Wenonah Yearbook - 1936

Page 1





Wenonah

Ex Libris Ever shall tomorrow better What today hath won,· Lead thy children, Alma Mater, On, forever on.'

C. C.

THE

WENONAH 1936


THIS book is meant to be a mirror of our college days here at Winona . Our stay has not been all hard work nor all fun, but whether working or playing there has been in evidence a friendly spirit of informality which we have all come to love . As a mirror of this school life, we have tried in this annual to catch that informality while presenting words and pictures showing our work and fun. FREDERICK NELSON

Managing Editor WILLIAM

H.

FRANZMANN

Editor-in-Chief

Louis H. HoovER Business Manager

Hoover, Nelson, Franzmaon


THE

ENONAH 1936

Published by the Graduating Classes of

Winona State Teachers College Winona, Minnesota


The

All seems beautiful to me . I can repeat over to men and women, You have done such good to me I would do the same for you, I will recruit myself and you as I go. I will scatter myself among men and women as I go, I will toss a new gladness and roughness among them. WHITMAN.


DEDICAT ON IT IS seldom that we students have an opportunity to show our appreciation for, or express our gratitude to a faculty member in anything more than a small way. The dedication of our yearbook to a person who is a favorite among us is one of the few things we can do. Through the dedication of this annual we hope in a small way to convey our admiration and love for

MISS FLORENCE L. RICHARDS in appreciation for her help and guidance in the teaching of literature and for her part in making the social life of this school the fine thing it is.



The FOREWORD MANY persons confuse change with progress. They hail each innovation as a vast improvement. We learn from history that many styles, changes in policy and philosophy or new techniques of performing various operations, while regarded highly by contemporaries, are today looked upon as steps in a retrogression. Of another thing we are certain: to be static is to retrogress. There is no such thing as "staying put". Persons who become convinced that whatever is, is right and pattern their behavior after that maxim soon find themselves antiquated . The only course, then, for the intelligent man is to study continually the work he is doing and make changes, not for the sake of novelty, but because he thinks such changes are for the better. In the matter of building a yearbook, changes are often made for the purpose of making the book different from books of other years. We must confess that that motive affected us too, but, on the whole, we have tired to achieve higher quality rather than mere novelty .

CONTENTS COLLEGE PEOPLE COLLEGE ACTIVITY

.

COLLEGE SPORT COLLEGE FUN

- - -- - - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - -


A

"That best portion of a good man's life, His little nameless, unremembered acts Of kindness and of love -

" WoRDswoRTH.


.FAREWELL

IT IS with a spirit of sadness in all of us that we leave this college after our few years here . Our grief is tempered by the opportunities we have of coming back occasionally and finding '·the same old school''. These homecomings help to renew friendships and revive the joys and pathos of school days. We will miss, when we return, and students still here will miss, the person of

WILLIAM H. MUNSON who leaves us this year. His absence will be like the removal of a landmark from a familiar landscape, which by its very absence reminds us the more of it. In the same way, while we miss Mr. Munson, we will recall that he was ever a friend to all, and was the philosopher and sage of this little community.



on the shore, And the ·individual withers, and the world is more and more. TENNYSON.


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0 youth whose ho:pe is high Who dost to Truth aspire, Whether thou live otJ die, 0 look not back nor tire. BRIDGES .


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COLLEGE PEOPLE Who loves not knowledge? Who shall rail Against her beauty? May she mix With men and prosper.' Who shall fix Her pillars? Let her work prevail. TENNYSON.


PRESIDENT GUY E. MAXWELL A. B. Hamline University A. M. Columbia Teachers College Ped. D. (Hon.) Miami University Ped. D. (Hon.) Hamline University

Faculty

F

ACULTY meetings afford an opportunity for the instructors of the college to come together for work and social times and to become better acquainted with one another outside their contacts while teaching.

At each of the study meetings held this year a member of the faculty or a guest speaker gave a talk on some subject of interest to the group. Following the talks tea was served. Mr. MacDonald spoke at the first meeting on some inter-

Seated- William H. Munson, Florence Richards, Arthur T. French, Mildred L. Engstrom, Minnie Zimmerman, Etta 0. Christensen. Standing- Gl endon E. Galligan, William A. Owens, Janet Rohweder, _Willis E. Boots, Erwin S. Selle, Mildred Bartsch, Robert R. Reed.

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Statttl - Jean Talbot, Ella Murphy , Margaret B. M iller, Dorothy Clark, Helen A. Pendergast, Stanley J. Pawelek, Frederick A. Jederman, Jean Brady Jones, Agnes Bard . Standint,- Ray J. Scarborough, Roy B. Tozier, Manley E. MacDonald, Nels M innc, Walter Grimm, Roland Torgerson.

esting phases of vocational guidance. The next time the faculty met Miss Dallman talked on New College. Mr. Scarborough at the following meeting presented some of the highlights of the trip he took around the world last summer. Halverson, who was guest speaker at the fourth meeting, showed the need for building a new culture for the Northwest . While Dr. Alexander of New Col-

lege, Columbia University was in Winona he spoke to the faculty concerning the educational experiment being carried on at his school. The social meetings have been an enjoyable part of the school year for the faculty. In October a party was held at Riverdale: the faculty enjoyed golf before dinner and dancing after the meal. At the home of Mr. Grjmm an evening

FRANK A. SHEEHAN Resident Director

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Louise C. Sutherland, Charles L. Simmers, Cathryn Cramer, Ella C. Clark, Martha E. Dallmann, Leslie Gage. Standing- Elizabeth McDowell, Maurine Scovell, Marion Da"·is, Bertha Schwablc, Glenn E. Fishbaughcr, Beulah Brunner, JeanS. Brouillette, Valera Jeffrey, Florctta Murray, Opal L. Foster. Seated -

get-together in February was enjoyed by listening to phonograph records. Another happy social event was a Valentine party held in the clubroom

on February 15. After eating a delicious turkey dinner members of the faculty spent the remainder of the evening playing games and cards.

Violet Kochcndocrfcr, Helen Pritchard, Rosalie Voelker, Ann Sielaff

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The

Faculty

TEACHER TRAINING BERTHA B. SCHWABLE KINDERGARTEN SUPERVISOR, PHELPS

SCHOOL

BEULAH BRUNNER SUPERVISOR,

MAURINE B. SCOVELL

PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH

SCHOOL

B.S. Teachers College Columbia University

Ped. B. Warrensburg State Teachers College A. M. Ohio State University

PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

B. S. Kansas State Teachers College A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University

LOUISE C. SUTHERLAND KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION

B.S. Teacher College, Columbia University A.M. Teachers College, Columbia University

GLENN E. FISHBAUGHER PHELPS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

INTERMEDIATE RURAL EDUCATION

B.E. Winona Teachers College A.M. University of Minnesota

A. B. Goucher College A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University

MARTHA DALLMANN

MILDRED BARTSCH

GRADES,

PHELPS

SCHOOL

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M. University of Minnesota CATHRYN CRAMER

LESLIE GAGE

ELIZABETH McDOWELL KINDERGARTEN SUPERVISOR

A. B. Cornell College

INTERMEDIATE

GRADES,

PHELPS

VALETA JEFFREY MUSIC PHELPS SCHOOL

B. Mus. Ed. Northwestern University M. M. Northwestern University

SCHOOL

PRIMARY SUPERVISOR, PHELPS

A. B. Iowa State Teachers College

SCHOOL

B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University

MARION F. DAVIS FRENCH

ELLA C. CLARK SUPERVISOR, INTERMEDIATE G_RADES

ETTA 0. CHRISTENSEN RURAL EDUCATION

B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University

A. B. College of St. Teresa

PHELPS SCHOOL

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M . University of Minnesota

FLORETTA MURRAY ART, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

JEANNE S. BROUILLETTE PRIMARY GRADES, PHELPS SCHOOL

B. E. Winona State Teachers College

B. S. University of Minnesota CHARLES L. SIMMERS FLORENCE A. KROEGER

DIRECTOR, PHELPS SCHOOL

A. B. Iowa State University A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University

LAURA OPAL FOSTER

HOME ECONOMICS

PRIMARY GRADES, PHELPS SCHOOL

B. S. Iowa State Teachers College

B. S. Teachers College, Columbia University

SOCIAL SCIENCE WILLIAM A. OWENS

FREDERICK A. JEDERMAN

ERWIN S. SELLE

PSYCHOLOGY

SOCIOLOGY AND GOVERNMENT

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

B. S. University of Chicago A. M. University of Chicago

A. B. Washburn College A. M. Columbia University Ph. D. Columbia University

A. B. University of Nebraska A. M. University of Nebraska

ROY B. TOZIER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SOCIAL

SCIENCES

A. B. Park College A. M. University of Illinois Ph. D. University of Iowa

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION ROLAND M. TORGERSON

STANLEY J . PAWELEK

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INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M. University of Minnesota

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M. University of Minnesota

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SCIENCE MANLEY E. M AcDONALD

WILLIAM H. MUNSON BIOLOGY AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE

DEAN OF MEN,

B. S. Olivet College

PLACEMENT,

NELS MINNE CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

AND

A. B. Saint Olaf College M. S. University of Wisconsin Ph. D. University of Wisconsin

GUIDANCE

A. B. Greenville College A. M. University of Michigan ARTHUR T. FRENCH

RAY

J.

SCARBOROUGH

GEOGRAPHY

MATHEMATICS

B. S. Harvard University A. M. Columbia University

A. B. University of Nebraska A. M. University of Nebraska

ENGLISH AND LITERATURE FLORENCE L. RICHARDS

WILLIS E. BOOTS

ELLA MURPHY

DEAN OF WOMEN, ENGLISH

ENGLISH AND PSYCHOLOGY

ENGLISH

Ph. B. University of Michigan A. M. University of Michigan

B. S. North Dakota Agricultural College A. M. University of Wisconsin

A. B. Smith College A. M . University of Wisconsin Ph. D. University of Iowa

ROBERT R. REED

JEAN BRADY JONES

ENGLISH

READING AND SPEECH

A. B. University of Minnesota A. M. Columbia University

A. B. Huron College A. M. Boston University Ph. D. University of Iowa

FINE ARTS DOROTHY CLARK

WALTER GRIMM

AGNES BARD

MUSIC

FINE ART

PIANO

B. S. Terre Haute State Teachers College

B. S. Central Missouri State Teachers College A. B. Central Missouri State Teachers College

B. E. Winona State Teachers College

JANET ROHWEDER VOICE AND- APOLLO

Winona State Teachers College B. S. University of Minnesota

PHYSICAL EDUCATION GLENDON E. GALLIGAN

HELEN A. PENDERGAST

JEAN TALBOT

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

B.S. University of Washington M. A. Teachers College, Columbia University

B. S. George Peabody College A. M. New York University

A. B. University of Wisconsin A. M. New York University

BUSINESS MABEL L. MARVIN

OFFICE ASSIST ANT

ROSALIE VOELKER

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COLLEGE NURSE

VIOLET KOCHENDOERFER

ACCOUNTANT

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MARGARET B. MILLER, R.N .

ANN A SIELAFF

PHELPS SCHOOL OFFICE ASSIST ANT

OFFICE ASSISTANT

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SENIOR CLASS

"Over, the four long years.' And now there rings One voice of freedom and regret.' Farewell.' Now old remembrance sorrows, and now sings But song from sorrow, now, I cannot tell. LIONEL JoHNSON.

One of the most joyous events in the life of the college senior is his graduation. But there is mingled with that joy of commencement a tinge of regret at leaving the friends and teachers after four years of living and working together.

E. F. C. C.

EVELYN BENNETT.

. . Winona

W. Bigelow A. Blcxrud

J.

SOCIAL SCIENCE, SCIENCE

International Relations Club 3. 4; Apollo Club 4; Football3; "W" Club 3, 4.

WILLARD BIGELOW ... Winona INDUSTRIAL ARTS

Industrial Arts CluD; Wenonah Staff 4.

JOHN BUCHOLTZ . . ... Minnesota City INDUSTRIAL ARTS, SCIENCE

Industrial Arts Club 1, 2; Newman Club 3, 4; Wenonah Players 4; Art Club 4; Die-No-Mo 4.

CELESTE BURKE.

.Winona

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE,

MONA BIGHAM ........ Winona

MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

SCIENCE, ENGLISH

EDUCATION, GEOGRAPHY

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

French Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Mason Music Club 4.

FRANK BLATNIK ..... Chisholm SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

Apollo Club 2; International Relations 3, 4; Arrowhead Range Club 2, 3, 4; Intra-mural Sports 2, 3, 4; Senior Class President; Representative Council4; Finance Committee 2; Wenonah 3, 4; Winonan 2, 3, 4; Lectures, Plays, Recitals Committee.

AGNES BLEXRUD .. Spring Grove EDUCATION, ENGLISH

Primary Club 1, 2, 3, 4; League of Women Voters

4.

T

CHRISTINE BREYER. . ..... Arcadia, Wis.

M. Bigham H. Brarulich Bucholrz E. Docken

J.

Brown

E. Christenson

HENRY BRATULICH .... Eveleth

HISTORY, ENGLISH, GEOGRAPHY

Junior High School Club; W.A.A.

Bennett Bla.tnik Breyer Burke

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Junior High School Club 1, 2, 3; Art Club 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 2, 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Wenonah 2, 3, 4; Winonan 1, 2, 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Physical Educarion Club 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; League of Women Voters 2, 3, 4.

JANET BROWN ........ Winona

ELFIE CHRISTENSON .. Red Wing SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Representative Council 4; Junior High School Club 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 4; Secretary 4; Y.W.C.A. 2, 3; Morey Hall President 4.

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

EVANGELINE DOCKEN.Willmar

Lecture, Plays, Recitals, 1, 3; Masque Committee 3; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Junior High School Club 1, 2; Representative Council 3; Winonan 4; Wenonah 4.

Winonan 1, 2, 3; Wenonah 2;Junior High School Club 1, 2, 3; Arr Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; League of Women Voters 2.

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SENIOR CLASS

Somehow it seems that the niche vacated by the graduating class cannot again be filled. Others may step up to assume the responsibilities which the seniors leave, but their personalities cannot be duplicated. Like the runners of the relay they pass on a baton to those who follow to grasp and carry on toward higher aims and accomplishments. Those who have served faithfully while in college live on through the achievements they have attained there. Seeds of the worthwhile projects they have planted will in time bear fruit.

HAROLD EDSTROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WorthingtOn

LOUIS HOOVER. . .

. ... Winona

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE,

JOHN KOZLOWSKI . ... . ....... . Milwaukee, Wis.

MUSIC, HISTORY

ENGLISH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

MATHEMATICS,HISTORY ,SOCIAL SCIENCE

Band Director 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary of Freshman Class; Apollo Club 1, 2; Chorus 1, 2; Die-No-Mo 1, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-MoShow 2, 3.

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4;Junior High Club I, 2; Wenonah Staff 2, 3, 4; Winonan Staff 1, 2, 3, 4.

CAROLEEN GOETTING .. . . Rochester

EUGENE JASPERS .. . .. Shakopee

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Football I, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 3, 4; Preceptor West Lodge 4; Assembly and Commencement Committee 4; Intra-mural Sports 1, 3, 4; "W" Club I, 2, 3, 4 .

ENGLISH, GEOGRAPHY,

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

MARTIN LAAKSO ... . ... Gilbert

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Freshman Class vice-president; Apollo Club 1; College Choir I; A Cappella Choir 2; Newman Club I, 2, }, 4; Football!, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club; Basketball 2, 3; Wenonah Players 4; Athletic Committee 3.

Art Club 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; "W" Club 3, 4; Winonan 4; Junior High Club 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4; Purple Key 3, 4.

International Relations Club 4; Winonan Staff 1, 2, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4;Junior High School Club I, 2, 3.

RUTH HARDT.

. ..... Lewiston

SCIENCE, ENGLISH

T

R. Hardt E. Jaspers J. Kozlowski H. Miles

C. Goetting L. Hoover G. Kabat M. Laakso

H. Edstrom E. Heimer A. Johnson L. McCown

ANNE MARIE JOHNSON. . . . .. CokatO

SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE

LUTHER McCOWN.

. . Winona

HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

Winonan 1, 2. 3; EditOr-in-Chid 4; Wenonah Staff 3. 4; Junior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Interna· tiona! Relations Club 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Senior Class Secretary; Purple Key 4.

League of Women Voters 3, 4; Junior High Club 3, 4; Country Life Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 3, 4.

EVANGELINE HEIMER. . . . . . . . . . . . Stacyville, Iowa

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 1, 2, 3, 4;Junior Class President 3; Die-No-Mo 2, 3. 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Board 2, 3 .

GEORGE KABAT ........ Winona

HAROLD MILES.

ENGLISH, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

MUSIC, INDUSTRIAL ARTS

Newman Club 2, }; Junior High School Club 2, 3; Girls Physical Education Club 1.

International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Mgr. Football and Basketball I.

Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Club 2, 3; Chorus 2, 3, 4; Mens Club; Mason Music Club 1, 2, 3. 4.

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SENIOR CLASS

With Frank Blatnik at the helm during the past year the class of '36 is completing the course on which it set sail four years ago. For the most part during the voyage the storms have been mild and few, with clear sailing toward the definite port in view. Assisting Frank have been William Thompson, vice president; Ruth Hardt, secretary; Cy Syverson, treasurer, and Elfie Christenson, council representative. And now, the voyage, as all good things, must end.

A. Muench R. Richards 0. Sanden C. Shira

ARTHUR MUENCH .Mountain Iron

J. O'Gara H. Roth A. Schneider E. Shirven

HAROLD ROTH .. ...... . Winona

HILBERT SENS ..... Rollingstone

HISTORY, SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS, HISTORY,

Arrowhead Range Club; Intramural Sports; "W" Club.

Football!, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports; Wenonah Players; Junior High School Club; International Relations Club.

International Relations Club, President 4; Men's Club.

THEODORE ROTHWELL. Winona

CHARLOTTE SHIRA .... . Winona

JAMES O'GARA .. Rice Lake, Wis. HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Industrial Arts Club 1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Dic·No-Mo 3, 4; Social Committee 3.

ALAN PAWELEK ... Thorpe, Wis. INDUSTRIAL ARTS,

Industrial Arts Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Board 2; Basketball 2; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir 2; "W" Club 2, 3, 4.

RUTH RICHARDS.

. . Rushford

ENGLISH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Primary Club 2;Junior High Club 3, 4; Sophomore Class Vice President 2; W.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Board 4; Shepard H:dl President 3; Physical Education Club 3, 4.

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SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

HISTORY, MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH

SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

Apollo Club 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Bask-etball 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4;

Primary Club 1; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Junior High School Club 3, 4; Intramural Sports 4.

ELIZABETH SHIRVEN . Rushford

MATHEMATICS, HISTORY

T

A. Pawelek T. Rothwell H. Sens D. Simon

OLAF SANDEN ......... Houston HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE, MUSIC

Junior High School Club 1, 2; Band 2, 3, 4; Men 's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Spotts 1, 2, 3, 4; DieNo-Ma 3, 4; Apollo Club 3, 4.

ALTON SCHNEIDER ..... Winona

DELOS SIMON .......... Winona PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY,

INDUSTRIAL ARTS,

SOCIAL SCIENCE

FINE ARTS, SCIENCE

Football I, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club I, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Tncramural Board 3, 4; Tracie 3; GolfTeaml, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo Show 3; Men's Club.

Men's Club I, 2, 3, 4; Att Club 3, 4;Junior High Club 1, 2; Industrial Arts Club 1, 2; Prom Committee 2; Wenonah 3, 4; Die-No-Mo Show 2.

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EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

Kappa Delta Pi, Secretary 3, 4; Mendelssohn, Secretary 3, 4; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Key 3, 4; Intermed iate Grade Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Internat ional Relations Club 2, 3, 4; B:tnd 1.

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SENIOR CLASS

Soon this group of seniors will embark on another voyage - much longer and much more serious than the one just being completed. Their preparation thus far should be ample to assure them of successful sailing throughout life. With the M. Snyder M. Southworth E. Steffes chart of knowledge and the W. Thompson D. Zimmerhakl M. Zorrcau compass of character as guides, the trip will surely be a happy one. As we stand by, watching and encouraging those who are about to leave us, we ratse our vo1ces to wish them, "Bon Voyage"! MARTHA SNYDER.

.Winona

HISTORY, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Junior High School Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mason Music Club 4; Winonan Staff 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 3, 4; Junior Class Secretary 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2,

ESTHER STEFFES.

.Winona

HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

HISTORY,

3, 4; Die-No-Mo Show 2.

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Junior High Club 3, 4; Mason Music 3, 4; Winonan 1, 2, 3, 4; Wenonah 3, 4; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. I, 2; Senior Pin Committee.

MARGARET SOUTHWORTH .. ........ Glencoe

WILLIAM THOMPSON. Wabasha HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

EDUCATION, ENGLISH,

SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCIAL SCIENCE, MUSIC

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 2, 3, 4; Mason Music I; International Relations 3, 4; Track I, 2, 3; Wenonah 3, 4; Winonan 3, 4; Senior Class vice-president; A

Kindergarten Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, 4; Mendelssohn 3, 4; Dic-No-Mo 4; Winonan 2; Wenonah 4; Chorus 3, 4; Class Play 2; Gua rd Member Wenonah Pla ye rs .

DONALD ZIMMERHAKL .. . ........ ... .. ... . Caledonia

Cappella Choir 2.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

ART

Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, 4; A Cappella Choir 2; Orchestra 1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Club 4; "W" Club; Dic-No-Mo Club.

MARION ZORTEAU . . Pine Island MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Junior High School Club

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2; W.A.A. I, 2;

Wenonah 2; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Preceptress of Morey Ha114 .

Seniors Whose Pictures Do Not Appear JANET BIERCE ..

. .. Winona

LEWIS DOWNING . ... St. Charles

Purple Key 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Mendelssohn

Junior High School Club; International Relations Club.

RAYMOND DUNN .... . . Winona

STANLEY WEINBERGER. . ......... Winona

ENGLISH, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

PRIMARY EDUCATION, MUSIC, ENGLISH

CLARICE DORMADY ... Winona FINE ARTS

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HISTORY

Wenonah Players, President 4; Intramural Sports,

Mendelssohn Club I, 2, 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. I, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Primary Club 3, 4; Mason Music Club 4.

. . Ormsby

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

A Capella Choir 3; Wenonah Players 4.

Club.

MONDA BERKHOLZ. . .. . .. Pine Island

CY SYVERSON.

MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE

ENGLISH, FRENCH, LATIN, MUSIC

HARRY McGRATH .... . . Kellogg SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Junior High School Club 1, 2, 3; Wenonah Players 4; International Relations Club 4; Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winonan

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EDUCATION, ENGLISH

Kindergarten Club 3, 4; International Relations

Club 3, 4.

Staff 4; Die-No-Ma 2, 3, 4.

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LAURA WILKINSON . . White Bear Lake

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Front Row- F. Schultz, D. Mallory, F. Miller, I. Johnson, J. Wachs, G. Ames, D. Westfall, W. Franzmann, L. Ross. Second Row- H. Krage, J. Gehrlich, U. Freyer, R. Thurley, R. Small, I. Pyknen, E. Kreutz, A. Buck, H. Uggen. Third Row - E. Haack, F. Gislason, A. Wilson, M. Birkholz, U. Costello, M. Berven, V. Lumovitch, H. Marek, M. Buchler. Fourth Row- 0. Johnson, H. Higgins, 0. Thomas, F. Nelson, E. Gibbons, M. Peterson, S. Niskanen. Back Row - E. Finkelnburg, P. La Due, B. Failing, J. MacDonald, E. Cohen, R. PrenriS, M. Clarke, A. Hill, B. Steffes, G. Losinski, C. Wekh.

The Junior

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HE Junior class this year is smaller than was anticipated due to the fact that many sophomores who would have returned had they not found work were fortunate in finding teaching positions. However, the size of this class shows that there is greater interest being shown in the four year course than has been formerly. Students are realizing the value of increased training in preparation for the teaching profession. At Homecoming the Junior class cooperated with the college to make the event a success. No other accomplishments of any note have been made by the class as a group. In scholarship, character, and extra-curricular activities in the college there are individuals in this class who are leaders. Dorothy Westfall, a member of the

Class

class was elected by the college to be its representative at the National Student Federation of America at its annual convention last December. In the fields of drama, newspaper, music, and sports are found Juniors who are ably supporting and helping to head the clubs which are engaged in the activltles. A favorable representation of Juniors have made the honor roll every quarter and five of the eight newly elected members of Kappa Delta Pi this year belong to the class. The Junior class has been headed this year by John Wachs, president; Dorothy Westfall, vice-president; Isabel Johnson, secretary-treasurer; Glenna Ames, representative council. Dr. Murphy is adviser for the class .

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Junior Class

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AMES, GLENNA

LADUE, PHYLLIS

BERVEN,11ARGARET

LINDBLOOM, jENNY

BIXBY, WILLIAM

LosiNSKI, GLADYS

BucK, ANNA jANE

LuMOVICH, VuKOSAVA

BuEHLER, 11ARGARET

LYNNE, WALTER

CHASE, HoRACE

11ACDONALD, JuNE

CLARKE, 11ARION

11ALLORY, DoROTHY

CoHEN, Enw ARD

11AREK, HELEN

CosTELLO, URsULA

11EAD, ELIZABETH

EnsTROM, EvERETT

11ILLER, FRANCIS

ENGSTROM, GEORGE

NELSON, FREDERICK

FAILING, BETTY JANE

NISKANEN, SAIMA

FINKELNBURG, ELSIE

PETERSEN, 11YLES

FRANZMANN, WILLIAM

PRENTIS, RoY

FREYER, UNITA

PYKNEN, IRMA

GARLOUGH, 11ARY

REDEPENNING, EwALD

GEHRLICH, JuANITA

RmEouT, 11Rs. 11ARGUERITE

GIBBONS, EMMETT

Ross, LOis

GISLASON, FREDRIK

ScHULTZ, FRANCEs

GISLASON, VICTOR

SMALL, RoBERT

GRIESE, RoY

STEFFES, BERNADETTE

HAACK, ERNST

THOMAS, ORVILLE

HARTIG, BETH

THuRLEY, RoBERT

HIGGINS, HAROLD

UGGEN, HAZEL

HovnA, 11ABEL

WAcHs, JoHN

JoHNSON, IsABEL

WEsTFALL, DoROTHY

joHNSON, ORLAND

WILSON, ARTHUR

KRAGE, HARRIET

YATES, 11ILLICENT

KREUTZ, ETHEL

YATES, VIVIAN

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SOPHOMORE CLASS

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HE graduating sophomore class has its luminous bodies, too, all of whom are enthusiastic about diffusing more light throughout this world, which is not at the present such a bright old place. It is indeed probable that the "status quo" will soar to incredible heights (or plunge to unbelievable depths) after they get an opportunity to propagate their teachings and philosophies. Like any other subnormal group, it has its lovers - few Romeos but a great many Juliets, its profound thinkers and those who are just profound, and those other types which space, fortunately, forbids us to mention. With this as your background we'll begin the task of presenting the sophomore "Who's Who". It is the spelling of Mildred Amley's last name that gives her the coveted honor of first place in talking about this celebrated group. Miss Amley, although a most ardent Juliet in the eyes of one of our senior boys, bids fair to become a promising school rna' am. Mary Garlough, the gallant

P.Abel

E. L. C. E.

E. Anderson E. Bornflcth

E. Cook

PAULINE ABEL ......... Winona

LIGUORI BARRY ...... Lake City

INTERMEDIATE

PRIMARY

Intermediate Grade Club 1, 2; Mason Music Club 2; Y.W.C.A. I, 2.

Primary Club 1, 2; Dic-No-Mo Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1; Womcns' Athletic Board 2.

EVELYN ALBERS ..... Lake City

ELNORA BERG ....... Zumbrota

UPPER GRADES

Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Junior High Club 1, 2; Incernational Relations Club 2; Wenonah Staff 2; W inonan Staff 2.

UPPER GRADES .AND RURAL

Y.W.C.A.. 1, President 2; Junior High Club 1,2.

Albers Barry

E. Berg

Burton

L. Clurn

Corell

S. Eggcrichs

M. Amlcy

LORRY CLUM.

.. Stillwater

RURAL Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; League of Women Voters 1; Junior High Club 1, 2; \V.A.A .

EVELYN COOK.

. . St. Charles

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 2.

ETHEL BORNFLETH .Stewartville RURAL

MILDRED AMLEY .New Richland

Country Life Club 1, 2.

ERMA CORELL .... Spring Valley

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Art Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Winonan Staff 2; Wenonah Staff 2.

UPPER GRADES

CAROL BURTON ....... Virginia INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

EDITH ANDERSON ...... St. Paul PRIMARY

Primary Club; Country Life Club; Mendelssohn.

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Intermedi:a.te Club 1, 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2; Guard Member 2; International Relations Club 2; Country Life Club 2; Arrowhead Range 1, 2; Secretary of Morey Hall 1; Social Chairman of Morey Hall2; Y.W.C.A..

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SABINA EGGERICHS .. .Spring Valley INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2; Intermediate Club 2.

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SOPHOMORE CLASS

M . .Garlougb H. Gstaldcr M. Hcascr D. Hudrlik

M. Foss A. Graf L. Harrison A. Holst

I. Eklof ]. Gehrlich A. Gunderson E. Highum

. Cokato

INEZ EKLOF.

ANNETIE GRAF .

MURIEL FOSS.

. .. Houston

UPPER GRADES AND RURAL

MARION HEASER .. . . .... Altura INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Newman Club I, 2.

HELEN GSTALDER. .

. Hokah

Intermediate Club 1, 2.

EULAH HIGHUM .. ... . Ostrander PRIMARY

Wenonah Players 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Winonan Staff 1; Country Life Club 1; Y.W.C.A. I; W.A.A. I.

INTERMEDIATE

MARY GARLOUGH. Minneapolis

ADELAIDE GUDERSON . . Montevideo

AMY HOLST ..

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Kindergarten 1, 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2.

Art Club 2; Mason Music Club 2; Primary Club 2; Kindergarten Club 2.

Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Country Life Club 2.

JUANITA GEHRLICH ... Fountain City, Wis. UPPER GRADES

Mason Music Club 2, 3; Junior High School Club 3; Winonan Staff 3.

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.. Caledonia

INTERMEDIATE

INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Club 1, 2; Art Club 2.

impersonator of Garbo and Arliss, says farewell to the two-year course. Will she be Marie Dressler's successor? Possibly someone can succeed the vivacious Mary Van Campen as cheer-leader, but discovering someone to fill her shoes as a dancer will not be a simple job. A certain prepossessing young man will have no pretty Liguori Barry to gaze at if she doesn't return to Alma Mater. Without a doubt Miss Barry in her role of a primary teacher will give the little ones a lofty start on the great highway of lik. . No one fears that Eulah Highum will not be a joyous addition to the teaching profession. Leave it to Miss Highum to maintain the standards. Lou Ella Peterson and Ruth Wooley have several things in common, one of which is their mirror-like brown eyes . No few boys have fallen victims of such orbs as tliose. Pauline Abel, through her very christening, is surely to be a tremendous success.

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Pri mary Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; League of Women Voters l.

LORENA HARRISON .Alma, Wis. PRIMARY AND RURAL

Act Club 2; Y.W .C. A. 2.

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RURAL

DOROTHY HUDRLIK. Owatonna INTERMEDIATE

Collntry Life Club 2; Intermediate Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Winonan Staff 2; Orchestra 2.

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SOPHOMORE CLASS Could we compose a poem to the magnetic Carol Burton, we would. Her charm coupled with her intelligence should make even the most backward child learn with appalling rapidity. The demure Florence Orke is representative of a number of the group. Modesty has its merits, too. Miss Gertrude Pugh should make her mark in the world of art. A really good student and most affable girl is Margaret Springer. Margaret will most assuredly find her place in the world. Red-headed Rose Wolfe is just like her hair - flashy and full of fire. No one ever described Miss Wolfe as a reserved, shy girl. Nor can it be said that she has ever found herself handicapped by a lack of words when wishing to express herself. Evelyn Albers, the brighthaired Alma Mater queen of the unforgettable seventy-fifth anniversary, can rely upon her own ability. Serious, yet not at all sullen, she will not dis-

M. Jacobsen .B. Kaiser

C. Larson

M. McNallan

MARIAN JACOBSEN .... St. Paul

VEARL KENNEDY ...... Adams

RURAL

INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2; President 1.

ARDYS JENSEN .... Clarks Grove UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 2.

BEVERLY JOHNSON .. Zumbrota UPPER GRADES

Junioc High Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 2.

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Club 2.

MARIE KIRKWOOD ....... Eyota PRIMARY

Primary Club 2; Mendelssohn Club 2; Kindergarten Club 2; Winonan 2.

ELDA KORN.

B. Johnson M. Kirkwood E. Long M. McHugh

A. Jensen

V. Kennedy

E. Korn L. Magnussen

EVA LONG.

.... Eveleth

RURAL Country Life Club; Arrowhead Range Club.

LORRAINE MAGNUSSEN. ..................... Red Wing UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 1, 2; Dic-No-Mo Club 2; W.A.A.l,2 .

. Lewiston

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

MARGARET MeN ALLAN. . . Kellogg

Kindergarten Club 1, 2.

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

CARROL LARSON ........ Mabel BERNICE KAISER.

. . Red Wing

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 1, 2.

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Newman Club 1, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2.

RURAL

Art Club 2; Country Life Club 1; Vice -President 2;Junior High Club 2; Incr:unural Basketball and Volleyball 1, 2; Track 2; Prom Committee 2.

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MORRO McHUGH .... Minneiska UPPER GRADES AND RURAL

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SOPHOMORE CLASS

M. McDonough I. O'Connors M. Olstad D. Pittclko

L. Nelson H. Oistad F. Orke G. Pugh

MARGARET McDONOUGH . ................ Kellogg INTERMEDIATE

Newman Club; Band .

appoint any school system fortunate enough to get her. We hope that in the future Elnora Berg will retain plenty of zim, zigor, and zitality. We do not fear that Erma Corell will not be a successful teacher. Just her picture convinces us that she'll put her heart and soul into her teaching work. Ardys Jenson, a one-hundred per cent teacher, won't shirk her teaching duties. When thinking of her behavior at T . C., even the word "shirking" is quite unbecoming to her. Cute girls, too, can make good teachers. Lorraine Magnussen gives sufficient evidence of that . It is extremely convenient for us to find these two names next and in consecutive order - Merle Ohlsen and Helen Oistad. These two people are seemingly much engrossed in the affairs of each other, which goes to show that the school teacher "falls" under appropriate conditions. I dare say though ( to redeem myself) that there is an adequate supply of

A. Norcon S. Olness L. Peterson ]. R<tSI11USSefl

HELEN OlSTAD.

. . Harmony

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club I; Mason Music Club I , 2.

LOU ELLA PETERSON . ........ . ..... . .. Lake City PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2; D1c-No-Mo Club 2.

LAURA NELSON ...... Rochester

SYLVIA OLNESS .

. . .. Peterson

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

INTERMEDIATE

BERNICE PITTELKO .... Winona

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; Winonan Staff 2.

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Councry Life Club 2.

Country Life Club; Intermediate Club; W.A.A.

MARTHA OLSTAD .

GERTRUDE PUGH ...... Winona

ALICE NORTON .... . . Albert Lea KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Winonan Staff 2.

INEZ O'CONNOR$ . .. . Plainview PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2; Winonan Staff 1, 2; Wenonah Staff 2.

. .Rushford

INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1.

Art Club 1, 2; Intermediate Club 1, 2.

FLORENCE ORKE.

JANE RASMUSSEN

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 1, 2.

. ... LeRoy

RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

.. Winona


SOPHOMORE CLASS intelligence to counter-balance the emotion involved in this case. Del Roche is one boy who can be proud of not living up to his name. We can boast that Lawrence Riley is really one among us who is serious for sure. Sylvia Wegner, a superb songster, is among this motley crowd. In tickling the piano she is one of our best. In the animated Lorry Clum we find the laughter of the world. Moreover it is that contagious kind, which makes victims of all in Lorry's presence. The classroom in which Miss Clum imparts her wisdom will not be a gloomy one. A conscientious young man is this Carroll Larson. You see we are not altogether bereft of the sane and sensible sort. Last, but not least, is Mabel Ree who is both cunning and cute. In her are combined several very desirable characteristics. She has cast her lot in the field of rural teaching and is, indeed, an assiduous and hardworking lass.

M. Rcc L . Ross G. Schliep E. Storlie

D. Richter M. Sandre M. Scholl meier H. Utzinger

MABLE REE ... . .. . .. . Zumbrota

MARIE SANDTE .. ... Stewartville

RURAL

INTERMEDIATE AND RUR AL

Physical Ed. Club; Die~No-Mo 1, 2; Country Life Club l, 2.

Country Life Club 1; Intermediate Club 1, 2.

DOROTHY RICHTER ... Lewiston

LUCILLE SANNES ...... Houston

Country Life Club 2; Intermediate Club 2; Mendelssohn Club 1, 2.

DELBERT ROCHE .... . . Harmony UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; International Relations Club 2; Wenonah Staff 2.

LOIS ROSS .......... . ... Winona KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1; Country Life Club 3; Wenonah Staff 3.

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MARY VAN CAMPEN .Rochester KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Mendelssohn 1, 2; Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Die-No-Mo Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1; Chorus 1, 2; Cheer Leader 1, 2.

ELEANOR STORLIE . . .. . Winona

UPPER GRADES

NITERMEDIATE AND RURAL

D. Roche L . Sannes M. Van Campen M. Springer

Junior H igh Club; Y.W.C.A. l, 2.

UPPER GRADES

Junior High Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1.

GRACE SCHLIEP . .

. . Zumbrota

INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2.

MAE SCHOLLMEIER .. ......... Cochrane, Wis. PRIMARY AND RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2; Primary Club 2.

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HELEN UTZINGER .

. .Racine

INTERMEDIATE

Intermedi ate Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A . 1, 2.

MARGARET SPRINGER . . . ... Millville UPPER GRADES

Country Life Club 1, 2; President 2; Intermediate Club 2; Intramural Volleyball and Basketball.

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SOPHOMORE CLASS

C. Welch

S. Wegner P. Westman

If you have read the foregoing you have a resume of the graduating sophomores of '36; if not, go back and read it. Although you might accuse us of intermingling some fiction with truth, you can rest assured that most of what has been said is authentic. We would have happily commented on each member, but these sophomores are a sensible lot and know that to complete such a work would be an endless task.

H. Welch R. Wooley

R. Wolfe

ROSE WOLFE . . . ........ Kellogg

SYLVIA WEGNER ..... Owatonna

HELEN WELCH .. Waukesha, Wis.

UPPER GRADES

RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Die-No-Mo Club 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2; Orchestra I, 2.

Country Life Club 1, 2; Secretary-Treasurer I; Band.

Y.W.C.A. I; Intermediate Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2.

CLARA WELCH .. Waukesha, Wis. RURAL Country L ife Club 1; Secretary Treasurer 1.

PHYLLIS WESTMAN .. . . Winona KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Y.W.C.A. 1; Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Art Club 2; Mendelssohn Club 2.

RUTH WOOLEY .

. . .. Sr. Paul

PRIMA RY

Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Librarian 2; Mason Music 1; Vice-Presidem 2; Chorus 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, 2; President 2; Primary Club 2.

Sophomores Whose Pictures Do Not Appear . Kasson

VERNA ELLIS.

PAUL MEINKE. . ... Minneapolis

PRIMARY

UPPER GRADES

Primary Club.

Apollo Club 1, 2, 1ibrarian; Chorus 1, 2, librarian; Mason Music Club 1, 2; International Relations Club 1, 2 .

ETTA FARR.

Kindergarten Club· 1, 2; Art Club.

AMILDA THIEDE JOYCE MILNE.

. .. . ... Preston

Country Life Club.

LOREN WOOD .

UPPER GRADES

Physical Education Club 1, 2; Newman Club; Mendelssohn Club 1, 2; Wenonah 2; W.A.A. 1, 2; Junior High Club 2; Chorus 1, 2; Band 2.

ANNA MULLER.

Spring Grove

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club.

LOUELLA KOHNER ..... Winona

MERLE OHLSEN . . ... St. Charles

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Grade Club.

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. .. St. Charles

PRIMARY

Primary Club.

RURAL

ALYCE HILL ........... Sr. James

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uPPER GRADES, RuRAL

Junior High School Club 2; Newman Club 2.

. . . . Ellendale

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

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LAURENCE RILEY . . . . .. . .... .. . . Zumhro Falls

Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3; Oie-No-Mo 1, 2;Junior High School Club 1, Apollo Cl ub 1.

RUTH ZARLING . ..... Plainview

UPPER GRADES

INTERMEDIATE AND RURAL

Junior High School Club 2; Country Life Ctub 2.

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UPPER GR AD E S

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Freshman

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N THE Fall of 1935, the older students were very interested in the new brand of students known as the genus freshmen. There was a certain amount of conjecture as to how they would react to certain stimuli. For the acquiring of this information, certain experiments were conducted: new students were allowed to sing at social hour, "show off" at football games and carry the books of upper classmen. Also they had their reaction times tested in the matter of promptness in putting their thumbs to the white buttons of their freshman caps. Mr. Owens gave them some bona-fide tests of intelligence, vocabulary and spelling. these tests showed that the new members of the student body had potentialities. Having gone through these ordeals in a creditable manner, the "frosh" began to give good accounts of themselves .

Class

Their first group project was the preparation of a float for the Homecoming Parade. On this the freshies worked hard and earnestly. The next project by the whole group was the presentation of a leap-year party. This party was held on April 25th and was characterized by an unusual arrangement of the gymnasium, colorful lighting and a general spirit of gayety. The freshmen proved themselves generous by inviting all the students of the college and faculty members . All persons attending reported a very good time. Officers for this year were: James Bard, president; Barbara Ronsberg, vice-president; Jean Kalouner, secretary; and Howard Johnson, treasurer. Mr. Jederman was their adviser.

Front Row - P. Johnson, F. Cooper, R. Larson, D. Ebert, M. Graner, A. Christensen, L. Blumcnrricc, W. Appleby, P. Berge ,]. Hagcrrhy. Second Row - M. Faklcr, M. Arnsdorf, B. Lagcson, J. Englund, R. Hamann, A. Bronk , A. Flom, J. Downing, H. Jackson, M. Ivancic, H. Heldt, Third Row - J. J acobs, .B. Fuller, L. Jensen, F. P£eil, C. Jackson, R. Koch, A. Davis, C. Chamberlain, W. Krage, L. Klindworth, .B. Johnson. Fourth Row - W. Duel, G. Kraft, D . Crowl, R. Dunn, C. Fuller, A. Burleigh, A. Hoblitt, L. Thompson, 0. Anfinson , ]. Bard. Back Row - H. Johnson, W. Carlson, J. Decker, R. Brandt, R. Wolfe, H. Grudcm, L. Brown, S. Farmer, K. McClave, R. Donnchowcr, E. Barski.

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Front Row- V. Kurzweg, D. Amdahl, A. Thurow, I. Orr, S. Marrin, R. Koenig, H. V. Smith, B. Ronsberg, R. Micklus, M. Norcon. Second Row- C. Crandall, E. Hartmann, W. Michel, P. Seaton, K. Wood, V. Warber, I. Radlc.e, V. Weber, E. Tufree, P. Logan, M. Boley, A. Newmann, L~.

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Third Row- E. Blessing, B. W:tshburn, L. Morken, M. Hammervold , D. Mann, D. Johnson, L. B:tng, M. Syverson, H. L. Smith, V. Bucher, L. Simons. Fourth Row- E. Wachter, C. Erw in, J. Marx, M. Engstrom,). Kalouner, E. Winters, C. Newmann, J. Weeding, M. King, S. Palmarlee, D. Ruhnaw . Fifth Row - N. Olson, L. Kennebeck,). La Barre, D. Krueger, E. Wildgrube, L. Schaeffer, E. Wing, D. Laudon, R. Rowell, E. Jo hnson, E. Lundgren . Back Row - P. Pfeilsticker, M. Wolvercon, W. Grimm, R. Townsend, E. Waldo, L. Ottman, E. Tompkins, J Marholic, J Smith , G. Lampman, E. Simon.

FRESHMAN CLASS The freshman class made itself known more because of the achievements of its particular members than through group projects. Members of this class have shown their talents and prowess in various lines of endeavor. Quite a number of them have applied themselves to their books and earned honor grades. The results of the intelligence testing gave this class a very high rating so great things can be expected scholastically. Some of the more husky men have exhibited their athletic ability in football and basketball, and bid fair to do well in track. A great many more have participated in the intra-mural program of sports. Athletics have also attracted many of the women who have the opportunity to participate in the splendid

varied program of women's sports. A certain few had the desire to "tread the boards ·' and after going through the Wenonah Players try-outs, attended its initiation banquet, and then settled down to their work as Thespians. Some tried their hand at journalism and helped supply copy for the Winonan. Those who found their interest in art were given opportunities to try out for the Art Club. In this club they found ample opportunity for work at homecoming and the "prom" season. Two members of the debate team are freshmen. The Die-No-Mo Club elected several freshmen because of the promise they show. In almost every activity one finds a good proportion of freshmen. With the progress so far made the group promises to equal or surpass the work of t.he past.

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COLLEGE ACTIVITIES Let us then be up and doing, With a heart for any fate~· Still achieving, still pursuing Learn to labor and to wait. LoNGFELLow.


Representative Council

Sitting- M iss Talbot, ]. Bard , J. Wachs, F. Bl atnik , G. Ames, Mr. Boots, Mr. MacDonald . Standing- E. Chrisccnson, B. Busse, G. Nc::rda hl.

Representative Council

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NE of the most significant student necessary of the joint system, recomorganizations is the Representative mends and advises in all student activiCouncil. To this group is entrusted the ties, receives applications for the organpower by the students to act in their ization of new clubs and recommends behalf regarding the upholding of high suitable action and may serve as board of review in all cases of student affairs. standards in the college . The membership is made up of five · Once each quarter it is the duty of the members chosen from the faculty, the president of the Student Council to make presidents of the four classes, besides a a report to the college association conrepresentative from each of the three cerning its activities during that time. The five faculty members of the counupper classes. This organization is an important cog cil are Misses Richards, Talbot, Messrs . in the machinery of the college . It is Boots, MacDonald, and Simmers . The the agency through which the associa- class presidents who are in the group are tion engages in college activities. Frank Blatnik, seniors; John Wachs, Duties of the council consist of nomi- juniors; Bernard Busse, sophomores, and nating to the association the student Harvey Larson, freshmen . Representamembers of the following joint commit- tives from the three upper classes are tees : athletic, finance, lecture, plays and Elfie Christensen , Genevieve Nerdahl, recitals, social affairs, alumni relations, and Glenna Ames . Officers are Frank assembly and commencement exercises, Blatnik, president; John Wachs, viceand public relations. It is responsible president; and Glenna Ames, secretary. for the supervision and revision when

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Debate

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HE question for debate this year was: "Resolved that the Congress of the United States shall have the power to over-ride the decision of the Supreme Court by a two-thirds majority vote." Although work on debate was begun later than usual, much was accomplished and the members of the team acquired much valuable experience. Dr. Jean Brady Jones began training the debaters in her public speaking class this winter. After an elimination the squad consisted of these seven : Walter Lynne, Frank Blatnik, Francis Miller, Clark Fuller, Frank Harcey, and Paul O'Brien. The official teams consisted of Frank Blatnik and Paul O'Brien, affirmative and Clark Fuller and Frank Harcey, negative . The first combats consisted of intra-school debates between these students themselves. The first debate outside the school

was one with St. Mary's College at Terrace Heights. An affirmative team from the University of Minnesota came to Winona to engage in a non-decision debate. At present there are tentative plans for a return debate with that team. Mankato Teachers College met the debaters of this school in a home-andhome series. In the debates here and at Mankato both schools presented both negative and affirmative teams. All debates were non-decision affairs. There are, at present, plans for debates with the C.C.C. camp of Lewiston, the debate to be held here, and also the Teachers College at La Crosse, Wis. Although the debates were all nondecision contests, the Winona teams compared favorably with all opponents.

Sitting - F. Miller, W. Lynne, F. Harcey, C. Fuller. Standing F. Blatnik P. O'Brien.

The Debate Squad

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Wenonah Staff

Sitting - D . Westfall, R. Hardt, E. Cohen, E. Steffes, R. Small , F. Blatnik, M . Snyder, W. Fr:umrann. Standi11g - E. Albers, D. Roche,J. Brown, M. Southworth, W. Bigelow, C. Breyer , A. Schneider, A. Hiii,J. Quaday , F. Nelson, M. Amlcv. L. Hoover, G. Nerdahl, E. Kreutz, A. J. Buck.

The Wenonah

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EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor ............... . ................... . . . ....... Frederick Nelson Editor-in-Chief .............. . ........ . ...... . . . ....... . ... William Franzmann Associate Editors .... . . . . . .... . ........ . .. . . ... ..... Ruth Hardt, Edward Cohen Literary Editor . . ....... . ............. . .. . ..... . .. . ... . ........... Janet Brown Literary Staff ... . . . .......................... Genevieve Nerdahl, Delbert Roche Art Editor ..................................................... . . Etbel Kreutz Art Staff . .... Gertrude Pugh, Anna Jane. Buck, June Englund, Donald Zimmerhakl Men's Sport Editor ........ . ..... . .. .. .... . ................ . ...... Robert Small Assistant Sport Editor ....... .. ..... . . . ...... . ........ . .... Graydon Lampman Women's Sport Editor ... ...... . . . . .. . ..... . ........ . ............. Esther Steffes Assistant Sport Editor ........ . . . ........ . .......... . .......... Christine Breyer Feature Editor ...... . ... .. ...... ... . .. .. .. ... . .. . .. . ......... Dorothy Westfall Snapshot Editor ...................... . ....................... . Alton Schneider Assistants ........... . . . .. .. . .... ... ... .. Alyce Hill, John Quaday, Horace Chase Picture Editor ........ . . . ........ . ......... . ................... Martha Snyder Assistant .. . ......... . .. . . . ........... . ......... . . . ... . . . .... Willard Bigelow BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ...... . ...... . ....... . . . . ............... . ...... Louis Hoover Assistants ......... . . . .. . ... . .................... Walter Lynne, Mildred Amley Typists ........ . ... . ..... . ............. Inez O'Connors, Jewell Jacobs, Lois Ross FACULTY ADVISERS Miss Dorothy Clark, Mr . Reed, Mr. French

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The Winonan Sta~~ EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor . ... ..... ... ....... ... .. .......... ........ . . . Frederick Nelson Editor-in-Chief .. .. .. .. ......... ... .... . .......................... Ruth Hardt Associate Editor .......................... . ...................... Esther Steffes Assignment Editor .. .... ....... . .... . ........ ... ...... ... ....... . Alice Norton Feature Editor .... . .. .. . ... .. . ........ . ........ .. .......... William Franzmann Feature Writer.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... Frank Blatnik Literary Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... ........ ... ........... Christine Breyer Women's Sports Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... Esther Steffes Men's Sports Editor ...... . ....................................... Robert Small Men's Sports Writers ... ..... .. .... . ......... Graydon Lampman, Bill Thompson News Editor ................................................... Edward Cohen Rewrite Editor ................................................... Janet Brown Music Editor ................................................... Glenna Ames REPORTERS Harriet Krage Eloise Tuftee Deloris Theisen Dorothy Hudrlik

Helen L. Smith Caroleen Goetting Bernadette Steffes

LaVerne Bang Sylvia Martin Helen Marek

BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ............................................... Louis Hoover Business Assistants ............................... Mildred Amley, Laura Nelson TYPISTS Martha Snyder

Waunella Appleby Juanita Gehrlich

Inez 0 'Connors Hazel Uggen

Sitting - L. Bang, E. Cohen, R. Hardt, L. Hoover, ·M. Snyder, E. Steffes, R. Small, F. Blatnik, C. Goetting. Standing- M. Small, F. Nelson,]. Brown, G. Ames, A. Norton, M. Kirkwood, L. Nelson, I. O'Connors, H. Uggen, M. Amley, C. Breyer, B. Steffes, H. Marek, D. Westfall, E. Albers, M. Laakso, H. Smith, W. Franzmann.

Winonan Staff

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Kappa Delta Pi

Seated -E. Sh irven, A. J. Buck,J . Bi erce , R. Hardt, M. Buehl er, D. Wes tfall. V . Gi slason , W. Fran zmann, Mr . Simmers, L. Hoover, F. Ne lson, M . Zortca u, M. Laa kso, A. Pawele k.

Standing -

Kappa Delta Pi

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N 1932 the John Dewey Club was or- nizing outstanding servtce tn the field ganized in the college . The foremost of education . Once annually new members are elected aim of the group was to secure for this school a chapter of the national educa- to the club after careful consideration of tional fraternity, the Kappa Delta Pi. scholarship, character, and ability by Two years later, on February 10, 1934," the members, with the guidance of Mr. the Gamma Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Charles Simmers, the counsellor for the group. Students who were elected this Pi was installed . The Kappa Delta Pi is a nationally year were Ruth Hardt, Dorothy Westfall, known fraternity for those who have a Margaret Buehler, William Franzmann, strong interest in the field of education Frederick Nelson, Victor Gislason, Anna and who show indications that they will Jane Buck, and Christine Breyer. After work to. achieve success in teaching. the initiation ceremony held at Mr. SimMembership in the organization instills mer's home the group went to Louis within one the desire to devote himself Hoover's home for a dinner at which to a higher degree of devotion to social Mr. Manley MacDonald spoke to the service by furthering high intellectual club on an interesting phase of education . At the regular meetings of the Kappa and personal standards during the period of preparation for teaching and by recog- Delta Pi which are held monthly, dis-

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cussions on education are carried on by the members. The officers who are serving for the present year are the following: Louis

Hoover, president; Martin Laakso, vicepresident; Elizabeth Shirven, secretarytreasurer, and Mr. Charles Simmers, counsellor.

The Kappa Delta Pi Emblem

Purple Key

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NE of the highest honors that is bestowed upon students in the college is admittance to the Purple Key. Membership in this organization is based on the promise of unusual service in the field of education as manifested by activities and scholarship. Each year ten students of the college are elected into the society, by the members of Kappa Delta Pi . Their election is determined by their scholarship and participation in at least four elective extra-curricular activities. Character is also taken into consideration. Although most members of Purple Key are upper classmen, students in the

last quarter of their sophomore year are eligible on the same basis as juniors and senwrs. This organization attempts to further among its members a social and professional attitude becoming to teachers . Students elected into the Purple Key this spring are: Janet Bierce, Christine Breyer, Carol Burton, Victor Gislason, Ruth Hardt, Luther McCown, Frederick Nelson, Delbert Roche, Dorothy Westfall, Marion Zorteau . The old members are : Margaret Buehler, Martin Laakso, Anna Jane Buck, Louis Hoover, Elizabeth Shirven, and Marion Mcintire.

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Wenonah Players Sitting- A. J. Buck, J. Downing, P. Seaton, M. Small, M. Southworth, W. Franzmann, C. Burke, Dr. Jones, G. Grimm, B. Kclbercr, B. Lageson, A. Pawelek, J. Wachs, F. Nelson. Sttmding - E. Shirven, M. Foss, P. O'Brien, S. Wegner, W. Lynne, J. McDonald, L.Jensen, C. Breyer,]. Bard, M. Van Campen, M. Laakso,

W. Grimm, K. McClave, J. Bucholtz, H. Rorh, E. Jaspers, L. Wood.

The Wenonah Players

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OR the purpose of promoting drama in the college a Dramatics Club was founded in 1916. Seven years later it assumed the name of Wenonah Players. Since its beginning the club has presented a number of successful plays. To insure that its members have ability and interest in dramatics the Players conduct two try-outs annually- in the fall and in the spring. The number of students who may join this group is limited. Opportunities are provided during the year for the members of the Players to participate in the various phases of stage activity. Play directing is especially encouraged because of its value in teaching. The program this year for the club has included play presentations, play reviews, a make-up demonstration, and a

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talk by Mrs. Milton Spencer on "The New Trend in the Theatre." Social activities of the Players were the fall initiation banquet and the ~pring dinner dance. The outstanding achievements of the club this year were two plays. The first of these was "The Detour" by Owen Davis given under the fine direction of Mrs. Milton Spencer. At Christmas time "The Shepherd Who Stayed Behind" was presented under Dr. Jean Brady Jones' capable direction. These plays showed evidence of hard work and were well received. The officers of the Wenonah Players this year are Frederick Nelson, president; Margaret Southworth, vice-president; Carol Burton, secretary-treasurer; and Dr. Jean Brady Jones, adviser.

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"Th e Detour

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"THE

DETOUR" by Owen Davis was the dramatic presentation of the Wenonah Players this year. Mrs. Milton Spencer, who has produced many successful plays in this community, directed it. The play is a rural folk drama of Maine. Its setting is a farmhouse in which an interesting study of the problems and ambitions of farm people are portrayed. The cast was decidedly convincing in its sympathetic interpretation of the characters. Dominating the play is the terrific struggle on the part of Helen Hardy, the mother, to obtain for her daughter Kate the things she herself had never had. Greatly opposed to Helen's great ambition is Stephen Hardy, her husband, whose dreams extend no farther than his neighbor's ten acre lot. Likewise, there

is resentment on the part of Tom Lane, a young business man of the community who wants to marry Kate. The mother's hopes are finally blasted when Dana LaMont, a visiting artist, pronounces Kate's attempts at painting as "school girl water color pictures." The play ends happily for all but Helen, and even she has hopes for her ·'grandchild to be.·' Helen Hardy was understandingly interpreted by Beverly Lageson. John Bucholtz played Stephen Hardy convincingly. Betty Kelberer and Frederick Nelson enacted the romantic pair, Kate and Tom Lane, with charm. Dara and Dana LaMont, the artist and his wife were Gretchen Grimm and Loren Wood. The remaining members of the cast were Ben, Weinstein, and his helper, played by Kenneth McClave, Paul O'Brien and William Franzmann respectively.

B. Lagcson,J. llucholrz, K. McClave, B. Kclbcrcr, F. Nelson, P. O'Brien , W. Franzmann, G. Grimm, L. Wood.

"The Detour''

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Die-No-Mo Front Row- R. Parker, L. Arns, E. Edstrom, W. Franzmann. Second Row- T. Rothwell, D. Crowl, R. Busdickcr, G. Grimm, O.Johnson, 0. Sanden, D. Westfall, M. McCarthy, E. Finkclnburg, R. Prenris. Third Row - M. Rce, L. Barry, L. Peterson, J. McDonald, S. Wegner, M. Southworth,J. Bard, M. Van Campen, A. Pawelek, F. Gislason, L. Magnussen, F. Nelson.

Back Row - Dr. Selle,]. O'Gara, L. McCown.

The Die-No-Mo Club T

HE Die-No-Mo Club is the pep organization of the college. It is made up of representative students and faculty members. It was started in 1926 with Ralfe Calkins acting as president. The purpose of the club is to create _ interest and enthusiasm in the welfare of worthwhile collegiate activities. An attempt is made by the club to get better and more support by the students at the athletic contests of the college. The Sportsmanship Code originated by the Die-No-Mo Club set high standards for the school. One of the busiest times of the year for the club was Homecoming. The event was sponsored by the club which arranged for the pep fest, bonfire, parade, and the dance given in the evening after the game. The annual production for the Die-No-

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Mo this year was "Three Cornered Moon", an hilarious three act comedy presented for the entertainment of the college .

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Participation is given by the organization toward recruiting new students for the college. Also, it aids in a financial manner such endeavors as the Apollo Club tour. Members are elected nomination from other which they belong and passed on them by the in the club.

to the club by organizations to having approval students already

Officers for the club this year are Theodore Rothwell, high voltage; Olaf Sanden, voltage; Gretchen Grimm, brush; Dorothy Westfall, spark; and Messrs. French, Selle, Reed, Jederman, Minne, Miss Brunner, insulators.

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"Three Cornered Moon"

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NSTEAD of presenting an original entertainment for its annual show this year the Die-No-Mo Club gave a three-act comedy, "Three Cornered Moon" by Gertrude Lankonogy. The club was very fortunate in obtaining Frank Wachowiak, a former member of the group, to direct the play. Under his supervision the play was quite successful. An interesting two-room interior set forms the background for the comedy. The plot concerns the "nutty" Rimplegar family whose money far exceeds its brains. Mrs. Rimplegar tries desperately but without success to control the finances of her household. Her daughter, Elizabeth is madly in love with Donald, a would-be novelist, who h as a '' beautiful soul,' ' but later she learns that she has really loved Alan Stevens, the family

doctor, who attempts to advise this family of " hair-brains." Also, in the family contending for the stupidity honors are Douglas, who believes himself to be a potential Barrymore in the embryonic state just ready to emerge from his chrysalis, and his brothers, Ed, an eighteen year old youth and Kenneth who attended Harvard . Jenny, the Czech maid, and Kitty, an actress from Brooklyn, are additions to the Rimplegar troubles. Members of the cast included Celeste Burke enacting Mrs . Rimplegar; Carol Burton as Elizabeth; Harry McGrath, playing Donald; Walter Grimm, doing Alan Stevens, and Donald Zimmerhakl, Paul O'Brien, Roger Busdicker, Martha Fakler, and Betty Peagler interpreting Douglas, Kenneth, Ed, Kitty and Jenny, respectively.

H. McGrath, M. Faklcr, W. Grimm, C. Burton, R. Busdickcr, E. Peagler, C. Burke, P. O'Brien, D. Zirnmcrhakl.

"Three Cornered Moon''

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Mendelssohn

Club At Piano - A. Bard . Front Row- V. Yates, P. LaDue,J. Downing, R. Wooley, H. Heldt, Mr. W. Grimm, P. Seaton, f. Johnson, E. Mead, D. Mallory, M.

Kirk~

wood, E. Steere. Second Row - B. Shirven, W. Michel, H. L. Smith, M. Garlough, G. Ames,J. Bierce, M. Birkholz, M. Southworth, A. Hill , A. J. Buck, M. Van Campen. Back Row- P. Westman, B. Jackson, G. Grimm, M. Boley.

The Mendelssohn Club T

HE Mendelssohn Club is completing Friday, May 8, in the college auditorium. its thirty-sixth year of existence as An interesting and varied program was a worthwhile musical organization. Un- given by the group. For guest artist der the excellent direction of Mr. Grimm they were fortunate in securing Miss the members are given fine training and _Zoe Wininger, a fine pipe-organist from keen appreciation in music. Members Chicago, who captivated the audience are selected through tryouts. by her playing. During the year this chorus of women All the time in Mendelssohn is not has sung for various occasions in the filled with work; during the year the college and throughout the community. members have enjoyed dinners and social At Christmas time the members strolled times together aside from regular pracabout towp. singing carols. They also tices. After the annual concert a dinner sang several selections on the program party was given which was much enpresented for the college at that time. joyed by the members. The group sang a few times this year Officers who have headed the organiover the broadcasting station of Winona. zation during the past year are: Margaret On April 24th they went to St. Charles Southworth, president; Vivian Yates, where an evening concert was presented. vice-president; Elizabeth Shirven, secreThe climax of the year's work was the tary-treasurer; Ruth Wooley, librarian annual concert given on the evening of and Mr. Grimm, adviser.

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The Apollo Club U

NDER the direction of Miss Janet Rohweder the Apollo Club has completed its sixth successful year of noteworthy activity in the field of music . Twenty men of the college are selected during the fall of each year to comprise this male chorus which has for its purpose to train the members in vocal work. Throughout the school year the Apollo Club practiced intensively in preparation for its annual spring concert tour which is the climax to the year's work. This year a four day tour was made in the southern part of Minnesota. The farthest point west where the club sang was Adrian. During the trip the chorus sang in thirteen schools and traveled over seven hundred miles. The annual concert in Winona was

At Piano -

given at College Hall on April 3. It was a great privilege to have as guest artist at this concert Mrs. Bernadine Courtney Johnson, a concert pianist who has played with symphony orchestras in America and Europe. Besides its school concerts the Apollo Club has appeared a number of times at community functions and has sung over the local radio station. The officers for the Apollo Club this year are Theodore Rothwell, president; Ray Pre ntis, vice-president; Frederick Nelson, business manager; Paul Meinke, Librarian, and Miss Janet Rohweder, director. Miss Elizabeth Mead has been the Apollo Club pianist for the past two years.

E. Mead.

T. Rothwell, R. Busdicker, C. Fleugel, W. Bixby, J. Rohweder, R. Brandt, R. Dunn, 0. Sanden, J. Bard. Back Row - W. Wadewitz, L. Johnson, E. Haack, W. Lynne, L. Ottman, A. Burleigh, P. Meinke, 0. Anfinson, D. Zimmcrhakl, R. Prcntis, F. Nelson.

Front Row -

Apollo Club

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Mixed Chorus At Piano - A. Bard. Front Row- R. Wooley, H. Heldt, W. Michel, P. Seaton, H. L. Smith, Mr. Grimm, Miss Rohweder, D. Mallory, M. Kirkwood, A. J. Buck, E. Shirvcn. Second Row - V. Yates, P. LaDuc, J . Downing, G . Grimm, I. Johnson, G. Ames,J. Bierce, M. Birkholz, M. Southworth, A. Hill, M . Boley, E. Steere. Third Row- B. Jackson, M. Garlough, C. Fleugel, R. Busdickcr, W. Lynne, W. Bixby, R. Brandt, R. Dunn, J. Bard, P. Meinke, M. Van Campen. Back Row- L.Johnson, E. Haack, T. Rothwell, W. Wadcwitz, L. Ottman, F. Nelson, D. Zimmerhakl, A. Burleigh, 0 . Anfinson, 0. Sanden.

The Mixed Chorus T

HE members of the Mendelssohn Club and the Apollo Club, as well as other students who sing and are not members of these groups, make up the college mixed chorus. ' Mr. Walter Grimm directs the group. Two regular practices are held weekly and some special rehearsals are called. The music which the chorus sings is some secular and some sacred. A variety of songs from famous oratorios, musical comedies and classical music is used. Some selections are sung a capella. Due to the lack of rehearsal time the chorus must utilize every moment in preparing music for presentation. The chorus has sung a number of times for the college throughout the year. At Christmas time a musical program was given in the gymnasium at which the chorus sang some appropriate numbers.

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On various occasions the group has sung at chapel exercises. During the past year the chorus sang a few times over the local broadcasting station on the college broadcasts. In the past years the chorus has given some interesting programs . The Mikado was presented in 1932 and during that same year the chorus assisted with the George Washington Bi-Centennial program. When it was first started, the chorus sang a capella entirely but a couple of years ago it seemed advisable to have accompaniment for some of the music. The officers of the chorus are: Roger Busdicker, president; James Bard, vicepresident; Mary Van Campen, secretarytreasurer; Paul Meinke, librarian; Mr. Grimm, director and Miss Agnes Bard, accompan is t.

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The Mason Music Club S

INCE the organization of the Mason Music Club in 1920 it has grown increasingly more popular each year. Membership to the club is open to any student in the college who is interested . . m musiC. The purpose of the club is to cultivate in its members a keener appreciation for good music through study and participation if possible. This year's program has carried out this aim in a commendable manner. In the course of the year the club has heard reports on the life of Handel and his work, "The Messiah", a lecture on symphonies and records of the same to prepare the group for the Minneapolis Symphony Concert given in Winona early this spring, and a concert by a group of Phelps school children playing

selections on their handmade xylophones, as well as contributions by the talented members of the club. One interesting program consisted of selections played on a curious musical instrument called the ocarina, commonly known as the ''sweet potato''. Some worthwhile accomplishments have been made by the Mason Music Club since it was founded in 1920 by girls who were at that time taking the public school music course. One of the club's projects was the furnishing of the music-practice rooms with curtains and furniture. Officers of the club are Elizabeth Mead, president; Ruth Wooley, vice-president; Bernard Busse, secretary-treasurer; and Mr. Grimm, advisor.

Stated- M. Arnsdorf, A. Gunderson, R. Wooley, B. Busse, A. Bard, E. Mead, R. Charpentier, Mr . Grimm, P. Abd, P. Meyer, M. Snyder . Standing- C. Burke, E. Steffes, M. Buchler, K. Einhorn, R. Busdickcr, C. Gholz, S. Palmar lee, M . Birkholz,]. Bierce, P. Meinke,]. Gerlich, H. Oistad, M. Van Campen.

Mason Music Club

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Orchestra

Front Row- ]. Marx, F. Jeffrey , L. Ray, W. Grimm , R. .Busdicker, R. Richards, G . Grimm, M. Foss. Back Row- W. Duel, B. Busse, H. Uggen, ar piano, H. Edstrom , Mr. Grimm, standing, L. ] orris, \V. Bixby , 0 . Johnson, M. Schuh , C.

Gholz, R. Griest, standing, 0. l-ludrlik, A. Daniels, P. Meyer.

The College Orchestra T

HE College orchestra offers a splendid chance for advancement in this type of music . Anyone in the college who shows ability in playing and desires to become a member is welcome to join the orchestra . The three-fold purpose of this orchestra is to aid by its presence at concerts, plays, and chapel exercises in the college, to give students who are interested in instrumental music an opportunity for experience in concert work, and finally, to familiarize them with worthwhile music of a grade suitable for junior and senior high schools. Orchestra music adds much to a program . Throughout the year the orchestra practices to prepare for occasions

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that arise which desire music by the group. Before the Wenonah Players' annual play and between acts the orchestra furnished the music. It also had a part in the annual Christmas program held in the gymnasium. Another occasion at which the orchestra played this year was the third annual Alumni Round-Up. Several times this organization has played for the Rotary Club at the Hotel Winona. The orchestra music is too often unappreciated because it is used as a background for another activity. However, the need for the assistance given by the orchestra is felt even if it does not receive all the credit due it. Loren ]orris is manager and librarian of the orchestra.

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The Band T

HE band plays an important part in the musical activities of the college. It was organized in 1927 by Mr. Grimm with a membership of ten. Since that time its membership has greatly increased along with the interest that students have been showing in the organization. After Mr. Grimm relinquished charge of the band in 1928 it has been directed by Mr. Reese, Mr. Gullickson, and Mr. Edstrom, the last being in charge at the present time. Rehearsals are being held daily during the week for class hour periods . When the weather permits in fall and spring, drills are held on the campus. Awards of pins and emblems are presented to members who have been faithful and have shown an enduring inter-

est in the work of the band. Many occasions during the year give opportunity for active participation of the band. At Homecoming - at pep fest, in parade, and on the field the pep instilled by the band's playing is decidedly in evidence. Last Fall the band went to St. Cloud to play for the football game there. During the basketball season, too, the band plays occasionally during the games. Besides this, several concerts are given in the audi tori um for the college and for the Phelps Training School and one is given at the city band shell in the spring. Officers for the band are Bernard Busse, president; William Bixby, vice president; William Duel, secretary-treasurer, and Harold Edstrom, director.

The Band

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Junior High Club Front Row - P. Berge, L. Simons, M. Berven, E. Storlie, U. Costello, P. Meyer, B. Kaiser, M. Snyder, H. V. Smith. Stcond Row - L. Magnussen , R. Hardt, E. Steffes, E. Bennet , M. Buehler, E. Christenson, U. Freyer, H. Smith. Third Row - M. Syverson, H. Oisted, A. Jensen, V. Lumovitch, D. Ruhoau, D. Ebert, R. Richards, M. Arnsdorf. Fourth Row - L. Bang , D. Johnson, D. Mallory, L. Sannes, A. Hill , M. Clarke, E. &rg . Fifth Row - F. Harcey, I. Pyknen, L. Jensen, L. Simons, P. Meinke, W. Franzmann , F. Gislason, E. Albers. Back Row - 0. Anfinson , M. Olson, D. Roche, C. Larson, F. Nelson, G. Engstrom, R. Wolfe, R. Parker.

The Junior High Club I

N ORDER to foster a more professional outlook for junior high school teachers and to give them a clearer insight into their problems this club was organized in 1921 with Miss Mabel Brown the first president. · Any student interested in the junior high school field may join the club. Meetings are held monthly in the club room. Included in the programs this year were talks, discussions, and musical selections. At one meeting a fine paper on "Roads" written by Miss Brunner was read for the group. Miss Scovell spoke at another on her extensive work in remedial reading in her English classes which was of benefit for those interested in this phase of education. A joint meeting held with the Intermediate Club was of mutual benefit to both organiza-

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tions . Mr. Fishbaugher gave an informative discourse on Germany in which he gave many new slants ·On the present conditions in that country. In January an all-college party was sponsored by the Junior High Club. It was a masquerade dance held in the college gymnasium. A variety of clever costumes were in evidence at this party which was greatly enjoyed by all who attended. This spring the club enjoyed an outtng. One of the accomplishments of this club is a contribution of fifty dollars to the Seventieth Anniversary fund. Present officers of the Junior High Club are Martin Laakso, president ; George Engstrom, vice president; Paula Meyer, secretary-treasurer; and Miss Brunner, adviser.

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The Intermediate Grade Club R

Father Libson's Game refuge. They made this trip twice due to the intense interest shown on the part of the club members. Besides these educational excursions the club has heard several excellent lectures. Miss Marvin talked about her trip to Mexico and Mr. Scarborough told the club of his "round-the-world" cruise with interesting illustrations on important points. A novel experience for the club was Miss Jeffrey's teaching demonstration of a rote song. Each year the club also sponsors an all-college party which is their outstanding social undertaking, Officers for the year are Carol Burton, president; Ruth Zarling, vice president; Adeline Daniels, secretary-treasurer, and Misses E. Clark, Dallmann, and Cramer, advisers.

EGULAR monthly meetings enable the members of this organization to get together and further their knowledge and interest in the intermediate field. It also affords an opportunity for the club to study and be instructed on the better methods of teaching thus aiding prospective teachers in these grades. The club has always had a large membership, as this field is a currently popular one for teachers college students to enter due to the fact that most teachers begin their careers in these grades. In order to widen the horizons educationally of its members, the club sponsors a series of excursions to various places of interest . This year they visited the Watkins Plant, Interstate Packing Company, Schuler's Candy Factory, and the Interstate Ice Cream Plant. The club also traveled to Rollingstone to see

Front Row -

Second Row Third Row Fourth Row Fifth Row -

R. Wolfe, R. Zarling, M. Sandre, H. Utzinger, P. La Due, S. Olness, L. Ray, M. Hcaser, P. Johnson. Miss Dallmann, E. Wachter, I. Eklof, J. Hcgarthy, P. Logan, B. Jackson, L. Morken, B. Failing, P. Meyer, Miss E. Clark. G. Pugh, A. Christcscn, L. Kennebeck, F. OrkC:, S. Palmerlee, E. Cook, Miss Cramer, K. Einhorn, E. Tuftce. E. Beaudin, P. Abel, M. Graner, G. Schliep, D. Hudrlik, S. Eggcrichs, H. Marek, M. Springer, A. Graf, R. Richards. T. Pykncn, B. Pittdko, M. King, B. Steffes, A. Daniels, B. Fuller, V. Kennedy, G. Losinski, F. Schulcz.

The Intermediate Grade Club

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Primary Club

Front Row - M. Kirkwood, E. High urn, L. Peterson, I. O'Connors, L. Barry, R. Wooley, H. Uggcn, A. Kuhn . Second Row- A. Gunderson, A. Thiede, M. Scholl meier, M. Rideout, I. Radke, I. Morman, V. W eber , E. Blessing. Back Row- A. B!e:x:rud, M. Boley, V. Ellis, M. Birkholz, Miss Brouillette, L. Harrison, Miss Gage, Miss Foster.

The Primary

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ITH the purpose of promoting educational interests and activities and to foster comradeship among its members, the Primary Club was organized by Miss Gage in 1923. Students whose major interest is primary department work are welcomed to membership in the club. The club is larger this year than it was last year which shows an increase in the work of this organization. At the regular meetings of the club talks ;tnd discussions compose the programs. One of the most interesting meetings this year was that at which Mrs. Maxwell gave a fine talk on ''A Cruise of the Baltic". At this meeting the Intermediate and Junior High Clubs were guests. In the fall a picnic dinner was held at

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Club

Bluffside . A party was given for new members of the group. The annual Christmas party was an enjoyable event for the club's members. To raise money the organization held a sandwich sale in the Shepard Hall social room. The Primary Club sponsored a Leap Year Party on April 17 which was one of the unique dances of the year. In accordance with all good Leap Year etiquette the women called for, and brought home, the men whom they escorted to the party. The crowd greatly enjoyed the novel affair. Officers for the club this year are Eulah Highum, president; Lou Ella Peterson, first vice president; Marie Kirkwood, second vice president; Hazel Uggen, secretary; Liguori Barry, and Misses Gage, Brouillette, and Foster, advisers.

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The Kindergarten

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to the Scholarship Fund . The Christmas "sing" before the holiday season was another joyous event. The first part of the meeting was spent in making bags for the children's Christmas Festival. Then, in the glow of candles, the girls sang favorite carols and listened to a Christmas story told by Miss Sutherland. On February eighteenth, a banquet was given for the girls of the Kindergarten Club. Another financial project of the group was the sponsoring of a sandwich sale to swell the fund in the treasury. Officers of the club are Margaret Southworth, president; Laura Nelson, first vice-president; Bernadette Johnson, second vice-president; Mary I vancie, secretary; Lois Ross, treasurer; Misses Sutherland, Schwable, and McDowell, advisers.

HIS year's activities of the Kindergarten Club have been interesting and varied because of careful planning on the part of those in charge of the program. The freshmen girls will always remember the delightful tea which was given for them by the Sophomore girls last October at the meeting. For the November program, the club secured Miss Etta Christensen for guest speaker. She gave an educational talk on "Schools in Mexico", a project which she studied last summer . At two later meetings this interest in "our outside neighbors" was carried further by programs in which members described the geography and family life of certain countries in Europe and in the Orient . The annual Christmas card sale this year, because of the efforts of the members, made it possible to add fifty dollars

Front Row - M. MeN allan, M. Fakler, B. johnson, M. Ivancic, M. Southworth, L. Nelson, L. Ross, H. Heidt, M. Lyon. Second Row - Miss Sutherland, K. Wood, V. Warbcr, M. Amlcy, E. Korn 1 M. Van Campen, A. Gunderson, C. David. Third Row - M. Kirkwood, Miss McDowell, J. Downing, A. Muller, A. Norton, M. Jilk, D. David, D. Theisen, Miss Schwable. Fourth Row- D. Krueger,] . LaBarre, M. Garlough, E. Wildgrube,J. Franke, R. Hamann, E. O'Donahuc, P. Wesemann.

The Kindergarten Club

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The Country Life Club Fir.st Row- Miss Bartsch, P. Meyer, H. Welch, Miss Christensen, C. Larson, R. Wol£e, F. Orke, R. Wooley, E. Blessing, L. Ray. Second Row - D. Amdahl, L. Ross, P. LaDue, M . Jacobsen, 0 . Anfinson, V. Weber , E. Wachter, B. Pittelko, B. Washburn, M. Rideout. Third Row - D. Theisen, V. Kennedy, L. Nelson, I. Radke, R. Larson, S. Olness, E. Bucher, V. Bucber,l. Eklof. Fourth Row - J. Franke, M. Springer, H . Welch, A. Newmann, C. Newmann , L. Blumentritt, E. Hartmann, S. Palmerlee, B. Jackson, L. Mor~ ken. Fifth Row - E. Albers, M. Schollmeier, E. Beaudin, E. Bornfleth, M. Ohlsen, A. Daniels, D. Hudrlik, E. Long, M. King, I. Pyknen. Si xth Row - L. Kennebeck, M. Hammervold, S. Eggericbs, J. Milne, E. Wing, S. Niskanen, G . Schliep, A. Holst, F. Pfeil.

The Country Life Club T

HE Country Life Club provides an opportunity for students interested in rural teaching to come together in an organized group to talk over problems related to that field of education so that conditions of teaching there may be improved and to enjoy social functions . Membership is not limited, but open to any students interested in country school teaching . This ye;:tr has been very profitable and enjoyable for this club. Its constant activity clearly shows its ambition to carry out the purpose of the club. The first social event in the fall was a Hallowe'en party for the club which was cleverly planned and carried out for the enjoyment of all. In the Homecoming Parade this group participated by having a clever float . At Christmas time

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the club had a program. During January a sleigh ride party was enjoyed. One day during the year they entertained the Country Life Club from La Crosse Teachers College. On the programs for the regular meetings are included informative speeches and discussions. At one time Miss Ella Clark gave an illustrated lecture on a trip she, with two other teachers, took to Mexico last summer. Mrs. Maxwell spoke of her trip on the Baltic Sea last year for another meeting. Parliamentary procedure was studied . The officers who have headed the group during the year are Ruth Wooley, president; Carroll Larson, vice-president; Florence Orke, secretary-treasurer. Misses Christensen and Bartsch are faculty advisers for the club.

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The League of Women Voters

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HE League of Women Voters is indicative of a growing interest on the part of women to know the workings of the government that they may be prepared to vote intelligently. Miss Helen Haor, field secretary, reorganized the Winona League in 1930 with Mary Walsh as its first president. Since that time it has come to have a permanent place on the extra-curricular program of the college . It is a non-partisan organization of three departments ( 1) efficiency in government; ( 2) department of international cooperation to prevent war; (3) public welfare department. The aim of the organization is to arouse enthusiasm in women concerning political questions and to prepare them through intelligently prepared discussions to be able to vote wisely.

Membership to the League of Women Voters is open to women of the college who are concerned with the current political problems and their solution. The problem selected for consideration by the club this year is : "Trained Personnel in Public Service ." Delegates were sent to Mankato to attend sessions of the College League of Women Voters convention . A number from the group also went to St . Paul on January 17 to attend a session of the State Legislature . During the year the League contributed an editorial to the Winonan on' 'Training Governmental Personnel" in which the need of education for those entenng public offices was stressed . The League's officers this year are Helen Marek, president; Gertrude Morehouse, vice president; Bernadette Steffes, secretary, and Miss Richards, adviser.

Stated - Miss Richards and H. Mare k. StandhJg- U. Freyer, B. Steffes , C. Bre yer , M. Seeling , A. Bl cxrud, A. C h ri~ tC )>C il, A. Johnson, 1. Einhorn.

The League of Women Voters

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·Newman

Club Front Row- E. Beaudin, M. Arnsdorf, R. Charpentier, H. Roth, E. Clark, E. Gibbons, P. Logan, W. Glubka, R. Wolfe. Second Row - M. King, L. Kennebeck, B. Kclbcrcr, M. McCarthy, E. Jaspers, M. McDonough, C. Schlafer, B. Johnson, M. MeN allan. Third Row - M. Jilk, M. Small, M. Buchler, A. Graf, M. Boley, U. Costello, G. Nerdahl, M. Van Campen,]. Downing. Back Row - A. Hill, J. Smith, D. Crowl, B. Busse, R. Griese, R. Koch,J. Bucholtz, B. Steffes, E. O'Donahue.

The Newman Club T

HE first organization of Catholic Leading Catholic men and women speak students of the college was formed at these meetings on subjects of particular in 1919 and was called the Students interest to the Catholic students. This Catholic Association. This group, whose . year instead of having a different proactivities were mainly social, held its gram chairman for each meeting, the meetings in the Cotter High School for club appointed a program chairman who several years. In the fall of 1928, the planned for the entire year. Miss Mary association decided to affiliate itself with Fehring was the chairman appointed this the Newman Club, a national organiza- year. Every year the club keeps a scraption of Catholic students. Since then the book which contains programs, pictures, purpose of the club has been three-fold; and souvenirs of the meetings. Delbert Roche, chairman, and Genevieve Nerdahl religious, educational and social. The yearly program includes monthly compose the scrapbook committee. meetings, a communion breakfast each The officers of the club are: Emmett quarter, an annual sleighride party, a Gibbons, president; Harold Roth, vice picnic held in the fall of the year, and president; Renee Charpentier, secretary; usually a spring dance. The quarterly and Robert Small, treasurer. Miss Ella communion breakfasts are special events. Clark is the adviser.

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The

Art

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HE Art Club was very active this year. It began its work in the fall term with an initiation tea. For Homecoming, the group prepared a float in conjunction with the Wenonah Players. At Christmas members of the club worked out, and presented in chapel silhouettes against an illuminated screen, showing in black and white the composition of famous religious pictures. During March, the club prepared an art edition of "The Winonan." The purpose of this project was to increase the interest in art among the students. For this purpose, club members wrote news stories, editorials, features and cut linoleum blocks for illustrations. Martin Laakso represented the organ-

Club

ization in a speech over station WKBH. He spoke on civic beauty. The big project of the year was the preparation of decorations for the Prom, the theme of which was one of gay frivolity. The setting was a night scene with the sky thickly studded with stars, and the walls enlivened by gay figures. During the year, there were program meetings at which talks and demonstrations pertaining to art were given, work meetings in which members experimented with various media, and occasional teas. Officers of the club are: Wm. Franzmann, president; Glenna Ames, vicepresident; Anna Jane Buck, secretarytreasurer, and Miss Dorothy Clark, advtser.

Sitting- E. Kinhlnburg, L. Harrison, C. Breyer,J. Englund, P. Westman, A. Gunderson, P. LaDue, I. Eckloff, M. Amley. Standing- G. Ames, C. Larson, W. Franzmann, G. Pugh, E. W. Docken, J. Kalouner, D. Johnson, M. Laakso, L. Bang, E. Kreutz, Miss

Clark, L. Thompson, A.

J.

Buck.]. Bucholtz.

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Men's

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FirJt Row- A. Pawelek, A. Hoblitt, D. Laudon, D. Simons, Mr. MacDonald , 0. Johnson, E. Barski, L. Wood. Seco,uJ Row - A. Muench, G. Bruegger, C. Fluegel, E. Johnson, M. Ohlsen, H. Edstrom, H. Roth, P. Meinke. Third Row - C. Gholz, E. Wing, C. Chamberlain, G. Kraft, W. Grimm, L. Jorris, D. Roche, F. Gislason, N. Benson, E. Haack. Fourth Row - B. Osrmoe, L. McCown, R. Parker, J. Kozlowski, G. Engstrom, C. Syverson, E. Edstrom, L. Thompson, D. Zimmcrhaki,J. Bucholtz. Fifth Row - R. Wolfe, J. Quaday, C. Larson, E. Tompkins, E. Waldo, W. Shay, R. Donchower, R. Dunn, 0. Thomas.

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HE Men's Club has probably the widest membership of all of the clubs in this college since it is open to all men of the school. The only requirement for bona fide membership is that the student shall have gone through the initiation duties and ceremony unflinchingly and in a manner worthy of a true student of the school. The Freshman man wears as badge of his noviceship a little cap of purple, with a white button on top. Upon meeting a more mature member of the club the initiate is required to "button", a process with which we are all familiar. At this stage the entering student performs such helpful tasks as carrying books, holding doors open, and amusing things of which the minds of upperclassmen conjure a great variety. Older students have been considerate enough

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to eliminate objectionable elements from the initiation so that now it serves more as a source of good-natured fun than as a vent for bullying. Having done these things, the student is ready for the initiation exercise which is usually preceeded by a Men's Club Banquet. At the banquet this year, speeches were given by Mr. Maxwell, Mr. MacDonald, and Mr. Sheehan. After the initiation the newcomer can consider himself a full-fledged member of the club and the college. The real purpose of the club is to have the men of the school organized so that if a question or problem concerning the men should arise, as occasionally happens, the group will be equipped to handle it promptly and efficiently.

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Club

Men's

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FTER the successful Men's Club banquet, which was held in Morey Hall, the club next presented a talk by Doctor Mattison who is one of the staff of doctors at the Winona Clinic. His subject was that of sex and venereal disease. He presented some interesting and very valuable material. His style of presentation was vivid and interspersed with humor, so that the talk was wellliked by all who heard it . Perhaps the biggest project which the club sponsored during the year was an all-college party given on the 28th of March in the college gymnasium. This was the first all-college party of the spring quarter. Dancing to the music of Jack Allen's Band occupied the hours

between eight and eleven. The large number of student and faculty members who attended enjoyed the event greatly. From time to time, short meetings are held in the college gymnasium to decide matters of general policy. While it cannot be called an extreme! y active club, it is valuable in that it helps to unify the male element of the student body, and this unity helps to develop a certain "esprit d' corps" of a wholesome and worthwhile kind. Early in the fall an election resulted in the choosing of the following officers: Delos Simon, president; Lyle Arns, vicepresident; and Emmett Gibbons, secretary-treasurer . Mr. MacDonald, dean of men, acts as adviser for the club.

Front Row- F. Harcey, F. Miller,]. Smith, J. O'Gara, L. Arns , E. Gibbons , G. Courtier, R. Hoover, N. Schmidt, W. Krage. Second Row- E. Cohen, W. Carlson, E. Johnson, T. Rothwell, W. Wadewitz, R. Brandt, W. Bigelow. R. Thurley, M. Peterson, R. Busdicker, E. Simon. Third Row- W. Duel, H. Graoscc, F. Blatnik, V. Gislason, L. Riley, M. Laakso, G. McAvoy, 0. Sanden, R. Prcntis, G. Lampman. Fourth Row- J. Bard, J. Marholic, R. Small, M. Wolverton, W. Bixby, W. Franzmann, E. Jaspers, L. Schaeffer, A. Burleigh, W. Lynne. Top Row- R. Rowell, G. Passmore, H. Bratulich, B. Busse,]. Wachs, F. Nelson, L. Hoover, K. McClave, D. Crowl, A. Wilson.

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··w,, Club

Front Row - W. Thompson, E. Jaspers, L. McCown, J . Kozlowski, D . Zimmerbakl, T . Rothwell, V. Gislason, A. Pawelek. Second Row - A. Jo hnson, E. Gibbons, R. Thurley , D . Simons, W. Shay, F. Gislason, J. O'Gara. Third Row - B. Parker, M. Peterson, B. Ostmoe, 0. Thomas, J. Wachs, E. Lundgren, R. Prencis, L. Arns.

Top Row- A. Muench, R. Townsend, W. Grimm, M. Laakso, W. Franzmann, M. Wolvercon, Mr. Galligan.

The "W" Club T

HE · 'W'' Club is one of the most exclusive clubs in school since membership in that organization is limited to those men who have won their purple ''W'' in any one or more of the three major sports, footsall, basketball, and track. The purpose of the club is to promote interest in, and to study various phases of sport. The club also aims to further the ideals of the true athlete and sportsman. Homecoming found the organization busy with decorations and helping to make the return home pleasant for alumni. "W" club members wore tags welcoming alumni . At the close of the football season, the club " threw" a banquet for all the football men who had gone through the season faithfully, whether they had won their letter or not. An interesting feature

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about "W" club banquets is that the boys cook and serve the meals themselves. This fact helped make the banquet very informal and enjoyable . Short talks were made by Dr. Maxwell, Dr. Tozier, Mr . Galligan, Mr. Pawalek, Mr. MacDonald, and several students. One of the most valuable awards in school is that given to lettermen . Graduating ' 'W'' club members are presented with a pass admitting them to all teachers college games and contests held at Winona . At the time of this writing, plans are in progress towards a ''W'' club picnic to be held sometime in May. Officers for the year are Luther McCown, president ; Robert Parker, vicepresident; John Wachs, secretary-treasurer. and Mr. Galligan is the club's adviser.

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The International Relations Club

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OR the purpose of studying and discussing present day international and national problems to get a better and more complete understanding of them, the International Relations Club was organized in 1933. Membership in the club is limited and new members are chosen in the fall and spring quarters. The past year has been of great importance to the club. On November 15 and 16 of last year this organization was a joint host with St. Teresa's College to sixteen colleges from throughout the state for a Model League of Nations conference. A great deal of enthusiasm and work was shown on the part of the club in preparation for this event . A very interesting program was carried out for the Model League . Current problems of international importance were considered, especially the Italo-Ethio-

pian affair, the Saar-Plebecite, and the Choco affair. A model session of the International Labor Organization was also held. The important speaker of the League Conference was Mr. J. Herbert Eichelberger, an authority on international affairs and a recent observer of the League session in Geneva, Switzerland, who gave some inside facts on the workings of that organization. Throughout the year the International Relations Club has sponsored speakers on foreign matters and had group discussions at its meetmgs. Hilbert Sens is president of the club. The other officers are as follows: Frank Blatnik, vice-president ; Cy Syverson, recording-secretary; Elfie Christenson, corresponding secretary; Robert Small, treasurer, and Dr. Selle, adviser.

Seated -

I. Johnson, H. Sens, F. Blatnik, C. Syverson, E. Christenson. Standing - A. Pawclck,J. O'Gara , G. Kabat, P. Meinke, W. Thompson, B. Shirvcn, L. Hoover, D. Westfall, H. Roth, E. Albers, I. Thomas, M. Bcrvcn, P. Meyer, G. Ames, R. Hardt, D. Roche, Dr. M ione, C. Breyer, V. Gislason, M. Laakso, M. Buchler, Dr. &lie, F. Nelson.

International Relations

Club

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The Y.W.C.A.

Front Row- J. Hagerthy, H. Utzinger, L. Matson, C. Nelson, E. Berg, E. Albers, E. Highum, B. Johnson. Second Row- D. Theisen, H. Heldt, S. Olness, L. Klindworth, E. Tuftce, H. L. Smith, B. Washburn, M. Faklcr, H. V. Smith. Third Row- P. Abel, L. Simon, L. Sanncs,J. Franke, J. Jacobs, R. Koenig, D. Hudrlik, E. Winters, M. Amley. Back Row- R. Hamann, L. Bang, A. Holst, G. Schliep, E. Wildgrube, L. Harrison, J. Kalouncr, J. Marx, M . Engstrom

The Y. W. C. A. T

HE Young Women's Christian Association is a club which has as its purpose the promotion of good fellowship and friendship among girls of the college. This friendship does not limit itself to the girls of the college as is shown by the fact that the club encourages the doing of "good turns" wherever possible. The first meeting of the year was a picnic held across the lake. This picnic took the form of a treasure hunt, with a treasure at the pavilion for the first person arriving there. The club did one of its "good turns" this Fall at a dinner given here for a group of school superintendents, when members of the club served the food and did other work connected with the affair. At Christmas time, the young women

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again showed their benevolence by journeying to the county poor farm, to bring gifts and to sing carols for the people there. The usual meetings consist of discussion, singing, and the playing of games. The club also presents the annual Friendship Day program for chapel. The program this year consisted of a history of the club, given by Elnora Berg, a talk on "Friendship", by Miss Sutherland, and musical selections. This spring a picnic was held by the members at which next year's officers were elected. Officers who served this year are: Elnora Berg, president; Coralyn Nelson, vice-president; Lois Simons, secretary; Eulah Highum, treasurer. Miss Richards acts as the club adviser.

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COLLEGE SPORT Where wreaths of fame had oft been lost and won, For feats of strength folk there were wont to do.

MoRRis.


Football The

Coaching Staff Mr. Boots, Mr. Galligan, Mr. Pawelek, Dr. Tozier, Mr. French.

VARSITY FOOTBALL

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HE opening of the 1935 season of football found Coach Glen Galligan back at the helm after a year's absence. Faced with a tough eight-game schedule upon his return, Coach Galligan began immediately to whip into shape his squad of forty members for the first of

the eight contests, La Crosse Teachers College. On the night of September 21, the squad met their first defeat at the hands of the La Crosse team to the tune of 18-2, and La Crosse, our traditionally undefeated rivals, still remain as a target for

Front Row - V. Gislason, J. Kozlowski, W. Thompson, D. Simon, A. Muench, M. Petersen, E. Jaspers, H. Chase. Second Row- E. Orbeck, R. Parker, W. West, R. Thurley, H. Roth, R. Florin, A. Hoblit. L. Arns. Third Row- R. Townsend, R. Jacobsen, E. Lundgren, W. Grimm, H. Larson, E. Tompkins, G. Passmore, L. McCown, B. Ostmoe. Back Row- Coach Galligan, Assistant Coaches Pawelek and Tozier, M. WolvertOn, R. Koch, E. Barski,J. Decker, C. Syverson,]. O'Gara.

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Football Cheer-Leaders M. Vlln Cllmpcn, R. Prcmis.

decided advantage in yardage and first downs . Winona opened its season at home by losing to Eau Claire 13-0. Once again Winona outplayed its opponents from scrimmage, but lacked in scoring punch. A heart-breaking defeat, 6-0, at the hands of Stout in its Homecoming game,

the 1936 eleven. The Winona squad started a 350-mile journey to Bemidji on September 27. Luck did not travel North with the team, however, as they again met defeat in a thrilling, hard-fought game which culminated in a score of 21-14. Although this game ended in victory for Bemidji, Winona showed a

(Continued on last page of men's athletics)

Front Row - J. Kozlowski, \V. \Vest, B. Ostmoe, D. Simon, R. Parker, W. Thompson, E. Orbeck, F. Gis!ason. R1ar Row - H. Chase, L. McCown, G. Passmore, L. Arns, R. Florin, A. Hoblit, R. Jacobsen, E. Jaspers, V. Gislason, D. Lowden, R. Koch, \V. Grimm,J.

Decker, A. Muench, E. Lundgren, R. Thurley, E. Tompkins, N. Sollie, R. Townsend, C. Syverson, Mr. Pawelek,). O'Gara, Dr. Tozier, Coach Galligan,

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Front Row-S. Farmer, H. Grudcm, L. Brown, D. Laudon, L. Ottman, L. Wood, L. Wilson, Coach Galligan. Second Row - L. Arns, R. Parker, T. Rothwell. Rear Row - C. Syverson, Manager, G. Passmore, W. Buswell, V. Gislason, L. McCown, L. Hoover, B. Ostmoe.

Basketball A

LTHOUGH the won-and-lost records showed only eight wins against nine defeats, the Purple cagers concluded a successful 1935-36 season with a final victory over Mankato on February 26 . The highlight of the season was the setting of a new all-time Winona scoring record in crushing the Waukon (Ia .) Junior College by an 81-17 score. Another achievement long to be remembered was the first basketball victory ever scored over the La Crosse T. C. Maroons. The trick was turned in the season's opener at La Crosse with the margin at 26-25. In the Northern Teachers College Conference, the Winona quint booked even in six league games . Two victories were counted over Mankato while single games were dropped in Bemidji and Duluth. An even break in a home-andhome series with St. Cloud rounded out

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the conference schedule. Duluth, perennial title-holder, again copped the league lead, with Winona numbered among its victims as the result of a 5~-34 beating. The Redmen of St. Mary's again won the title "Champions of Winona" with two hotly contested victories over the Purple. Captain Norbert Scully of the Redmen was cast in the role of hero in each game. His field goal in the final seconds at Terrace Heights broke a tie and gave St. Mary's a 25-23 win. Again in College Gym, after the T. C. cagers had maintained a slight lead for three quarters, he dropped in a long shot which sent the visitors on their winning way. In non-conference competition the T.C. quint met Rochester, Stout, and Eau Claire in two games each and played single contests with Waukon, La Crosse, and Hibbing .

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Luther McCown, captain and star senior forward, was honored by selection to the All-Conference team as picked by the six league coaches. Ted Rothwell, senior guard, received honorable mention. Following are the choices of the coaches:

Johnny Wachs, lanky center and forward, who played in nearly every game is the captain-elect for the coming season. Six returning lettermen, with good reserve strength too, should mean another good season this winter. The season's record follows :

First Team Second Team McCown, Winona ... F ... Outwin, St. Cloud Kunze, St. Cloud .... F. .McArthur,Mankato Vucinovich, Duluth. C. .... Caskey, Bemidji Baree, Duluth ...... G ..... Gorman, Duluth More, Duluth ...... G .. .... Glick, Bemidji

Eight squad members played often enough to earn letters. They are Luther McCown of Lewiston, Ted Rothwell of Winona, Bob Parker of Byron, Lyle Arns of Harmony, Berger Ostmoe of Columbia Heights, Vic Gislason of Minneapolis, Johnny Wachs of Winona, and Warner Buswell of Minnesota City. McCown and Rothwell are graduating senwrs along with Louis Hoover, a reserve .

La Crosse . . . .... 25 Waukon J. C. ...... 17 Rochester J. C. .... 22 Stout ............ 38 St. Mary's ..... . ... 25 Eau Claire .... .. ... 36 Eau Claire. . . . . 42 St. Cloud. . . . .. 38 Bemidji.... . ... 42 Mankato... . .. 29 St. Cloud. . . . 43 Hibbing... .41 Duluth..... . ... 58 St. Mary's. . ... 41 Rochester ......... 22 Stout. .... . .. 39 Mankato .......... 22

Winona ...... 26 Winona ...... 81 Winona ...... 49 Winona ...... 34 Winona ...... 23 Winona ..... 45 Winona ...... 38 Winona ..... .40 Winona ...... 27 Winona ...... 38 Winona ..... . 39 Winona .. .... 35 Winona ...... 34 Winona ...... 36 Winona ...... 39 Winona ...... 28 Winona ...... 27

T. Rothwell, B. Ostmoc, L. McCown, L. Hoover, W. Buswell, Coach Galligan, R. Parker, H. Grudcm, L. Arns, G. Passmore, V. Gislason.

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Front Row- A. Pawelek, W. Franzmann,]. O'Gara, D. Zimmcrhakl, W. Carlson, M. Ohlsen, R. Cheney.

Back Row - M. Peterson, L. McCown, T. Rothwell, J. Kozlowski, H. Chase, H. Grudcm, L. Jorris.

Track T

RACK prospects at the beginning of the season looked rather gloomy this year. The squad was smaller than it has been in some years because tennis, golf, football, and baseball took some· of the veterans and also attracted some freshmen who may have been prospective track material. Winter tarried with us longer than usual, delaying the initial workouts. Probably the greatest handicap the men had to face was the lack of an adequ.ate field for practice. The operation of tiling the field and rearranging it to assimilate the plot of land given by the messrs. Bell and Prentiss, tore up the field, leaving only a little over 100 yards of cinder track. Coach Galligan found only a few veterans of last years' strong team which came within a fraction of a point of winning the State meet. These men are Don

Zimmerhakl, Captain of the 1936 squad, Jimmy O'Gara, Loren ]orris, Luther McCown, Horace Chase, Bill Franzmann, and John Kozlowski. On May 1, the squad went to La Crosse to meet the La Crosse Teachers on a muddy field. The Winona men surprised themselves by garnering 60,73" points to La Crosse's 6973'. The Winona team was short two good men at this meet. Had Stuart Farmer, star discus man, and Ted Rothwell, javelin, been on hand, the score may have been closer or reversed. At this meet, Winona showed a weakness, known in the last several years, in the weights, and again displayed strength in the dashes, relay, hurdles, pole vault, and high jump. As the season progresses the squad should become better-balanced, and will improve in strength.

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The La Crosse meet, while ending in defeat, served in two ways. Those men who won places were encouraged; and those who did not were able to tell where they needed work. At the time of this writing, three meets remain . On May 8th, the local team meets Mankato in a dual meet there; on May 15th the boys meet Eau Claire and La Crosse in a triangular meet at Eau Claire. The State Meet will be held on May 22nd, at Mankato as a night meet . The squad, which hopes to capture the State title is headed by Don Zimmerhakl, the man you usually see leading the 220 yard dash. He, O'Gara, and ]orris take care of the dashes and form the relay team with the exception of one man who is not yet picked . Chase and R. Peterson run the high hurdles

"Perk" Cheney, AI

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and the high jump. Franzmann and Carlson are the low hurdlers . The distance runners are led by McCown, last year's captain, and are supplemented by Grudem, Barski, Quaday, and Wing who should do something before the season is over. The javelin throwers are Grimm, Zimmerhakl, and R . Peterson. Pawelek is the star pole vaulter, while Wolverton and Cheney show promise. McClave in several events, Crowl in the half-mile, Larson in the mile, Ottman, Parker, and Laudon in the high jump will help round out the squad . The shot put, in which Winona is traditionally weak, may be helped by the presence of Farmer and Parker. Indications point to the fact that Winona will again be a strong competitor for the State track and field title.

THE TRACK SQUAD WARMING UP Myles Peterson, Leslie Ottman, Don Crowl, "Horse" Chase, Harold Grudem, Lucher McCown, Willard Carlson, LorenJorris, Don Zimmerhakl, Jimmy O'Gara, Bill Franzmann. (The man behind O'Gara is Ohlsen.)

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Tenni.r

Golf

Volleyball

TENNIS - A. Pawelek, T. Rothwell, Mr. Boots, L. Hoover, E. Cohen. GOLF- D. Simon,J. Wachs, 0. Johnson, W. Bixby. VOLLEYBALL- A. Pawelek, D. Keacney, A. Davis, D. Laudon.

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Tennis

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HE Purple tennis squad, top ranking in college competition since 1933, has already taken to the courts in preparation for matches with the La Crosse Teachers, U . of Minnesota, and the Mankato Teachers before engaging in the state tournament games to be held at Mankato, May 22 . Coach W . E . Boots has four veteran netmen who, together with a number of promising new players, will make another strong bid to retain the state title, their 's by virtue of repeated winnings. Louis Hoover, Winona - veteran of city tournament games and for the past four years instrumental in college play, Ted Rothwell, Winona - of the Teachers net team for the past two years and also

competing in city tournaments, Alan Pawelek of Thorpe, Wisconsin, Irving Thomas, Minneapolis, and Frank Blatnik, Chisholm, are ready to defend past laurels and meet their first test on May 2 when the La Crosse Teachers provide opposition on the local courts. After a return match on May 13 ( tentative at writing) the Winona Peds journey to Minneapolis for a contest with Coach Phil Brain's University Big Ten players. Dates for a Mankato T. C. series have not yet been determined and if such games cannot be arranged the tennis team will close the 1936 season on May 22, when the state meet will be held on the college courts at Mankato.

Golf B

ECAUSE definite plans for the spring golf competition were not available at the time of the printing of the annual, only a brief account of this sport is here listed. Glendon E. Galligan, Teachers College athletic director, announced a possible intention of entering players in the State meet that will be held at Mankato on May 22. Among the players who will

form the nucleus for the team are listed: John Wachs and Delos Simon, Winona; William Bixby, Wyeville, Wis.; and Orland Johnson, Winona. The Westfield course has been again offered the college players for practice on any day exclusive of Saturday and Sunday. A class under William Bixby will be taught the rudiments of golf as an extra-curricular event.

Volleyball T

HE game of volleyball is one of the most popular intramural sports in this college during late winter and early spring . A goodly number of men turned out for this sport and were divided into eight teams of eight men each. The tournament found these teams taking the names of "Big Ten" teams.

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A round-robin tournament was played in which the eight squads competed . The tournament-winning team of this year was called "The Wildcats" and was made up of the following persons: Kermy McPherson, Al Pawelek, Don Laudon, Bob Thurley, Ross Donnehower, Duke Shay, Al Davis, and Dick Kearney .

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Men's Intramural Basketball T HE CUBS- L. Wood, E. Barski, A. Hoblit, E. Jaspers, A. Burleigh , E. Lundgren, A. Pawele k.

Intramural Basketball

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HE annual intra-mural basketball season was brought to an exciting close on Feb . 12 in a play-off game between the Cubs and Braves who had finished the regular schedule tied for the top . The Cubs, made up of West Lodge players , gained the championship with a decisive 35-22 victory . As usual, the non-varsity men interested in the cage sport were grouped on eight teams and a round-robin schedule of games was run off. The Cubs and Braves were easily the oustanding teams and each won six of their seven games, necessitating the championship play-off. Strangely enough, the Cubs only defeat came at the hands of the last-place Cardinals . The championship Cubs displayed their mastery over the secondplace Braves during the regular schedule but had to do it again after the 18-15 upset pulled by the Cardinals. The only threat to the two leaders came from the Pirates, who won their first four games onlv to lose out at the

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finish as they were beaten three times in a row. For the first time an "official " all-star intra-mural team was picked . The varsity cagers, who had refereed the games, chose the following men : FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM E. Johnson, Braves . F ....... Fuller, Giants Wood, Cubs . . .... .. F .... L. Wilson, Pirates Grudem, Yankees ... C. . . 0. Thomas, Braves F. Gislason, Tigers . G . ... . ... Jaspers, Cubs Simon, Pirates . .... G . Kozlowski, Cardinals Loren Wood ran away with the individual scoring honors as he chalked up 82 points . Other high scorers were Earl Johnson with 65, Orville Thomas with 52, and Willard Carlson, who scored 45 points. FINAL STANDINGS W L Pts. Op .Pts Cubs . . . . ...... . ... 7 1 194 145 Braves . . . .6 2 214 153 Pirates . .4 3 160 139 Giants . . .. 4 3 104 90 Tigers . . .. 3 4 159 170 Yankees . .3 4 133 119 Dodgers . . ... .. . . ... 1 6 102 179 Cardinals. . . .1 6 102 173

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Intramural Board

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HE new movement in athletics is more interested in sports for a great many, rather than specialized, highly competitive action for a very few. While not abandoning inter-collegiate activity in which the most talented men compete and others act as spectators, the intramural program does allow for a far greater number of persons to compete in contests than would be possible under the older system. This movement probably is actually helpful to the major sports since persons given the opportunity of playing and learning these games themselves, will become more interested and intelligent spectators. The board plans and supervises the round-robin tournaments in the various sports. At the beginning of the season

for each sport, students interested sign up, and in this way the board knows just who will be playing. Then the committee makes an effort to balance the teams as effectively as possible to make competition more equal. Teams take names, ranging from flowers, vegetables, and baseball teams to New Deal alphabet soup. Interest runs high and members of each team regard their games as very serious contests. Round-robin tournaments were held in basketball and volleyball, and diamond ball. By providing athletic activity for a large number of persons, the intramural board is doing a real service for the school in the lines of recreation and health.

Front Row - D. Simon, M. Peterson. Back Row - A. Hoblitt, L. Arns, Mr. Galligan, G. Lampman.

Intramural Board

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Boxing

Smith, H . Ro th , R. Thur ley, Instructor Da ve Honigs, L. Jorris, J. Quaday , M . Wo !ver con , L. Riley, W. Krage.

Boxing

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OR the first time in several years no all-college boxing tournament was held this spring . All activities in the way of fisticuffs took place in the regular boxing class held twice a week in the Library gymnasium. Dave Honigs was again in charge of instructing the dozen or more class members in the "manly art of self-defense ' ' . Bob Thurley, a veteran of two former tournaments and college welterweight champ, assisted Dave in showing the essentials of boxing. The teaching of fundamentals occupied the first of the quarter while later on the members of the class were paired up in the various weight divisions for one and two round sparring matches. In this way, the fighters were able to put into execution the correct methods of attack and defense while at the same

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time Dave Honigs could correct any mistakes that were made. The left jab, the straight right, the right cross, and the hooks were punches demonstrated to the class and all became more or less adept at throwing these fundamental blows . The class also was instructed in the rudiments of defense . Mervale Wolverton, a southpaw, and Bob Thurley were the outstanding boxers in the class this year . Bob went to Minneapolis for the Golden Gloves bouts at the auditorium but lost a close threeround decision in his first fight . In an appearance on a local card, Wolverton won an easy decision. New equipment, including a heavy punching bag, was available to the boxing class and made it possible to secure a more satisfactory training.

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Varsity Football October 12, rounded out the first half of the Winona Teachers' schedule. Homecoming games seem to carry a jinx for Winona as evidenced by a 13-0 defeat by St . Cloud on October 19 at St. Cloud. The highly-praised Mankato team came to Winona on October 24 and returned triumphant because of a 13-0 victory over Winona. In this game Winona displayed one of the best brands of football that it played all season. November 2, Winona opened new athletic relations with Columbia College of Dubuque, Iowa. During an entire, hard-fought game Winona held the upper hand until the last few moments when a fifty-five yard pass gave the Columbia team a 6-0 victory. Winona wound up its season with its Homecoming game with the league champions, Moorhead T. C. who were named as the only Minnesota college team who might give the powerful Gophers a formidable battle. Fans witnessed the workings of one of the best teams ever to play on the Teachers College

Continued

field. This game ended in a 38-9 victory for the Dragons. By graduation Winona will lose six seniors. Among these are John Kozlowski, three years on all-conference teams, who during his career at Winona played the positions of guard, end, and fullback; Delos Simon, quarterback; Art Muench, halfback; Bill Thompson, halfback; Gene Jaspers, tackle; Luther McCown, end. The prospects for a successful 1936 team at the present time look very promising with the loss of only the above-mentioned seniors . Coach Galligan will have the following men as a nucleus for his next year's squad, if all return . His line should be strong with this material- Bob Thurley, Horace Chase, Berger Ostmoe, Eugene Lundgren, Frederick Gislason, Myles Petersari and Walter Grimm; candidates for the backfield will be Merle Wolverton, Vic Gislason, Edward Barski, Lyle Arns, Loren Jorris, and Don Laudon. These, with the newcomers, should build a powerful team for Winona .

Baseball F

OR the first time in eighteen years this college has had a baseball team. Under the tutelage of Stanley J. Pawelek, 21 men turned out for the sport. This group included some men who had considerable experience, and others with less experience but a great deal of enthusiasm . The only games scheduled of this season are those of a three-game series with the St. Mary's college for the intercollegiate championship of Winona. The baseball squad includes : John

Kozlowski, short stop; Myles Peterson, catcher; Art Wilson, Luther McCown, and Lyle Arns, pitchers; Bob Thurley, third base; Louis Hoover, Harold Grudem, and John Wachs, first base; Loren Wood, Bob Parker, Donald Laudon, Berger Ostmoe, Bob Townsend, Al Pawelek, John Marholic, and Warner Buswell, outfield . Other candidates are: Eugene Wing and Don Crowl, second base; George Lehmkuhl, catcher; and Leslie Schafer, third base .

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W.A.A . Board

Seated - Miss Pendergast, G . Grimm, R. Richards, P. Meyer, Miss Talbot. Standing - L. Simons, B. Fail ing, C. Breyer, M. Bervcn, M. Engstrom, L. Barry.

The Women,s Athletic Board

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HE Women's Athletic Board has for its general purpose the fostering of true sportsmanship, the promotion of health and physical efficiency, the stimulation and maintenance of interest in athletics, and the encouragements of good fellowship among women of the college. As the administrative unit of the Women's Athletic association, the Board has for its motto: "A sport for every girl and every girl in a sport ." Specifically, the Board cooperates with the Physical Education department to provide opportunity for class instruction for beginners in various sports, to arrange for participation in sports, and games and tournaments in season and recreational activities, and to cooperate with the men's intra-mural board in providing opportunities for men and women of the college to participate in such recreational activities as are sultable for mixed participation.

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The following activities are sponsored by the board : Fall-sports - Tennis, golf, kittenball, volley ball, hockey, soccer, and horseshoe. Winter sports - Skating, skiing, tobogganing, basketball, indoor baseball, deck tennis, hand tennis, paddle tennis, pingpong, badminton, shuffleboard and quolts. Spring sports - Tennis, golf, kittenball, volley ball, horseshoe. At the close of each quarter the Board provides for recognition of members who have participated in some sport. Last fall a "Paul Bunyan" feed was served at the "Logging Camp" to about fifty members . At this meeting Christine Breyer received the large chenile "W" for having earned 1,000 points thru participation . At the close of the winter quarter a "Basketball Bounce" was held at "Dribble Inn" .

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The Physical Education Club T

HE Physical Education Club was organized in 1921 by Miss Lewis. The club has accomplished a great deal during its fifteen years of activity. It is composed of majors and minors in the field of physical education. The purposes of the club are to promote a feeling of unity among members in the physical education department and to raise the ideals and standards in physical education. The motto, to which the group well lives-up is, "Play for play's sake". The activities the club has taken part in are numerous. Play meetings are often held in which seasonal sports are played. An all-clay camping trip was taken early last fall. Interesting speakers in the

field of education talked to the girls on several occasions. The entire group braided leather whistle cords to take with them when they go to teach. The club assisted in the physical education demonstration by giving a negro tap dance program . This program was repeated for the Alumni Reunion. A spring hike and weiner roast closes every year's activity. This year Christine Breyer served as president of the board; Caroleen Goetting as vice-president; Esther Steffes as secretary; Ruth Richards as treasurer, while Miss Pendergast and Miss Talbot are the advisers.

On Hands and Knees~ L. Morken, M. Bcrvcn, R. Richards, M. King, J. Kalouncr, C. Breyer, H. Krage, M. Buchler.

On Hands- M. Engstrom, D. Mallory. On Ftet - J. Marx, P. Meyer, C. Goetting, A. Hill, E. Steffes.

Physical Education Club

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Athletic Program

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HE Physical Education department and Women's Athletic Board offered a varied program of activities to T . C. girls. As the seasons rotate, so rotate the sports. Winona students are fortunate to have four distinct seasons and excellent facilities for play. The city and T. C. courts and the golf courses are available in the fall, summer, and spring

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for students who are tennis or golfminded. The hills provide excellent places to hike and to have roasts and fries and also provide good tobogganing and skiing. The lake and river may be used for swimming and canoeing in season, and skating and ice-boating are enjoyed during the winter months.

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TENNIS Tennis , doubles and singles, are popular fall and spring sports. Marjorie King has charge of the tennis program for this

year. She has scheduled a tournament for both advanced and beginning tennis players.

HOCKEY AND SOCCER Hockey and soccer are two of the favorite fall sports. The Physical Education majors and minors enjoyed several games of hockey last fall. Liguori Barry, soccer sports head, drew up a soccer tournament. Rivalry and friendly competition ran high between the teams.

Ruth Richards and her team-mates won the tournament . These two outdoor activities encourage the girls to get out-of-doors on the nice fall days and enable all girls to meet the newcomers in friendly games .

GOLF Miss Pendergast instructed a large group of golf enthusiasts in the fundamentals of golf last Fall. They were taught how to hold the club, how to

stand when swinging, and how to swing the club . These girls are now putting their acquired knowledge to use at the Westfield golf course.

SWIMMING saving, the girls learned some valuable teaching methods. Miss Julia Oviat instructed the class .

The Physical Education majors were given swimming lessons at the Y.W .C.A . pool during the fall quarter . Besides perfecting strokes and working on life-

CLOGGING Clogging has become more and more popular the last few years. Both boys and girls take part in the clogging classes Miss Pendergast offers each quarter . This movement towards co-education in the Physical Education department is being carried out extensively in California colleges and the movement is gradually being taken up by other colleges today.

The winter quarter advanced clogging class gave a clever never clog and the beginners put on several country clogs for the assembly. Besides learning new dances and perfecting them, each member of the advanced class is given an opportunity to teach the class a few steps . This indeed, is valuable teaching experience.

VOLLEYBALL Volleyball is a popular late-winter and early-Fall sport . After basketball is over, the volleyball games begin . Paula Meyer the volleyball sports head, has announced an interesting tourna-

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ment which is now in progress. Captains of the teams participating are Elaine Wildgrube, Elsie Blessing, Lois Simon and Margaret Berven .

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Basketball

CHAMPS- P. Meyer, L. Simons, R. Richards, L. Jensen, M. Bcrvcn, E. S[cffcs, M. Schollmcier

Basketball Basketball, for a number of years, has been the most popular sport during the winter months for both boys and girls . During the more recent years, basketball for girls has become intramural in nature rather than intercollegiate, as it formerly has been. Years ago, girls played basketball chiefly as forerunners for the boy's games. Now they carry on the game independently and have in view a three fold purpose : to develop within each player a joy of fellow-cooperat ion and of fun, to gain a sense of playing the game fairly, and to develop a keener interest and spirit of the game. This year about fifty girls came out for basketball. After several weeks of practice, captains were chosen and the

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group was divided into eight teams. Captains were Lois Jensen, Caroleen Goetting, Esther Steffes, Mary Engstrom, Paula Meyer, Margaret Berven, Ruth Richards and Mae Schollmeier. Lois Simon, the basketball sport head, scheduled a Round Robin tournament. This gave each team an opportunity to play against seven teams . The squads headed by Lois Jensen and Mary Engstrom tied for first place, while the other teams gave them stiff competition. After their first tournament, an elimination tournament was run off. Mary Engstrom and her teammates again took first place and Margaret Berven 's team took the consolation honors. Miss Talbot officiated the games.

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COLLEGE FUN Alas.' regardless of their doom The little victims play.' No sense have they of ills to come Nor cares beyond to-day . GRAY .


What is it Miss Brunner is saying to you, Mister Ostmoe? . . . Things all look rather pleasant at present . . . . Mr. Torgerson promises us some fast action . . . Surely, there must be something interesting on the horizon as we look out over the hills . . . Hmmm! Now there's what I call a kite . . . No need for Doc Dafoe and assistants to look so worried, the quintuplets are particularly bright today. Look at

them, all up on their chairs, gurgling and bubbling- happy things! ... Here we have our dean of women backed up against a Shepard Hall tree . . . the "Doc" . . . Miss McDowell . . . Now if the democrats could take their hurdles this easily . . . They won't tell, but it must have been a good one . . . And with the smile of A. T. French we refer you to the next page.

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Parker's doing his good "turn" for the day . . . The school turns out to see the team off . . . Knotty problems in the physics lab . . . Capture of the maid from Zumbrota . . . Trials and tribulations of editors . . . The House of Tillman cracks a smile . . . Another corner of the afore-mentioned lab . . .

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Kindergarten kids all dressed up . . . Ruthie . .. It's hard to tell what S. J. P. is looking at, but we'll give you three guesses as to whom Vic is chasing . .. Who gets that baleful stare, Knopp? . . . Art students are always busy Well, almost always .

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A happy, motley crowd we see . .. Bring on those Gophers! . . . They laughed when I sat down . . . Paul Bunyan had nothing on this crew of huskies . .. Shucks, it's only 20 below - let's go for a swim . . . Ah, it's a bonny lass ye are, Margaret . . . Let's take this one home, shall we, Passmore?

. . . Snow surely is a comfort after hard exercise, don'tcha know? . .. You figure it out, we never heard of the guy . . . Can it be they're looking down on us? .. . Darky's delight . . . Not bad, Al, not bad! .. . West Lodge takes a sunning . . . Art, Blondie, and Don are in a jovial mood .

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Homecoming was a big day. The student body voted a week before the game to have a parade, and what a parade it was! Shepard Hall boasted a large purple football . . . Mabel Ree rode proudly in her place of eminence as Homecoming Queen, Morey's float was built on "Henry's" trusty Chandler . . . Those football men on the Morey door weren't kicking you out by any means . . . Verona Bo-Peep herded her

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black and white sheep . . . The band played vigorously . . . West Lodge carried a lion standing triumphant over the fallen Moorhead dragon . . . Fretz and Mary led cheers . . . The Arrowhead Range Club lent us a saw to help in a massacre . . . Wenonah Schliep kept her weather eye out for heap big dragons ... Winona met the Moorhead dragon with a six-headed one of our own . . . It was a great day. Yes sir! A great day.

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Good old library! . . . College car groans while inconsiderate boys and girls sit atop it and Bill holds apple core coyly . .. Merrily we go to school .. . Wie gehts, Gus? . . . Garvin Heigh ts, fond mem'ries . .. Mother, mother, may I swim . . . Remember the days when we said we'd go on a picnic if summer came on a Sunday this year? . . .

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West Lodge shovels out .. . Ah'm just a ding-dong daddy . . . Blondie and "Quaddie" getting their heads together on this hand-standing business . . . Beautiful Sugar Loaf . . . Zimmy works on a bust for the Little Theatre . . . Lake Winona, if you didn't see the foliage you wouldn't know which side was up. Fine photography, Mr. Reed!

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Volume- 12 Pages

WINONA, MINNESOTA

Number 1

CATALOG AND BULLETIN of

Winona-on-the-Mississippi Previews of Coming Attractions for 1936.-37

Entered as Senior Class Matter at the P. 0. at Winona, Minnesota

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Winona-on-the-Mississippi "E Pluribus Unum"

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"Our course is like that of the mighty Mississippi - lined with bluffs."

ScHOOL MoTTO : Teachers' pet -

Why can't we?

ScHOOL FLOWER : Wallflower .

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Shopping District, Winona, Minnesota

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HE thriving up-to-date business section of downtown Winona offers everything the fastidious college student could desire. In the foreground is shown one of the city's fine department stores, which has for years borne the name of its aristocratic founder, General Merchandise. ·

Prospective Site of College

Plans are underway for a new campus to be located on Garvin Heights. This hill is to be found on the left-hand side of lovely Lake Winona, which has been donated to the city by the college. The new classrooms will be equipped with ventilation and nicely trimmed with class officers and oak furniture . The cooperative cottages at the foot of the promontory will replace the present dormitories. The new chapel building is pictured near the cottages. At 10:30 P.M. the lights will be extinguished by means of a central switch located in the social room, and the Huff Street bridge will be drawn up.

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GENERAL INFORMATION GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS

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HE college is located near the dormitories for purposes of convenience. To a casual observer the college would seem to be bounded on the various sides by Main, Washington, Sanborn, and King Streets . The casual observer is right - it is so bounded. Most of the buildings are fireproof - although fractious employees must not take the term too literally - the largest proportion of said buildings having been constructed within the past century. The Administration Building is a three story brick structure containing offices for the President, the Registrar, the Accountant, and the Secretaries, in addition to the activities room which houses the Winonan and Wenonah staffs. The Science Building comprises the physics and chemistry departments, in addition to the geography, botany, and biology departments. It is the proud boast of the chemistry department that it has frequently stood the acid test. The literature, composition, grammar, and speech classes are held in the English Building. These last mentioned buildings, together with the History Building and the Manual Arts Building are all firmly knit together to form one united whole with the Administration Building. The Library Building and the Training School are used for research and experimentation, although the former is frequently used as a social center in the evenings.

SPECIAL COURSES CoNDUCTING in railroad work.

Classes in conducting are offered for those particularly interested

BooKKEEPING - Comprehensive information as to the special work offered in this field ~ay be had by applying to any of those listed under "Overdue Books" on the main bulletin board. MANUAL TRAINING - Those interested in sweeping, shoveling, etc. and etc., may be enrolled in these courses upon application to N.Y .A. authorities. SPECIALIZED TEACHER TRAINING nominated as class officers.

This work is open only to those particularly

DEBATE AND ORATORY - Work in oratory and debate is given special emphasis . By reason of the training provided in correlation with history and sociology, students are able to argue evasively and time-consumingly during Association meetings.

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ACTIVITIES

Students at Dinner

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N THIS homelike atmosphere students assemble thrice daily to partake of nourishment, physical, mental, and spiritual. Each student is supplied with a napkin, a plate, a glass or cup, according to his choice, and the necessary implements for chopping and shoveling. The student does not pay extra for these conveniences they come with the food . Few rules are necessary and those which have been evolved grew out of the suggestions of the students themselves. They include such as the following : l. Any student caught reaching for the pickles, etc., during the invoking of Grace is restrained from so doing unless over one-half of the table group follows suit . 2. When reaching for bread, at least .one foot of the reacher must remain on the floor . When reaching for other than the staple foods, both feet must be kept on the floor . ~· ~ rj1A 3. The server need serve to each receiver only once. After that it is a question of individual skill .

The Athletic Field

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ACTIVITIES (Continued)

Shepard Hall Girls on Spring Outing, 1936.

Some Facts About Dormitory Life Each dormitory has one official bell-girl and several belles. At 10:30 girls come in and lights go out. Any disturbance may be reported to the house-president in the event that a preliminary investigation does not reveal that she is the disturbing element herself. Study hours are observed from a distance. It is expected that during study hours students will lower their voices to a scream. A progressive faction in each of the dormitories has taken up cudgels against the de-sofa-ization of the social room and the stricter enforcement of study hours. "Protect our wild life," is their plea.

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CURRICULUM

''Learning by Doing"

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HE project method of teaching is being employed by this class in Advanced Alphabet Work during one of their laboratory periods. When the alphabet has been completely worked out, this group will be promoted to Primary Reading. Classes in art are given for those ·desiring such work. Courses included are: drawing with a pencil, drawing with a pen, drawing in sand, drawing pay, and drawing room. The first step in producing future artists is to enable them to make their mistakes seem intentional. Next, an objectionable conceit is developed so that no one can stand being around the students, in order that they may get the necessary solitude. This conceit also helps the artists tell, and perhaps convince others, of the greatA Member of the Class in Court ness of their work. With this Procedure. preparation, developing the talent is totally unnecessary. Art Student at Work

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CURRICULUM ( Continued )

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Member of Mathematics Class Demonstrates Work with Angles.

Don't Be A Lone Fish - Come to Winona and Get in the Swim .

ARE YOU A FAILURE? - Do people laugh when you amble over to the piano? Learn now to make their laughter turn to amusement - come to Winona, and let our music department do the rest . Are you tongue-tied at the crucial moment? Do you ever say to yourself, "Gracious me, but I wish I had a better vocabulary?" Come to Winona, and continue your wishing here . Do you ever flinch and wince and things when you are walking on the beach and you hear people hiss, "Skinny!" Do you ever envy the bulging bicuspids (or is it biceps?) of some tanned Apollo, the alluring curves of some hennaed Venus? Come to Winona and do rural practice teaching. Your friends will not believe you are the same person. The Wenonah staff is sponsoring a "free tuition" contest, the rules of which are as follows : 1. Simply tear the cover off a 1936 Wenonah and send it with $15 in cash to

Feature Editor, Wenonah Activities Room Winona State Teachers College Winona, Minnesota . 2. The $15 bills will be put in a hat and each member of the Wenonah staff will be allowed to draw one, or two, or three, depending on the number of contestants. The last bill in the hat will be the winning bill, and if the owner can identify it blind-folded, he or she will be entitled to one quarter's free tuition at Winona-on -the-Mississippi . 3. Plan now to enter this epoch-making contest!

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ATHLETICS

Football Team in Action

FOOTBALL HE Winona Pilgrims (so termed because they make so much progress) are shown in this picture taken during scrimmage. The boys have maintained an unbroken record this year. The squad is divided into three sections: the first string, or those with the best line; the second string, or those with the next best line; and the scrub team, for clean-up purposes. A high grade of intelligence is deemed necessary to athletes in this college . This season an outstanding left guard was demoted to quarterback because he stated in a test that a pacifist is something used to keep a baby quiet. Rigorous training rules are observed - posted on the bulletin board .

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TRACK A recent survey showed that our fastest track men owe their success to rising at 7 :55 and getting to an 8 :00 o'clock class. SWIMMING For those not satisfied with the swimming pool located on the regular athletic field, and believed by the unimaginative to be a drinking fountain, the college has provided a fine river, known as the Mississippi, for aquatic sports. If it is not the swimming but the pool in which one is interested, one is referred to several genteel establishments on the main drag .

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End of Catalog and Bulletin

• NoTE: Rest of page may be used for autographs - honest, it may-'

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Poetic Attempts ON SATURDAY For three long weeks I've been an earthling. I've walked on small and narrow streets I've thought small thoughts I've dealt with petty trifles And wept over them. I've looked up at white mansions I thought them huge and marvelled at their beauty. But on Saturday, Ah yes, on Saturday I shall leave them all. I'll put aside my dog-eared books And climb, Until I reach the summit of the highest neighbor hill, And then I'll feel exalted! I'll look down with pity Upon the minuteness of the white mansion, I'll think with scorn upon the petty trifles And laugh to think I'd ever wept O'er anything so small. HELEN

L.

SMITH .

SONNET I meant to glorify you with my praise And so, heaped eulogies upon your head . I told you that I liked the things you said And liked the ways you said them. Entire days I spent in praising you - in writing lays In which to praise you more, the ev'nings sped Away. I sent those notes and while you read I thought of your eyes, your lips and lovely ways. In earnest zeal to make you great, I Told every compliment there is to tell, Exalted you with every little speech Or song. To ra:ise you very, very high This my plan, has succeeded all too well I fear, I've raised you now beyond my reach! W . FRANZMANN. MY PRIDE My pride is like a small matchTipped blue and red; It makes a little flare when lit, But oh, it is so black when dead. HELEN

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TO PEACE How sweet the thought That you and I - a German and a Dane Are now the best of friends For that is as it should be! We may have met upon the field of battleArrayed each in his country's uniform, With intents as murderous as vile Merely for the purposeOf showing loyalty To a false, trumped-up ideal Made to appear like the bubbly foam That covers and conceals The stench-exuding water 'neath it . But as this foam is dissipated it reveals The grim reality in form Too true and horrid. I might have shot you stabbed you killed you . Or you have murdered me. How infinitely finer! How much more natural That we should meet like this As friends whose bonds Will live and ever grow more strong While we work together for the good Of all humanity. FREDERICK NELSON.

A BROWN PETAL Crippled I am, Enfeebled with age and long labor, The flowers that once bloomed gayly along my path Have withered, The rose it's pinkest bloom has lost And turned a rusty brown as I watched it. What need have I for life? What happiness engendered? That I should live on for countless years When all my loved have fallen by the wayside And I alone remain to shed Their unshed tears . Just one more day today Each day alike, With gray purged path and rusty look Upon each naked tree and shadowy nook, Doth to my shivering form send further chill, Will rack this enfeebling body 'Til it's still.

SMITH.

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Speaking

or Things

"The time has come," The Walrus said, "To speak of many things.

We think we now

We trust that you

Have spoken of

Will read right on -

A goodly bunch of things

You'll learn so many things

Of faculty, and sophomores

Of where to buy

And freshmen sprouting wings;

Your coat and hat,

Of sundry other stuff

Your ice-cream cones and rings.

We wrote

In short, we're sure you'll find

And now, the ads we brings.

The stuff To make you feel like kings.

So patronize these merchants Be sure they don't get missed, For anyone can see that they're One reason we exist.

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ADVERTISEMENTS

TO THE public spirited business men of Winona whose liberal patronage has helped to make this book possible. Please accept our thanks.

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And it's some time since last we ate, We sit a-sousin' mighty happy Boldin' damsels on our lappy. We think ah, nithin' of the miles Our Ford V-8's in little whiles Can take us back from whence we came,

"Tam O'Shanter - 1936" By

WILLIAM FRANZMANN

When holy Willies leaves the street, And thirsty neighbors, neighbors meet, And as the hours are getting late

'Prtewert 'Photos COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE

PRIEWERT STUDIO 69 East 4th Street Films Developed

Application Photos 25 for $1.00 50 for $1.50

Picture Framing

GEO.H.PLETKE STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES

Exclusive FERNDELL Agency

Stager J ewelry Store

~tcbcnson's

W. ] . WARMINGTON

Smart Apparel For Women

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY AND REP AIRING Corner Third and Main Sts. Winona, Minnesota

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"If it's new you'll find it here"

COURTESY

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W. F. PELZER

Campus Beauty Shoppe

"Tail or for Your Success"

Campus Sweet Shop

Custom Tailoring

AND

Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Ryan 451 Huff St.

RELIABLE INSURANCE

Compliments of the

Winona Insurance Agency Exchange Bldg.

Winona, Minn.

Hotel Winona

PHONE 2875

Compliments of

Latsch & Son Co. ·Since 1867

WHOLESALE GROCER Winona, Minn.

COMPLIMENTS OF

Shoe

B& D

Store

"Let us fit your feet"

MASTER CLEANERS AND DYERS

s Phone 3030

Where sits our sulky, sullen dame Keeping her wrath all nice and bottle With her new hot water bottle. This truth found honest Tam soon arter He had stepped upon the starter. Oh, Tam, hadst thou but been so wise To take your own good wife's advice! She called you well a lazy shirker Bad as a W. P. A. worker.

68-70 East Fourth St.

But to our tale: on this fair night, Our Tam got lit up like a light. He nivver could've got so happy By takin' oney one sma' droppie. The cordyals doon his throat did slither And honest Tam was all a-dither. Elephants on the chandeliers Skeered him but he quelled his fears By drinking whisky after whisky He felt first fine, and later, frisky.

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WE ARE HAPPY TO HAVE PLAYED A PART IN THE COMPILATION OF THIS ... THE 1936 WENONAH

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Greene Engraving Co. Newton Bldg.

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St. Paul, Minnesota

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McConnon & Company MEMPHIS, TENN.

WINONA, MINN.

A Winona Company which manufactures a complete line of over 170 guaranteed products, including Foods, Toilet Articles, Good Health Products, Stock and Poultry Raisers Supplies, Insecticides, and many other necessities. ····~J····

Has rendered dependable service to homes in cities, towns, and on the farms for almost 50 years.

*

R. D. Cone Company

The Star Shoe Repair Shop

WHOLESALE AND RET AIL HARDWARE 66-70 East Second Street PHONE 4052 SINCE 1855

Cleaning, Dyeing and Repairing 174 Main St.

When in Winona EAT AND SLEEP At The

Edwin A. Brown PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST

Williams Hotel & Cafe

THE REXALL STORE

Kodaks -

Frank and John Williams, Props. ·Excellent Food at New Low Prices

' ·Adieu, adieu, kind friends,'' he shoutit Loudly so that nane could doubt it. Then he stepped upon the starter An' dashed off in his petrol-darter, Keepin' one hand on the throttle And anither on his bottle:

The tavern lookit unco funny A slighterin' snake was after bunny, Who lightnin ' quick dived under table As fast and quick as he found able. Came the time that Tam should leavin', With a sorrow quite bereavin'.

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Kodak Supplies

117 W. Third St.

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Strange and odd he found the highway It first went your and then went my way. Tammie had to keep on switching Of the wheel to keep from ditching His old trusty, rusty Lizzie. For he found the highway dizzy. Full of critters strange, the night was Making queer sounds; funny buzz-buzz. Off from one side there came streakin'

A long, loud thing with smoke a-leakin' From a hole on top; and whistling Mournful set his hair to bristling. Then his courage with likker braced, He the locomotuff raced, Shriekin', yelpin', scootin', snortin', He made the race quite sum pin' sportin'. Bearin' on him, the en gin puffin', "Poof," thought Tam," 'he's only bluffin' .''

FORD HOPKINS COMPANY DRUGS

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52-54-56 E. Third Street TOILETRIES TEA ROOM

~9/lC. ~

163 Ceme:,:.

Winona

GATE CITY LAUNDRY

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164 West Third

LADIES AND MISSES READY-TO-WEAR

Phone 2888

J. C. PENNEY Co. DEPT. STORE

Clothing and Shoes for the Entire Family

FINE FURS SINCE 1897 108 W . 3rd St.

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Phone 2202

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Wl!i~~LD BAY STATE MILLING

Co.

WINONA, MINN.

THE COLLEGE BARBER SHOP

Compliments of

Allyn S. Morgan

Will satisfy your particular appearance

GIVE US A TRIAL "We appreciate your business" C. K. SuNDBY, Prop.

Satisfactory Service Always

GRAAF'S

Rademacher Drug Co.

JEWELER

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS LADIES' SPORTSWEAR Winona Phone 2124

DRUGS -

59 West Second Street

A Complete Line of

Compliments

Meats, Groceries, Picnic Supplies

Dial2358

WINONA, MINN.

Locomotive going to fire Bereft old Liz of her back tire.

Came the crossin' nearer, nearer, Every second life was dearer. But the train intent on wreckin' Had, too bad, fergot to reckon On the pick-up of that auto At least it hadn't as it ought toFor with one spurt, the master safe was, But the rear end, oh deah me, suz!

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F. W. Woolworth Co.

WERNER & OSTROM 519 Huff St.

PAINT- GLASS

Now lissen to me, Scotties true, Never do as Tam did do, For cars less tires don't look sa nifty And what is worse - it is na thrifty. The End .

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Turn In for Gas and Oil WHEREVER YOU SEE THIS SIGN

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ONCE - ALWAYS )

Cities Service Oil Co.

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COMPLIMENTS OF

WINONA CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION FIRST NATIONAL BANK MERCHANTS BANK WINONA NATIONAL AND SAVINGS BANK

Eugene Ormandy - Conductor

COMPLIMENTS

Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra

Says-York Band Instruments

of

Have Material ly Improved the Brass Section of his Orchestra

Siebrecht Floral Co.

W. J. DYER & BRO. DISTRIBUTORS

St. Paul,

Springdale Dairy Co.

BAILEY & BAILEY

PASTEURIZED MILK, CREAM AND BUTTERMILK OF SUPERIOR FLAVOR 529 Huff St. Dial 3982

Dealers in DRY GOODS, CLOAKS, SUITS Carpets, Draperies, Wallpaper

Winona Electric Construction Co.

The College 'Inn

IT'S A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE

450 Huff St. MEALS, LUNCHES FOUNTAIN SERVICE C. J. McVey, Proprietor

''Everything Electrical'' 178 Main St. Phone 5802

DORMITORY ANTICS No record of school life would be complete without a reference to the activities, derisively called antics, of the dormitory dwellers, derisively called inmates. A complete catalogue of these antics would take too much room and would be too much

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work, so we won't do that. A short list won't hurt. Favorite sports are: shortsheeting*, eating, crabbing, over-eating, singing, talking, shouting, whistling, and very, very rarely, studying. * An amusing stunt by which the victim breaks a leg getting into bed .

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WINONA HOT SPRINGS Winona hot springs are, contrary to popular opinion, not springs of hot water, but rather, the reference is to the warmth of the season directly preceding summer. Spring comes with a rush in this town,

and as the needle of a metallic thermometer is deflected, so is the fancy of young men turned. When the fancy of young men is turned, that is, in common parlance, 'nuf said.

Compliments of Winona Theatre Co.

STATE ... \VINON A ... A·v oN

HOLDEN'S

COMPLIMENTS OF

S. S. KRESGE

523 Huff Street Can supply you with Toilet Articles, School Supplies, and Expert Kodak Work.

Winona, Minn.

Baker & Steinbauer "Better Shoes" Winona- La Crosse- Rochester Eau Claire

Supply Your Needs At- CHOATE'S

Building For Tomorrow on the Foundations

of Today

H. Choate & Company Established 1861

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WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE ESTABLISHED 1858-8800 GRADUATES

Offers a combined general and vocational education at smaller expense to the student than almost any other higher institution of learning.

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Grades and High School

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Elementary Schools

Supervision, High School, etc. Academic Fields Fine Arts, Music Industrial Arts Physical Education

Rural Schools Kindergarten-Primary Primary Grades Intermediate Grades Upper Grades

Its four-year curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor of Education and its two-year to the diploma, with suitable and specific certification for public-school service. The Junior College program of the first two years is a boon to the financially limited students.

Send for Yearbook and other literature

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T. C. CAVES AND TUNNELS The subterranean life of this college is one which receives very little attention. Vast and amazing as the labyrinth of tunnels and underground chambers is, there exist no guides, no personally conducted tours through these catacombs. The policy of the administration is against the exploitation of these natural resources. A pity it is too, for freshmen often lose two

or three weeks of school trying to find their way out. The place would be a veritable heaven for a hide-and-seek party, but such active rompings are disparaged by the previously mentioned administration . A movement is now underfoot to make the school more tunnel conscious. It's a good idea.

NATHE MEAT MARKET

Compliments of a

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QUALITY MEATS 211 East Third St.

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Louis Thurow Box Factory

Botsford Lumber

Manufacturers of Window and Door Frames Packing Boxes and Crates Quality Mill Work Third & Wilson

FRIEND

Company Complete Line of LUMBER For Manual Training PHONE 3552 WINONA, MINN.

WINONA, MINN.

Compliments of COMPLIMENTS OF THE

Mississippi Valley Public Service Co .

Winona Clinic

.The George Hillyer Furniture Co. ESTABLISHED 1870

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INCORPORATED 1910

"The store where you find the nationally advertised lines" FURNITURE, RUGS, LINOLEUMS, CHINA, GLASSWARE, PICTURES, MIRRORS, BABY CARRIAGES, LAMPS AND SHADES

Winona, Minnesota

166-168 Center St.

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JONES & KROEGER COMPANY

PRINTERS- BINDERS STATIONERS

108- 110 E. Third St.

WINONA, MINN.

Printers of the I9J6 Wenonah

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1936 - LEAP YEAR We had a hunch there was something we should have mentioned before, and here it is almost the end of the book and we're just coming to it . It is only fitting and proper that note be made of the fact that this year was leap year . Don't think for a moment that this fact went by unnoticed . The reversal of the natural order was most noticeable at some of the school

parties. The girls were required to call for their gentlemen friends, who would be ready in "just a minute," said minute coming about one half an hour later in accordance with a time-honored custom, established, we believe, by women. Girls exchanged dances, bought food, walked men home, etc., all carried out to the finest details. Men gloried in it, and the women didn't mind much .

THE following firms have contributed to the financial success of this issue of the W' enonah. lf7e appreciate your patronage. STUDIOS OF G. E . GRIFFIN KRATZ CANDY SHOP HENRY G. HANSON, JEWELER QUALITY FUR SHOP ROYAL TAXI FEDERAL BAKERY CO . SUPER CLEANERS WILLIAMS BOOK AND STATIONERY LINDSAY STUDIO KALMES TIRE SERVICE

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AUTOGRAPHS

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AUTOGRAPHS

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