Wenonah Yearbook - 1937

Page 1


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THE WENONAH 9 3 7

WINONA Her wealth of waters wreathing headland domes Thrust out to guard her by her broad plateaus, She cherishes her colleges and homes Amid her mile-deep elm and maple rows. Here faith is full,· here anxious doubt is stilled,· A reassuring constancy is here,· Here is the far and valiant hope fulfilled, Sweet spring-time ardor of the pioneer. EDWIN

E

X

L

I

B

T.

REED.

R

I

s


1he

This book, which we hope will be a pleasant memory of college days at Winona, has been produced by the Wenonah staff under the direction of:

WILLIAM

H.

FRANZMANN,

Managing Editor

BERNARD BussE,

Editor-in-chief

WALTER LYNNE,

Business Manager


ENONAH We Present, A pictorial and verbal record of study, cocurricular activity, sports and fun at a "typical" college which can no seem typical

t~

longe~

us because of the associa-

tions we have with it.

Published by the

Graduating Classes of Winona State Teachers College

WINONA, MINNESOTA


OED We thank you for the guiding hand you've lent us, And only hope we may Fulfill the confidence you' ve placed in us.

Miss Brunner

::;


ICATION This is a teachers college. In it are people desirous of becoming teachers- people who are guided by the faith that they can help others to do the same work they are doing. Theirs is an unselfish labor. They are satisfied not with producing teachers as good as they are, but sincerely hope to impart knowledge in an even better way. This better way implies not only the mechanical repetition of facts, laws and formulae: the hope is also there that pupils will catch the love for learning, will be happy, successful members of a society whose nature we cannot with certainty predict. Were we able to predict the nature of this coming social world, the task of pedagogy would be much simpler; or if life were static, we should have our path plain before us. As things are, however, we can only endow our children with the means for adjusting themselves to a changing social order. A person whose sincere touch has been felt in this direction is

MISS BEULAH BRUNNER to whom we humbly dedicate this 1937 Wenonah in respect for her merit as a teacher and teacher of teachers.


Through these doors, A few short years ago we passed Wondering at what lay beyond; Now we know, and sadly find Our time has passed,

1he

And now again we face a new beyond.

West entrance to College Hall


-

FOREWORD Morituri te salutamus - "We who are about to die, salute you. " Those were the last spoken words of many gladiators who died in the Roman arenas. This book is published by the graduating classes of this college. The philosopher Schopenhauer thought of every parting as a little death; every meeting, a little resurrection . In a sense, we die - we depart, and our niches here which we think so important will soon be filled by others and our absence not too keenly felt. We persist in flattering ourselves, however, that in the future there will still be some who remember us, and that our stay here has not been too tragically ephemeral. Bearing this in mind, we have gone about producing this yearbook. We have attempted in a way to present a picture of what we do here: the preparation we make for our life's work, our avocations, our sports, and our fun. True, we do this largely for ourselves. We like to have an album for our memories, but those of us who have the most contact with the book's production come to look upon it as a memorial to ourselves . With this as an ideal we have put forth earnest efforts that you might remember us at our best, but in the hope for progress, we hope that succeeding classes will improve upon our best. You, who are about to replace us, - we salute you! ¡

CONTENTS COLLEGE PEOPLE

COLLEGE SPORTS

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES

COLLEGE FUN



"Lead thy children, Alma Mater, On, forever on .'"



"May the echoes of our happy laughter Find shelter in these vines And laugh again whenever breezes blow. "



"The bridal-wreath has decked herself with fragrant whiteness. And peonies nod heavy heads To bid you sweet farewell.''



"If I am to be rich,

May I be so In memories of loveliness ."



College People


PRESIDENT GUY E. MAXWELL A. B. Hamline University A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University Ped . D. (Han.) Miami University Ped. D. (Han.) Hamline University

Administration and Faculty

W

E, THE people entrusted with the compiling of this yearbook, have never liked the idea and custom of presenting the faculty of the school in the lifeless, impersonal manner of former years. We feel that that practice is especially out of place in this school since here we come to know our instructors in a way that is helpful and inspiring. On this page we present our "prexy,_

Mr. Maxwell, who is so close to the student body that he knows many of us by our first names, and Mr . Frank Sheehan, the resident director whom we know all too little. Our chief acquaintance with him is as diploma-passer-outer at graduations. On succeeding pages by means of words and pictures we hope to make you feel better acquainted with our ¡ ¡teachers of teachers. ' '

MR. FRANK A . SHEEHAN Resident Director Since 1933

18

THE

1937

WENONAH


1acult~ IRST we have Dr. Raymond, Four new teacher of biological sciences. This is his first year here, but he has already made himself very popular. Mr. Scarborough teaches geography, makes us conscious of the magnitude of the earth; Mr. French is the patron saint of math majors and one of the most colorful people on the campus; Mr. MacDonald serves as dean of men, placement director, and has taught and teaches botany, general biological science and vocational guidance at various times; Dr. Minne teaches general physical science, chemistry and physics. The next picture portrays our men of the social sciences. Dr. Selle enlightens us on sociology, economics, government and social problems; Dr. Tozier teaches a variety of courses in the social sciences and secondary education; Mr. Owens explains the intricacies of stimuli and responses, the compilation of educational statistics, and the art of keeping happy, in his psychology courses; Mr. Jederman gives a series of history courses enlivened and spiced. by observations upon American life and the New Deal. In the next group we have: first, Dr. Murphy, noted for her survey course of English literature, world literature, and composition, her stiff tests and her subtle humor; Mr. Reed teaches imaginative wntmg, "types", and other courses in literature; Miss Richards is the dean of

THE

J. Scarborough, Mr. Arthur T. French, Mr. Manley MacDonald, Dr. Nels Mione.

Top Picture: Dr. Marion R. Raymond, Mr. Ray

1937

Middle Picture: Dr. Erwin S. Selle, Dr. Roy B. Tozier, Mr. William A. Owens, Mr. Frederick A. Jedcrman. Lowtr Picture: Dr. Gladys E. Lynch. Dr. Ella Murphy, Mr. Robert R.

Reed, Miss Florence L. Richards, Mr. Willis E. Boots

WENONAH

19


To"'p

PictNr~:

Mr. Glendon E. Galligan, Miss Helen A. Pendergast, Miss Margaret .B. Miller, Miss Jean Talbot.

MiJJ[, L•ft: Miss Minnie Zimmerman, Miss Mildred L. Engstrom. MiJJ[, Rigbt: Mr. Stanley J. Pawelek, Mr. Harry R. Jackson. Low1r Ptcturt: Miss Agnes Bard, Miss Valeta Jeffrey, Miss Doro chy Clark, Mr. Walccr Grimm.

20

women, teaches contemporary literature and such specialized courses as Wordsworth, Browning, etc .; Mr. Boots teaches grammar, composition and occasionally psychology. He is one of the faculty's most ardent volleyball devotees; Dr. Lynch teaches drama, speech and dramatics. As adviser for Wenonah Players she has helped to inject new life into the organization. The first picture in the second panel presents: Mr. Galligan who holds the new position of athletic director; Miss Pendergast and Miss Talbot who teach physical education for women and who have played an important part in the promotion of co-recreational activities ; Miss Miller, in the background, is the school nurse and gives us helpful, friendly advice when we don ' t feel so good. At the library desk are Miss Zimmerman, assistant librarian, and Miss Engstrom, chief librarian . They keep us in reading matter. The gentlemen at the band saw are Mr. Pawelek and Mr. Jackson. They both give courses in industrial education. Mr. Pawelek acts as an all-around handy man in athletics, assuming coaching duties in the absence of others . He also is coaching the baseball team this spring . Mr . Jackson coaches varsity football, and coached the B squad in basketball. Miss Bard teaches piano and plays the organ at every chapel exercise. Miss Jeffrey has charge of music at Phelps school and also teaches violin to college students.Miss Dorothy Clark teaches a great variety of subjects under the head of fine arts and is the

THE 1937 WENONAH


adviser of the art club. Mr.Grimm teaches music classes, directs the Mendelssohn Club and the orchestra and leads the singing at chapel. The groups on this page cannot be pigeon-holed so nicely as belonging to certain departments; almost all of them, however, help in teacher-training by acting as supervisors over student teachers. Miss Scovell teaches English in the junior high school; Miss Ella Clark teaches and supervises in the intermediate grades, Miss Cramer teaches the fourth grade at Phelps. Mr. Fishbaugher teaches Math and junior business training in Phelps Junior High. Miss Dallman teaches the fifth grade. Miss Brunner, to whom this year's book is dedicated, teaches social science and is supervisor of the junior high school. Miss Kroeger teaches home economics in the junior high school. During fourth hour the odor of soup or vegetables permeates the corridors and makes us frightfully hungry. Miss Murray teaches art to the Phelps School youngsters. Their work is seen in the form of sketches, murals and a yearly puppet show. Miss Bartsch is one of the rural supervisors and is frequently seen in the school car going to or from an associated school. Miss Davis teaches general languages and French to junior high pupils and French to college students. Miss Christensen, the other rural supervisor is the best person we know for detecting birds in early spring. Mr. Simmers, director of the training school, also teaches classroom management,

Top Picture, Standing: Miss Cathryn Cramer, Mr. Glenn E. Fishbaughcr, Miss Martha Dallman, Miss Beulah Brunner. Seated: Miss Maurine B. Scovell, Miss Ella Callista Clark. Middle Picture, Standing: Miss Florence A. Kroeger, Miss Florctra Murray, Miss Mildred Bartsch, Miss Marion F. Davis. Seated: Miss Etta 0. Christensen, Mr. Charles L. Simmers.

LotNr Picture: Miss Jeanne S. Brouillctttc, Miss Laura 0. Foster, Miss Leslie Gage, Miss Bertha B. Schwable, Miss Josephine Kjclland.

THE 1937 WENONAH

21


superv1s10n and curriculum . He takes a great deal of interest in Kappa Delta Pi, for which he is counsellor. Miss Brouillette teaches the second graders, Miss Foster teaches the little tots in the first grade . Miss Gage is supervisor of the primary grades and teaches the third grade . Miss Schwable is the supervisor of the kindergarten. Her work was made more difficult this year because of the absence of Miss Sutherland who was ill. Miss "Jo" Kjelland is a kindergarten teacher, but also takes some regular college subjects and is active in our extra-curricular activities. Our office staff! what would we do without them? Miss Pritchard, as registrar, helps us to untangle knots in our programs; Miss Voelker takes our tuition money, accepts cash for board bills and hands out F.E.R.A. checks. "Anne" is indispensable. She answers our questions, listens to our woes, and deals all too gently with us when we fail to observe office hours. "Vi" Kochendoerfer takes dictation from Mr. Maxwell, and gives us excuses when we're late for classes. Miss Sutherland was suffering from a prolonged illness at the time these pictures were taken. Miss Sutherland. is

OUR OFFICE STAFF Miss Kochcndocrfcr at the typewriter. Strmdiug: Miss Helen Pritchard, Miss Rosalie Voelker, Miss Anne Sielaff.

one of the heads of the kindergarten . She usually speaks at chapel on Friendship day and near Christmas . We missed her Christma5 story this year.

MISS LOUISE C. SUTHERLAND

22

THE 1937 WENONAH


Faculty 1936-37 TEACHER TRAINING MARTHA DALLMANN

MILDRED BARTSCH

INTERMEDIATE GRADES, PHELPS

RURAL EDUCATION

Winona State Teachers College A. M., University of Minnesota

.JOSEPHINE KJELLAND Winona State Teachers College

SCHOOL

St. Cloud State Teachers College B. S., A.M., University of Minnesota Columbia University University of Chicago

.JEANNE S. BROUILLETTE PRIMARY GRADES, PHELPS SCHOOL

Duluth State Teachers College B. S., University of Minnesota Columbia University

MARION F. DAVIS A. B., College of Saint Teresa University of Iowa University of Minnesota

SUPERVISOR, PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH

SCHOOL

B. E., Warrenburg State Teachers College Columbia University A. M., Ohio State University University of Minnesota

HOME ECONOMICS

Winona State Teachers College B. S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University FLORETT A MURRAY

FRENCH

BEULAH BRUNNER

FLORENCE A. KROEGER

ART, PHELPS SCHOOL

B. E., Winona State Teachers College University of Chicago

GLENN E. FISHBAUGHER PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

A. B., Cornell College Harvard University A. M., University of Minnesota

ETTA 0. CHRISTENSEN RURAL EDUCATION

BERTHA B. SCHWABLE KINDERGARTEN SUPERVISOR , PHELPS SCHOOL

B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University

LAURA 0. FOSTER

B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University A. M., Columbia University University of Chicago

PRIMARY GRADES, PHELPS SCH OOL

B.S., Iowa State Teachers College University of Chicago

ELLA C. CLARK

LESLIE GAGE

SUPERVISOR, INTERMEDIATE GRADES

PRIMARY SUPERVISOR, PHELPS

PHELPS SCHOOL

SCHOO I.

St. Agatha's Conservatory College of St. Catherine River Falls State Teachers College B. S., A.M., University of Minnesota Columbia University University of Chicago

Chicago Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Arts Northern Normal and Industrial School B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University University of Minnesota

CATHRYN CRAMER

MAURINE B. SCOVELL PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

B. S., Kansas State Teachers College Uni versi ty of Kansas A. M., Teachers College, Columbia University CHARLES L. SIMMERS DIRECTOR, PHELPS SCHOOL

Iowa State Teachers College A. B., Iowa State University University of Wisconsin A. M., Teachers College, Columbia University

VALETA .JEFFREY

INTERMEDIATE GRADES, PHELPS

LOUISE E. SUTHERLAND

MUSIC, PHELPS SCHOOL

SCHOOL

B. Mus. Ed ., Northwestern University . M. M., Northwestern University

A. B., Iowa State Teachers College A. M., University of Iowa Colorado University

KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION

B. S., Columbia University University of Colorado

SOCIAL SCIENCES WILLIAM A. OWENS

FREDERICK A . .JEDERMAN

ERWIN S. SELLE

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

PSYCHOLOGY

SOCIAL SCIENCE

State Teachers College, Peru, Nebraska University of London A. B., ·A. M., University of Nebraska

Oshkosh State Normal School B. S., A. M., University of Chicago

A. B., Washburn College A. M., Columbia University University of Chicago Ph. D., Columbia University

ROY B. TOZIER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

A. B., Park College A. M., University of Illinois Ph. D., University of Iowa

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION STAN LEY .J. PAWELEK

HARRY R . .JACKSON B. Ed ., Eastern Illinois State Teachers College M.S., University of Indiana Northwestern University

THE

1937

Oshkosh State Teachers College B. S. , A. M., University of Minnesota Carnegie Institute of Technology

WENONAH

23


SCIENCE MANLEY E. MAcDONALD

ARTHUR T. FRENCH MATHEMATICS

NELS MINNE

DEAN OF MEN, PLACEMENT DIRECTOR

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

Bridgewater State Normal School B. S., Harvard University A. M., Columbia University

A. B., Greenville College A. B., Saint Olaf College A. M., University of Michigan M . S., Ph. D., University of WisUniversity of Illinois consin University of Chicago MARION R. RAYMOND RAY J. SCARBOROUGH BIOLOGY

GEOGRAPHY

A. B., Michigan State Normal College A. M., Ph. D., University of Michigan

A. B., A. M., University of Nebraska Clark University University of California

ENGLISH AND LITERATURE GLADYS E. LYNCH

WILLIS E. BOOTS

ELLA MURPHY

ENGLISH

SPEECH

ENGLISH

B.S., North Dakota Agricultural College A. M., University of Wisconsin University of Minnesota

A. B., Iowa State Teachers College Oxford University A.M., Ph. D., University oflowa

A. B., Smith College A. M., University of Wisconsin Columbia University Ph . D., University of Iowa

FLORENCE L. RICHARDS

ROBERT R. REED

DEAN OF WOMEN, ENGLISH

ENGLISH

Ph. B., A. M., University of Michigan University of Colorado

A. B., University of Minnesota Harvard University A.M., Columbia University

FINE ARTS AGNES BARD B. E ., Winona State Teachers College

DOROTHY CLARK

WALTER GRIMM

FINE ART

MUSIC

B. S., A.B., Central Missouri State Teachers College Chicago Art Ins ti tu te Columbia University University of Chicago

Indiana State Normal School B. S., Terra Haute State Teachers College University of Minnesota

PHYSICAL EDUCATION HELEN A. PENDERGAST

GLENDON E. GALLIGAN

JEAN TALBOT

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL .EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

B. S., University of Washington University of Illinois M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University New York University

Chicago Normal School B. S., George Peabody College A. M., New York University, School of Education

A. B., University of Wisconsin Wellesley College University of Colorado A.M., New York University

LIBRARY MILDRED L. ENGSTROM

MINNIE ZIMMERMAN

LIBRARIAN

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN

Carleton College Mankato State Teachers College University of Minnesota

Winona State Teachers College Ph. B., Hamline University University of Wisconsin

BUSINESS OFFICERS 1936-1937 VIOLET KOCHENDOERFER

A. B., Vassar College B. S., Simmons College

MABEL L. MARVIN PHELPS SCHOOL OFFICE ASSIST ANT

MARGARET B. MILLER, R.N .

MRS. ETHEL PURCELL MANAGER OF DORMITORIES

ANNE SIELAFF OFFICE ASSISTANT

ROSALIE VOELKER ACCOUNTANT

COLLEGE NURSE

24

HELEN B. PRITCHARD SECRETARY AND REGISTRAR

OFFICE ASSIST ANT

THE

1937 WENONAH


We P~tesent ... SENIORS Those blase creatures who "know the ropes", who are surprised at nothing save that four years have passed with miraculous swiftness.

JUNIORS Often the forgotten people of the school. They toil and labor in the shadow of the seniors' emmence; they'll "Show 'em" next year.

SOPHOMORES Outgrown the pangs of being novices, beginning to appreciate the fine place Winona is; some of these people will stay on for the four-year course while others leave to begin their work "in the field".

FRESHMEN Alas, poor rooky, may his tribe increase! Listen Freshman, don't feel sad ¡now, for when you're an upperclassman you'll want to start all over again.

All these go to make up our

COLLEGE CLASSES


Margaret Bcrven Monda Birkholz William Bixby Anna Jane Buck

~er ,,

Margaret Buchler Marion Clarke Edward Cohen Ursula Costello

Everett Edstrom George Engstrom Betty Jane Failing William Franzmann

Mary Garlough Juanita Gehrlich Frcdrik Gislason Victor Gislason

Roy Griese Macy Jilk Isabel Johnson Robert Keller

Harriet Krage Ethel Kreutz Phyllis LaDue Vukosava Lumovich

26

THE

1937

WENONAH


. . . Dexter

MARGARET BER VEN.

MARY GARLOUGH .

............. Minneapolis

ENGLISH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE

EDUCATION, ART, ENGLISH

Y.W.C.A.l, 2, 3, 4;Scnior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 3, 4, Presidem 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Finance Committee 3; \Vinonan 3, 4; League of Women Voters 2; Kappa Delta Pi 4.

Kindergarten Club, Secretary 2; Mendelssohn Club 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4, Annual Fall Plays 2, 4; Secretary of Morey Hall 4.

JUANITA GEHRLICH. ......... Pine Island

MONDA BIRKHOLZ.

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY, MUSIC, ENGLISH

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Special Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Primary Club 3, 4; Mason Music Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Kindcrgarccn Club 3, 4.

. .......... Fountain City

ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH

Mason Music Club 2, 3, 4; The Winonan 3, 4; High School Club 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 4.

FREDRIK GISLASON ................ Minneapolis ... Adams

WILLIAM BIXBY. MUSIC, ENGLISH, HISTORY

Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3; Apollo Club 3, 4; Golf 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, 3.

ANNA JANE BUCK.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winona

ART, ENGLISH, MUSIC

VICTOR GISLASON.

. .......... Minneapolis

SOCIAL SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY

Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sccrcrary-Treasurcr 2, 3; Mendelssohn 2, 3, 4; Special Chorus 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Editor 4; Purple Key 2, 3, 4; Kappa Drlta Pi 3, 4; Band 4.

Football I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball!, 2, 3, 4; Dic-No~Mo 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2; Junior-Senior High School Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4; Purple Key 3, 4 .

. . . . . Pine Island

MARGARET BUEHLER.

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 4; Orchestra 4; Editor-in-Chief of Winonan 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; High School Club 3, 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, 4; Senior Class Secretary-Treasurer 4.

. ................. Preston

MARION CLARKE.

SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Football 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Jun ior High School Club 2, 3; Veterans of Future Wars 3 .

ROY GRIESE .. ..... ...... .............. Winona ENGLISH, MUSIC, HISTORY, MATHEMATICS

Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Special Chorus 3; A Capella Choir 1, Orchestra 3, 4; New· man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Mason Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4; H igh School Club 3, 4; lncramurals 3, 4.

. ... Winona

MARY ]ILK . .

HISTORY, POLITICAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, GEOGRAPHY, ENGLISH

Wenonah Players 3, 4, Secretary 4; H1gh School Club 3, 4, President 4; Winonan Staff 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 4.

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; League of Women Voters 4; Kindergarten Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2.

EDWARD COHEN.

. .............. .... Eveleth

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

Tennis 3, 4; Arrowhead Range Club 3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; Winonan News Editor 3, 4; Wenonah Associate Ediror 3.

ISABEL JOHNSON .... ..... .. ... .......... Weaver MUSIC, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Die-No-Mo 1, 2; Mendelssohn 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; College Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Accompanist 1, International Relations Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; M<tson Music Club 1, 2, 3.

URSULA COSTELLO ...................... Weaver SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH, HISTORY

International Relations 4; Junior High School Club, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2;Junior-Senior High School Club 4.

ROBERT KELLER.

. Still water

SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

Wenonah Players 1, 2, 4; Junior High School Club 1, 2; High School Club 4; l ntramura!s 2, 4; Scouting 2; Debate 4; Class Play 2.

. . Worthington

EVERETT EDSTROM.

MUSIC, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

Die-No-Mo 1, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Club 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4.

GEORGE ENGSTROM.

.... .. Winona

HARRIET KRAGE.

. ....... Winona

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; High School Club 4; Winonan 3, 4; Wenonah 4; Newman Club 4.

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY, ENGLISH

Football 4; High School Club, Vice President 3, President 4; Wenonah Assistant Business Manager 2, 4; Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Intramural Volleyball 3, 4.

. . . . . . . . . Winona

BETTY JANE FAILING.

ETHEL KREUTZ.

. .Winona

ART, ENGLISH, H ISTORY

Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, President 4; Wenonah Staff 2, 3, 4; High School Club 4.

EDUCATION, HISTORY, ENGLISH

Junior High School Club 1 ; Intermediate Grade Club 2, 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, Treasurer 2; W.A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 3; Winonan Staff 4.

WILLIAM FRANZMANN.

. ... Stillwater

PHYLLIS LADUE ........... .

... St. Paul

EDUCATION, ENGLISH, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Art Club 3, 4; Mendelssohn Club 3, 4; Special Chorus 3, 4; Intermediate Grade Club 2, 3; Country Life Club 2, 3.

ENGLISH, ART, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4, Guard Member 3, 4; Arc Club 2, 3, 4, President 3; Wenonah 2, 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief), Managing Editor 4; Winonan 2, 3; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 2; A Capella Choir 1; Junior High School Club ), High School Club 4, Imramurals 3, 4; "W" Club 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4.

VUKOSAVA LUMOVICH ................. Kinney ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, GEOGRAPHY

W.A.A. 3, 4;Junior High School Club 3, 4; Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4; Intermediate Grade Club 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Rangers Club 3, 4.

THE 1937 WENONAH

27


Wa.lcer Lynne June MacDonald Kermit MacPherson Dorothy Mallory

Helen Marek Elizabeth Mead Francis Miller Frederick Nelson

Saima Niskanen Myles Peterson Roy Prentis lrma Pyknen

Marguerite Rideout Lois Ross Helen Schrock Francis Schultz

Robert Small Dorothy Stoehr Orville Thomas Hazel Uggen

John Wachs Dorothy Westfall Arthur Wilson Vivian Yates

28

THE 1937 WENONAH


WALTER LYNNE ........................ Winona

MARGUERITE RIDEOUT.

. ........ Winona

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY, ENGLISH

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Apollo Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; College Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Debate 3; Winonan 4; Wenonah 3, 4; Buisness

Primary Club 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Country Life Club 1, 3, 4; League of Women Voters 4.

Manager 4.

JUNE MAcDONALD

.. Eveleth

ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY

Wenonah Players 3, 4, Vice President 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Arrowhead Range Club, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; High School Club 4; Wenonah 4;

LOIS ROSS

. ..... Winona

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Kindergarten Club I, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Country Life Club 3; Y.W.C.A. 1, 4; International Relations Club 4.

HELEN SCHROCK.

Pucple Key 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Annual Fall Play 3, 4.

KERMIT MAcPHERSON ..

.. Winona

HISTORY, ENGLISH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Freshman Class President; Sophomore Class President; Representative Council I, 2; lncramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2; Die-

. ........ . ... Winona

ENGLISH, HISTORY

High School Club 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Winonan Staff 2, 3; Wenonah

Staff 3.

FRANCES SCHULTZ.

No-Me 1, 2.

. ...... Stewartville

EDUCATION, ENGLISH, GEOGRAPHY

DOROTHY MALLORY.

. . . . . Sioux Falls, S.D.

Intermediate Grade Club I, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer I; A Capella 1; Y.W . C. A. 3; League of Women Voters 3, 4, President 4; Primary Club 4.

ENGLISH, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, HISTORY

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Special Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4;Junior High School Club 1, 2, 3;Junior-Senior High School Club 4; W.A.A. I, 2, 3; Physical Education Club 2, 3.

HELEN MAREK.

. ............... Chatfield

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, ENGLISH, HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY

League of Women Voters 2, 3, 4, President 3; Y.W.C.A. Finance Chairman 2; Winonan 2, 3, 4; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Presidem 4;

ROBERT SMALL.

. ......... Winona

SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH, HISTORY

International Relations Club I, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 2, 3; Winonan Staff I, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor 3, Managing Editor 4; Wenonah Staff '1., 3, 4, Spores Editor 3, 4; High School Club 4; Alumni Relations Committee 3; Class Vice President 4; Newman Club 2, 3, Treasurer 3.

DOROTHY STOEHR.

......... Chicago, Illinois

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY,

W.A.A.l.

ENGLISH, BIOLOGY

ELIZABETH MEAD.

....... Red Wing

MUSIC, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Mendelssohn 1, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Accompanist 2, 3, 4; Special Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Mason Music Club I, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 4; DieNo-Ma 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4.

FRANCIS MILLER.

. ............ Winona

SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Band 1, 2; Science Club 4;Junior High School Club I, 2, 3; High School Club 4.

FREDERICK NELSON.

.......... Albert Lea

Wenonah Players 4; International Relations Club 4; Y.W.C.A. 4; Intermediate Grade Club 4; High School Club 4.

OR VILLE THOMAS.

. ..... Arnolds Park

MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

"W" Club I, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Football1, 4; Intramural Board 1, 4; Track I, 2.; Intramural Spores.

HAZEL UGGEN ........... .

.. Wells

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, ENGLISH, IIISTORY SOCIAL SCIENCE

W.A.A. 3, 4; Primary Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Orchestra 3; International Relations Club 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4.

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

Junior High School Club 3; High School Club 4; Winonan Staff 2, 3, Managing Editor 3; Wenonah Associate Editor 2, Managing Editor 3; Apollo Club 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3, President 4; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; International Relations Club 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; Art Club 4; Special Chorus 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4, President 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Preceptor West Lodge 4; Debate 2; Stage Manager 75th Anniversary Pageant; Annual Fall Play 3, 4.

SAIMA NISKANEN.

. .... Kinney

JOHN WACHS.

. ........... . .. Winona

SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE

President Senior Class, President Junior Class, Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. Captain 4; Representative Council 3, 4, Vice President 3, Secretary 4; Winonan 4; Wenonah 4, Wenonah Players I, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 1, 2, 3, 4, &crctacy 3; Die-No-Mo Club 3, 4; Band I, 2, 3, 4; Golf I, 2, 3, 4; High School Club 4; Athletics Committee 2, 3; Intramural Sports I, 2, 3, 4; A Capella Choir 1; Finance Committee 4.

MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, ENGLISH

International Relations Club 4; Junior High School Club 3, 4; Wenonah Players 4.

MYLES PETERSEN.

. .... Wabasha

HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

"W" Club I, 2, 3, 4; Football I, 2, 3, 4; Baseball), 4; Intramural Board 4.

ROY PRENTIS ...

...... LeRoy

SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH

Football I, 2; Apollo Club I, 2, 3, 4; Band I, 2, 3; Junior High School Club I, 2, 3; Die-No-Mo 3, 4.

DOROTHY WESTFALL.

. .......... Montevideo

ENGLISH, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4, Vice President 4; Representative Council 4, President 4; N .S.F.A. Delegate 3; Junior Class Vice President; Winonan 2, 3; Wenonah Feature Editor 3; International Relations Club 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; President Shepard

Hall).

ARTHUR WILSON ....................... Winona MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Intramural Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4.

VIVIAN YATES.

IRMA PYKNEN ......................... Virginia

. ... Harmony

ENGLISH, HISTORY, MUSIC

High School Club 3, 4; Intermediate Grade Club 3, 4; Arrowhead Range

Band I, 2, 3, 4; Mendelssohn I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, Recording Secretary 4; Special Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Y.W.C.A.l, 2; Mason Music Club 2; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Die-No-Mo Club 4;Junior High School

Club 3, 4.

Club I, 2, Senioc High School Club 4.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, SCIENCE, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

THE

1937

WENONAH

29


Fir.It Row: W. Glubka, E. Albers, H. Welch, P. Meyer, M. Robertson , P. Wesemann, M. Carl son, L. Schuh , A. Gunderson, E. Zierdt, E. Beaudin, M. Van Campen, E. Kurzweg. S1conJ Row: 0. Johnson, S. Wegner, P. Abel, H. Tuomi, G . Pugh, G. Grimm, M. McCarthy, G . Nerdahl , I. Wetmore, L. Kennebeck, L. Nel son. T hird Row: R. Busdicker, G. Bruegger , L. Arns, L. Riley, W. Morse, C. Morse, B. Blix, M. Fehring, W. Wadewitz,J. Quaday, M. Ohlsen. Fourth Row: B. Busse, B. Ostmoe, R. Pa rker, R. Wolf, G . Voga rd, V. Suomi , N . Moore, I. Thomas,J. Laakso, D. Roche, L. Larson .

Junior Class

A

CCORDING to Webster,junior means younger in years or lower in rank . Well, the juniors may be of tender years, and, of course, the Seniors consider th¡em lower in rank, but one thing they are not lower or inferior in is ability. When the Seniors depart, the Juniors will step into their places easily and well. This year, the Junior Class, as it did last y~ar, lost many potential members because of the large number of sophomores who secured teaching positions and hence did not return to school. Juniors may be found in all the college organizations, either heading the club or participating in the activities. The Juniors contribute extensively to the two college publications . The representation

30

THE

1937

of Juniors on the Winonan staff is greater than that of any other class, while two editors and five staff members of the Wenonah are Juniors. Writing isn't the only talent which the Juniors have . There is also a goodly number of musicians, actors, and athletes among them . That some of them belong to the intelligentsia is evidenced by the fact that seven of the twelve newly elected members of Kappa Delta Pi are Juniors and five Juniors are members of Purple Key. Officers of the club are, Berger Ostmoe, president; Bernard Busse, vice-president; and Adelaide Gunderson, secretarytreasurer. The junior member of the Representative council is Elizabeth Blix.

WENONAH


Junior Class ABEL, PAULINE

McCARTHY, MARION

ALBERs, EvELYN

MEYER, PAULA

ANDERSON, DAVID R.

MicLus, FLoRENCE

ARNS, LYLE

MooRE, NATHAN

ARVIDSON, BERNICE

NELSON, LAURA

BEAUDIN, ERMA

N ERDAHL, GENEVIEVE

BLix, ELIZABETH

OsTMOE, BERGER

BRUEGGER, GEORGE

PARKER, RoBERT

BusDICKER, RoGER

QuADAY, jOHN

BussE, BERNARD

RILEY' LAWRENCE

CARLSON, MARY

RoBERTSON, MARGARET

CHARPENTIER, RENEE

RocHE, DELBERT

CHASE, HoRACE

SANNICOLA , CARMEN

CouLsoN, WALLACE

ScHELLHAs, ELFA

EvANs, HAROLD

ScHuH, LAuRA

FEHRING, MARY

SoMMERDORF, LucrLLE

GHOLZ, CHARLES

STORTI, PAUL

GLUBKA, WINNIFRED

SuoMI, VERNER

GRIMM, GRETCHEN

THOMAS, IRVING

GuNDERSON, ADELAIDE

THOMPSON, KARLOTTE

HIRSCH, ANN

TuoMI, HILDA

HoBLITT, ARTHUR

vAN CAMPEN' MARy

,HoovER, RoGER

VoGARD, GoRDON

JOHNSON' ORLAND

WADEWITZ , WALTER

]oRRis, LoREN

WEGNER, SYLVIA

KENNEBECK, LuciLLE

WETMORE, INEZ

KESSELS, KATHRYN

WoLF, RAYMOND

KJELLAND, JosEPHINE

WoLFE, RosE

LAAKso, JoHN

ZIERDT' ELEANOR

THE

1937

WENONAH

31


Donna Amdahl Waunella Appleby Dorothy Baker LaVerne Bang

Pearl Berge Elsie Blessing Marcella Boley Ethelyn Bucher

Verona Bucher Renee Charpentier Annie Christensen Carol Crandall

Adeline Daniels Carol David Dorothy David Joan Downing

Alice Ebert Dorothy Ebert June Francke Maxine Graner

Joyce Hagerthy Mabel HammervolJ Frank Harcey Eloyce Hartmann

32

THE

1937

WENONAH


DONNA AMDAHL.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mabel

ADELINE DANIELS .

High School Club 2; Councry Life Club 1, 2; W .A.A. 2.

WAUNELLA APPLEBY . ...

... ... Pine Island

INTERMEDIATE

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Country Life Club 1; Intermediate G rade Club 1, 2, Secretary路Treasurer 1; Orchestra 1.

. .. . . . Minneiska

RURAL

CAROL DAVID.

. .. Eyota

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Country Life Club 1, 2.

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2 .

DOROTHY BAKER . ..... .

. . . . . . Fountain DOROTHY DAVID ..

PRIMARY

. ......... Eyota

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Primary Club 2; Country Life Club 2; W.A.A. 2.

Mendelssohn Club 2; Kindergarten Club I, 2; Primary Club 2.

LAVERNE BANG .. .... . .... . ........ .. Red Wing JOAN DOWNING .

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Winonan Staff 1; Art Club 1, 2; H igh School Club 1, 2; Y.W.C. A. 1, 2.

PEARL BERGE.

. .. Whalan

. .... . .. Winona

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Primary Club 2 ; Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Mason Music Club I , 2, Secretary 2; Veterans of Future:: Wars 1; Wenonah Play路 c::rs 1, 2; Chorus 1.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

High School Club 1, 2; Mason Music Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Country Life Club 2; Basketball!; Girl Reserves 2.

ALICE EBERT ............ .. . . ..... . ..... Preston INTERMEDIATE

Intc::rmc::oliatc:: Club 2; Primary路 Club 2.

ELSIE BLESSING ....... . .......... .... ... Hokah PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2, Vice President 1, President 2; W.A.A. Board 2.

DOROTHEA EBERT ... ..... . . .. ........ Zumbrota JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Junior High School Club I; High School Club 2; Country Life Club 2.

MARCELLA BOLEY.

. .. Kasson

PRIMARY, ART

JUNE FRANKE.

. .. .. . ... .... . ....... Eyota

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Primary 1, 2; Winonan 1, 2; Speci2l Chorus 1, 2; Art Club 2.

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Country Life Club 1.

MAXINE GRANER .. . ... ... . . ETHELYN BUCHER.

............ . .... Zumbrota

RURAL Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; Intramurals 1, 2.

. .. Kellogg

INTERMEDIATE

Imc::rmediate Grade Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 2.

JOYCE HAGERTHY ...... ..... ....... Minneapolis VERONA BUCHER .

.... . Zumbrota RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

Y.W.C.A.. 1, 2; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2; Coumry Life Club 1, 2.

Country Life Club 1, 2.

MABEL HAMMER VOLD .... .

. .. .. ... Preston

RENEE CHARPENTIER . .......... .... ..... Bruno

RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

Country Life Club 1, 2; Mason Music Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Girl Reserves 1, 2; lntramurals 1, 2.

Intermediate Grade Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, Secrerary 2; Mason Music Club 1, 2, 3, President 3; Girl Scout Leader 1, 2.

FRANK HARCEY ... ..... . . .... . . ..... St. Charles ANNIE CHRISTENSEN .

. .. ....... Minneapolis

INTERMEDIATE RURAL

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Club 1; League of Women Voters 1; lntramurals 1, 2.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Debate 1, 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2; Jun ior High School Club 1; Men 's Club 1, 2; Organizer Veterans of Future Wars, Treasurer 1, Post路Commandc::r 2.

ELOYCE HARTMAN ......... . . ....... . ... Hokah CAROL CRANDALL.

............... Utica RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

INTERMEDIATE

Country Life Club 1, 2, Social Chairman 2; Intermediate G adc Club 2; W.A.A. 1; G irl Reserves 2.

THE 1937 WENONAH

33


Lois Heimer Lyrene Heins Hazel Heldt Mary Ivancie

Beatrice Jackson Norma Jacobson Lois Jensen Bernadette J ohnson

Doris Johnson Esther Johnson Lucille Kennebeck Marjorie King

Mildred Kjome Lois Klindworth Elsie Kurzweg Rocde Larson

Annabelle Liebe Pauline Logan Florence Mid: Ius Irene Morman

Anna Neumann Cora Neumann Ivy Orr Viola Peterson

34

THE 1937 WENONAH


. ................. Rochester

LOIS HEIMER.

MILDRED KJOME ..

. ... . ....... Spring Grove PRIMARY

INTERMEDIATE, RURAL

Newman Club 1.

Art Club 2; Primary Club 1, 2; Y.W .C.A. 1, 2.

. .......... Zumbro Falls

LYRENE HEINS .

INTERMEDIATE

LOIS KLINDWORTH ........... ..... Zumbro Falls RU~'{AL

League of Women Voters 2; Intermediate Grade Club 2.

Band I, 2 ; W.A. A. I, 2; Die-No-Mo 2; Y.W.C.A. I , 2 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chisholm

HAZEL HELDT.

ELSIE KURZWEG.

KIND ERG AR TEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn 1, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Special Chorus I; Ranger<> Club 1, 2.

. ....... Marble

MARYIVANCIE .

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2, Secretary 1; Primary Club 2; Arrowhead Range Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 2, Vice President 2; League of Women Vorers 2, Secretary-Treasurer 2 ; Y.W.C.A. 2.

.............. Chisholm

BEATRICE JACKSON

INTERMEDIATE

Mendelssohn 1, 2; Special Chorus 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2, Vice President 2.

. . ... Cochrane, Wis. RURAL

W.A.A. I, 2, Board 2.

ROCELE LARSON . . ........... ......... Mazeppa RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

. .... . ........ Owatonna

ANNABELLE LIEBE .

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, ART, ENGLISH

International Relations 4; Primary Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mason Music Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Country Life Club 2 ; League of Women Voters 2. Miss Liebe is a senior . Her picture was included in this section through error.

NORMA JACOBSON . . ........ . .... ... Lanesboro PAULINE LOGAN .

INTERMEDIATE

.... Srewarrville

INTERME DI ATE

Intermediate Grade Club 2 ; W .A.A. 1; Country Life Club 2.

Newman Club 1, 2; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2; Primary Cluh 2; Country Life Club 2 .

. . . . . . . Rose Creek

LOIS JENSEN .

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Wenonah Players 1, 2; H igh School Club 1, 2; Die-No-Mo 2; International Relations Club 2; M endelssohn Club 2; Special Chor us 2; Wenonah

Staff 2.

FLORENCE MICKLUS .

. Minneapolis

ELEMENTARY

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Grade Cluh 1, 2.

BERNADETTE JOHNSON .............. . Sr. Paul KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

........... Red Wing

DORIS JOHNSON ... .

Primary Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1.

RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2 , Secretary-Treasurer 2; W.A.A. 1, 2.

Ar t Club 1, 2; Junior High School Club 1, 2.

. .Red Wing PRIMARY

. . . . . . Kellogg

INTERMEDIATE

Newman Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1; Intermediate Grade Club 2.

MARJORIE KING.

. ....... Eyota

CORA NEUMANN .... ........ . . RURAL

Primary Club 2; League of Women Voters 2; Y.W.C.A. 2.

LUCILLE KENNEBECK ..

. .Eyota

ANNA NEUMANN.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

ESTHER JOHNSON .

. ....... Hokah

IRENE MORMAN . PRIM A RY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Primary Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; lntramurals 1.

. . . . . . . .Sourh Sr. Paul

IN fERMEDIATE

Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2 ; Newman Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; lntramurals 1, 2.

Country L ife Club 1, 2; W.A.A. 1, 2 .

. ........ Houston

IVY ORR. INTERMEDIATE

Country Life Club 1, 2; W.A.A. 1 ; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2 .

VIOLA PETERSON .

. ......... . .... Pipestone

INTERMEDI ATE

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Grade Club 2.

THE 1937 WENONAH

35


Luci lle Ray Helen V. Smith Muriel Syverson Dolores Thei sen

Elo ise Tufcee Ruth Voll Esther Wachrer V io leHe Warber

Velma Welxr Phylli s Westmann Eleanor Zirzow

Sophomores Who Are Enrolled in the Degree Course

36

ANFINSON' OLAF

DECKER, JoHN

BARNETT, LuciNDA

DETTLOFF, CEDRIC

BARSKI, EDWARD

DoNEHOWER, Ross

BARTSCH, VIOLET

EIFEALDT, JoHN

BLESSING, ELSIE

EIKREM, JoYcE

BoLEY, MARCELLA

ENGSTROM, MARY

BossHART, MARION

ERWIN, CLARICE

BRATRUD, CHARLES

FARMER, STUART

BRONK, ALICE

FuLLER, CLARK

BuRLEIGH, ARDEN

GRIMM, WALTER

CARLSON, WILLARD

GRUDEM, HAROLD

CooPER, VENITA

HAAS, KATHRYN

THE

1937

WENONAH


LUCILLE RAY .... .

..... Austin

RUTH VOLL ... .. .... .. .... ..... . . ....... Kasson INTERMEDI ATE

INTERMEDIATE

Orchestra 1, 2; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2; League of Wo men Voters 2; Country Life Club 2 , President 2; Y. W .C. A. 2.

Y.W.C.A. 2; Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Grade Club 2.

ESTHER WACHTER ......... .. . . .. . ... Rosemount HELEN V. SMITH ..... . . . .............. Wabasha JUNIOR HIG H SCHOOL

INTERMEDIATE, RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

Y. W.C.A. I , 2; Junior High School Club I ; High School Cl ub 2.

VIOLETTE WARBER ......... .. ...... . .... Dover

MURIEL SYVERSON ....

Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Pri mary Club 2 .

KINDERG ARTEN-PRIMARY

. . . . . Ormsby

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

. Y.W.C.A. 1; High School Club 1, 2; lntc:rnatiooal Relations Club 2; Winonan 2; Weno nah 2.

VELMA WEBER ...... .

. .. . .. . . Elgin

PRIMARY M AJOR

Primary Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2.

DELORES THEISEN ........... .

. .Zumbro Falls PHYLLIS WESTMAN . ....... .

KINDERG ARTEN-PRIM ARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Pri mary Club 2; Y. W.C. A. 1, 2; Country Life Club 1; Winonan 1, 2 .

. ... Winona

KINDERG ARTEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Art Club 1, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Primary Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2 .

ELOISE TUFTEE ................ .

. . Albert Lea

INTERMEDIATE

Y.W.C.A. 1, 2 ; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2; Wino nan 1, 2 ; Weno nah 2; Country Life Club 1, 2.

ELEANOR ZITZOW .

. .Kellogg

INTERMEDIATE

lntcrmc:diatc: Grade: Club 2.

HILL, MADGE

OTTMAN' LESLIE

JoHNSON, HARRY

PFEILSTICKER, PHILIP

JOHNSON, OscAR

RoNSBERG, BARBARA

KLAUSLER, BERNICE

RowELL, RoBERT

KocH, RAYMOND

RuHNAu, DoROTHY

KocKENDOERFER, DoROTHY

SEATON, PEGGY

KoENIG, RuTH

SEELING, MARGUE RITE

KRAFT' GILBERT

SHAFFER, LESLIE

KRAGE, WILLIAM

SIMONS, Lms

KuRZWEG, VIOLA

SMITH, GARLD

L.

LABARRE, JEANNE

SMITH' HELEN

LAMoTTE, DoROTHY

SPRIESTERSBACH, CARYLL

LAuDoN, DoNALD

STUCKI, RALPH

LuHMAN, INEz

THuRow, AuDREY

MILLER, jAMES

ToMPKINs, ELLis

MoEN, HARLEM

wASHBURN' BETTY

MoRsE, CAROLMA Y

WEEDING, jEAN

MosiNG, V ERBENIA

wELCH, HELEN

NORDQUIST' A VIS

WILDGRUBE, ELAINE

NOSEK, wALLACE

WINTERs, EvELYN

OLSoN, NoRRIS

WoLVERTON, MERVALE

OsTROM, RoBERT

THE

1937

WENONAH

37


FirJt Row: D. Waby , M. Smith, H. Wamhoff, M. Pike, F. Woodward, A. Sundby, V. Towner, H. Scrfling, H. Schumann, M. Wcllcome, M. Roche, V. Pearson,

I. Pawelek. Second Row: A. Paulson, M. Smith, E. Wamhoff, H. Schumann, R. Mogren, M. J. Wiesling, P. Steger, L. Steward, M. Culbertson, B. Travis, R. Rockne,

C. Zabel. Third Row: M. Donehower, P. Thorson, D. Loughrey, H. Thorpe, E. Stull, A. Pearson, V. Reilly, P. Schwarz, M. Niemela, D. Rother,J. P:uterson, R.

Voelker, L. Whitman. Fourth Row: R. O'Neill, C. Johnson, A. White, H. Duncanson, J. McVey, H. Anderson, M. Paulson, M. Passe, J. Gatzlaff,J. Robertson, J. Davidson, H.

Hammond. Fifth Row: R. Bell, A. Bremer, R. Spencer, N . Fjetland, L. Walsh, A. Bye, L. Christenson, C. ¡Bratrud, L. Frankson , G. Johnson, E. Gatzloff, C. Dornfeld .

Freshman Class

T

HE evolution of a freshman from a frightened, woe-begotten creature to a self-confident, independent individual is as astonishing as the evolution of man . The upperclassmen are always greatly surprised and a little resentful when this transformation takes place. This year in just a couple of weeks it was impossible to distinguish between an upper classman and a freshman when they had endured their battery of tests - intelligence, vocabulary, speech writing, and spelling. The freshmen swiftly replaced the 1-don't-know-where-I- belong expressions on their faces with 1-knowwhat-I'm-doing expression for by this time the upper classmen had properly initiated them into college life . Each freshman girl living in the dormitory was assigned as "stooge" to an upperclassman. The duties of a ''stooge' '

38

THE

included running errands, washing and pressing clothes, supplying candy to one's "superior," and showing great deference at all times . During initiation week freshman girls appeared with makeup only on one side of the face, hair partly braided and tied with huge ribbons wearing different colored shoes, and carrying sofa pillows or cloth animals. One day the task assigned was to carry an uncooked egg all day, having each of her instructors endorse it. While the girls fared thus, the freshmen were also being reduced to subjection. They were required to wear the traditional purple skull caps with a button on the crown and "button" or "double button" at the command of an upper classman. During assembly periods freshmen were called upon for initiations and stunts, while the inhabitants

1937 WENONAH


Several of the boys have done rather of West Lodge provided similar entertainment at Social Hour on Tuesday well by themselves in football, basketnights. One Monday the freshman boys ball, boxing, and track. The freshman arranged en masse on the steps of the class contributed two regulars to the main entrance rendered their version of basketball team and three to the football our Alma Mater song. Anyway we're squad. A great many men have particiglad they learned the words. pated in the intra-mural program of Stunt night was a revelation. On sports while the girls have engaged in that night the freshmen exhibited a lot soccer, tennis, and indoor games. of talent and versatility. They presented The freshman singers, artists, journaactors, singers, and musicians - all of lists, and actors found ample opporthem surprisingly good. tunity to satisfy their interests in the In their float for the Homecoming various clubs of the college, such as the parade the freshmen again displayed Art Club, the Winonan, the Mendelssohn their originality and ability. Club, and the Wenonah Players. The freshmen proved their altruism Officers of the freshman class are: Scott this year by sending the funds set aside Johnson, president ; Elva Enstrom, vicefor the freshman party to the flood president; Margaret Finkelnburg, secresuffers. However, the freshmen still gave tary-treasurer. Scott Johnson is the all the students and faculty members of freshman member of the Representative the college a grand party, charging only Council. Mr. Jederman is the class a very moderate fee . adviser.

First Row: A. Meyer, M. J. Lane, M. Finkelnburg, E. Knutson, J. Harris, S. Christianson, L. Anderson, K. Haas, G . Edstrom, M. McMullin, K. Grimm. Second Row: A. Ohlsen, A. Devine, C. Croxford, R. Hines, G. Bell, L. Hilden, C. Duncanson, H. Mollenkamp, M . Meyer, M. H iltunen, E. Enstrom , ]. Foster. Third Row: V. Kangas, B. Coc, M . Campbell, G. Graham,]. Eikrcm, G. Cressey, W. Bunge, D . Funk, W. Cipra, A. Hanson, V. Bartsch . Fourth Row: M. Kirkwood, R. Devine, M. Gilbertson, C. Keirn, C. Benke, M. Costello, M. Canfield, G. Freese , M . Dromctcr, R. Lenton, J. Baumgart. Fifth Row: N. Boehlke, E. Booth, R. Colquhoun, l. Limpert, H. Martin, L. Klavitter, L. Miller, B. Hoffman, C. Hamlin,J . Beyer, C. Benson, C. Hol zworth. Sixth Row: 0 . Joneson, J . Amdahl , W. Kaczrowski, A. Andrejek, A. Hassinger, S. Locken, R. Brandt, J. Eifealdt, B. Evers, B. J . Fellows, H. Eifcaldt , L. Durrant. Srvmth Row: R. Johnson, C. Dettloff, H. Brokken, S. J ohnson, G. Mauszycki , R. Mayer, F. Madernan, I. Burkhard t ,J. LeMay, G. Herron, S. Blondell.

THE 1937 WENONAH

39


OUR FAREWELL In only a few days we shall pass out the doors of this institution: many of us perhaps will never see our Alma Mater again. Therefore, ours is a feeling of mingled joy and sadness. Naturally we regret leaving, but still we who are graduated are thrilled to think that the school has put its stamp of approval on us. We look upon this as an honor and a trust. We have introduced ourselves, let you know what we've done while here, and now we shall try to depict what we have done this year and a little bit about how we've done it. This material is found in the sections on:

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES COLLEGE SPORTS COLLEGE FUN

In the hope that we'll leave you a little better acquainted with us by showing what we do, and also to give you something to remember us by,

We 40

THE

P~z.e~ent .. .

1937 WENONAH


College Activities


The Representative Council

Sitting - B. Blix, Miss Richards, A. Hoblitt, Mr. Boots, B. Ostmoe, J. Wachs. Stnndin!, - Miss Talbot, S. Johnson , D . Westfall , L. Simons.

The Representative Council

B

EING a democratic institution, the Winona State Teachers College has what all such institutions have, a system of representation. The Representative Council is the group to whom the students intrust the power to act in their behalf. This is the organization which must endeavor to maintain the high standards of the college. These representatives play a truly significant part in the affairs of the school. This council has a number of duties . One of these is nominating to the association the student members of the following ¡ committees : athletic; finance; lecture, plays and recitals; social affairs; alumni relations; assembly and commencement exercise; and public relations. It is also responsible for the supervision and revision, when necessary, of the joint committee system, advises in all student activities; receives applications for the

42

organization of new clubs, recommending suitable action, and may serve as board of review in all cases of student affairs. This year the council has an additional duty : It has charge of the ruJe governing eligibility for offices in any college club or organization, and participation in public performances . The five faculty members of the Council are: Misses Richards, Talbot ; Messrs. Boots, MacDonald, and Simmers. The student members are the class presidents: John Wachs, senior, Berger Ostmoe, junior, Arthur Boblitt, sophomore, and Scott Johnson, freshman; the representatives from the three upper classes are Dorothy Westfall, Betty Blix, and Lois Simons . Officers of the Representative Council are Dorothy Westfall, president, Berger Ostmoe, vice-president, and John Wachs, secretary .

THE 1937 WENONAH


International Relations Club

A

LTHOUGH the impressive title of conference, held April 9th and lOth at this club suggests a group of poli- the University of Minnesota, included ticians, there isn't a politician in the round table discussions, open forums, club. (Members, please don't feel hurt.) and speeches by prominent men. "Causes These young people really do things, of War," "Collective Security vs. Isolawhich is more than can be said of some tion," "The Situation in Spain," "Panpoliticians. One thing this group does American Conference,'' and ¡'Economic not do is try to settle the affairs of the Problems" were some of the topics of nations . The purpose of the organiza- the round table discussions . Merle tion is to study and discuss present day Ohlsen, one of the Winona delegates, international and national problems to presided at the round table discussion on get a better and more complete under- peace education. Other official delegates standing of them. Membership in the from Winona were Dorothy Westfall, club is limited . At the beginning of Isabel Johnson, Evelyn Albers, and Deleach fall and spring quarter new mem- bert Roche. bers are chosen from a list of students The officers of the club are: Isabel who have expressed a desire to belong Johnson, president, Irving Thomas, vicepresident, Margaret Berven, recording to the club. Each year this Winona group is repre- secretary, Dorothy Westfall, correspondsented at the state conference of Inter- ing secretary, Evelyn Albers, treasurer. national Relations Clubs. This year's Dr. Selle and Dr. Tozier are the advisers .

Sitting - Dr. Tozier, M. Berven, I. Thomas, I. Johnson, E. Albers, D. Westfall, Dr. Selle. Standint,, FirJt Row....__ L. Larson, N. Olson, P. Meyer, L. Simoos, E. Mead, M . Syverson, H . Uggcn, M . Buchler, G. Ncrdabl, L. Ross, A. Liebe, K. Kessels, D. Stoehr. Second Row- G. Vogard, V. Suomi, R. Small, L. Riley, M. Ohlsen, R. Koenig, L. Jensen, S. Niskanen, B. Arvidson, U. Costello, P. Pfcilsticker, D. Roche, R. Stucki, V. Gislason, B. Busse, F. Nelson.

International Relations

Club

.:-------------------------------....:..__....:._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:._....:.._....:.._....:.._....:.._:.:.:,;,;I

THE 1937 WENONAH

43


The Wenonah Staff

Sitting- J. Wachs, E. Tuftcc, W. Lynne, W. Franzmann, B. Busse, G. Nerdahl, H. L. Smith, K. MacPherson. Standing, First Row- P. Seaton, E. Zicrdt, B. Washburn, M. Syverson, L. Nelson, A. Buck, J . MacDonald, M. Engstrom, P. Meyer, G. Pugh. E. Finklcnburg. Second Row - R. Small, M. Clarke, H. Krage, L. Jensen, A. Bremer, R. John son, G. Engstrom, S. John son, E. Kreutz, E. Wildgrubc, A. Burleigh, C. Spriestersbach.

The Wenonah Staff EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor ................... ... .................... William Franzmann Editor-in-Chief .......... .. . ........ . ............ ........ ....... Bernard Busse Associate Editor .............................................. . Helen L. Smith Literary Editor .... .... . .. . . ...... . ..................... . . .. Genevieve Nerdahl Literary Staff .... ... . ... .. . ... .... Betty Washburn, Eloise Tuftee, Irving Thomas Art Editor .. . ...... .. .... . .. .................. ... .... . .. ...... Anna Jane Buck Art Staff ... .... . ......... ... Elsie Finklenburg, Gertrude Pugh, Marion Bosshardt Men's Sport Editor ........ ..... ........................... . ..... ¡. Robert Small Associate Sport Editors ............................ Leslie Ottman, Adolf Bremer Women's Sport Editor . .. . ...... . .. : . .. .................. ..... . Mary Engstrom Associate Sports Editors ............ . . .. ............ Harriet Krage, Paula Meyer Feature Editor ..... . ........ . . .... .. .. ... .. . .. ......... Dorothy Kochendoerfer Feature Staff ...... .. .. ... ..... ... .. . .. ..... Kermit McPherson, Muriel Syverson Snapshot Editor ... ......... . . .. ..... . .......... ... ................ Lois Jensen Assistants .................. .... ... ..... ... ....... Eleanor Zierdt, Norris Olson Picture Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ....... .... .. ..... . .. ......... Marion Clarke Assistants ........ .. .. . . ... ....... . . . . . ........... . . . Ethel Kreutz, John Wachs Characterization Editor. . . . . . . . . ......... .. . ........ . ... .. Caryl Spriestersbach Assistant .. .................................... .. ............... Peggy Seaton BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ....... . .......... . ............................ Walter Lynne Assistants .. .. . ........ ... . ........ George Engstrom, Scott Johnson, Clark Fuller Business Artist ... . ........ . ................................... Arden Burleigh Typists ....... . ................... Juanita Gerlich, Laura Nelson, Edward Cohen Hazel Uggen, Marion Clarke, Muriel Syverson Faculty Advisers ..................... Miss Dorothy Clark, Mr . Reed, Mr. French

44

THE

1937 WENONAH


The Winonan Staff EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor ....... . ..... .. ....... . ............... . ....... . . Robert Small Editor-in-Chief ................. . . .. ............. ... .... .. .. . Margaret Buehler Make-up Editor .......... . ..... . . . . .. . ......... . . . .......... . . . Marion Clarke Assignment Editor .............. .. . ................ . ........ Genevieve Nerdahl Associate Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................. Eloise Tuftee Feature Writers ..... . .................. Kermit MacPherson, Adelaide Gunderson Men's Sports ..... ... ... . ......... . .. ...... Gordon Vogard, Kermit MacPherson Women's Sports .................................... Harriet Krage, Paula Meyer News Editor . ........ . . . . ............ . . ....................... . Edward Cohen Literary Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen L. Smith Alumni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Del bert Roche Music Editors . ................... . .. ............ Isabel Johnson, A vis Nordquist Club Editor . . ........ . ........ . ... ........................ . .. Margaret Berven Re-Write Editor ... . . .. ............................ .. ......... Bernice Arvidson Betty Washburn Adolph Bremer

REPORTERS Margaret Meyer Muriel Syverson Margaret Berven

Dolores Theisen Robert Johnson

BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ......... . ..... .. ............. .. ... .. . . ........ Walter Lynne Business Ass is tan t .......... . . . ..... ... ... . . .... .. . . .. . ....... Walter W adewi tz Advertising.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. John Wachs, Glenn Johnson Circulation . . . . .... . .... . . . . . .. . ..... . ... . ... . Betty Jane Failing, Eleanor Zierdt TYPISTS Berger Ostmoe

Hazel Uggen

Juanita Gehrlich

Sztting - E. Tuftec, W. Lynne, M. Clark e, R. Small, M. Buehler, E. Cohen, A. Nordquist, G. Vogard. StatJding, Fir.Jt Row - A. Gunderson, B. Washburn, M. Meyer, H. Uggen, E. Zicrdt, B. J. Failing, P. Meyer, G. Nerdahl, H. Krage, M. Syverson, J. Gehrlich. Second Row - A. Bremer, R. Johnson, D. Roche.

Winonan Staff

THE

1937

WENONAH

45


Kappa Delta Pi

Sitting- E. Albers, E. Krcurz, M. Berven, E. Mead, I. Johnson, G. Nc::rdahl. Standing, First Row -

A. Gunderson, P. Meyer, R. Wolf, R. Keller, D. Roche,J. Kjelland, M. Rideout.

Stcond Row - A. Buck, M. Buehler, W. Franzmann, F. Nelson, Mr. Simmers, V. Gislason, D. Westfall, H. Uggen.

Kappa Delta Pi

K

APPA DELTA PI is a national honorary society for those who have a strong interest in the field of education and show promise of success in teaching. The Gamma Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was installed in Winona State Teachers College on February 10, 1934. The purpose of the club is to instill in its members a high regard for the teaching profession. Only those students in their junior or senior years of college who have a high scholastic standing, admirable personal qualities, and membership in at least four extra-curricular activities, are eligible for membership. The following were initiated into the Kappa Delta Pi this year: Evelyn Albers, Margaret Berven, Adelaide Gunderson, Robert Keller, Josephine Kjelland, Ethel Kreutz, Isabel Johnson, Paula Meyer,

46

THE

1937

Genevieve Nerdahl, Mrs. Marguerite Rideout, Delbert Roche, and Raymond Wolfe. Old members still in school are: Anna Jane Buck, Margaret Buehler, Dorothy Westfall, William Franzmann, Victor Gislason, Elizabeth Mead, Hazel U ggen, and Frederick Nelson. The club attempts to bring worthwhile speakers to the club and to the college. Dr. A. B. Caldwell of the State Department of Education spoke at the initiation ceremony on January 25, 1937. At a Founder's Day Program, April 16, the club secured Prof. Luther Purdom of the University of Michigan as a speaker. Officers of the club are Fred Nelson, president, Dorothy Westfall, vice-president, Margaret Buehler, secretary-treasurer, William Franzmann, program chairman, and Mr. Simmers, counsellor.

WENONAH



The Wenonah Players

First Row- Dr. Lynch, W. Franzmann, M. Clarke , F. Ne lson, J. MacDon ald, W. Lynne, M. GarIough .

Second Row- D. Stoehr, H. Martin , P. Seaton, H. L. Smith , S. Ni skanen , V. Kangas, V. Lumovic h, A. Gunderson , ]. Foster. Third Row- M . Van Campen, S. Wegner, R. Koenig , L. Jense n, R. Ostrom , C. Morse, A. Nordq uist , A. Buck, G. Gri mm . Fourth Row -

J. Dav idson, C. Spriestersbach, J . Laakso , V. Suo mi, J. Wachs, R. Ke ller,

M. Ohl sen, N. Olson, F. Harcey.

The Wenonah Players

D

URING the past year the Wenonah Players have accomplished a great deal in the field of dramatics . Much of the credit for this year's success belongs to Dr . Gladys Lynch whose constant enthusiasm and personality have been sources of inspiration for the members of the club . The first important event of the year for the Players was their annual Fail Initiation Banquet and Dance given in honor of the newly elected members. At the Minnesota P .T.A. Convention held in Winona last fall the Players presented the one-act drama ''Wind Over Salem" . which won first prize in the state P .T .A . play-writing contest last spnng. The fall production was ' 'Children of the Moon" by Martin Flavin . For the Christmas program Henry Van Dyke's "The Other Wise Man"was rewritten for the stage and presented by the Players. "The King Abdicates", an original satire, by Frederick Nelson, was pre-

sented at the college and various places in town . This and several other plays were presented over the local radio station by members of the Players. In April, a one-act play contest was sponsored for the neighboring high schools. The purpose of the contest was to promote interest in dram'atics. Talks and demonstrations were given by members of the Players . For the spring production four one-act plays, directed by members of the club were presented. They were " The Far Away Princess" directed by Mary Garlaugh, ' 'The Intruder'' directed by Caryl Spriestersbach, ''The Marriage Proposal¡' directed by William Franzmann, and "The Valiant " directed by Frederick Nelson . Officers of the Wenonah Players are Frederick Nelson, president; June MacDonald, vice-president; Marion Clarke, secretary; Walter Lynne, treasurer; Dr . Lynch, Dr. Murphy, and Dr . Tozier, advisers. c

"\

48

THE

1937

WENONAH


11

Children of the Moon 11

T

HE Wenonah Players' dramatic presentation for this year was Martin Flavin's "Children of the Moon" which was directed by Dr. Gladys Lynch. "Children of the Moon" concerns members of the Atherton family in whose blood runs the taint of "moon madness." Embittered toward life because of the tragic deaths of her husband and her son, Mrs. Atherton wishes her daughter to be unhappy too. To attain her selfish ends she starts into action a force which gets beyond her control and has more tragic results than she had anticipated. Old Judge Atherton, played with convincing realism by Robert Ostrom, Winona, has a moon madness which has its effect on the other members of the family. Madame Atherton, grandmother of Jane, depicted by Mary Garlough of Minneapolis, was one of the best roles in the play. Carolmay Morse of St. Paul

F. Nelson,]. MacDonald, W.

Lynn~.

was splendid in the role of the neurotic mother. June MacDonald of Eveleth gave an understanding and appealing protrayal of Jane, daughter of Mrs. Atherton. Major Bannister, the aviator who won the heart of Jane, was given a sympathetic interpretation by Frederick Nelson of Albert Lea. Walter Lynne, Winona, made a likeable and amusing butler, while Caryl Spriestersbach of Pine Island made a capable mechanic. John Laakso of Gilbert was admirable in his role of Doctor Wetherell. The behind-stage cast was headed by Marion Clarke, Preston, as stage-manager with the lighting and realistic sounds of the pounding surf and the droning aeroplane under the direction of Verner Suomi, Norris Olson, and Merle Ohlsen . The unusually effective set was designed by Anna Jane Buck.

C. Spriestersbach, M. Garlough, R. Ostrom, C. Morse,J. Laakso.

''Children of the Moon''

______________________________________..........,,, ..

THE

1937

WENONAH

49


The Die-No-Mo Clttb

FirJt Row- L. Arns, R. Parker, G. Grimm, E. Wildgrube, M. Van Campen, President F. Gislason on desk. Smmd Row- R. Busdicker, L. Klindworth, Dr. Selle, G. Edstrom, H. L. Smith, S. Wegner, 0. Johnson, D. Westfall, A. Gunderson. Third Row- E. Finkelnburg, L Simons, B. Ronsbcrg, V. Yates, J. MacDonald, E. Blix, P. &:a ron, M. McCarthy, M. Buehler, B. Mead, ]. Kjelland. Fo11rtb Row -

L.Jensen,J. Wachs, R. Griese, F. Ndson, E. Edstrom, V, Gislason, W. Franzmann, B. Busse.

The Die-No-Mo Club

T

HIS is a pep organization in a moment of relaxation, for even a club of boosters must have some periods of ease. The club's purpose is to promote interest and enthusiasm in worthwhile college activities. The club attempts to. get better student support of the college athletic contests. It selects cheer-leaders through a program of try-outs presented during chapel. The club is taking an increasingly active part in the Homecoming activities. This year they had complete charge of the arrangements for the pep fest, bonfire, parade, and the dance given in the evening. The annual Die-No-Mo Show, an original entertainment, "Swing Inn," featuring the Hal Leonard orchestra was very successful. From the funds raised

50

the club contributed seventy-five dollars for a band tour in the spring and another sum towards the Apollo Club tour. The Die-No-Mo also gives financia) aid in the recruiting of new students for the college. Members are nominated to the club by organizations to which they already belong and elected by the Die-No-Mo members. The Die-No-Mo is one of the youngest clubs. It began its work in 1916 and drew up the Sportsmanship Code of the College. Its name means "dynamo," generator of energy. Officers of the club during the past year were: Fredrik Gislason, high voltage; Lyle Arns, voltage; Gretchen Grimm, brush; Mary Van Campen, spark; Messrs . French, Selle, Reed, Jederman, and Mione, insulators.

THE 1937 WENONAH


/Is w1ng ¡ "SWING INN"- that's the name of the show the Die-No-Mo club gave this year and everyone who saw it really felt like "swinging in." The show was a smashing success. Considering the enthusiastic reception given the cast, it is safe to conclude that "Swing Inn" was the crowning success of all the shows which the club has ever produced. From the opening scene to the spectacular climax there wasn't a dull moment in the whole show. The clever lines of the dialogue snapped right along, the dancing was as smooth and polished as a Ziegfield follies, and the music was catchy but in excellent taste. The show concerns a young coed Penelope Brooks, June MacDonald, who decides to earn her expenses for a year. With the help of her fiance, Everett Edstrom, and a few willing friends

1nn II

Penelope opens a night club for college students. This plot provides a background for the dancing and the music. Floor show units included vocal solos and trios, piano solos, tap dances, dance choruses, and selections by Hal Leonard's Orchestra. The numbers rendered by the orchestra, "Swing Overture," "Gold Digger's Lullaby," "Mr. Ghost Goes to Town," and the "Carnival of Venice" practically brought down the house. The High Kick dance and the Collegiate chorus were equally well received. The modern and classical interpreters of the dance, John Wachs, Russell Mayer, and William Franzmann, had the audience almost hysterical with laughter. "Swing Inn" was written by Dorothy Westfall and directed by Gretchen Grimm.

.

Stated- R. Schuh, P. Storti, H. Edstrom, A. J. Buck, A. Thurow, H. Krage, M. Wcllcome, B. Washburn, K. Grimm, W. Franzmann, R. Mayer, J. Wachs, B. Busse, W. Grimm, S. Johnson. Second Row - M. Buehler, M. McCarthy, H. Eifealdt, V. Yates, L. Arns, G. Grimm, D. Westfall, R. Busdicker, M. VanCampen, A. Pratt (Guest Artist), E. Edsrrom,J. MacDonald, L. Jensen, B. Jackson, V. Kangas, P. Seaton, M. Finkdnburg, G. Edstrom, V. Towner, L. Hilden. Third Row- L. Wood, B. Mead, I. Johnson, S. Wegner, R. Griese, L. Ottman, G.Johnson, B. Blix, W. Wadcwitz, M. Schuh, H. L. Smith, W. Lynne, C. Gholz.

''Swing Inn"

THE

1937

WENONAH

51


The Mendelssohn Club

First Row -

V. Yates, P. LaDue,J. Downing, H. Heldt,J. Kjelland, H. L. Smith, !.Johnson, Mr. Grimm, L. Hilden, G. Edstrom, E. Mead,

D. Mallory, S. Christianson, K. Grimm, M. VanCampen. Second Row - D. David, P. Thorson, M. Gar Iough, S. Wegner, H. Martin, H. Eifealdt, G. Graham, L. Jensen, A. Nordquist, D. Loughrey,

M. Birkholz, M. Boley, A.

J.

Buck, G. Grimm,

J. Foster, A. Bard, Accompanist.

The Mendelssohn Club

M

USIC hath charms- especially when it issues from the lips of this well-trained group. Under the direction of Mr. Grimm, the members have an opportunity to become acquainted with much good music. They ¡ sing secular and sacred music, a capella and accompanied. The primary purpose of the organization is to give glee club experience to members, but it also serves as a laboratory for women students majoring in music. Here they gain experience in conducting and in solving actual problems of glee club work. The first social event of the year was the initiation banquet given for the new members. Each girl joining the club was assigned a stunt displaying her special talents. Members are selected through tryouts. A series of spring concerts was given

52

THE

1937

at La Crosse, Preston, St. Charles, Eyota, West Salem and climaxed by the 37th annual concert in the college auditorium Friday May 7. Formal attire and a guest artist, Miss Ramona Gerhard, added to the audience's sincere enjoyment of the home concert. It was followed by a banquet for the members to which alumni members were also invited. During the year the club also sang before chapel, at the college Christmas program, and for the activities of commencement week. Officers of the club this year are: Isabel Johnson, president; Elizabeth Mead, vice-president; Vivian Yates, recording secretary; Helen L. Smith, corresponding secretary; Janet Foster, librarian; Mr. Grimm, adviser. Miss .Agnes Bard accompanies the group.

WENONAH


The Apollo Club

T

HIS group of male singers is one of the best advertisements the school has. Their work each year is centered around an annual tour which they take in spring. They left on the fearful thirteenth day of April on an itinerary which this year included more territory than had any previous tour. Towns at which they sang included the following: W aseca, St. James, Windom, Pipestone, Slayton, Renville, Olivia, Osakis, Morris, Wadena, Crosby, Hibbing, Mountain Iron, Cloquet, Sauk Rapids, and Lake City. The boys went from town to town singing as many as four concerts a day. During the week-end they were away they stayed at Grand Rapids. The club has sung at some of these towns in other years but some were new additions to the ~;our. Concerts on the tour were featured by selections by the string quartet composed of Harlem Moen, Glen Johnson, Lucille Ray, and Virginia

Brightman and by the vocal quartet made up of Walter Wadewitz, Walter Lynne, Loren Wood and William Bixby. Members of the club are proud of the fact that they reached all concerts on time, suffered no accidents (not even flats) with the exception of Oscar Janeson's running out of gas while only a few miles from Winona on the return trip. Their annual concert was given on April 23. This concert included a variety of musical numbers: humorous, serious, novelty and classical numbers. Mrs. Lawrence Moening, formerly Janet Rohweder, who directed the organization last year was the soloist for that evening. The club this year was directed by Mr. Langum. Fred Nelson is president of the club, Walter Wadewitz holds the responsible job of being business manager and Oscar Joneson acts as secretary and librarian.

fi,..rt Row - 0. Joneson, W. Lynne, R. Busdickcr, Mr. Langum, Director, H. Moen, W. Wadcwitz, W. Bixby. Second Row- P. Storti, R. Johnson, L. Ottman, F. Nelson , R. Mayer, B. Busse, G. Johnson, L. Wood. l!ccompani.tt - E. Mead.

The Apollo Club

THE

1937

WENONAH

53


The Mixed Chorus

First Row - V. Yates, H. Heldt, P. LaDue, L. Simons,]. Kjclland, H. L. Smith, I. Johnson, Mr. Grimm, L. Hilden, G. Edstrom, E. Meade, D. Mallory, K. Grimm, M. Van Campen. Second Row - D. David,]. Downing, P. Thorson, H. Martin, H. Eifcaldt, G. Graham, L. Jensen, A. Nordquist, D. Loughrey, M. Birkholz, M. Boley, A. Buck, G. Grimm,J. Foster. Third Row - 0. Joneson, R. Busdickcr, W. Lynne, W. Bixby, H. Mallory, B. Busse, R. Mayer, F. Nelson, L. Ottman, H. Moen, G.JohnÂĽ son, W. Wadcwitz, R. Brandt, 0. Anfinson, W. Grimm, Jr., A. Bard, Accompanist.

The Mixed Chorus

M

R . Walter Grimm, Supervisor of selections at chapel. Another activity in Music, directs the college mixed which this organization participated was chorus. This chorus should be distin- the program at the all-school Christmas guished from the all-school chorus which party. The chorus with t!J.e assistance Mr. Grimm also directs each chapel of the Mendelssohn club, the Apollo meeting. The Mendelssohn Club and the club and the College orchestra presented Apollo club, as well as other students a group of beautiful Christmas hymns throughout the school who are interested and carols. The aim of the club is to acquaint in good musical performance and who sing well, compose the enrollment of interested students with music of merit this club. Miss Agnes Bard, piano in- and worth. The music is picked from structor of the college, and assistant to the works of composers who wrote during the classical, romantic and modern Mr. Gr1mm, accompanies the group. The chorus practices regularly, twice periods thus providing a variety in type a week. Some special rehearsals, how- which includes oratorios, classical muever are called before performances. Due sic, and musical comedies. The officers of the club are: Vivian to the shortness of practice periods it is necessary that the chorus utilize practice Yates, president; Roger Busdicker, vicepresident; Lois Simons, librarian; Glenn wisely in preparing numbers. During the homecoming activities this Johnson, assistant librarian; and Mr. year the group presented a number of Grimm, advisor.

54

THE

1937

WENONAH


The Mason Music Club

T

HE Mason Music Club is composed of music majors and others interested in furthering their musical education. Recently the club devised a unique, as well as pedagogical, way of taking roll. Each member responds when his name is called by giving a musical current event . In this cooperative way the members of the club can keep abreast with the musical events. Following "roll call" musical selections are presented to the club by members as well as other musicians of the school. At one time Phelps Junior High school quartette, under the direction of Miss Jeffrey, entertained the club. Not long ago the club purchased playing cards. However these cards are not of the euchre variety . True to the purpose of the club this purchase con-

Stattd -

cerns the musical advancement of its members. The game is similar to ''Authors'' but instead of authors and their respective literary works, the game deals with composers and musical works. Realizing that a well-balanced musical diet must contain some extramusical activities, the club plans for a picnic each spring which is the main social gathering of the year. At the present time, plans are in the making for the picnic, and all the members are looking forward to it with a great deal of anticipation. Leading the club in an official way are Renee Charpentier, president; Virginia Brightman, vice president; Joan Downing, secretary; and Genevieve Edstrom, program chairman.

A. Bard, R. Charpentier, Mr. Grimm, J. Downing, G. Edstrom, A. Gunderson, R. Griese. V. Brightman, J. Gchrlich, C. Gholz, M. Birkholz, B. Busse, R. Busdickcr, A. Nordquist, A. Liebe, E. Mead .

Standing -

The Mason Music Club

THE

1937

WENONAH

55


The College Orchestra

First Row- E. Blix, H . Moen, L. Ray , G. Jo hnson, R. Busd icker, M .

J. Wis land,

D . Kuehl , G. G ri mm, P. Meyer.

Stcond Row- V . Brightman, P. Thorson , W. Gri mm, Jr., W. Dud , B. Busse , R. Ostrom, M . Buchlcr ,J. LeMay, C. Ghol z, P. Storti, H.

Schu~

mann, C. David . Standing- Mr. Gr imm, D irector, R. Gr iese.

The College Orchestra

A

LTHOUGH the college orchestra is comparatively small it is one of the most important musical organizations in the college . The orchestra provides an excellent opportunity for individual growth under the wise direction of Mr. Grimm ; it also provides an opportunity of leaving the regular routine of school work and getting into a musical atmosphere . No doubt Mr. Grimm's "clowning" plays an important part in putting the musicians in a receptive mood. During the Christmas season the orchestra ¡in conjunction with the vocal organizations of the college presented a program of music in keeping with the season . Usually the orchestra occupies the pit in front of the stage, or the stage proper, but on this occasion they played very effectively from the balcony . The orchestra played before and between the

56

THE

1937

acts of "Children of the Moon ." The longest program, devoted entirely to the orchestra, was the chapel program . The orchestra also played at the Hotel Winona for the Rotarians . Re~ently plans for an exchange of concerts with La Crosse Teachers College orchestra were completed . The Winona musicians plan to play at La Crosse on the eighteenth of May . The orchestra is growing each year . During this past year three instruments have been added, the oboe, bassoon, and the French horn . Although the orchestra is an extra curricular organization, one credit hour per quarter is given to those participatwg. Harlem Moen, first violinist, is assistant director and librarian .

WENONAH


The College Band

T

HE college band under the direction of Everett Edstrom, is an exceptionally active organization having made fifty-two public appearances thus far this year. Besides playing frequently at the football and basketball games, the band went on several out of town concert tours, averaging about seven per quarter. At the present time sixty students are receiving instrumental band instruction at no additional cost to themselves. This year, twenty students with no previous experience have begun band work. Every student desiring private instruction, whether a beginner or an advanced musician, is urged to take advantage of the exceptional opportunities offered. In connection with the college band is the experimental high school band at Mabel, Minnesota, directed by the Edstrom brothers, which offers field experience in conducting and instrumental teaching for the advanced members of

the band. Charles Gholz, Roger Busdicker, and Bernard Busse are now acting as assistant conductors. The Mabel Band was state champion in its division in 1936, and served as clinical band at the Minnesota State Bandmaster's convention in Minneapolis in April, 1937. Not only has the college band, in toto, been very active, but the individual members of the band have, both in solo and ensemble work, entertained many clubs and organizations throughout the year. This spring, the band will present its customary concert at the lakeside band shell as a part of the commencement exercises; and during the month of May, there will be weekly twilight concerts on the college lawn. Officers of the band: Bernard Busse, president; Roy Griese, vice-president; Inez Wetmore, secretary; Paul Storti, librarian; and Everett Edstrom, Conductor.

Fir .It Row (Front to Back)- B. Busse, J. Bard, E. Burkhardt, A. Bronk, A. Nordquist, R. Busdickcr, A. Buck, R. Ostrom, R. Prcntis, Second Row- P. Storti, E. Edstrom,]. LeMay, L. Klindworth, E. Haack, 0. Thomas, H. Moen, G. Edstrom~ M. Buehler, W. Bixby. Third Row- M. Wcllcome, W. Duel, H. Brokken, R. Schuh, I. Wetmore, J. Downing, l. Johnson, L. Steward, V. Yates, R. Griese. Fourth Row -0. Johnson, L. Jorris, 0 . Joncson, D. Loughrey, C. Gholz, E. Mead, A. Andrcjck, R. Park er.

The College Band

THE

1937

WENONAH

57


The High School Club

Fir.rt Row- V. Yates, M. Bosshart, M. Hiltunen, G. Ncrdahl, M. Clarke, D. Loughrey, A. Nordquist, M. Meyer, K. Kcssels, H. V. Smith, L. Simons, V. Kurzwcg. Second Row- D. Stoehr, M. J. Lane, D. Mallory, E. Albers, H. Tuomi, M. Syverson, L. Schuh, H. Krage, M. Bcrvcn, M. Buchler, M. McCarthy. Third Row- R. Andcrson,J. MacDonald, l. Pyknen, V. Lumovich, M. Fehring, B. Arvidson, S. Niskanen, U. Costello, D. Johnson, L. Bang, L. Jensen, M. Syverson. Fourth Row- L. Arns, S. Johnson, R. Wolfe, M. Ohlsen, R. Stucki, D. Roche, R. Small, L. Riley, W. Franzmann, F. Miller, N. Olson. Fifth Row- V. Gislason, Dr. Tozicr,J. Wachs, R. Keller, R. Griese, F. Nelson, G. Engstrom, H. Moen, J. Quaday, G. Vogard,J. Laakso,

The High School Club

T

HE large membership of this newly organized High School Club is evidence of the professional spirit possessed by the students in the secondary field. The High School Club, which is open to any student interested in the junior or senior high school field, replaced the Junior High Club. The purpose of the High School Club is to promote interest in the high school movement in the Winona State Teachers College and througho_ut the state, and to gain a clearer insight into the problems of the high school teacher. The program committee of this group has functioned effectively in providing programs for the regular meetings. Marion Clarke, LaVerne Bang, Gordon Vogard, and Frederick Nelson are responsible for these programs which are both educative and entertaining.

58

THE

1937

This year some of the speakers at various meetings of the club were Dr. Tozier whose subject was ''Changes in the Secondary School Organization and Practice;" Dr. Lynch who spoke on the problem of dramatics in junior and senior high schools; Miss Marvin who talked about her trip to Japan; Mr. Fishbaugher who spoke on "Consumer's Cooperatives''; and Miss Brunner on "Land Reclamation." In addition to talks the programs included musical selections given by the students. Officers of the club are: George Engstrom, president; Marion Clarke, vicepresident; and Doris Johnson, secretarytreasurer. The advisers of the club are the high school supervisors: Misses Maurine Scovell and Beulah Brunner; Mr. Fishbaugher and Dr. Tozier.

WENONAH


The Intermediate Club

M

ORE "best" teachers are needed. That's why the Intermediate Club has regular monthly meetings to further their knowledge of better methods of teaching and to stimulate each prospective teacher's interest in the intermediate field. Because the intermediates are interested in everything and are eager to become educated in every field they sponsored a series of excursions to various places of interest. They visited the Interstate Packing Company, the Bay State Mill, and Father Libson's Game refuge at Rollingstone. The club has enjoyed several worthwhile meetings throughout the year. Miss Marvin talked about her trip to the Orient illustrating the different types

of clothing worn there. The children's librarian of Winona, Miss Butler, gave an interesting lecture of "Children's Literature." Miss Micklus, a student of the college, spoke on the methods the blind use in reading, such as the Braille system and talking books. A valuable meeting was the discussion and suggestive addresses by the members concerning free material from business concerns, which is available for teachers. The club participated in stunt night and sponsored an unusually successful school party on April 24. The officers of the club are Helen Marek, president; Beatrice Jackson, vicepresident; Virginia Towner, secretarytreasurer, and the Misses E. Clark, Dallmann, and Cramer, advisers.

First Row - J. Hagerthy, I. Micklus, L. Ray, E. Beaudin, V. Towner, H. Marek, B. Jackson, V. Kangas, C. Zabel, V. Cooper. Second Row - V. Pearson, P. Abel, D. Stoehr, E. Tuftee, Miss E. Clark, P. Logan, E. Zierdt, B. Failing, V. Peterson, M. Canfield. Third Row - Miss Dallmann, B. Travis, Miss Cramer, V. Lumovich, E. Hartmann, L. Kennebeck, I. Wetmore, C. Duncanson, P. Meyer. Fourth Row - L. Hines, M. King, I. Pyknen, M. Niemela, I. Orr, A. Ebert, N. Jacobson, F. Woodward, D. LaMott, P. Schwarz. Fifth Row - M. Wood, H. Anderson, E. Zirzow, E. Stull, A. Pearson, J. Weeding, A. Daniels, H. Schumann, C. Hamlin.

The Intermediate

Club

THE

1937 WENONAH

59


The Primary Club

Seated - D. Baker, I. Morman, E. J ohnson, E. Blessing, H . Uggen, A. G underson, V. B:nrsch, Miss Foster. Second Row - Miss Brouillette, R. Voc:lker, P. Logan, J. LaBarre, V. Lumov ich , M. Boley, C. David, Miss G age. Third Row - .J. Downi ng, M . Carlson, D. Swehr, W. Cipra, A. Hanson , M. G raner , B. J ohnson , A. Meyer , D. Dav id.

The Primary Club

W

E believe that Wordsworth was right when he said, "The Child is father of the Man," so, the primary grades, in the child's education, play an important part in molding his character. The Primary Club has the dual purpose of promoting interest and familiarity in this field of education and fostering comradeship among its members. Membership is open to all students interested in the primary department . Sociai activities of the year included a party for the recognition of new members, a hike to Garvin Hights, followed by a weiner roast there, and a Christmas party. The club contributed a clever float to the Homecoming parade. The slogan,

"Watch us beat Stout," was portrayed by a tall girl dressed as a schoolmaster whipping a short girl dressed to represent Stout. Miss Dallmann spoke to the club on the "Youth Movement in Germany" and Mr. Reed gave an illustrated lecture on "Wild Rice ." Mother Goose was the center of attention at one meeting. Talks on the value, history, and scope of Mother Goose Rhymes were given by members of the club. The meeting was ended with a contest in reciting Mother Goose rhymes . At the April meeting each member told something of interest about her home town, and during May the traditional breakfast on the bluffs was held.

~r-------------------~--------------------------------------------------------------------

60

THE

1937 WENONAH


The Kindergarten Club "TICK tack, tick tack," says the old that they give helps prepare them for clock in the kindergarten room. the organizing of Mothers' clubs in the "It's pretty quiet here during the night, future. but I've certainly seen a lot of activity ''With the hustle and bustle of Christin this room during the days that have mas came the annual card sale for the past. maintenance of the scholarship fund, "In September there was the tea given and the regular 'Christmas Sing!' by upperlcass kindergartners for fresh"Another project the club sponsored man girls joining the Kindergarten club. was the making of scrapbooks for the When they joined, their affiliation children's ward of the Winona General brought the total membership to thirty- hospital. "It seems to me that the club's acseven. "How well I remember the club mem- tivities are well directed by Lois Ross, bers scurrying around getting ready their president; Laura Nelson, first vice presiunit for the homecoming parade. As I dent; Deloris Theisen, second vice presirecall, it was one of bicycles with large dent; Verdell Reilly, third vice president; slogans attached to them. The words of Janet Foster, secretary; and Violette the slogans typified kindergarten acti v- War her, treasurer. "The Misses Sutherland, Schwable, ities and materials. "Then there were the days when I've and Kjelland are club advisers. ''Tick tack, tick tack, I wonder what seen the student teachers and their supervisors getting ready for the meeting the rest of the years will bring?" of the Mothers' Club. This assistance

First Row - L. Anderson, K. Haas, M. McMullin, B. Johnson, J. Foster, L. Ross, Miss Schwablc, V. Warbcr, L. Nelson, J. Kjelland . Second Row- D. David, M. Ivancic, V. Reilly, M. Campbell, E. Blix, C. Morse, B. Evers,]. Eikrem, P. Wcstmann, M. Garlough, C. Holz-

worth, F. Snyder, A. Gunderson, H. Heldt. Third R?w- J. Downing, D. Theisen, J. LaBarre, E. Wildgrubc, J. Franke, M. Jilk, C. David, M. Van Campen.

The Kindergarten Club

THE

1937 WENONAH

61


The Country

Life Club

FirJt Row- E. Blessing, L. Ray, M. Meyer, ]. Baumgart, ] . Beyer, M. Ivancic, V. Peterson, E. Tufrcc, B. Washburn, F. Mic kl us, M. Rideout, J. Haggcrc hy.

SICimd Row- P. Logan, A. Sundby, R. Larson, H. Mollcnkamp, E. Hart man, E. Buc her, V. Bucher, A. Neumann, D. Ruhnau, M. Smith, E. Wamhoff, H . Wam hoff, V . Bar tsch .

Third Row- ¡£. Wac hter, F. Woodward , A. Ebert, D . Funk, L. M ill er, R. Vo ll, M . N iemel a, C. D uncanson , G.lkll, D . Baker, L. H ilden, A. Pa ul son.

Fourth Row- W. Apple by, H. Wel ch, M. Pi kc, l. Pykncn , R. Be ll , G. Scholl me ier , R. Stucki, B. Evers, L. Kl avittcr, C. Neu mann, A. Pearson, M iss Christensen.

The Country Life Club "G

IVE them the country and they 'll improve the life there" might well be the motto of the Country Life Club. The club brings together students interested in rural education so they may study problems of teaching in the country as well as enjoy the comradeship of the group . This year 's meetings have included a panel discussion of the Parent-Teachers' Association, a model of a school board meeting, a discussion of 4-H Club work, a sleigh ride, and a Christmas program . On April 24 members of the club attended a Country Life Club Day in La Crosse as guests of the La Crosse Teachers College Country Life Club . A joint program including numbers by both clubs was gi ven for their mutual enjoy-

62

THE

1937

ment. A speaker, a picnic supper, and dancing were other features of the day . Last year a similar plan was carried out when the La Crosse club members were guests at Winona . Both days were very enjoyable and worthwhile. They provided an opportunity for members of the clubs to make new friendships and wide contacts in a group of college students having a common interest - rural education and rural life. Officers of the club are elected each quarter. Those who have presided during the spring quarter are: Ralph Stucki, president; Joyce Hagerthy, vice-president; Marion Niemela, secretary-treasurer; and Alice Pearson, program chairman. Misses Christensen and Bartsch are faculty advisers.

WENONAH


The League of Women Voters

T

HE funny thing about this group is that, although it is called the League of Women Voters, many of the members are not voters. A little matter of age requirement keeps some of them from voting . But when these politicallyminded women reach twenty-one they will certainly take an active part in the affairs of their government. The purpose of this league is to promote interest in political questions among women and prepare them for intelligent voting . It is a non-partisan organization of three departments: First, efficiency in government; second, department of international cooperation to prevent war; and third, public welfare department. Membership to the League of Women Voters is open to all the women of the college who are interested tn current political problems.

SttJted -

Some of the topics discussed at the regular meetings of the club this year were : "Amendment Number Two," "Social Security Act," " Achievement of Peace Conference at Buenos Aires, ' ' "European Situation in Spain," "Merit System,'' ''Reorganization of Government . The League sends delegates to the annual state convention of the College League of Women Voters . This year Miss Esther Johnson was the delegate to the convention which was held in St. Paul on February 19, 1937. Miss Johnson also attended several sessions of the state legislature while she was in St. Paul. The Officers of the club are : Frances Schultz, president; Mrs . Kathryn Kessels, vice-president ; Mary I vancie, secretary-treasurer. Miss Florence Richards is the adviser.

Miss Richards, L. Schuh, F. Schultz, K. Kcsscls, M. Ivancic. L. Ray, L . Heins, H . Mare k, M. Wood, E. Johnson, M . Jilk, M. Rideout.

Standi!J[, -

The League of Women Voters

THE

1937 WENONAH

63


The

Newman Club

First Row - D. Roche, Miss E. Clark, R. Griese, L. Kennebeck, B. Busse, D. Waby, E. Knutson, M. Jilk , J. Downing, H. Krage, H. Martin, M. Roche, K. Haas, B. Johnson, I. Pawelek, W. Glubka. Third Row - A. Liebe, R. Voelker, V. Reilly, B. Blix, B. Hoffman, U. Costc:llo, M. Canfield, M. Costello, R. Charpentier, M. Van Campen.

Second Row -

Fourth Row -

J. Beyer,

P. Steger, M. J. Lane, G. Nerdah l, M. Bo ley, B. Evers , M. Posse, M. Buehler, M. McCarthy, E. Beaudin.

Fifth Row- \V. Kaczrowski , A. Andrejek, L. Schaffer, M. Fehring, L. Riley , N. Moore, L. Walsh, R. Koch, J. McVey, D . LaMotte, M. Drometer.

The Newman Club

R

ATHER serious looking group, isn ¡ t it? But these students really aren't as serious as they look. Not quite, anyway. These Newmanites are held together by a common bond, their religion . This Winona association is affiliated with the national organization of Newman Clubs. The purpose of the club is three-fold: religious, educational, and social. Each quarter the Newmanites have a communion breakfast and each month a Sunday¡ afternoon meeting. The activities of the club began this year at Stunt Night when the members presented their traditional style show. Members showed costumes which were appropriate for the various Newman Club functions throughout the year. Each fall the Newmanites sponsor a picnic for the purpose of acquainting new Catholic students with the club.

64

THE

1937

Another annual affair of this group is a sleigh ride party. Each year the Newmanites encounter great difficulty in selecting a date when there is plenty of snow and suitable weather for sleighing . This year the sleigh ride was held during February. An abundance of snow and mild weather combined to offer favorable conditions which resulted in a very large turnout for the sleigh ride . An interesting record of Newman Club activities is the scrap book which contains pictures, programs, and souvenirs of the meetings. Ursula Costello, chairman, and Mary Fehring have had charge of the scrap book this year. The officers of the club are : Roy Griese, president, Lucille Kennebeck, vice-president; Delbert Roche, secretary; Bernard Busse, treasurer. Miss Ella Clark is the adviser.

WENONAH


The Art Club

D

ON'T they look like artists? They are - and they ' ve been mighty active this year . The Art Club through membership in the American Federation of Art has been able to sponsor a number of exhibits . The outstanding project of the year is the annual " Prom" which the Art Club sponsors . Working out a gay theme and preparing the decorations for the prom takes much of superior skill - and they've got it . Some of their other activities include decorating the building for the homecoming festivities, a float in the homecoming parade, art exhibits, lectures, parties, and making Christmas wrapping paper. During the year there were program meetings at which talks and demonstra-

tions pertaining to art were given, work meetings in which members experimented , and occasional teas and parties . The aims of the Art Club are : To further interest in art; To raise the standards in art work; To assist in art problems related to college work . The members of the club feel that these aims are carried out because each member works earnestly throughout the year . The membership of the club is limited to twenty-five members, although anyone may try out . There are opportunities for try-outs at the beginning of each quarter . Officers of the club are : Ethel Kreutz, president; Arden Burleigh, vice-president; Elsie Finkelnburg, secretary-treasurer ; and Miss Dorothy Clark, adviser .

Seated- B. Hoffman, E. Kreutz, E. Finkelnburg, R. Rockne , M . Bosshart, P. LaD ue, P, Wesemann, M. Kjomi, A. Gunderson, A. Hob! it t , M. Boley , B. Coc. Standing- G. Jo hnson, F. Nelson, D . Johnson, E. Wildgrubc, V. Pearson, B. Blix, A. J. Buck , A. Burleig h , P. Seaton, Miss D . Clark, G. Pugh.

The Art Club

THE

1937

WENONAH

65


The

··w·· Club

FirJt Row -

0. Johnson, F. Gislason, L. Arns, R. Parker, J. Wachs, 0. Thomas, V. Gislason, M. Peterson, R. Thurley.

Second Row- M. Jackson, Mr. Galligan, W. Kaczrowski, W. Franzmann, W. Carlson, R. Spencer, C. Fuller , R. Prenris, J. Gaczlaff. Third Row- J. Kalbrenncr, C. Dettloff, W. Morse, C. Brarrud, H. Grudem, S. Farmer, B. Ostmoe, M. Wolverton, E. Barski.

The "W" Club

B

··w··

EFORE any student can join the Cohen, publicity man, Mr. Jackson, and Club he must earn a purple · ·w· · Mr. Galligan . which signifies he has completed a sucTwo of the primary purposes of the cessful season in one or more of the three club are; to develop an active interest in major sports: football, basketball, and the various phases of sport, and to furtrack . Because of this qualification the ther the ideals of a true athlete and membership in the club is limited. A sportsman. great many of the members are Phy. Ed. At the last meeting of the club the awarding of jackets was suggested. Also maJors. The outstanding event of the year was at this meeting new conference rules the "W" club banquet which formally were discussed . Now that spring is in the air the club ended the football season. The guest speaker was Mr. F. R . Adams, superin- is seriously planning on the annual picnic tendent of schools at Marshall, Minne- which has come to be a tradition with sota. The program, which was con- the club. Officers of the club are: Victor Gisducted by Victor Gislason, toastmaster and president of the club, included talks lason, president; Mervale Wolverton, by President Maxwell, Horace Chase, vice-president; Loren Jorris, secretarycaptain of the football team, Eddie treasurer; Mr. Galligan is club adviser.

66

THE 1937 WENONAH


Men's Club

T

HE Men 's Club , composed of the men students of the college, is the largest club in the college . Because of the large membership the club confines itself to a few major activities . In the fall of the year, the incoming Freshman had the privilege of expressing their admiration for the college and the upper classmen by performing various and sundry tasks : Carrying books, holding doors open, pressing trousers, running errands, and other unclassified activities. This Men's club activity was climaxed by a successful party in the college gym, and the members felt satisfied that they had uncovered a surprising amount of individual talent among the underclassmen . During the last few years some objectionable features of the initiation have been eliminated so that now the initia-

tion comes nearer to achieving one of the aims of the Men's Club - to help the freshmen get acquainted as soon as possible, to break down any social barriers that might exist, and to instill in the men of the college a feeling of oneness, an esprit de corps. The club has a few major meetings each year . Usually these meetings precede the activities which the club sponsors . Erection of a flag pole in Maxwell field was considered during the last meeting . On May 20, the club invited the school to an all college party in the " gym" to dance to the music of Hal Leonard's Orchestra. The officers of the club are Lyle Arns, president; Arthur Hoblitt, vice president; and Harold Grudem, secretarytreasurer; Mr . MacDonald, adviser .

First Row - F. Harcey, H. Ham mond , 0. Joneson , W. Krage , W. Bixby, M. Wolverton, L. Arns , E. Barski, ]. Davidson, G. Bruegger, E. Cohen. Second Row - R. Busdicker, R. Anderson, M. Ohlsen , G. Smi th , R. Wolfe, G. McVey , R. Bel l, C. Bra crud, A. Whi te, G. Kraft, F. Mill er. Third Row- L. Schaffer, C. Dornfeld, G. Johnson, W. Carlson , A. Hassinger, L. Ottman, ]. Decker, R. Done hower, H. Capron, ]. Laak:so, C Fu ller. Fourth Row_- C. Dettloff, H . Mallory, L. D urran t , R . Johnson, A . Bremer, N. Fje d and, R. Keller, R. Mayer, G. Vogard, B. Busse, W. WadeW itz .

Fifth Row- W. Kaczrow ski, A. Andre jek, 0. Jo hnson, D . Roche, F. Nelson, ]. Wachs, H. Grudem, V. Gis lason, H. Brokkc: n, R. Parker, G. Herron, D . Loudon.

Men's Club

THE

1937

WENONAH

67


The Y.W.C.A.

Fint Row- D . Ruhnau, \V. Bunge, R. Colquhoun, R. Voll, P. Abel,

J.

Patterson, C. Croford, M. Niemela, D. Funk.

StconJ Row- Miss Richards, M. Seeling, D . Kuehl, E. Wildgrube, J. Hagerrhy, E. Tdtee, L. Simons, V. Towner, F. Woodward, M. Hiltunen, B. Johnson , M. Wei !come, I. Pawelek. Third Row - J. Weeding, D . Theisen, J. Franke, V. Warber, K. Haas, L. Anderson, L. Bang, C. Hamlin, H. Uggcn, P. Schwarz, D. Scochr, E. Johnson, W. Cipra, A. Hanson, M . Ivancic, L. Ray, H. Heldt. Fo11rth Row -

L. Hilden, M.J. Lane, M. Finkclnburg, M. Dromctcr, A. Sundby, B. Travis, M. Gilbertson, A. Paulson, V. Cooper, M. Carlson.

The Y. W . C. A .

I

T LOOKS as if the Y.W.C.A. group is hearing a bulletin from the national organization which the college club joined in 1910; or it may be a report of Marcia Seeber's work in China which claims their attention. The Young Women's Christian Association is primarily a service club. In the fall, old members were assigned "Big Sister" duties to the freshmen girls to help them become acquainted . Miss Sutherland ¡ spoke on "Friendship" at the annual Friendship Day program in chapel. Following the speech Y.W.C.A. members distributed flowers to be worn that day by students and faculty. Early in the year the club also gave a "get-acquainted tea" for the women of the college. At Christmas time the club carried

68

THE

1937

out two projects: making stuffed oilcloth animal toys which were given to the Margaret Simpson Home to be distributed to the poor, and going to the county poor farm to sing carols and bring gifts. Seventy college women took the sixweek¡ s course in Girl Reserve Leadership offered by Miss Bush of the local Y. W. C.A. and sponsored by the college club. Social meetings of the club included a treasure hunt, a sleigh ride, a picnic, and talks by Miss Harmacek and Mrs. Thomssen. Officers for the past year were: Betty Washburn, president; Pauline Abel, vicepresident and social chairman ; Pearl Berge, secretary; and Hazel Heldt, treasurer. Miss Richards and Miss Kramer are the club advisers.

WENONAH


College Sports


Coaching Brain Trust

Harry R. Jackson, Glendon E. Galligan, Stanley J. Pawelek.

Athletics at W. S. T. C.

W

INONA Teachers College has an excellent program of athletics. This year the plan of providing athletic activity for both men and women was tried in the form of co-recreational games. This is as it should be, and the plan proved popular. Our athletic program now consists of inter-scholastic contests, intra-mural competition, and friendly

play activity involving both men and women. We believe that there no longer exists any need or reason for a sharp division between the men's and women's athletic sections in the yearbook. For that reason we have attempted to fuse the two in this book to suggest the close cooperation that is coming about.

Mary Van Campen, Arden Burleigh.

Cheer Leaders

70

THE 1937 WENONAH


Athletic Program

O

NE of the best and most varied programs of interscholastic and intramural athletics ever offered by the college was enjoyed by the students during the past year. The program was valuable both from the standpoint of games won and lost in the interscholastic competition and in the participation of a majority of the college in some form of athletic activity. The highlight of the varsity sports year was probably the winning of the City Title by Warrior teams both in football and basketball. While the gridders won but two games this season they did win those they most wanted to cop - the Homecoming battle with Stout Institute of Menomonie and the city title clash with the Redmen of St. Mary's. Games were lost to Duluth, St. Cloud, Mankato, Bemidji, and Columbia. The Purple and White eleven held the powerful La Crosse Maroons to a scoreless tie. The basketball five enjoyed its most successful team in years. The Warriors finished second in the Northern Teachers College Conference with five wins in seven games. Against all competition

THE

1937

the cagers set up the fine record of fourteen wins and three defeats. Lyle Arns, a dynamo at forward, was honored by selection at a forward post on the allconference team as selected by the coaches. Ralph Spencer, freshman guard, was placed on the second all-conference team. The track, tennis, golf, and baseball teams are ready to go on attractive schedules set up by the Athletic Director G. E. Galligan. Baseball has been elevated to the status of a major sport along with football, basketball, and track. Two changes in coaching personnel were made during the past year, M. R. Raymond succeeds W . E. Boots as tennis coach, while R . B. Tozier has taken over Mr. French's duties of coaching the golfers. The intramural schedules were set up and played off under the capable guidance of this intramural board. A new high in student participation and interest in intramural athletics was noted. An interesting change in the lineup of the intramural volleyball league was the entrance of a faculty team.

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FirJt Row - V. Gislason, M. Peterson, L. Arns, B. Ostmoe, R. Spencer, R. Parker, J. Decker, R. Thurley. Steond Row - A. White,]. Kalbrenner, M. Wolverton, L. Jorris, R. Koch , D . Laudon, E. Barski, F. G islason. Third Row - M. Fonhun, E. Gatzlaff, G. Krah, C. Di:ttloff, A. Lund by, B. Kaczrowski, C. Fuller, A. Micheletti, C. Jo hnson. Fourth Row - G. Vogard, H. Brokken, G. Engstrom, L. Walsh, 0. Thomas , L. Durram, H. Chase, E. Tompki ns. Fifth Row - J. Quaday, Manager, G. Amdahl, B. Ruesi nk, C. Bratrud,J . Laakso, C. Selander, Coach Galligan, Coach Jackson.

Football

A

T THE outset of the season, the prospects were attractive for Harry R. Jackson, newly appointed football coach, and Glen E. Galligan with seven veterans returning among the forty candidates reporting . Bright as the outlook was at the start, injuries reversed the picture by claiming a number of experienced men. In the first contest on September 19, Duluth, conference champions in 1936, poured its heavy barrage of man-power through Winona's light line to amass a score of 25 to 0. Coach Jackson sustained a serious loss in the tilt when Victor Gislason retired permanently from Purple football togs because of a fractured hand.

72

La Crosse, traditional rivals, met her equal, September 26 in the Purple and White, who staved off a desperate third quarter drive of the down-river team to emerge morally triumphant with a 0 to 0 score. Captain Horace Chase was lost for the season because of a dislocated vertebra in this game. A safety in the first period with Bemidji on October 2 proved to be the decided break for the Northerners . All later attempts to score were futile, and so the Winonans left the field on the short end of a 2 to 0 count. In the homecoming tilt on October 17 with Stout, the Warriors carried their banner high, driving home the initial victory, 6 to 0. The touchdown came as

THE 1937 WENONAH


Football a result of a determined 75-yard drive which culminated in Arns' sneak over the line from the one yard marker. St. Cloud overwhelmed Coach Jackson's men in a 21 to 0 defeat on October 23. Journeying to Mankato, Winona found stiff opposition and that coupled with a number of injuries resulted in a 21 to 0 defeat. Although Winona outplayed Columbia on November 7, a lack of scoring punch handicapped, and a loss, 6 to 2, was recorded. The most pleasing event of the season was the renewal of football relations with St. Mary's College. In the Armistice Day game, the first meeting since

1929, Winona climaxed and ornamented her record with a well-earned victory over their inter-city rivals . The Warriors employed to advantage their punting ability in ankle-deep mud to emerge a 7 to 0 victor. In a post-season bouquet, Bob Thurley was selected as an end on the second All-Star conference team. Graduation will cut deeply into this year's squad . Captain Horace Chase, Victor Gislason, Myles Peterson, Fritz Gislason, Robert Thurley, and George Engstrom all will be absent next year, but a promising group of newcomers have established themselves during 1936 to enclose the future in potentiality.

AN ACTION SHOT FROM TH E HOMECOM ING GA ME.

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Stnttd - H. Brokkcn, S. Johnson, L. Wilson, G. Smith, C. Dettloff, W. Kaczrowski , J . Kalbrenner. Knulint,- D. Laudon, G. Herron, L. Ottman, C. Bratrud, W. Morse, A. Andrejek. Standing- Quaday, Manager, R. Spencer, B. Ostmoe, R. Parker,J. Wachs, H. Grudem, V. Gislason, L. Arns, Mr. Galligan Coach.

Varsity Basketball

T

HE most successful cage season in many years was completed by the Warriors this year . Playing a tough seventeen-game schedule, the Purple and White won fourteen tussles against only three defeats. Only once were they outclassed, and then by the powerful Duluth Bulldogs who have been rolling up onesided basketball victories over strong foes for the last three years. Winona won the city basketball title for the first time since the resumption of the rivalry with the St. Mary's College five . After downing the Redmen 34 to 29 at the College gym in their first post-holiday game, the Warriors defeated the Krausemen rather easily at Terrace Heights by a 38 to 27 margin .

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After losing two of their first three games, the Purple and White finished the season with thirteen wins in fourteen starts. In the Northern Teachers College conference Winona's record was five wins and two defeats, good for second place. Twin victories were scored over Mankato and Bemidji while St. Cloud was easily defeated here. Duluth, conference champs for the third consecutive year, invaded Winona for a one-sided 42 to 26 win while the Warriors ' other defeat occurred at St. Cloud . Lyle Arns with 162 points, averaged just a fraction under ten points per game to lead the individual scoring for Winona . Captain John Wachs and Ralph Spencer followed with 108 and 102 points

1937 WENONAH


respectively while Bob Parker had 93 and Berger Ostmoe had 77. Ten varsity cagers won letter awards for their work during the past season. They are: Arns, Ostmoe, Wachs and Laudon, all forwards; Parker and Grudem centers; and Andrejek, Spencer, Morse and Vic Gislason, guards. Lyle Arns was placed at forward by the coaches, who picked a N.T.C.C. AllConference team. Ralph Spencer was named a second team guard. The teams as selected by the coaches follows : First Team Second Team Moren, Duluth ... F ........ Nelson, Bemidji ARNS, Win on a. . . F ... Pennington, Mankato Witham, Bemidji .. C. .. Odanovich, St. Cloud Barle, Duluth ..... G .... SPENCER, Winona Gorham, Duluth .. G ....... Hoerr, Mankato

The only squad members lost by graduation are Captain Wachs and Vic Gis-

lason, so the outlook for next year is very prom1smg. The following are the results of the season's games: Winona ...... 34 Winona ...... 25 Winona . ..... 31 Winona . ..... 43 Winona . ..... 41 Winona ...... 34 Winona ...... 35 Winona ...... 38 Winona . . .... 39 Winona .... . . 37 Winona ...... 43 Winona ...... 45 Winona ...... 26 Winona ...... 35 Winona ...... 45 Winona ...... 38 Winona . ..... 34

Rochester J. C. .... 15 Gustavus Adol .... . 29 St . Cloud ......... 41 Bemidji ........... 38 Alumni ........... 13 St. Mary's ........ 29 Bemidji ........... 34 St. Mary's ........ 27 Manka to . . . . . . . . . 29 Waldorf-Luther .... 26 Stout ............. 28 Mankato ......... 37 Duluth ........... 42 Stout ........... .. 26 St. Cloud ......... 18 Rochester ......... 29 Hibbing ...... . ... 18

A SCENE AT BASKETBALL PRACTICE.

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Fir;t Row- \V. Carlson, L. Jorris, S. Farmer, H. Grudem, W. Franzmann (Capcain), J. O'Gara, Assistant Coach. Second Row- G. Kraft, A. Burleigh, C. Fuller, C. Dettloff, ]. Quaday. Third Row- D . Roche, M. Wolverton, A. Hoblitt, J. Laakso, R. Welton. Fourth Row - H. Duncanson, A. Andrejck, N . Moore, J. Wachs, N. Fjctland, A. Hassinger.

Track

T

HE prospects for a good track team looked none too bright to Coach Galligan at the beginning of the season. Such valuable men as Zimmerhakl, O'Gara, R. Peterson, Pawelek, McCowri, Rothwell, Chase, Kozlowski and others were lost through graduation and other reasons . The relay team lost three of its championship men, retaining only ]orris. Indications, therefore, point toward a weakness in the dashes and the relay but the ¡ presence of such weight-men as Farmer, Spencer, Grimm, Wolverton and others should do much in overcoming a traditionally weak point in Winona teams . A large number of new men are working out and show evidence of becoming point-winners before long. A new, larger and better track permits regular workouts under contest conditions -

76

something that was missed last year because the track was torn up . A few capable lettermen remain from last year's squad. They are, Bill Franzmann and Willy Carlson on the hurdles and dashes; Stew Farmer, shot and discus; Eddie Barski, middle distances; Loren Jorris, dashes and relay; and Hal Grudem, in the longer distances. Some of the newer members of the team are coming along with a rush and will probably prove valuable assets to the team. Among them are "Scoop" Dettloff, a menacing 440 man, Art Andrejek and Merv Wolverton in the polevault; Ottman, Grimm and Fjetland in the high jump. John Quaday, in the distance runs, has improved greatly over last year and should cop his share of points. Welton, Hassinger and Fritz Gislason look good in the dashes . Bur-

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leigh, in winning the novice meet low hurdles showed exceptional form and stamped himself as a running mate for Franzmann and Carlson. The schedule of meets for this season includes a meet at La Crosse on May 7, a quadrangular meet here, May 12th, a dual meet with Mankato, here, on the twenty-first of May and the state meet with the other five teachers colleges of the state at Moorhead on May 29th. Plans at present indicate that Coach Galligan will take a few men to Minneapolis to run in a meet at the University

track on the 14th of May . Since a large portion of the team is ' 'green, ·· there is not too much optimism shown for results this year, but Coach Galligan is grooming his men to make a strong showing or possibly winning the title in the Northern Teachers College Conference in the 1938 season . Results of last year's competition were a loss to La Crosse, a win over Eau Claire and La Crosse in a triangular meet, a loss to Mankato in a dual meet and second place behind Mankato at the state meet .

SO ME ACTION SCENES DURI NG TR ACK PRACTICE Upper Ltjt, Andre jck clearing the bar in the po le vaulc. Upper Right, Ottman high jumpi ng. Lou•er Left , a pract ice sprint. LoU'er Right, Franzman n and Car lson running the low hurdles .

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"The Champs" Volleyball

"The Champs" Basketball

Voillyha/1- A. Hoblitt, A. Andrejek, B. Ostmoe, M. Peterson (Captain), R. Donehower, L. Wood, L. Larson. Baskttha/J- 0. Thomas, L. Christensen, L. Wilson,]. McVey,]. Davidson, E. Barski (Captain).

Intramural Volleyball

V

OLLEYBALL is one of the popular sports of the college and is turned to by a large number of college men for diversion from the regular routine of things. It affords opportunity for exercise, cooperation and clean competition to anyone who wishes to take part . At the opening of the spring quarter

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those men interested in volleyball were apportioned to seven teams by the intramural board. This group sees that intramural games are run off on schedule . The faculty formed an eighth team and ended the race in sixth place . At the close of the season team No. 3 headed the list with a total of 284 points.

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VOLLEYBALL TEAM STANDINGS Total Team Captain Points III Myles Petersen . . ... . ........ 284 II Russell Mayer ... ... . . .. . ... 275 V Oscar Joneson .. .. ... ... . ... 254 IV Gordon Vogard .... . ... . .... 252 VII George Engstrom . . . . . . 240 VIII Galligan . . . . .. 222 ( Faculty) Kermit McPherson . . .. 216 I VI Lyle Arns .......... . ... .. .. 192

It has been rumored that volleyball is no longer a game of skill in this college, but rather that the team having the largest number of good arguers was destined to win . Some teams even went on "sit-down strikes" during games trying to win their point . It was all in the spirit of fun, however, and the season came to an end all too soon for the participants.

Intramural Basketball

T

HE 1936-37 intramural basketball race was marked by the closeness of the battles and by the frequent occurrence of upsets. The Brewers finally won out in a playoff victory over the Jeeps after the two teams had ended the schedule tied at five wins and two defeats apiece . As usual, the players entered in the intra-murals were limited to those who were non-varsity members. The men who signed up for the cage sport were. grouped into eight teams of eight players each . A round-robin schedule was played . The Brewers, losers in two of their first three games, copped five straight to win the title . The Redbirds set the pace for the first four games but lost out at the finish as they dropped three in a row. They probably were the champion inand-outers . They defeated both the Brewers and the Jeeps but could not win over teams which finished in the second division .

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Llewellyn Wilson of the Brewers ran away with the league scoring title as he counted 76 points in the 7 regularly scheduled games . Loren Wood was second in the individual scoring. An all-star team was picked by a vote of the league players: First Team Second Team L. Wilson . ....... F. . . . . ....... Smith Wood ..... .. .... F ... . ... . . H. Johnson Farmer ... . ...... C. . . . .. ...... Ottman Fuller .. .. ....... G ......... Wolverton Herron .. . ....... G . .... .. . F. Gislason The final standings of the teams follow : Pet . W L Brewers ............ 6 2 .750 3 .625 Jeeps .... . .......... 5 3 .571 Redbirds .. ........ . 4 Indians .... . . ..... . 4 3 .571 Millers ...... . ...... 3 4 .429 4 .429 Colonels . .. ....... . 3 Mudhens .......... . 2 5 .286 5 .286 Saints ....... . ..... . 2

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Tennis Squad

Golf Team

T ENN IS SQUA D Mr. Raymond, ]. Ro ber cson, G. Mc Vey, E. Cohen, I. Thomas. GOLF T EAM W. Bill: by, G. Mausyc ki, B. Os tmoe, J . Wac hs, Dr. Tozier.

Tennis

F

ACED with the results of heavy losses through graduation, but basking in the light of potential candidates, Dr. M . R . Raymond is taking over the coaching duties of the Purple and White tennis squad, champions of the Northern State Teachers College conference since 1933, who thi s year must prepare for meets with St . Mary 's College, La Crosse,

Mankato, and St. Cloud, in addition to the State tournament games at Moorhead, May 29th. From last season 's championship team - Ted Rothwell, Louis Hoover, Eddie Cohen, Irving Thomas - only Captain Cohen of Eveleth and Thomas of Minneapolis remain, but Walter Nosek, of Proctor, Winona city champion and

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Harry Johnson, Proctor, provide excellent skill on which Coach Raymond may shape his Winonans in preparation for the defense of their impressive record and the acquiring of new laurels. The team will be initiated into competition when La Crosse plays on the local courts, May 1. Inter-college rivalry with St. Mary's will be continued on May 4th, which is to be followed by a match against St. Cloud in Winona on May 8th. A return meet with La Crosse is scheduled on May 11th. After another local match with the Mankato Peds on May 21, the Warriors will oppose St. Mary's on May 25 in the final preliminary contest before the state meet. At

the time of writing there is a possibility of adding Rochester Junior College on the schedule. Contenders in the tournament, who compete for the title of "state champions," will this year be the guests of Moorhead Teachers College on May 29, in conjunction with the N .T.C.C. track and field meet. For four consecutive seasons the Purple and White tennis teams have held the Winona banner to the very top in State competition, and this year under the new tutorship of Coach Raymond, Mr. Boots, having voluntarily retired from the coaching position, the college renews its hopes for success on the court .

Golf "G

OLF is beginning to have a more important place in the recreational activities of the college student." Thus Dr. Roy B. Tozier, in taking over the coaching duties of the Warrior golf squad, symbolizes and predicts the continued progress in the student golfing program of Winona Teachers. ¡ Previous to this season the policy has been to have a faculty sponsor presiding over the golf team, but this year, Dr . Tozier, in addition to giving golf a more important position, will broaden his d~ties into actual coaching. For material he has three veterans - John Wachs, Winona, Berger Ostmoe Columbia Heights, and William Bixby, Wyeville - and some promising newcomers. The complete schedule, at the time of the writing, has not been announced. However, two matches will undoubtedly be played against St. Mary's, as well as a similar series of matches with the Rochester Junior College. Several other

THE

1937

colleges in the near v1cmlty are being considered by Athletic Director Glen E. Galligan as possible opponents for the Purple golfers. Again a state golf tournament is to be held, this year simultaneously with the State Track and Field Meet at Moorhead on May 29th. At the present time officials of the golf program have not stated whether the Winona team will participate. The final decision will be based on the proficiency of the squad . As in previous years, the college is offering the use of six memberships at the Westfield golf course to any student desiring to play. There is a decided movement astir to organize the teams of the Northern State Teachers college conference on a competitive golfing basis . Whatever the outcome of these plans will be, within the college and intercollegiately, one thing is positive the direction .

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Baseball Team

Boxing Class

Bauha/1 T1am - Mr. Pawele k, Coach, C. Dettloff, E. Bars ki , G. Smith, W. Kaczrows ki, C. Bratr ud, M. Peterson ( Capta in) , R. Thurley, L. Arns, L. Wil son, A. Wi lson, R. Spe ncer, R. Par ker.

Boxing Clau - M. Wo lverton, L. Christensen, R. Busd icker , L. Durrant , E. Ba rs ki , R. Thurl ey , H. D uncanson, R. Doneho wer , W. Krage, J . Laa kso, C. Jo hnson, J. Decker, A. Wh ite, Dave Honig s, Instructor.

Baseball

T

HE baseball team of the college, coached by Stanley Pawelek, will show what it can do this year by playing a three-game series with St . Mary's College, two games with Mankato Teachers College, and two with Stout Institute . At present no other games have been scheduled or played. A rainy spring necessitated a late start

for practice and made regular practice uncertain. One practice game with the Polish National Alliance team was postponed two times because of the wet weather . With the beginning of May, the weather is more promising and Coach Pawelek hopes to send a good, if not tested, team on the field against its opponents.

,-

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As this is only the second baseball team to represent the college for several years, a great amount of interest has not yet been aroused, but enthusiasm will probably rise after a few games are played. New equipment and new uniforms have been purchased, so the men will have the necessary tools with which to work and will make a good appearance on the field. Myles Peterson is the captain of the

nine and will likely hold down the catching position. For possible pitchers, Pawelek looks to Arns, Spencer, Kaczrowski, Dettloff and A. Wilson to find the right man or men. Spencer will play third base as well as pitch; Kaczrowski will be in the shortstop position, and A. Wilson will be on second. First base position is pretty well cinched by L. Wilson. Fielders will include: Barski, Wood, Smith, Bratrud, Kalbrenner, and Thurley.

Boxing

T

HE annual all-college boxing tournament held in the library gymnasium was the climax of the training the members of the boxing class had been getting throughout the winter quarter. Dave Honigs was again in charge of the instruction of the thirteen class members. He was assisted by Bob Thurley, a four-year veteran and welterweight champion. Coach Honigs used most of the quarter in teaching his pupils the fundamentals - the jab, the straight right, and the hooks. During the remainder of the twelve week period the boxers were paired off in the various weight classes for one and two round sparring matches. The class met twice a week during the regular class period and irregularly on other days. Four champions were crowned in the various weight divisions during the tournament. The bouts were all two-round affairs with an extra round in case of a draw. An interesting feature of the

finals was the fight between Thurley and Wolverton, a southpaw. These two boxers fought so evenly that no decision could be reached at the end of the three rounds. They will hold jointly the 165 pound championship. Ross Donehower in the 155 pound class was probably the outstanding boxer in the tournament with the possible exception of Thurley and Wolverton. Donehower defeated Leonard Durrant and Eddie Barski to win his title. Other champions who were decided are Clifton Johnson, Lee Christenson, and John Laakso. All of these men will receive medals. The list of champions follows: 135 pounds l45 pounds 155 pounds 165 pounds Wolverton . 175 pounds -

Clifton Johnson. Lee Christenson. Ross Donehower. Robert Thurley and Merv John Laakso.

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Men 's Intramural Board

Standing- L. Ottman, L. Christenson. Su1t1J- 0. T homas, Mr. Galligan, Athletic Director, B. Ostmoe.

Student Control of Athletics

F

OR the first time that we know the pictures of the Men's Intramural Board and the Women 's Athletic Board are being printed on the same page . We

do not mean to imply by this arrangement that the men have become sissies or that the women have suddenly become a crowd of tom-boys . Far from that,

Standmg - J. Panerson, Fresh man; M. Engstrom, Sophomore; \V. Cipra , Freshman; M. Bcrvcn, Senior; H . Uggcn, Senior. S1uttd- E. Blessing, Sophomore; Miss Ta lbot, P. Meyer, J unior; L. Simon, Sophomore; Miss Pendergas t, E. Kurzwc:g.

Women's Athletic Board

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we believe the men are as virile as ever, and the women as feminine. Both groups have, however, come to the realization that it is neither effeminate or rowdy-ish

to engage in athletic games with persons of the other sex. Therefore, we show them together .

Intramural Board The intramural board is concerned with providing pleasant athletic activity for as large a number of persons as possible . This committee works in perfect accord with the idea of interscholastic competition, but realizes that a system providing only such competition is inadequate in caring for the athletic needs of a group of college men . The board arranges and runs off tournaments in various sports . These tournaments are usually round-robin affairs.

The final or title-establishing games often create nearly as much interest and comment as do some of the varsity games. The board tries to plan the teams competing so that there will not be too great a variance of ability between groups. Tournaments were held in basketball, volleyball this year. In addition, the board cooperated with the women's board in planning and supervising the co-recreational games .

The Women ¡s Athletic Board The W .A.A . board has a function similar to that of the intramural board for men. They aim also to provide a wide and well-rounded program of sports so that there will be a range of activities to suit various interests and to entice an ever-increasing num her of people into athletic activity. In addition to cooperating in the presenting of the corecreational games, the board fosters a wide variety of activities for women .

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Among them are: tennis, golf, kittenball, volleyball, hockey, soccer, horseshoe, skating, skiing, tobogganing, basketball, indoor baseball, deck tennis, hand tennis, paddle tennis, ping pong, badminton, shuffieboard, and quoits. The two boards are rendering a valuable and important service to the student body by providing the means for an interesting, healthful form of recreation .

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SOME SCENES DEP ICTI NG CO- RECRE ATIONA L ACTIVITY Upptr Ltft, The fo lk-dancin g group; Cpptr Right , ping pong and dar ts. Lower Ltft, badm inton and volleyball ; Lowtr Right, a clogg ing group.

Co-Recreational Games

C

O-EDUCATIONAL recreation has been engaged in by the majors in physical education for three or four years , but this is the first year that a program for all students and faculty has been inaugurated . This mixed-group activity offers all an opportunity to meet in a play situation, which is the most natural one . Throughout the East and in California, this movement seems to be rapidly growing more popular as it is in our own institution . In our school this co-activity has taken the form of recreational games, folk-dancing and clogging: activities which have proved most popular. Equipment for such games as badmin-

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ton, volleyball, deck tennis, ping pong, darts, hand tennis and paddle tennis is provided for use by anyone in the afternoons. Volleyball is a good game for mixed groups because most people have learned to play this game in high school. With an even number of men and women on each team, real competition is afforded as well as much fun. Badminton is suited to almost anyone wanting activity, for the reason that it is fun merely to fool around with the light racquet and shuttle-cocks ; however, great dexterity can be attained in playing. It is a fast, skillful game when play is perfected . The men's and women's physical education departments have, with the aid

1937 WENONAH


of students selected by the W.A.A . and Intramural boards supervised this social hour in the gym in which the whole situation is very informal. People come when they can, and play as long as they are interested or have time . Brief instructions were given at the beginning of the season but participants help anyone who needs or desires assistance . Often spectators gathered to watch the play and a few exhibition matches were played. A person chancing to be present when this activity is being carried on would see that the players are enjoying themselves to the utmost extent and would observe that here men and women easily make social contacts, whether watching or participating, develop numerous skills, and learn to play games which during school as well as in days to come will always be a means, of helping them to meet worthwhile people and to adjust to a new communtty. Many of our men and women avail themselves of the opportunity of receiving instruction in folk dancing and

clogging from Miss Pendergast . These classes are required for majors in the "phy ed" field but may be used as electives by any student . The folk dancing class made its own costumes and presented a number of dances for a meeting of superintendents, for a chapel program and for a nearby high school. It is at first surprising to find our athletic heroes tripping lightly and swinging their feminine partners with a gentle grace, but what is more natural? This is one of our traditions given to us by our oldworld ancestors as a spontaneous selfexpression and a means of relaxation from toil. Don't, however, be led to think that it is not a vigorous activity . Football men have been heard to remark that it is more strenuous than playing a game of football. The mixed-group activities, initiated as an experiment to our school, seem by their popularity to be an established part of the physical education program to be enlarged and to become even more popular in the future .

A Farewell to Miss Pendergast Miss Helen A. Pendergast, director of women's athletics in our college, has accepted a position at Louisiana State University for next year. It was Miss Pendergast who initiated our program of co-recreation and who in many other ways enlarged and bettered the physical education program in our school. We feel that Louisiana State is gaining much and that we are losing not a little when Miss Pendergast assumes her duties there this summer. We have been fortunate in having her here these past six years . During

this time, Miss Pendergast has had several articles published in state and national magazines, has delivered lectures and led round-table discussions and generally promoted the physical education for women . Not only the majors and minors in her own department but students throughout the college have been inspired by her sincerity, progressiveness and heart-felt interest . Though we regret our loss, we sincerely wish Miss Pendergast the high success of which she is deserving in her new pos1t10n .

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SOME OF TH E ACTI VITI ES IN TH E WOMEN 'S ATHLETIC PR OGRAM , A kitten ba ll g ame. Some practice swings in golf. Field hockey.

Basketbal l. Tennis. Volleyba ll.

Athletic Program

T

HE Women 's Athletic board and the Physical Education department offer a well-rounded program for all girls of the college . Not only are students given a well organized Physical education program, but they are favored with excellent facilities for play. The city and Teachers

College both offer fine tenins courts and the city lends the use of its golf course to all college students . The hills provide a splendid hikin g, skiing and tobogganing ground, and the river and lakes offer swimming, skating, and boating in season.

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Basketball

Hockey and Soccer

A basketball tournament for girls is held every winter. These games prove very exciting and worthwhile . Practice periods are provided for the inexperienced to learn and for the more advanced girls to assist others and improve themselves .

Field hockey and soccer are outstanding fall sports . The skills are taught in classes, a tournament is played after school, and technics are given in coaching and refereeing .

Volleyball Tennis and Golf In both the spring and fall, tennis and golf are offered to the girls in classes and after school. Every spring the W .A .A . sponsors a tenms tournament .

Swimming

A volleyball tournament is played every spring by girls who are interested in this sport . Many girls who don't turn out for other sports find volleyball a very interesting game .

Softball

The W .A .A . sponsors an open swim night which is held once a week at the Y.W.C.A . There is also a class in swimming for majors and minors. In this class, the girls learn how to swim, how . to teach others and how to become efficient teachers of swimming .

Indoor baseball, played outside is the ball game popular in the spring . It is a fast game, but not as strenuous as baseball. The familiarity of most of the girls with this game always assures a good tournament .

Track

Dancing

In the spring, instruction is offered after school for anyone interested in track or field events . Old skills are perfected and many new ones are mastered . The discus, shot put and javelin throw prove popular because of their novelty to most girls .

Classes in elementary and advanced folk dancing and dogging are offered . Both boys and girls participate in these classes. On special occasions demon strations of the skills are given whi le the class is in costume .

THE

1937

WENONAH

89


Physical Education Club

Stt~t,J - G. Graham , E. Tufree, M. Bervc:n, A. Thurow , P. Meyer, G. Edsrrom, M. Buehler, M. Meyer, V. Towner, I. Wetmore. Standing - L. Simon, Miss Talbot, Miss Pendergast, H. Krage.

Physical 'Education Club

T

HE Physical Education Club is composed of majors and minors in the field of physical education. It was organized by Miss Lewis, Physical education instructor in 1921, and has been an active organization in the school life since that time. The purposes of the club are to promote a feeling of unity among members of the group and to raise the standards and ideals in physical education. The motto is "Play for Play's sake ." The year's program consisted of numerous meetings and of play meetings in which the members engaged in seasonal sports . Speakers whose interests are related to physical education promotion have contributed to the club. Dr. Meinert of the Winona clinic spoke on the subject ¡'What Physical Education Teachers Should Know about Health." Members of the club this year attended

90

the annual play day at Carleton College. An annual All-Women's Party is sponsored by the Physical Education Club and the Women's Athletic Board each fall. This year the clubs were responsible for an especially jolly party. The guests came in informal attire and participated heartily in the various games and contests . Some of these were volleyball, dart throwing, deck tennis, ping pong, running games and jumping games. Success in any game gave the person a certain number of points. The person who had the largest number of points received a prize . The very delightful evening was climaxed by large group folk dances directed by Miss Pendergast. The officers of the club are : Lois Simons, President; Harriet Krage, Vice President ; Gayle Graham, SecretaryTreasurer ; Miss Pendergast, Adviser ; Miss Talbot, Adviser.

THE 1937 WENONAH


College Fun


HOMECOMING!

1. Still life.

2. Prexies.

3. When in doubt, punt!

4. Group picture.

5. Quaday, what big feet you have.

6. And we did it!

7. First impression.

8. Then it all went up 1n smoke.

9. Sheep-ard Welcomes You.

10. No. 1 in action.

11. King Football.

12. Kindergarteners at play.

13. Truckin'.

14. Ain't he "Stout"!

15. Edstrom's enterprise.

::t

92

T·H E I 9 3 7 WEN 0 N A H


BITS OF KNOWLEDGE

DID YOU KNOW THAT :

OPTIMIST - Person who thinks he knows a place where he can borrow money.

If all the people who eat in dormitories were placed side by side they would reach.

PEsSIMIST -

Person who has tried .

DIPLOMACY - Art of letting someone else have your way. Some people say, "Sorry, I don ' t understand you" instead of "Sorry, I only have listened .¡' MAN - Only thing that blushes or needs to. Mark Twain . Education will broaden a narrow mind, but there is no cure for a big head.

Birds with one feather are practically naked . There is seldom a slip twixt the skirt and the hip . A stitch in time saves embarrassment? A rolling stone is hard to stop? A bird in the hand is dangerous? That Jack and Jill went up a hill which is harder than going down?

The man who agrees with everything you say lies to others also. HIGHBROW intelligence.

Person educated beyond his

TANNERY - Shed ( remember Papa's razor strap .) When you talk you teach, when you listen, you learn . To keep out of trouble, breathe through the nose; it keeps the mouth closed. Women really are superior. No man can listen to three conversations while carrying on one.

JADY 'S (Mr. Jederman) HISTORY COURSE in eight short lessons. (Can't vouch for originality jump on us .)

so don't

1. Blessed are the young, for they shall in-

herit the national debt .

What this country needs is a national holiday following holidays in which to recoup from the holidays . (Remember New Year's Eve.)

2. The world owes us a living but it's up to us to collect it .

A poor relative appreciates your help, but he always holds your success against you .

4. Wrong is what the other fellow does that I don't approve of.

It's fine to have fun, but don't let the fine cost more than the fun .

5. C.O .D. means "Call on Dad."

Man blames Fate for other accidents, but feels personally responsible when he makes a hole in one. DANDRUFF - Chips off the old block. FRANKIE's FLAME - Eleanor. A HousEDicK's VIEWPOINT -

THE

Transom.

1937

3. The wheel that squeaks the loudest gets the grease.

6. It's better to be a live coward than a dead hero, because when you're dead, you stay dead such a long time. 7. When the pot begins to boil, the scum rises to the top. 8. Nothing is too good for the soldier . That's what he gets .

WENONAH

93


OFF-HOURS

1. Are we good! 2. Loaded down. 3. " Apple polishing. " 4. A feeble attempt .

s.

· 'Par~jng is such sweet sorrow .

6. lnsti tutionalized. 7. Home from Sunday School!

8. Bet it 's a funny paper. 9. Sleepy time guys! 10. Warming the bench. 11. "Out in the field . " 12. ·'The laboratory. ' '

13 . Goodnight, young men! 14. Servant's entrance. 15. Just a sample! 16. ·'Opportunity class .

..

17. Some more business! 18. Come and get us! 19. Waiting for the boat races. 20. Gordy. 21. 'Snow fun! 22. Cracking the books. 23 . Hi-ya, Toots!

94

THE

1937 WENONAH


BELL GIRL'S LAMENT Each evening after dinner's done The bells begin to ring "You're wanted on the phone," I say; ''Thank you,'' their voices sing.

A progressive town is one which always has its main street torn up for some improvements . A careful motorist is one who avoids not only the wet spots on the road but the wet spots along it as well.

The doorbell, the telephone, For Mary, Janet, Bea: The telephone, the doorbell, Bells never meant for me.

Some people never become alarmed until they have a rude awakening.

The doorbell sounds, ¡'Miss Zabel, please.'' "One moment while I ring:" "You have a caller, June," I say "Thank you," her voice will sing.

Simile - As intrepid as a bookkeeper going to the boss for a raise in salary with red ink on his fingers.

The doorbell, the telephone, For Saima, Lois, Bea: The telephone, the doorbell, Bells never meant for me. -

EoNA NoRTHRUP.

MIXED DRINKS Bicardi Cocktail -

Horse's Neck -

BENEFITS OF A HIGHER EDUCATION: If nothing else, boys, you can always join an Escort Bureau. Which leads us to believe that one might prove quite a success right here in ''our own back yard.'' WHAT A WOMAN NEEDS IS:

upheaval in Cuba.

Careless Love- Easy to make, easy to take. Harvard Cocktail -

Education will broaden a narrow mind, but there is no cure for a big head.

A college diploma.

Who are we to judge?

President - No matter which party.

Up to the age of 14 - good health and parents . From 14 to 40 - good looks . From 40 to 60 - personality. And from 60 on - cash! Oh, that we might stay young forever!

Rocking Horse - Swaying delight. Side Car - Easy riding. Stinger - Stung again!

HOPED-FOR STUDIES THAT WE NEVER GET 1. A course in Higher Apple Polishing.

2. Girls' boxing class.

3. A new math course in "fi.gger skating." 4. A study of Lounging Methods.

s. Technic

of Social Room Chair Straighten-

mg. 6. Sophomore course in Deleterious Results of Classroom Insomnia.

THE

1937

"THERE'S GONNA BE SOME CHANGES MADE'' Our "Winonan" problems are over - maybe! As an innovation in the policy of our Winonan paper, it has been suggested that we run two front pages each time. The reason for this is the fact that very high advertising rates can be secured for front page advertising, thus increasing the advertising revenue plenty. We know all our readers will be pleased to hear of this proposed radical but very advantageous change. Swell idea, don't you think? There only seems to be one flaw that I can see . . . we carry no advertising on the front page. But who cares?

WENONAH

95


SCENES " AT HOME"

The house of Tillman goes berserk. Ev Edstrom tries to read with fingers in ears, but his is a sorry task with the bedlam that's going on .

The notorious third floor girls of Shepard Hall are all decked out in Sabbath finery, and a fine lot of comely damsels they are .

The even - more - notorious West Lodge men are out for a sunning. West Lodge nicknames present a wide and almost stunning variety. Among the monickers are "Cockrobin," "Bear-Clutch," "Tilly," "Pansy," "Squeeze," "Chubby," "Schnozzle," and "Alcatraz." See if you can guess the owners of these weird cognomens.

96

THE

1937

WENONAH


THE REAL LOW DOWN ON W.S.T.C. ELECTIONS It was authoritatively told to us that the

JuLIET -

"Ah, me!"

RoMEO - ''Oh, schpeak, von dimes more, pright angel pird!"

hlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlili hlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlilihlili JuLIET - "Romeo, Romeo, ver you vas?" blah blah; we furthermore believe that any blah blah blah blah, and we would like to see no more such blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Although we believe that Winona Teachers, as a "hole," is unpolitical, we further think that things are blah blah blah and should be changed and therefore, blah blah blah, we blah! If, on the other hand, we furthermore might state that BLAH BLAH BLAH, but, barring further maneuvering, we will remain silent. Elections have proved that blah blah blah and thusly we take our stand. Blah!

SHTOP PRESSH! Etaoin shrdlu! Etaoin fhoud, Heh! Heh! We were only fooling. This is one on you . This is not Jewish, we are just giving the typesetters a rest . Heaven knows, they need it, don'tcha think?

RoMEO - ''I took dhee at dhy vord und came. Call me, luf, und I come quick!" JuLIET -

"How you got dot garten in?"

RoMEO - "Mit lufs light vings I der vall schump over like a gees pird." JuLIET - "If mein fader see you, it vas perter if you diedt before you vas porn." RoMEO - "I had me one night's cloak to hide me in, und if you luf me, it vas perter if I gone dedt here before dose pright eyes as some places oderwhere, ain't it?" JuLIET - "0, Romeo, you make me plush aber you gant see dot in de night. 0 dost dhou luf me?'' RoMEO-:- "Schweed goil, I schwear by dot moon I luf dhee ." JuLIET - "Oh, schwear not by dot moon. Sometimes he don't shine and such luf like dose I don't want." RoMEO- "Dan vat I schall schwear py, fair geese pird?''

LOGIC FROM GOOD OLD W.S.T.C.

J uLIET - "Don't schwear at all, but if dhou If you look in Webster's dictionary, you . moost schwear, schwear py your own grawill find the word "scribble". This is becious self." cause nearly every word in the English language is printed in Webster's dictionary, RoMEO- "So help me, gracious, I luf dhee ." and girdly is a word in the English language. JuLIET - "Goot night, good night, I must me on der ped go." Oh, mama, pin a rose on me! RoMEO -

"0 golly, you gone away?"

IN THE SPRING A YOUNG MAN'S FANCY TURNS TO - LOVE

JuLIET - ''Vat goot for me gan you tonight hafe?"

(Due apologies to William Shakespeare)

RoMEO - ¡'Dot you can gif me yourself und all your luf."

RoMEo - " It was her, Oh, it vas mein luf. She schpeake somedings aber I don't fershtand vat she say. Oh, see, she has her scheek on her handt. Oh, if that mitten on her handt vas me dot I might touch dat scheek!"

JuLIET - "You got my luf pefore you ask him, and I gif him to you again and again, und again. I must to ped now go. Goot night, goot night, goot night.'' RoMEO -

''Der teufel! She vas gone! Oh,

-.

THE 1937 WENONAH

97


CANDID SHOTS

1. Efficiency man. 2. "Now I lay me." 3. Franke, aren ' t they enTheissen? 4. Burning the midnight oil? 5. Florence Loring Richards!! 6. And she saved 35c. 7. Phelps athletes. 8. Dignity and impudence. 9. Pedagogical guinea-pigs. 10. The show must go on! 11. Tranquillity. 12. His Majesty, the King.

13. Cross sticks.

14. High, low, Jack and game.

15. Sleep, Bebe, Sleep!

16. Don't M amma don't!

17. Before and after.

98

THE 1937 WENONAH


you agin pack? I got me skeerd, I dought you don't get again pack." JuLIET -

"Romeo, hist!"

RoMEO - "Schweed vone, I hist, I don'd gare if I hist the nightd through so you pin der hister. It was so schweed to stand here.'' JuLIET - "It vas near morning und I vould haff dhee gone. I must on der ped go. I see you agtn. RoMEO - "Oh, me, Oh, me, dot vas too pad. Schleep, schweed schleep. I come me some odder night. Goot night, goot night!"

paper napkin and held it up while his friend gnawed busily behind the improvised screen. "0. K.?" he asked. "Yep," said the gnawer, putting down the bone. Then he took up the paper napkin shield while the first one lit tooth and nail into his chicken. The system undoubtedly works just as well for corn on the cob, watermelon, or the more complicated versions of the threedecker sandwich. So, I leave you with the thought, "When in doubt . . . remember, that necessity is the mother of invention!"

A QUESTIONNAIRE FOR DORM-DWELLERS THE 1937 ATTACK : To You With Etiquette Trouble The old rules of etiquette are not built to stand the gaff of this mad pace we keep, and it is inevitable that correct form must adjust itself to changing conditions and customs. We owe great thanks therefore, to the modern drug store, which has brought upheaval to the old eating regime. Liston to this, you lads and lassies, the "worm has turned." Just as, when lunching at a drug store counter, it is neither propitious (means 'gracious' . . . I hope) nor possible to draw out a young lady's stool for her, so in the same environment diners no longer resort to the old method of retiring under the table to finish off a chicken bone in the fingers . The new procedure was nicely demonstrated in our own well-frequented Steak Shop one Sunday afternoon (so many things happen on Sunday afternoon). Two young men whose names I shan't reveal were each eating One Half Young Spring Chicken, French Fried Potatoes - SOc. Came the moment when they had to decide whether to call it a day or pick up the bones in their fingers. Without an instant's hesitation, the first young man whisked out a

We have prepared a questionnaire to uncover all dorm woes- or maybe you're a perfect dweller, as a dorm dweller goes . Give yourself a 0 if you never do these things; 1.-if, well, hardly ever; 2.-if occasionally; 3.-often; 4.-always. 1. Does your roommate have to resort to force to get you to rise in the morning? 2. Do you go into pre-breakfast grouches? 3. Do you monopolize the bathroom? 4. Do you sing "fortissimo" in 'the bath? - S. Do you yell down the hall to another early rising friend at 8:00 Saturday and Sunday mornings? 6. Are you a dorm pest, flitting from one room to another doing mischief? 7. Do you short-sheet beds? 8. Do you throw your dirty stockings in the corner? 9. Do you put things like popcorn and snakes in people's beds? 10. Do you ring bells incessantly giving no time for wanderers to answer? 11. Do you take doors off? 12. Do you barricade doorways? 13. Do you let your radio roar?

THE 1937 WENONAH

99


MORE CANDID SHOTS

1. Up and over the curvature.

2. Keep you eye on the saw, Grudem.

3. Do you follow me, friends?

4. Integrate this one!

5. We're from the Normal.

6. What, another weekly quiz?

7. Delving into the private life of the earth worm.

8. Kraftsman.

9. Watch those calories.

10. Light house-keeping.

11. And where were you last night, Rog?

12. A mild flirtation.

13. How's my stance?

100

THE

1937

WENONAH


14. Are you selfish with your boxes from home?

23. Do you ask people to bring up your meals to you?

15. Do you object strenuously to the stimulus of light while dozing off to sweet lethargy?

24. Do you remind people of your fragilities due to a recent operation?

16. Do you set your alarm for an early hour and then fail to get up?

Now find the total of all your answers. The worst possible score you can get is 100; the best is 0.

17. Do you proclaim at length about what "he" or "she" said on your dates?

25. Do you attempt to "pun"?

If your score if 90-100- We hope all the aforementioned evils are practiced on you.

18. Do you ever leave rings around the bath tub???

If your score is 75-80 deserves a new-deal.

19. Do you clean the room before dust piles up an inch thick?

If your score is 50-75 -

20. Are you incessantly crying down the hall, "Is somebody going to the Inn?"

If your score is 15-30- Good.

21. Do you wear your roommate's clothes?

22. Do your roommate's ties match your suit?

Your dorm-fellows Fair -

just passing.

If your score is 30-50- Pretty good. If your score is 5-15 -

Excellent.

If your score is 0-5 - You're too good to be true. Try again and be more honest.

WHY TEACHERS DIE YOUNG (We submit these boners in sympathy for and contention with the passage of the pending Teacher's Retirement Act.) A balanced sentence is one that has a equal clause on both sides of the colon. Dryden's Restoration drama ... Pilgrim's Progress.

Pivot is a play in which one foot stays in place and the other goes wherever it wants to. They found an oasis in a dessert. A person says in speaking of term life insurance: You take out the policy for a given length of time and after that time it is extinguished. This student didn't know if the answer was right or wrong or not. A step hop in folk dancing is a toe kick. He went home before daylight to see his father but was delayed with a flat tire. The Pilgrim's Progress was written by Paul Bunyan.

THE

1937

The cultural aim is the power of arithmetic in the use of eggs, bananas, oranges, and objects. This note was left on Miss Pendergast's desk: "Sorry I broke this golf club. While ¡playing the club became broken." Arithmetic should be taught because it is chiefly preparatory for the child for the life to come. Two good boners have been made about Pertelote and Chaunticleer in the Nonne Preestes Tale from Chaucer. One student said that Pertelote was a prominent writer of the sixteenth century. Another stated that Pertelote was the fowl wife of Chaunticleer. The prize winning boner of the year was contributed to the school's skeleton closet by a professor. Mr. Jederman taught nearly a whole period of Ancient History before he realized he was teaching his European History class.

WENONAH

101


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On the left we have a graphic, candid portrait or diagram of activities here at dear old Siwash - pardon us, we mean W.S.T.C. By gazing at it carefully you may find much to interest and entice you. We think we've included everything we've dared to. Please, please, however, don't ask us what the score is . We never have known.

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THE

1937

WENONAH


Poems 1n a Lighter Vein

AGRARIAN MEDITATION When Venus lingers on the brow Of yonder hill and stars are new, I go home to milk the cow And think of you! They clung together heart to heart One thought betwixt the two, Two souls as one from sun to sun The rent again was due.

CANNIBAL In the pan Was a ginger-bread man And in the man A raisin. I emptied the pan And et up the man And now, I'm a cannibal Brazen. - H. L. SMITH.

We paused beside a crystal pool And talked of this and that You held my future in your hands, But I - just held your hat. Tell me, radiant little maiden, Sweet beneath the moonlight's glow How can such an ethereal vision Dispose of earthly dollars so? -NATHAN MooRE.

JILTED I took her out to wine and dine To win her smile - to hear her laugh The moon was out, the stars were out And I was out - ten bucks and a half! - NATHAN MooRE.

"PUPPET SHOW" by Willy, aged six I went once to a puppet show To see some dolls do actingThey all had hair as white as snow And manners most exacting. The heroine was pretty, but, She's just a marionette, And anyhow I'm much too young To think of marryin' yet. -WILLIAM FRANZMANN.

THE

1937

SINNAH! Three big sins And a hundred small I ruefully count them twice. Of course I know I can't be good, But I wish I would Be nice. - H. L. SMITH.

WENONAH

103


Poetic Attempts DREAM LIFE If there were dreams to sell, And you the peddler gay, Had I the coin to serve me well I would toss it all away.

All I would ask the whole day throughIs to walk in the road by the side of you, And all life could give in the twilight still To share your supper beneath the hill. But if at night when the stars were bright, With a vagabond wind at our backs, We longed afar for a distant star, We would borrow a dream from your pack. -

LAURA AGNES DEVINE.

THE POET A poet, he would walk along, His feet alone upon the ground We walk onHis soul, an albatross, high-flying, With power to change The thoughts and words of everyday Into lyric poems, smooth-flowing; But then, some earthy soul Talked earnestly to himConvinced him of the folly Of writing ''frilly'' things, In short, he killed the albatross, So now our poet walks, His feet, his eyes, his very soul Upon the ground we walk on. -

A CROOKED STICK Oh Richard said that riches should be mine And Everett said, that fame he'd give, ' And Jock decided that' a mansion fine Should be mine In which to live, And you have offered safety, And pledged your heart to love (As all men do) through thin and thick But yet, I think I'll tarry for a while Lest while I wander dreaming through the woods, I pick a crooked stick. -H. L. S.

THE

1937

WENONAH

WILLIAM FRANZMANN.


ADVERTISEMENTS ····o---~---G····

We wish to extend our sincere thanks to the business men of Winona ronage

whose has

generous

helped

make

patthe

publication of the 1937 Wenonah possible.

THE

1937

WENONAH

105


Let us Fill Your Coal Bin

Henry G. Hanson

D. F. O'BRIEN LUMBER COMPANY

JEWELER Winona, Minnesota

Compliments

Stults

SPANTON'S Home of TAYLOR-MADE ICE CREAM Come in - Try Our Frosted Malteds STORES IN WINONA AND ST. CHARLES

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We have the clothes you like

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SPECIAL RATES ON

Agency

STEVENSON'S Shoe Department "Exclusive B ut Not Expens [ve' '

SPEND WHERE YOU SAVE AT

APPLICATION PICTURES

Studios

oJG. E. Griffin

Opposite Library

Complete Outfits for Men, Women and Children

Great Sport- Fine Exercise- Swimming Handball - Showers - Friendship - Companionship- Fine Social Lobby. Membership $10 a year Good at any "Y" in the world

Y.M.C.A.

106

Compliments of a

A

FRIEND

Fifth and Johnson Sts.

THE

1937

WENONAH


MASTER CLEANERS AND DYERS

s Phone 3030

68-70 East Fourth St.

R. D. Cone Company

RELIABLE INSURANCE

WHOLESALE AND RET AIL HARDWARE 66-70 East Second Street PHONE 4052 SINCE 1855

Winona Insurance Agency

When in Winona EAT AND SLEEP At The

Exchange Bldg.

PHONE

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COMPLIMENTS OF

Williams Hotel & Cafe Frank and John Williams, Props. Excellent Food at New Low Prices

Shoe

B& D

Store

"Let us fit your feet"

Edwin A. Brown PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST THE REXALL STORE

Kodaks- Kodak Supplies 117 W. Third St.

MILESTONES Roughly, people can be divided into two classes - those who are your friends, and those who bring candid cameras to your parties. Up to now, no two of the world powers have been able to agree on the number of

THE

A FRIENDLY STORE TO SHOP FOR

College Togs, Formals and Everything Smart for School and Campus "If it's new you'll find it here" COURTESY SERVICE

battleships it takes to handle a delicate situation. Just to show the type of radio entertainment we're getting these days, people have almost completely stopped squawking about the static. Then there is the King who swapped his kingdom for a clothes-horse.

1937 WENONAH

107


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* THE 1937 WENONAH

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'Prtewert 'Photos COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE

PRIEWERT STUDIO 69 East 4th Street Application Photos 25 for $1.00 50 for $1.50

Films Developed

W. F. PELZER

GATE CITY LAUNDRY

Custom Tailoring Pressing, Repairing and Alterations

164 West Third

Fine Food Prod1tcts

Distributed by

Latsch & Son Company

Will satisfy your particular appearance GIVE US A TRIAL

"We appreciate your business" C. K.

· Winona, Minn.

DIARY OF A FRESHMAN 7 - First day of skool. We had a "mixer" in the gym - wasn't necessary. I was mixed enough as was 'cause I took some tests.

SEPT .

SEPT.

8-

Fall quarter began and we had

Phone 2888

THE COLLEGE BARBER SHOP

DEER WOOD- UBESEEFOODCRAFT-

Picture Framing

SuNDBY,

Prop.

more tests too. I ain't happy. I found out I got an "I.Q. ", whatever that is. 11 - Things are getting better we had stunt night. Gee! them seniors is nuts.

SEPT.

SEPT.

15 -

First social hour. They dance

THE 1937 WENONAH

109


different here from at home. They don't bounce so much.

OcT. 2 - There was another game to-

night. People are beginning to work on homecoming.

SEPT. 21- They had some Mary'n'ets at

chapel today. I don't care so much fer dolls but they was cute.

OcT. 16- They had one of the biggest

bonfires I ever seen tonight. called it a pep-fest.

They

SEPT. 25- Football game.

They played at night with a white ball.

OcT. 17- Today there was a swell home-

SEPT. 26- Faculty reception. I met a lot

coming parade and a game and a danceall in one day. Whee!! (We won too.)

of my teachers again which I think is silly. I got in some good gum-choon tonite.

Nov. 9 - Mr. Rollo Walter Brown spoke to us in chapel. He's an interesting gent.

*

.:f"il'sltWn 9nc. ~~NA,MINN, ~

The Star Shoe Repair Shop

LADIES AND MISSES READY-TO- WEAR

Cleaning, Dyeing and Repairing 174 Main St.

J. C. PENNEY Co. DEPT. STORE

Clothing and Shoes for the Entire Family

Compliments of the

HOTEL VVINONA and the

PARK HOTEL

110

THE

1937

WENONAH


W1!f~$!LD BAY STATE MILLING

Co.

WINONA, MINN.

Springdale Dairy Co. PASTEURIZED MILK, CREAM AND BUTTERMILK OF SUPERIOR FLAVOR Dial3982 529 Huff St.

BAILEY & BAILEY Dealers in DRY GOODS, CLOAKS, SUITS Carpets, Draperies, Wall paper

A Complete Line of

Meats, Groceries, Picnic Supplies

WERNER & OSTROM 519 Huff St.

Rademacher Drug Co. DRUGS- PAINT- GLASS 59 West Second Street

IT' S A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE

GRAAF'S CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS LADIES' SPORTSWEAR Phone 2124 Winona

Nov . 11 - Armistice Day, but we had a war (football, tee hee) with St . Mary's and beat 'em . Nov. 13 - Wenonah Players gave a play, "Children of the Moon." I liked it . Nov. 26 DEc. 4 DEc. 17 -

We had turkey for dinner .

F. W. Woolworth Co. WINONA, MINN.

DEc. 25 - Christmas. More stuff! DEc. 31 - There ain't much left of this year. ]AN. 1 - Happy New Year! ]AN. 27 - Mr. Werrenrath sang and talked for us.

Die-No-Mo show. Some fun!

FEB. 14 - Valentine's Day day for me.

Christmas play.

THE

Compliments of

FEB. 12 -

First basketball game .

Dial 2358

1937

WENONAH

that's the

111


24- Mr. Chapman showed us some slides and movies tonight.

FEB.

MAR. 18- General Butler and Private Peat talked tonight. I was afraid the Gen. would fall into the pit.

MAR. 19- Mr. C. E. Jones demonstrated some things he called "gyroscopes" in chapel today. APRIL 24 -

Intermediate grade club party.

MAY 1 - The players gave four one-act

FORD HOPKINS COMPANY DRUGS

-

52-54-56 E. Third Street TOILETRIES TEA ROOM

McConnon & Company WINONA, MINN.

MEMPHIS. TENN.

A Winona Company which manufactures a complete line of over 170 guaranteed products, including Foods, Toilet Articles, Good Health Products, Stock and Poultry Raisers Supplies, Insecticides, and many other necessities. ··••(+)••··

Has rendered dependable service to homes in cities, towns, and on the farms for almost 50 years.

FINE FURS SINCE 1897 Phone 2202

108 W. 3rd St.

11 2

THE

1937

WENONAH


COMPLIMENTS OF

WINONA CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION FIRST NATIONAL BANK MERCHANTS BANK WINONA NATIONAL AND SAVINGS BANK

HEADQUARTERS

COMPLIMENTS

for Musical Merchandise of Quality At Popular Prices

of

Siebrecht Floral Co.

W. ]. DYER & BRO. ST. PAUL

Baker & Steinbauer

Si nce 1870

MIN N.

LET JAY ROBB

"Better Shoes"

Shovel Your COAL

Winona - La Crosse - Rochester Eau Claire

Lindsay Studio

Compliments of

THE LEICHT PRESS

116 West Fourth

Printers . Publishers . Lithographers

FI N EST IN PORTRAITS for all occasions At Prices that Please the Student

plays. Some funny, some sad, all pretty good .

MAY 28 - The Phelps School kids were promoted. Some of them.

MAY 7 - Mendelssohn Club Concert tonight. The gals looked pretty good.

MAY 31 -

Backaloret sermon.

4 - Last day of school, graduation, no more pencils, no more books . . . whee . . . !!!

JuNE

MAY 8 - "The Prom", everyone decked out swell, 'neverything.

THE

1937

WENONAH

11 3


PUNS FROM W.S.T.C.'s LOUSIEST PUNSTERS I don't like Detloff of yours. In our parlor dere' s spots on decrepit.

Gee, you're den.re- (den.re as in fender.) Fjetland pony. Arndt I beautiful? A heavy snowfall brought out the remark, "These are the days of .rhovelry."

Compliments of Winona Theatre Co.

STATE ... WINONA ... AVON

HOLDEN'S 523 Huff Street Can supply you with Toilet Articles, School Supplies, and Expert Kodak Work.

Phone 2175

Stager Jewelry Store W. J. WARMINGTON DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY AND REP AIRING

ilrii/QJ//I#ftlming ~

Corner Third and Main Sts. Winona, Minnesota

l!..l'l C1e1ners. Qms and H1tters

Supply Your Needs At -

CHOATE'S

Building For Tomorrow on the Foundations

H. Choate & Company Established 1861

114

THE

1937

,701

E. 3rd

WENONAH

of Today


WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE ESTABLISHED 1858-9000 GRADUATES

Offers a combined general and vocational education at smaller expense to the student than almost any other higher institution of learning.

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Grades and High School Supervision, High School, etc. Academic Fields Fine Arts, Music Industrial Arts Physical Education

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Elementary Schools Rural Schools Kindergarten-Primary Primary Grades Intermediate Grades Upper Grades

Its four-year curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor of Education and its two-year to the diploma, with suitable and specific certification for public-school service. The Junior College program of the first two years is a boon to the financially limited students.

Send for Yearbook and other literature

THE

1937

WENONAH

11 5


SOME MORE BONERS

Then there is the perennial boner of a student who looked in vain for a certain book on the reserved shelf, only to find that the rare book was his text .

The central aisle of the church is called the naive. Terra cotta means firm ground.

COLLEGE INN

COJ\JP LT:\J Ei'-/TS Or

DINNERS, LUNCHES

S. S. KRESGE

I ce Cream Fresh from the Freezer Good Food -

Winona, 1\Iinn.

Good Service -

4,31 Hu II St.

Pleasant Atmosphere

J. McVey, Prop. ~

Louis Thurow Box Factory

Botsford Lumber Company

Manufacturers of Window and Door Frames Packing Boxes and Crates Quality Mill Work Third & Wilson

C.

Complete Line of LUMBER For Manual Training PHONE 3552 WINONA, MINN.

WINONA, MINN.

Compliments of COMPLIJ\IENTS 0 F TilE

Mississippi Valley Public Service Co.

Winona Clinic

The George Hillyer Furniture Co. ESTABLISHED 1870

-

INCORPORATED 1910

"The store where you find the nationally advertised lines" FURNITURE, RUGS, LINOLEUMS, CHINA, GLASSWARE, PICTURES, JviiRRORS, BABY CARRIAGES, LAMPS AND SHADES

166-168 Center St.

116

THE

Winona, Minnesota

1937

WENONAH


JONES & KROEGER COMPANY

PRINTERS- BINDERS STATIONERS

108- 110 E. Third St.

WINONA, MINN.

Printers of the I93 7 Wenonah

THE

1937 WENONAH

11 7


A good maxim to remember is that the more dumber you can get 'em to think you are the more you can get by with less.

And a fence is the thing which grass looks greener the yonder side of.

THE following firms have contributed to the financial success of this issue of the VV enonah. lf/e appreciate your patronage. ROYAL TAXI J. MILTON DAHM, JEWELER KALMES TIRE SERVICE KRATZ CANDY SHOP QUALITY FUR SHOP WILLIAMS BOOK AND STATIONERY KEWPEE LUNCH SUPER CLEANING WORKS BILL'S BARBER SHOP HASTINGS BROS., JEWELERS

11 8

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1937 WENONAH



THE 1937 WENONAH

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120

THE

1937

WENONAH