Wenonah Yearbook - 1935

Page 1

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Historical Literary Section As all worthwhile things do, the Winona State Teachers College had its origin in an ideal. It has been generally conceded that Horace Mann was the first active promoter of that ideal. As a leading American advocate of education in the early eighties, he spent some time in inspecting the six normal schools in Prussia. Upon his return he stated that he believed the main defect in our public school system to be unprepared teachers . The following twenty years witnessed sincere attempts to remedy this condition. In 1858, Dr. John D. Ford of Winona, suggested the normal school system for our own state. The city of Winona, through its success in raising $7,000 by means of subscription, became the site of the new school which was the first of its kind to exist in the northwest. On August 2, 1858, the school was founded and two years later on Sep-

tember 3 it was formally opened. How odd that first school morning would have seemed to the students of this generation! Two teachers and twenty applicants met in the upper room of the town Pres. Ogden hall, a building which had been temporarily loaned by the people of Winona. This same considerate and generous spirit still exists among the citizens and has come to be known as their heritage. According to Mrs. Howe, who was privileged in being a member of that first group of hopefuls, the seats were benches such as we now see in city parks. Although the students were strangers to each other, one purpose united their efforts. They were preparing to teach in the schools of the new state and all were determined to help the founders in making the venture successful.

<:

THE FIRST CLASSROOM


SCHOOL PICNIC AT SUGAR LOAF

Principal John Ogden voiced the sentiment of many when he said, in speaking of the institution, "She launches forth freighted with the dearest hopes, the earnest prayers, and the highest ambition of the leading minds of the great and free people of the Northwest." The three R's - reading, writing and arithmetic were the principal subjects taught, although a course in Latin and special method studies were also introduced. Probably the most exciting and impressive incident enjoyed by that first class was the trip to the first teachers' convention held at Rochester. We are told that they traveled in two stage coaches and on their return engaged in a race down Stockton hill. No accidents occurred, however. Had not Principal Ogden been a man of sterling qualities, probably the ideal would have died in its infancy. His initiative and courage were invaluable in providing a firm foundation for the school. However, in December of the year 1861, he resigned to take up arms for his country. The Civil War became the center of all interest for the next

few years. Unfortunately, competent teachers could not be secured and funds were inadequate; hence, in March of 1862 the school was closed. It was reopened in 1864 with William Phelps as its principal. It was he who established the school on a permanent basis. Mainly through his intercession the state replaced the small frame building with a new school valued at $134,000. Of this Pres . Phelps amount the citizens of Winona donated $32,450. showing their desire to have the normal school located here. The cornerstone was laid in 1869 with impress! ve ceremony. It was their vision which induced the founders of the school to choose three young men to go to the Boston Institute of Technology for special work. Each of these was promised a place on the faculty and a salary of $800 per year upon his return. One of these young men was Charles Morey; all three accomplished much, both for their alma mater and for the state. In 1876 the legislature failed to make an appropriation for the three normal schools of the state . Our heartfelt · gratitude is due the people of Winona who through public subscription and

UPSTAIRS ONLY, 1860-69

personal sacrifice kept the Winona school open until the necessary funds were secured . The Honorable Thomas Simpson deserves mention for heroic work in this campaign.


The routine of the school remained primarily the same during the next twenty years. Under Charles Morey a course of study was organized for high school graduates. Principal Morey was a fluent orator and a fearless critic. His ambitious spirit was very noticeable and fully appreciated during his years of directorship from 1888 to 1904. Probably Irving Shepard· s greatest achievement during his years of service lay in the establishing of the first kindergarten west of the Mississippi. Though funds for its maintenance were lacking, this venture succeeded because of the great enthusiasm of its founder and the courageous women who worked with him. Dr. Shepard's wish was to have the Normal School as up-to-date as possible. Being a rigid disciplinarian, he felt that vigorous work was essential to the making of good teachers. Probably his success in keeping the school and members in an up-andcoming condition was responsible for the one hundred fifty percent increase in attendance during the following two years. This necessitated the raising of

entry requirements and the addition of two wings to the old main building. Nineteen years Dr. Shepard gave to the school, and some of the traditions which we cherish in our college today were strict practices for the students to observe then. To show that even at this early date the school was no dead wire we present the championship football team of 1896. Pres. Morey This team succeeded in defeating both Carleton and the University of Minnesota Medics. The team as pictured are: Top Row: D. H. Roberts (Amherst, coach); Kemple (R. H.); Lehnerts (Ass't Manager); Ralph Wedge (F. B.); F. K. Rowell, Owen Parker (L. H.); W. Merrill (Manager); Merrit Horen. Second Row: Guse (R. E .); Loughrey (R. T.); Keenan (R. G.); McGulggan (Capt . Q. B.); Jones (C.); J. Harris. Bottom Row: F. K. Bean, Chris Graden (L. E.); Bert Wallace (C.); Holmes (L. T.); Ristey (L. G.). Under President Millspaugh, who

EARLY CLASS GROUP


CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL TEAM ---::- 1896

served between 1898 and 1904, stress was laid upon the necessity of fusing intellectual and physical education. As a great advocate of student activities Dr. Millspaugh was influential in enlarging the physical education courses. However, he realized also the importance of the cul rural side of education and his breadth of view showed him the necessity of both. Pres. Shepard His aim had been to conserve the best elements in the institution and to add those which seemed expedient. According to his many friends and sincere admirers he truly saw the fulfillment of that aim before his resignation in 1904. In that year Mr. Guy E. Maxwell, previously director of the training department, became president of the school. During the first· five years of his service he was influential in helping to secure an appropriation of $55,000 to provide for the kindergartens, a gymnasium and a library . This greatly

enlarged the institution. By 1908 the cost of the school buildings, furnishings, and grounds had reached $350,000. Probably it would be interesting to search through the records to see what the student body and faculty -were experiencing in the way of school entertainments and activities in the early days of 1908. Even then it was the custom for the faculty to give a reception for the students. Besides Y.W .C.A. parties and an S.E.M .E.A. convention

BEST IN NORTHWEST, 1869-1922


the students looked to their chapel hour for entertainment; in November of that year Miss Mabel Marvin (whom we all know) told in chapel the story of ''Five Pounds of Cinnamon.'' Also we might mention the fact that a Mendelssohn centenary program was given the chorus in February, 1908. Although school customs have changed but slightly during the last twenty years, it is not our privilege to hold commencement exercises in the Winona Opera House as did the graduates of that time. Pres. Millspaugh A very vital need was met when Governor Johnson signed a bill appropriating $75,000 for a Women's Building. The attendance was increasing greatly and women formed more than eighty percent of those who entered. It seems that our school has always been foremost in leading some worthwhile movement in the city of Winona; the year 1910 proved no exception to the rule. We are told from

LOST BY FIRE, 1922

old and reliable sources that it was the Winona State Normal School which started the pioneering for playgrounds in Winona. A vast improvement in the recreatory space belonging to the school itself served to set an example which produced effects even now visible. In 1912 Miss Florence Richards succeeded Miss Katherine Kenaga as Dean of Women. She was a graduate of the University of Michigan and had spent two summers in graduate study and two summers in Europe for the same purpose . Miss Richards proved invaluable in the forming of a more socjal

-.-.

GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM


FIRST DEGREE GROUP

sp1nt among the women students of the college. Groups were organized for "neighborhood social purposes" and probably much "little sister" work was done in this way. The a vail able women's dormitories were filled to overflowing. It might interest certain of the men students of our college to know that at one time West Lodge was called West Morey Lodge and was the resident boarding place of twenty young ladies. Probably the most outstanding occurence during the year 1915 was the dedication of the New Model Training School named f-or William Phelps. The program began with the 's chool hymn "Hail Winona!" sung by the students. Director Somsen deposited in the cornerstone a bronze box containing the appropriate papers. The main speaker of the day was Governor Eberhart who gave a stirring message to his listeners. He stated the main purpose of the new school in these words, ''The aim of this elementary school is to assist children to appreciate the values of life and to get control of them." Probably the secondary or correlated purpose for

which Phelps School was established was so that the leaders and students of the Normal School might have an institution in which to apply those principles of method "upon which the best educational thought and experience have been fully agreed." TheW orld War changed conditions in the personnel, material, and spiritual affairs of the school. Attendance was decreased by the withdrawal of Pres. Maxwell many students into various important affairs closely or remotely connected with the war. Of course, the number of men enrolled was reduced very greatly and a number of the faculty also enrolled in the army. The members of the school looked with pride on the honor roll which grew from week to week. Time was given to many phases of war work that could be done at the school and the dormitories outside of class hours; also, chapel reriods were given to the furthering o war work. Even the managing of the building was affected by the war, the supply of coal restricting the running of the ventilating fans. On February 22, 1918, a Service Emblem was dedicated to commemorate the service under the flag of forty-five young men and women of the Winona State Normal School. The forty-five students were represented on the emblem by forty-five stars . A copy of this emblem was placed outside the school where all might see it. Probably I might insert here the fact that Winona ended its 1917-1918 foot-

PRESENT BUILDING


ball season by defeating St. Cloud 28 to 13. Here's to your luck in 1935, team! You see, we· ve always had the material and all it takes is will to keep them from "getting our goat." With the coming of peace, a new impetus was felt in the school. Constructive, worthwhile work continued while new theories and tales of astonishing inventions and discoveries were being poured into the avid ears of Winona Normal School students. As a climax to the work in the mechanical field, "Cinderella" was displayed after many hours of anxious computation and hard work. "Cinderella" was a small cyclecar built under the direction of Mr. John H. Sandt. A very significant change occurred in 1921 when the state legislature adopted the name Winona State Teachers College and authorized the College Board to grant the degree, Bachelor of Education. Possibly no one else ever felt more proud than these young men and women who, in June 1926, received the first degrees to be awarded by

the college. All Winona remembers that Sunday morning in December 1922 when the old college building burned. The fire did little damage to the library and model school but it destroyed entirely the main building which had been the home of the school for more than fifty-five years. Amid many great handicaps the school carried on its work for the following two years. To the heroic teachers of whom Miss Gildemeister was one, as well as to the "never-give-up" students goes a laurel for their courageous attitude. On the opening day of the school year in 1924, the students were privileged to occupy a complete new fireproof building costing with equipment $632,000 and known as College Hall. That is the building which we, the students of 1935, occupy today. It is a structure which houses deep-rooted traditions of yesterday and lofty aspirations for tomorrow. These traditions are imbedded in the spirit and the life of the institution. Many of them, such as chapel

-.-.

SUMMER SCHOOL GROUP


1922 FIRE

exercises, modified student government, and the standards of sportsmanship are probably not thought of as traditions to the outsider. Even our appreciation of the beauty of our natural surround-

ings has become traditional; in the views from Garvin Heights, the rustic scenery on Birch Trail, and the boldness and age of Castle Rock we can read as from a history text. These landmarks have watched for years our progress of a school and probably will for hundreds of years to come. In our diamond jubilee year we are endeavoring through a picturesque pageant to bring a realization of what has been wrought since the first class group sat in the upper room of the city hall. It is also our wish to show in this way our heartfelt appreciation to each and everyone who have helped to make the Winona State Teachers College what it is today. And when we say this we are thinking not only of the building but of the spiritual values of our school, for they are "more real and lasting than its walls."

BIRCH TRAIL


History of the Year's Activities FALL QUARTER

F

~ESHMAN

Day, Septem?er 3, which ended a Freshman Mtxer w the gymnasium at eight o'clock marked the informal opening of the fall quarter. Registration and the formal opening occurred the following day. Initiations at the three dormitories and by the Men's Club provided amusement for several weeks but the Stunt Night party and the faculty reception were the social high lights of the first month . Friendship Day, a traditional observance, sponsored by the Y.W.C.A . culminated the "get-acquainted" activities. A lecture on modern plays by Dr. LeRoy Arnold and the production of his latest play, " Then and Now" by the city League of Women Voters as guests of the college League were appreciated by the entire college. The Homecoming celebration was the big event of the fall quarter. On the evening of October 19, in spite of the inclement weather, a big pep fest was staged in the auditorium. The next day's program consisted of the Homecoming assembly at 10 A.M . in the auditorium, a parade, football game with St . Cloud, receptions at Morey and Shepard Halls in the afternoon and a dance sponsored by the Die-No-Mo Club in the evening. A reunion was held at the Curtis Hotel in Minneapolis during the M.E.A. convention. A "travel party" arranged by the Intermediate Grade Club for the entertainment of the entire college and the presentation of the· ''Music Master'' by the Hanscom Players under the auspices of the Wenonah Players concluded the social activities for the first quarter. 1n

WINTER QUARTER Everyone was back on December 3 after an interesting Thanksgiving holiday ready for the new term to begin. On that evening the College Women's Club, as guests of the faculty members who belong to that organization, presented Miss Vera Brittain, an English author and lecturer. Christmas was observed at the dormitories with the second annual Christmas dinner dance preceding the lovely program of Christmas music presented by the music department assisted by Miss Sutherland, who told a Christmas story. After the program an hour of dancing in the gymnasium completed the evening's activities .

Basketball games were the main form of amusement during the winter quarter . Music by the college band, songs and cheering by the student body as well as the stunts put on by the physical education department provided further entertainment for the spectators. The presentation of "Minick" by the Wenonah Players, the Die-No-Mo show and several excellent members of the Columbia Community Concert course, which included the recital by the Vienna Boys' Choir, and the program of Spanish dances by Madame Goya, furnished further entertainment during the winter quarter. There were also two all-college dancing parties sponsored by the Country Life Club and the other by the Men's Club.

SPRING QUARTER Most of the activities during this quarter centered around the celebration of the seventyfifth anniversary. Concerts by the Mendelssohn and A polio Clubs and two concluding numbers of the concert course were given during the first part of the quarter. The May Fete sponsored by the kindergarten department, the Southeastern Track Meet at which teams from nearby high schools competed and the Play Day for the children of the rural schools associated with the college were held in May. The Prom, which was held on June 1, was the first of the commencement week activities . On Sunday evening a supper for the seniors was given at Shepard Hall after which the baccalaureate services were held in the auditorium. An organ recital by Emmett Raymond was given on the Memorial Organ on Tuesday and on Wednesday. The first presentation of the Masque, depicting the historical background and traditions of the college, was given under the direction of Mr. Henry Youngerman who was assisted by committees composed of faculty members and students. The Alumni reunion and banquet were held at Morey Hall on Thursday and the Masque was repeated in the evening. Commencement exercises on June 7 in the auditorium of College Hall, at which Miss Theda Gildemeister delivered the Commencement Address, culminated the year's activities.





PRESIDENT GUY E. MAXWELL A.B. Hamline University A.M. Columbia University Ped .D. (Hon.) Miami University Ped . D. (Hon.) Hamline University


ROY B. TOZIER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

ERWIN S. SELLE

A. B. Park College A.M . University of Illinois Ph. D. University of Iowa

SOCIOLOGY AND GOVERNMENT

A. B. Washburn College A. M . Columbia University Ph. D. Columbia Un iversity

FREDERICK A. JEDERMAN HISTORY, DEAN OF MEN

A. B. University of Nebraska A. M. University of Nebraska

NELS MINNE CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

A. B. St. Olaf College M. S. Univcrsitv of Wisconsin Ph. D. Universi"ry of Wisconsin

Faculty

ARTHUR T. FRENCH MATHEMATICS

B. S. Harvard University A. M . Columbia University

RAY

J.

SCARBOROUGH GEOGRAPHY

A. B. University of Nebraska A.M. University of Nebraska

WILLIAM H. MUNSON SCIENCE

B. S. Olivet College

WILLIAM A. OWENS PSYCHOLOGY

R. S. University of Chicago A. M. University of Chicago


ELLA MURPHY ENGLISH

A. B. Smith College A.M. University of Wisconsin Ph. D. University of Iowa

WILLIS E. BOOTS ENGLISH AND PSYCHOLOGY

13. S. North Dakota Agricultural College A.M . University of Wisconsin

ROBERT R. REED ENGLISH

A. B. University of Minncsot1. A. M. Columbia University

HELEN A. PENDERGAST PHYSICAL EDUCATION

B. S. Peabody College

A.M. New York University

1934-35

JEAN TALBOT PHYSICAL EDUCATION

A. B. University of Wisconsin A.M . New Yo~k University

EARL GREENE HEAD COACH

A. B. Albany College B. S. Oregon State College A. M . University of Iowa

FLORENCE L. RICHARDS LITERATURE, DEAN OF WOMEN

Ph. B. University of Michigan A. M. University of Michigan

DOROTHY CLARK FINE ARTS

B.S. Missouri State Teachers College A. B. Missouri State Teachers College University of Chicago


WALTER GRIMM MUSIC

13. S. Indiana Stare

Tc<~.chcrs

College

JANET R. ROHWEDER VOICE AND APOLLO

Winona State Teachers College B. S. University of Minnesota

AGNES BARD PIANO

ll. E. Winona State Teachers Collcgc

JEAN BRADY JONES SPEECH AN D DRAMA

A. B. Huron College A. M. Boston University Ph. D. University of Iowa

Faculty

ETIA CHRISTENSEN RURAL EDUCATION

.U. S. Teachers College, Columbia Universi ty A. M. Teachers College, Columbia Un iversity

MILDRED BARTSCH RURAL EDUCATION

13. E. Winona State Teachers College

ROLAND M . TORGERSON INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M . University of Minnesota

STANLEY

J.

PAWELEK

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

D. S. University of Minnesota A. M . University of Minnesota

~-----

--- ·--- - - - - - - - - - -


CHARLES L. SIMMERS DIRECTOR, TRAINING SCHOOL

A. B. Iowa State University A. M. Teachers College, Columbia University

BEULAH BRUNNER SUPERVISOR, JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

B. E. Warrensburg State Teachers College B.S. Columbia University A. M . Ohio State University

GLENN E. FISHBAUGHER JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

A. B. Cornell College University of Minnesota

MAURINE SCOVELL JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

13. S. Pittsburg Kansas, State Teachers College

1934-35

A. M. Columbia University

MARION DAVIS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

A. B. College of St. Teresa

ELLA C. CLARK SUPERVISOR INTERMEDIATE GRADES

13. S. University of Minnesota A. M. University of Mioncsou

MARTHA DALLMANN INTERMEDIATE GRADES

B. S. University of Minnesota A. M. University of Minnesota

CATHRYN CRAMER INTERMEDIATE GRADES

A. B. Iowa State Teachers College


LOUISE C. SUTHERLAND DIREcrOR, KINDERGARTEN

U.S. Teachers College, Columbia University A.M. Teachers College, Columbia Univ.

BERTHA M. SCHWABLE SUPERVISOR, KINDERGARTEN

B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University

JEANNE S. BROUILLETTE PRIMARY GRADES

B.S. University of Minnesota

LAURA 0. FOSTER PRIMARY GRADES

B.S. Iowa State Teachers College

Faculty

EVELYN SEMLING KINDERGARTEN

Winona State Teachers College

MILDRED L. ENGSTROM LIBRARIAN

B. E. Winona State Teachers College Library School, University of Wisconsin

MINNIE ZIMMERMAN ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN

Library School, University of Wiscoosiu Ph. B. Ham line University

FLORETTA MURRAY ART, TRAINING SCHOOL

B. E. Wiooua State: Teachers College


LESLIE GAGE SUPERVISOR, KINDERGARTEN

B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University

HELEN B. PRITCHARD REGISTRAR

A. U. Vassar College

B. S.

Sin~.mo11s

College

ROSALIE VOELKER ACCOUNTANT

ANN SIELAFF OFFICE ASSIST ANT

1934-35

VIOLET KOCHENDORFER OFFICE ASSIST ANT

MARGARET B. MILLER RESIDENT NURSE

Kahler School of

FLORENCE KROEGER JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Domestic Science

VALETA JEFFREY MUSIC, TRAINING SCHOOL

ll. M. Ed. Northwestern University

Nur~ing,

Rochc stu-



·.-



LLOYD AMBROSEN . .

... . . . ... ... ... . Winona

MARY CASSIDY .. .. ..... . . ..... . .. . . . . Rochester

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY

Junior Class Pres.; Senior Class Pres.; Representative Council 3, Pres. 4; International Relations Club, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Joint Finance Comm.; Prom. Comm.; Social Comm.; Wenonah Staff 2, Asst. Sports Ed .; Winonan 1, Asst. Sports Ed.;Junior High Club 1, 2; A Cappella, Vice-Pres. 3.

Newman Club 3, 4; Junior High Club 2, 4; League of Women Voters 4; Wenonah Staff 4, Literary Ed.

ISABEL DOWNING ..... .... . .. .... .. .St. Charles EDUCATION, MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH

LAUREN AMDAHL .

. . . Mabel

Kindergarten Club 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Band 3, 4; W.A.A. 3; Mason Music 4 .

HISTORY, ENGLISH

Apollo 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, Pres. 4; Orchestra 2, 4; Chorus 2, 3, 4; Men's Club 2, 3, 4; Junior High Club 2, 3; Mason Music 4; Debate 4; Wenonah 4, Asst. Business Mgr.; Winonan 4, Asst. Business Mgr.; International Relations Club 4.

MAIZIE AHRENS . . . .. .. . . ..... ... ... . .. . Winona

GRACE ENGER

. .. Hardwick

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY

W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 4; A Cappella 3; Junior High Club 1, 2, 3; Representative Council 3; Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; Winonan 3, Women's Sports Ed.; Wenonah 3, Asst. Women's Sport Ed.; Sportsmanship Comm. 2; Le~tures , Recital, Plays Comm. 3.

MUSIC, ENG LISH

Mendelssohn 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 2; Mason Music 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 2; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; Mixed Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Class Sec. . .. .. Winona

HELEN ENGLISH . H ISTORY, ENG LISH

JOHN BLATNIK .

. . ... Chisholm

W.A.A. 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1; Junior High Club 1, 2, 3; Band 3, Vice-Pres. 4; International Relations Club 4; Winonan 3, Circulation; Wenonah 4, Asst. Picture Ed.

SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Band 2, 3; Orchestra 2, 3, Pres. 4; Debate 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Range Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Senior Class Sec. JOHN FUHLBRUEGGE .

. ... Winona

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, HISTORY, PHYSI CAL ED..U CATJON

CELESTE BURKE .... .. .. . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . Winona

Die-No-Mo 2, 3, 4; Industrial Arts Club 1, 2; VicePres. 3; Joint Athletic Comm. 3; Football 1, 2, 3; ·Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Board 4.

SENIORS


SENIORS

WILLIAM GEBHARD .................... Winona

BETH JOHNSON ......................... Winona

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Track 1, "W" Club 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3; Junior High Club 1, Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winonan, News Editor In tram urals 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 2, 3; Intramural Board

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH

2; 2; 4; 3.

Junior High Club 1, 2; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; League of Women Voters 3; Winonan 4; Wenonah 4, Women's Sports Ed .

JOHN KISSLING .. GEORGE HAJICEK ... ..

............ Winona

. ... Winona

SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HISTORY, ART, SCIENCE, ENGLISH

Freshman Class Pres. ; Sophomore Class Pres.; Senior Class Vice-Pres.; Men's Club 1,' 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Die-No-Mo 1, 2, 3, VicePres . 4; Apollo Vice-Pres. 1, 2, 3, 4; College Choir 1, 2, 3, Pres . 4; Track 3, 4; "W" Club 4; Representative Council 1, 2, Vice-Pres. 1; Art Club 1, 2; Wenonah 2, Features; Band 4.

Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 1; Art Club 4.

CECIL GRONVALL .................... Red Wing SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

Sophomore Class Pres.; Purple Key 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Winonan 3, Ed. in Chief 4; Apollo 1, 2, Business Mgr. 3; Chorus 1, 2, 3; Debate 1, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Wenonah 2; International Relations Club 2, 3, 4.

JOHN HAWKINS ...

EDNA KRUGER ................. Escanaba, Mich . ENGLISH, FRENCH

Junior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 1, Pres. 2; A Cappella 3; Art Club 4.

. . Austin

GEORGE LEHMKUHL.

SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

Football1, 2; Track 1; Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winonan Staff 4.

Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2; "W" Club 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Men 's Club 1, 2, 3, 4.

LOUISE HUNDLEY ................. . .. .. Winona

--

. .... Perham

MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE

CONSTANCE LINDGREN.

. .Red Wing

HISTORY, ENGLISH

EDUCATION, MUSIC

Representative Council 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Junior High Club 3, 4; Art Club 3, 4; Wenonah 4, Snapshots; Prom. Corum. 3.

Y.W.C.A. 2; Primary Club 1, 2, 3, Sec. 4; Intermediate Club 3; Mason Music 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Mendelssohn 4; Chorus 4; A Cappella 3.

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NAOMI LUNDBERG . . . ...... . . .. . . .. . . . St. Paul

WILLIAM OWENS ...... ... .............. Winona

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Y.W.C.A. 2; League of Women Voters 4;Junior High Club 4.

Die-No-Mo; Purple Key; Kappa Delta Pi, Pres. 4; "W" Club, Pres. 4; Men 's Clnb l, 2, 3, 4; Apollo Club l , 2; Track l, 2, 3, 4; Tennis l; Basketball 3.

MARION MciNTIRE.

. .. .. .. .. . . . .. Red Wing

MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Die-No-Mo 3, 4; Mendelssohn 4; .Junior High Clnb l, 2; Chorus 4; Wenonah 2.

BERNICE MESHKE

..... Winona

SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

LORETTA PETERSON .... .. . . . .. . . ... .. . I van hoe SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY, ENGLISH

KATHERINE PHILLIPS.

.. . . .. Reedsburg, Wis .

ENGLISH, HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Wenonah, Picture Ed . 2, Ed. in Chief 4; Winonan, News Ed. 2, Associate Ed. 3; Junior High Club, VicePres. 3, Pres. 4; Country Life Club l; Intermediate Club 2; Beginners Band 2; Y.W .C.A. 2, 3.

.Junior High Club l, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Wenonah 4, Literary Staff; Winonan 4; Physical Education Club 3.

BETTY MILLER . ............ . .. . ........ Winona

WILLIAM ROTH .

MATHEMATICS, ART, ENGLISH

... . . Winona

HISTORY, INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL

Primary Club l, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3; Art Club l, 2, 3, 4, Sec.-Treas . 3; Die-No-Mo 1, 2, 3, 4, "Spark" 2; Prom Comm . 1, 2, 3; Wenonah 2, 3, Asst. Feature Ed.; Costume Designer for Masque 4.

~ClENCH

Industrial Arts Club l, 2, 3; Men's Club l, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club l, 2.

BERNICE SCHAFFNER ..... . . Fountain City, Wis. FRED MOILANEN ..

. .Rochester

SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Football 3, Capt . 4; Basketball 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Men's Club 3, 4; "W" Club 3, 4.

MUSIC, ENGLISH

Mason Music 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4, Librarian 3; Band 2, 3, 4; Winonan Staff 4; Rewrite . Ed.; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4.

SENIORS


SENIORS

. .Winona

FRANK WACHOWIAK ...

BEATRICE SCHAFFNER . . . .. Fountain City, Wis. MUSIC, ENGLISH

ENGLISH, HISTORY

Mason Music l, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3; Orchestra, Librarian 2, Pres. 3, Sec. 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Winonan Staff 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, Sec.-Treas . 4; Purple Key 3, 4.

Wenonah Staff 2, Asst. Art Ed.; Winonan Staff 2, 3, 4, Feature Ed. 3; Newman Club l, 2, Pres. 3, Sec. 4; Wenonah Players, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 3, 4, Cheerleader 3, 4, Director Die-No-Mo Show 3; Art Club 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3; Men's Club l, 2, 3, 4; Debate 2; Homecoming Comm . 3; Public Relations Comm. 3; Prom Comm. 3; Masque Comm. 4.

. Winona

SIDNEY SCHMIDT ..

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

International Relations 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Track 1, 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 2, 3; Intramural Board, Sec. 3; Debate 4; Intramural Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 1, 3; Boy Scout Leadership 4; Tennis

.Red Wing

BETTIE WALTERS . .. .

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ENGLISH, MUSIC

Mendelssohn 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Die-NoMa, Spark 3, 4; Mason Music 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, VicePres . 3, 4; Physical Education Club 4; Die-No-Mo Show 2, 3, 4; General Assembly Comm. 3, 4 .

1, 2.

MARJORIE SELLE .. . .

. . . . . Winona

MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH, MUSIC

Winonan Staff 1; Wenonah Staff 2; Wenonah Players 1, 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mol, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Mendelssohn 3, Pres. 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Junior High Club 2; Chorus 3, 4.

SUZETTE SUCKER ..

CHARLES WEISMAN .. .. . .

. . . . . . ... Winona

HISTORY, ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS

Apollo Club 2; Junior High Club, Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 3; Newman Club 2, 3; Men's Club 2, 3, 4; Wenonah Players 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Football 3; Intramural Basketball2, 3, 4, Capt. 2, 3; Debate 3; A Cappella 3; Wenonah Staff 3, Asst. Business Manager .

. . . . . Lewisville

ENGLISH, HISTORY

Mendelssohn 4; Band 3, 4; Chorus 4; Wenonah Players 4; Winonan, Managing Ed. 3, 4; Wenonah Staff, Asst. Literary Ed. 3, Managing Ed. 4; International Relations Club; Publicity Ch'm. Prom 3; Homecoming Publicity Chairman 3.

VINCENT VIEZBICKE . ..

MARY JANE WEISMAN .. .... . ....... . . Winona HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH

Band 3, 4;Junior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3; Newman Club 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 4, Asst . Picture Ed.; French Club 1.

. . . .. Virginia

HISTORY, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE

·--·--

. . . Winona

PEARL WEISMAN.

Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3; Track 2; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; "W" Club 2, 3, 4; Range Club 2, 3, VicePres. 4; Men's Club 2, 3, 4; Die-No-Mo 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4.

-~

HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS

Junior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Girl Reserve Leadership 3.

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JULIA MAUD WEICH ..

. ...... Winona

EDWARD ZAKRAISHEK ................. Eveleth

SOCIAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

League of Women Voters 5; Y.W.C.A. 2, 3; Intermediate Grade Club 3; Junior High Club 1, 2; French Club 1.

Fifth Year Normal Club, Sec. 2; Range Club 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3;Junior High Club 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Wenonah Players 3, 4; Newman Club, Sec. 2, 3, Pres. 4; Senior Class Pin Comm.; West Lodge 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 3; Men's Club 2, 3, 4; Masque Comm. 4; A Cappella 3, Pres.

HELEN WYMAN.

. .... Winona

ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE, SCIENCE

Winonan Staff 1, 3, 4; Wenonah Staff 4, Asst. Literary Ed.; Band 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 3; A Cappella 3; Senior Class Treas.; League of Women Voters, Sec. 4;Junior High Club Treas. 3; International Relations Club 3, 4; Sportsmanship Comm. 4; French Club 1; Y.W .C. A. 3.

Seniors Whose Pictures Do Not Appear MARJORIE ALLEN ...... . .

. . . . . . . . . . Wayzata

EMILY KARLSTROM .

...... Moorhead

MATHEMATICS, ENGLISH, SOCIAL SCIENCE

ART, ENGLISH, EDUCATION

Junior High Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winonan Staff 1, Asst. Ed. 2.

Art Club 3, 4; Primary Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3, Historian Recorder 4; Morey Hall Pres. 4; Wenonah Staff 4, Art Ed.; A Cappella 3, Sec.

AUGUST HENDERSON ..

. Aurora

MUSIC, HISTORY, ENGLISH

WALTER NIEMI. ..

Junior High Club; Industrial Arts Club, Sec. 2, 3; Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Range Club.

Orchestra 3, 4.

HERBERT ROSCH . . VERNE HERMAN . .

. .. Eveleth

MATHEMATICS, INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL SCIENCE

. ..... . ...... .. . Plainview

. .... .. . ..... ... Winona

SOCIAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, Capt. 4; "W" Club l, 2, 3, 4, Sec.-Treas. 2, Pres. 3; Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4.

CAROLYN SUNDE . . ENGLISH, HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCE

SENIORS

. Winona


JUNIORS

JUNIOR CLASS

Top Row- D. Simon, W. Thompson, 0. Sanden, E. Jaspers, M. Laakso, D. Zimmcrhakl, H. Scns, C. Schneider, E. Redmond, P. Knopp. Third Row-- M. Southworth, E. Christenson, R. Richards, M. Barry, E. Shirven, L. Wilkinson, T. Rothwell , A. Berg, D. Simon, C. Syverson. Stcond Row- H. Ambuhl, L. Hoover, M. Hopp, C. Breyer, C. Goetting, H. Bratulich, A. Pawelek,]. O'Gara, A. Schneider, W. Bigelow. Bottom Row- C. Dulas, C. Shira, R. Hardt, J. Brown, R. Boyd, E. Steffes, J. Kozlowski, M. Snyder, L. McCown.

Junior Class EACH succeeding year is indicative of the fact that people realize the increasing demand for advanced education. The size of the junior class presents a living proof that the desire for education is growing, and that the four-year .course is ever becoming more popular. All collegiate activities are well represented by the junior class. Because they are a major group in W.S.T.C., the juniors are found active in such organizations as Wenonah Players, Die-No-Ma, Wenonah Staff, Apollo Club, Mendelssohn Club, College Choir, and both women's and men's athletics. The junior class is also very favorably represented in the honorary groups of the college. It is gratifying to those who were instrumental in promulgating it, that the four-year course is proving itself an overwhelming success. Those farsighted individuals realized a few years ago the advantages of higher education and its possible effects on the world. It is with anticipation that the juniors are looking forward to their senior year and their well-earned degrees. Success to the class of

1936! The officers of the class are: LuTHER McCowN ..... . . . . ............................... Pre.rident THEODORE RoTHWELL ... .. . . . .. .. . . . .................. Vice-Pre.rident MARTHA SNYDER .................. . ......... .. ... Secretary-Trea.rurer jANET BRowN ....... .. .. ................. .. .. . Repre.rentative Council DR. MINNE ......... . .... .. .. .. ... . . .......... . ........... Advi.rer


Junior Class AMBUHL, HAZEL

LINDEROTH, MRs. VIRGIL

BARRY, MATHEW

MAcPHERSON, KERMIT

BEAN, jAMES

McCowN, LuTHER

BERG; ALVIN

MuENCH, ARTHUR

BIGELOW, WILLARD

MuENCH, FREDERICK

BLEXRUD, AGNES

NEEB, EDWIN

BLATNIK, FRANK

O'GARA, jAMES

BoYn, RuTH

PAWELEK, ALAN

BRATULICH, HENRY

RAPHAEL, SISTER

BREYER, CHRISTINE

RicHARDs, RuTH

BROWN' JANET

RIDEOUT' MARG VERITE

CHRISTENSON' ELFIE

RoTHWELL, THEODORE

DICKERSON'

v lOLA

SADLER, FoRREST

DIEPENBROCK, Lois

SANDEN' OLAF

DoTY, MARJORIE

ScHNEIDER, ALTON

DuLAS, CEciLIA

ScHNEIDER, CHESTER

EnsTROM, HAROLD

SHIRA, CHARLOTTE

GoETTING, CAROLEEN

SHIRVEN' ELIZABETH

GusTAFSON, LuciLLE

SIMON' DELOS

HARDT, RuTH

SNYDER, MARTHA

HEIMER, EvANGELINE

SouTHWORTH, MARGARET

HIGGINs, DoROTHY

STEFFES, EsTHER

HoovER, Louis

STREHLow, MRs. INGA G.

HoPP, MARGARET

SuBBY, MoNA

jAsPERS, EuGENE

SYVERSON, CY

JOHNSON' ANNE MARIE

THOMPSON' WILLIAM

KABAT, GEORGE

WEINER, RuTH

KNOPP' PHILLIP

WILKINSON, LAURA G.

KozLowsKI, JoHN

ZIMMERHAKL, DoNALD

KREUZER, KARL


ROY PRENTIS

. ... .. LeRoy

ELIZABETH SHIR VEN .. .. .. . ... ... .. . . Rushford

JUNIOR HIGH

INTERMEDIATE

Football1, 2; Apollo 1, 2; Intramurals 2;Junior High Club 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Men's Club 1, 2; "W" Club 1, 2.

Band 1; Intermediate Club 1, Social Chm. 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Wenonah Players 1, Program Chm. 2; International Relations Club 1, 2; Mendelssohn 1, 2.

EDWARD REDMOND .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. Lanesboro JUNIOR HIGH

Newman Club 1, 2; Men 's Club 1, 2; Junior High Club 1, 2; lntramurals 1, 2.

RACHEL RICHARDSON .

. .. Eyota

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2.

VIRGINIA ROBB.

BERNARD SIMON . .. . .. . ...... .. .. . . .. . .. Altura JUNIOR HIGH

Newman Club 1, 2; Track 1, 2; Football1, 2; Men's Club 1, 2; Band l.

MAY SKARE.

.... . . . .... . .. Spring Valley JUNIOR HIGH

Junior High Club 1, 2; A Cappella 1; League of Women Voters, Treas .

. .... .. .. . . . . Winona FERN STAPF. . . . . .. . .... .. ... ... ... . Farmington

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 1, 2; W.A.A . 1, 2, Sports Writer; Physical Education Club 1; Winonan l.

CHESTER SCHNEIDER.

RURAL

Die-No-Mo 2; Wenonah Players 2; Junior High Club 2; Sophomore Class Treas .

. . . . . . . Albert Lea

JUNIOR HIGH

International Relations Clnb 2; Debate 2; Men 's Club 1, 2; Country Life Club 1, Sec.-Treas.

BERNADETTE STEFFES ..

. .. Rollingstone

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2.

SOPHOMORES


SOPHOMORES

DOROTHY STELLMACHER.

. .... Eyota

ALICE WAKEFIELD ..

JUNIOR HIGH

. ... Winona

JUNIOR HIGH

Y.W .C.A. 1, 2; Intermediate Club 2; Junior High Club 2.

Junior High Club 1; Y.W.C.A.

HAZEL WEIMER ................. .. .. .. Lewiston PRIMARY

. ..... Mazeppa

EDWIN STULL .

Primary Club 2.

JUNIOR HIGH

Men's Club 1, 2; "W" Club 1, 2; Junior High Club 1, 2; Boxing; Track. DOROTHY WESTFALL. ....... ....... Montivideo INTERMEDIATE

\V inonan 2, Features; Wenonah Staff 2, Asst. Feature

Ed.; Intermediate Club 2. . ........ Lake City

KARL TOMFOHR. RURAL

Band 2; Country Life Club 2; Junior High Club 2; Men's C.lub 2; Intramural Basketball 2.

. .. Harmony

VIVIAN YATES . JUNIOR HIGH

Mendelssohn 1, 2; Mixed Course 1, 2; Band 1, 2; W.A.f,.. 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2;Junior High Club 1, 2; Mason Music.

. .... Wells

HAZEL UGGEN .

ELEANOR ZABEL .

. ...... Plainview

INTERMEDIATE

PRIMARY

Intermediate Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, Vice-Pres. 2; Winonan Staff, News Ed. 1, 2; Wenonah Staff, 2, Asst. Literary Ed.; W .A.A. 1, 2; International Relations Club 1, 2;Joint Social Comm. 1; Morey Hall Council1 .

ALICE VALENTINE.

. .. Minnesota City

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 1; A Cappella 1; Newman Club 1, Vice-Pres. 2; Wenonah Staff, Historical Literary Ed .

ELEANOR ZIERDT

... Wabasha

INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate Club 1, 2;Junior High Club 1; W.A.A. 1.


Sophomores Whose Pictures Do Not Appear ..... Winona

JAMES BEAN .. ..... ...... .

.................. Caledonia

ALVIN BERG .

RITA McCOLGEN . . ................... Mazeppa JUNIOR HIGH, RURAL

JUNIOR HIGH

. ... Winona

FRANCIS MILLER ..

JUNIOR IIIGH

JUNIOR HIGH

......... Plainview

RUTH BOYD ..

ELIZABETH OIST AD.

INTERMEDIATE

. .. Harmony

INTERMEDIATE

. ...... Houston

ARTHUR CARLSON.

. ........ Canton

MARIE ORAKER ..

RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

MARY FRANCES CREED ..

. .. ... Rochester

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

MARGUERITE RIDEOUT ...... . . . .

. ... Winona

PRIMARY

. ... Winona

CATHERINE GALLAGHER .... INTERMEDIATE

MONA SUBBY ........................ Albert Lea JUNIOR HIGH

...... Minneapolis

FREDRIK GISLASON. JUNIOR HIGH

DORIS VOORHEES.

. . ... Dexter PRIMARY

VICTOR GISLASON . . . .

. .......... Minneapolis

JUNIOR HIGH

MARG VERITE W AKEflELD .

. ....... Winona

PRIMARY

.. Freeburg

ROSE RITA GRAF ... KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

EVELYN WALSH.

. ................ Harmony RURAL

... Chatfield

ELDORA GRIEVE .. RURAL

RUTH WEIMER .. DOROTHY KALKBRENNER ...... . .... Lake City

. .... Lewiston

INTERMEDIATE, RURAL

INTERMEDIATE

..... Montgomery

ELLA KROCAK ..

REUBEN LANGHANS .. RURAL

LOREN WOOD ..

Houston JUNIOR HIGH

INTERMEDIATE

.Red Wing

DAR WIN ZAPPE .. JUNIOR HIGH

. Philbrook


FRESHMEN

FRESHMAN CLASS

Top Row - W. Bush, N. Benson, A. Fehring, R. Brown, C. Cichosz, L. Harrison, A. Holst, L. Arns, K. Eggleston, G. Bruegger, C. Guile, G. Gardner, E. Cox. Fourth Row- F. Kissling, L. Hall, G . H~sly, F. Harccy, B. Busse, N. Ervin, L. Kohner, M. Amlcy, G . Grimm, H. Gstaldcr, 0. Doely, C. Larson. Third Row - L . Jorris, A. Graf, C. Burton , M.Jacobson, L. Barry, B. Kaiser, B. Kennedy, E. Bornflcth, E. Caldwell, 0. Buckham, W. Glubka, A. Hoblit, R. Hoover, Second Row- R. Hafiz, C. Einhorn, E. Erickson, E. Korn, A. Graner, E. Beaudin, B. Johnson, E. Berg, E. Albers, A. Jensen, L. Heimer, H. Gilberg. Boltom Row- L. Aygarn, R. Busdickcr, D. Bycr, E. Kurzweg, P. Abel, L. Clum, B. Kclbcrcr, E. Long, R. Charpcmicr, E. Highum, I. Eklof, C. Goetsch, V. Kroncbusch.

Freshmen ~N

September 1934 a horde of young students from many high schools all over Minnesota and other states as well, came to the Winona State Teachers College to begin their college careers. These first year students have lived up to the tradition set by their predecessors. One would have to look far to find a group any more zestful and ready for college activities but at the same time eager to pursue their studies, than the present freshman class. They were likewise eager for participation in the various college clubs and organizations as was shown by their "let's-go attitude." The "pigskin" lured many a former high school champion to the football field for long hard hours of practice in the fall. Lusty voiced young leaders called ''What's the matter with the team" and students responded in as lustful a tone . In the ranks of the band filed peppy cornetists, drummers and other musicians. The officers of the first year class are: PreJident Vice-PreJident BETTE McLAUGHLIN . . . . . . . . . .. .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sect'etary-TreaJttrer MR. FRENCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AdviJer

JuLIUS HARGESHEIMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . VICTOR HAFNER . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SOPHOMORES

=====+==================================== GLENNA AMES ..

. ..... . .. .... .... Weaver

SOPHIE BLATNIK ...

.Chisholm

INTERMEDIATE

JUNIOR HIGH

Winonan Staff l, Rewrite Ed., 2; International Relations Club l, 2; Mendelssohn l, Sec.-Treas. 2; Mixed Chorus l, Sec. 2; Art Club 2; Finance Comni. 2; Mason Music l, 2; Intermediate Club 2.

Debate l, 2; Orchestra l, 2; Range Club l, 2, Sec.Treas. 2; Junior High Club 2; Wenonah Players l, 2; International Relations Club l, 2; Wenonah Staff l, 2; Public Relations Comm .

ROSAMOND AMOS . . . .

MINERVA BOLLINGER ...

. Plainview

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

. .... Cochrane, Wis.

PRIMARY

~

Kindergarten Club l, 2; Band l, 2; Art Club l, 2; Y.W.C.A .; Wenonah Staff 2, Picture Ed.

Mendelssohn 2; Mixed Chorus 2; Art Club 2; Primary Club 2.

BERNICE ARVIDSON . .. . ...... . . .. .. . Albert Lea

DOROTHY BROWN ...

JUNIOR HIGH

Y.W .C.A. 2; Junior High Club 2.

. . .. . . ... . ... Rochester

JUNIOR HIGH, RURAL

Junior High Club l, Sec . 2; Y.W.C.A. l, 2; Winonan Staff 2.

MARGARET BER VEN . ........... .. .... . . Dexter JUNIOR HIGH

Junior High Club l, 2; League of Women Voters 2; Y.W.C.A . 2.

.. Winona

MAX BUNN . JUNIOR HIGH

Apollo l, 2; Mixed Chorus l, 2; Junior High Club 2; Men's Club l , 2.

THEDA MAE BLACKWELL ... ... . .. Clarks Grove KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY, RURAL

Primary Club; Y.W.C.A., Social Chairman; Winonan Staff l, 2, Circulation Manager; Wenonah 2, Asst. Business Manager.

URSULA COSTELLO ..... . . .. ..... . . . . . . . Weaver JUNIOR HIGH

Newman Club l , Sec. 2.


. . . . Harmony

BAYONNE DANIELS.

ETIA FARR ...

.. .. . Ellendale

JUNIOR HIGH

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

.Junior High Ch1b 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Physical Edncation Club 2.

Kindergarten Club 2, Treas. 2; Primary Club 1; Art Club 1.

OOROTHA DASCHLER .. .

. ... . Newport

INTERMEDIATE, RURAL

GRACE FOSTER ....... ....... . ... . Ida Grove, I a. PRIMARY

Y.W.C.A. ; Intermediate Club.

Primary Club 1, Sec. 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2.

. .. Rochester

DORIS ENGLE .

UNITA S. FREYER .. ........ . ... . . Redwood Falls

JUNIOR HIGH

Country Life Club 1; Junior High Club 2; Winonan Staff; Band 2.

GWENDOLYN ENGLERTH ...

. . . . Winona

INTERMEDIATE

W.A.A. 1, 2; Winonan 1; Intermediate Club 1, 2; Physical Education Club 2.

MARJORIE ERICKSON.

JUNIOR HIGH

Y.W.C.A. 2;Junior High Club 2; W.A.A. 2; Physical Education Club 2 .

JEANETIE GARBE . .

. . .... . . .. .. Sr. Paul

INTERMEDI ATE, RURAL

Y.W.C.A . 1, 2; Intermediate Club 1, 2.

. .. . . .... .. Red Wing

PRIMARY

Wenonah Players 1, 2; International Relations CI ub 1, 2; Primary Club 1, 2; Winonan Staff 1; W.A.A. 1, 2.

PHYLLIS GARDNER.

.... Stewartville

PRIMARY, RUR AL

Country Life Club 1; Primary Club 2.

~=======================================+=====

SOPHOMORES


Freshmen

J

OURNALISM held its attraction for the talented. On the mastheads of both the Winona and the Wenonah are to be found names of ambitious freshmen. Freshmen women showed eagerness to become members of the Mendelssohn Club, while the tenors and basses joined the Apollo Club . The purple and white basket shooters were not all veterans this year; in fact a large percent of the team were college freshmen. The numerous other clubs and organizations of the college invited first-year students to join, which they did. The footlights dazzled many a young thespian who took his stand upon the stage and uttered forth vehemently "To be or not to be." After having learned the location of the library the earnest young freshmen were to be seen at all hours of the day industriously studying. College parties were a welcome diversion for the tired lectured students. Looking ahead into the future one may prophecy that the sophomores of 193536 will continue to build a fine structure, the foundation of which has been laid by this year· s freshmen.

FRESHMEN Top Row- J. Rasmusson, L. Stevens, G. Ncrdahl, S. Pcsonco, B. McLam;hlin, M. McCarthy, A. Norcon, M . Schader, E. O'Donahue, N. Veir, S. Wright. · Fourth Row - A. Mulyclc:, P. Meinke, E. Thomas, H. Welch, L. Nelson, P. Westman, F. Orke, C. Nelson, A. Zictlcman, G. Schliep, H. Utzinger. Third Row- W. Toner,J. Milne, S. Wegner, D. Richter, A. Swanson, M. MacMallan, I. O'Connors, R. Zarling, L. Sannes, B. Pindko, R. Wooley, B. Ulvcstad. SrconJ Row- R. Parker, W. Wadcwitz, A. Minzel, G. Pugh, P. Meyer, H. Oiscad, M. Olstad, H. Rivers, R. Wolfe, E. Storlie, M. Youngs. Bottom Row - B. Osrmoc, M. Rcc, L. Pcrcrson, L. Magnussen, M. Sandtcs, S. OJ ness, D. Roach, N. Sollic,J. Quaday, C. Neetieton.

FRESHMEN


SOPHOMORES

DOROTHY GREENING ...... . . . .. Grand Meadow

THEKLA HANKE . ...

. ... .. . Rollingstone

PRIMARY-RURAL

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2, Treas. 1; Art Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A.; A Cappella 1.

Mendelssohn 2, Librarian 2; Mixed Chorus 2.

FLORENCE HARTIG . ... ... . . .. Miles City, Mont. BEULAH GREGOR . ....... . . . . . . .. . . ... Millville PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2; W.A.A. 2; Morey Hall Council, Vice-Pres. 1, Pres. 1; Country Life Club 2.

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A . 1; W.A.A. 1; Wenonah Players . •

BEATRICE HEASER . ... . . . . .... Plainview

ERNST HAACK .. . RURAL

Country Life Club, Pres. 2; Junior High Club 2; Men's Club 1.

MIDRED HANSON . . . ... . . . . .. .

. . . . Sherburn

RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2; League of Women Voters 1.

... . ... Sherburn

PEARL HANSON . . RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

. ... ..... Minneiska

JUNIOR HIGH, RURAL

Country Life Club 1, Pres.; Junior High Club 2; Newman 1, 2; Girl Reserves 2.

CHARLOTTE HIGHUM .

....... Preston

PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2, Pres. 1; Mendelssohn 1; Librarian 1; College Choir 1.

CAROL L. HILMER .. .. .

.. .. . .. Rochester

JUNIOR HIGH

Mendelssohn 2; Mixed Chorus 2;Junior High Club 2.


HATTIE HOSTETTLER .............. Rollingstone

PHYLLIS LADUE.

..... St . Paul RURAL

'RURAL

Country Life Club 1, 2.

Country Life Club, Vice-Pres. 2.

EUNICE HOWARD ..

. .Oakland

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

MARIAN LENTON .

. .......... Stewartville PRIMARY

Kindergarten Club 1, 2.

Primary Club 1, Vice-Pres. 2; Y.W .C.A. 1; A Cappella 1.

MARY JILK ........ .... ....... Rhinelander, Wis. JUNIOR HIGH, RURAL

Kindergarten Club 1, 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Girl Scouts 1.

VIOLA LIDGERDING .................. Red Wing JUNIOR HIGH

League of Women Voters 1, 2, Sec. 1; Winonan Staff 1, 2; Wenonah 2, Asst. Feature Ed. 2; Junior High Club 2 .

ISABEL JOHNSON.

. . . . . . . . . . . . Weaver

JUNIOR HIGH

Mendelssohn 1, Vice-Pres. 2; Die-No-Mo 1, 2; International Relations Club 2; Apollo Accompanist 1; Mason Music 1, 2; Mixed Chorus 1, 2.

GLADYS LOSINSKI .....

. ... . . Dodge, Wis.

INTERMEDIATE, RURAL

MARY AGNES KEOUGH ........ . ...... Millville PRIMARY

Primary Club 1, 2.

RUTH LYON .......... .

.... Plainview

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY

SOPHOMORES



SOPHOMORES

=====+====================================== DOROTHY MALLORY .

..... Sioux Falls, S. D.

. .. . .. . Spring Grove

ANNA MULLER .

JUNIOR HIGH

KINDERGARTEN-PRIM A RY

Mendelssohn l, 2; Physical Education Club 2; Junior High Club l, 2; Mixed Chorus l, 2; W.A.A. l.

Mendelssohn l, 2; Kindergarten Club, Vice-Pres. l, Pres. 2; Y.W.C.A. l; Mtxed Chorus l, 2; Gtrl Reserve Leadership l, 2 .

. . Rochester

HELEN MAREK .

ELLEN JANE MURPHY ..

. . ... . . . . Rochester

INTERMEDIATE

KINDERGARTEN-PRI M ARY

Intermediate Club l, 2; Y.W.C.A. 2, Financial Chm.; W.A.A. 2; League of Women's Voters 2; Winonan Staff 2, Typist.

Mendelssohn l, 2; Kindergarteo Club l, Vice-Pres., Pres. 2; Y.W.C.A. 1; Mtxed Chorus 1, 2; Gtrl Reserve Leadership 1, 2.

MRS. EVELYN MORRILL. ..... Rhinelander, Wis.

EVELYN OGROSKY ..... .. . ... ... . . . . .. Stockton J U NIOR JIIGH

JUNIOR HIGH

Junior High Club, Vice-Pres.; League of Women Voters .2, Pres.; Country Life Club.

MARJORIE MOYER

Pine Island

Wenonah Players l, Sec. 2; W.A.A. 1, Pres. 2; Y.W .C.A. l , Pres. 2; Physical Education Club 1, 2; Junior High Club l, 2.

GERTRUDE OLSON.

. . . Minneapolis

INTERMEDIATE

INTERME DIATE

Intermediate Club 1, 2; A Cappella l; Country Life Club 1, 2; Mason Music l.

Intermediate Club 1, 2; League of Women Voters 2; International Relations Club; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Wenonah Staff, Asst. Characterization Ed.; Winonan Staff.

FREDERICK MUENCH ..

. . Mountain Iron

JUNIOR HIG H

"W" Club; Newman Club; Range Club; Football; Men's Club.

OR VILDA PETERSON . . . INTERME DIATE

Intermediate Club l, Vice-Pres. 2.

. .. Rushford


--

-

-

.,



The Representative Council THE Representative Council was instituted in the spring of 1927, but did not assume its duties until the following September. Leslie Johnson was the first president. It is composed of five members chosen from the faculty, the presidents of each of the four classes and a representative from each of the three upper classes. The purpose of the organization is to further cordial relations within the membership of the college, to maintain high standards of honor and loyalty, and promote in every possible manner the best interests of the college. The members meet jointly every two weeks to discuss matters pertaining to the various college activities. They appoint members to the joint committees delegated to carry on the business of the College Association. It has been a vital part of the college since its organization and has rendered willing services whenever the opportunity has arisen. Members of the council are: Orland Johnson, Louise Hundley, Elsie Finkelnburg, Julius Hargesheimer, Miss Richards, Miss Talbot, Mr . Boots, Mr. Simmers, and Mr. J ederman. The officers of the club are: LLOYD AMBROSEN .. . . . . ...... . . . .. ........ . ............... President LuTHER McCowN .................................... Vice-President jANET BRowN .... .... ... ... . ......... ...... ... ... ........ Secretary REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL

Top Row - Mr. Boots, Miss Talbot, Miss Richards, J. Brown, Mr. Simmers. Bolfom Row- L. Hundley, L. Ambrosen, E. Finkelnburg.

REPRESENTATIVE

COUNCIL


W E N 0 N A H

S T A F F

WENONAH STAFF Sr,mJing, (Ltft to Right)- L. Hundley, T. M. Bb.ckwell, M.J. Weisman, H. English, S. Sucker, E. Finkelnburg, E. Karlstrom, A. Schneider, E. Kreutz, H. Wyman, K. Phillips, B. Johnson, C. Breyer, A. Valentine, W. Franzman. S~atuJ(L,fttoRight)- R. Amos, R. Hardt, G. Olson, B. Meshke,G. Engstrom, M . Cassidy,C. Gallagher, E. Zabel, D. Westfall.

Wenonah Staff Managing Editor ............................................... Suzette Sucker Editor-in-Chief ......................... . ..... .... ............. Bernice Meshke Associate Editor ............................................. Frederick Nelson Art Editor . .... .............................................. Emily Karlstrom Assistant Art Editors ....... . ................... Elsie Finkelnburg, Ethel Kreutz Sylvia Davidson, Alton Schneider Literary Editor .................... : . ............................ Mary Cassidy Historical Literary Editor ............................. . ... ..... Alice Valentine Assistant Literary Editors .. Catherine Gallagher, Helen Wyman, Katherine Phillips Men's Sport Editor .............................................. Karl Kreuzer Assistant Men's Sport Editors ....................... Robert Small, John Hawkins Women's Sport Editor ............ . ...... . ... .................. Christine Breyer Assist'ant Women's Sport Editor ................................... Beth Johnson Feature Editor ........................ . .................... William Franzmann Assistant Feature Editors .................... Viola Lidgerding, Don Zimmerhakl Eleanor Zabel, Dorothy Westfall Snap-Shot Editor .................................................. Alvin Berg Assistant Snap-Shot Editor .... . ...... .. ..... ... .............. .. Louise Hundley Picture Editor ....................... .. ............ . ........... Rosalind Amos Assistants ..................................... Helen English, Mary J. Weisman Characterization Editor ......... . .... . ... . ............ .... ......... Ruth Hardt Assistants ................ . ..................... Sophie Blatnik, Gertrude Olson Business Manager ... ........ ... . ... . .............. .. . ....... ... . Louis Hoover Assistants ............ . .................. George Engstrom, Theda M. Blackwell Typists ...... .. .................... . ........ . Martha Snyder, Katherin.e Phillips


The Winonan Managing Editor ....... . ........................ . ...... Suzette Sucker Editor in Chief. .... . ...... ... . . . ....................... Cecil Gronvall Associate Editor ..... .. .. ..... ..... . .............. ... .. ... Ruth Hardt Feature Editor ......... . .... . ........................... Frank Blatnik f Frank Wachowiak, William Franzman, FeatureWriters .......... . ... IJ · D orot h y west fll . H arges h ermer, \ u1ms a Literary ......... . . . .. .. .......... .. ... . .. . ... .... . .. Frederick Nelson Women's Sports ......... . ............... Beth Johnson, Christine Breyer Men's Sports .. .. ..... . ... . ... Karl Kreuzer, Robert Small, John Hawkins News Editors ........ . ... . ............. Eleanor Zabel, William Gebhard Rewrite Editors ..... . ........ . . ... ...... Bernice Schaffner, Glenna Ames Music Editor ... .. .. .... .. ........... . .... .. . ... .. ... Beatrice Schaffner REPORTERS Sarah Wright Helen Wyman

Margaret Southworth Gertrude Olson

Dorothy Brown Katherine Phillips Viola Lidgerding

BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager .... ... . ........ .. .. ....... ............ Louis Hoover Business Assistants ................. Helen English, Theda Mae Blackwell TYPISTS Inez 0' Connors Helen Marek

Ruth Lyon Hazel Uggen

THE WINONAN STAFF

Top Row - E. Zabel, H. Uggen, W. Franzrnann, L. Hoover, F. Nelson, L. Amdahl, S. Sucker, V. Lidgcrding, D. Brown, G . Olson. S1cond Row - S. Wright, R. Small, F. Wachowiak, B. Johnson, R. Lyon,!. O'Connors, G. Ames, H. Marek. M. Southworth, Bottom Row - B. Shaffner, K. Phillips, H. English, H. Wyman, C. Gronvall, C. Breyer, R. Hardt, D. Westfall, B. Shaffner.

THE

WINONAN

STAFF


KAPPA

DELTA

PI

KAPPA DELTA PI

Standin!,- B. Schaffner, W. Owens, L. Hoover,]. Bl:trnik, C. Gronvall , Mr. Simmers, C. Schneider, M. LJ:1kso, f. Wachowi:~k,

E. Shirven. · Silting - S. Sucker, C. G:lilagher, M. Selle, C. Sunde, B. Schaffner, M. Mclntire, N. Lundberg.

Kappa Delta Pi THE John Dewey club was organized in 1932. It had as its foremost aim to secure a chapter of the national educational fraternity, the Kappa Delta Pi, in the college. The Gamma Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was installed February 10, 1934 .. It instilled within its members a higher degree of devotion to social service by fostering high intellectual and personal standards during the period of preparation for teaching and recognizing outstanding service in the field of education. The first officers of the club were: Marie Burmeister, president; Daphne Buck, vice-president; Ethel Ascott, secretary; Helen Hammond, historian-recorder; and Mr. Simmers, counsellor. The Kappa Delta Pi provides its members and others with interesting educational discussion groups. It obtains talented educators to impart valuable messages to its members. The members of the club this year are: Beatrice Schaffner, Bernice Schaffner, William Owens, Marjorie Selle, Cecil Gronvall, John Blatnik, and Emily Karls tram . The officers of the Kappa Delta Pi are: WILLIAM OwENS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

............ . President V ice-President . . . . . . Secretary-Treasurer . . . . . . Historian-Recorder

CECIL GRONV ALL . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BEATRICE ScHAFFNER . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. EMILY KARLSTROM. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...


Purple Key THE Purple Key is an honorary society with its membership based on the prom is.:: of unusual service in the field of education. Each year ten students of the college are elected into the society, their election being determined by their scholarship and participation in at least four elective extra-curricula activities. The members are mostly upper classmen, but students in the last quarter of the sophomore year are eligible on the same basis as the juniors and seniors. The organization endeavors to develop among its members a social and professional attitude becoming to a teacher. Election to the Purple Key is one of the highest honors bestowed on students by the college. New members elected this year include: Margaret Buehler, Evelyn Ogrosky, Gertrude Olson, Martin Laakso, Suzette Sucker, Chester Schneider, Marian McIntire, Frank Wachowiak, and Elizabeth Shirven.

THE PURPLE KEY W. Owens, L. Hoover, C. Gronvall, J. Blatnik, Mr. Simmers, C. Schneider, M. La:~.kso, F. Wachowiak. Sitting - G. Olson, B. Schaffner, M. Buc:hkr, S. Snckcr, M. Mcintire, E. Shirven, E. Ogrosky.

Standing -

P U R P L E

K E Y


DIE-NO-MO

DIE-NO-MO Top Row - H . Edstrom, ) . Fuhlbruegge, A. Berg , L. Ambroscn, M . Subby , W. Owens , D. Mi ller, S. Weinberger, L. Hundley, W. Dickerson, Or. Selle. SteonJ Row - Mr. Reed, F. Gislasoo, V. Viczbickc, J. Kissl ing, G. Enger, M . Hopp, L. McCown, T . Rothwell, F. Kissling , E. Edstrom, M. Ahrens , M . Van Campen . Bottom Row - A. Pawelek, B. Walters, M. Mcintire, E. Finkclnburg, S. Davidson, F. Stapf, V. Gislason , M. Selle, F. Wachow iak, 0 . Sanden, I. Edgel l.

Die-No-Ma DIE-NO-MO means "dynamo," generator of pep and energy. The Die-No-Mo Club is an organization made up of the representative students and faculty members . The purpose of the club is to further worthwhile collegiate activities of the school by creating interest and enthusiasm in their welfare. Ralfe Calkins w as the first president of the organization-_ The club began its work in 1926 by encouraging in various ways a hundred per cent attendance at the college games and entertainments. High standards for the school were set when the Die-No-Mo club originated the Sportsmanship Code . In addition to the sponsoring of pep fests and booster meetings before athletic contests as w ell as the homecoming activities, the Die-No-Mo Club presents an annuai show for the entertainment of the college. This year it was an original production, "Pigs Wings," which was directed by Julius Hargesheimer. The officers of the club are : VICT OR GISLASON _ _ _ _ .. _ . . . . .. _ . _ . . .. . . . . .. _ . . . _ . . .. . . H igh

Voltage V oltage . Brttsh and Spark

JoHN KisSLING . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. MARJORIE SELLE .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . MESSRS. JEDERMAN, SELLE, REED, FRENCH , MINNE ,

Miss BRUNNER .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. _ . .. . A dvisers


Wenonah Players

A DRAMATICS CLUB was founded in 1916 but it did not assume the name of "The Wenonah Players" until in 1923. The first officers were : Dorothy Magnus, president; Sybil Yates, vice-president; Beatrice Peters, secretary-treasurer and Agnes Loughlin, faculty adviser. The primary purpose of the club is to promote drama in the college as a whole. Equally important however, is the training it furnishes the members of the club by holding workshop meetings. The purpose can best be set forth by this short poem : ''ACTIVITIES'' To rouse the spirit and develop the heart, To inspire the soul and enlarge the vision To help our fellow-men through play and service And thus to assist in the progress And upbuilding of this school - for this Our club was founded . The club has presented many fine plays. Two that stand out most vividly are "Disraeli" in which Ruth Beth Watts, a former instructor in the college, played the lead and "Death Takes a Holiday," presented four years ago . The outstanding accomplishment this year was the three-act play ·'Minick.'' The officers of the club are: STANLEY WEINBERGER . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. President JoHN KissLING . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . Vice-President EvELYN 0GROSKY .. . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Secretary-Treasurer JEAN BRADY JoNES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. .. . . AdvisetJ

WENONAH PLAYERS

Top Row - E. Necb, F. Kissling, S. Blatnik, F. Nelson, J. Wachs, E. Ogrosky, J. Kissling, W. Franzrnann, C. Burton. Second Row - M . Erickson, S. Sucker, F. Hartig, M. Van Campen, M. Southworrh, M. Garlough , H. Roth , G. Grimm, S. Wegner, E. Shirven. Bottom Row - R. R. Graf, F. Stapf, S. Davidson, S. Weinberger, B. Walters, M. Selle, I. Edgell , B. McLaughlin, Dr. Jones.

W E N 0 N A H

P L A Y E R S


MENDELSSOHN

CLUB

=====+======================================, MENDELSSOIIN CLUB

Top Row - T . H:tnkc, M . Mclmire, E. J. Murphy, C. Lindg ren, S. Suck er, A. H ill , M . Posz, S. Wrigh t, C. Hilmer. Second Row - M . Orakcr,l. Johnson, S. Wegner, G. Ames, B. Walters, M. Hopp, M . Garlough , V. M iller, M . Van Campen. &11om Row - Accompanist, Miss Agnes Bard, V. Yates, I. Edgell , M. Ahrens, M. Selle, D irectOr Mr. Grimm, E. Meade, D. Mallory , R. Wooley, M. Bollinger.

Mendelssohn Club

THE diamond anniversary of the college is an outstanding milestone for certain organizations within the college as well as for the institution as a whole. The Mendelssohn Club was founded under the direction of Miss Caroline V. Smith in 1900, and this year marks the thirty-fifth anniversary of this very worthwhile musical group. Because they have an intense interest in fine music, the members have done much in promoting it in this community and elsewhere. The annual recital was given March 29 at College Hall. Mr. Johannes Fossum, violinist, formerly of Minneapolis and guest artist for the last year's concert, also participated in the concert this year . The efficient directing of Mr. Grimm, and the earnest work of the members of the club made this recital one of the finest musical programs of the year. The officers of the club are: MARJORIE SELLE .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .

.... . ... .. President

IsABEL JoHNSON . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .•.. . .. . .. . . V ice-President GLENNA AMES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. ..

Secretary-Treasurer

THEKLA HANKE . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Librarian MR . WALTER GRIMM . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .

Director


Apollo Club DURING the five years of its existence, the Apollo Club has made an enviable reputation for genuine artistic accomplishment. "To sing for the joy of singing, to develop interest and ability in the art, and to reflect the spirit of the college which sponsors it" are the purposes of this group of men students who comprise the club . The spring tour which the club takes each year has been an influential factor in building up the enrollment of the college and advertising the music department to the public. The club, under the enthusiastic direction of Miss Janet Rohweder, is in much demand to sing at civic gatherings and to broadcast programs of fine music. The annual concert was given at College Hall on April 5. Mrs . Keith Emery, a violinist of Winona, was guest artist at the concert. The officers of the club are: THEODORE RoTHWELL ..... . ....... . . . .... .. . . . ....... . . .. . President LoREN WooD ...... .. .. . .. . . ... . ... . ....... . . ... ..... Vice-President RAY BROWN ... . . .. ......... . . . .... . . ..... . Student Business Manager JoHN DuEL ............................... Assistant Student Manager DR. MINNE ................. . .............. Faculty Business Manager Miss JANET RoHWEDER .. ... . .... .... . . .. . ......... . ...... . . Director

APOLLO CLUB

Top Ko1v - C. Nettleton,

\V , Prigge, W. Wadewitz, F. Kissling,J. Dud. !J'tconJ Roru- H . Miles, M . Bunn , W. Miller, D . Robinson ,]. Kissl ing, L. Amdahl, W. Busch. &11om Row- Accompanist, E. Meade , R. Busdicker, V. Haffner, R. Brown, Director, Miss Jauct RuhwcJ.cr , T. Rothwe ll,

E. Nccb, P. Meink e, G. Hanke.

A P 0 L L 0

C L U B


M I X E D

CHORUS

MIXED CHORUS Top Row - R. Busd ickcr, W. Wadcw itz, W. Prigge , D . Ro binson , J. Duel , P. Meinke. Fourth Row- V . Hafner, W. Miller, M. Bunn, F. Kissling, T. Rothw ell, E. N c:cb, R. Bro wn, W. Busch . Third Row - Hanke, D . Edgell, M iss Rohweder, M . Posz, M . Hopp, G. Ames , C. Hilmer, L. Amdahl , J . Kissling. SmmJ Row - M. Orakcr, Thekla Hanke, M. Mcintire, M. Selle, A. Hill , Mr. Grimm, S. Sucker, S. Wegner, I. Johnson, B. Walters, V. Miller, M. Van Campen. Bottom Row - Accompanist, Miss Bard, V. Yates, C. Lindgren , M. Garlough, M. Ahrcas, E. J. Murphy, S. Wright, D. Mallory, R. Wooley, M. Bollinger.

The Mixed Chorus THE Mixed Chorus is made up of the young women of the Mendelssohn Club and the young men of the Apollo Club together with a selected group of students who are interested in vocal music . Under the direction of Mr. Grimm the chorus meets twice a week to practice secular and sacred music. Songs from oratorios, operas, and musical comedies are sung sometimes with accompaniment but often as a cappella music. In 1932 The Mikado was presented and that same year the chorus assisted with the George Washington Bi-Centennial program . It is always willing to cooperate whenever music is needed for assembly programs and plays an important role in the Christmas and Easter programs given for the assembly as well as in the Commencement Week exercises. Occasionally it takes part in community and church programs in the city. The choir holds a very definite place in the musical circles of the college, always adding a great charm to any program in which it has a part.

.

T he officers of the club are : . . . President JoHN KisSLING .. . .. . . . . . .... Secretary GLENNA AMES . . .. . ... ... ... . . ... . .. . . . Treasttrer LoREN WooD .... . . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . .. .... .. .. Librarian PAUL MEINKE . . .. . . ... . . . Miss BARD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ...... . . . ......... Accompanist MR . GRIMM .... . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .... . . .. .. . . . . .... D irector


Mason Music Club

THE Mason Music Club was organized October 8, 1920, by the girls who at that time were taking the public school music course. Margurite Snyder was the first president of the club. It is the intention of the club to study those phases of music that are not included in the regular curriculum and to help the members cultivate a taste for the true appreciation of the best music. Since its founding in 1920 it has helped to create real interest in the music department of the college and has furnished the college with a fine quality of musical entertainment. Through its efforts the music-practice rooms have been furnished with curtains and furniture. The club was instrumental in the preparation for the Christmas program during the past year. The officers of the club are: BERNICE ScHAFFNER . . . . . .. ... .. .. ... . ... .. . . . . .... . . .. . . . . President CoNsTANCE LINDGREN .... . ..... . .... . ... .. ... . ....... Vice-President RuTH WooLEY . . ... .. ... . . . .. . . . . ...... . . .. .... . .. Secretary-Treasurer MR. GRIMM . .. .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . Adviser

MASON M USIC CLUB Top Row - H. Edstrom, E. Edstrom, L. Amdahl, P. Meinke, R. G riese, P. Knopp, Mr. G ri mm, E. Nccb. Stcond Row - V. Yates, B. Walters, M. Ahrens, B. Meade, M. Moyer, C. Lindgren. &11om Row - J. G crlich, l. Downing, B. Schaffner, Miss Rohweder, E. Steffes, M . Hopp, B. Schaffner, Miss I3arJ, R. Wooley.

M A S 0

N

M

U S I

C


OR C HE S TRA

=====+====================================~ ORCHESTRA Accompanist, B. Schaffner. Stnted ( LtfttQ Right)- R. Proctor, E. Edstrom, M. Schuh, V. Jeffrey , S. Blatnik, R. Drown, L. Amdahl, J. Blatnik , L. .Jorr is,

0. Johnson, R . Richards, B. Schaffner . Stauding- R. Griese, Mr. Grimm.

College Orchestra

THE College Orchestra was organized in 1924 under the direction _of Mr. Grimm and is now one of the outstanding musical organizations in the college. Its members are accomplished musicians who enjoy instrumental music and wish to familiarize themselves with orchestral work. The organization has a three-fold purpose; to aid by its presence at concerts, plays, and chapel exercises in the college; to give students who are interested in instrumental music an opportunity for experience in concert work, and, finally, to familiarize them with worth-while music of a grade suitable for junior and senior high schools. Since its organization it has furnished music at the plays and other entertainments presented by the various clubs in the college, who recognize and appreciate its excellent musicianship and willing cooperation in assisting at so many programs. The officers of the club are: BEATRICE ScHAFFNER . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. Secretary LAUREN AMDAHL .. . ... .. . . . . .. . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . L ibrctrian


The Band THE first band, consisting of ten members, was organized under the direct ion o f Mr. Grimm in 1927. It assisted at pep fests and football games and was one of the outstanding features of the 1927 Homecoming celebration. Since its organization it has participated in all college activities, as well as furnishing entertainment on numerous occasions for clubs of the city. Its membership has increased steadily until at present there are forty members . Mr. Grimm was the director in 1927 and 1928 and since that time Mr. Reese, Mr. Karrow, Mr. Gullickson, and Mr. Edstrom have acted in that capacity. During the past year it participated at all the college football games, pep fests, and basketball games, as well as in the Homecoming parade . It has given concerts during assembly, for the Phelps school, and for the Rotary club at the college auditorium. It took a prominent part in the parade during the Winter Carnival sponsored by the Junior Chamber of Commerce and gave an open air concert in the Lake Park band shell durl.ng the closing week of school. The officers of the band are : Pfesident HELEN ENGLISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Vice-Pt'esident JoHN DuEL . ........... .... . . . . ...... . ..... .. .. ..... . .... . Sect'etat'y HAROLD EnsTROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Dit'ectot' LAURE N AMDAHL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

THE BAN D Bdck Row - V. Yates, 13. Busse , M. J. Weisman, L. Stephan, 0 . Thoma~ , 0 . Johnson , H. Bra t ul ich, H. Edstrom, W. Bush, M. McDonno ugh , 0 . Sanden, J. Duel. Second Row - B. Schaffner, B. Schaffner, H. Welch, F. M iller, J. Kissli ng , V. Hafner, F. Kissling, R. Prcn tis, R . Spcll(.:cr, G. Lcrnkuhl , D. Z imrncrh ak l, L. Jorris. Front l{ow - M . Schuh , R . BusJickcr, M . lluchlcr, E. Gi bbons, W. Toner , l. Downi ng , A. Pawe lek , \V. Ui xby, 12. Ld')n om.

B

A N D


JUNIOR

H I G H

C L

U

B

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL CLUB Top Rl}w - R. Robinson, R. Richards, L. Hundl ey, F. Stapf, B. Heaser, B. Arvidson, U. Freyer, M. Skare, E. Storlie, M . Bcrven, R. McCol~cn, E. Zakraishck Stcond Row- P. Meyer, L. Clum, E. Steffes, H. English, M. Snyder, B. Johnson, L. Sannes, D. Kaiser, L. Magnussen, E. Berg, C. Goetting, D. Brown. Third Row -N. Lundberg, E. Johnson, M. Cassidy, D. Mallory, V. Yates, C. Breyer, R. Hardt, K. Phillips, E. Kruger, M.

J. Weisman, C. Hilmer, B. Mcshkc. Bottom Row - E. Haach, H. Bratulich, F. Miller, M. Laakso, V. Gislason, M . .Bunn, F. Gislason, K. Tomfohr, L. Wood, M. Barry.

The Junior High School Club THE Junior High School Club was organized in 1921 for the purpose of promoting the junior high school movement throughout the college, and to gain a clearer insight into the problems of the junior high school teacher. Miss Mabel Brown was the first president. Since its organization it has assisted in the staging of two carnivals to help furnish the club room, and assisted the Men's Club in sponsoring the Homecoming party in 1917. It has donated fifty dollars to the student loan fund and twenty dollars to the Seventieth Anniversary fund. It has given several all-college parties, besides the annual suppers for the club members. One of the interesting programs of the current year consisted of a buffet supper given during the winter quarter. The most outstanding activity was the granting of a life membership in the Alumni Association to Miss Flora Trites, a former member of the college faculty. The officers of the club are : BERNICE MEsHKE . .. .... .... . .......... ... ........ .. ...... Pre.rident MRs. EvELYN MoRRILL .... . . ....... ...... . ..... ..... . Vice-President DoROTHY BROWN ........ .. ..... . .. ....... .. . .. . . . ........ Secretary CHRISTINE BREYER .......... .... . ........ . ...... . . . ... . ... Treasurer Miss BEULAH BRUNNER ... ...... .. . ......... . ....... . . . ..... Adviser


Intermediate Grade Club

THE Intermediate Grade Club was organized in 1925 by Miss Frances Smith, with Agnes Pederson as the first president. The club holds regular monthly meetings throughout the year for the purpose of aiding prospective teachers by presenting better methods of teaching in these grades, and of giving those interested in this field of work a chance to get together. A system of committees makes it possible for every member to be an active participant in club activities. Since its organization it has sponsored several all-college parties and has assisted other clubs in sponsoring entertainments for raising money for the organ fund and furnishing the club room. During the current year the club has sponsored a series of ten-minute movies to which all the students of the college are invited. A treasure hunt opened the year's program, while excursions to the Interstate Packing Company, the Watkins Company, and other interesting places contributed much pleasure and practical educational experience. An all-college party using travel as a theme was the club's outs tanding social undertaking. The officers of the club are : President Vice-President CAROL BuRTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . ... Secretary-Treasurer ELIZABETH SHIR VEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social Chairman MissEs ELLA CLARK, CATHRYN CRAMER, MARTHA DALLMAN . . . . Advisers ELEANOR ZABEL ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ORVILDA PETERSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ..

LNTERMEDIATE GRADE CLUll S. Olncss, P. Abel, R. Richards, R. Hafiz, C. Nelson, H. Utzinger, F. Orkc, M. Sante, M. Moyer, M. Flanry, V. Rob b. Third Row- H. Marek, B.Stdfcs, G. Englerth, Miss Dallman, Miss Clark, R. Zarling, E. Krocak, Miss Cramer, D. Kalkbrenner, R. Wolfe. Second Row- G. Ames, G. Olson, D. Daschlcr, B. J. Failing, E. Zicrdt, H. Gstaldcr, A. Graner, E. Beaudin, R. Proctor, E. Shirvcn, A. Graf. Bottom Row- R. Weiner, M. Orakcr, F. Schultz, S. Olncss, 0. Peterson, E. Zabel, G. Pugh, C. Burton, M. Ellis, R. Boyd.

Top

Row~

INTERMEDIATE

G

R A D E

C L U l.l


PRIMARY

CLUI3

====+======================================] PRIMARY CLUB Top Row- E. Highum, M.A. Keough, I. O'Connors, D. Voorhees, B. Gregor, R. Weimer, B. Ulvcstad. Stcond Row- T. M. Blackwell, M. Bollinger, S. Davidson, L. Barry, L. Peterson, H. Uggcn, M. Rideout. Bottom Row- C. High urn, G. Foster, M. Lenton, M. Erickson, Miss Foster, Miss Gage.

Pri1nary Club THE Primary Club was organized by Miss Gage in the fall of 1923, its purpose being to promote educational interests and activities and to foster comradeship among its members. The first officers of the club were: Vesta Phillips, president; Mildred Voight, first vice-president; Mercedes Winter, second vice-president; Jmnie Hill, secretary; and Ada E. Minard, treasurer. Since its organization the club has had many interesting speakers at meetings. At various times it has sponsored unique programs for the entire school, raised money for the organ fund by giving a carnival with another club, held delightful parties for its own members, and cooperated with other clubs in giving a fair to start a fund for the furnishing of the club room. Du~ing the past year Miss Butler gave an interesting talk on "Late Books for Children." Miss Miller spoke on the subject of "Investments," and "Alaska" was the theme of a delightful talk by Miss Marvin. At Christmas the "get together" was permeated by a happy holiday spirit; merriment and unique costumes formed a delightful combination at the Mother Goose party and a picnic dinner at Bluffside was the last social event of the year. The officers of the club are: CHARLOTTE HIGHUM .... . .. . . .. . ... .. . .. . .. . ... . . ......... Pmident MARIAN LENTON .... . .... . . . . . . . ..... . . . . ... ... . ..... Vice- President GRACE FosTER ........ . ........ . . . .... . ...... . . .. .. ....... Secretary DoRIS VooRHEES ....... ... . .............. . .... . ......... . . Treasurer MissEs GAGE, BROUILLETTE, FosTER .................... . .... Advisers


Kindergarten Club pROM the standpoint of its contributions to the college and to the community, the Kindergarten Club has proven itself one of the most worthwhile groups in school since the organization of the club in 1915. Perhaps the most pertinent is the establishment of the Kindergarten Scholarship Fund. Gifts of equipment and pictures to the Kindergarten Department indicate a constant interest in that division of Winona State Teachers College. In 1918 the club contributed to a Kindergarten Unit in France. A donation to the Near East Relief was made in 1925, and the Kindergarten Club was instrumental in the earlier assistance in the Winona Day Nursery. The first president of the organization was Irene Davey (Mrs. E. F . Lieb). The present officers of the club are: ELLEN jANE MuRPHY ........................... . ...... . .. President IsABEL DowNING .... . .... .. ........ . ............ First Vice-Pre.rident PHYLLIS WEsTMAN .... . ... .. ..... . ...... . ....... Second Vice-Pre.rident MARY GARLOUGH ..... . .. ... .. . ... ... ...... .. . ... ...... .. . Secretary ETTA FARR ......... .. .. .. .. . . . . .... . ... .................. Treasurer

KINDERGARTEN CLUB

Top Row - Miss Schw:~.ble, C. Dulas, M. Naylor, F. Hartig, R. Graf, M. Southworth, M. Van Campen, E. O'Donahuc, L. Ross. Second Row - A. Mueller, S. Wright, D. Greening, L. Nelson, A. Norton, R. Amos, E. HowJ.rd , M. MeNallan, M.Jilk, Miss Sutherland. &ttom Row - E. Downing, E. F:1rr, P. Westman, M. Garlough, E. J. Mllrphy, M. Am ley, R. R ichardson, R. Lyon, E. Korn .

K I N D E R G A R T E N

C L U B


NTERNATIONAL

RELATIONS

CLUB

~~=+==~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB

Top Row - S. SliCker, S. Blatnik, C. Gronvall, L. Hoover, E. Zakraishek, C. Syverson, H . Sens, S. Schmidt, Dr. Selle. Second Row - C. Schneider, H . Wyman, G. Ames, E. Zabel, E. Shirven, C. Breyer, G . Olson, H. Engli sh , M. Selle, F. Kissling. Bottom Row - I. Johnson, G. Kabat, L. Ambrosen, R. Small, W. Franzmann, M. Laakso, V . Glslason, L. Amdahl, M. Erickson.

International Relations Club

THE International Relations Club was organized in 1933 with Henry Southworth, president, Joseph Gislason, vice-president, Thelma Anda, corresponding secretary, Lloyd Ambrosen, recording secretary, Richard Parish, treasurer, and Dr. Selle and Mr. Jederman, advisers. The purpose of the club is to study and discuss those national and international events and issues which are daily transpiring and which vitally concern our American life and institutions. The membership is limited to twenty members. At each meeting several current topics are presented by a committee of the members and a discussion by the entire club follows. Last year it cooperated with the Debate Club in bringing the Cambridge Debaters to the college. Several of the members participated in the Model League of Nations Conference held at St. Catherine's College in St. Paul in the spring of 1934. The dub has invited the International Relations Clubs in all the colleges in the state to participate in another model conference to be held at W .S.T.C. next year. During the current year the club cooperated with the International Relations Club at the College of St. Teresa in bringing Major Booth to Winona. This spring several delegates attended the conference held at Macalaster College in St. Paul. The officers of the club are: President SmNEY ScHMIDT . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-President HILBERT SENS . . . . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corre.rponding Secretary WILLIAM FRANZMAN . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recording Secretary RoBERT SMALL . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer DR . SELLE . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adviser LLOYD AMBROSEN .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...


Art Club

THE Art Club was organized in 1923 at W .S.T.C. under the directio:J of Mrs. Cassidy, art instructor, with Inez Eckblad as the first president. It has a threefold aim: to further interest in art; to raise the standards of art work and to assist in art problems related to college work. The club proposes through activity, to encourage creative art and to develop an appreciation of beauty as well as to inculcate in the minds of youth the principles of art as applied to life. Any student in college may try out for membership in the club, but the twentyfive selected must have interest and ability in applied, industrial or fine art. The school and community is richer because of the efforts and work of the Art Club. In recent years the club cooperated with the Good Fellows in providing dolls and toys for children at Christmas. Each year the club makes possible the lovely prom decorations, and in the spring copies of world-famous masterpieces are exhibited in the club room. Through the influence of the art department students and friends of the college realize the worth of the paintings and sculpturing found in the college. The officers of the club are: ELsiE FrNKELNBURG . .. . .... . .. . . . .. . . . .... . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. President ETHEL KREUTZ . .. .. . ... .. . . . . . .... . .... . . .... . . . . Secretary -Treasurer Mrss DoROTHY CLARK . .. .. ... .. . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . ..... .... Adviser

ART CLUB Seated (Left to Right ) - R. Graf, M. Laakso, M. Bollinger, E . Kruger, G. Ames, B. M iller, E . Finke! nburg, A. Schneider, R. Amos, S. Davidson. Standing ( Ltft to Right)- D . G reening, W. Franzman, G. Hajicek, J. Brown, D. Zimmcrhakl, F. Wachowiak, E. Kreutz, L. Hundley , C. Breyer, E. Karlstro m, Mi ss D. Clark .

A RT

C L U B


M

U

EPSILON

N U

MU EPSILON NU

Top Row- R. Langhans, R. Griese, P. Knopp, Hanke, J. Fuhlbruegge, W. Franzmann, H. Bratulich, H. Ch:~.se, E. Jaspers, J. Duel, L. Hoover, E. Haack. Third Row - V. Gislason, L. Amdahl, V. Herman, 0. Doely, M. Laakso, L. Hall, E. Co.x, M. Bunn, G. Haeslcy, H . Edstrom, L. Jorris. Second Row- P. Caswell, M. Barry, F. Gislason, G. Lemlc:uhl, A. Henderson, E. Gibbons, E. Edstrom,). Bucholcz, W. Bixby, C. Baeuerlcn, W. Dickerson. Bottom Row- J. Kozlowski, G . Kabat, C. Gronvall, W. Gebhard, A. Berg, G. Hajicek,J. Kissling, W. Bigelow, G. Engstrom, L. Aygaro.

Mu Epsilon Nu THE name Mu Epsilon Nu was chosen for the men's organization when it was started during the winter quarter 1921-22, but it is better known in the college as the Men's Club. Membership is open to all men in the college. The first officers included James Vermilyea, president; James Gross, vice-president; James McCaffrey, secretary; Walter Wegner, treasurer; George Vondrashek, sergeant at arms; and Mr. Everts, faculty adviser. The purpose of the club is to promote good fellowship and social activity among the men of the college and to further the interest of the college as a whole. Due to the efforts of this club all the noxious accompaniments of initiation have been eliminated in the college and a program of wholesome amusement and harmless sport has been substituted . New members are initiated from time to time but the largest initiation occurs a few weeks after the opening of the fall quarter.


Mu Epsilon Nu THE Men's club is of particular interest to freshmen for they are given many opportunities to display their talent and furnish entertainment for the college during the opening weeks in September. The freshman initiation is the only definite program of the club, but it has done a great deal to foster the growth of social activities and good fellowship. It has sponsored several entertainments for visiting football teams, taken an active part in the Homecoming program each year and instigated a spring carnival which was held jointly with other college organizations for the benefit of the Memorial Organ Fund. Its most outstanding accomplishment was the introduction of the intra-mural sports program in 1930 to encourage clean sportsmanship and friendly competition within the college. Each year the club elects an Intra-Mural Board to take charge of the program. It was through the efforts of this club that boxing instruction under David Honigs was introduced a few years ago. The officers of the club are: JoHN

E.

KozLOWSKI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ·: . . . . . . . . . . . President

HAROLD RoTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vice- President

DELOS SIMON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary-Treasurer MR. JEDERMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Adviser

MU EPSILON NU Top Row- E. Zakraishck, H. Sens, R. Robinson, F. Neison, W. Wadewitz, 0. Thomas, D. Zimmerhaki,J. O'Gara, W. Owens, I. Thomas.

Third Row- V. Viezbickc, C. Syverson, O.Sandco, P. Meinke, E. Nccb, K. Tomfohr, S. Schmidt, A. Pawelek, L. Wood, M. Peterson, R. Thurley. Second Row- F. Miller, C. Weisman, B. Simon, E. Redmond, W. Thompson, A. Schneider, C. Schneider, D. Zappc, F. Muench,

M. Schuh Bottom Row -

F. Moilanen, D. Simon, R. Prentis, L. Shira, L. McCown, T. Rothwell, S. Weinberger, W. Roth, H. Roth.

M

U

EPSILON

N

U


"W"

C L

U

B

W CLUB Top Row- N. Ervin, G. Lemkuhl , I-1. Chase, 0. Thomls, W. Gebhard, J. Kozlowski , F. Muench, W. Thompson, J. O'Gara, Coach Greene. Second Row - E. Stull, F. Gislason , E. Jaspers , A. Pawelek, V. Gislason , M. Laakso, H. Dratulich, L. Hall, J. Kissl ing, L.

Arns, R. Russel l. Bouom Row- V. Viezbicke, D. Simon, R. Prentis, F. Moi lanen, A. Berg, W. Owens, D. Zi mmcrhakl, M. Peterson, R, Thurley.

"W" Club

THE "W" Club was reorganized in 1929 as the result of a felt

ne~:d

for a men 's athletic organization in the college. M embers of the club feel it their purpose to strive to advance an interest in athletics and to extend the ideals of the men who have been fortunate enough to earn their purple letters. The constitution of the club requires that the " W" must have been earned in one of the major sports - football, basketball or track . A gold " W" set with nine half pearls is the emblem typifying the club. Membership in the club consists of two types : those who take the initiatory degree and those who take the " W" degree . The first president of the club was Everett Johnson. The present officers of the club are : WILLIAM OwENS . . . ORLAND JOH N SON . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAM THOMPSON . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . .. ... .. . MR. GREENE . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .. President . .... V ice-President ... . Secretary-Treasurer . . . . . . Adviser


Country Life Club THE Country Life Club was organized before 1915, but when the rural department came into being in 1915, the club was reorganized with forty-five members. The first officers of the club were: president, Edward Zenk; vice-president, Genevieve Bowen; and secretary, Eliza Savage; and adviser, Miss Ensfield. The purpose of the club is to promote interest in bettering the social conditions of rural communities in which the students may be sent to teach. Since the date of its founding the Country Life Club has sponsored annual play days for rural boys and girls. It has established a loan fund and holds annually spring conferences for county superintendents and high school training teachers. Within the last year the rural department people have had many fine talks on rural problems. An all-college party was sponsored by the club on January 19. The officers of the club are: REUBEN LANGHANS ............. ...... . . ................. . President PHYLLIS LA DuE .. . . .............. . . . . ........... . .... Vice-President PAuLA MEYER ........ . .... . ....... . .............. Secretary-Treasurer RuTH WooLEY .... . . . ................. .. ...... Chairman of Programs

COUNTRY LIFE CLUH Top Row - M. Youngs, F. Orkc, C. Larson, R. Langhans, K. Tomfohr, R. Zarling, P. LaDue. Stcond R,,,v - P. Meyer, M. Olsrad, E. Albers, C. Welch, B. Pittelko, M. Hanson, E. Anderson, Miss Christcru.cn. /Jotl()m Row - Miss llart!>ch, C. Goetsch, J. Miluc, E. llaacb, M. Jacobson, S. Eggcricks, M. Bondlcth.

COUNTRY

LIFE

CLUB


MASQUE

COMMITTEE

MASQUE COMMITTEE

Top Row - Mr . Pawelek, E. Ogrosky, D. Roche, V. Gislason, Dr. Jones, W. Roth, S. Blatnik, E. Nccb, F. Wachowiak Bottom Row -

B. Miller, Mr. Grimm, Miss Clark, H. Youngerman, Miss Pendergast, Mr . Boots,

J.

Brown.

The Masque Comtnitee THE pageant which was put on this year to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the college, was directed by Mr. Henry C. Youngerman. The following committees composed of faculty members and students had charge of the work for the masque. Production committee: Miss Pendergast, chairman; Dr. Jones, Miss Dorothy Clark, Miss Kreger, Mr. Grimm, Mr. Pawelek, Mr. Boots, Mr. Torgerson, Betty Miller, Sophie Blatnik, Evelyn Ogrosky, B. Schaffner, Janet Brown, Frank Wachowiak, William Roth, Delbert Roche. Costume design committee: Betty Miller, chairman; Ethel Kreutz, Glenna Ames, Gertrude Pugh, Louise Hundley, William Franzman. Costume construction committee: Sophie Blatnik, chairman; Mable Ree, Bernice Kaiser, Paula Meyers, Rose Rita Graf, Beulah Gregor. Stage design committee, Frank Wachowiak, chairman; Sylvia Davidson, Donald Ziminerhakl, George Hajicek, Martin Laakso, Alton Schneider. Stage construction committee: William Roth, chairman; John Fuhlbruegge, Horace Chase, Alan Pawelek, Willard Bigelow. Properties: Victor Gislason, chairman; Woodrow Toner, Walter Wadewitz, Stanley Weinberger, Betty Failing, Marion McCarthy. Music committee: B. Schaffner, chairman; Marj~rie Selle, Harold Edstrom, Isabel Johnson, Elizabeth Mead, Ruth Wooley. Dance committee: Janet Brown, chairman; Betty Walters, Mary Van Campen, Gretchen Grimm, Alyce Hill. Publicity and program committee: Delbert Roche, chairman; Dorothy Westfall, Bernice Arvidson, Karl Tomfohr, Suzette Sucker, Julius Hargesheimer. Assisting dramatic committee: Evelyn Ogrosky, chairman; Edwin Neeb, Marjorie Erickson, Edward Zakraishek, Elizabeth Shirven, Florence Hartig, Carol Burton, Stanley Weinberger.


Y.W.C.A.

THEY.W.C.A . is one of the oldest organizations in the college.

The purpose of the club is to build for a more abundant life in a four fold way - through physical, intellectual and spiritual activltles. In 1914 it became affiliated with the national organization of the Y.W.C.A . The program of the organization tends to secure the spirit of friendship and cooperation among the young women of the college. Through the efforts of former members the Big Sister movement was initiated and is carried out each year. During the opening days of the fall quarter the members meet trains and buses and assist new students in becoming acquainted with their new surroundings . An annual hike and breakfast in the early part of the fall quarter, Friendship Day and distribution of Christmas gifts at the poor farm are traditional activities of the Y.W.C.A . During ~he past few years a course in Girl Reserve leadership occupies the major part of the winter meetings. The officers of the club arc: EvELYN 0GROSKY . . . . . . . . .. ... . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . President ELEANOR ZABEL . . . . .. •... . ... . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. ..

Vice-President

H E L E N GsTALDER . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary BETTY FAILING . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Treasurer THEDA MAE BLACKWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social HELEN MAREK .. . .. Miss RICHARDS . . . ..

Chairman .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . . Finance Chairman . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Adviser

Y.W.C.A. Top Row - H. Marek, M. Fcany, B. Arvidson, 0 . Freyer, E. Berg, G. Schliep, R. Wolfe, R. Amos, M. Olstad , E. Albers , M. Berven, B. Fa iling. Stcomi Row - E. Zabel, A. Holst, G. Fo:stcr, P. Abel, H. Gstalder, E. Storlie, L. Sannes, H. Utzinger, E. Highum, Miss Richards. Bvttom Row - P. Meyer, L. Clum, E. Murphy, D. Brown, V. Yates, E. Ogros ky, M. Uuch lcr, M . Arn lcy, C. Nelson, R. Zarl ing.

Y.

W.

C.

A.


D

E

D

A

T

E

DEBATE

Top Row - L. Amdahl , F. Ndson,.J. Blatnik, S. Schm idt . Bottom Row - C. Gronvall, S. Blatnik, C. Schneider.

Debate

THE first

de~ate

society was organiz~d in 1_924 wi~h Howard Lund for its temporary pres1dent . Dr . Selle, Mr. K1rk, M1ss Dav1s, and Mr. Stalcup were the advisers. Membership was limited to twenty-five members and the society had a full membership the first year . The only requirement was interest in the work. The purpose of the society was primarily to develop a debate team, but it also aimed to give all members some training in impromptu speeches, parliamentary procedure, and formal discussion . In 1927 under the leadership of Mr . Fishbaugher a new team was organized and while there were no formal decisions, the audience decided in favor of Winona at three of the four intercollegiate debates with Eau Claire and La Crosse Teachers Colleges. Since reorganization the college has been represented in debates with St. Mary's, St. Thomas and the Eau Claire, La Crosse, and River Falls Teachers Colleges aml also Rochester Junior College. This year non-decision debates on the topic "Resolved that the nations should agree to prevent the international shipment of arms and munitions" were held with La Crosse, and River Falls Teachers Colleges and St. Mary's College. It participated in the inter-collegiate tournament at Eau Claire during the winter quarter. Dr. Minne has been adviser during the past three years.


Intramural Board THE intramural board which supervises all intramural activities for the school year is composed of five members; Coach Earl Greene and one from each class. In the past the representatives were appointed by the Men's Club but this year a new system of election was carried out. The present plan was the appointment of one member to represent each class to be selected by the president of that class. On this year's board Everett Cox represented the freshmen; Horace Chase, the sophomores; Delose Simon, the juniors and John Fuhlbruegge, the seniors. Coach Earl Greene automatically became the nominal head of the board. The board supervised the intramural basketball tournament, the intramural volleyball tournament, and the spring diamondball tournament. In each case the board furnished their own officials and directed the work of arranging schedules, dividing the teams and providing necessary equipment; and settling all questions or disputes arising in connection with the tournaments. Under the present code of the board anyone is eligible to play in any intramural tournament providing he is not taking part in varsity competition. Anyone who is a letter man or has participated in more than one inter-collegiate sport is ineligible to participate in any of the various round robin tournaments. The purpose of this ruling is to provide athletic recreation for those men in the college who do not participate in inter-collegiate athletics.

INTRA-MURAL BOARD E. Cox, D. Simon. Suted - ]. Fuhlb!Ueggc, H. Cha ~ e. St(mdhtg -

I N T R A M U R A L

n 0 A R D


MINICK

MINICK S tandi ng -

ll . Walters, F. Nelson, 13 . Sh irvcn, F. Wachowiak, E. Ogrosky , 13 . McLaughlin, W. Franzman. Sitting - M. Garlough, F. Kissling , S. Wegner, E. Nccb .

Minick MINICK, a comedy by George Kaufman and Edna Ferber, was presented by the Wenonah Players under the direction of Dr. Jones, during the winter quarter. The scene was the crowded city apartment of the younger Mini~ks who made a brave attempt to be hospitable to the prying but kindly old father who came to live with them. His inability to adjust himself to the gay life of the younger set is the cause of both comedy and pathos . The cast was as follows : Minick .. .. . ... .. .. . . . . ... .... ... . . ... .. . .. . . . . .. .. . ... .. . ...... Fred Kissling Fred Minick, his son . . .. .. . .. . .. . .. ... . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . . .. . ... . . .. Edwin Neeb Nettie Minick, Fred's wife . . . . . . ... . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . ..... Sylvia Wegner Lulu, a colored maid . . . . .... .. . .. ... . .. ... .... .. . . ....... . . .. .. Mary Garlough Annie, another maid .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .... ... . Sophie Blatnik Jim Corey . . . .. . .. . . ... . .. . . .. ... . .... .. . . ..... . . . . . . . . .. . . .... .John Kissling Ella Corey ... . ... . .. . . . .... . .. .. . .. . ... . . ..... . . . . ... .. . . . . .. .. Bettie Walters Al Diamond . ....... . . .. . ... . .. .. .. . . . .. . . . . . .. .... . . .. . .. . . William Franzman Marge Diamond .... . .. . .... . . . . . . . . . ... . . . .... .... . . ... . . .... Gretchen Grimm Mr. Dietenhofer . .. . .. .. ... . .. . . . ... .. . . . .. .. . . .. ... . . . .. . .. . . Frederick Nelson Mr. Price . .. . . ... .... . .. . .. ... . . ... . .... . .. . .. . .. . . .. .... . ... . . .. Harold Roth Miss Crackenwold . .. . .. . . ..... .. . .·. . .. .. . . .... . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . Evelyn Ogrosky Miss Stack . .... . ... .... . .. .. . .. . . . .. . . .. ... . .. .. .. . ... . . . . . Mary Van Campen Mrs. Smallridge .... ... . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . ... . .. ..... . .. Elizabeth Shirven Mrs . Lippincott . . . .. .. . . .. ... . . .. .. . . ... ..... .. .. . .. .. .... . Bette McLaughlin


The Pot Boiler THE Pot Boiler is a cleverly written one-act play. Backstage is the setting for this hilarious comedy . It depicts the trials and tribulations of a theatrical troupe and director on the morning of dress rehearsal. The situations and lines are surprisingly reflective of play rehearsals . Mr. Suds, the director, tries frantically to whip the play into shape although even he does not know how it will end, never having written beyond the first act . The play ends with a side splitting scene in which the actors rebel and suggest that the proper conclusion would be to "shoot the author .'' It was presented at chapel by a group of the Wenonah Players under the direction of Edward Zakraishek. The cast was as follows : Mr. Pinikles Suds, the director .. . . . .. . . .... . . . .. . . . . .. .... . . Edward Zakraishek Mr. Woodby, the would-be playwright . .. .. .. . . .... . . . .... . .. William Franzman Mr. Ruler, the hero . ... . ... . . .. . . ... . .. ... . . .... . .... ..... . ... Frederick Nelson Miss Ivory, the heroine . . . ... . . . . . ..... ............ .... . .. ...... . . . . Fern Stapf Mr. Inkwell, the villain . . . . .. . . .. . . . .. .... . .... . . .. ... .. . .. Stanley Weinberger Miss Pencil, the villainness ... . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . ...... ... . . . . . ... . . Carol Burton Mr . Ivory, the girl's father ...... . .. . ... . . . .. .. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . ... . . Harold Roth

THE POT BOILER F. Stapf, S. Wei nbe rger, C. Burton, F . Ne lson, W. Franzman , E . Zakr ai shc k.

THE

POT

BOILER


DIE-NO-MO

S H 0

W

====+====================================~ DIE-NO-MO SHOW Top Row - F. Kissling, L. Jorris, E. Edstrom, 0 . Sanden, StcomJ Row - A. Hill, M. Selle, O.Johnson, M. Mcintire, G. Enger,J. Kissling, M. Hoppc,ll. Busse, 1-1. Edstrom, R. Busdickcr, G. Grimm, S. Wegner, W. Franzmann, R. Hafiz, B. Miller. Douom Row - B. Walters, F. Harting, D. Zimmcrhakl, D. Voorhees, B. Ostmoc, H. Ambuhl, W. Bixby , V . Gis lason, D. Simon, W. Thompson,]. Hargcshcimcr, R. Russell, M. Van Campen, R. Prcntis, E. Stoslic, H. Chase, L. Schneider, L. Wood, W. Glubka, A. Pawelek.

Die-No-Mo Show "PIG'S WINGS" was the title of the entertainment presented by the Die-No-Mo club on February 22. It was written and produced by students under the direction of Julius Hargesheimer and Mary Van Campen. A very effective stage setting of tall green, black and silver columns which provided indirect lighting for several of the numbers was arranged under the direction of Frank Wachowiak. The entertainment was in the form of a radio broadcast and was very clever! y announced by Mr. Hargesheimer. The opening number was an original song "I Miss You" by Bettie Walters and sung by a trio consisting of Janet Rohweder, Sylvia Wegner and Miss Walters . The program consisted of a series of dances, songs and orchestra numbers. The Kampus Kings played the accompaniment throughout the production as well as presenting several clever specialty numbers.


Cheerleaders ·'Come on purple Come on white Come on Winona Let's fight!!!"

THE cheerleaders move rhythmically with the yelling of the crowd.

"Louder!" they shout and another yell with more "pep" comes from the enthusiastic fans while Mary Van Campen pinwheels and then suddenly stops with the splits, jumping to her feet in time to conclude the final "rah" of the "skyrocket." The next yell is led by the male faction of the cheerleading troupe as "Franky" Wachowiak, " Gilly" Courtier, and Wayne Dickerson go through all sorts of twists and turns to bring out the best in yelling. The cheers form a splendid stimulation for the players on the team. The leaders are chosen by means of competitive tryouts at the beginning of the school year. Their duty is to instill the needed enthusiasm for the student body at the games.

CHEERLEADERS Buck Row - G. Courtier, F. Wachowiak, W. Did::crson. Front

Row - M. Van Cam)kn.

C H E E R L E A D E R S


·. -


------' . _. . _.



Coach Earl Greene

to the leave of absence taken by former Coach Glen Galligan the Purple D UEgridders were issued into the well experience football tactics of a new mentor, Coach Earl Greene. Greene came to Winona highly recommended from the coaching staff at Iowa State College. He had previously coached championship football and track teams at Albany College, Oregon; three championship football teams · at McLoughten Union High School at Milton, Oregon; and then was elected fresh· man coach at Iowa State College. Coach Greene was developed under such famed coaches as Knute Rockne of Notre Dame; Ed. Zuppke of Illinois; Doc Meanwell of Wisconsin; Hager, Behessler, Hayward and Reinhard all of Oregon State. His personal record includes all-conference guard at Albion College, Michigan, and regular on the University of Illinois football team.

Fred Moilanen

Football Capt.

Luther McCown Track Capt.

Alvin Berg

Basketball Capt.


F. Moilanen

M. Pererson

0. Jo hnsou

V. Viezbicke

Football 1934 MATERIAL was fair for the 1934 eleven but the Purple was handicapped throughout the season by injuries. Lack of sufficient offensive power prevented a better showing. The team won but two games of the seven scheduled but played well at all times and deserved a higher rating.

WINONA 0

LA CROSSE 12

The superior reserve power on the LaCrosse squad enabled the downriver eleven to defeat Winona by 12-0 in a night game at College Field. Harr scored for LaCrosse in the first quarter from the four yard line and Butterwick plunged over from the one yard line late in the game. LaCrosse held the upper hand throughout, making 15 first downs to 9 for the Purple.

W. Gebhard

G. Lehmkuhl

J. Kozlowski

H. Chase

R. Prcntis

E. Jaspers

V. Herman


L. Hall

L. Arns

W. Thompson

WINONA 6

V. Gisbson

BEMIDJI 0

Winona won in its first conference game, taking a 6-0 victory from Bemidji in a home game. The score came in the third quarter on a 36 yard pass from Johnson to Viezbicke. The Purple outplayed the northern eleven during the entire game, missing several other scoring chances. The victory was costly because in this game Gene Jaspers broke his arm and was out for the season.

WINONA 0

MOORHEAD 26

The powerful Moorhead eleven, the class of the conference, defeated Winona 26-0 at Moorhead. The Purple held their rivals in check except for the last three minutes of the first half when Moorhead pushed over 3 touchdowns. Matson, Yatchak, and Hollister scored for the winners. .Winona lacked the scoring punch to cash in on two breaks in the first half, and did not threaten thereafter.

D. Simons

N . Ervi n

F . Muc:nch

II. Brar(1l ich

E. Lehmk uhl

R . Thur ley


=====+========================================

L. ]orris

R. Parker

K. Eggleston

R. Russell

L. Aygarn

WINONA 2 EAU CLAIRE 6 The Eau Claire Teachers downed the Winona Peds at Eau Claire 6-2. Eau Claire scored early in the fourth quarter on a 12 yard pass, Behn to Davies, and gave Winona two points later in the period when they chose an intentional safety rather than attempting to punt from their one yard line. Vince Viezbicke missed an attempted field goal in the third period. It was Winona's best scoring chance. WINONA 0

ST. CLOUD 7

The St. Cloud team defeated Winona in the homecoming battle 7-0 . The touchdown was made by Smith in the first quarter from the two yard line a·fter the Purple had twice repulsed drives within the five-yard line. A heavy St. Cloud line made running plays ineffective and the Winona pass attack was hampered by the slippery field. WINONA 0

MANKATO l3

A night game played at Mankato resulted in a Mankato victory over W.S.T.C. by 13.-0. Mankato scored in the first quarter on a l2 yard run by Keefe after an 80 yard march down the field. Gladhill scored the other touchdown in the third quarter. Winona twice reached within lO yards of the goal but could not score. WINONA 8 ROCHESTER 6 A blocked punt which rolled out of the end zone for a safety provided the Purple with the winning margin in their 8-6 victory over Rochester at College Field. Winona scored its points in the first half, the touchdown coming on a pass from Moilanen to Russell that gained 50 yards. Rochester scored early in the second half when Peterson's punt was blocked in the end zone. West recovered it for the J. C. touchdown . Winona held a big advantage in play the entire game, but the other scoring efforts were checked by the small Rochester eleven.


Johnny Kozlowski, Gene Jaspers, and Lyle Arns received mention on the allconference selection; Kozlowski being placed on the first team. Horace Chase played well at center in every game. Moilanen, Viezbicke, Herman , and Lehmkuhl graduate. They will be hard to replace. W.S.T.C. FOOTBALL 1934 Winona . .. ... . .... ... . . . . ... Winona .. ... . . .... . . .... .. . . Winona ... .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . Winona . . . .. . ..... .. . .. ... . . Winona . .. . . . ...... . .. .. .... Winona ... . .. ..... . ....... . . Winona . ... . . .. . .. . ..... . .. .

0 6 0 2 0 0 8

La Crosse . . . ... ............ . 12 Bemidji . . . . . ......... . .. . . . . 0 Moorhead .. .. . .. ..... . ...... 26 Eau Claire . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .... . 6 St. Cloud ... . . ... .. . .. .... . .. 7 Mankato ... . .. ... .. .. . .. . . . . 13 Rochester ..... ... .. . . .... ... 6

16

70

ALL CONFERENCE ELEVENS First Team Position Second Team Stevens, Moorhead .. . ...... . .. . .. .. . . . E . . . .. .. . . .. .. .... . . .. Perpich, St. Cloud Serbins, Moorhead ... . ... . . ... . .. ... . . T .. .. .. . .. . . . ... . . . .. . Schranz, Moorhead KOZLOWSKI, WINONA ..... ........ G .... . . . ... ... . . .. .. JASPERS, WINONA Alden, St. Cloud . . ... . .. ... . . . .... .... C. .. .... . . . . . . .. . . .. . Erickson, Moorhead Johnson, Duluth ... . .. .. .. . . .. . .. .... . G ... .. ... ....... .. . . . Bjerknes, Moorhead O'Heirer, Duluth ............... . .. ... T . .. ..... . .. .. ... . . .. .. . Koech, Mankato Marconeri, Moorhead .... .. .. ... ... . . . E. . .. . . ...... . . . .. . . .. .. Hoerr, Mankato Scheela, Moorhead . . .. . ... . ... . . .. ... Q.B . ... .. . ... ... . .... . .. . Gorham, Duluth Edlund, Moorhead . ..... . .. .. . . . . . .. H.B .. ... .. . . ....... . . . . . ARNS, WINONA Hollister, Moorhead .. .. . . . . ... ... ... H.B .·... . . ... . . .. ..... . . . . Keefe, Mankato Krueger, Bemidji . ........ ....... . . . . F.B .... . . .. . .. .. .. . ... Naglowski, Duluth

Emmett Gibbons

Will iam Tho lllpson

Verne Herman. Assr. Coach

Sidney Schmid t


B A S K E T B A L L

BASKETBALL L. Arns,J. Wachs, K. Eggksron, R. Brown, E. Cox, L. McCown, A. Berg

Basketball Sumn1ary

E

ARLY in December after the Purple gridders had cast off tpeir football suits previously completing a successful season on the gridiron, the north wind sounded a call to Thrym who presented an atmosphere which flowed free! y through the veins of all basketeers and heralded their return to the court. In the call issued by Coach Earl Greene there were only five veterans: Captain Alvin Berg, Luther McCown, John Wachs, Vic Gislason and Louis Hoover, present. However the Purple were to play host to such former high school stars as Everett Cox, Ken Eggleston, Lyle Arns, Ronald Brown, and Robert Parker. With this array of former high school cagers the Purple looked forward to a promising basketball season.

WINONA 30 STOUT 28 In a first season game Winona met Stout on their own floor and played a close game until the last three minutes when Luther McCown made a gift shot to win a 30 to 28 game for the Teachers.

WINONA 26 LANESBORO LEGIONNAIRES 28 The following evening the Purple met a strong Lanesboro Legionnaires quintet. The boys started clicking after a poor start and overcame a 13 point lead but lost in the closing minutes 28 to 26 as a result of a field goal by Ed . Johnson, lanky center.

WINONA 31 ST. MARY'S 36 In one of the roughest and most exciting games of the season the St. Mary's Redmen won a 36 to 31 victory. The Redmen led 25 to 13 at the half but a third quarter rally/ut the Purple in the lead 29 to 26 with four minutes to play. Excitement ran high in both sections of the grands tan as Kane scored two free throws. Scully came through with his field goal and set the Redmen on a rampage which counted a 36 to 31 victory.

WINONA 33 ROCHESTER 23 The Purple then journeyed to Rochester to outclass the Yellowjackets to win an easy 33 to 23 victory. Winona established an early lead in the first half and although outscored the second, their lead was sufficient to carry them through.

WINONA 26 EAU CLAIRE 35 The Eau Claire Teachers chalked up a 35 to 26 win over the Purple in a close contest at Eau Claire. The Wisconsin Peds took an early lead but Winona came back to cut the margin to 19 to 17 at half time. However the Peds found themselves in the remaining time and stepped out to win by a nine point margin.

WINONA 19 LA CROSSE 41 The powerful La Crosse five purely outclassed the Purple cagers in their first game in " 35." The maroon starting combination piled up a 17 to 1 lead in the first period. The Purple cue the Maroons down to 20 to 11 at half tine and managed to hold the downriver team in check until the final when the Maroons stepped out.

WINONA 35 EAU CLAIRE 32 The second contest with Eau Claire brought out a clicking combination which later was to do considerable damage in the conference. Winona took an early lead and held it throughout the game until the final minutes when the Peds rallied to tie the score at 31. Field goa ls by Eggleston and Berg gave the Purple a 35 to 31lead. The Peds counted a free throw to set the final score.

---------------~-----------


WINONA 31

BEMIDJI 26

The Purple stepped out in the last three minutes of play to win their first conference victory, when they defeated Bemidji on their own floor 31 to 26. Wachs tied the score at 24 all and Berg made a field goal and gift shot followed by McCown's field goal. Berg's fifth gift shot made it 31 to 26.

WINONA 32 MANKATO 26 Winona won their second conference victory when they defeated the Mankato Teachers 32 to 26. The Purple led through most of the game but went into the final trailing the Katoans 25 to 23. The team held Mankato to a single free throw while Cox sunk two baskets and one gift shot and McCown and Gislason each scored field goals to clinch the game for the Purple.

WINONA 29 ST. MARY'S 31 St. Mary's won the city championship title by defeating the Teachers 31 to 29. Despite the sensational playing of Cox who made 16 of the 29 points the Redmen managed to eke out a two point victory by a spurt in the final minutes.

WINONA 32 DULUTH 38 Winona fans wicnessed one of the best games of the season when the conference champions, the Duluth Teachers, defeated the Purple 38 to 32. The Purple put up a hard battle and tied 16 all at half time. Again in the third quarter the score was tied at 19 all but the Winona team couldn't stave off the powerful attack of the Northerners and they piled up a 10 point lead which they held throughout the final period.

WINONA 25

MANKATO 27

An aggressive Mankato Teachers team defeated the Purple 27 to 25 in a closely fought contest. Mankato led by Pennington and Gladhill took advantage of the opportunities offered them and tied the score at 25 all with one minute to play. Gladhill then won the game by making two gift shots for the Katoans.

WINONA 27

ST. CLOUD 45

On the annual tour the Purple quintet first encountered a 45 to 27 defeat from a strong St. Cloud team. The Saints scored two to every Purple's one from the floor, however, the Purple made seven free throws to the Saints five . Always striving to overcome the margin the Purple were trailing by 18 points at the end of the game.

WINONA 36 MOORHEAD 33 Winona came back on the second game of their tour to beat the Moorhead Teachers 36 to 33. With 40 seconds to play the Purple went out in front by taking a 36 to 29 lead but the Dragons managed to score two quick field goals to bring the score at 33.

WINONA 20 ROCHESTER 16 Unexpected resistance was met in the second game with Rochester. The score was tied 16 all at the close of the third period but the Yellow jackets couldn't keep Brown and Cox from scoring and the Purple forged ahead to take a 20 to 16 victory.

WINONA 34 ST. CLOUD 40 An overtime period in which the Purple lost a 40 to 34 game at the hands of a slightly superior St. Cloud team marked the close of the basketball season. The score at regular time was 32 all. Urick scored a free throw and Cox a field goal. Again, Urick scored a field goal to give the Saints a one-point margin. Arnold then made a field goal and Perpich a gift shot to set the 40 to 34 score. BASKETBALL T. Rothwell, V. Gislason, F. Moilanen E . .Jaspers, R. Pttrkcr, L. Hoover

=========================================================+=========--:!

B A S K E T B A L L


T R A C K

TRACK

Top Row - L . Jorris, B. Ostmoc, L. McCown, ]. O'Gara, D . Simons, E. Smll, M . Laakso, F. Kissling.

Bottom Row- C. Weisman, J. Koslowslc:i, D. Zi nuncrhakl, C. Guile, L. Hall, E . Cox, K. Mad'hcrso11 .

Track

P

ROSERPINA, daughter of Ceres, was reluctant to invade the upper Mississippi valley and Coach Earl Greene and the Purple cindermen were confronted with the possibilities of a late start in their track activities. However, early in May the weather became more favorable and the Purple trackmen could be seen jogging back and forth on Johnson and Washington streets, to and from practice. With such experienced trackmen as Don Zimmerhakl, Bill Owens, Jimmy O'Gara, Luther McCown, Edwin Stull, Bill Franzmann, Horace Chase and Martin Laakso, members of the 1934 championship track team, at Earl Greene's disposal, the Purple looked forward to a · successful season. As the season progressed great possiqilities in Everett Cox, Leonard Hall, Kermit M acPherson, Ken Eggleston, Newell Ervin and Wellington Shay came to the foreground.

May 6. -

TRACK SCHEDULE Winona Quadrangular Meet at College Field. Participants Score Winona . .. . .. .. .. .. .... .. . . .. . ... . .... . . .. . . . ........ ... .. 67 St. Mary 's . .. .. . . . . . . . . ... . . .. . ............ .... .... . . .. . . . 34 Mankato.. .................. ... ..... .. . . . 27 Eau Claire . . . . .. . .. . ...... ...... ... . ... . .. ... . 26

May 10 - Luther Quadrangular Meet at Decorah, Iowa. Participants: La Crosse T. C., Winona T. C., Upper Iowa U., Luther College. May 18 - Dual Meet with La Crosse at Winona College Field. May 25 - State Meet at Minneapolis. Participants: The six teachers colleges in the state. Winona won their initial meet held under the floodlights at college field . The Purple scored 67 points, St. Mary's placed second with 34 points, Mankato scored 27 points and Eau Claire received 26 points. Owens of Winona took first place in the 100 yard dash with a 10.2 time. Hall, Winona, placed second; Keefe, Mankato, third and Zimmerhakl , Winona, fourth . In the 220 finals Zimmerhakl , Winona, placed first with 23.7 time. Keefe, Mankato, ran second ; Hall, Winona, third; Lorenz, St. M ary' s, took fourth . The most beautiful run of the evening was the mile in which McCown, Winona, and Barker, St. Mary's, were fighting for first place from the start of the race until McCown


forged ahead with 50 yards to go to place first, leaving Barker a second, and Love, St. Mary's, the third place. Norbert Scully, Redman star track men, came throngh in the 440 to place first with a time of 53.4 seconds. O'Gara, Winona, took second, Right, St. Mary's, third and Loomis, Mankato, placed fourth. Barger of St. Mary's displayed excellent form in his two mile run, placing first with 11 minutes 35.2 seconds as the time. Stull, Winona, kept at his heels until the last few rods when Barger stepped out to win by at least three yards. Erickson, Eau Claire, running a nice race, placed third. Ken Eggleston, Winona, kept in second place until the last two laps when his stamina seemed to break down and it looked as if he wouldn't be able to finish, however, Ken kept in the race to gain a fourth place and one more point for the Purple. In the low hurdles, Board of Eau Claire took first in 26.9 seconds. Gladhill, Mankato, took second; Franzmann, Winona, third; Hoerr, Mankato, placed fourth. Hoerr, Mankato, stepped out to win the 105 yard high hurdles in 15.3 seconds. Chase of Winona took second, Gladhill of Mankato took third and MacPherson of Winona, placed fourth. The half mile run again found Scully, St. Mary's, taking first in 2.12. Shay, Winona, took second; Cox, Winona, third and Lyons, Eau Claire, fourth. Competition was much keener in the field events. Wrobel, St. Mary's, tossed the javelin 164 ft. 3 inches to win first place. Winona took the remaining points with Zimmerhakl second, Rothwell third, and McCown fourth. AI Pawelek took first in the pole vault for the Purple with a 10ft. jump. Nelson, Mankato, Kissling and Ostmoe, Winona, split two points each in a threeway tie for second place. The discus was won by Barnes, Eau Claire, with a toss of 118 ft. 6 inches. Hoerr, Mankato, took second; Ervin, Winona, third and LaFreniere, St. Mary's fourth. Barnes, Eau Claire, again won the shotput with a 39 ft. 11Yz inch throw. LaFreneire, St. Mary's, took second, Dusky, Eau Claire, third and Hoerr, Mankato, fourth. Voight, Eau Claire, won the high jump with a 5 ft. 8 inch jump. Meier, Mankato, took second; Scully, St. Mary's, Johnson, Winona, and Nelson, Mankato, split a three way tie for third place. Bill Owens won the broad jump for the Purple with a 21 ft. 5 inch jump. Don Zimmerhakl, Winona, placed second; Johnson, Winona, third and Wrobel, St. Mary's, fourth. The Purple relay team composed of ]orris, O'Gara, Owens and Zimmerhakl won the relay, with St. Mary's placing second and Mankato third. Eau Claire was disqualified because their second man missed the baton.

TRACK Row~ W. Shay, T. Rothwell, F. Moilanen, A. Pawelek, W. Thompson, G. McAvoy, H. Roth, N. Ervin. Bottom Row - K. Egglcswn, \V. Franzrnann, 0. Thomas, R. Brown, W. Owens, H. <;::hasc,J. Fuhlbrucggc.

Top

T R A C K


TENNIS

A

I

J

~

TENNIS ThcOOore Rothwell, Louis Hoover, Irving Thornas, Coach W. E. Boots, Joho Blatnik, Alan Pawelek, William Owens

Tennis

Lours

Hoover, Ted Rothwell and Alan Pawelek, members of last year's state championship tennis team, formed the nucleus around which the 1935 Purple tennis team was built. A complete tennis schedule was pending with Coach Willis Boots directing Louis Hoover to carry on correspondence with various colleges for possible tournaments. Plans were complete for a tournament with La Crosse Teachers and a State Tournament in which the six teachers colleges are expected to participate. The State Tournament is to be held May 30 at St. Cloud. St. Cloud was selected for its central location. Mr. Hoover corresponded with Hamline, Macalester, and Carleton colleges to arrange possible tournaments. However final arrangements have not been completed. The three former champions will be bolstered by William Owens, John Blatnik, Irving Thomas and Everett Cox . The method of selection was the appointment of a committee by Coach Boots to rate the possible contestants. In the event that the committee should act unfavorably toward a certain contestant he has the alternative of challenging the man above him and thus work his way into the varsity squad.


Boxing IN THE annual boxing tournament held under the direction of Dave Honig, Bob Thurley won the middleweight title, Albert Mulyck won the bantamweight title and Clark Guile won the light heavy weight title. Mulyck won both the bantamweight and the featherweight titles. He beat Alan Pawelek in the former class and George Hajicek in the featherweight class. Thurley defeated Arthur Wilson in the finals of the middleweight class. Clark Guile worked his way to the finals of the light heavyweight class by defeating Robert Robinson on a technical knockout and then winning a decision from John Kozlowski in the final. Edwin Stull won the welterweight title by a decision over Alvin Berg and the same over Harold Roth. Gene Jaspers took the heavyweight title by outpointing Ross Russell who had previously defeated Lyle Aygarn . Judges for the tournament were W. G. Owens and F. A. Jederman. Dave Honig refereed the bout~.

Golf DEFINITE plans for the 1935 golf team were incomplete as the annual went to press but Coach Arthur French stated that possible reciprocal tournaments would be held with La Crosse, St. Cloud, and Rochester. Mr. French is making an effort to have Mankato, St. Cloud, Duluth and Bemidji join Winona to take part in a state meet to be held on the university course. Westfield Golf Club has again offered the use of their course with the permission granted to the college to allow eight men the opportunity of participating. The course is made up of nine holes which have been improved during the past year. Mr. French hopes to arrange tournaments with outside colleges to be played at Westfield. BOXING

Back Row- R. Thurley, A. Wilson, R. Russell, C. Guile, L. Aygarn, R. Robinson , W. Franzmann. Row- Dave llonigs, A. Pawelek, H. Roth, R. 1-lonigs, G. Hajicck, 13. Simon, E. Stull, A. Mulyck.

fro11t

BOXING


INTRAMURAL

BASKETBALL

I NTRAMURAL BASKETBALL

L. Wood, L. Shira, J. Blatnik, L. Aygaro, W. Roth, F. Gislason

Intramural Basketball 1934-1935 UNDER the supervision of the intramural board an eight team basketball league was formed and squads selected from the 60 men who indicated a desire to play. All letter winners or members of the varsity squad were barred so as to give each man in school a chance to perform . A round robin schedule of seven games per team was adopted. With few exceptions the games were well played and closely contested. As is always the case, several players stood out as the games were run off; among them were - Shira, Ostmoe, Schmidt, Pawelek, Wood, Frank and John Blatnik, and O'Gara. The title was won by the TVA team captained by Louis Shira. The TVA's finished first by copping the playoff game from PWA, second place winners. TVA and PWA had both finished with records of six wins and one loss ._ The CWA and AAA teams also were strong, finishing in the first division.

FINAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS Team

Captains

First ..... .......... . .......... .. . ... TVA ......... . . . .. ... . ... . L. Shira Second .... _............ . ..... ....... PWA ... . ................. J . Kissling Third . ... .. .. . . . ... . . . .. . . .. . . . ... . . CCC ...... ... .............. H . Chase Third .. . . .. ............. . .. .... . .... AAA ....... . . . ....... .. . .. K . MacPherson Third . .. . .. . . ..... . ... . .. ......... . . FCA . ... .. . . . ... . . . . . ..... J. O'Gara


Men's Intramural Volleyball

THE men's volleyball tournament was won by the All-Americans .

Six teams were chosen by the Intramural Board and seven men were placed on each team. The captains chose the names for their teams . Delos Simon captained the winning team; Alvin Berg, the W .C.T.U . 's; Luther McCown the Intellectuals; Theodore Rothwell the Prohibitionists; Sidney Schmidt the Abstainers and Harold Roth the Teetotalars. The Intramural Board adopted the same method of scoring as was used last year, that of using the total points to determine the winner rather than using the percentage rating. The games were very closely contested and the winner was not determined until the very last game. Due to an upset on the part of the All-Americans and the W .C.T.U .' s, the fourth-place team had a very good chance to win the tournament in the last game but the Intellectuals saw to it that they kept their place. FINAL VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS All-Americans .. ..... . . . ..... . .. . . 199 W .C .T.U.'s ...... . .. . .. .. .. ... . . . 197 Intellectuals ... .. . .. .. . . .. .. ... . .. 195

Prohibitionists . ........... . .. . ... . 179 Abstainers . . . . ... .. .... . ... . ...... 154 Teetotalars .. ... . . ........ . .. . .... 142

MEN 'S INTR AMURAL VOLLEYBALL \\' . Toner , R. Parker , L. ll oovcr, H. Bra w lich, B. Ostmoe.

I N T R A M U R A L

V 0 L L E Y B A L L


WOMEN'S

ATHLETIC

ASSOCIATION

MISS TALBOT

MISS PENDERGAST

The Women's Athletic Association

THE Women's Athletic Association is organized for the purpose of encouraging physical activity by giving all girls in the college the opportunity of participating in some form of athletics. As results of this purpose we are beginning to recognize girl's ability to play organized games; we believe we are fostering a spirit of good sportsmanship and most certainly we are furthering the observance of health rules. Each girl must earn at least one hundred points to become a member of the W.A.A. Points are earned by taking part in the various sports sponsored by the organization during the year, and for hiking, swimming, skating, tennis, skiing, tobogganing, and sliding. The sports sponsored by the W.A.A. in the order of their occurrence and with the sport leader of each are as follows: soccer, Betty Jane Failing; field hockey, Alyce Hill; basketball, Virginia Robb; volleyball, Anita Zittleman; swimming, Katherine O'Flaherty; tennis, Gretchen Grimm; and baseball, Gwendolyn Englerth. Officers of the Women's Athletic Association this year are: EvELYN 0GROSKY ..... .. .. . ........ . ..................... Presidertt BETH JoHNSON ................ ..... .. . ........ . ..... . Vice-President GRACE ENGER ... .... ..... . .... .... .. .... .. ....... Secretary-Treasurer Miss TALBOT ..... . ... ............ .. . . ..................... Adviser Miss PENDERGAST ........................... . .............. Adviser


Physical Education Club THE Physical Education Club is composed of minors and majors in the field of physical education. The purpose of the club is to promote a feeling of unity among members of the group and to raise the standards and ideals in physical education. "Play for play's sake" is the motto carried out at each meeting, during which time exhilaration and joyousness reign supreme. One play meeting is held each month to engage in some seasonal sport as basketball, volleyball, badminton, or quoits. The majors in the men's department are often invited to the play meetings and challenged to a game. Members of the club are thereby provided a means to test their skills and at the same time spend an enjoyable evening. Miss Julia Oviatt of the local Y.W .C.A. was present at several of the meetings to talk on physical education as a social service. Slides of professional soccer and hockey players as well as of our own teams were shown to illustrate fine form and technique. A spring hike and weiner roast usually closes the year's activities. The officers of the club are: BETH JoHNSON . . .. . . . .. . .... . . . ........... .. ............. President GRACE ENGER ........ . ............................... Vice-President ALYCE HILL ...................................... Secretary-Treasurer Miss TALBOT ............ . ........ . . . .. . ................... Adviser Miss PENDERGAST ......................... . ............ . ... Adviser

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLUB Top ~ow - ll. Daniels, D. Mallory, C. GtXcting, G. Englerth, R. Richards, M. Rce . . S1coml Row - B. Walters, F. Harcig, M. Buchler, E. Ogro~ky, V. Robb, Paula Meyers, G. Enger. Bottom R.ow - Miss Pendergast, H. Krage, C. Breyer, ll. Johnson, A. Hill, A. Zittleman, L. Schneider, Miss T;1lhor.

PHYSICAL

ED.

CLUB


WOMEN'S

SPORTS

Fall Sports

THE sport which proves to be most popular in the fall is soccer. A large group of girls subordinate other activities in preference to this running kicking game. At the beginning of the season play was ragged and bruises were common but as the girls went out eager to learn, they were soon playing ball that only good coaching could make possible. The group was divided into teams for a tournament . Three games were played in addition to the regular meetings. The games were very close, and the teams evenly matched. Field hockey closely follows soccer in importance for a fall sport . Practice is carried on under the direction of Miss Talbot. There seems to be something about the cold, crisp, fall air which invites the girls out in the open. Bruised ankles and skinned elbows add to the enjoyment of making goals over the "goalie's" protests. The players developed much skill and technique and at the end of the season played brilliant play-off games.


Winter Sports ARRANGEMENTS are made each year for the majors and minors of physical education to use the pool at the local Y.W .C.A. for class instruction under the direction of the physical director at the "Y". Besides learning the various strokes and types of dives, members of the class are given many teaching hints which should prove very valuable. The W.A.A . sponsored several splash parties which were well attended. Our dancing program consists of clogging, character, folk, and interpretive dancing . This past year the personnel has been extended to include the men majors of physical education. Before Christmas a project called, ''The Toy Shop'' was undertaken, in which original character dances for various types of dolls were composed . A large group of girls enjoyed the beginning clogging class, and now have a variety of fundamentals which will enable them to appreciate rhythm as well as the more intricate steps.

WOMEN ' S

SPORTS

-----------------------------'-


WOMEN

'S

SPORTS

=====+======================================~

Winter Sports BASKETBALL is the most popular sport during the winter months. This year after the tournament was held, it was decided to re-choose teams and have another series of play-off games. The teams were well-matched and each game proved to be more exciting than the previou·s one. The following captains were chosen as team heads for the regular tournament : Anita Zittleman, Gretchen Grimm, and Lorraine Magnussen. Rose Hafiz, Bernice Kaiser, and Virginia Robb captained the second group of games . Much of the winter program for freshman classes consists of teaching fundament~! skills and rules of the game. The follow-up sport on our winter program is volleyball. It is offered immediately after the basketball season is over, and before other outdoor sports begin. This year three games were kept in progress at the same time and a high degree of interest was held throughout the season. Catherine O'Flaherty, Betty Jane Failing, and Anita Zittleman were chosen to captain the teams through the tournament.


Spring Sports AS EARLY in the spring as is possible, tennis players are busy on the courts . Tournaments are scheduled and play-off games usually result in much excitement. Beginners' instruction in tennis is given by Miss Talbot for W.A .A. credit, thereby providing recreation for "rec" enthusiasts and also giving would-be players the opportunity to get a start. A sport that most girls play from childhood on retains its popularity in college, as is evidenced by the number of girls who come out to play baseball in spring. The smooth lawn on the campus facing Main Street provides an ideal setting for the games. Home-runs are not plentiful but interest is held high by the fine display of skills and technique. Following in the footprints of Virginia Van Wie, a large group of our girls traverse the green at the Westfield Golf course. New clubs are furnished by the physical education department, which also secures tickets-for students to use. Miss Pendergast gives beginners' instruction in golf on the campus each year to acquaint new players with strokes and terms of the game.

WOMEN

' S

S PORT S





Spring Days in Class On days like this the world all drowses; I see a million vari-colored blouses But they're only spots before my eyes. The prof is one of those long-winded guys And in spite of all the coffee I can take I still must fight to keep awake. I dig my nails into my palms (This day is like an opiate) And yet I cannot keep awake (Must be something that I ate.)

The air is heavy, my blood is thin (I've forgotten now which class I'm in) But here's a hint how dry this class is 'Twould make Sahara seem'n oasis. The meter of this "pome" is hazy, But if you were I, you too' d be lazy, What with listenin' to a din Of some subject dry as sin Whooh! I'm all in!!!

Now ev'rthings far off and dim, 'Prof' is talking but don't mind him He'll say that stuff tomorrow, again, And tomorrow- I will sleep again.

"The Tie that Binds" BLESSED be the tie that binds, but, oh far more blessed is he that binds it. That was evident by the thought that went through the mind of an illustrious inebriate ("drunk" to you!) of this fair city one night last May. When I met him he was having considerable difficulty in the business of tying his cravat, which is a highly complimentary name for the thing he wore! Well, there I was faced with a problem: a tie that should be tied but wasn't. What was I to do? He claimed that he had become so accustomed to tying ties of the jazz-bo type that he had utterly forgotten how to tie this other type. I tied the tie for him, which task was but a simple matter. I carried it all through with the greatest solemnity, and made it all seem very mysterious and complicated. I may even have said a few incantations to heighten the effect, but I couldn't be sure - one never is, you know. When I had finished he was as grateful as a pup just out of a bath. If he'd have had a kingdom he· d have given me half of it, but I think I'd have held out for his daughter. (Dearie; you know I wouldn't. I only say those things to be funny.) Not having one of those things (a kingdom) he offered me his next best: "Want a drink son?" "No thanks. You see I'm an athlete up to the Teachers College and I got to keep training.'· Then he felt my biceps, evidently dubious as to whether anyone with a physique like mine could possibly be an athlete. I think he was still wondering when he said, "Well, keep it up, kid. That's great stuff! You'll get somewhere someday! Then I passed on feeling very inspired. It's little things like that that make life more pleasant.


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TO <;."fUD(.

Dorm Life

H

AVE you ever seen a cliff honey-combed with swallows nests? And did you ever notice what a flutter is caused when you walk by? Well, a cliff's got nothing on these here new dormitories. All a fella has to do is to walk his best girl down any one of the walks on the quadrangel and he has started a hubbub which will last until the next poor sap is so bold as to walk in that valley of the shadow. (Who is the shadow- that's just it - wh.o is he? If we knew - gr-r-r). When S.F.B. Morse boasted that he would put a girdle around the earth in twenty minutes he certainly had never heard of dorms . If Morey Halls and Shepard Halls were placed end to end around the world it would, of course be silly, but that's not the point. We'll wager that news (providing it were gossip) would flit around the world in a split-second. One of the great indoor sports at the dorms is kicking about the quantity and quality of food, and yet those same persons manage to keep themselves "pleasingly plump." Some persons actually take salts to get rid of the fat they put on by not eating enough. That's hardly paradoxical- it's goofy. Then there is the washline. One of West Lodges favorite games is to stand near it and pick out which girls must have laundered. Of course this is a lewd sport and should not be engaged in. The dormitories are filled with so diverse a collection of people that it is difficult to make any statement which will apply to all of them. The only thing that can be said is this, and its an awfully old crack; ''If all the people who eat at Morey Hall were put end to end they would reach. -FinisDon't mind me - ammonia bird in a gilded cage.


Inside Dope- on the Athletics

I

NSIDE dope is queer stuff. It is composed of various elements: hot spray from showers, soap, liniment, sweat, tall-stories and close harmony. It is hard to say which smells the worse. When you step into locker rooms, you have cut yourself off from this world and you step into an entirely foreign environment. When you see the boys gayly romping around on the football field, basketball floor, or pacing on the cinder track you get a very much distorted view - few people realize that these fellows aren't just ''athletes," but that there are a large number of opera stars, novelists, poets, philosophers, masseurs among them with here and there a prevaricator thrown in for good measure. If it's tall stories you're looking for, we suggest the tall lad from the land where the tall corn grows. You can always find "Little Lu" telling some sort of story by which he convinces himself and no one else that Iowa is a good state to live in. Then there are those hurdlers who tell about knocking off dimes at the beginning of the season when they're still nasty ( not the dimes, the hurdlers) and gradually working down to the point where they can just scratch the enamel on the hurdles as they go over. But it is in the line of music that we have our best performers, although some people would take exception to that statement. If you can find Don Zim, the chances are that you will find him in the center of a trio or quartet which is concencrating earnesrly on something like the "Drunkard Song" or "Down by the Old Mill Stream." Oh, those melodies bring the tears to your eyes - if you only think of how they should be sung. We also have solo performers, although they 'd prefer not to have their names mentioned here. The only fella who!!! came right out and acknowledged that he's good is AI Berg, and he 's no singer - he's a yodeler. This little clan is affected by one strange malady, "shin splints." Only a very few of us know what it is but we've all got it. The ai lment has a habit of cropping up when we ' ve been working pretty hard and feel that we need a rest. If some athlete should have to drop out of school, the people mourn, " Too bad, he's a good man with the discus," but we of the tepid catacombs mourn differently. "There goes the best little second tenor on the squad."

pus l.lS rc.n o /. w~r


"Poor John" "AW GEE! I wish you didn't have to go off to college tomorrow, John. I'm gonna be awfully lonesome." "What do you think about me? Do you suppose I'll be running around with those college women, when I've got my darlin' little Isabel sitting home knittin' wool socks for me when I'm fighting in the trenches with chemistry and trigonometry? Not on your life, honey bunch!" "Why you old rake - to even think of going around with those hussies. If you do, I'll crown you with rna's new Dutch oven!" "Now listen here, young lady. Something of that nature goes for you too. If I even hear of you going around with that silly old bachelor, Gross, you'll get your little behind paddled so hard you won't be able to sit on whipped cream." "Aw, John, you know I don't like that addled Edmund Gross. The only reason I ever go with him is because he takes me places where you're always too broke to go. But if you say so, I will ;point my mighty little index finger and say to him, 'Go, you villian! and never darken our guest towel again' .'' "Izzy, that crack's so old its good. If you weren't the star performer here I'd leave this 'gol-dern theaytre' and never patronize it again." The rest of the conversation was muffled and indistinct, but the gist of it was that they promised to be faithful, very faithful, and that they'd each write nice long letters. The next morning John was down at the depot, his face still red, from cursing an obstinate suitcase which refused to close. The suitcase in question sat quite innocently by, looking like something which had a choice of being a sphere or a cube and had made a compromise, being both and neither. Isabel was there, of course, as were a considerable number of relatives who may as well not have existed for all the importance that they carried at that moment. The train finally lumbered out of the station bearing our precious John who was so covered with lipstick that it was hard to tell whether he was an Indian with leprosy or a white man with measles. He was unaware of all the beautiful scenery he passed through; he didn't notice the little towns on the way until he was startled into reality when the conductor gargled out "Middleton" - which is a very nice name for a college town. The days in college were busy, but never so hectic that they did not allow for frequent letters of prodigous length. They ran like this. Sept. 18 Dear Izzy, Well, here I am in college. Hi dehi de ho! Rah, rah, rah, and all that tripe. I'm very busy, dear, taking entrance exams, finding a rooming place and, more important, finding a boarding place where I can get plenty of butter and meat. If you were around I could live on love pudding and water, but that stuff is no good when you're out for football as I am. Tomorrow I have my first class. Pray for me, Izzy. Your great big loving sweetheart, John Sept. 20 Dear John, Got your letter. Thanks. I miss you a lot alread y. I don't see how I'll be able to wait until Thanksgiving when you come home again. Edmund called up last night, but I said "nothing doing." Do I get a kiss for that? Yours, ( & how) , Isabel Sept. 22 Dear Izzy, Yon certain! y do not get A kiss. You get a gross - why can't they get another word for 12 dozen instead of that one which has such a vulgar connotation? There was an initiation dance last night and the freshman men were given blind dates. You should have seen the hag I got stuck with. No competition for you there, baby. I've seen some dim bulbs in my time but this girl was so dim she could make a photographer 's dark room seem like a solarium. Don't worry about me - I'm your true blue, John


Everything went rosy for John. He wrote letters, received letters, and between times worked on his studies. Suddenly however something went wrong. He didn't get his answer to his last letter as promptly as he should have. He waited three whole days, determined to be firm. Then he wrote a letter, scorching in parts, begging and entreating in other places. He sent this special, Dear Isabel, If you think you can get me fussed by not answering my letters, you'd better get that idea out of your cute little head with a funny nose in front of it. If you think I miss them you're mistaken - the actual state of affairs is quite the contrary. I save a lot of time by not writing to you. The only thing is that writing letters has become a kind of habit that's kinda hard to break - but don't think I'm feeling bad. You don't mean that much to me. Yours, (this offer good for a limited time only) John P.S. Under separate cover you will receive one (1) large box of stationery and one book of stamps. Please, please write to me. I'm so lonesome for you I can't think, I can't study I can't do anything. I didn't mean those things in the letter - I just wanted to scare you a little.

J.

B.

No reply. He waited what seemed an interminable week. Then Came a letter with typewritten address, no return address, and signed a friend- all typewritten, completely anonymous. It read: Dear Mr. Brown, I may be considered nosey, but I feel it my duty to inform you that there are rumors of Miss Isabel Harmon's engagement with Mr. Edmund Gross. My advice to you would be to return to your home town and find out just what is the status quo. A Friend John was so perturbed that he stuffed four nightshirts, eighteen handkerchiefs, two shoes - both odds, nary a shirt, tie, or change of underwear into an overnight bag and dashed down to the depot and climbed aboard the first train home and went so far as to go forward to the engine and urge the engineer to make all speed for his destination. He stepped off the train at Hazeldale, the home town, and saw Isabel walking blithely along resting her arm brazenly upon that of Mr. Gross. John tried to appear nonchalant and pretended that he had not seen them. He'd have been more successful had he taken the time to close his overnight bag and not have a streamer composed of the contents of the bag flaring out behind him. He looked too much like a kite to convey the effect of dignity he so much desired. He hurried home and when he thought the beauty and the beast had finished their walk, he called up excitedly, "May I speak to Miss Harmon?" "This is she." "Well you know d- -well who this is! Can I come over and hear you explain?" "Yes come over about five o'clock." "Okay. So long!" He intended to be terse and abrupt but he failed. Somehow as soon as he heard her voice he couldn't be angry for the life of him. He strode over to her house determined to be very severe with her. He expected to find her feeling just a bit abashed, but there she was, at a tea table sitting as calm a Buddha. It was hard to be angry but he managed. "What the dickens do you mean turning back on me like that. Are you going to marry Gross or not?" "Oh, John, bless your trusting little heart, no! I'd sooner go into a convent than marry that dolt. You just come up real close and I'll whisper a secret." Of course John came close, "real close." "Listen you big booby, I framed this thing so that you'd get scared and come home. Now that you're home you can take me to dance out at the Pine tonight. All I wanted to do was to get you home. I did - and aren't you glad? Am I so dumb as I look?" "No, you're dumber, but I like 'em dumb." From here on the conversation again became muffled and indistinct. THE END

===========.


Saturday Night in a Small Town Cl ATURDAY night in a small town is a bizarre sight. The dweller of a large city misses

0

an opportunity when he is not privileged to witness the mixture of hectic scurry or nonchalant loafing that prevails on the eve before the Sabbath. Gayety is the keynote; no one is unhappy. The "missus" scuttles to and fro to see which one of the general stores will give the most in trade for her eggs and which emporium is offering the best bargains in gingham or taffeta. She is earnest about her work but still she has time to converse with the neighbor lady on the most adventitious way of pickling beets, or perhaps she will "requisition" a slip from her begonia plant - it's that lovely. The older farmers, their leather faces tanned, wearing arm-bands and suspenders, with their sleeves rolled up only slightly above the wrists, are lounging around the cigar-store Indian. Their conversation is concerned with the latest "idee" in corn binders and eradicators of potato bugs. The general lightness of mood is betrayed in their t ales about the guernsey calf or the bay colt, both of which are the " most larfable lil cusses yo' ever saw." But the gay young bloods, hell-bent in a hurry and up to no good, are the ones who supply the real "yokel" color. They are either going to or coming from some place of high sin the theatre or ice-cream parlor. Theirs are the voices engaged in noisy persiflage and repartee - he is a sluggard indeed who is not ready with a retort to any sally with dazzling speed. Typical of the taunts and banter is this; The red-headed country belle, growing slightly weary of all this cleverness, says with emphasis meant to stun, "Listen, bo! you can go too far with me." The swain referred to, as indomitable as a cork in mercury, returns with true rustic brilliance, "When?" This goes on and on, far into the night. If you've missed anything tonight, don't feel bad. Just come around again next Saturday, and it will all be repeated - same town, same people, and ( alas !) the same wise-cracks.

What Has Beco1ne of Theodosia? ( Aaron Burr had a very beautiful daughter, Theodosia. She one time disappeared, so naturally everyone wondered what had become of her. ) "What has become of Theodosia?" The people all are asking . And we can ' t do anymore than guess ; The question is too tasking. We looked into the sugar-bowl, And behind the cellar door And everywhere it looks as if Theo isn't anymore. We looked in the woodshed And down amongs't the coal. And in the bathtub looked to see If maybe, she'd gone down the hole. We looked most ev'rywhere, I guess E'en neath yon bushel basket. The question is, alas, too hard So why for do you ask it? For further information see any good encyclopedia or MR. JEDERMAN.


Revenge Just because they found me - making love To the fairest of all lamp-post in this, our city, They clapped me in the hoosegow summarily, ( not merrily, summarily!) But I swear I'll have revenge They cannot do a thing so dastardly To such a one as me. I'll show 'em; I'll go in my garden and eat some worms And then I'll die! summarily, ( not merrily, summarily!) Then they 'll be sorry they picked on me.

Those Shocking Electricians!

T

HE electricians in our town gave an "amature" play last night . It was positively "re-volting." The orchestra played "Watts the fuse" of worrying'?" and We "shunt" go home until morning. The heroine had her hair in "coils" and her eyes were as clear as " crystal". Although my "resistance" was strong, her " magnetism" was so great that I was "induced" to go up to meet her after the show. She recited a poem, the "meter" of which was very bad, but we "field" pretty good just to have her up there. We were wishing she'd a ppear with greater "frequency." There was a court scene, and when the judge asked, " What's the 'charge'?" the answer was, "assault and 'battery'." There was a slight Roman touch when the goddess of crops, "Series," was mentioned. In one scene there was quite a commotion. This was natural, however, since they were just "electron" a president. A doctor was examining a little boy. He said, " Make your "tungsten" out so I can look at it." He shook his head a little and told the kid's mother to be sure he got his daily supply of "protons." The villain said, ''I'm going to kill a cat." The hero said, "You're going to 'killowat'?" and then catchin, "You'd better not let that cat 'dynamo ' because its been killed eight times before." In a train scene a "conductor" came around to collect tickets and "cell" candy. The hero consulted a mystic who asked him, "What do you want me to do - 'television'?" The hero was a detective who had worked himself from the "ground" up. In referring to his assistant, Solomon, he once remarked, " 'Solenoid' find that guy if we could only a find a clue." In conclusion the orchestra played " 'Ohm' Sweet 'Ohm' ." The play was very rotten and I'm glad they've " switched" to another town . I understand they are going from town to town. I hope they have a "short circuit." Don ' t tell anybody, but I'm going to have a date with that heroine the next time "ammeter.' '


1. 2. 3. 4.

" Hello Red!" (Repeat) Activities room trio . Industrial artists. Gr-r-r-r!

5. Aren't there any more at home like you? 6. Foreigners from Dakota, Iowa. 7. T ootsies.


1. 's no fun!

2. Brother, would you spare a dime? 3. Girls Lounge. 4. Nice back you have Harold.

5. Fender, Marthy and Toots. 6. Another college widow! 7. Still looking for a valentine, Urs?


l. Wachs works!

2. 3. 4. 5.

Natural expressions. Redman rests! Three's a crowd. Mrs. Chadwick's little girl.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Nice Bow Wow, Wegner Izzy. Our Mascot. She also rode. Vocational training.

11. Intermediates. 12. For some - sum four. 13. Dean Richards. 14. Six Day Bike Race.


1. Watta Man. 2. Fine feathers do not make fine birds. 3. Come ups- time. 4. Some Sissy, Cece. s. Gracey.

6. Harriet. 7. Survival of the unfit. 8. Twins. 9. Who's Who. 10. More Morey's.

11. Squad in action. 12. Band formation. 13. Privileged Frosh. 14. West Lodge captures two 15. Up a tree.


1. Harmony duo. s. Heterogeneity. 2. Esther & Johnny. 6. In their own little world. 3. Beauty and Beast- on steps. 7. Homogeneity. 8. Every Sweet William has 4. Compensation for the fi.ddler. its Fern.

9. Voorhees her Ostmoe. 10. Unhand me, - Berg-lar. 11. Too good to last.


.... ....

l. Two heads are better.

3. Ah wilderness were paradise now.

5. My Man! 6. Two dangerous blondes. 7. Get thee behind me, Satan. 8. Beat Russell at all costs!

4. This ought to be good.

9. Little Lou and Mona.

2. Love also moves in cycles.

10. Song birds. 11. God's gift. 12. Snow birds. 13. Loving cup in action.


ADVERTISEMENTS ···+-----~-----<1····

TO THE public spirited business men of Winona whose liberal patronage has helped to make this book possible. Please accept our thanks.


SPARKLING INDIVIDUALITY- You find it in Bureaubuilt Annual•. . . . . . Beauty of Design - Quality of Engraving-Distinction of T/,eme.... Don't merely dream of suc/l an Annual. Let BUREAU. CRAFT /,e/p you make it a H.eality.

\Ve inviteyourcorre&pondence. Let ua tell you w/,at BUREAU.

etfin;:~~polis -

=========


An aged mother was scolding her oldest boy for some of his bad habits. "Ain't you shamed of yerself,'' she exclaimed, "to be chawin' terbaccer an' smokin' that ole pipe? You is jest aruinin' your health!''

"But, listen, Ma," replied her son, 'Tm past seventy years old, ain't I?" "Yes, you is," admitted the mother, "but maybe if you didn't chaw and smoke you'd be ninety by now.'' Black and Red.

'Prtewert 'Photos COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE

PRIEWERT STUDIO 69 East 4th Street Application Photos 25 for $1.00 50 for $1.50

Films Developed

Picture Framing

GEO. H. PLETKE STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES

Exclusive FERNDELL Agency

~tebenson' s

ROYAL CAB

Smart Apparel For Women

Phone 3530

"If it's new you'll find it here"

STEAK SHOP

COURTESY

SERVICE


RELIABLE INSURANCE

Compliments of tlte

Winona Insurance Agency Exchange Bldg.

Hotel Winona

PHONE 2875

Compliments of

Latsch & Son Co. Since 1867

WHOLESALE GROCER Winona, Minn.

COMPLIMENTS OF

Shoe

B& D

Store

"Let us fit your feet"

MASTER CLEANERS AND DYERS

s Phone 3030

Wilson Miller - I guess you've gone out with worse looking fellows than I am, haven't you? (Again) - I say, I guess you've gone

68-70 East Fourth St.

out with worse looking fellows than I, haven't you? Girl - I heard you the first time. I was just trying to think. Black and Red.


''What is that deaf and dumb carpenter so frantic about?'' "He just hit his thumb with a hammer and he can't find his pad and pencil.'' Black and Red.

AI- Well, kid, you lost your bet, and now I want the forfeit. Carol- I don't know what you mean and besides someone might see us. Black and Red.

McConnon & Company WINONA, MINN.

MEMPHIS, TENN.

A Winona Company which manufactures a complete line of over 170 guaranteed products, including Finest Foods and Groceries, Toilet Articles, Good Health Products, Stock and Poultry Raisers Supplies, Insecticides, and many other necessities.

Has rendered dependable service to homes in cities, towns, and on the farm;:; for almost 50 years.

R. D. Cone Company WHOLESALE AND RET AIL HARDWARE PHONE

66-70 Easl Second Street 4052 SINCE 1855

TV hen in TV inona E.-\ T AND SLEEP .\l The

Williams Hotel & Cafeteria Frank and John Williams, Props. Excellent Food at New Low Prices

Stern €5 Field THE STORE FOR li!EN .55 W. Third Winona, ~linn.

Edwin A. Brown PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST THE REXALL STORE

Kodaks -

Kodak Supplies

NewLocation -

117 W. Third St.


The FASHION The Store that sells the Best in LADIES A~D l\1ISSES READY-TO-WEAR

for Just a Little Less Walk around the corner and Save If It's New We Ilave It

GATE CITY LA UNDRY 1G4 West Third

F

u

Phone 2888

R

s

• Always the smartest furs in the smartest fashions. • Safe vaults for scientific storage- at low cost. • Dependable repairing by skilled furcraftsmen.

CONRAD'S 108 W. 3rd St.

STUDENTS 0 F ECONOMY

I

I

I

Can be snappy dressers on a very small allowance if they buy their clothesatPenney's! Sports togs, sweaters, sox and shirts are famous for good styling, long wear and low price! Try them! The "pater" will be so impressed!

• It pays to shop at

Phone 2202

Shepard Hall girls have decided that some men are so narrow-minded they can look through a keyhole with both eyes.

Judge - "Who was driving when you hit that car?'' Inebriate ( triumphantly) - "None of us; we were all in the back seat." Black and Red.


Turn In for Gas and Oil WHEREVER YOU SEE THIS EMBLEM

<

ONCE - ALWAYS )

Cities Service Oil Co.


WINONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE ESTABLISHED 1858 -

8700 GRADUATES

Offers a combined general and vocational education at smaller expense to the student than almost any other higher institution of learning.

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Grades and High School Supervision, High School, etc. Academic Fields Fine Arts, Music Industrial Arts Physical Education

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUMS For Elementary Schools Rural Schools Kindergarten-Primary Primary Grades Intermediate Grades Upper Grades

Its four-year curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor of Education and its two-year to the diploma, with suitable and specific certification for public-school service. The Junior College program of the first two years is a boon to the financially limited students.

Send for Yearbook and other literature


BIRDIE (Dedicated to Mr. French) Birdie on my window sill You wake me with your cheep, cheep, cheep. Some people say they like your song, But ah me, I'd rather sleep.

Epitaph Here lies a pedestrian Cold as ice; He jumped only once. ( He should have jumped twice.) Black and Red.

\YI!i~.2LD BAY STATE MILLING

Co.

WINONA, MINN.

THE COLLEGE BARBER SHOP Will satisfy your particular appearance

GIVE US A TRIAL "We appreciate your business"

C. K. SuNDBY, Prop.

Compliments of

Allyn S. Morgan JEWELER Salisfactory Service Always

EAT

Dolly Madison Ice Cream

DRUGS- PAINT- GLASS

Manufactured by

TRI-ST ,\TE ICE CREAM CO.

A Complete Line of

Meats, Groceries, Picnic Supplies

WERNER & OSTROM 519 Huff St.

Rademacher Drug Co.

Dial 2358

59 West Second Street

Compliments of

F. W. Woolworth Co. WINONA, MINN.


Compliments of

STATE THEATRE Presenting the Finest in Talking Pictures NEW WIDE RANGE SOUND

HOLDEN'S

COJ\IPLTJ\rENTS OF

S. S. KRESGE

523 Huff Street Can supply you with Toilet Articles, School Supplies, and Expert Kodak Work.

Winona, Minn.

Compliments of

Baker & Steinbauer

Henry G. Hanson

"Better Shoes"

158 Main Street

Winona - La Crosse - Rochester

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairs

Supply Your Needs At -

CHOATE'S

Building For Tomorrow on the Foundations of Today

H. Choate & Company Established 1861

A gifted small girl has explained that pins are a great means of saving life, "by not swallowing them.'' - C. E. Montagne, in the "Golden Book."

There you have it: Life is war - Edwin Young. War is Hell - General Sherman . Hell is empty - Shakespeare. Golden Book.


"What is youth?" ''I'm a thophomore." Black and Red. Morey Hall Diner - ''There must be a new dishwasher here.''

Second Morey Hall Diner - "What makes you think so, Sherlock?'' First Morey Hall Diner - "Because the fingerprints on these dishes are different." Black and Red.

COMPLIMENTS OF

WINONA CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION FIRST NATIONAL BANK MERCHANTS BANK WINONA NATIONAL AND SAVINGS BANK

COMPLIMENTS of

Siebrecht Floral Co.

.Springdale Dairy Co. PASTEURIZED :MILK, CREAM AND BUTTERMILK OF SUPERIOR FLAVOR Dial3982 529 Huff St.

Winona Electric Construction Co. "Everything Electrical" 178 Main St.

Phone 5802

Our Name

W. J. DYER & BRO. Has Been Synonymous With EVERYTHING MUSICAL St. Paul SINCE 1870 Minn .

BAILEY & BAILEY IT'S A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE

The College Inn 450 Huff St. MEALS, LUNCHES FOUNTAIN SERVICE C.

J. McVey, Proprietor


Buy Good Shoes and Keep Them Repaired

NATHE MEAT MARKET

A.M. BARD

QUALITY MEATS 211 East Third St.

525 Huff Street

~

Botsford Lumber Company

Louis Thurow Box; Factory Manufacturers of Window and Door Frames Packing Boxes and Crates Quality Mill Work Third & Wilson WINONA, MINN.

·

Complete Line of LUMBER For Manual Training PHONE 3552 WINONA, MINN.

Compliments of COMPLIMENTS OF THE

Mississippi Valley Public Service Co.

Winona Clinic

The George Hillyer Furniture Co. ESTABLISHED 1870

-

INCORPORATED 1910

"The store where you find the nationally advertised lines" FURNITURE, RUGS, LINOLEUMS, CHINA, GLASSWARE, PICTURES, MIRRORS, BABY CARRIAGES, LAMPS AND SHADES

166-168 Center St.

Student Teacher- "What's all this?" Phelps School Hopeful - ''Those are my Mae West problems." Student Teacher - "Mae West?" P. S. H.- "Yeath, I done 'em wrong." Literary Digest.

Winona, Minnesota

And look how strong trains are: A train smokes a lot and also choos. Some people think that genius is hereditary and others have no children. Both from Readers Digest.


W. F. PELZER

Campus Beauty Shoppe

"Tailor for Your Success"

Campus Sweet Shop

AND

Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Ryan

Custom Tailoring

4.51 Huff St.

[

Winona, Minn.

FORD HOPKINS COMPANY DRUGS

-

52-54-56 E. Third Street TOILETRIES TEA ROOM

THE following firms have contributed to the financial success of this issue of the \V enonah. Jf7e appreciate your patronage. STAR SHOE SHINING PARLOR STAGER JEWELRY LINDSAY STUDIO WINONA CLEANING WORKS GRAAF'S CLOTHING STORE GRIFFIN STUDIO SALET'S DEPT. STORE SUPER CLEANERS KRATZ CANDY SHOP KALMES TIRE SHOP


JONES & KROEGER COMPANY

PRINTERS- BINDERS STATIONERS

108- 110 E. Third St.

Printers

WINONA, MINN.

of the

I935 Wenonah


Autographs


Autographs


=====+====================================~

Autographs