Wenonah Yearbook - 1912

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WENONAH

PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1912 ¡ WINONA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 11111111 lllll~:lll lilll ll,llll ll,llll l,llllllll llll lilllll l l l llilllli'lll llllll llllll lllllllillll llilll llll lllll lllll lilllllllllll lllllllil l l l llllll.i lllllllllli il lllllll lllll'lll l, llllllllllll!lll l lll l l l l llllllll l l lllll lllll llllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllllillll lillllllillllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllll l 1 1ll llllllllllllllll:llll l!lllliiiiiiiii,JIIIII:IIIIIIIIIIIiilllllllll llllillllllllll:lllllillllll1llllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllll lilllllillliiii,JIIIIillllllllllllilllllllllll11llllllllllllllll lllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllll lllll llllllll11111111111 11111 1111111111111111111 111111 1111 11 111111111 111111111111'111111111 11111111111111111111111111 111 1


OUR ALMA MATER


Wenonab

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Heap Big Chief

EDITH M. FoLGER

Heap Little Chief Wampum Maker Great Spirits' Countenances

ANNA GRAMS

TRYPH E NA CHISHOLM ( BLANCHE RowLEE REBECCA HUNT MONA RIL E Y

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Big Tribe's Countenances

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Pictures of Hunting Grounds . Legend Writers

MONA RILEY {

Heap Big Laugh Picture Writer

CATHERINE HAWKINS ORRIN FRIED LEONORA WINDHORST EDNA FIFIELD

f }ESSIE NORMAN l MR. HINDMA N

War Dances and Games Tom-tom Men

R U BY PETERSON

Manitou W m:shipers Departed Spirits H eap Little Tribe

RUTH CESANDER ALDA COLGATE KING McDoNALD

Heap Big Powwows

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Keepers of the Papooses Heap Big Crow Keepers of the Wigwams Medicine Men

MABEL OLSON HELIA p ALMGUARD

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To Present, Past, and Futur e N ormalites- Greetingsl

ID

HEN, in the course of a Normal career, it becomes necessary to better the world in general by giving it a new viewpoint with new thoughts and ideals, the Senior class pauses long enough in its strenuous career to publish an Annual. Thus - the Wenonah of 1912.

If, gentle reader, in perusing these pages you do not discover a new thought, do not blame us. But reflect! Study your own mind! Perchance you will find that you are paying more attention to form than to content; or mayhap you are not concreting the picture sufficiently.

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Be that as it may you can only hope to grasp the depth of our ideals, appreciate our art, and understand our humor when you have reached the heights upon which the class of 1912 now stands.

GRACE DIG N I N HAZEL STRA U S

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EDITH M. FoLGER .

EDYTHE McCoN N O N

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B. CHORPE N ING ( MRS. Miss SPECKMAN MR. CoLBY

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LEE PEMBERTO N

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TO THE CITIZENS OF WI NON A WHO HAVE H ELPED TO MAKE THIS SENIOR PUBLICATION A SUCCESS,

WE, THE CLASS OF 1912 DEDICATE

OUR ANNUAL


LAKE SHORE DRIVE, SHOWING SUGAR LOAF

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PRESIDENT GUY E . MAXWELL


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RESIDENT GUY E. MAXWELL was born in Mason County, Illinois, in 1870. Nine years later his family moved to a farm in western Minnesota, where he lived for three y ears. He attended the Appleton public school and later prepared for college 111 the academy of Hamline University. Upon graduating from that institution in 1893, he was elected principal of the village school of Herman, Minnesota. After holding that position for two years, he took up a similar position in the high school of Marinette, Wis., remaining there three years. Desiring to prepare for special work in educational supervision, Mr. Maxwell entered Teachers College at Columbia University in 1898, earning the master's degree the first year and studying for the doctorate the following year. At the close of the second year he was appointed principal of the training department of the Winona State Nor mal School, and came to take up the work in 1900. After four years in this position he was elected president of the school. During the present

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year he was unanimously chosen President of his " Alma Mater," Hamline University, but declined the offer. It should seem then that President Maxwell's whole life has been a preparation for the position which he now holds. The healthy growth of the institution during his administration, and the hearty and loyal support of the entire Faculty of the school in carrying out his policies, furnish evidence of his administrative ability. Some one has said that "A great personality can not be talked about, it must be known to be understood." To know Mr. Maxwell is to admire him. He is a man of strict honesty, and common sense, ever actuated by the highest sense of duty, . and of right rather than by policy. He has a feeling of kindliness and of interest in all, calmly weighing every situation. "The noblest motive is the public good." He is ever willing to sacrifice self for the good of all. At all times he is found working for others. Acting from a sense of duty his life of service makes him the student's friend. May we say of him as was said of Pestalozzi: MAN, CHRISTIAN, CITIZEN.

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jfacultp JosEPH S. GAYLORD, A. M. Psychology and History of Education

W. H . MuNSON, B . S. Z oology and P hysical Science

Knox College, Galesburg, Ill. ; Graduate work , Yal e, Harvard and Berlin Universities; Oratory at Emerson College.

Mi chigan State Normal College; Olivet College; University of Michigan.

THEDA GILDEMEISTER, B . S.

P edagogy and Sttpervisor of Training Normal University, Ill.; University of Chicago; Columbia Uni versity.

B ERTHA

H.

State Normal School, Winona, Minn.; Massach usetts School of Technology; Normal Art School, Boston .

v. SMITH

State Normal School, Winona, Minn.

SPECKMAN

Drawing

Page 8

CAROLINE

V ocal Music and Penmanship

KATE

L.

SPRAGUE, B . S.

Mathematics Michigan State Normal College; University of Michigan.


MILDRED BARNES Aov. GRADUATE " All nature wears an universal grin." MINNEAPOLIS

MAMIE WOHLFARTH HUTCHINSON

Says she, " If I can I'll capture <;t man ."

EDNA HARRIS

NETTTE SIME NEVADA , IA.

Knc . GRADUATE

"A riddle many fain would solve. "

ELEM. GRADUATE

WINONA

" If you want a friend that 's true,

I'm on your list. Page 10

ADV. GRADUATE

ELEANOR SMITH Ar,v. GRADUATE " The flower of meekness grows on a stem of grace." DuLUTH

MARCELLA MINNEAPOLIS

McGEE Aov. GRADUATE

" Happy am I, from care I am free Why aren't they all contcntec! like me? "

ROSE SEIDEL SPARTA, Wrs. Aov. GRADUATE " She that was ever fair and never proud Had tongue at will , and yet was never loud. "

MARY SCHLERMAN OwATONNA

ELEM. GRADUATE

" In no way frivolous."

GRACE REID RED WING

Aov. GRADUATE

" Let no man accost me unless he hath a mighty reason. "

JESSIE KAISER ST. PAUL

ADv. GRADUATE

" She bestows her smiles on all alike ."


J. L. STOCKTON, A. M. Principal of Elementary S chool and Pedagogy

]OHN HERMAN SANDT

Colorado State Teachers College; Columbia University.

East Stroudsburg State Normal School , Pa. ; Summer School, Teachers College, Columbia University.

CLYDE

0.

M amtal Training

RuGGLES, A. M.

History and Social Sciwce

MARY GRANT

Iowa State Teachers College; University of Iowa; Harvard Graduate School.

Librarian

AurA L. BrNZEL, B. S. LO UISE M. KUEHN

Kindergarten Education Kindergarten Course, Teachers College.

Mil waukee

Nor mal

School ;

Secretary State Normal School, Winona, Minn.

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F. ETHEL HARVEY , B.

S.

Physical Education

ANNA

Iowa State Teachers College; Teachers College, Columbia University.

J.

BERRY, A. B.

Teacher in Elementary S cltoo! University of Denver, Colo.

HARRIET CARTER , B.

s.

Teacher in Elementary School Buffalo State Normal; Cornell University; Teachers College, Columbia.

HELEN FORD

STAPLES

T eacher in Elementary School MABEL

L.

MARVIN

Teacher in El ementa1·y School State Normal School, Winona , Minn. Page 10

State Normal School , Winona. Minn.; Boston Correspondence Society; University of Chicago Correspondence School; Columbia School of Oratory, Chicago; Teachers College , Columbia University.

AGNES GROVES STORIE,

PH.

B.

Teacher in Elementa1·y School State Normal School, Oshkosh, Wis.; University of Wisconsin.


FRANCES M. SMITH

Teacher in Elementary School Peabody Teachers College, Nashville, Tenn.; Teachers College, Columbia University.

M. HOLZINGER , A. B. , M. s., B. D. Elementary Science, Botany and Latin Olivet College, Michigan. Yale Seminary. JOHN .

E.

CATHERINE BURKHOLDER, PH. B. . Teach er in Elementary School Kansas State Normal School; University of Chicago.

EMMA B UNN MATTESON, B.S.

Household Arts Stale Normal School, Oneonita, N.Y.; Domestic Science Course, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Household Arts Course, Teachers College, New York City.

MARY w. HOLMES , B. A., B. s. Associate in KindergMten Education Wellesley College; Teachers College, Columbia University.

B. CHORPENNING, A. B . English and Literature Iowa State College; Cornell University, New York. CHARLOTTE

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LENORE B. SHANE WISE , A. B.

ALBERT C. HOD GE

University of

History, English, Principal of High School Michigan State Normal College; attended Columbia University and University of Chicago.

Assistant Physical Director Assistant Physical Director, Y . M. C. A., Winona, Minn.; Student at the Institute and Training School of the Y. M. C. A. , Lake Geneva, Wis.

Matron, Morey Hall Matron, Fargo College, Fargo, N. D.; Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn.; State Normal School, Moorhead, Minn.; State Normal School, Winona, Minn.

Reading Iowa State Teachers College, Chicago.

HARRY H. HINDMAN

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NIRS. B.

R.

KATHERINE

J.

KE NAGA, A.

M.

Dean of Women Ferry Hall , Lake Forest College; College, Cambridge, Mass.

Radcliffe

BEEDE CHARLES

c.

COLB Y , B. PD.,

s.

B.

Geography Michigan State Normal College; University of Chicago.



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0NG sought for Strips of Sheepskin, rolled ! For six long terms, through homesickness and tears, Delightful spreads, and joys, and pink-slipped fears, We've sailed from shore to shore, just Thee to hold! Expression reefs, nor data whirl-pools cold, Did sink our flee t, nor beg us wat'ry biers. The minor, major, notes, which struck our ears, But caused constructive thoughts our minds to mould! 0 Rolls ! Thou art not sheepskins, but the Fleece Of purest gold, which, Jasons all, we've won. Thou art a legal literary lease To teach the youth to live, to rest, to run, To taste the mystic, pedagogic, piece Of science-pie, seasoned, tho' not yet done.

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SUBTILE thing, that calls us ever on, Nor stoops, nor weakens when we feel Those cumbrous cares that bid us steal To haunts of baser self and failure wan, Is this ideal. A growing thing, that e'er at our approach Demands each added step reveal Some 'vantage gained, some hope made real, Removing us a step from self reproach , Is this ideal. A vital thing! Sought for by all earth's race, Nor dreamed that gaining it would seal The fate of future human weal, And woo stagnation's lull to brood in place Of the ideal. A sacred thing to seek but never gain, Defined by earth as the unreal ; Still are we satisfied to feel That in that Spirit-life we shall attain To our ideal.

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Attain? Content the end of growth to see? Not so! Being divine, we kneel Imploring thee to let our zeal To higher levels rise for growth must be Still our ideal. - K. D.

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SERVANT unto Kings am I Who teach the little child. I offer him the brimming cup Of knowledge undefiled. "Drink deep!" I cry, " Nor leave untouched A drop. 'Tis wholly thine ! Love! Beauty! Truth! Take all and live! Beyond are worlds divine !" -

MILDRED BARNES.


LEONORA WINDHORST OLIVIA Aov. GRADUATE " She is a scholar, a ripe , good one, Exceeding wise , fair spoken , and per:; uading "

MAE MATHTS MARSHALL Aov. GRADUATE " Simply sweet and sweetly simple , \Vith many' a smile and many a dimple. "

MYRTLE CROSS

THERESA O'LEARY FLANDREAu , S. D. , Aov. GRAD. " There is mischief in this woman. "

\VINONA

ELEM. GRADUATE

" The sweetness of her mu sic will untune the sky."

REBECCA HUNT Knc. GRAD. '" Tis the little thing.; in life that count. "

MONA RILEY MINNEAPOLIS Aov. GRADUATE " Her air, her manners, all who saw admired. "

ALDA COLGATE BRADLEY , S. D. Aov. GRADUATE " Content to let the world.wag on as it will."

WILLIAM SNYDER \VrNONA Aov. GRADUATE " My only books were woman 's look And folly' s all they've taught me."

EDNA FIFIELD \VtNONA Aov. GRADUATE " Good nature and good sense must ever join .

MARY MAc KENZIE \VrNONA Anv. GRADUATE " Of manners gentle and affections mild. "

REo LAKE FALLs

Pa ge 15


ANNA BUCK L ANES BORO

Aov. GRADUATE

"Her look is full of s miles. "

ALICE GRAY

MARINE ~11LLS

ELEM. GRADUATE

" Merry eyes and merry ways. "

ANNABEL BLOWERS WINONA

ADv. GRADUATE

"You can 't be in love and a s hark at the sa me time. "

MARJORY SPATE S ST. P AUL

ELEM. GRADUATE

"A woman good wit hout pretense.})

MAE MASON \V ABASHA

ELEM. GRADUATE

"A sweet attractive kind of grace."

,__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___.@.

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ETHEL MEGINNIS WINONA

ADv . GRADUATE

" Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit. "

ANNA VINER } ACKSON

ADv. GRADUATE

"Nothing mean to be said about her. "

BLANCHE ROWLEE RusHFORD

ADV . GRADUATE

" Whose talents to fill any station were fit. "

FLORENCE KINNE WINONA

ADv. GRADUATE

"A fair exterior is a silent recommendation. "

JE SSIE NORMAN FARMJNGTON

Ao v.

GRADUATE

" High flight she had and wit and will And so her tongue lay never still. " Page 17


@I EMILY JENSON H UTCHINSON

ELEl\f. GRADUATE

'' \Vh at is man that we s hould consider him ?"

PEARL THOMPSON Aov. GRADUATE " Thotless of Beauty , s he was Beauty 's self. " STI LLWATER

Page /J

LUCY HOULIHAN CALEDONIA

ELEM. GRADUATE

" \Vhat's in a name?"

LEONA WATKINS Ao v. GRADUATE "S he s hould have been a sig ner of the Declaration of Independence. " MARSHALL

LYDIA AUPPERLE Sr. CHARLES Aov. GRADUATE " \Vh at torments of grief yo u endu red From evils which never arrived."

MARY WEIDA CALEDONIA

ELEM. GRAD UA TE

" I am a fema le-w hat I think I mu st speak. "

HARRIET FROMER NEWPORT

ELEM. GRADUAT E

" J do my work with a resolut e will."

SEDATE BROWN Aov. GRADUATE "S he is big in body, brain s and ability." ALBERT LEA

OLI\'E ATWOOD Aov. GRAD. "Sweet young thing, never had a crush."

TREMPEALEAU , \~' Is.

RUBY PETERSON Ao v. GRADUATE " Oh ! there 's nothin g h alf so sw ~et as love's young dream." STILLWATE R


FRANCES POTRATZ \VrNONA Aov. GRADUATE "Many a gentleman friend lnd she."

NESSIE MILLER Sr. CHARLES ELEM. GRADUATE "She had a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade and a hand to execute any mischief.))

Sr.

ANNIE PALMER Aov. GRADUATE "Never idle a moment."

CHARLES

HAZEL NORI-!EIM REo \VING

Aov.

GRADUATE

"A pleasant face , a happy soul."

CORA CHRISTIANSON Aov. GRADUATE " A girl who does not wear her heart on her sleeve but her friends know it is true.'' l\1JNNEAPOLIS

HELENA HOROVITZ ELY Koc. GRADUATE "She has an oar in every man's boat And a finger in every man's pic."

VIOLET MELANDER

BESSIE WEIR

REo VVJNG Aov. GRADUATE ''She was a damsel of delicate mold With hair like sunshine and heart

" All things come to him who waits."

MINNEAPOLIS

Aov.

GRADUATE

of gold."

MABEL ARNELL MINNEAPOLIS Aov. GRADUATE "Delightful task! to rear the tender thot, To teach the young idea to s hoot. "

ALICE TUPER CHATFIELD

ELEM. GRADUATE

"You can tell her by her smiles for miles and miles and miles."

Page 19


ANNA McGREGOR BoiSE , IDAHO

ADv. GRADUATE

EDITH FOLGER WATERTOW>I,

S. D.

ADv. GRAD.

ROSE BLUMENSON ELY

KDG. GRADUATE

" She knows what she knows, when shr knows it. "

"A mind not to be changed by place or time' ·

" '\\' ears herself work."

GRACE DIGNIN

ELSIE GROVER Aov. GRADUATE " Het eyes are song without words. "

JANESVILLE

MERRIAM PARK

Koc.

GRADUATE

" A diligent seeker for the germs of knowledge ." Page 20

\VrNONA

out

looking

for

MAY MURPHY ELEM. GRADUATE

" It takes the Iris h to beat the Dutch. "

CATHERINE HAWKINS Aov. GRADUATE " A student. a literary light and knows how to ask intelligent ques· tions. " MINNEAPOLIS

ELLEN FORSBERG Aov. GRADUATE " Not very tall , nor very small But fair and sweet, and liked by all." MINNEAPOLIS

KATHERINE DAVIES ORIENT. IowA Koc . GRADUATE " From her sweet lips , smooth elo · cution flows ."

ELVA LUMLEY RENVILLE

ELEM. GRADUATE

" She speaks, behaves and acts just as she ought."


BLANCHE MEEK Aov . GRADUATE "S he is meekness itself. "

ANNA MALONEY ARCADIA

ELE~L GRADUATJ<-;

CLAREMONT

"She has hair of raven hue And eyes of Iris h blue. "

MARION BURTON Koc. GRADU ATE " He is a fool who thinks by force or skill to turn the current of thi s maiden'~ will." HIBRING

MAUDE LITTLE REDWO OD FALLS '

4

ELEM. GRAD .

1 chatter, chatter as I go."

LAURA ROBINSON Aov. GRADUAT E " Thy modesty 's a candle to thy wits."

HAMMOND

ARLOINE FORBES Aov. GRADUATE " Re -:M:orse is hers."

:M AR SHALL

LENA ETSCHlED PtNE IsLAND

ELEM. GRADUATJ•:

"A nature so mod("st and rare You hard ly at first sec the strength that is there. "

FLORENCE LYMAN Ro cKWELL, IA.

ELEM. GRADUATE

" The way s he says " Lover JJ goes to my heart. "

EULA WAY Aov. GRADUATE " A quiet lass ; there are but few who know the treas ure hid in you." ClAREMONT

WINIFRED FERNALD APPL ETON

Koc.

GRADUATE

" In faith, \Vinni e, you have a merry he a rt. " Page 21


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ANNA MALONEY ARCADIA

EL£).1. GRADUATI-:

"She has hair of raven hue And eyes of lris h blue."

JlLANCHE MEEK Aov. GRADUATE "She is meekness itself."

CLAREMONT

LAURA ROBI NSON Ao v. GRADUATE " Thy modesty's a candle to thy wits."

HAMMOND

LENA ETSCHIED PINE I SLA N D

ELEM. GRAD UATE

" A nature so modest and rare You ha rd ly at firs t sec the strength that is there."

EULA WAY ClAREMONT

Ao v.

GRADUATB

;(A quiet lass; there are but few who know the treasu re hid in you."

c===========~© ~------~--~

MARION BURTON Koc. GRADUATE " He is a fool who thinks by force or skill to turn the current of this maiden's will." HJBRING

MAUDE LITTLE RF.DWOOD FALLS

ELEM. GRAD.

" I chatter, chatter as I go."

ARLOINE FORBES Aov. GRADUATE " Re-Morse is hers."

MAR S HALL

FLORENCE LYMA N RocKW ELL, I A.

ELEM. GRAD UATE

" The way s he says " Lo ver" goes to my heart."

WINIFRED FERNALD APPLETON

Koc.

GRADUATE

" In faith , \\'innie. you have a merry hea rt."

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!Q HELIA PALMGARD ELY

MARY TRUESDELL

Aov. GRADUATE

"Her heart is not in her work."

a.________

Page >JJ

Koc. GRADUATE

"To teach or to marry- that is the question."

RUTH HILL YORKVILLE, ILL.

ELEM. GRAD.

"Comrosure is thy charm."

BEATRICE HARRIES MINNEAPOLIS

KDG. GRADUATE

"Her cheerfulness is an offshoot of her goodness."

LEONA WOLF Aov. GRADUATE "Rare compound of oddity, frolic and fun/'

STILLWATER

---~a

GLADYS McFADDEN MAN., CAN. Koc. GRAD. " Not out for a school teacher tho she has attended one year at the Normal." EMERSON,

TAYLORS FALLS

RENA CRANE WINDOM

ELEAL GRADUATE

"Quiet but very effective."

I-IELEN LUDWIG CALEDONTA

ELEU. GRADUATE

"Cheeks that resemble the roses so fair."

TRYPHENA CHI SHOLM STILLWATER Aov. GRADUATE "'Tis the mind that makes the body rich."

LOUISE WARREN Aov. GRADUATE " Knows her own mind and talks like lightning." MINNEAPOLIS


ALICE OYEN MINNEAPOLIS

ELEM. GRADUATE

"There was no hurry in her hands, No hurry in her feet. "

ETHEL BLANCHARD UTICA

ELEM. GRADUATE

" Modest doubt is called the beacon of the wise."

MARY A. HOLMES Aov. GRADUATE " Whose lilLie body lodged a mighty mind. " GENEVA

LEE PEMBERTON WINONA Aov. GRADUATE nLaugh every time you're tickled And once in a while any how."

EDITH TAYLOR Aov. GRADUATE " Virtue alone is happiness below." ST. CHARLES

MARGARET RIORDAN DASSEL

ELE:M. GRADUATE

"Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you."

VIOLA KNAPP Aov. GRADUATE "Of one heart a nd name with him.'

DuBUQUE , IA.

OLGA PFEFFER BLUE EARTH

ELEM. GRADUATE

" She is checked for silence but never taxed for speech."

DEAN BALDWIN REowooo FALLS

Aov.

GRADUATE

" Say naught to her whe n you see her in the halls and she'll say naug ht to you.n

MYRTLE SUTHERLAND Aov. GRADUATE " Follow the Gleam."

CHATFIELD

Page 2.:!


GERTRUDE McNALLAN KELLOGG

Aov. GRADUATE

"As cheerful as the day is long.''

VERONICA SCHOUWEILER HAMMOND

ELEM. GRADUATE

''She understands the magic of silence.'' Page 21,

HELEN HEITMAN Aov. GRADUATE "Silence never yet betrayed anyone."

RUTH CESANDER Swux FALLS, S. D., Knc. GRAD. ' ' Vlith earnest, pensive look Bending o'er an open book."

WINO NA

ARLINGTON SANDT

JEAN COLVILLE Aov. GRADUATE "0 sleep, it is a blPssed thing Beloved from pole to pole."

\ VYKOFF

FouNTAIN CITY

WTNONA

ADV. GRADUATE

" You can tell what kind of wheels he has in his head hy the spokes that come out of his mouth. "

REowooo FALLS

ANNA GRAMS ADv. GRAD UA TE

" In mind very wise."

SIGNIE ANDERSON CooK KDG. GRADUATE " A little nonsense now and then is relished by the best of them."

MABEL OLSEN

STELLA MEANS ELEM. GRADUATE

"Strength of .nind is exercise, not rest ."

JACKSON

Aov. GRADUATF.

"I cannot check my girlish blush. "


KATE SCALES j\1JNNEAPOL1S

Aov. GRADUATE

"A woman who did her own thinking and needed but little advice. "

MYRTLE HEDLOFF Aov GRADUATE :'I am, tho I say it m.yself, worth going a mile to see." ELY

LOLA CRAGG WINONA SPECIAL "Every action is measured by the depth of the sentiment from which it proceeds."

HAZEL STRAUS LACROSSE, Wrs. Aov. GRADUATE "Music hath charms to soothe the troubled mind. "

EMMA PETERSON Aov. GRADUATE "I have much within myself that pleases me. How I should hate to be homely." MINNEAPOLIS

LUClLE McAR THUR \ VINONA

ELEM. GRADUATE

"This naughty word disturbs mereaction."

GRACE SIMPSON SPARTA , ' VIs.

Koc . GRADUATE

"'Tis a lesson you s hould heed, Jf at first you don 't succeed Try, try, again. "

FRANK J. STREIFF Chief Engineer

Page 25


MOREY HALL AND WEST LODGE


C!Commtnctmtnt

~rogram

jfrtbap, jfune 7. 1912

®pera

~OUSt

I

Music:

Glory to Isis!

;

Verdi

From 'Aida'

i

MENDELSSOHN CLUB NOR MAL SCHOOL CHORUS

I I

Prayer

~nnounctmtnt~ ANNUAL SERMON- Rev. L. B. Crosby, Sunday, June 2, at 8 p. m., in Central M. E. Church.

'REV. T. S. DEVITT CLASS PLAY-"Nathan Hale" by Clyde Fitch, Wednesday, June 5, at 8 p. m., in the Opera House.

Music: Choral, "Cast Thy Burden upon the Lord" From 'The Elijah' Mendelssohn

CLOSING CHAPEL ExERCISEs-By the Senior Class, Thursday, June 6, at 9:30 a . m., in the Assembly Room.

NORMAL SCHOOL CHORUS Address: "A Great Trinity" PRES. L. C. LORD, Charleston (Ill. ) State Nor mal School Music:

"0 Art Divine"

Schubert

NoRMAL ScHOOL CHoRus Presentation of Diplomas DIRECTOR JED L. WASHBURN, Duluth Music: "Beauteous Night" Lex Contes d' Hoffman

"

I

FACULTY RECEPTION TO THE SENIOR CLASS-Thursday, June 6, at 3:30 p. m., in Morey Hall. COMMENCEMENT ExERCISEs- Address, "A Great Trinity," Pres. L. C. Lord, Charleston (Ill. ) State Normal School, Friday, June 7, at 8 p. m., in the Opera House.

Offenbach

Miss MYRTLE E. CRoss MR. LEE R. PEMBERTON Benediction

Page 27


<!Class

~lap

((ast of ((ijaracttrs Nathan Hale (Yale 1773) Ebenezer Lebanon L ieut. Col. Knowlton Captain Adams Thomas Adams Wi ll iam Hu ll (Yale 1773) Captain Guy Fitzroy Lieut. Cunningham J aspar British Sentinel Page 1!8

H . H. HINDMAN ARLINGTON SANDT KING R. McDoNALD ORRIN FRIED HARRIS PETT LLOYD GENTZKOW HARRY WHITE WILLIAM SNYDER GEORGE WHITE LEE PEMBERTON

Alice Adams . MAE MATHIS Mistress Knowl ton MYRTLE E. HEDLOFF Angelica Knowl ton ELLEN FORSBERG The Widow Chichester . . . . MARCELLA McGEE School Gir!s:-BESSIE WIER, MONA RILEY, REBECCA HUNT, LEONORE W I NDHORST Schoo l Boys:- SAMUEL WRIGHT, EvERETT CHALMERS, FLORENCE CoNSIDINE, URBAN SCHUH, ELMER TAINTOR, FLOYD PERKINS. American Soldiers:- EVERETT CHALMERS, URBAN SCHUH, FLORANCE CONSIDINE. British So ldiers :- LEE PEMBERTON, FLOYD PERKINS, KING McDONALD, WILLIAM SNYDER.


ctClass "Nathan Hale," a patriotic drama by Clyde Fitch, will be presented by the Seniors, under the supervision of Miss Lenore B. Shanewise.

j}atban ACT I Time- An April morning, 1775. Place-The Union Grammar School, New London, Conn. Nathan Hale, a staunch Whig, is a young schoolmaster in New London, Conn. Among the pupils in his school is a charming young girl, Alice Adams, with whom he falls in love. Her villainous cousin, Guy Fitzroy, a British officer, loves her also. Hale takes every opportunity to keep her in after school. During one of these "punishments," he confesses his love for her. Her cousin, Angelica Knowlton, enters the school and becomes infatuated with the assistant schoolmaster, Lebanon. ACT II Time-A September afternoon, 1776. Place- Colonel Knowlton 's Home, Harlem Heights. A year later Angelica elopes with the courageous(?) Lebanon. Hale, now in his country's service, comes to Col. Knowlton's house to attend a conference. He finds Alice here and tells her of the difficulties besetting the Continental Army. Fearful of the outco me, she makes him promise never to risk his life unnecessarily. The conference is called. Her desire to remain is refused; unseen she hides behind the curtains. The country calls for a volunteer to discover the British plan of attack. Hale volunteers and the conference closes. Alice rushes out and reminds him of his promise. She pleads with him, implores him , and finally overcome with grief and anger, falls unconscious. ACT III SCENE

I

Time- A September evening, 1776. Place- Widow Chichester's Tavern, Long Island.

~lap The story of the play centers around Nathan Hale, the American Spy, well known in the Revolutionary History of our country.

~ale SCENE II Time- The next morning. Place- The same. In an inn on Long Island, Hale, acting as a spy, meets Fitzroy, who suspects him. After trying many ways, without success to make him reveal himself, Fitzroy sends for Alice, saying that her lover is dying and wishes to see her. He tells Hale of his suspicion and his plan. Unseen, Hale bids the Widow Chichester to warn the girl. Alice comes but pretends not to recognize her lover. Fitzroy is enraged. However, the faithful servant J as par, follows his mistress and, unwarned, recognizes Hale. Fitzroy immediately arrests him and then starts toward Alice, determined to have her, but Hale overpowers him and flees with Alice.

ACT IV SCENE

I

Time- September, 1776, the night following. Place- The tent of a British Officer. On the evening before his death, Hale learns from Alice 's brother, Tom, that he has saved the states. Tom also brings Alice for the last farewell. SCE NE II Time- The next morning. Place- An orchard with a large tree in the center which is to be used as a gallows. The British soldiers lead Hale to the gallows, to the roll of muffled drums where he repeats those well known words, "I only regret that I have but one life to give to my country." MYRTLE E. HEDLOFF. Page 29


3f unior~


m:bt

~oul

of attica

0

PERFECT soul of Attica, undimmed, Unworn by time, untouched by death and tears, Immortal of immortals, whom the years Have ever worshipped and have ever hymned.

What happy chance hath caught and sharply limned Thy form against the cliff that far uprears Its noble head, yet listens while it hears The naiad mirth with which its base is rimmed! Too much we miss thee in this later world, Forget the joy,- the care-free happinessThe beauty and the treasure it impearled. 0 Attic Spirit! touch our souls and heal The ache for things whose worth we only guess, And h elp us know, because you help us feel. -

JAME S LEROY STOCKTON.


•


,ffleubel~~obn

FIRST SOPRANO MISS GRACE E. CHARLES, Minneapolis MisS MYRTLE E. CRoss, Winona Miss LAURA R. RICHARDSON, St. Paul MISS MILDRED BARNES, Minneapolis MISS R uTH E. HILL, Yorkville, Ill. Miss ALICE TUPER, Chatfield MISS HAZEL STRAUS, La Crosse, Wi s. SECOND SOPRANO Miss MARION BuRTON, Hibbin g MISS RuBY A. PETERSON, Stillwater MISS GLADYS SANDERS, Minneapolis MISS FLORENCE STEICHEN, Winona Page 34

'!Club

FIRST ALTO Miss Lucy FROST, Lak e City Miss J uNE McKEowN, Chatfield MISS FLORENCE LEONHARDT, Winona Miss EvA SwENDEMAN, Dodge Center Miss OLGA PFEFFER, Blue Earth

SECOND ALTO Miss MARY C . WEIDE, Caledonia MISS H AZEL VAN DE BoGART, Zumbrota Miss EDITH ERWIN, Crookston MISS LEONA WATKINS, Marshall


~cnbclssobn

C?

HE Mendelssohn Club has rendered many pleasing selections during the past school year; not only at the regular Chapel exercises, but also at the Liszt and Commencement programs. The music of only the greatest composers is used by the organization, as shown in the following May Day program by the Club:

0 Lord Most Holy In the Boat Serenade Song of a Shepherd Sweet Genevieve Sextette- Lucia de Lammermoor

Cesar Franck Edward Grieg Ethelbert Nevin J. Bertram Fox Henry Tucker Donizetti

The Club has displayed its ability not only by its chorus work, but by programs given by individual members of the organization. Miss Grace Charles gave an excellent program consisting of Irish and German Folk Songs, and the following selsctions from Schubert and Schumann: Hark! Hark! The Lark Who is Sylvia Dedication

}

The Nut Tree } The Lotus Flower

Franz

C!Cluh

The Franz Liszt Centennial Program was a delightful combination of individual, chorus and club work. PART I

Reading- One Hundred years of Liszt, N atilie Curtis Miss EDITH WILLIAMS

March of the Crusaders

"Legend of St. Elizabeth"

MENDELSSOH N CLUB

Mignon's Song

Knowest Thou the Land? Mrss GRACE E. CHARLES

Thou Art Like a Flower MR . LEE

R.

PEMBERTON

The Loreley NORMAL CHORUS

PART II

Rhapsodie No. 2 Tannhauser March, Arranged by Liszt Liebestraume Miss ALVINA BoLEY

Schubert Robert Schumann

A number of very delightful songs were beautifully rendered by Miss Myrtle Cross. Among them were " Mandalay," by Charles Willeby, and "To You" by Oley Speaks. Mr. Lee M. Pemberton, our baritone soloist, has won his laurels principally through his solos, but his obligato work deserves creditable mention.

The Chorus has given some remarkable selections, the composers represented being Handel, Haydn, Mendelssohn, and Gounod. "The Heavens are Telling," from The Creation, "He is Watching Over Israel" from The Elijah, "Sanctus and Benedictus" from St. Cecilia Mass were among the compositions given. The vocal number on the Lecture Course this season was a recital by Frederic Martin. His program was full of variety. The selections were from the Old Classics, Modern Lieder, Song in French , and Modern Songs in English . Page 35


~ri ~tgm a

V

1Littrarp

URING the last t erm , the public speaking class formed a new organization in this school , the "Tri Sigma Literary Society." The members of this class realized the need of wider social intercourse and a more enthusiastic school spirit, and were anxiou s to obtain the values of more extensive literary work , as well as the cooperative aspects of an organization. To secure these advantages for themselves, for others of the school, and for the institution th ey felt that one of the best means was through membership in a literary society. The membersh ip at present consists of twenty-five people, but it is th e plan of the society to increase the numb er to forty, which is th e maximum number provided for in their constitution. The initiation of the first new members took place April twenty-seventh, after which they were welcomed a t the first social function of the society. The society elected the following officers and committees: L eonora Windhorst, President; Lee Pemberton, Vice-President; Harry White, Secretary; Mary E. Baldwin , Treasurer; Catherine D avies, critic ; an executive committee to have charge of th e programs; a nd a membership committee to accept the na mes of the candidates. The regul a r meetings of the society are held once in two weeks , on Saturday evening. At each meeting a literary program is given for th e m embers a nd their guests. After a short intermission, a business meeting is called at whi ch only those belonging to the society are present. At this time all business is transacted a nd the critic's report is given . The following progra m was given at an open mee tir. g in the Assembly room , May 11 , 191 2: Page SIJ

~ocittp

HUMOR PART I 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

MR. FRIED MR. PETT Mrss DAVIES MISS BARNES

Monologue, "A Telephone Romance" Musical Selection (piano solo) Series of P a ntomimes on the Annual(a) Getting Advertisements . Miss FROST, Miss M EEK, Miss CoLGATE, MISS RILEY, MISS WILLIAMS (b) A Seni or a t t he Photographer's MISS HEDLOFF. MR. SANDT (c) Editor-in-chief at Work . MISS ROWLEE (d) The Critic MR. WHITE (e) When the Annual Comes Out . MISS ROWLES, MISS BALDWIN, MISS PETRICH, MISS TRUES DELL, MR. HAWLEY

PART II Farce entitled , "No M en Wanted" Cast: MISS WINDHORST, MISS STRAUS, MTSS NORMAN 2. Vocal Solo- " \Voman" . MR. PEMBERTON The Society is t a king st eps to become a n incorporated body, in the h ope that its influence will become a force in the institution, because of its lasting organization, good literary work and the benefits reaped from it by the student b ody. 1.


J)ou~ebolb

HE opening of the Winona Normal School last fall wa s marked by an event so important as to make us feel that its entire course had been changed and made better. Although young and few in number, we- the Household Arts Department- have set sail with the highe st courage, and the confidence that we can arrive safely and well equipped with the knowledge of how, when, and how much mankind should eat . We have fitted ourselves so well in this chosen branch of learning that we feel, in the selecting and rejecting of the different kinds of foods, as the poet did when h e said: "No pickles now for me I ' m as healthy as can be ; Coffee now's no consolation I believe in much hydration ; From infection I'll be free So no more ham for me. "

~rt~

But the science of cooking is not the only thing we h ave studied ; sewing, house planning and furnishing, laundering, and home nursing which is very important because we not only must learn to feed people but¡ also know how to take care of them. In a few words Meredith gives us the significa nce of the work done in this department: " We may live without poetry, music and art, We may live without conscience, and live without heart ; We may live without friends ; we may live without books; But civilized man cannot live without cooks. He may live without books,- what is knowledge but grieving ? He may live without hope,- what is hope but deceiving? H e may live without love,- what is passion but pining? But where is the man that can live withou~ dining?" Page 37


O

1Sinbergarten 11\epartment

HE kindergarten department may be considered by some a rather unimportant part of the school since its members are so few in number; but size does not always determine value, for "the best things come in small packages."

Either the department is growing more popular, or the withdrawal of the tuition fee has had it> speedy effect, for this year the Junior class¡ is twice the size of the Senio1. Altogether there were thirty-seven . students enrolled in September 1911, under the directorship of Miss Binzel and Miss Schwable. What a delightful surprise awaited the Seniors this last fall as they stepped into the old, familiar class rooms! For there, in place of the dilapidated green boards and faded blue wall paper, they found fresh boards and buff-tinted walls, also a generous equipment of lockers and cupboards. Now the materials need no longer be kept on tables but may be stored away neatly. The first event of great importance was the annual picnic supper at Bluffside Park. This has gradually grown to be a class institution; it is really a class introduction, for it paves the way for class spirit between Juniors and Seniors. We hope that the kindergartners of the future will see fit to m ake this a time honored custom. This cla >s spirit has been shown throughout the year in the parties that have been given and in the Friday afternoon teas. It is hard to classify these teas exactly. Some one Page 38

looking in might call them sewing bees, and then again, some one might say they were information circles. Well, they were both, altho they were held more for the purpose of becoming better acquainted, than for anything else. The city kindergartners joined us in these little social circles. The special features of these teas i n c l u de d talks given by Mrs. Choate, Mrs. Lees, Miss ¡ Binzel, Miss Stewart and others. Several parents' meetings have been held in the interests of the kindergarten and primary department. At some or these meetings the teachers presided, and at others, the parents. Both teachers and parents took part in the general discussions. These meetings have been a great help in bringing the school in closer touch with the home. Everything moved along smoothly after the opening of the fall term until we heard that Miss Schwable was about to leave. Juniors and Seniors alike regretted to see her go, but all knew that she was giving up her work here in order that she might help at home, where she was so greatly needed. Miss Mary W. Holmes of Boonton, New Jersey, took her place as associate kindergarten teacher and we have come to appreciate her both as a friend and as a teacher. In years to come we hope to find this department grown in size and in prestige, looked upon, not as of little importance, but as an influential factor in the life of the Normal School. GRACE DIGNIN '12.


I [!]

IIIIIIII IIIIIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIII IIIIII IIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIII I IIIIIIIIIIIIIil l llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllmllllllllllllllll llllll llllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll:llllllllll llilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llilll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IDIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllillll llllllllllllllll 1111111111

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O

RE department of physical education is one of the most attractive in the Winona Nor mal School. The course is so wide in range that each student finds so me work which appeals especially to him. The new gymnasium offers every facility for indoor sport s.

There are many who became "braves" in baske t ball. To some 'twas a new game but others were veterans in this art of warfare . An inter-class schedule was arranged for the Senior, Junior, and high school teams, the high school " middies" winning the championship. The games between the Normal men and the outside team s drew large crowds from the many basket ball enthusiasts. Captain Perkins' team closed the season with a well earned victory over Gale College, the score being 26 to 17. The eager interest of the Winona Nor mal School in the great Am erican game was truly shown by the number who rushed to take their places at the bat as soon as the baseball season opened. Their ability and strength have been displayed in the exciting mat ches played between the members of the Winona Baseball League. Many did not care for games but preferred a life in the watery depths. These took advantage of the new course in swimming. Some became adepts in the art of life saving and rescue work. The classes in the artistic phase of folk dancing and rhythm

were very popular. The results of this work were demon strated in a clever program consisting of folk and national dances. ]111111111111[

fjr ogram NORWEGIAN-Mountain March DA NISH- The Ace of Di amonds FIN NISH- Sjalaskuttan- Bounding H eart ScoTCH- Reel of Four I TALIAN- Tara ntelJ a

SwEDISH- bstgotapolska; Vafva vadmal- Weaving Dance AMERICAN-Folk D a nce; Couple D a nce; Butterfly Schottische ENGLISH- Pop Goes the Weasel; Off She Goes; Trenchmore; Old English Dance; Ribbon Dance. lllllllllllllt

The spirit in any educational institution is revealed by loyalty and enthusiasm shown in the department of athletics. Fair play and good fellow ship which are so manifes t among the men and women in the various gymnasium classes and sports, characterize the school spirit of the Winona Nor mal School.

Page 39


RHYTHM CLASSES

Page 40


BA SE BALL AND SWI MMING POOL

Page 41


W. N. S. BASKET BALL TEAM

JUNIOR BASKET BALL TEAl\{

MIDDIE TEAM

SENIOR BASKET BALL_ TEAM

TENNIS



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jfrienbsbip

ITHIN the last ten years the Young Woman 's Christian Association has been established in almost every college, normal school, and university in our country. The increase in membership shows that students everywhere have found this a most helpful and valuable organization. Our school is not an exception to the rule. The sympathy and loyalty whi ch have been given the association , have set it upon a strong foundation and ha ve inspired its workers with interest and enthusiasm. The one feature of the work which must receive special mention, is the wee kly prayer meeting. During preceding years this service has been held on Wedn esday or Thursday afternoon in Society Hall, but because of the inconvenience of that hour, the time and place were both changed. Now the meetings are held on Wednesday evenings at Morey Hall. Only those who have attended can know the help and stre ngth received there. Many splendid talks have been given by members of the faculty and by the citizens of Winona. These t a lks have helped to bring about a deeper and truer understanding between t eacher and student, and have given a new insight into the things that are really worth while. Special selections of music have added greatly to the interest of th ese meetings. And now, what about the social times? They, surely, must not be forgott en ! They began with the opening of school in September, when the new stud ents were heartily welcomed by members of the society and made to feel that th ey had cast their lot among friends. How delicious the cold lemonade tasted on that hot afternoon of registration day! But that was only a sample of what was to follow. The informal reception given for all was a most delightful occasion and a splendid opportunity for becoming acquainted. The interest which it a roused among the students showed itself in the hearty response given when th e next party was announced, under the tit le "A Frolic." The year's work has left many pleasant memories among the students and has united them in a firm band of friendship .

0

WHAT a friend I newly met, one day! Someor.e, I thought, to share my frolics free, To laugh light-heartedly, when times were gay, Or smile a way slight shadows, I might see; Yes, just a friend to sympathize with me When all the world seemed cloudy-like, uncl ear, Because a cross had bowed my head, maybe, Or some grave fault of mine, aroused my fear; A friend, indeed, sent by the Father-Friend, with cheer. I thought He sent this kindly, helping, hand; But no! How little may I now express God's mercy, as its measure does demand! 'Twas not a friend lik e that, I now confess, God gave me here, but rather did He bless Me with a bud, with perfect, golden, core, A soul from out His garden, in excess Of love , a bud to open, and the more Reveal pure sacred Friendship, through its parting door.

RUTH CESANDER.

ÂŽfficers of !J. W. {{. Ql jfor !Jrar 1911=1912 President Vice-President Secretary Treasttrer . . M embers hip Committee Devotional Committee Finance Committee . Intercollegiate Committee Music Committee . Social Committee .

MAE MATHIS J ESSIE NoRMAN RUTH CESANDER BESSIE JENSON . JESSIE NORMAN REBECCA HUNT MYRTLE HEDLOFF MAUD WHITTET EDITH ERWIN VIOLET MELANDER

0 Thou, Our Father, Friend, and Gard'ner, there And h ere! But let all heart-buds break, unfold , To form most perfect centers, by our care, That they, like Thine, may e'er disclose the gold; May we, by purity, commun ion hold With one another, and all time, with Thee; For Father-Gard'ner, neither new, nor old, But everlasting as Thine Own must be Our Friendship. So we share Thy Heaven's harmony. -

RosE SEIDELL. Pa ge 45


Jflorep J)all

DINING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

~cents

STUDENT'S ROOM

KITCHEN


~octal

1Ltfe of ;ifttlorep J!)all

HIS school year great efforts have been made to make it a most enjoyable and profitable one for the students. Far more was accomplished than we had expected and we can say that there is a greater feeling of sympathy among the students than ever before. Many interesting events have happened, some of which we will attempt to describe. The season opened with a delightful reception given at Morey Hall, Oct. 13, by the Faculty to the students of the Normal School and also to the citizens of Winona. Music was furnished by the Winona Orchestra and during the course of the evening light refreshments were served. This was an excellent chance of meeting the members of our teaching body. The receiving line consisted of Mr. ar:d M1 s. G. E. Maxwell, Mr. and Mrs. Hodge, Mr. and Mrs. Ruggles, Miss Harvey, Miss Shanewise, Mr. Colby, Miss Matteson, Miss Kenaga and Mr. Somsen. Two informal frolics were given by the Y. W. C. A. girls in the gymnasium. The first one was held in the early part of September and was well attended by the students. Each guest on entering the building was given a card on which she wrote her name and home address so that all might . become acquainted. The former students renewed old friendships and many new ones were formed. The evening ended with two grand marches, the first one being led by Mr. Colby and Mrs. Chorpenning, and the second by Mr. Hindman and Miss Straus. Each group vied to see which could go through the prettiest and quaintest actions. The second frolic was given during the latter part of November. A very interesting program had been prepared, one pleasant feature being the pantomime, "Mrs. Jarley's Wax Works." The following is a program given by the West Lodge Vaudeville Troupe in the latter part of February. A.

B. C.

D. E.

Selection . . . The West Lodge Educated Dog Novelty Entertainers Legerdemain

N. G . SYMPATHY ORCHESTRA IzziE-Do-A- CANCAN MrKY-lLL-Y-MORECAN ( GERANIUM ASSISTANT JEREMIAH { MME. HUMAN SHANK Selection from Grand Opera M . GREAT SCOTTI Late of Metropolitan Grand Opera Co. INTERMISSION

F.

Play-itte-"The Snow-cap Sisters GeneraL Manager . Advertising Agent Musical Director . Head Usher . Costume Designer .

WEST LODGE THEATRICAl. STAFF DICK RICHARDSON E. SwrNDLEMAN IKY WESTMAN H. STRAUSSY CLARA HODGE

The orchestra was a high success. We are sure it cannot be surpassed and those who did not hear that inspiring music certainly missed one of the greatest chances offered in a life time. The educated dog was a marvel. To this day his cleverness is talked about. The novelty entertainers by means of their graceful dancing brought memories of ancient Greece and the days that are no more. Monsieur Legerdemain in his sleight-of-hand performances .did most clever work. How he did his wonderfully mysterious feats cannot be fathomed. The vocal solos of Mme. Human Shank and M. Great Scotte selected from grand opera are beyond human expression. Nothing can be said but the feeling remains. In the Play-itte human character was portrayed in all its peculiarities. Never before have we witnessed such arts. The performance throughout showed the best training. The costumes were beautiful. For them the troupe is indebted to Clara Hodge, designer. There has always been something to do for the girls that live at Morey Hall but the girls at private places have found time hanging heavily on their hands. Miss Kenaga who had an inkling of how affairs were outside of the Hall, planned, as she always does, to make life more pleasant, by uniting the girls into neighborhood groups. Through the kindness of the ladies who gladly opened their homes to these parties, many pleasant afternoons were spent. Miss Kenaga has given a series of teas at Morey Hall on the first and fourth Tuesdays of each month. The women of Winona and the students have assisted at these teas. Some of their special features have been the rendering of musical and literary selections. Page 47


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STUDY HOURS AT MOREY HALL

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HIS study in clay modeling, taken from Spaldings' interesting group, is strong in expression of character. The boys are "Tossing up for first choice." The one whose hand can grasp the " last hold" leaving the bat free enough to have a knife blade sliced across its top will win first choice. The stout lad, with exultation expressed in face and pose, is seizing every advantage for forcing the other 's hand upward. Note the sturdy thumb joint of the left hand crowding upward, and the spreading fin gers. The slender youth gazes at the overtopping finger, with anxious face, di sm ay in every line of the drooping figure. He is the coming man who accepts the results of life without considering the causes, the other will be the type who wins at all costs.

!.'=====~ Page 50


gives opportunity for a la rger range and variety of problems. It impresses a sympathetic altitude toward modern industrialism and factory conditi ons. Learning to operate machines gives a n industrial intelligence which proves useful in ord ering our relations to t he material world. After one has become proficient in using the comm on tools, the machines a re used. Those who have had a course in join ery can now cut mortises in a few minutes with ease a nd utilize the time saved, in other work . The band saw is used only b y the instructor and authorized students. Lumber is cut to stock sizes required for grade woodwork, furniture making, a nd cabinet m a king. Special shapes and cuttin gs are also done advantageously with the band saw. Woodturning is a distinct line of work. Exercises are given in soft wood turn in g to familiarize one with the tools and operations, an d these a re applied in the making of finished a rticles in h ard wood. Cen ter turn in g a nd face plate turning are taken up . In advanced work , the courses offer the maxi mum amount of information and skill in practical methods of construction with th e minimum amount of labor a nd material.

jl}ew ..:fflacbines in .:fflanual m:raining 11Bepartment HE efficiency of t he manual training department has recently been augmented by the addition of three high g~ad e wood-work ing machines, nam ely: a Diamond foot-power lnorliser, a n Oli ver 30-i)l ch ba nd saw, a nd a 12-inch American wood-turning lath e. It is only recently t hat machines h ave found a place in Manual Trainin g work. Th eir introduction has raised questions as to their place and function in education. There is no doubt that their in coming broadens the scope of the work undertaken , gives experience in a greater range and variety of proble ms and saves time a nd la bor. No one wo uld leach agriculture for practical and cultural purposes by having the pupil sp ad e a nd prepare by ha nd even a city block. Neither should the chisel, plane, a nd saw be used too laborio usly af ter a sufficient number of projects have familia rized one wi th t he order a nd processes of h and t ool work. The use of tim e and labor saving means Page 5 1


3Jn tbt

~brpbrrb' ~ ~rm~

;f$1p ~onnrt (Composed upon compulsion in Literary Interpretation Class)

X

BLESSED sleep has claimed him for its own, And yet, 'twas only a brief yesterday He plucked the rose, and wandered by the way. The Reaper came with muffled steps unknown And cut the flower, dimming hope's fair ray. It was as if a lily lately blown, Feeling the breath of icy winds a-moan Should fall asleep on some bright morn in May. Most like a blossom on a bank of snow, He lay, too beautiful for earth to lose. Such peace and love, such purity, I know The gentle Shepherd's arms could not refuse. He calls His lambs from trials and cares below, To all the joy His goodness doth diffuse. -

CATHERINE HAWKINS,

'12.

SIT me down a sonnet to begin All fraught with worry, eyes with gloom aglare. Of themes, I have a plenty, words no more than air; But since to fail would be a sorry sin, Right valiantly, I strive success to win. And here's my theme! my own, so black despair Toned till my dankest grief it shall declare And fills the frightened air with dismal din. But lo! my gloom and grief are grown to fun, For rhymes are right and five feet fairly run . The sonnet turn stands out like shining sun, Alliterations, cadences are spun And now my great and glorious work is done, And as a sonnetier a name I 've won! -

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H AT constitutes our state? Is it a land Of silent forests dark with fir and pine, Of untold treasures hidden in the mine 'Till man its magic secrets should command? Does it consist of limpid lakes which stand Reflecting Heaven's blue, of fields which shine With golden wheat, while toil its strength combines To garner sheaves for the active miller's hand? Yea, our proud state is all of this, and more, For men she boasts, true men, whose zealous care In field, in mine, in town, or in a score Of battles far from home, by sword and prayer, Has made her name a light to go before All other states; and all the world her heir. -

MYRTLE HEDLOFF,

MARCELLA McGEE.

~ ~raprr

INCE Thou, 0 God, hast given us to see Ideals wrought out before us, day by day, Into such simple words, and ordered way Of life, that holy precepts cannot be Less real to us than lilies are; nor free Air better serve the birds, nor time to play Rejoice young children more, than visions may Mean use to us, and joy in serving Thee Grant that we may, with tireless patience, still, And faith, and an unconquerable will Bring down the highest and the holiest dream That lights us from above, to forms that seem As fit for use, as rudders on lost ships; As plain to read, as smiles on mother-lips.

'12.

C. B. C.

Page 52

•


GLIMPSES OF THE CAMPUS


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HE morning sun is flooding hill and meadow with radiant light. Each blade of dewy grass glistens like a veritable jeweled sword. The saucy bobolink calls "Bob White, Bob White" from the distance, and the wild canary tilting through the air sings of all the gladness and joy of the new morning, The bees make frequent trips from the flowering basswoods to the hives. The squirrels frisk about in the woods scampering from tree to tree in the glad joy of freedom. In the pastures the cattle are cropping the sweet grass, and the lambs play gaily together. The air is filled with the faint fragrance of growing things. It is the beginning of another joyous day. How can there be unbelief when all Nature, with supreme faith in the Creator's goodness takes up the song, "It is good to be alive, it is good to be alive?" And now it is noon. The glowing sun has dispelled each lingering shadow, and the fairy dew has fled with the purple shades. The birds have sought the cool woods, and the flowers drink in the

wealth of sunshine. The cattle are contentedly resting in the pleasant shade of pasture trees, or enjoying the coolness of the quiet brook. Then surely is unbelief profanation when everything in Nature in quiet content praises God, "Who has blessed the world with life and light since Eden's dawning day." At last the sun sinks behind the western hills. Could the splendor and riches of the Eastern kings of old even faintly image the subtle harmonies of color in one sunset? The birds cease to sing and the blossoms bow their heads in flower prayer. The cattle are coming up from the pasture, and their lowing is the only sound which is borne on the breathless quiet of the summer night. Violet shadows wrap the world in a veil of silence. Then must the skeptic bow his head for, "The peace of God which passeth all understanding" lives in all, and through all, and around all things that have being. CATHERINE HAWKINS. Page 55


"AWAY FROM BOOKS"


Winona <tEnbirotuntnt

DEVIL ' S CAVE

SUGAR LOAF

HE love of beauty is instinctive; we all long to experience it. It is most adequate, complete, and final. Harmonious relations are effective; they discipline, inform, and broaden man. They are educational. Amo~g the important ministers to culture through beauty Nature is pre-eminent. For

BIRCH WALK

this reason Winona is favored above many another school. The high, perpendicularly walled bluffs, over-looking the lake at their base, contoured by immense sand-stone and lime-stone ledges to 500 feet above the river valley bed, present a fine firmness of line--a stirring figure of nobility, force, dignity. Three to five Page 57


miles apart are the walled linings of the valley. In the low-lands, with farms, cities, forests, and defiant walls on either side, glides on the mighty Mississippi. From the river bottoms to the bluff heights, one finds an unusual diversity of soil and exposures- affording great range and variety of plant life. The pasque flower, blood-root, and Canada gingers; the hepaticas, anemone, and Dutchman's breeches; asters, buttercups, and violets; columbine, shooting stars, and golden rod; nut trees, willows, bass, oaks, birches, elms and aspens; sumacs, dog-wood and hazel-brush; grape, moon-seed, brier and bittersweet- all these give us a landscape infinite in variety, always "appealing to the imagination with some fresh and unsuspected loveliness,"- a health, delight, and enrichment for life. As a field for the study of physiography it would be hard to find an equal. The geologist finds the earth's surface turned on end in the exposures on the bluff sides, The work of the agents of weathering is everywhere apparent. As one can read races through their literature, paintings, sculpture, and architecture, so one can here read much of the span of earth's formative processes; thot and observation master her order and comprehend her activity. Moreover, the elements are no mean teacher. Come into a realization of Nature's beauty, and then you somehow intuitively know that there is born and vitalized a part of your better nature in you. Each season has its meanings. Springtime brings forth such an exuberance of life! Two hundred species of birds herald it on! One feels its might; its force moulds itself into one as an eternal value. Language is too crude to say how one grows - how

Page 58

one gets a perspective view in a sweep into the vastness of the universal; it is an unfolding of our insight. Summer matures things. The stalks are filled out; the seed pods filled in. Progress and constancy are its key words. The hazel nuts and acorns have been developing all the while. The sheen of the lake's perfectly smooth surface, wherein each star has its own bright spot, wherein the streaming moonbeams glance and re-glance on and off over its surface, reflects the bluffs in their prime, gloriously dressed. Autumn presents the ripened fruit and sees it pass. Apples, plums, berries, cherries, nuts and seeds of many sorts; tinted and toned foliage; songs of the new generation of birds and insects, it is stupendous in wealth. Then, when a change comes, as all things change, the leaves drop, fruits fall. How quickly the stripped birch on a lone high precipice is idly whipped by the first wintry wind. The aspens draw feeble sighs and the willows droop low. The change comes not as an interruption or discord; it is an incident in the chain of Endless Life. In all seasons Nature has endless vitality. In her are mysteries that transcend man's understanding. These are ever challenging, baffling, calling to the soul. On the other hand, every aspect of life is a revelation of vitality, of inexorable laws, steadfast relations which are cultural. This assimilation is essential to "reaching the full stature of our spirit." It disciplines, informs, and broadens man. Mother -of us all, here in this valley we breathe the breath of life. Your force, phenomena, law, and beauty aid us in interpreting our life. May Winona's Alma Mater be ever as in our day your close friend. ORRIN A. FRIED, JUNIOR '12.


Contributors please hand in all jokes on tissue paper so the editor will be able to see through them. JYir. Holzinger: " \,Yhere does the moon rise?" Gertrude Johnson: "At home it rises over Happ 's barn. " Mr. Sandt (in Manual Training class): " How do you hold a chisel on a concave surface?" Miss Rowles: "Why, you raise the devil." Miss C. V. S.: sang best?"

"Now girls, who do you think

Miss Riordan (with an adoring glance at Lucile): "Oh, Miss McArthur, she opens her mouth wider than any one in the class. " Prof. H. (in Botany class): "Now when we go out on our field trip the girls and boys should walk together. Now don't all walk with Harry White." Mildred T.: " I once looked into a mirror and it made me look tall and thin. " Harriet F. (after roaming about the library for three days) : "Miss Grant, will you please show me where Ibid is?" Miss G.: "Please look for it in the dictionary." Deer Editor-In beer is five cents (5c) to bawl me out in the Annual. Mae Mathis.

THE NORMAL STUDENTS' CAREER Seem Green To the new machine Exact Fact Greener than they seem Big Dig Working like a prig Too True Don't care a figWise Guys Soon a graft tries Soft Prof. Oh , where are his eyes? Shirk Work Search for other joys Shows Beaux Candy, Kratz, and noise-

June Moon Sings another tune Test Pests All are here too soon. Dread Red E upon the slip. Flunk Plunk Story ended- Blip! IRM

M.

WHOMES, JUNIOR .

There once was a Professor Gaylord, Who had once been suspected to pray, " Lord , Let me but find One logical mind , To me endless delight it would afford." There's a dear little lady called Grant, Whose praises we cheerfully chant, Tho many a dime, For "reserves" kept o'er time, On her desk we regretfully plant. Page 59


There once was a teacher called Sprague, Her methods were not at all vague, She would have things right, Clear, simple, and trite, All " bluffers" to her were a plague.

VARIETY IN SPECIAL GYMNASTICS

We will all miss our dear Miss Kenaga, vVho soon from our midst wends her way-ga , Tho a stickler for rules , And the morals of schools, Farewell to her, sadly we say-ga. Hurrah for our manager, "Pem," Our chesty Caruso, "pro tern," There's no end to the sound, That rolls round and round. When he sings us a morning anthem.

COURSES BY H. H. H.

Fall Term - Bluff Hurd-les. Winter Term- Snow Ball-ing (Dean Wins). Spring Term- Mae flower picking.

ARE YOU THE ONE? One eve at the hall , ' twas a Friday I'll say, A man with a maid who was winsome and gay, Signed up at the desk that a walk they would take , And at the usual time their return they would make. The maid had much pleasure and joy unalloyed , The man was uneasy , with the clock he had toyed. Alas for the maiden! alas! for the clock, It had stopped at 8:30 its wonted tick tock. When this was discovered and put back to rights It was late in the even and time for the lights; Alas! on returning unprepared for a shock, The maid found the key had been turned in the lock. That villainous man to have done such a thing! Don' t you think it was wrong so much trouble to [bring? The man knew himself 'twas a deed dreadful black To surreptitiously set time a half hour back. The deed, yes we know - how, when , where it was [done But what we can't discover is, Who is the One.

0. P.

, VIe all know a teacher called Ruggles, Who cheerully, valiantly struggles, To teach us the tricks Of the day 's politics, With which he so skillfully juggles. Page 60

ECHOES FROM THE SENIOR KINDERGARTNERS On the steps of a State Normal, In the city of Winona , Stood a student, now a senior, Filled with kindergarten training; Thinking of the day she landed, At this institute of learning. Loudly beat her heart within her, Burned her cheeks with great excitement, When she thought of noise and tumult , Of the hurrying and the skurrying, Of the slips, the pink slips, 'round her, Of the people whom she knew not. Startled, wakened from her dreaming. Followed fast those well known foot-prints, Followed in that winding passage To the room called "Kindergarten." Now this senior, very different, Finding all her classmates gathered, Heard these words of those around her: "Yonder stands the great tall Signi Thinking of her many troubles , Wondering if the little children Feel her presence or her absence When they're working at the table. You can see near by dear Winnie Showing forth her independence, Like a little girl we've heard of Who when good was most angelic, But when bad was horrid. Look there sitting at the table Rose it is who's always busied With endless chains of lesson plans. Hark! there comes the sound of music,

Grace's touch we know so well; She, though sure of all her music , Tries the skip and then the hop; For there beside her stands our Nettie Going through the various movements; Saying, as she tries them over, ' \Vel!, I'm sure Quite sure that that's right.' Now look happy, 0 , my Mary, Turn your sadness into gladness, Make a pocket, for ' tis easy, Hide your kerchief there within it, So your hands will be unhindered. 0, my Katherine, we're delighted Of your honor to have learn-ed; Take along with you your training To the little negro children; Practice in your kindergarten Spontaneous activity. Do not worry, Miss Helena, If a school ma'am you become not; Be content; it's not your calling. Who knows but it may be this Painting stripes on white stick candy. There you see our bright assistant, Marion Burton is her name; Who, in all her speech and actions, Pleases those who are above her. Do you know that from our circle Miss Grace Simpson has departed? How the little ones will miss her , How their speech will be retarded Less a volunteer come forward. In our midst is our fair Beatrice Smiling as she keeps a-saying , 'Isn't there a way much better?' Where is our Canadian member With her great supply of will pow'r Strong enough to take her northward To the pole so far beyond us? But hear fearless Ruth Cesander Cry aloud and speak in this wise: 'Wednesday is my day for walking, For my critic days are over.' Heard you then the little Irwin Speak out boldly to Rebecca, 'You're too 'ittle for a teacher.' Then the bell for game class sounded And the happy crowd disbanded, Planning for another meeting Of such jollity and gladness.


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MILDRED OLSON, the beautiful Prima Donna, is now playing the juvenile part in G. White's ninth s uccess, " The Kissing Girl. " OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE CLASS OF 1912 P UBLISHED ONCE BY THE CLASS OF 1912 Editor ELEANOR SMlTH Asst. Editor EuLA WAY Manager BLANCHE MEEK No. 3001 Milkyway Telephone 3 Mars All checks, drafts, postal or express orders gratefully received. SUBSCRIPTION RATE S $·5 . 00 Single Copy

ANNOUNCEMENTS IRENE W ESTMAN amd EMMA PETERSON, the girls with the loose feet are creating a great sensation on the Orpheum Circuit. HELENA K . HOROVITZ has recently joined the Black Berry Troupe of Uncle Tom 's Cabin and will descend to heave n as little Eva. M YRTLE NA H EDLOFERETTI and ROSETTI SEIDELITZ a r e booked for a n a rtist concert at N orm·a l Hall, Aug. 48th, 1912. A few seats in Seventh Heaven still un sold. MAUDE LITTLE, the popular singer, who only talks, retired from active st age life, after several successful careers. FLORENCE L YMAN , VIOLA KNAPP, a nd MARY TRUES DELL have sol ved " The Boy Qu estio n. " .MISS ARLOINE FORBES will favor audiences at the "Drea m " thi s coming week with illustrated songs from the noted pen of LYDIA AUPPERLE. NOTES FROM THE FOOTLIGHTS HARRIS PETT, th e tale nted actor, is now making his seve nth appearance in the pitiful a nd tou chin g dra ma, " The Breaker of Hea rts." Moves all to tears, especially th e girl s. Seat sale now at R eid and Ludwig Co. HARRY HINDMAN, th e Matin ee Idol, is now starring with MAE M ATHIS as his leading lady. in " His Latest Crush. " Page 62

R uBY PETERSON is starring with K. McDo NALD, the great comedian in " Why \Vomen Leave Hom e," which has co mpl eted a three night's run at Minnesota City. (Th ey have n' t stopped running yet.) DRAMATIC DOINGS ORIN FRIED, BESSIE \VEIR , and ARLINGTON SANDT present "The Rube, th e Girl and the Pumpkin ," at the Princess the week of June 7th. The cu te, c unning, petite, stunning, (all that a nd the n so me) LEONA WoLF will open the season at the Black Cat. PINKEY PERKI NS (the boy preacher) h as left th e pulpit for a bri ef run in vaudeville. (Varie ty is good for the so ul). MANAGER A. MALONEY introduces GERTRUDE HANSON and DOROTHY D EwART in "School Days." (They h a ve not yet outgrown the part). Th e MISSES HAZEL STRAUS and OLGA PFEFFER are e njoying a most prosper o us season in their wonderful skatin g stunt on Nobody's Circuit. DOMESTIC NOTES HEAR Y E!! Lovers of real art will rejoice in the return engagement of MADAM JESSIE KAISER in Shake Beer's " Om elet" (with the ham ) . Mrss GENEV IEVE GROVER, who portrayed " Oatmelia" so acceptably in th e first appearance. is recovering from a n e r vous breakdown at Doc Bu zz's sanitarium . She h as b ee n replaced by h er unde rstudy, EDYTHE McCoNNON . HOME AGAIN Th e "Nightingal e Songsters" ALDA CoLGATE, MAE MASON and returned from an extensive tour of They re port th e egg m arket in flouri shing.

L. Hou LIHAN, M . LITTLE h ave Winona County. St. Charles as

LATEST SONG HITS " I W a nt Someone to Flirt with M e." DuetSung by FLORENCE STEICHEN and BILLIE BARNES in their g reat comedy success " Love \Va t c hes."

" Why I am a Lemon in the Garden of Love" by EMILY JENSEN. " I \Vant Someone to Call me Dearie" R . S. V. P . to ELLE N FoRSBERG. " Oh ! What I Know About You!" BEATRICE HARRIES. " If Th ey'd only let Poo r Adam's Rib Alon e," by K ATHERINE K ENAGA, writer of "Gi rls! Girls! Girls!" ."Can't Y o u See I'm L onely?" By LEONORA vVINDHORST. "Come Take a Trip in m y (h ot) Airship" by ARLINGTON SANDT. "If You T a lk in Your Sleep, Don't Mention My Name"-L. McARTHUR. " Lord , H ave Mercy on a M a rried l\1an"-vVILL SNYDER. " L ove l\1e"- MAME vVOHLFORTH. " I \Von't Play Unless You Coax Me"-FRANCES B ERRY. " If Time were Money I ' d be a Millionaire"LEE PEMBERTON. " My Sweetheart is the l\la n in the Moon " SEDATE BROWN. " If 1 Only H ad th e Nerve"- E. M EANS. "Please Go 'way a nd L et M e Sleep " - J EAN CoLVILLE. " Life's a Funny Proposition After All"-MARY WEIDA. " T ell me pretty maiden, are there a ny more at hom e like you"- PEARL THOMPSON. ANNOUNCEMENTS FRA ULEIN M ONICA RILEY, "The Flirting Princess"- Dream Theatre. SIGNORITA HAZE LLE STRAUS, Normal Music Hall - Beginning Aug. 20. PRm'. WM. SNYDER and his wonde rf ul troupe of Train ed Fleas a nd o th er animals at the Bijou. All com e.

Mc

FADDEN KENZIE GEE

C

ute unning a t ch y

" \Vh at Every vVo ma n Knows" at " \Vest End L y ri c"


~ant ~bs WANTED-So me one to be my leading man in my play "Life." Signed MONA RILEY. WANTED-So me one to take me home from the Symphony. RUBIE HURD. LosT-In wilds of Chicago-a man? EMMA PETERSO N. LosT-Across the lake the dignity of a young man. Finder please return to ]ESSIE BRADLEY.

~~!till ~ome

Ql}ne ftlease

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What the Advisory Council has done? Why Miss Shanewise is called "The Source of all Propriety?" Why the Tri Sigma originated? Who started the merry chase of the dust pans down the stairs one Wednesday night? What takes place in faculty meeting? Who walks more often in the Assembly Hall than President Maxwell? When Gen gets her lessons? Why Gertrude H. says, " Papa's got the biggest auto in Fertile?" and Where in - - - is Fertile? Why one of our teachers always says, "Let us go back and see if we can get this straight" when the class corners him on a question? Why Lee Pemberton likes tall girls? Why the Rest Room is noisy?

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"Top o' the vVorld"- THE SENIORS " Babes in Toyland"- THE UNDERGRADUATES IN GE NERAL "Sing-Sing to Liberty"-GRADUATION " The District Leader"- MARIO N BuRTON "The Roll icking Giri"- LEONA WoLF "The Music Master"-LEE PEMBERTO N "Her Own Way"-ARLOINE FORBES

"The Girl from Out Yonder"- THERESA O' LEARY "The Chaperon"-MARGARET STANTON "Red Feather"- FLOYD PERKINS "Th~ Chorus Lady"-MYRTLE CRoss "Three Twins"-M. RILEY, A. CoLGATE, L. WINDHORST "Madam Butterfly"- 0 .LGA PFEFFER " The Great Divide"-C. ·ScHVAN AND R . HUNT "Love Watches" over KATHRYN SAINESBURY AND ELMER TAINTER "The Cowboy Girl"-NESSIE MILLER " The Lily"- B. HARRIES " The Flirting Princess"-H. HoROVITZ "The Man of the Hour"- HARRY \~T RITE "Strong Heart"- VroLA K NAPP " Little Miss Innocence" -G. DIGNIN "The Slim Princess"-l\1. ARNE LL "Taming of the Shrew"-JEAN CoLVILLE "Peck's Bad Boy" -A. SANDT " Baby Mine"-A. BLOWERS "M iss Nobody from Starland"-M. McGEE "The Chocolate Soldier"-KING McDoNALD "Little Miss I ndependence"-ALICE TUPER "Such a Little Queen"- D. BALDWIN "Class Mates"?- M. SUTHERLAND AND F. PERKINS " The Girl from the Golden West"- JESS BRADLEY "The Call of the Wild" -TEACHING " The House of Bondage"- NORMAL

~udton ~ale IN THE ASSEMBLY RooM , JUNE 7, ' 12, 11:59 P. M . The following articles will be on sale: BESSIE WEIR A well-worn grin Exceedingly hot air ARLINGTON SANDT Midnight Oil BLANCHE RowLES KATHERI NE HA lYKINS A's HAZEL NORHEIM Composure A Know-it-all pose EMMA PETERSON CORA CHRISTIANSON A little modesty WILL SNYDER Athletic fame LEE PEMBERTON Surplus lung energy

Popularity Linguistic gymnastics Her good nature Gift of chattering Twenty League Boots Quick Accommodation Artistic ability .

CLARA McCuNE ORIN FRIED TRYPHE NA CHISHOLM HELEN HEITMA NN H . HINDMA N VIOLET MELANDER EDNA FIFIELD r MABEL OLSON Power to convince business men \ l !-lELIA p Al.MGARD

1!laffpptus If Harry is Hind-rrian , what would Col-by? If Hodge sang Mi ss C. V. S. a ballad, what would Hol-sing-er? If a Speck-man had a Mad (i) son, would Gaylord have a Mun(m)-son? Is Miss Shane wise and Miss Loui se Kuehn to the fact, that Max (is)well again? If a child were ill would Miss Burk-hold-er? If Mr. Colby refuses to take Miss Shanewise to the opera in a cab, will Miss Carl-'er? If Mr. Ruggles Sandt Miss Gildemeister a Sprague of holly would Mrs. Chorpenning have Binzelous? Cart'er up to Smith, drive a Staple in for Burk (holder), put a Berry in , and tell a Storie about it, Marvinless.

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When calling upon a girl at Morey Hall , what is the correct way to do ? NoRMAL Bov. First of all you shou ld drape yourself gracefully over the spindle chair in the Hall , be careful not to break it, then allow yourself to be bawled out by the girls in the living room while the bell goes tinga-ling. After the hostess's arrival, help enliven the evening by a remark edged into a tirade on the latest lark. Be carefu l to strike the right evening or the door will slam in your face. Page 63


THF END


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EDWIN A . BROW N. ''... BRowN, ABBOTT & SoMSE N. BOTSFORD LUMBER Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . BAKER & STEINBAUER . . . . . . . . . . . BAUER'S ART STUDIO. BAILEY & BAILEY .. . . B AY STATE MILLING Co.. H. CHOATE & Co. ... WM. DEILKE. . . . . . . . . . . . ARTHUR E. DoBBS Co .. DREAM THEATRE .. . ELMER & WANZER . . . THE FASHION. . . . jOHN F UHLBRUEGGE WM. A. HAR GES HEIME R . DR. WM. F . HoLDE N . HIRSCH CLOTHING Co.

74 78 72 74 75 71 72 70

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75 78 72 74

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A. HODGINS TRA NSFER Co ... I NTER - STATE MERCANTILE Co •.. V. R. IRviN & Co. Jo NES & KROEGER Co .. MRS. A GNES H. KRATZ. KISSLING & SON. E. KAROW . . . . . . . . . . . . LARSON HAIR DRE SSING PARLOR S. LA NG PACKING Co .. MORRISON BROS. MILLER'S MILLIN ERY SHOP. 0. M c MA Nus . . . . . . . . . . . ] AMES D . MUNRO . . . . . . . . . . . .. NEvius LIVERY Co . . PARK HOTE L . . . . OTTO P. ROE MHILD .

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PAGE WILLIAM RADEMACHER. . . • . . . SMoKE CREAM Co. . . . . . . . • . . . S. W. MORGAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0. P. SONTAG . MATH S CH ULER...... . . GEORGE B. STAGER . . . . . ' jOSEPH SCHLINGERMAN. . . . . O.L.TAYLOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . THILL SISTERS.,. , , , . . . . , .. , JASPER I. VAN VRANKEN. . . . . . . • . • . J. C . VOELKER. . . . JoHN VoN RoHR ... . . . . . . . . . . WACHS & SoN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WRU CK & GATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WI NON A GA s LIGHT & CoKE Co. . WI NONA STEAM LAUNDRY Co.. . . . . . .

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Page 65



Page 67


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A. HODGINS C(;rans/er Line

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Office 120 west Second Street

.....

+·~··~·~··~··~··

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··~··~··~··~··~··~··~··~··~··~+

A. HARGESHEIMER

Registered Pharmacist.

Leading Prescription Druggist.

'Prescriptions our S pecirllj}

Te l ep h one cal l s promptly attended to.

Cor. T hird and CenterSts. Old Deposit Bank Bldg.

+

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+•.....••~··~··~·•~••~··~··~··~••....._••~·~·•~••~·•~••~•+

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The House of Quality Goods

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Nevius Livery & Transfer Company

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1 V. R. IRVIN & COMPANY 11 l l ii . +•.....

Wholesale Grocers St. Paul

Minnesota

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The Winona Steam Laundry Co. Phone 292

62-64 E. Fourth St.

Give us a trial package. W e will try to please you.

Page 68

~

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+·~-·~-·~-·~-·~--~--~-·~-·~-·~--~-·~-·~-·~-·~-·~·+

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Graduation Special A Sterling Silver Brush, C omb and Mirror for $9.00

ll

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i ~ at S. W . MORGAN'S i t+·~-·~-·~-·~··~--~-·~-·~-·~-·~--~-·~-·~--~-·~-~-+.

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Funerals, Weddings, Livery and Transfer

l l i Corner Fourth and Johnson Streets t +................. ... ••

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Best Service in

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When you take a stroll across the Lake, don't forget to stop at

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SCHULER'S BAKERY 551-553 Huff Street

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Shoes as You Like Them (DE would like to attend to your shoe wants, as we think we are well prepared to do so, and urge you to compare the style, quality, comfort and price of McManus' Good Shoes with any in the world.

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8EFDRE AND 11FTFR TH£ WEDNeSDAY

110RNIN{;

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Page 69


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NORMAL STUDENTS

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Will find us headquarters for C hafing Dishes, Alcohol a nd Gas Stoves, Tennis Rackets and Ba lls and everything in the sport ing goods line at lowest prices.

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MILLINERY 125 E. Third St.

Winona, Minn.

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as a student of t he Winona State Nocmal are offered special rates on any size and the latest and best styles in modern Photography. We will a lso meet any competitors prices a nd guarantee you better va lue.

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Ground F loor.

Eastman KODAKS a nd supplies.

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GROCERS We handle all those good things which make for a fine p1cmc OPPOS ITE POST OFFICE

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Page 70

KISSLING & SON

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ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEARS

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Black Suede Black Cravenette Black Satin Black Ribbed Silk Brown V elours

Black Velvet Patent Leather Dull Kid Gun Metal Calf Blk Buck, (genuine)

Fifteeen different materials. O!!ite a variety, is it not? A II are Goodyear welt sewed, all are made over genuine Pump lasts-~he:y fit and slay on beller than most pumps. Surely our store is the right place to buy your Pumps.

WRUCK & GATES 53 W. 3rd St. "Foot-Fillers" Winona, Minn

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AT THE SAME OLD STAND

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Ladies' Rubber Heels Ladies' Sewed Soles Mens' Sewed Soles

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SHOES REPAIRED WHILE YOU

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A FRESH SUPPLy OF CHOICE GOODS AT BOTTOM PRICES

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272 East Third Street

WINONA, MINN.

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WINGOLD FLOUR - Always of the highest quality, is now superb. Made in our new 4,000 barrel mill- the finest on the American Continent- of the finest wheat and under the most sanitary conditions, it is easily the king of spring wheat flours .

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Hotel for your wife, American Plan, $2.00 and $2.50 per day. ~ H ot ·and cold running water, local and long distance phones in all rooms.

W INONA, M INNESOTA

YOUR NEIGHBOR

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PACKING COMPANY

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MANUFACTURE RS OF HIGH G RADE SAUSAGES AND P U RE KETTLE RENDERED LA RD. PAC KERS AND

Highest Cash

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OF SELECT HAMS AND B:CEO:rncr Lafayette

for all kinds of Live and Dressed Stock

and Fourth Streets Phones: 1312- 1313

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THE "TAYLOR MADE" STORE

73 E. T hird Street

P age 7G

Winona, Minn.

68 W. 3rd Street

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W INONA, MINN.

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515 HUFF STRERT

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J. D. MUNRO

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GROCERIES~n~ROVISIONS

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Page 77


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Pictures, Frames and Casts for School decorations to which we give Special attention

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W ould you be sure of thorough satisfactory drug store service?-Then deal at our store. BeCore any drug or che mical is bought by us it must first measure up to our require mentso therwise it is not received, therefore when we sell you drugs and chemicals you can be sure of their quality. This is worth your knowing w hen you have a prc~cription to put up. Remember to come here for particular wants.

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Something New in Normal Pennants with the picture of the Building A fine Souvenir for the Graduating Class at

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ATTORNEYS AT LAW

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Type Expression- Mechanical Perfection Thoroughly Complete Service the words of any Printed matter are comprehended, the types and their arrangement have expressed something to the reader- a sense of good taste, of interest, of weight and importance, if the typography is of our production. In printing now-a-days, with delicate types, costly engravings, and fine papers, it is necessary that the workmen thoroughly understand their work and that the machinery be of the most modern type and not worn. At our plant will be found the best workmen that can be had and machinery up-to-date, me~hanically accurate and economically operated. ;;;m:ll l l l l l li i i i 1111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11•EFORE

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~ We have at the disposal of the discriminating buyer of printed things, a completely equipped establishment for producing the best in booklets, catalogs advertising matter, and the like. Besides we have an organization for assisting you to the best results in the most economical way. When contemplating the production or any printed matter consult us- we assure you of careful attention.

JONES & KROEGER COMPANY WINONA

Printers, [Binders, 6ngravers MINNESOTA

Page 70


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Shampoo Parlors

All kinds of Hair Work Made to Order

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HAIR GOODS

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INDIVIDUAL MOLDS AND FANCY CREAM A SPECIALTY

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500·502 HUFF ST.

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WM. DEILKE

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KRATZ CANDY SHOP OPPOSITE POST OFFICE Where you forget worry and care.

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