from the clergy. The big boat rolled down stream three or four miles, then back thr u Winona, thru the draw, and up to Fountain City, an indescribably European little village, snuggled between the hills by the river's edge. Altho happy, the crowd was most of the time peaceable and well-behaved. It was a comparatively easy matter for the police to maintain order. Real disorder broke out but twice: once when the "life preservers" became hilarious over the attempt of a certain blindfolded clerical member to do a pirouette about an umbrella and then advance stemward without falling "stemward." The big boat rocked its sides with laughter and soon there was new excitement, for Master Eugene Maxwell was discovered corralled on the port side near the bow of the boat where he had been bribed to show a few of the newer dance steps. Later it was learned upon good authority that lhi.s corrupting work was the act of a Senior who had last term been conditioned in S-1 :M- t. As the party disembarked, Photographer Holzinger sought to improve his reputation by taking a good picture. T he attempt was a signal failure. The eating of every edible in Fountain Cily, a delightful return trip accompanied by a few mosquitos that had been picked up en rout e, the arrival in Winona sound and safe, happy and weary, tells the remainder of the story. As the returned excursionists set foot upon the dock that e\¡ening, there was experienced for the first time by many the feeling that Winona is "home."

V. L. M.

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The Pension Party

I

N the fall of 1913, the Senior class was anxious to have some sort of fun, and for the purpose of conjuring this fun they elected a s:>cial committee. This committee was at its "wits end" to find an idea for a party, until President Maxwell told the school one morning of the pensions for teachers. It was then that a "pension party" was thot of, and, in the Normal's big gymnasium, the Seniors gathered one Saturday evening in November. It was a sight for the gods-that gym with all those Seniors in it! They were all "dressed in garb of twenty hundred, as they'd look when granted pensions." There was a goodly- no, rather a badly-number of old maids of various kinds: some white haired, motherly looking old souls; some who had not as yet given up all hope, and were still trying to look young and coquettish-one in particular, do you remember which one, Dorothy? and some who had fallen until they felt themselves man's equal and were strong in asserting themselves. Then, too, Gaby Deslys's successor was there, dressed in Parisian costume, and flaunting feathers and a "chic" little cane. The entertainment for the evening was opened by a t hrilling selection given by the noted "Albroic Band." The band was much in evidence thruout the evenin g and helped a great deal in making the party the screeching success that it was. The deft (also deafening) way in which the tin pails were handled, the heart rendering manner in which the various combs were used, and the highly gynmastic method used in leading the band, all excited the wonder and hilarious admiration of the guests. The two big events of the evening were realized in a clever play presented by one of ~1iss Theisen's reading classes, and several readings by Miss Theisen herself. The rest of the evening was spent in the usual Normal way :- playing games, "Grand March"ing, "Virginia Reel"ing, talking of good old Normal times, and eating. After the party was over, everyone declared it had been a brilliant success, and all who attended it will remember it as one of the events of their Normal life.

Impression of the Y. W. C. A. Carnival

W

ELL, it wasn't bad, "considering." You may judge for yourself what is meant by "considering." But when four of us began to prowl around in the arena, we certainly had to hold on to our pocket-books. We couldn't move unless we spent a penny or more, and we never knew before that Normalites were so mercenary. Judging by this, next year's pupils will be a bunch of hard fisted old misers. As for talent, we arc forced to admit the whole affair was a scream, -whether of delight or agony, we refuse to commit ourselves. Our finish came at the fortune teller's booth. vVe don't know who the good looking "seeress" was, but we understand she was an instructor (much to our sorrow), and we are sorry for the way we tried to flirt with her and hers. Oh, we mustn't forget the band. John Philip Sousa would have turned green with envy had he seen the band. We don't know what he'd have done if he had heard them. One of our number, (sad to relate), was captivated, or fascinated, or something equally as bad, by the leader and we are still wondering whether it was the music that did it. The movies were "reeley" good, and Earl Kirschtein must be a favored swain from the number of times they showed his picture. To sum it all up, it was a veritable "Eighth Wonder of the World." It certainly is too bad that they will all(?) become school teachers with so much talent in the amusement line. We certainly think that many of them are missing their calling by a city block. So take heed, fair Nonnalites- wc have seen several classes come in and go out; and take it from us you're wasting your time teaching school. Hoping we have hurt no feelings and wishing for your sakes, as well as ours, that there were fewer Mondays and more Fridays, we remain, OuTSIDERS.

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CALENDAR 1913-14

SEPTE:.IBER 1-Tea to Faculty at Kormal School. 6- ¡ovel River Trip of the whole school entitled, "Get Acquainted Ride." I 3-Senior and Junior Kindergarten Picnic across the Lake. 19-Faversham in "Julius Caesar," was enjoyed by the ~ormal students, from the gallery. 22-~Ir. Gaylord much to our di~n1ay (?) t.alked at length about "~1an." 26-Faculty Reception to students at )..lorey Hall. OCTOBER 6-1\Iiss Samson again impressed upon us the "need of physical education." I 1-Lecture Recital for students by Miss Barrows at Morey Hall.

13-Dr. Dickerson, believing much as President Wilson, recited the "Kew Democracy." 16-Irma Whomcs presented the "Victrola" left by the class of " 1913." I 7-Lecture-"Dawn of Plenty" by Frank Stockton at Normal School. 20-Mr. Mangun talked on, "The Teacher," professional and non-professional. Lccturc-"The Boy," by Bishop Hughes of California. 29-Concert-Oratorio Artists of Chicago. 3 I -Miss Richards gave a Hallowe'en Parly in the gymnasium. NOVE:\1BER 17-:Miss Richards gave a splendid review of the "Comedy of Errors." 21 -Seniors entertained themselves at a "Pension Party," in the gymnasium. 24-Graduation Dinner at Morey Hall. Mr. Stockton talked on, "Experimental Work in Arithmetic." Ben Greet Players in "A Comedy of Errors." 26-30-Thanksgiving vacation. DECEMBER 5-Junior Kindergartners played they had a party. 8-Mr. Munson divided all the people into classes A, B, C, D, E, and F. 16-Lccturc-Dr. Wiley, "Pure Food Advocate." J 7-Christmas Party for students at Morey Hall. "The Birds' Christmas Carol," reading by Miss Slifer with tableaux by Normal Girls. 18- At eleven o'clock-Christmas vacation began. 46


JANUARY 1-Happy New Year! 5-Nonnalites have returned. 13-Mr. J. H. Sandt's birthday (age kept secret). 14-Mr. Sandt shows us as nearly as he can what a steam engine should resemble. Mr. Moore revealed his boosting ability by launching a "fresh" Literary Society. 16-"Tea," at Morey Hall. EARL KIRSCHSTEIN, soloist. No Sandwich Sale-Many "lean and hungry looks," were visible at recess time. FEBRUARY 2-Mr. Polley talked on the conservation of Natural Gas-(Mostly Hot Air). 9-Mr. Holzinger told us to use our senses so that our personality would develop. J0-:\1r. Gaylord very religiously expmined the fatal step in our career-namely, expression tests. I I -The public speaking class rendered a very unique "Lincolnian," program, assisted by Dr. Dickerson's bits of oratory. 13-The ventilating system was put out of order so that the expression tests could be written without any interruption from the fans. ( ?) 16-Earl Kirschstein read from "Julius Caesar." 18--"Tea" at Morey Hall. MRs. KEATS, CARLTON NEVILLE--soloists. 23-Mr. Abrams showed us the necessity of keeping a stiff upper lip, in his talk entitled, "Backing." MARCH 6-Dinner to graduates at Morey Hall. 7- 16-Spring vacation. 17-St. Patrick's Day.-All is again lively at the Normal. Miss C. V. Smith, always ready to help a good cause along, allowed us to sing, "Wearing of the Green." 20-Mr. Seymour gave an interesting talk on the "Life of Queen Elizabeth." 23-Field glasses were admirably advertised by President Maxwell at five dollars a pair. Miss Campbell ably advertised the merits of Columbia U. 24-Men were excused and Miss Richards talked to the girls. 26-Mr. Moore started a fire under his mental boiler to manufacture more steam for the Annual. Mr. Polley fixed the chairs in the History Room. 27-Mr. Mangun selfishly ate cough d1¡ops during his first hour class. 30-1Iiss Abbot took us to fairy-land to visit "Rumpty-Dudget." APRIL )-"April Fool." 2-Men! Yes, a carload from Beloit, vVis.-Clcver entertainers! 3-A Bulletin Board '-first improvement of the year to Miss Samson's office. 6-Miss Slifer read Wm. B. Yeats' play, entitled, "Cathleen ni Houlihan." 9-Students very much lamented the fact that Harris Grow Pett was confined to his bed with the mumps. I 3-Mr. Maxwell talked on and on as an excuse for a regular Monday morning talk. 14-The Advisory Council met and pondered on several deep questions. (?) We were all urged to give the city a clean-up and paint-up. 15-Miss Smith during chorus practise, "Now my dear, lovelypeoplc- prettysoon there won't be any more Sandy or Hunkey and these happy days will be a trail of smoke and a little blue sky." 17-Typical extemporaneous talks were given by Mr. Holzinger on "Trees" and Mr. Munson on "Birds." Second improvement of the month was made in the physical \.raining department, namely, a "1tiail Box." 20-Mr. :\Ioore succeeded in convincing us that "War is Hell." 22-0pinions of the faculty were vemured on, "How to increase the number of boys in ow¡ school." 47


4.8


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T

HROUGHOUT the entire year, the busy students of the Winona Normal School participate in some form of physical training. During the fall and spring terms, the bluffs offer a splendid goal to the Seniors for hikes and long walks. In addition to this, some take an interest in tennis and hockey. Anyone passing the courts as early as five-thirty on a fine spring morning, will find a number of girls enjoying the sport. In the autumn of 1913, field hockey, under the direction of Miss Samson, was introduced into the gymnastic curriculum for the first time. "Well does hockey deserve its present popularity and success, for it is a splendid, scientific and healthful game and, furthermore, from the different work required on different parts of the field, it is adapted to all types of players, increasing in them all mental alertness, vigor and endurance; those necessary factors in a successful life." In the winter months, several forms of indoor exercises present themselves. While the guileless Juniors are required to take calisthenics and folk dancing, the noble Seniors choose their electives from gymnastic dancing, swimming, and basket ball. Thus are the students initiated into the values and pleasures of physical t raining and development.

Basket Ball

T

HOUGH the popular indoor basket ball has been played for years in the 1'\ormal School, it has never had a more triumphant career than ll%~~~ll=5>=9;jl it has this year. The Junior girls began practice early in the season, the object being rather to have as many girls as possible play basket ball than to develop a Junior first team. Among the Seniors two teams were formed, the "Kellies" and the "Midrues." Although the "Middies" did splendid work, the "Kellies" succeeded in winning the Normal championship. To Miss Samson, the coach, i.s due much credit for the enthusiasm and effort with which the teams struggled for the championship. Thru her was realized the truth that final success is due to team work and co-operation and not to individual starring. "Midrues" ''Kellies'' Louetta Albro Helen Bacon Gladys Brugger Ana Benson Louis Murphy Edna Brugger Esther Huston Keturah Olson Alice Isaacs Edna Prieve Helen Jeans Veronica Rush Femicha Klinefelter Borghild Sand Cordelia Koelmel Clara Schwirtz Marion Robb Ella Seidlitz

Championship Games February 25 February 27 March 4

Middies 10 Middies 19 lVIiddies 9

50

Kcllies 11 Kcllics 27 Kellies 11



52



Y. W. C. A. CABINET

Y. W. C. A. PRESIDENT . VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURER Chairman of Finance Committee Chairman of Devotional Committee . Chairman of Bible Study Committee Chairman of Missionary Committee . Chairman of Social Service Committee Chairman of Social Committee Chairman of Music Committee . Chairman of Association News Committee Chairman of Art Committee Chairman of Advertising Committee Chairman of Rest Room Committee

54

ALICE BRILL MAUD BERRY FRANCES GREEN ELEANOR HAI N LuciLLE ScHRAUT HELEN BATES

]EAN IRVINE ELIZABETH COAN ELLA HYMAN BORGHILD SAND RuTH GLUDT JuLIA PLUMMER HARRIET STAHMANN MAUD BARRICK LILLIAN ANDERSON


W. C. A. has been unusually active during the past year. The T HEY. first step in the year's success was a membership campaign waged between t he Blondes and Brunettes. This was followed by a beautiful and impressive initiation service and a banquet. Early in the year, two Bible Study classes were organized. This, however, was but the beginning of a larger and fuller activity. Miss Coan, a Student Volunteer, returning from the Seventh Inter-national Convention, held at Kansas City, December 30- January 4, brought with her an abundance of inspiration. An impetus was thus given to Mission Study. The first move in this direction was a mission tea, given at Morey Hall. A plea was made for the organization of Mission Study classes, and was responded to most heartily. As aresult, four Mission Study classes were organized, with an enrollment of seventy-five members. The subjects studied were Turkey, India, China, and the New Era in Asia. Two of the largest entertainments given by t heY. W. C. A. were the Carnival and the Pageant. The special features at the Carnival were "stunts" by members of the Faculty. a minstrel show, a moving picture show, which consisted of pictures of students and Faculty members "then and now," and a crystal gazer from India, acting thru the medium of Miss Slifer. The pageant used was that published by the National Association. I t represented South America, Japan, India and China. The scenery, costumes and music, characteristic of the different countries, added greatly to the charm of the whole. The organization has felt that it would be helpful to become a part of t he National Association, and plans arc now under way for affiliation. The Y. W. C. A. has sent delegates to two conventions: =-.!iss Coan and Miss Bezanson to the State Student Volunteer Convention at Hamlin, and Miss Hain to Geneva. They are planning to send five delegates to Geneva this summer. The weekly sandwich sale was one of the means taken toward the raising of the Geneva fund. The rest room, maintained by the Y. W. C. A. for the benefit of the students, has been made more attractive by the addition of new pillows and the beginning of a library. The Wednesday night devotional meetings have been a source of inspiration and help to the entire student body. The Christmas meeting stands out as one of the most impressive and beautiful meetings of the year. The Lyric quartette gave a Christmas cycle, "The Night of the Star" and Miss Slifer read "The Christ Child" by Elizabeth Harrison. The passion week service was no less beautiful, and consisted of two numbers of the Lyric quartette, one nwnber, Phelp's "0, :Yioming Land" by Miss Potter and Mr. Kirschstcin, and a reading by :.Iiss Slifer, "The Three Weavers" by Annie F. Johnston. The special features at the other meetings were a solo by Carlton Neville, two very interesting talks, one on China by Mrs. Gaylord, and one on the "Taj Mahal'' by Miss Sprague, and a program by the Mendelssohn girls. The success of the year has been due to the interest and co-operation of the Faculty and students.

55


The C. G. C. this short history, the C. G. C. wishes to make its debut in the pages of the "Wenonah" of 1914. The Club was orgaruzcd in 1911 for the purpose of bringing the studcnls into closer social intercourse, and for educational and religious purposes as well; and it has continued to follow the example set by its founders. Problems of school loyalty have been brought before the girls with a resulting endeavor on the part of each to "put her best foot forward." Papers on various subjects have been discussed , books have been reviewed and commented upon, and numerous musical numbers have been rendered. The social affairs of the C. G. C. have been extensive and extremely enjoyable. Costume parties have predominated, where each newcomer added to the whirl of merriment. The Club's membership has steadily increased, and at the present time numbers exactly eighty. Thus docs the C. G. C. make its entry into the " Annals of the Ages," and hopes to find therein a cordial greeting which it will gladly reciprocate. OFFICERS Presiden t Vice-President Secretary Treasurer .

OLIVE

M.

B ERRY

HELEN BAR LOW LILLIAN GRAMS Lou i SE TRACY

56


The Writers' Club The Writers' Club is made up of nine active members: MR. STOCKTON l\IRs. STOCKTOK MR. MuNSON 'Vr.r. BAKER

LELIA MYERS :.IARION RoBB ELORJNE FRL' ETEL FREDERICK BoRNCA!IIP IRMA WHO~IES

Four a bsent members: KI NG R. l\ I cDoNALD L UC I LLE GROFF

MRS. C HORPENNIKG RUTII CHORPENNING

And one honorary member: l\ IRs. K ING

R.

i\IcDoNALD

The Clu b regrets that l\Ir. :.Iunson is not represented m the club picture. was not yet a member when t he picture was taken.

Call of the Deep Hush! Hush! Hush! 'Twas the waves up from the sea. Oh Hush! For lo! ten thousand souls Lie buried asleep in me. Hush! Hush! Ilush! And the waYcs curled on the sands, While on the shore I lay and dreamed And the waves broke over my hands ; And the waves did cover me, lying there, And the waYcs broke over my soul. Then I longed to sleep In the quiet deep, And rest where the breakers roll. Hush! Hush ! Hush! 'Twas the waves up from the sea. 0 Hush ! For lo! ten thousand souls Lie buried asleep in me. I. M. W. 57

He


Triolette

Gentian

\Yhcn the sun is in the west, Then the world doth quiet pause, Bathing in the opalled rest When the sun is in the west. Then it huJTies on its quest, Spw-recl by its eternal laws\iVhen the sun is in the west, Then the world doth quiet pause.

Gentian, thou fair flm,¡er, And frail as thou art fair, Why, 'neath cloud so dom¡, Gentian, thou fair flower? When the sun illumes thy bower, Gentian, thou fair flower, Thy smile dispels my care, Gentian, thou fair flower, And frail as thou art fair.

E. E. F.

W. II. M.

Autumn

Across the Lake

(Chain verse)

The lake is still, The sun is down; And o'er the hill The shadows frown. The shadows fro"n On gloomy lake; On trees so brown; On reeds that . quake. On reeds that quake The air is chill. The leaves all shake,Thc lake is still.

Across the lake the cliffs are old, And \\;nding paths to summits make The grandeur of the Yiew unfold, Across the lake. The lawns, the dells, the crags that wake To music of the songster boldSuch blessing we can all partake. Where shades of silver birches hold The coolness which the branches make, Ah, there is treasure all untold Across the lake.

E. M . S.

M.R.

The Change He peeped with childish, longing eyes Thru the bars of the garden gate At the world outside, So fair and wide, \\'here hovered luring Fate. Kow as a man, he would retmn From the world where Fate called; But the stubborn bars of childhood's gate Yield not at his prayer. I t is too late; And the garden by Time is walled.

W. F. B.

58


Villanelle of the Reading Child The child her treasured toys forsook, Asswned a wise and patient face, And turned the pages of a book. 1\'ithin the sheltered window-nook, IY'hich was her chosen pla~;ng-placc, The child her treasured toys forsook. As guileless as a dreaming brook. She bent her dainty, flm,;ng grace, And turned the pages of a book. What was it that she underlook' Why was it that for any space The child her treasured toys forsook' With rapt, unfathomable look, She glimpsed the secrets of the race, And turned the pages of a book. And so with quaint and darling crook Of head and bodY dear to trace, The child her treasured toys forsook, And turned the pages of a bOok. S9

J.

L. S.


-

-

--------~

Mendelssohn Club 1914

First Soprano M ISS Ar.ICE l\1. BRuNER MISS GLADYS HUESTIS Miss CoRDELIA KoELl\JEL M ISS IRENE MASON l\IIss GLADYS PuTSCH l\liss ).!At:D PoTTER . l\llss HANNAH TILL:\IA::-< Second Soprano l\IIss SYLVIA A~DERso:-; l\1ISS ALICE BRILL . .MISS TESSIE BROOKS 1\Irss GEKEVIEVE LAWRENCE Mrss ETHEL SIMPSON M ISS LORETTA WESSEL First Alto M ISS HELEN BATES Miss ETHEL BouQUET Mrss AuDREY M rTCHEI.L M1ss J osm SuTHERLAND MISS FLORE::-iCE S:\IITH M iss LouiSE TRACY Second Alto MISS HARRIETTE CHARLES l\1ISS ELORI!\E FRt:ETEL MISS Rt:TH GLUDT Miss Eowi!\A O'BRIE:-< . MISS EVALYN RODGE MISS BORGHILD SAND

Minneapolis Minneapolis Wabasha Spring Valley Winona Winona Winona :VIii an St. Paul Winona Yankton, South Dakota Flandreau, South Dakota Little Falls Lake City St. Paul . E ly Chatfield Winton Winona St. Paul Winona Lake City Winona Ruthton Willmar 60


l\IISS CAROLINE

v. SMITH

She moves among us in her quiet way With cheerful mein, and, as we come and go We hardly realize, we cannot know How much she docs for us from day to day. How much we honor her we cannot say, Nor rightly all our deepest. feelings show; But, patient and serene she helps us grow, And all Winona doth its homage pay. A tribute now to her who is our friend; A song of love to one who fills with light The darkest shadows of the path we wend. Some day when we have gained a clearer sight We may perhaps more justly sing her praise; But now great joy be hers, and length of days.

61


Normal Chorus The school year has been unusually active in a musical way. The four musical organizations of the school, consisting of the Normal School Chorus, St. Cecilia Society, Mendelssohn Club and Lyric Quartette have assisted at all of the musical and social functions of the year. The St. Cecilia Society, including two hundred women's voices, did some especially fine work in "Lift Thine Eyes" at the time Mendelssohn's "Elijah" was given . The Lyric Quartette, consisting of Miss Potter, soprano, Miss Sand, alto, Mr. Raymond, tenor, and Mr. Kirschstein, bass, has done some effective work at chapel time. The culminating musical event of the year was the presentation of Mendelssohn's " Elijah." The event was made all the more remarkable because the oratorio was given almost entirely by members of the school, the important solo parts being sung by members of t he chorus. The orat orio was given as a Vesper Service, and the spirit of the hour, and the beautiful music will always be remembered with pleasure. The student body appreciates the assistance which members of the Y. M. C. A. quartette, Master Carlton Neville, Miss Alvina Boley, Emmett Raymond and Miss H elen Kirschstein gave in t he various musical features of t he year. At the commencement exercises, to be held June 5, it is proposed to give selections from Grieg.

Lyric Quartette

E)'!:.VIETT RAYMOND

Tenor MAUD POTTE R

BoRGHILD SAND

Soprano

Alto

EARL KIR SCHSTE I ),T

Bass 62


Forum Literary Society G the winter tenn, a group of students, feeling the need that existed for a more intimate social and intellectual intercourse, and, believing that that intercourse could only be promoted by mutual participation in public literary work, founded, under the able leadership of Mr. Moore, the Forum Literary Society. This society has for its avowed purpose the encouragement of public literary work among the Normal students; and as such, it is predestined to exert for the promotion of public literary work in the school. The meetings are held every two weeks. At the first regular meeting the following officers were elected: President Vice-president Secretary Treasurer Critic

. HANNAH TILL),IAN ELSIE FEATHERSTONE . OLIVE M. BERRY ADA KERNKAMP CLARA ScHWIRTZ HAZEL wOODRUFF ALICE I SAACS ELII!I RA FOSTER ELLA KERNKAMP IRMA BREWSTER GEO. W. SCHlJOKE

Program Commit tee

1

Parliamentary Censor Sergeant-at-arms Reporter

Several enjoyable programs have been given, among which was a Burns Program, which included a biography of Bums and several of his poems. Another program was made most interesting by each member responding to roll call with an original stanza or poem. Although still in its infancy, the Forum is progressing rapidly, and by next year expects to be one of the stable literary organizations of the school. 63


The Tri Sig ma Literary Society

T

HE Tri Sigma Literary Society has endeavored, this year, to ca,rry on the work begun in 1912. At the opening of the fall term, the eight Senior members invited ~~~IJ~~ twenty-five Juniors to join the society to aid in carrying on its social and intellectual culture. Miss Slifer, the teacher of reading and public ~~~~i~i speaking, at the invitation of the society, became t he faculty advisor. ~ H er deep interest and advice have been greatly appreciated by the members. Beside the informal programs, given at the regular meetings, the society presented three open meetings, one each term. The following is representative of the monthly programs. l\Iarch 30, 1914. Roll Call . Quotations from "Hamlet!' Mexican :M usic JosiE SUTHERLAND The Situation in Mexico LuCINDA GoLTz Vocal Solo . . Rt:Tll KELLETT Mexican Story . JESSIE BRADLEY OPFICERS President . Vice-President Secretary . Treasurer

MoLLIE MoLITER VIRGINIA MAcELROY HARRIETTE CHARLES RcTH KELLETT

The following are the Senior Members: RUTH KELLETT ltJESS BRADLEY A CoRA Sn.roNs A ALICE BRILL A HARRIETTE CHARLES A 64

Luc iNDA GoLTz A ELEANOR HAIX A MAUDE BERRY A SYLVIA AKDERSON A BORGHJLD SAND 1~


The Handicraft Guild

I

N January 1914, a group of seven people met in the manual training room for the purpose of furthering the art of clay modelling. Lions and copies of ''The Reading Child'' were studied and modelled during ihe winter term. Different facial features were also studied and made in clay. After spring vacation, the club met again and definitely organized for the first time. The field of work was widened, basketry, weaving and metal work being added. Several new members were admitted, raising the membership to twenty-two. The name, "Handicraft Guild," was selected in preference to the old nickname "Mud Hens." A president, Olive Keith, and secretary-treasw¡er, Leila Homstad, were chosen and the work of the organization was well started on its new career.

65


HE three plates illustrating basketry, clay modelling, and weaving arc examples of T the three lines of work done in the Elementary Handwork Course. All the fundamental processes involved in the usc of clay, raffia, reed, yarn, and cord arc covered in the first eight weeks of the Course. This leaves four 'IYeeks of elective workand the student chooses forty hours of work in some one or t\YO lines. Each one usually plans and makes something which is practical and has a corr.mercial besides an educational value.


Cinderella LTHO the serious business of the Winona Normal School is the turning out of graduates, the Normal School is bound to become famous for other reasons beside that of the good quality of its graduates. At present it is engaged in a subsidiary business which bids well t o take as favorably among the boys (at least the little boys), as does its girl graduates. That business is the manufactw¡e of automobiles. It had been reported that Mr. Sandt, supervisor of the manual training department, would compete with Mr. Ford in the manufacture of inexpensive but serviceable autos; but the rumor seemed unfounded until one day we were all surprised by the merry "chug-chug" of )v!r. Sandt's genius transformed into a tangible article. How the boys did swarm about it! How narrowly t he chauffuer missed leaving a gash in the dense circle of eager youths that surrounded it! Cinderella had made her initial appearance from out the dark comers of the basement. Her monstrous big sisters, Peerless and Packard, may look with disdain upon the little beauty, but happy-faced princes from the four corners of the city envy their companion who has touched the hem of Cinderella's hood. The lucky prince is Harold Sandt, who, \vith the magic wand of industry, enhanced in value by his father's knowledge, has transformed cold steel and uncouth lwnber into a mechanism of beauty and service. All the work of getting the car into running order was done by Harold Sandt and his father in the manual training shop at the school, \vith the exception of some lathe work which had to be done down town, since the department does not have a lathe for metal work. The metal parts of Cinderella, undoubtedly the first miniature auto successfully built in this city, were constructed almost entirely from the parts of two old bicycles. It is the first huge result of Mr. Sandt's efforts in emphasizing construction along mechanical lines, instead of merely confining the work in the manual training department to the making of articles out of wood. In his attempts to emphasize the value of instruction in metal-work, Mr. Sandt by no means depreciates the value of wood work but simply points out its limitations as a medium. Cinderella is a model of simplicity and is proof of the fact so often reiterated by Mr. Sandt, that metal-work can easily be adapted to school shop conditions. 67



Geography Club

T

HE Geography Club, organized at the beginning of the winter term, consists of the teachers of the elementary school and advanced students who are especially interested in geography. This club has spent some very profitable hours under the instruction of Mr. Polley, our geography cnthusi1l;st, who has shown a keen interest in the work being done in the elementary school, and a strong desire to be helpful. The outline of work covered by the club is as follows: Geography I. II. III. IV.

v.

VI.

WINTER TERM of Winona Region Origin of the Earth. Geology of Region. Physiography of Region. Soil. Wheat -Intensive Study. 1. The Grain from Commercial Standpoint. 2. An Economic Factor. 3. The Winona Mill. The Fibre Industry.

SPRING TERM Regional Study of South America.

THE

END OF THIS 69


Class Play "Mice and Men" M. L. Ryley. "The best laid plans of Mice and Men gang ah agley"- BuRNS. PLACE-Old Hampstead. Tti\IE- About 1786. CHARACTERS Mark Embury (scholar and philosopher) . GEO. SCHMOKE Roger Goodlake (his friend and n eighbor ) . jOHN KATOWSKI Captain Geo. Lovell (his nephew) EARL KIRSCHSTEIN Sir Harry Trimblestone (a London beau) CARLTON ALGER jAMES ROBB Kit Bamigcr (a fiddler) Peter (Embury's servant) HARRIS PETT ]ESSIE BRAD LEY Joanna Goodlake (wife of Goodlake) Mrs. Deborah (Embury's housekeeper) HARRIETTE CHARLES Peggy ("Little Britain") . L0 !1ISE TRACY Matron (of Foundling Hospital) EDWINA O'BRIEN Beadle (of Foundling Hospital) ARCHIBALD PoLLEY Molly (a kitchen maid) ANA BENSON Orphans (of the Foundling Hospi tal) HELEN KEMP, ALICE IsAACS, AnA KERNKA:\IP, lvEL CLOuGH, LILLIAN ANDERSON, RuTH GLUDT, IRENE Mt:IR, MARIE C Ro ccH, NIARION RoBB. 70


The Staff .:'IIARIO:\ ROBB

LII.L!AX A:-<DERSO:\

l-fELE:-1 BATES

Literary

Organizations

Senior Kindergartners

llELEN BIRDLEOO~GR L~CI:-IDA GoLTZ

Ragout

Social

High

School

ANA BENSON

Junior Kindergartners LELIA MEYERS

MARIA:-< vVooo

Athletics VrGERTA RAS~IUSSE:-<

Jr.

Bus.

HARRI ET STAH~IA !\:-1

:\!gr.

Art

SARAH F L EMING

BORGHIL.D SAND

!SABELLA MARZOLF

ELORI XE FRUETEL

ADA

] uniors

Business Manager

Editor-in-chief

Assistant Editor

Asst.

w.

FLOYI) ~lOORE IRMA \\"HO~IES

Bus.

Mgr.

Faculty Critic

.

DOROTHY KECKEFOT H

U NDERHlLL

}

. Artists CO~TRIBUTORS

A LICE I sAACS, G t.ADYS BRUGGI':R, EDNA BRUGGt>R, ~IYRTLE AR~tSTRO:-JG, V. L. l\IANGUN, I R:-.JA WHO)I ES,

J.

Wn.LI E BAKER, W. H. MuNSON, L. S-rocKTO:-< , OLIVE KEITH, GEORGE ScHMOKE, IxA L. BEv£R, LEILA H OMSTAD, FRANCES FAWCETT, ELEA:\01{ liAIX, MARTHA BLACK)IORE, EVALV:-1 THOMPSON, OL!Vt,; BERRY , RUTH KELLETT,

HELEJ\' }EAKS, LOIS MURPHY, ~IARIE CROUCH,

HELEN KEMP, LILLIE E:-<GJI, ETHEL ~IXOX .

7l

E. M.

STOCKTON,


LITERARY Our President As I'm about to pen my thoughts, and these With those of others, too-words scarce define Our love for him, our president, so kind And thoughtful. Always with t he right he sees. Our interests, yea ambitions, are the keys In which, if notes discordant there he find, By high ideals he makes t hem seem consigned, And music sweet peals forth to you and me. Our school-days here arc numbered? Nay, not so, But rather say the seed which he hath sown Hath fall'n on fallow ground, and seeks release Amid the fields, that others, too, may know And see the harvest which this seed hath grown. As to his paths, we have no wish but peace. E. E. T.

- +¡- ¡

A Playette Scene:-Room 23, 11orey l lall. Time :-Friday evening. Characters:-Eleanor , Leila, Lou, .:\Iat, .:\Iyrt, Fcm, Irene, Ded, Lena, 1liss Richards. (The girls are enjoying a candy party and, as the fire refuses to properly conduct itself, they find it necessary to prolong their gathering after the prescribed retiring how-.) Eleanor (looking out): Giggers! The black kimona is at the other end of the west conidor. Leila: Girls! Be quiet, you know I'm responsible. (In a second t he room is in dead silence. Mat gets under one bed, Ada under the other, Ded under the table and two girls in each wardrobe The others find places on the couches.) Eleanor: l\Iat your foot is sticking out. :\Iyrt: Dcd, your arm shows. Mat: I wish the side of that cover were dow11. Oh! I'm going to get out of here. Where arc you Lil ' Lil : Sh-h. I'm not supposed to let her know I'm here. My landlady'llMat: Oh, these landladies arc in league withl\Iyrt: Don't say it, l\Iat. Mat : Well they are. Talking about "-iping up floors with damask towels and keeping lights on all night and Irene : If you want to make a stump speech, subject " Landladies," get out in front of the building. Remember we're in 23. Eleanor: We've been quiet long enough. I don't believe she's coming at all. (She looks out.) Nothing stirring. I'm going ou t under the light and scrape this pan. (She takes the pan and goes out, leaving the door open.) Ded: I'm all curled to pieces. M yrt: That doesn't make any difference. \Vhat about our waste basket? 72


Ded: Why-er-I-its all smashed. I didn't know it was there. Eleanor (hurrying into the room): It, appeared right out of the alcove. (She disappears into the wardrobe and silence reigns supreme. A gent le knock, and a form appears in the doonvay. There is no sound. Presently the form speaks.) Miss Richards: Girls, are you going to bed tonight? (No answer) Miss R. : Girls! (Fern snickers) Miss R.: Girls are you going to answer me ? (Everybody snickers and just at that moment Lena runs into the room with some matches, and bumps into Miss Richards.) Lena: Oh! Miss R.: I'm trying to talk to the girls and they won't answer me. What shall I do? Lena: Shakc'em. Miss R.: I think I'll have to see who they are. (She goes to the first couch and turns the search light on them.) 'Why, just look at all these sleeping beauties, and they cannot say a word. Here's Hazel and Amelia and-, I don't know who this is with h er face covered. (She goes to the other couch.) And here are some morc,-:VIyrtle, Hazel and Leila. Now I'll have to get some out of the wardrobes. Why, Otelia and Benelta. (She docs not find Lou who is standing behind the clothes). And in this one Irene and Fern. Now I guess I've got you all. Fern (goes to the table and picks up the pan): Won't you have some candy, Miss Richards? Miss R.: No, t hank you. Will you-? Fern: But it's good, Miss Richards ; take some. Miss R. (more sternly): No, it's too late. Will you go to bed now? All: Yes, ma'am. (Miss Richards goes when they have aU(?) left for their rooms.) Mat (from under the bed) : She sure missed her guess when she thot she had rounded up everybody. (A weak voice is heard at the door.) Fern: I want some candy. Leila: Me too. Eleanor: Where's my share? (Soon they arc aU back in the room eating candy, when again a familiar form appears in the doonvay and a light flashes into the room.) l\Iiss R. (sternly) : Girls! ! (They file out one by one.) Fern: Good-night, Miss Richards, This is 23 right. Miss R.: Myrtle, are they coming back again? Myrt: Why, I don't know. Miss R. : Are they coming back ? MyrL: Why, I can't tell you, Miss Richards. Miss R. : Is this your room? Myrt: Y cs'm. (She is t aking the cross-examination beautifully.) Miss R . : Well, arc they coming back? Myrt: Oh, I see-you mean that I shouldn't let them. Well, I won't. Miss R.: You won't let them come back tonight? l\fyrt: 1\o'm. Miss R.: All right. (She leaves taking with her the dignity of the room, and soon the house is lost in deep slumber.) .M. B.

73



A Night at the Lodge (Apol01,>ies to Miss S-)

:\Iiss Richards took dmm the receiver. Miss Richards- "Yes, we have two vacancies at the Hall and would be glad to welcome another girl.-You say she is nervous but determined to go on with her work?Indccd it is a beautiful place in the spring.-Thc air would be exceedingly good for her.You want a quicL place and wholesome food?- The Hall would hardly be the place but the Lodge is very quiet.-Yes, the girls arc so thoughtful over t here, and keep very early hours.-Shc hates ragtime?-No, nothing but classical music.- Tomorrow at 7 :30.-Good-bye." The next morning a cab drew up before :\1orey Hall, and a stout, dark-haired, wholesome girl, who looked anything but nervous, alighted. From behind window curtains and cracks of the door, the Lodge girls saw three suit cases and two band boxes pul ofi by the cabman. "Wonder if those contain all her wordly belongings. Why didn't she take a trunk?" She was brought in and introduced. 1Iental and verbal comments were passed on the future in-mate of cell No.9, and there were many conjectures concerning Maude's opinion of her new room-mate. "I had no idea so many girls lived here in this little house. Why, what is that?" she exclaimed. "I understood you didn't, play any ragtime here. I just hate it. It gets on my nerves so." A number of girls came in to meet the New Girl just then, and Bert answered, "\Vc're sorry. Sometimes it keeps us livened up. You sec the ;\Lorey Hall girls come over here when they want "to hesitate." Naturally, it doesn't bother us at all." "Let us help you unpack your suit cases." "Perhaps you'd like to go to bed, lclme- " "The bell. Somebody, please go to the door. The b>irls down stairs are so slow." "It must be the express man with my trunks. Where can we put them? Show him up here," the New Girl called over the banister. The girls looked at one another, and the exclamation burslfrom them all: "Trunks! How many have you?" "Only three, but I am sure I shall have to send home for more of my clothes. Soon everyone was preparing for the night. The last white-robed, thirsty straggler had drunk at the fountain ncar the bottom of the stairs; the last door closed; and the last windows raised with a squeak; then all was quiet. Suddenly, from out the awful stillness ct;es of "Help! help! ! help! ! A man! Oh! help~" awakened the l'\ew Girl. "}.laude, l\lauck, what \Yas that? Listen! Hear that yell? There.""Ilelp! Ilelp- A man~!" The whole house was aroused. The girls rushed down the front stairs to confront Jess standing in the hall, staring wildly. "Jess, J ess, why, what is it ?" the girls asked frantically. "Sh! sh! Lois-saw-a-man-at, at-her-window!" she gasped. "What!" came a chorus from the landing. "Somebody tw-n on the lights." As the door of the living room was thrown open, a ten¡or stricken voice from behind the preceptress' ctoor called, "Hazel, Hazel, turn on the lights." Before the words were out, the lights were on. An'y C.'lme tearing down the hall followed by Benetta and i\Iollie crying, "Who said a man? Let's sec him." "Oh' Ben, Ben. "\Yhcre's Ben?" Lois cried, wringing her hands. "Lois, what is the matter? There wasn't-" "Girls, it must haYc been a nightmare. i\Iaybc-." "Oh, 1liss T- , :\!iss T-, come quick. The New Girl has hysterics." "Hurry!" "Let's go back to bed. Where's Loretta?" i5


"Ben and Esther, where have you been? You look as tho you'd seen a ghost." "In the room. Girls, the screen has been pulled off the window-" "Sh! sh! Listen. Arc you sure:" "Call the police. Why didn't we do it before." "Hello, hello. Central, give me the police station please." There was a hub-bub. Consternation rei~:,>ncd. Everyone was talking at the same time. "How do you spose-" "No wonder she awoke- ." "I'd like to see the man. I'd-." "What time is it?" "Two o'clock." "It's perfectly awful to have thai porch there "Ilow did Lois ever get in here? I wouldn't.." "Good the door wasn't locked, or-." "Here's the police. Somebody go to the door." "I'm going out to sec if there arc any tracks." When the policeman came in again, he was met at the door by a dozen girls demanding, "Were there any tracks?" "Why yes. Why didn't you call us right away?-Thought it was a nightmare?This was a pretty bad one. Can't do any more tonight. Go to bed." "Arv, come and sleep ¡with me." "Let's double up. Come on, Ana." "No thanks, I'm going up stairs, Catch me sleeping down stairs. Nix." "Lock your windows, everybody." Upstairs it required the combined efforts of three girls and 1\IHss T- to quiet the New Girl, but after a while she fell asleep, exhausted. It seemed that the house had only been asleep for an hour, when hasty footsteps were heard on the porch. A number of nervous rings, and girls running excitedly back and forth, aroused her again. "Is it time to get up, ~1aude?" "No, it's only five.-Why, what can be the matter?-1'11 sce.-What is it, girls?" "The house is on fire. Get dressed quick." "What next! Seems to me we have had enough for one night." "Who said fire?" "The roof is on fire. Smell the smoke?" "I\o! Why Giere, where did you get the clothes:" "Had to save my best woolen dress, my furs, hat, and money. Too cold to go out without mittens." "Your hair, ha! ha! ha! Those rags,-" "Oh! oh-gir-rls I'm-I'm so scared. Do you s'pose it's really on fire? l\Iy trunks!" "The firemen-Here they are." " I'm going to see where it is." "There's nothing t he matter, I'm sure. Let's go to bed." The firemen came down from the attic, disappointed not to find a trace of a fire anywhere. "The firemen can't locate a fire, can you?" "No. Next time be sure it's a fire." "Well, what are you going to do with a house full of frightened girls?" The ).J'ew Girl tumbled on her bed in a heap saying, "Oh! dear, this house certainly is quiet, and you girls do keep early hours."

E. H.

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T o My Mother As I in solitude do contemplate Of days of childhood and of youth so dear, I cry, " Oh, Mother mine, were you but here; To sec thy patient smile, 0 wondcrous trait. Long since thou left me here alone, so drear, To join the k ingdom of the Etcmal King. Oh, that I once might feel the joy thou'd bring, If thou again to me now could appear. To thy dear arms I fled from childish fea1·s, And nestled there as safe as sheep in fold. When older grown, still thou my refuge dear, To thou alone I could my heart unfold. God grant that some day we again may meet In Heavenly realms \Yhere joy will be complete." L. E. H.

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The Wind The wind is out tonighL. Superb she lies Along the raging tumult of the skies; And, as her gray and ragged clothing drifts In careless grace, her laughter sinks and lifts In low, strong joy. Her hair is blown about Across the moon. One arm she reaches out And stirs the sleeping cold to active life. I t swings across our faces like a knife, With keen, rough power. Wave on wave, the air, In roaring joy, leaps thru her tangled hair, And whips the leafless limbs of aching t rees, Which groan unwillingly. Tumult.uous seas Of sound begin and pass. Begin and rush To silence; rise and roar and die-A hushThen wild t.hey bellow over plain and tmm And sea. They swell in mighty power and drown The world in noise. The light and scanty snow Is whirled in tiny drifts, and t.hen, as tho Her fingers brushed from the face of earth, It flies and disappears. The roughened ice Upon the streets grows harder. In a trice The low, wide sheet of steely, gleaming mail Upon the lake is rent with muffied wail, And splits with deep, reverberating boom. High up, storm drifted , cold, the moon In frantic haste is plunging thru the clouds Forward, forever falling thru the shrouds Of tom and floating garments. All the stars In wild disorder blown about t.he sky, Try evermore to fall t.o earth; but high The North Wind holds them with her hair And catches them upon her clouds or e'er The last long plunge is taken. L. M. 7i


Commencement Week (Present pred•ction of n future progrnm)

Wednesday Evening, June 3. The class play, "Mice and J'v!en," was sttccessfully presented to an enthusiastic and appreciative audience. Thursday Morning, June 4. Class Day exercises. Extracts from the program.

Color Song 11id the fragrant sweet pea blossoms, snowy white, Entwined ·with dainty ferns and grasses, breathing forth delight, \Ve sing the message told by them with humble mien, And wave aloft their colors,-white and green. Green doth S)mbolize endurance, strong and true; Fair white doth tell of purity, and life and courage, too. Then waYe aloft the shining bam1er, gleaming bright, And cherish long its colors, green and white. Tune-First motive of Mendelssohn's "Spring Song"

Cup Song Tune-" My !Tc"rt's in the llighlands''

This cup which we cherish In ftiendship's true name, We fill now with love drops, All sparkling the same; We breathe round its casement, All silvery bright, The spirit of freedom, Of duty and right. ''"c pass it on gladly To new guardians strong, And tell forth its purpose In this, our Cup Song. Then drink to its last dregs, This nectar so sweet, And so by thy qualfmg I t's mission complete. Thursday Afternoon. A most beautiful and impressive ceremony was enacted in the planting of the Class Ivy. In the hearts of those present was the hope, that with the re-birth of the ivy each year, would come to our Alma ).l ater a kind thot for those who planted it there. Thursday Evening Faculty reception. Friday, Jw1c 5 Sc11ior banquet at Uorey Hall. From the banquet, all betook thcmseh·cs to the opera house, where the Seniors received the reward of their labors in the form of a much prized diploma. i8


Class Song The wave of our being has home us along, And brought \vith it friendship and laughter and song, And knowledge and purpose to answer the call When plunged in the struggle that comes to us all; But now is the turning that comes in the tide; Our school days are halted; our pathways divide; And yet in our thoughts shall our school oft ariseOur mother of vision, the light o( our eyes. ·w hile onward we wander in sunshine and shade, We'll meet our life problem and not be afraid. Our days shall be ordered by vistas of cheer unlocked from the treasures that came to us here. These walls breathe a spirit as perfect, as rare, As incense diffused in a life-~•ising air. \\'e ne'er shall forget thee, ne'er sc,·cr thy ticsOur mother of vision, the light of our eyes. The future awaits us, \Ye cannot remain; It offers its pathway through pleasure and pain. From known to the unknown it beckons today, And we shall be judged as we sow by the way. Then plant the blue flower and care for it well ; The nectar of service is cupped in its bell. Such nectar is loved by the school that we prizeOur mother of vision, the light o( our eyes.

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Notice Students~ As you peruse the follo\\ing pages, stop to think and remember. Remember who our patrons are. Think how you can make them realize that iL docs pay to advertise in our Annual. Then show them we mean what we say.

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Ninety-nine Reasons for Patronizing Our Advertisers 1. They made this Annual possible. 2. The Normal is loyally supported by them. 3. Their goods are 0. K. 4. They arc men who give you a square deal. 5. Their advertisements are guides which lead to the pleasant Road of Satisfaction. 6-99 . Find out yourself by trading with them. You will never regret it.

Our Advertisers Bay State l\Iill Baker & Steinbauer ] . R. Baker & Co. Edwin A. Brown Bailey & Bailey J ames E. Burke C. A. Baeuerlen Hdw. Co. J. J. Baumgartner II . Choate & Co. W. A. Cunningham F. G. Cross Colonial Theatre H. A. Cichanowski Dobbs Studio Elmer & Wanzer W. A. Ilargesheimer W. A. Hodgins llardwick's Milk & Cream Depot Dr . Holden V. R. Irvine & Co. Inter-State !vlcrcantile Co. joseph Leicht Press

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Kissling & Son II. B. Kline Kratz Candy Shop Lang Packing Co. Allyn S. Morgan 0.]. McManus New York Cleaning Works New Electric Carpet Cleaning Co. Rembrandt Studio Gco. B. Stager Schlingerman's Schuler's Bakery Skoglun's :\Iarket The Fashion l\I. Toye Estate Von Rohr's Pharmacy Ward Bros. Co. Wachs & Son Winona Steam Laundry Wruck & Gates Winona Heating & Ventilating Co.


H. Choate & Co. "THE QUALITY STORE" F eaturing and Specializing Merchandise of Quality and Individuality at Moderate Prices g,·ery department of this establishment is bright with new and interesting merchandise with the last word of fashion . Wherever you go through this splendidly prcparl·d store, you will always find the stocks up to the Choate High Standard.

FEATURED IN OUR MANY DEPARTMENTS ARE RARE AND BEAUTIFUL CREATIONS IN Women's and Misses' Suits, Coats and Dresses -smart models for c,·ery occrtsion, each bearing some touch of individuality that gives it distinction. Charming New M odes in Blouses and Waists. Beautiful New Fabrics in Dress Goods, Silks and Trimmings, many of them our own importation-exclusive and not found elsewhere. Dress Accessories, R ich Laces, the smartness of our Neckwear, with their ,·eritablc host of new ideas. Dent's French Kid Gloves- \Yc arc exclusive .\gents for "·inona. They arc famous on both sides of the Atlantic for Style and Quality-most good dressers wear Dent's Kid Gloves, let your next pair be a "Dent's"- thcy cost no more than many of the inferior kinds sold-we always have a complete stock for street and cvcnu1g wear. Hosiery-the kind that will plcusc you and give you sa.tisfactory wcur-may it he silk, lisle or cotton-they are here in black and colors. Millinery--Our trimmers cater lo the desire of careful dressers, who desire distinguished hats of "tone" and simplicity! They can plca.o;e you!

Have You Seen the Winsome White Goods For Commencement Wear ,\ ttcntion, Fair Seniors-Sec our display of classy, beaut iful, dainty materials [or Commencement wear. The marvels of white weaving arc cxamplificd in our showing displayed in the white goods section. Designs of imported and domestic production for charming gowns-there are Nubbed Voiles, Embroidered Voiles, Crepe de Chine, French Voiles, Bordered Voiles, Snow Flake \·oilcs, Rice Flake \·oiles, Pompadour \·oiks, Embroidered Crepe, Ratmcs in plain and fancy brocade, lawns, batiste, etc., ran~ing in price 25c, up to $4.50 per yard. You are urged to se<..~though, as usual, you will not. be urged to buy. The showing is one which will t<.'mpt you gr<'atly~f that we are sure.

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To the Faculty and Students I of the Winona State Normal I I

We take this method of expressing our appreciation of your liberal patronage during this year, and j wish to assure you that in the future we will be bet- 1 ter prepared to serve you than ever. We want t o l congr.atulate you that you are to .have a new building. We sincerely hope that the Winona State Normal I may ever continue to grow and prosper. 1 1

THE INTER-STATE

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Just in this connection, we want to ca ll your attention to the class of merchandise that we carry, the service that we render, and the methods we employ both as to the treatment of our customers and the publicity given our store. The class of merchandise carried in the Inter-State speaks for itself. This fact is so generally conceded that it has been truthfully said: "It is good if it comes from the Inter-State." In the dealings with our customers we try to treat them just as we would like to be treated ourselves. Under the head of truthfulness in advertising, we insist that every Inter-State advertisement, barring typographical errors, shall be absolutely truthful and honest. Believing then as we do that it is to our mutual benefit to trade together, we solicit your valued patronage, and promise always in return a square deal.

The Inter-State Mercantile Company WINONA, MINNESOTA

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"Tell the truth, the whole truth, and anything but the truth." "Thim's our sentiments too." THE STAFF MYRT:-"Has Hazel gone out to observe the stars tonight?" FERN :-"No, she has gone to observe the sun (son)."

Lemon Drops RECIPE: 3 drops water (if necessary) }i-cup sugar 2 gallons lemon juice Now boil! Then cool off rapidly.

MR. MooRE :-" :Miss Tillman, what does the court stenographer do?" Miss T. :-"Sits in the court-room and takes notes." MR. MooRE :-"Doesn't he ever look up?" MISS T. :-"Well I guess he looks up different points sometimes."

Can any one tell why Sylvia Anderson doesn't cat but ten meals a day? (The staff could not make out whether it was "two" or "ten" so we gave Sylvia the benefit of the doubt.) MISS SA:.tsoN (after 1st gym. class):"Did vou take a shower bath?" JuN.IOR:-"No ma'am, is there one missing?"

Heard ncar the bulletin board. ADELINE Me. :-"Oh ~ I can't take advanced manual training because it comes the same hour as physics. I wonder what Mr. Sandt teaches there at 'consultation?' "

Have you noticed the flirtation between I rene Uuir and Peter Tri in Psychology II?

MR. l\lAxwELL:-"l\Iiss Olson, how would you suggest that this floor be cleaned?" Miss OLsON :-"Well, I hardly believe I'd use a vacuum cleaner. I think a hair brush would be best."

STUDENT (in Lit. Society) :-"Dr. Dickerson, could we open our program with a musical selection?" DR. DICKERSON :-"Why yes, but you might open it with a crow bar." An illustrative sentence heard in Grammar class :-~loses played tennis at Pharaoh's Court.

Mrss RICHARDS (in Lit. Int.) :-"Name some of the poems Tennyson has written." MR. SCHMOKE :- "'Crossing the Bar, ' 'Child's Lullaby' and 'Father Will Come to -:\Ie Soon.' "

l\IR. MANGt;N :-"All our names, 1t IS said, have their origin with some meaning. Now mine, Mangun, what could that be?" R. B. :-""Why, maybe, the man behind the gun."

Wafted from the Grammar room: "Yes, my jokes are always original,that. is I have only heard t hem once or twice." 84


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THE DOBBS STUDIO

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I ~d~i~ -~~ Br:~- ·r I

F. G. CROSS WHOLESALE DEALER

BUTTER, EGGS AND POULTRY WINONA, MINNESOTA

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PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST Kodaks and Supplies

S. W. Cor. Third and Main Streets Winona, Minnesota I +-··--------M---- IIWI-11-.. .--••-•+

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_F_O_R_D_R_Y_G_O_O_D_S_,·l ,.

TRANSFER LINE

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Office: 120 West Second

Schlingerman' s +·---------------------+•1•

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W. A. Hodgins

UNDERWEAR and HOSIERY, shop at

73 East Third Street Minnesota Winona

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~---S~o~;un's-Ma;k~t -~ CHOICE MEATS _________.,. 519 Huff Street

Phone 493

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DR. DICKERSON (in Hist. of Ed.):"What does the 'Early Cave ).len,' deal with, Mr. Schmoke?" l\I R. ScHMOKE:-"I didn't study the book, but I suppose it naturally deals with the Cave Men." DR. DICKERSON :-"How do you know it doesn't deal with bluffers?"

Are the Normal girls boosters? Ask the Beloit Glee Club. DR. D. :-"Why is gold said to be malleable?'' CLASS :-"Because it can be rolled out thin like cake dough." DR. D. :-"I suppose t hat's why gold is sometimes called 'dough.' " CLASS (obligingly) :-"IIa, Ha !"

ELLA FISHER (after scanning the platfotm one Monday morning) :-"I'll bet Mr. Moore is going to talk this moming; he's the only one with a shoe shine."

Points from Mr. Mangun's argument against bringing more young men to Normal under false pretenses. 1. Could you get a boy to study the kindergarten course? 1'\o! He would pass it up as a pay card does a hobo. 2. How would a boy studying science teach a fourth grade class? H e would fit in like a "horse" in a "feather bed." 3. I believe in co-education but too often it becomes "cooed" (education).

Hunky be nimble, Hunky be quick, Classes arc calling, Don't be falling. :\1. c. MR. l\ 1ANGUN :-"In connection with this outline of the term's work, we had a short exposition on the life hercaftcr."Apologctically, "Now I'm talking about something I don't know anything about - but I do that quite often so it is all right."

]UNIOR:-"What would this old oak say if it could talk?" MR. HOLZINGER:-"It would say, 'I an1 an eln1, ' " Ana you'll be sorry for not handing in your picture; the one we're going to put in 'vill be even worse than your own.

At class play rehearsals when :\lr. Alg~r waggers a dollar to a doughnut that the plot won't work, George Schmoke calls him a weak-patted fool and l\Ir. Katowski swears he will leave them both in the lurk.

OVER THE TRAl\SO:\I (Knock at door 22 after lights were off) (Inside) "Come in, come in! I'm in bed~ ' I'm not going to get up and unlock Lhe door. If you can't get in any other way, come over the transom.!!" (Oulside) "Girls, girls, this is l\Iiss Richards.''

ALICE I. (in Sewing III) :-"Do you wash those shawls in "¡ater ?" l\IIss .i\Icl\1.: - "Oh no! -in rain water." MR. MooRE:-"Who is the coun.Ly coroner?" A~I BlTl OlJS VOLUNTEER:- "Well , if any one dies from no cause whatever, he is sent for."

F ERN, (at Brown's Drug Store) :-"I want some witch-hazel." CLimK :- "Do you want it in bulk ?" FERN :-"Ycs." Then turning to her friend, "I thot it was a liquid."

:\liss Slifer received a letter lodav. I wonder if it was a good one? (Goodwin.)

IIcard in Civics class (after visiting court.) DR. D. :-"\\-hen were the jUf),ncn swon1 in?" :\lATT:-"Oh! they all swore at once."

"~\ word to the \\;Se is impossible. The wise talk all the time." HO\v about it, Louise?

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Foot Toggery for Young Women The Newest and Smartest Lasts Recognized the Country over as the Best. MADE by JOHN KELLY, who never made a poor Shoe $3.00, $3.50, $4.00

BAKER & STEINBAUER 69 West Third Street

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HAVILAND &

CO.'S Fine China,

J. R. Baker

Syracuse China, in Sets and Fancy Pieces. Cut Glass-Pretty One-Dollar Pieces . TRUNKS, SUIT-CASES and SATCHELS,

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~\. The St=·~::::uality is

finest in theWorld

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always higher than the Price

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It's all in the way it's milled All requirements are fulfilled. Though o'er all the earth you scour You'll find no match for WINGOLD FLOUR.

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Es tablished 1894

James E. Burke

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Toys Notions and Novelties at MoneySaving Prices.

MADE IN THE FINEST MILL IN THE WORLD

PIANOS AND

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MISS ~1. (In manual training) :-"Oh, we ought to have one more; thirteen is an unlucky nwnber." MR. SANDT :-"Oh no it isn't! The two most important events in history were connected with the number thirteen. There were thirteen original colonies, and I was bom on the thirteenth."

Docs ~Ir. Gaylord like red? For further information go to Esther Kruppcnbachcr. "Did you hear that Marie Bruner has become a mason?" "Since when?" "Since spring vacation." "How's that?" "Oh, every morning she plasters her spit curls."

\ÂĽhen you mention me in the Annual, let it be in the Beauty Department. -LILLIAN ANDERSON.

KATHERINE L. :-"Oh Roxie, I just heard that I have a little nephew." Roxm B. :-"Oh isn't that lovelyis it a boy or girl?"

l\Iiss Slifer, to Grace Strong after she had completed a recitation:- "~!iss Strong, you have a very sweet voice, but some how or other you have gotten into the habit of talking high. (Does any one know how tall Art is?)

~!ARION (going to her prospective superintendent) :-"He's good looking and looks single. Is my hair on straight?'' (On her return, utterly disgusted):"Oh fudge! he's got a marri (ed) twinkle in his eye."

Heard in Domestic Science Room. "Put plenty of nuts in the cake." "I won't crack any more nuts today, my jaws hurt already."

MR. STOCKTON:-" No, dumb animals never imitate." IRENE M um:-"If one kitten crawls up a screen and another sees it and docs the same, what is that?" MR. STOCKTON (after much deliberation) :-"Why that's two kittens crawling up a screen."

MR. MAXWELL (in School Management) :-"Arc the after effects of measles and mumps dangerous?" M. B. '14 :-"No, not unless they die." "Peter Tri is going to leave this Spring." "\Yhy ?" "Because all trees lea,¡e in the Spring." "But he's changed his mind." "W.hy?" "Because he's evergreen."

"Why Ana, put something on your head. It's cold." " I have got something. I've got my psyche." While the postman may not be a flirt all the Normal girls get love letters from him.

MR. PoLLEY :-"How are glaciers fmmcd ?" TESSIE BROOKS:-"They come up out of the water." MR. POLLEY:-"Whcre did you find that, glaciers come up out of the water?" TESSIE BROOKS :-"Down at the movies."

MR. H OLZINGER:-"When the horse shoes strike quartz you can sometimes sec sparks.'' MOLLIE M. :-"Why I have done it myself."

DR. D. :-"Did you ever follow a bee to find a bee tree:-" P. S. '1-l:- "Lots of times." DR. D. :-"Did you ever get any honey?" P. S. :-"1\o, I got stung."

l\IR. PoLLEY:-"Is this diagram correct?" l\Ilss II. :-"Ycs sir, but just change the location of that north star. Put it further south and it '"'ill look better." 88


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I Kratz's Candies

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Are Pure and Wholesome. We make all kinds of Home Make Chocolates, Caramels, Bon Bons, etc., fresh daily.

Our Home Baked Goods Are much sought for, as they are fresh and have a taste different from Bakery Cooking. LIGHT LUNCHES AT ALL HOURS

Kratz Candy Shop j

Opposite Post Office

Pho n e 3 67-.J

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W. A. Cunningham 113 Center Street

PLUMBING , HEATING AND ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION

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I will endeavor to PLEASE YOU regardless of all other things

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The Rembrandt Studio

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F. ERNEST HERBERT, Artist

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TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1914 We extend a cordial invitation to visit this store when making their Commencement Footwear purchases. White Nubuck and White Linen Boots and Pumps ; Black Satin, Velvet or Cravenette Pumps and Colonials ; P atent Pumps , with or without straps. The classiest array of Graduation F ootwear to be found in this city.

0. J. McMANUS

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lYene. Ma.son Evelrn Cctrlson Al'l<l. Bezanson Lorettll. Albr-o

5a.rah Flem111g

Ruth Glu.dt

Bel'-1h~ BrEl d.

At-v1lla. Be.l de11.

FRAULEIN

A.

Fraulein A. Bclden:-Is it proper for a girl who is engaged to go out with another young man more than once? Yours in the dark,

BELDEN

Yes, Jessie, it is considered proper if the young man is bashful. (?)

M. It is more common than proper, but it depends altogether on the girl.

Dear A. Bclden:-As P-L was provoked at me last Thursday I went home to mother on Friday. Do you think that was the best thing to do?

Dear Fraulein:-! received a most beautiful Easter plant with six large blossoms. No card accompanied it. Do you thi:r'nc one of my Minneapolis admirers sent it?

Undoubtedly, as Paul was thus able to share his auto with several girls over Sunday.

IRENE

LENA

RUTH KELLET'l'.

II.

Dear Fraulein Belden :-Summer vacation will soon be here. Would it be proper for Hannibal to spend three months at the Lake of the Isles? MARIE B. That really would be almost too long a time. Six weeks would be perfectly proper. The other six weeks you might spend at summer school.

No Ruth, as long as there was no card, it probably came from your mother. Mlle. Belden:-Is it considered proper to help a bashful young man on, by calling him up and doing the leap year stunt? Fussed, ]. B. BRADLEY.

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KISSLING & SON

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MILK & CREAM DEPOT

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Best Ever Buttermilk, XX Cream for Whipping Purposes, Cottage Cheese, Best Ever Butter.

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DRY GOODS, CARPETS, DRAPERIES, WALL PAPER, CLOAKS AND SUITS We are leaders in these lines. We can save you money. One price to all. Never undersold on good merchand ise.

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Phone 894-J

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Liebe Fraulcin:-How long must you know a boy before you can let him hold your hand? Anxiously, MARION

"At H ome" Dearest Darling: Just t hink, I ha.\¡en't seen oo since Friday. I miss 'oo so, as I have no one to love up and kiss. '\Vhat have 'oo done since 'oo have come home? Musser and I went shopping Saturday and I got so many darling clothes. :VIy hat is so cute- very becoming to me. 'Nen, I got a pair of patent leather pumps wis eight straps and a shiny, silver buckle. Daddy and I went to the Lyric in the evening and I enjoyed it so much. 'Nen we went and got some pop-corn and I came home a tired and happy girl. Well, darling, I'll sec 'oo soon. With heaps of love, Your own , B. P.

w.

Ask J ames Robb. Fraulein Belden:-Today's mail brot me only two letters from Chicago. Is there any way by which delivery can be hastened? MAUD.

Have him spend two more hours a day writing. Dearest Fraulein Belden :-Is it proper for me to offer the girls peanuts? EARL.

Y cs, when Ana isn't around. Winona, Minn., April 3, 1914.

Will you call for your apologies or shall we deliver them,

Dear Mama: Boo-hoo, I couldn't get my pretty curls to hang right today, so I tied my hair up with a nice green ribbon. Lots of Lhe girls say my hair is red,- but I don't think so, do you ? Some of them say my hair is wooley, but I don'L care if they say t hat, cause I know they're only jealous. What should I tell them if they say it again > When the Superintendents come I comb m y hair like the other girls, so that I don't look like only a little girl. Well, I can't write any more. Good-bye. Your own darling, GLADYS S.

Letters from Our Little Folks Morey Hall. Darlingcst Mother: Here it is Sunday A. lVI., and I am all dolled up for Sunday School. I look perfeclly darling this morning in my green suit and hat with patent leather trimming. I have been wearing my brown poplin to school as you told me to and of all the com ps and "T. L .'s" I get. Of course, you know it is a perfect match with my hair and I think the dress is a beautiful shade. I sang at the Convention last week and so many people went dippy about me. Never had so many have crushes on me before. I don't blame them tho, for I looked so sweet. M other, if a boy should ask me to go to church, would you go unchaperoned? I don't think I would. (Never mind, Gladys, you'll never be asked.) As I hear B. calling me, I had better find my penny and go. '\i\Tith oceans of love and a kiss on every wave, Your own,

Winona, Minn. April 7, 1914. Dear Brother: How are you, I'm just havin' such a good time. All the girls like me so well, and the teachers do, too. They think I'm t he cu test little girl, and I always say such awful smart things, that every one has to laf at me. I guess they laf cause I'm so little. But my dear brother, there ain't no nice hoys like you or the rest in our town, here. I just won't look at any of them. We didn't have pie for dinner. T ell all my boy friends, hello. I love you all. MARJORIE H.

LITTLE FAIRY.

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IOld Faithful and Turban

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BRANDS

YOUR FOOD INSURANCE YOU WILL NEVER BE DISSAPOINTED IF YOU USE THESE BRANDS

V. R. IRVIN & CO.

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Sporting Goods

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---·- ·-----EMIL LEIC HT, President

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STANLEY LO:Il S.

Manage r

JOSEPH LEICHT PRESS PRINTERS . BINDERS PROCESS COLOR PRINTING BOOKLETS AND CATALOGS ANNUAL PUBLICATIONS (]Superior equipment and facilities enable us to offer to Educational Institutions a particularly complete and efficient Printing Service. (]Wide experience on College Catalogs, Annual Publications and similar works, together with an organization of intelligent workmen under careful supervision, insure our patrons that orders will be properly filled, and that the details of typography, presswork and binding will be accorded the attention necessary for the most effective results. (]LEICHT PRESS SERVICE is resourceful service. Let us submit samples to demonstrate the distinct advantage it has for you.

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LE,_I_c_H_T_P_R_E_s_s________ WI_N_o_NA, MI_N_N_E_s_o_T_A_l

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H. B. Kline Electrical Supplies and Construction Telephone 614

109-111 Center Street

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Classified Ads vVANTED: fortune. WANTED:

FoR SALE: To the Houston Bunch, our 1% looks and our 99% graft with Mr. Mangun. ~Iollie Molitcr. Sarah Fleming.

A man to share my new Hattie Bartlett, heiress. More hair and curly. Marie Bruner .

FoR SALE: ability.

Some of my dramatic Carlyn Girtlcr.

WANTED: A joke cracked in faculty meeting. A. Polley.

FoR SALE:

My Missouri drawl. Dr. Dickerson .

WANTED: Ana Benson's prescription for a rapid and luxuriant growth of hair.

To LoAx:

'VANTED: A for next year.

F atherl y advice. Dr. Dickerson.

To LOAN:

A few blushes. Lillian Anderson.

High School position :\label Franklin.

WANTED:

Height by George Schmoke.

'V ANTED:

A Parisian pompadour. H arris G. Pett.

BIRD DEKTISTRY: All bir ds' teeth repaired. Bridge work a specialty. Lillian Ander son.

WANTED: A trustworthy 1-,rirl to care for my J ewell. Fern St. J. FoR SAJ,E: FoR SALE:

Giggles.

J.

LosT: Hall.

Two sugar bowls from Morey

T owey.

Classifications. T. Gildemeister.

FoR SALE: The following copyrighted poem. "There was an old mY! who lived ia an oak; The more he saw the less he spoke; The less he spoke the more he heard. Why can't we all be like this bird?" G. E. ~laxwell FoR SALE: Kratze.

My reserved table at H elen ] cans.

INFORMATION: Bayonets are implemen Ls of war . They shoot m en with t hem. R oxie Brown. FoR SALE: er son.

My graft with Dr. DickMarjorie Hodge.

FoR SALE: Any information regarding bird, beast, or man. ~Ir. Holzinger. FoR SALE:

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:\Iy everlasting smile. Harriet Dcrdowski.

THE NEW WOMAN's MOVEMENT 96


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Colonial Theatre

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Matinee Daily

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We've Foot-wear for all seasons- the best values at any price, and experienced Shoe Fitters at your j :j service. G ive us a trial.

WRlJ£~-F~~~TES

53 WEST THIRD STREET

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WINONA, MINNESOTA

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SI\.\P DRAGOI\S "If any thin~ herein offend, In philosophy to li,·e pretend, And then thruout. the li,·e long day f t matters not what neighbors say." Till-man enters the I\ormal, th<• girls herein will continue to Robb the Winona I figh School of its J ewells. l f a Polley should peck a Child(s) would Burk-hold-er and Hol-sing-er to sleep, "~ix-on that noise," Bliss of the :\orrnal.

\Yood-rufi the

If Lawrence tun1ed on the Fawcett would Frue-tcl Charles to call a Plummer? If a Palmer gave George Schmokc a Ilomstacl, wou ld he take a Breid? lf Helen (a) Bates the tango, will Susie W als-cr ?

H Fnmces Green should turn Gray, wou ld Marzolf Rush on a Campbell to get. M oore Sand, If Sam-son had another P et(t.), would it he a Polley? If Lillian Hurl-ey Bolc(s), would :\Jarie Crouch and Luretta Dodge?

If Kline-fell-er Brmn1 hair turning Green , would she become Riley? J UST OCT Little :\Iovement Has a :!~.Ienning all its Own" J. S. GAYLORD. "You Need SymiJathy"-C. V. SMITIJ. "Don't Wake JVle Up, f 'm Dreaming"

LL\IERICKS T here was a young lady named Fern \\'ho was so eager to learn. One dav while at school She met a young Jewell And so ended t he aim of our F ern. There was a young lady named Proctor Who resided at the home of a doctor One day w hile excited "Trcs Moustar de" she cited, And this from our pianist, Proctor. There was a young lady named Bess, Who li ved up to all fashions in drc-;s. She stepped on the scale "\ nd turned deathly pale, The weight of this maid you must guess. Lou, whom \\'C name in this jingle, Keeps ?\!iss Richard's netTCS in a tingle. In the closet she hid, Cnder-hill's lid, \\'hen sought by :.Iiss Richards \\'ilh a shingle. Ana Benson is sure a cu te girl, 1\ nd she keeps Earl's heart m a w hirl. We wonder oft times, If e'er the glad chimes ·w ill announce that he's captured his pearl. Lucinda's nan1e we all do know, .\ nd you bet nothing about her is slow. And the whole Senior Class, Without this dear lass. 0.1 the blink would he sure to go. There is a young lady na:;ned Green, \\'i th a boY is rarelv she seen, But Yoti bet thai her eves Can inake your pulse nse, ..\ n<l make you feel queer in the bean.

" l ~verv

:\lABEl. FRANKLIN.

"Roamin' in the Gloamin' " LEN.\ Jh:ANP:R. "Sweet GeneYieye"- A KA B ENSO». " \Yho is Syh;a?"- SYt. \'L\ ,b :nERSON .

"Dom1 on the Farm"- A. PoLLEY. " \\'ill There Be AnY Stars m :\Iv Crown?" LI LLI.\l\ GR;UIS. ·

WINONA NORMAL WHITE SOX LEAGUE First l3asc-LrLLJE ALLEN. Second Base- EsTHER KRt'P P T~N BA Ci t t ;R Third Basc- RcTH Ilu.;K tXS. Pilchcr- ::\IA v RrLEY C'atchcr- 1REXE A ntORE Short-slop- I REXE 1\Il·tR Right Fielder GE:-<EYIE\'E LA wRgxcc: Left Fielder HELEN B.\RRETT Cetller Ficlder-AxA BExsox Cmpirc ?\l.n·o PoTTER


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Put on a Good Front when you are talking to a lady and the chances are you will be successful. Ladies like to see lovely white linen and, if we have the care of yours we know it will satisfy the most exacting person. In our system of Laundering we never injure the most delicate fabric, but we do assure perfect work at a very moderate price.

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The Winona Steam Laundry Co. 62-64 East Fourth St.

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P. E. LANG

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DEALERS IN

BEEF, VEAL, PORK, MUTTON, LAMB, POULTRY

Grocers and Ice Dealers

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(Successors to ]. F. Lang)

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Manufacturers of High Grade Sausages and Pure Kettle Rendered Lard. Packers and Curers of Select Hams and Bacon. 1

A Fresh Supply of Choice Goods at Bottom Prices

Highes t Cash Price Paid for all kinds of Live and Dressed Stock.

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Lang Packing Co.

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272 East Third Street

N. E. Corner Lafayette and Fourth Streets. Phones 1312-1313.

Winona, Minn. =

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My Dear 1\fiss Isaacs:- \\'hat can I do for a double chin? I have a slight trace of one and fear it will mar my beauty. Yours hastilY .' HELEN K. Walk a good deal and attend no less than four spreads a week- these preferably after hours.

Beauty P arlors (PCTSOnally Conducted by

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A. Isaacs.)

Dear ~11le. Isaacs:-How can I get a complexion like Emmett Raymond's. CARLYN GrRTLER. This spring, while at your country home, gather three pecks of milk weed pods, press, save the fluid, add several drops of peroxide and then apply to face after meals. I\Iaclcmoisellc Isaacs:-How would a young girl appear to the bestadvantage, with her hair done up, or with a large how: Yours lovingly, ELEAI:\OR w. NeYer appear in public without a hcau. It is most uncultured. Dear ::\Illc. Isaacs :-I am tall and good looking, have a fair complexion, small mouth, a Roman nose, brown eves, a heavenly voice, and wonderful dramatic ability. All the girls think I'm handsome and arc crazy about me. Do you really think they have cause to be? EARL K. From the above description we should think that not only arc the girls crazy ( ?) about you, but you yourself are slightly inclined that way. One way to make your small mouth larger is to talk about larger subjects, as "I" has ncYer been known to contain much material for oratorical speeches.

Who said we have no men ~ Behold our sons! ! Dickerson Anderson Samson T hompson Munson Mason Benson Johnson Simpson ::VIaxson Olson Stevenson Rru.musson SO.:.IE PEOPLES' IDEAS OF HAPPINESS GEORGE ScH:-10KE-No girls. Lots l\It:RPHv-r-.Iany naps. jEss BRADLEY-Fancy coiffures. DoROTHY l\IooRE-Latest. fashions. THE EDITORs- No Annual. CORA SE\IONS-To talk all she wants to. RosE PELLOWSKI-Pink checks. THE STILLWATER Bu:-..rcH- A private phone and no interruptions. EAR l. KrRSCHSTEIN-Twcnty-six hours' work BEt:LAH PAuiER- Curly hair in wet wcaLher. IR:.IA 'VHOi\IES- Six inches more m height. LIELA l\lEYERS-A corner on the "kiss me quick." ~IR. HoLzr:-~cER-:\Iy name in tlw .\nnual. lRE::\E :MUIR-Teddy bears and tin dogs.

Dear :\!iss lsa.acs:-I wear my hair in a eight and usc a hair net. The girls would like to see it changed. Can you make any suggestions? 0TELIA B. You might coil it loosely on the top of your head. I suggest making a but.tcrOy of the net fi~-,rurc

l\Iadcmoiscllc Isaacs :-Can you tell me what will remove freckles? My friends say that mine arc charming but they annoy me exceedingly. Yours in distress, HELEN ]. A little pwnice stone applied vigorously two or three times a day will do the work. 100


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GROCERIES, PROVISIONS AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 515 Huff Street Phone 1414

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Telephone 801-J 109 E. Second Street

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Fashion

Winona's only Exclusive Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Store WINONA

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We wish to call your attention to the fact that we are now prepared to show the most exclusive up-todate assortment of Ladies' Coats, Suits and Dresses for Spring to be found in the City at Popular Prices.

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A B Cs for Kindergartners A is for Allen and Anderson too, Who arc both studious, kind ancl true. B stands for Alice, and Helen, and Bess, Their other names you'll have to ).,rttess. The Crouches and ITan¡ict all come under C, No girls in this school could jollier be. E is for E llefson, a happy young Lhing, When older she grows, much good will she bring. G is for Frances, our girl from the West, I know all agree she is one of the best. H is for Ruth, :\1. Ilenrv, and ~ell, Of each one's charms we. gladly would tell. I is for J ean, thru whom we must sec, Because the one "I" in our class is she. K is for Esther, and Leona as well, The answers to questions they know ,-cry well. L is for Gcncvic,¡e, a sweet young lass, \Yho, in looks and in goodness, few can surpass. Maxson, l\IcGuiggan-lwo :\Is in a line, Millbrath and l\1uir this finishes it fine. N is for Xixon, our president dear, We all feel bcLLcr when she is ncar. R is for Riley, whose first name is May, She's a fine girl you hear all say. S to be cared for, then my brain can untwist, So here's Harriet, Ella and Ruth to finish the list. For the rest of the alphabet, names we have none, So the rhyme I began is surely now done.

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SCHULER'S ICE CREAM PARLOR

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SCHULER'S BAKERY 551-555 HUFF STREET

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FRENCH DRY CLEANING OF LADIES' AND GENTS' . GARMENTS

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New york Cleaning Works 68 WEST FOURTH STREET

~.-S.pecial Prices to Students

any drug or chemical is bought by us it must first measure up to our requirements--otherwise it is not received, therefore when we sell you drugs and chemicals you can be sure of their quality. This is worth you r knowing when you have a prescription to put up. Remember to come here for particular wa nts .

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--::Cleaning Elf~~; Ca:e:l Co.

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with your next order for Carpets and Rugs

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113 EAST SARNIA STREET

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Dr. Holden's Drug Store 523 HUFF STREET

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FINIS


STUDE~T OF l'\ATURE Owl CYKTHIA CoRNWELL • i~h lingale-MAUDE PoTTER Buttcrflies-Rt:TH KELLETT GLADYS P t:TSCH RL'TH HUNKINS Wren li1~LEN BATES Peacock CARLYN GrRTLER Red-headed WoodpcckerELORINE FRCETEL LOUISE TRACY ALICE ISAACS Bird of Paradise-HATTIE BARTLETT Sparrow- ADA CxoERHILL Clam .\lARJOI\ ROBB Kitten LArRA HoLKER Trees-PETER TRI Poplar IIARRJET STAH:'.IA~::>: Oak- A':\A BE::-:soN Date ELEANOR WARD Palm :\lARGL'ERJTE PAur (ER)

! ! You should have heard the commotion In school the other day, When the boys from old Wisconsin Came over to sing their lay.

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The girls! They shouted and they laughed They even stamped their feeL, 'fhey giggled and they whispered, "Those boys arc just too sweet."

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But you really must. forgive them, For such a sight is rare In the Assembly Hall of :-Jorn1al Where the sex is mostly fair. LILLIE A. ENGH. DOI'\'T GET SORE j usl cause we say some little things

That no one's said before; And see the funny side of things Don' l get sore ~

\\Tould the "son" revolve around the

W c like yo11; honest, kids, we do, H's fun and nothing more, And since we're only teasing you Don'L get sore!

Normal If

Bess Derrick should lose her appeli lc? Gladys Brugger should lose her temper~ Dr. Dickerson should forget his sern1ons? Mr. Gaylord should think as much as he suggests? Gladys Huestis rea11y were a fairy? !\laud Borecn should "·alk on bolh feet? Louise Tracy were good looking? Sarah Fleming didn't like fudge?

Some time, when we have parted, kids, And Normal days are o'er, These jests will picture classmatcs,fricncls,-so Don't get sore!

Ex.

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Music How often is the soul of man inspired By music, which docs thrill us thru and thru, Creating new desires and longings too! The things to which we have so long aspired Seem closer to us; we arc greatly fired By wonderful ambitions. All the bad, That once in us did lie, now makes us sad; vVc pray for help to be all Lhat's desir ed . Oh! there is m usic t hat docs fill our souls Wi th love of ever ything which makes this earth; And t her e is music that is light and gay, That tells us of the happiest of goals; But best of all is music which gives birth To deeper, holier thots at close of day. F. F.

Banquet Song Junior Class Song 1913

Tune-"The Quilting Party.''

'Tis today that we must sever From our friends and classmates dear : But then we'll ne'er forget them ever; The friends, that we made here. Refrain: We arc leaving, Alma Mater , We arc leaving you today, And o ur hearts are filled with sadness As we're leaving you today. Fellow students and instructors; We have learned to love vou well. And to know our love is laSting Time and tide will only tell. Refrain: Them farewell to dear old ~ormal, .\ nd farewell to all the rest; For we're leaving our Alma 1\I ater, And the friends we love the best. Refrain: H . C. L. K.

Tune-''Commcncement Day''

Oh Seniors! Now we greet you Upon our last school day, W c b1ing you our best wishes, \ 'fife wish you good a lway. W c Junior s now must follow Your shining footsteps, bright,, And we must tr y our best now To be supremely right. Oh Seniors~ When you leave us Pray don't forget us here, But kno"' that the old ~orn1al Still holds you all most dear. And when you feel discouraged Think of our last refrain, Forever and for-aye, dears, W c wish you joy and gain.

Poor, Misunderstood Kg's Even tho we arc accused Of never wor king like the rest , Any one who is abused May just step in and try our test. If technics, games and slories all, Seem to you so very small, Just think of other things we do, And vou will find that. we work, too. E.N. 105