16th Media Art Biennale WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE

Page 1

16 th MEDIA ART BIENNALE WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE



16th MEDIA ART BIENNALE WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE


Dyrektor / Director Violetta Kutlubasis-Krajewska Dyrektor artystyczny / Artistic director Piotr Krajewski Główni producenci / Chief producers Zbigniew Kupisz Małgorzata Sikorska Zespół programowy / Program team Krzysztof Dobrowolski Dagmara Domagała Paweł Janicki Dominika Kluszczyk Bartosz Konieczny Klio Krajewska Magdalena Kreis Barbara Kręgiel Agnieszka Kubicka-Dzieduszycka Michał Michałczak Małgorzata Sikorska Michał Szota Kamila Wolszczak


16 MEDIA ART BIENNALE WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE th

THE WRO ART CENTER



Fostering the emancipation of artworks, the expansion of media arts has made artists abdicate some of their prerogatives in favour of the viewers and enabled transcending the autonomous world of art and the experience it offers. Multiple developments have not just facilitated but, indeed, necessitated experimentation with ways of showing media art to the audience. These developments include opening up of artwork forms, artistic uses of techniques associated predominantly with other, non-artistic contexts, drawing on new communication practices engaged in by contemporary audiences and assimilation of various cultural and social participatory contexts and mechanisms. With the WRO Media Art Biennale, organised regularly since 1989 and boasting its own numerous circle of fans, it could be taken for granted that the audience will vary in experience, ranging from the first-time visitors to the viewers who have already made a considerable investment in media arts, including the prior editions of the Biennale. This diversity entails a multiplicity of attitudes toward the contemporary media in everyday use: active participation or avoidance, reflective or superficial approaches, to cite a few dichotomies, which may in fact belie the complexity inherent in the multifaceted array of stances and positions. Be it as it may, those who are still traditionally referred to as the audience certainly boast ever richer and more varied experience with the media and, in everyday practices, rely on the tools similar to those used by artists. Some viewers, additionally, may easily draw on the insights acquired in the previous editions of the Biennale. Importantly, the latest three editions of the WRO Biennale add up to a coherent conceptual sequence. In 2011, Alternative Now addressed the  vibrant trends in contestatory art, critical extra-institutional practices, individual temperaments and the grit of artistic experimentation. In 2013, 7


Pioneering Values prompted reflection on the history of media arts, highlighting both the diversity of its forms as well as its continuous identity sustained over half a century of uninterrupted development. In turn, Test Exposure, labelling the entire programme of the 2015 WRO Biennale, highlights its focus on the recent developments in media arts coupled with the testing of diverse ways in which media art may be displayed or may itself affect the viewers. Test Exposure is a polyvalent and potentially deceptive phrase; it may designate “a trial exposure” and, at the same time, “a testing exposure”. The very word exposure in itself conveys a multiplicity of meanings, including exhibition and presentation as well as disclosure, unveiling and unmasking, but also vulnerability and hazard. This is, actually, what the latest WRO Biennale sought to achieve – to put recent art to the test when confronted with the audience and to put the viewers to the test when exposed to art in a variety of spaces, circumstances and contexts. It produced a unique test to the autonomy and resilience of art, which, embedded in contemporary life, faces up both to the designs various political and economic agendas have on it and to the challenges of pop culture, which formats our – the public's – expectations, preferred understandings and aesthetic habits. How does art handle the joint demands of attractiveness and intelligibility today? How will the public and the critics respond to departures from the normative, mainstream discourse, which call for thoughtful focus, interpretive independence and, ultimately, mindfulness and confidence in one's own, oft insecure sensibility? Exposing as an interpretive strategy Test Exposure circumscribes the role of explicit programmatic declarations and interpretations for the sake of displaying and producing the exhibition value defined in terms of giving the exhibition the shape and organising the context 8


and architecture of perception that promote the viewers' autonomous experience, discovery and meaning-making. What our Exposure exposition also explored was also in how far artworks communicate their meanings to the audience, whether additional information about the ideas they convey is, or is not, a necessary prelude to the reception act and to what extent the viewers could become autonomous interpreters, gleaning from the show, discovering or inventing the order of meanings and values. Interpretation involves culling, from a work or a statement, such as an exhibition, a certain ensemble of elements one deems essentially meaningful. The meanings produced in this way may transcend the artist's conscious intents. There is a line, one notoriously difficult to draw, between the work's intrinsic properties and its interpretation propelled by a particular reception moment, diverse individual sensations and experiences, and, finally, a complex gradability of meanings coupled with a multiplicity of possible readings and ways to configure the same elements. At the same time, the committed viewers may confront their ideas with other views, browsing through elaborate descriptions provided on websites, talking to gallery guides and participating in curatorial tours, workshops and art mediation actions. The latter were given a prominent place in the comprehensive Little WRO project addressed to the young audience, which sought to abandon the privileged authorial or curatorial interpretations for the sake of art mediation understood as making art and the audience engage and interact with each other in meaningful ways. Our intent was to involve the audience, as early as possible, in putting together the programme of the 2015 WRO Biennale. For years, WRO has been dedicated to cultural and artistic participation, ranging from interactive investment to inclusion in performances and network projects. 9


Now, we concluded that, in our relationship with the audience, we should also share our responsibility and doubts. To this purpose, we held open meetings, which substantially contributed to the screenings later on display. The new forms of participatory viewing sessions open to the public helped us relinquish the exclusively expertise-based, curatorial take on the  programme development. The Biennale's main shows The slogan of Test Exposure had also its purely practical dimension related to locating the 2015 WRO largest exhibition in the new University Library still awaiting its official opening. Entering the brand-new edifice, which had yet to be put to use, allowed us to test the building for its utility in the scope and ways completely unanticipated before. The artworks were arranged across the four storeys of the monumentally spacious building reminiscent of Modernism's ideal art museums. Veritably anonymous, monochromatic and suffused with dispersed light, the huge halls and passageways gave room to distanced perspectives and complex exhibit groupings difficult to arrange outside museums. The Library's architecture – its bulk and structured spaces – paired with its urban surroundings offered a perfect setting for the show to test a certain illusion of the contemporary art museum. An opposition and a counterbalance to that distanced neutrality was provided by a project staged in a small flat in a decrepit tenement, a few blocks away from the brand-new Library. The site-specific show was closely interlinked with the actual social environment and involved integrating activities addressed to the neighbourhood's residents. The exhibition housed in the National Museum, placed in its 19th-century main hall, displayed a tension between the material and the non-material in 10


media artworks conceived as objects and images to be looked alongside the sculptures and paintings of the museum's permanent collection. The exhibition in the WRO Art Center, an experimental space by default, was devoted to artworks at the intersection of art and biology which involved nonhuman actors and natural phenomena encountered in objective developmental processes, thereby fusing biological organisms and technologies of interspecies communication. Most of the works on display were inspired by the idea of stimulating actually unfolding processes rather than of simulating them digitally. Finally, one of the Biennale major shows used the public spaces of the Renoma, one of the oldest department stores in Europe. Given that more than 700 thousand customers came to the Renoma when the exhibition was on display, this event of the 2015 WRO Test Exposure served as a harbinger inducing the audience to visit the other venues of the Biennale. The Renoma exhibition tested art as available to perception in dispersal, in conditions adverse to contemplation, art whose presence took by surprise and interfered with the autonomous purposiveness of the operative communication channels. The exhibition programme, supplemented with screenings and performances at a former train station and in other public spaces, posed a complex test to art, confronting it with appropriated, adapted, arbitrary or redefined spaces. Involving vivid, but not constraining, venues, the diversity of exposition arrangements across the 2015 WRO Test Exposure was instrumental to showcasing the complexity of current art forms, highlighting their multifarious referentiality and encouraging interpretive openness fuelled by varied attitudes and expectations toward contemporary art.

11


TEST EXPOSURE READER

EDITED BY PIOTR KRAJEWSKI AND VIOLETTA KUTLUBASIS-KRAJEWSKA


12

Dagmara Domagała CITY EXPOSURE: TRACES AND THE OPEN CITY

17

Magdalena Kreis LITTLE WRO

20

Kamila Wolszczak GG: SELF-SUPPORTING UNIVERSAL EXHIBITIONS

23

Dagmara Domagała FIRST COMPETITION FOR MEDIA ARTS GRADUATION PROJECTS

30

Krzysztof Dix WHERE DOES THE CARPET GO?

33

Krzysztof Perzyna SIMULACRA

36

Roger Malina THE CRISIS IN DATA REPRESENTATION: RE-IMAGINING WAYS OF EXPLORING AND INHABITING DATA

40

Piotr Wyrzykowski MOBILE APPLICATIONS FOR PISSEDNESS EXPRESSION

44

Joanna Zylinska FOSSILS AS MEDIA: PHOTOGRAPHY AFTER EXTINCTION

13


DAGMARA DOMAGAŁA

CITY EXPOSURE: TRACES AND THE OPEN CITY

The city, a phenomenon located at the intersection of gaze and experience, is a driving force and a cradle of post-modernism. It is a labyrinth of meanings, the beating heart of contemporary civilisation and a grand theatre of visuality. It often features as a focal point of various descriptions and studies. It is an ever-renewable source of themes because it is life itself – life that constantly pushes ahead, rushes forward and forms a yet indeterminate future. The city I look into does not need a name because, though locally it displays different facets, it nevertheless works like a meticulously designed mechanism, the only difference being that the city develops spontaneously and, in a way, without any external intervention. The human element vanishes in the tangled network of anonymous institutions. The human element is, admittedly, an anonymous actor in this network, yet pushed so far into the background that easily mistaken for an extra. Test Exposure, which involves testing the paradigm of mediated vision, testing the exhibition space and, first and foremost, testing one’s own senses, takes us onto uncertain, indefinite paths and precludes an immanent, unreflected immersion in the exhibition’s realm. I traverse physically remote spaces. Looking and experiencing are mediated by an expanded world of art linked to the developing technological industry. Like Dziga Vertov come from the dead, step by step, image by image, I can decipher the poetics of the city as an afterimage and find a secret Artepolis amidst palimpsests written over and over again. The city, whose afterimage surfaces on the eyelids, is a Foucauldian counter-site, a virtual heterotopia suspended between its physical location and a trans-subjective experience of the post-modern homo viator capable of changing his/her point of view with uncanny freedom. Gerard Lebik’s Saccades: Deconstruction of the Time-Space Continuum is

1

14


a hybrid-site with no physical reference whatsoever. As sound is suspended in time and space, the mechanisms of vision get deconstructed. This paradox breeds a certain distrust of senses. Searching for the source of the sound makes the eyes register the image. The austere architecture of glass and concrete, combined with the perplexing audio, generates meanings. The non-place comes to be emplaced amidst associations and experiences. The buzzing of Saccades triggers a torrent of processes and urges to open the first pages of that post-modern city located in a unique inter-space: in-between the physical, visible and the mental, lived. In “the simultaneous places”2 called into life by the audiovisual media, the line dividing senses becomes obliterated. The experience of space is enhanced by audible sounds. As such, Lebik’s installation has a lot in common with Paul Virilio’s visionics. A virtually mediated experience of an indefinite city unfolds in Seoungho Cho’s video Listed. The recording interspersed with subjective prose represents a flow of unconsciousness, registering images glimpsed daily in passing and instantaneously forgotten. Cho’s impressionistic cityscape is disjoined from its physical place, and while the image is replete with detail, it has no supra-individual existence. As the artist’s video-autopsy portrays a place embedded in his biography, in a unique context of his own, the image remains cryptic to all those unfamiliar with it. It may forever remain but an impression devoid of meaning. Still, reality is full of such t r a c e s that take on meaning. The deconstructive reading of urban paths presupposes the necessity of meaning. There is no colloquiality without a trace, just like there is no death without life.3 L'espace vécu, the lived space, fuses time and space in Derridean nonconscious and nonpresent spacing.4 Place becomes time, a particular, individual event that conveys experience. The trace strips the place of physicality, evoking the co-existence and interpenetration5 of the human and space. The city turns into “an amorphous sensorium,”6 a unique generator of supra-individual sensuous stimuli which often come from individual experience. In her video Messages (I’m going), Małgorzata Goliszewska also deconstructs stimuli and mediates the experience of a cityscape littered with advertisements. The contemporary flâneur does not contest the rhythms of the city. Reflection on the mobile tissue entails panting rather than assuming a meta-view. Also Lena Dobrowolska (Drive by) adopts an untypical flâneur mode. A slow safari-ride through Romanian shantytowns is ostensibly safe and superficial. The filmed landscape may be passed by unreflectively, just like any other one in the imagined city. But the slow motion diverts attention from looking itself, highlighting instead the as-yet invisible human being, an actor in the clipped-out fragment of reality. These are not junk-images or dead records affecting objectivity. It is a device deliberately employed to deconstruct that urban passage. The medium that once removed the source of experience away now comes to be its fullyfledged mediator. New York’s gentrification may find its testimony in the images of Harlem’s derelict neighbourhoods and unseen poverty made visible in the city space (Hans Scheugl, Homeless New York 1990). 15


Places marked with a trace are only symbolic points that form a virtual entity, an imagined city, a phantom city that is a battlefield where powers controlling the memory of these places clash with its actual participants and where a singular memoryscape is forged: a fluid landscape constituted by its subjects’ representations.7 Images deceive; they bend the limits of being and non-being and, unlike words with their pars-pro-toto function, they act rather as warrants of reality whence they allegedly come.8 Since the image that looks for a trace is not objective, it may penetrate through the landscape’s thin surface and reach down to memoryscapes. The recorded reificions reveal their individual biographies and flesh out with meaning. Depopulated Athens from Marina Gioti’s video As to Posterity is more than merely a city stripped of people. Rife with traces of human existence, it is a post-apocalyptic enormity which seems a very probable version of the future. The image shows empty streets, buildings, shop windows, birds, trees and dummies. Intentionally and consciously eliminating the human element, the pure recording conveys a lucid message, a parabolic trace with inverted meaning. The title – As to Posterity – reverberates with a straightforward admonition. The moment that divides civilization from ruins seems ungraspable. Photospheres of Chernobyl (Sasha Litvintseva, Immortality. Home and Elsewhere), unfinished or ruined hotel complexes (respectively, David Krems’s Yo no veo crisis [I don’t see no crisis] and Marek Wasilewski’s Dead Hotels’ Bay) snatch places from their material cradle by intervention of the virtual medium. The spaces turn into a universal memoryscape, a pure record of the visible world. The invisible is added by interpretation. Consciousness holds only a notional city – a certain representation of it, a trace of experience that constitutes the perception of it. Pure images do not exist. The video reverses the urban palimpsest – it reconstructs the trace it contains through digitalisation of the image. It overwrites meanings on placeless places, producing a sense of subjective communion with the intersubjective universe of urban symbols. Artepolis is a notional city, an amalgam of places seen in fragments, the uprooted being of metapolis. “It is a space of losing and finding,”9 a process that reflects afterimages of countersites, which often exist only as mental entities. The new media are tools of contemporary Mnemosyne, who finds what has been lost in and through the recorded image. The phenomenon of afterimage is not predicated on experiencing the city as a whole. Afterimages come into being at the intersection of individual perception and collective consciousness, at the intersection of experiences and representations. The lived image of the city is defined by what the eye cannot see because the visible is only a paltry part of the whole experience. The afterimage captures the individual among the Google Street View socialised traces. A quest through the virtual interface, Aleksander Janicki’s Po-widoki (After-images) exposes the superinscribed layers of memory and cultural history of place. The flâneur has the whole virtual world at his/her disposal. The mediated experience does not obscure any 16


aspects of the real experience. The work’s structure and poetics are founded on the cultural context paired with the immersive power of the virtual experience of traversing Japan’s eastern coast (Tōkaidō). The images that drift by are afterimages of thickly overwritten palimpsests, layers of cultural meanings piling up ever since Bashō’s journey in the 17th century up to contemporary Google car trips. As the common consciousness expanded, the virtual image of the road from Kyoto to Tokyo lost its simulacrum-status to become a warrant and a representation of virtual consciousness. Time and space do not exist. The media-enhanced senses make it possible to experience the city simultaneously in a fluid time-space continuum rather than layer by layer. Umberto Eco insists that the post-modern era’s expectation vis-à-vis a work of art is an expectation of the unpredictable.10 Discontinuity and indeterminacy of the narrative, avoidance of the permanent and the certain, all turn individual experience into inner exploration. The transcendent aura mutates into the immanent one: both within the work and in the viewer who looks for meanings anchored deep beneath layers of the text. Emphatically, the text is not the language of modernity. The language of contemporary Artepolis is to be found in the image coupled with the digital, or virtual, media hypertext – ever deeper planes of seeing and s(t)imulated feeling. The individually produced meaning will however turn out to be entirely dissolved in the intersubjective universe of intimations and symbols. The city as a multimedia exposure offers a paradigm of perception through experience. The city exposure may thus unfold as traces and afterimages open to interpretation. City Exposure is a present-day Artepolis, opera aperta steeped in post-modernity’s fluid reality. The open city watched through a virtual cinema-eye takes us on an immersive journey, whereby time and space need no generalising. It is a hybrid-place which exists in consciousness as a meta-being dissociated from its space and, at the same time, is a physical site conventionally charted on the map as a point. The virtual layering highlighted by the virtual media encourages us to make a journey across images and experiences, across spaces and places, across sensuous stimuli of aesthetic experience and meanders of cultural memory.

1

M. Foucault, Other Spaces: Heterotopias and Utopias, trans. Jay Miskowiec, p.3. web.mit.edu/allanmc/www/foucault1.pdf

2

B. Kita, Między przestrzeniami. O kulturze nowych mediów (Kraków: RABID, 2003), p. 36.

3

J. Derrida, Of Grammatology, trans. Gayatari Chakravorty Spivak (Baltimore: John Hopkins UP, 1997), pp. 62-63.

4

Ibid., p. 68.

5

E. Rybicka, Modernizowanie świata. Zarys problematyki urbanistycznej w nowoczesnej literaturze polskiej (Kraków: Universitas, 2003), pp. 126-127.

6

Ibid., p. 108.

17


7

E. Rybicka, „Pamięć i miasto. Palimpsest vs pole walki,” Teksty Drugie 5/2011, pp. 201-211.

8

„Zdrada jest próbą mistrza. Rozmowa z Arturem Danielem Liskowackim,” in J. Borowczyk, M. Larek, Rozmowa była możliwa. Wywiady z pisarzami (Poznań: Stowarzyszenie „Czasu Kultury”, 2008), p. 120.

9

G. E. Karpińska, „Miasto wymazywane. Historia łódzkiego przypadku,” in I. Bukowska-Floreńska (ed.), Miasto – przestrzeń kontaktu kulturowego i społecznego (Katowice, 2004), p. 165.

10

18

U. Eco, The Open Work, trans. A. Cancogni (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1989), p.80.


MAGDALENA KREIS

LITTLE WRO

Little WRO programme – which has been part of the WRO Media Art Biennale since 2009 – is intertwined with the WRO Biennale’s main events this time more tightly than ever before, making for a curator-selected, complementary component of the whole festival. Also, it insists more emphatically on children and their families, parents, teachers and other adults participating together in exhibitions and shows. In the broader context, it’s been a regular item in the Art Mediation programme launched annually by the WRO Art Center. What Little WRO presents to its audience is a selection of works from the Biennale’s main programme of particular interest to young and less experienced art viewers. Such arrangement was informed by the idea of avoiding both bringing in new works and putting up a separate show “for children.” In this way, the Little WRO Guide came into being – a free publication focusing on 15 out of all the works on display in ten various WRO venues across Wroclaw. Each of the exhibits was described in terms comprehensible both to children and to uninitiated viewers of contemporary art. The selection of works to be included in the Little WRO Guide was designed not only to captivate the audience with technological uniqueness or make them admire the capacities of technical devices, computers and machines, but also to engage the audience in a narrative on issues relevant to them and their daily experience. As each work is described on a separate sheet, the audience can choose on their own in what order to visit the venues and watch the exhibits. In this way, the viewers can exercise autonomy and are given a mediating tool to inform them about the selected element of the WRO Biennale’s extensive exposition. The Little WRO Guide made it possible to visit the exhibition without a human guide discussing the works (though it should be added that group guided tours of Little WRO were also organised, with guides and artists offering their original 19


commentaries). The Guide encouraged also the viewers to stroll through the exhibitions along their own paths, engage with works, read their descriptions and do the suggested assignments. Ample space was however retained for the parent-child collaboration. The works included in the Little WRO Guide are but a modest sample, but the assumption behind the publication was that zigzagging the exhibitions, the card-collection in the hand, would have a “viral” effect. Traversing the show for a particular exhibit described in the Guide, one was indeed likely to bump into another compelling, attention-grabbing work and start figuring out what had gone into its making, how it “worked” and what it presented. Besides descriptions, the Little WRO Guide contained simple assignments related to particular works each. Some of them were supposed to be done on the spot in exhibition venues while other ones suggested doing some more work at home or at school. The creative exercises inspired to explore the media art experience but also showed their simpler, analogue versions, thereby helping the audience grasp the complex embedment of contemporary artworks in everyday life and issues we face daily. The Little WRO programme included also Warm-Up and Extra Time – two theme-focused educational projects accessible in the WRO Art Center’s Media Library. Commencing one month before the 2015 WRO Biennale, the Warm-Up presented exhibits of the previous WRO Biennale edition to explain fundamental notions of media arts, such as computer animation, to-camera performance, interactive installation, site-specific show and mapping. The Extra Time, in turn, was designed to tie in with the WRO Résumé and encouraged re-engaging with the Little WRO Guide exhibits as re-cast in documentation. The underlying idea was that activities and pastimes designed for children and their families, instead of being a one-off event, should have a continuity and a follow-up. Both the Warm-Up and the Extra Time are now part of the permanent WRO collection made available in the Media Library. The video programme dovetailed closely with the main programme. Works included in the special 9th Little WRO screening programme were selected from the entries submitted for the 2015 WRO Biennale under an open call, even though no special category of “films for children” was singled out. Like all other screenings, the premiere screening at the Sunday Film Matinee was a held in the Biennale cinema arranged in Wroclaw’s University Library and attended by the participating artists. Every Saturday during the Biennale, rerun screenings were organised, and the collaboration with artists continued and developed in subsequent Sunday screenings over the following months. Little WRO included also two interactive installations – The Dog and Painting – both connected with The Interactive Playground but re-designed for the 2015 WRO Biennale.

20


Constructed in Wroclaw’s branch of the Polish Television for the special edition of the WRO Biennale in 1994, The Dog was an interactive installation that barked at the viewers passing by, triggering cheery and friendly responses. After the Biennale, it was incorporated into The Interactive Playground. The dog lives in a wooden kennel, barking loudly to welcome the visitors, the computer-generated sounds activated by motion detectors from a TV set in the kennel. The installation was shown also at the WRO Biennale in 2015 (in Wroclaw’s University Library), and this time it was also offered to the audience as a miniature copy they could assemble themselves. As the 2015 WRO Biennale opened, a mobile app was made available together with a toy-kennel to put together at home. Consequently, The Dog could live anywhere in the world if only the app was downloaded and the cardboard kennel assembled following the manual from www.pies.wrocenter.pl. Painting was a new version of Paweł Janicki’s original Painting with Light. On Children’s Day, which fell during the 2015 WRO Biennale, an interactive space was arranged at the WRO Art Center for the audience to engage, together and playfully, in an online project involving light, movement, image and sound. Throughout the day, children in two locations across the globe – Wroclaw and Johannesburg – accessed the installation via the Internet. The children could play together as Poland and the RSA are situated in the same time zone. Using shiny toys and light-emitting objects, one group of participants would “paint the screen over” in colourful shapes while the other group at the other end of the world made themselves busy “wiping off ” the same spots, figures and patterns. People from remote corners of the world created jointly one audiovisual composition using a unique, indirect communication platform. Little WRO was also given a new visual identity of its own, designed by young Poznanbased printmaker and illustrator Michał Loba, a co-founder of the Arizona Studio. Like the Little WRO’s entire programme, its graphic design was aligned with a general visual concept of the WRO Biennale, drawing on its colour palette and patterns and merging with it aesthetically. Little WRO was tightly interwoven with the WRO Biennale both thematically and visually, once again proving that young, less experienced viewers deserve to be treated seriously and to be initiated into contemporary art in ways that give justice to art itself and do not infantilise the audience. The varied, comprehensive programme, including texts, guided tours, video screenings and interactive installations, gave both children and parents, teachers and other adults an opportunity to learn about creative tools and ways of employing them in art. I believe that it had an impact, slight though it might be, on the consciousness – of both young and already experienced WRO Biennale’s audience – about new-media tools, contemporary aesthetics and social relationships at large.

21


KAMILA WOLSZCZAK GG: SELF-SUPPORTING UNIVERSAL EXHIBITIONS

Kamila Wolszczak’s curatorial project Launched as part of the 16th Media Arts Biennale by the WRO Art Center. As the Biennale’s central theme was Test Exposure, the project was framed as one of several experiments with and on exhibition spaces. GG1 is the fifth edition of the Universal Self-Supporting Exhibitions project (SUW) initiated by Kamila Wolszczak in Wrocław in 2012. Once again, SUW tests an alternative exhibition space – this time a flat at 4/11 Górnicki Street, Wrocław. The 40 m2 flat situated on the second floor of a tenement from the turn of the 19th century gave the artists room and opportunity to launch projects – messages interpreting the theme and the venue. The impulse for these pursuits was provided, on the one hand, by the deserted living space and, on the other, by communication ways offered by and practised through the first Polish Internet IM system from the 2000s used for private and group communication. Gadu-Gadu is a tool that promotes building personal relationships without physical presence. When the Internet made inroads into Poland, the Messenger proved enormously popular, attracting millions of users. Over time, the solutions it applied have been borrowed by other social networks and media. As competitive software products started to mushroom on the market, Gadu-Gadu has gradually dwindled into a disco polo item2 of the Web. In 2007, the system was bought by Naspers, a multinational Internet and media group originally based in the RSA. GG-SUW served as an analogue form of the IM, with site-specific projects and artists themselves becoming the communication medium. 22


Twelve artists were invited to contribute to the project, based on non-invitational submissions. When the results were out, the artists and the curator scouted the flat, the surroundings and the entire neighbourhood. The joint efforts culminated in a collaborative show for the local residents and other visitors. The SUW framework wass thus designed to engage artists who seek dialogue with the audience and group interactions as well as the audience who meet the artists alongside watching their art. Kamila Wolszczak on her project: SUW is informed by the idea of independent curatorship in private spaces and collective engagement of artists and organisers in decision-making about the programme. The SUW-related activities follow a few universal principles. SUW is a process with, as its culmination, an exhibition in a noninstitutional space. This time our focal and starting point was an abandoned flat in 4/11 Górnicki Street, Wroclaw. Based on the information gathered during “the site inspection, ” we invited entries to a competition for works dedicated to the neighbourhood and its residents. Nine proposals were selected out of the total 30 submissions that directly addressed the flat and its surroundings. The group of twelve artists collaborated on their projects with neighbours and other willing participants. The artists were assisted by four mediators facilitating smooth communication on several planes. As our major object was a symbiotic unity of the place and the visitors, we did not seek to create a gallery-type “white cube, ” looking instead to evoke a domestic atmosphere, where chatting about the weather, performances and new technologies were tightly interlaced. We were regularly visited by the neighbours; our particularly frequent guest was Ms. Ania, who mustered courage to show her drawings during our stay at Górnicki St. and, in the project’s final stage, joined the GG-SUW exhibition as a local artist. With a view to smooth communication, the exhibition was designed to cater to various needs and wants: the artworks represented diverse techniques, including performances, installations and interventions. A real challenge was to fit the show into the space we had entered, without interfering with or impinging on the flat’s socialist décor and flavour. There were four ways to approach the show: – navigating with a map and descriptions placed next to the artworks, – participating in the strolls organised in the neighbourhood and the flat itself, – using the QR codes to jump to the blog,

23


– approaching art guides and artists scheduled to stay in the flat and offer their services in the opening hours The intense time shared by the local residents, artists and SUW’s numerous friends triggered reflection and thinking about future transformations. The unprecedented number of visitors exceeded even the most optimistic expectations. The ample feedback from various viewer groups proves inspirational, encouraging new ideas and attitudes targeting new venues. Still, the most important outcomes of the project are exchange and dialogue. In return for the trust the residents offered us, they were gifted projects dedicated to them: Krzysztof Bryła’s “Waiting for the lift” (“Czekając na windę”) and “Clearing the air. Welcome” (“Pranie brudów. Welcome”) by Karolina Balcer and Kinga Krzymowska. They are still to be seen in the staircase of the house in 4 Górnicki St.. This experience has taught us mutual respect for the labour and time invested in joint action. Whenever we come to the house, the residents want to talk with us and inquire where our “actions” continue now. Ms. Ania still draws; one can meet her from time to time around the Dome, where she goes looking to architecture for inspiration. The backyard under the management of the Wrocławskie Mieszkania [a municipal agency] has been included in a development scheme, with plans to rebuild it and adjust its infrastructure to local needs. The change process goes on.

1

GG is an acronym of Gadu-Gadu (Chit-Chat), which is a colloquial phrase designating informal, friendly (and sometimes inconsequential) talk. It is also the name of a Polish instant messaging service allowing various forms of communication over the Internet. (translator’s note)

2

Disco polo is a name given to a genre of popular dance music in Poland, equally beloved and scorned for its steady rhythms, simple melodies and unsophisticated lyrics. (translator’s note)

24


DAGMARA DOMAGAŁA

FIRST COMPETITION FOR MEDIA ARTS GRADUATION PROJECTS

Public art schools from eight Polish cities (Cracow, Warsaw, Lodz, Poznan, Katowice, Wroclaw, Gdansk and Szczecin) united in a common enterprise supported by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. The idea was to promote media arts as a progressive, though still only vaguely defined field young artists engage with and to show results of their work at the 16th WRO Media Art Biennale. In this way, an unconventional, independent graduation show came into being, exhibited outside the art schools. “The media” to be found in the exhibited projects are not always easy to pinpoint. They seem to stem from several different, but interpenetrating modes. They are, so to speak, a passkey to creative work, a test that disperses exposure and disrupts the usually linear narrative of graduation shows and competitions. Historically, it is the first, albeit small and very modest, step toward unsettling conventional notions of such events. WRO 2015 Test Exposure became an experimental site. Art school graduates were exhibited side by side with well-established artists. For some, it proved too much of a challenge; for others – such as Natalia Balska, Aleksandra Trojanowska and Justyna Orłowska – it was an opportunity to spread out their wings, present autonomous and mature works and enter the Competition for Graduation Projects.

25


Natalia Balska, B-612 Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow, Department of Intermedia supervisor: Prof. Artur Tajber (Studio of Performance Art) + Grzegorz Biliński, PhD + Prof. Marek Chołoniewski (Studio of Art Spheres) The First Competition for Media Arts Graduation Projects Award (ex aequo) An interactive installation out of this planet bringing to mind a cyberpunk remake of The Little Prince. Powered by a different algorithm each, artificial neural networks named Jamie and Joey sustain a more or less anonymous plant by ensuring that it gets enough water over the diurnal cycle. Natalia Balska developed an advanced project that explores the interdependence of two organisms: a live plant and a virtual AI system. We do not experience the uncanny valley because the Little Princes of B-612 stick to their simple, electronic form without attempting any organic mimesis. The computer collects the data and initiates action. The neural network is capable of learning and remembering which activities have a positive influence on the condition of the plant, monitored by an independent apparatus. The neural networks can develop only if the plant does. However, the two entities are not aware of each other’s existence. B-612 mediates a relationship of two organisms inhabiting two distinct realities: real and virtual. The amount of stimuli is reduced to a minimum. There are neither volcanoes nor baobabs, nor a lamb on the planet. Ethical reflection gives way to profound philosophical problems evoked by the work. By making the plant and the computer interdependent within one connected system, Balska produces a kind of hybrid of two co-dependent organisms. They are, by far, no cyborgs yet; still, B-612 definitely transcends the achievements of modern agrotechnology. Jamie and Joey interact with the plant, forming one, closed system. Their survival and development depends on whether they manage to keep the organism in good shape. Water is their shared resource, and the SNN must learn to compromise for both parties to survive. The immersive quality of this love story resides in a simple dependence. If the plant dies, Jamie and Joey are bound to forget everything. B-612 defies generalisation and goes far beyond tendentious narcissism so frequent in young generation artists. Its universality is challenging, yet undeniable. Balska gives embodiment to ideas we know from Dick’s novels, and in the creative act she turns into a veritable demiurge of her little planet. Her expansive art represents McLuhan’s evolutionary theory of sensory extension and transporting art into the realm of scientific mysticism.

26


Marta Mielcarek, Inversion Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Faculty of Media Art supervisor: Prot Jarnuszkiewicz, PhD (additional diploma: Prof. Mirosław Bałka, Studio of Spatial Activities) The First Competition for Media Arts Graduation Projects Award (ex aequo) The 2-channel video installation confronts two ostensibly identical images. The multiplied female figure is stripped of identity, having no distinct features except sex. Dressed like for a school assembly, she is modest and dispassionate, yet disquietingly reminiscent of homely children form Haneke’s The White Ribbon. Image one beacons, and image two responds. The synchronic dialogue of gestures is a vague cross of a sports contest, a May Day parade and an ancient tragedy. For the viewer faces a modernised Greek chorus. Doubled, to boot. The eponymous inversion takes place on many levels of reception and interpretation. The coryphaeus is not a guide. The ensemble is in fact a soloist. We cannot put a finger on things, as they melt away in a study of individual identity that vanishes in an undifferentiated mass of collective imitation. There is neither an individual nor a collectivity. There are only Ctrl+c and Crtl+v key-combinations, which produce copy after copy as if in a totalitarian nightmare. What is more, the artist draws on culturally obvious gestures. The priest, the policeman, the conductor and the flight attendant become devices of her imaginary regime. Mielcarek’s chorus is like Aeschylus’ and Nietzsche’s – a dangerous tool that exposes the deceit of apparent reality, a tool that is supposed lend reality to the protagonist and his tragedy, to evoke community feelings in the audience and make them think identically, and to release Dionysian moods. Inversion is a spectacle that painfully exaggerates the artist’s inner rupture as she searchers for identity. I define the collective, she will say, and the collective defines me in equal measure. The unification gives a sense of security, but it may also trigger aesthetic objections. Marching, hand-clapping and verbal exercises are all performed within a naïve aesthetics of perfect unison. Movements on the screen resemble the flight of cards across the screen which crowns a won game of Windows Solitaire. One craves for any of the dead figures to make a mistake or step out of the neat line, be it once only. In vain, though – not a single element is displaced or breaks down. It is a perfectionist’s paradise … and a hell for those who overlook Inversion’s intricate, analytical concept. Karina Madej, The Art of Familiarity Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz, Department of Multimedia supervisor: Artur Chrzanowski, PhD (Photography Studio) + Prof. Wiesław Karolak (Intermedia Studio) 27


Marked with characteristic smudges on the film, three images shot with an 8mm camera appear and disappear. A road, a deserted hospital, a ghastly flat, a wedding dress hanging from a curtain rod. The non-linear narrative and handheld shooting induce a sense of overwhelming anxiety. The images interweave, days drudge by drearily, and a drama transpires as the viewer is slowly guided by the image. The installation is complemented with three photographs that outline the context of the depressing videos. An uncle for whom the time has stopped due to an accident. Madej performs a sort of self-art-therapy as in designing and developing a work of art she works through a family trauma. She wrenches images from memory, which obsessively dwells on the same motifs. Madej is not afraid to wake up demons, but the emotional states emanating from the work are decipherable only and exclusively to the artist herself. The viewer sees an aesthetic outcome of wound-healing. In her blog, the artist relates step by step the work in progress, the evolution of the concept; she puts together an archive of photos. She pedestalises life that keeps going on, albeit mutilated. The Art of Familiarity is an intimate diary of “familiarity” and, also, of “life.”1 Nevertheless, it does not put forward a concept of total art espoused by Fluxus. It boast nothing of childlike joy; it is by no means free and amateur art, unconstrained and abolishing popular thinking about art. The prose of life has been forged into art and not the other way round. The Art of Familiarity shows limits to this life, turning into a document of and a testimony to an individual’s lot. Madej gives voice to her uncle, thereby lifting the taboo of solitude and encouraging the viewer to engage in ethically suspect voyeurism. Tomasz Koszewnik, Lucid Dream University of Arts in Poznan, Audiosphere Studio supervisor: Prof. Leszek Knaflewski, PhD (asst. Daniel Koniusz) Questions about the innocence of artistic intentions set a trap for the audience. The starting point of Koszewnik’s elaborate installation is provided by an improvised exotic beach. The backdrop photos tempt to join in the mystification and lure into a philosophical labyrinth no one suspects to be there. The setting makes one want to take pictures. In this way, Koszewnik highlights persuasion methods utilised in and by art, all means and devices that aim to win the audience’s favour and their related embarrassment. The cynical composition arranged in the international exhibition space is supposed to legitimise the status of the artwork. All the more so as a diploma certifying an arts degree is displayed nearby. But is the viewer really so easily convinced?

28


Facing Lucid Dream, one wonders whether its point is demystification of the naive audience or self-demystification of the naive artist, who relying on the simplest rhetorical tricks seeks to convince the audience that non-art is art indeed. Who has the power to confer meanings now? And isn’t the structuralism-vs.-postmodernism debate a thing of the past by any chance? Sarcastic conceptualism reveals itself in an essay that accompanies the display. Montaigne, Arendt, Derrida and Plato are quoted throughout, yet they in no way address the title, which may prompt reflection of quite a different kind. “The lucid dream” features in cultural production as an element of subconscious that has a very real impact on the life of the dreamer. The lucid dream state is an individual and individually perceived experience. If one’s clarity of thinking is retained in the REM phase, one may control the content of one’s dreams. Thus, a certain deceit and self-manipulation of our minds become an attempt to conceal inconvenient truth. In this respect, Lucid Dream might resort to double negation to offer a mask that enhances the trite emptiness and occasionally absurd conceptuality of contemporary art. Alicja Boncel, Ivictoria Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice Faculty of Art, Studio for the Interpretation of Literature supervision: Prof. Grzegorz Hańderek We are constrained first of all by the limits of our imagination, which up to a certain developmental stage thrives unfettered and exceptionally potent. In childhood, one can bear far more absurdity without caving in to it so easily. A demiurge of non-sense, Ivictoria plays the violin to a goat and waters wheat-ears using a garden watering-can. We do not know who she is, so she may as well be any of us. And all of us would like to return to the absolutely unbounded freedom and latitude of childhood and, revelling in carefree ludicrousness, forget about the life cycle for a while at least. In the green room we thus get used to death. Though there is no death in this land, or at least it is treated with a childlike zest. Ivictoria is an entomologist and a guard of flowers, killing beetles and other bugs and pinning them down in a showcase amongst dissecting tables and latex gloves. The video’s idyllic atmosphere redolent of Kochanowski’s epigrams clashes with the surrounding installations. Fallen-out milk teeth, prepared insects and bizarre instruments with their fanciful colours familiarise life with death. The playful form disguises the lurid undertones and evokes increasingly absurd associations in the audience.

29


Aleksandra Trojanowska, Questions to All Answers Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art and Design in Wroclaw, Faculty of Graphic Arts and Media Art supervisor: Prof. Wiesław Gołuch (asst. prof. Maja Wolińska, asst. Jakub Jernajczyk) Studio of Media Persuasion (additional diploma under the supervision of prof. Andrzej Bator, Studio of Fotomedia) The artist indirectly acquaints us with her autistic brother. We will neither see him nor hear his voice in the video footage. A work of veritably ferocious verbal inventiveness and exceptional communicative power, Questions to All Answers demolishes the myth of autism as a depressingly speechless disease. Three blue screens represent the outer world. A shadow drifts across them, accompanied by the sound of phrases reiterated in involuntary echolalia. Without gratuitous pathos, one may get an abstract glimpse of the world through the artist’s brother’s eyes, and hear and fathom his ways of communicating and overcoming the communicative barrier, one of the disease’s main symptoms. The work seeks to foreground the sensory deficits and bewilderment in the world overflowing with stimuli. It spares us, however, the indignity of the banal and the literal. Trojanowska tackles a very knotted issue in an individual and sensitive manner. She does not serve us a miraculous story of the Rain Man type but invents symbolic ways to indirectly render a coherent image of the family’s sacrifice and unconditional love. Questions to All Answers demands reflection and close attention to all words, which become objectified in booklets overprinted with them and in disconnected phrases scattered around the exposition seemingly at random. Touching of words accrues an entirely new meaning in this context. Justyna Orłowska, The First Haircut Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk, Faculty of Sculpture and Intermedia, Intermedia Studio supervisor: Prof. Grzegorz Klaman (with the cooperation of Anna Biała, PhD, Department of Genetics, University of Gdansk) Hair is replete with cultural meanings. Hair-cutting is a deeply symbolic act, which in our culture serves as a rite of passage historically involving young boys only. In Orłowska’s work, the first haircut is enacted by a woman who, additionally, is much older than tender Siemowits of the Piast era. In the video, the woman pulls a two-metre long root of tangled hair, animal bristle and grass out of the ground. On the one hand, the root evinces an alliance of three different species, but on the other it utterly reverses the natural order.The hair seems the most representative substance containing human DNA. Convolving hair with bristle and grass is a transgressive gesture. The knotted snarl of hair is a synonym of racial or class adulteration. Orłowska attempts to cross the line between nature and culture, creating a hybrid coiled up into one organic mass. The result is a root in which three worlds, so far isolated from each 30


other, form a symbiotic whole. The root will give rise to something new, remaining at the same time a sign of the past that must be discarded as it is cut off. This posthumanistic idea has also a purely human facet to it. The return to the roots is a return to a traditional rite, to a folk tune about Johnny and white linen, a return all the way back to nature down on one’s knees. The symbolic cutting-off of the root means going into the unknown, shaking off the mother’s tutelage and facing up to uncertain surprises the future has in store. Recasting the problem as a woman’s one may be feministic, but it is also profuse with meanings and images. For a woman, cutting her long hair is a part of a farewell to the past, of a quest for a new identity. The cutting-off of hair symbolises strength and independence in striking contrast to Samson’s male weakness. In The First Haircut, Orłowska is herself. The performance involves also a transgression on the part of the artist, who wrestles with a prospect of entering adulthood. The mother’s hands cut the root off. There is no returning to the past. Fortunately, one can always take the cut-off shag along. Rafał Żarski, Closed Circuit Academy of Art in Szczecin, Multimedia Studio supervisor: Prof. Agata Michowska + Prof. Wojciech Łazarczyk Investigating the domestic soundsphere like a dogged NASA engineer. Closed Circuit is an ironic to-camera performance that ventures beyond the triviality of daily life. The artist records the soundscape of his flat, with a green point showing his current position on its floor plan. Detached and effortless, Żarski uses very simple means to elevate the banal to the rank of an interest-deserving phenomenon. He renders the prose of life with an sensitivity reminiscent of Wojciech Bruszewski’s works, without ascribing any higher causes or attributing any particular properties to it. He rouses the viewer from the perceptual obliviousness to the surrounding world of things.

31


KRZYSZTOF DIX

WHERE DOES THE CARPET GO?

Vincent Voillat named his work presented at WRO Biennale 2015 Tapis roulants and thus he opened a semantic box of treasures. The most basic meaning for “un tapis” is “a carpet” and for “roulant” – rolling or moving, usually this word is used to describe things that move on castors. But they can mean much more. In French exists the expression the artist used, “un tapis roulant”, but it means “a travelator” (in French sometimes called also “un trottoir roulant”) or “a treadmill” – things we do not see in Voillat's installation. What is more, the term “roulant” is rather broad and not limited to being the synonym of “mobile”. It has more usages and can be translated also as “droll” or “amusing”. Additionally, “un feu roulant” is “a crossfire” or “a barrage” in French, “des fonds roulants” – “a working capital” and as independent noun “un roulant” is used for “a train (or bus) crewman”. Besides, “un tapis roulant” makes you think, and rhymes with, “un tapis volant” – “a flying carpet”. This in turn suggests the atmosphere of Middle East and world of One Thousand and One Nights. Such an association is not totally unjustified as Voillat brings a viewer to the streets of Cairo. The installation consists of recorded sounds of a busy thoroughfare of the Egyptian capital and of the colourful striped air-filled bags which are, as we can read in the work's description, the car covers the artist himself brought from Egypt. Since the shape of the covers resembles that of a car and since they are exhibited in the car park of the Renoma Department Store, the impression they have is quite surreal, in the sense that they seem to be in the right place, even though they are not; they may astonish an unprepared viewer who comes to Renoma just to do some shopping, yet it would be hard to find a more appropriate place for a car cover than a car park. The same applies to the sound part of the installation – one may think, for a very brief 32


moment, that the sound comes from the outside and not from the speakers. It is not until we notice the sheer loudness and clamorousness of that sound, that we realize its real source and try to find out, where were they recorded. The tone of the voices, the speech melody, the call of the muezzin – all this indicates an Arab country. Compared to other, more technologically advanced works exhibited at WRO Tapis roulants seem to be purposely unspectacular: recording and three covers inflated to the shape of a car, that is all. The artist called it “car dreams”, he intended the colours of covers to resemble the colours of Cairo and the rhythm of covers' ascending and descending to mirror the dynamics of breathing. Voillat has avoided a superficial spectacularity, but the installation is certainly remarkable. That remarkability, which enables the spectator to take aesthetic pleasure from it, tends to hide its enigmatic meaning. The ambiguous title suggests the possible multiplicity of interpretation of the work. It is quite obvious to assume that there is an analogy between “tapis” (“carpets”) and car covers, but why has the artist named them “roulants” and not, for instance, “respirants” (“breathing”), while they are neither rolling nor have a moving platform with a conveyor belt? Is it, then, possible that Voillat meant simply “droll carpets”? Their appearance, similar to that of large children's toys, does support such an interpretation, but their shape and original function may also reasonably warrant the translation “riding carpets”. The title, even when most adequately translated, is not key to the work, but one of its parts which should be taken into consideration, when we try to understand it. There are at least two main ways of interpreting Tapis roulants. The first is that it is a kind of tourist meditation on Voillat's own residency in Cairo in 2014. The second, political, is more problematic one – what exactly can air-filled stripped car covers and recording of the foreign city's soundscape tell the visitors? What exactly does the feeling of immersion in the imaginary space of the Egyptian capital, where the sounds are heard out of nowhere and the cars are light, hollow and fragile, might mean for them? I cannot answer this question with such confidence as Dominique Moulon who said that Tapis roulants make the viewers realize “that Europe, to continue its development, must inevitably strengthen its cooperation with the countries of the southern Mediterranean”1. He even used an exclamation mark at the end of the sentence. Nevertheless, it is quite certain that the artist, by taking us to the invisible streets of the distant city which suddenly becomes strangely near, wanted us to ponder on the country whose current situation Europeans cannot ignore. Nor is it the first time Voillat used the recordings of a soundscape as a mean of artistic expression, nor the first time when he produces the Cairo-inspired work. In 2008 he took part in European Sound Delta project which engaged thirty artists whose task was to record the sounds of their surroundings and make a musical composition out of it. Such a form of artistic expression is in keeping with Voillat's broader interest in the relationship between 33


people, material, as well as immaterial, things and urban, as well as natural, space (on Voillat's website one can watch the short film Kiitos shot above the arctic circles) which he tries to make visible in his oeuvre. The artist's works that are related to his Cairene residence are typical of this approach. The earliest of them was Stone satellite dish No.1, Cairo – satellite dish made in the same limestone that was used for the casing of the Great Pyramid, the second one was the collection of small figures called Concrete's waves, souvenir of a revolution – it commented on current politics and displayed the aesthetic potential of the concrete barricades built after the events of the “Arab Spring” in 2011 – the concept was to reproduce barricades' curved shaped walls in miniature in Egyptian alabaster, the stone that is a popular material for souvenirs marketed to tourists. In this context Tapis roulants would be the third part of the “Cairene triptych” in which visually appealing form is always coupled with something that is very concrete and abstract at the same time. In the case of the first of the works the creative impulse had its origin in the view of dozens of antennas, all turned to the same direction like flowers to the sun, along with the most ancient idea of the communication with heavens; in Concrete's waves the post-2011 security solutions were clashed with the tourists' need of possessing a souvenir; in Tapis roulants the meaning is more obscure – the incorporeal sound characteristic of the very particular space is moved to the another one and the physical object, cover, loses its function and instead of being part of car equipment tries to be a car itself – moreover a living one, creating the impression that it breathes. Everything here runs away from the everyday context, but there is something peaceful and harmonious about it, even, as the title says, “roulant” – droll. An inhabitant of Wrocław in Renoma is for one moment a Cairene in the same way the cover is a car, but this moment of illusion, of the strange suspension, allows us to experience the feeling of universal sympathy, the fact that things, spaces, sounds, thoughts are not set in stone, but are convertible and may change in having been stripped of their ordinary usage.

1

34

D. Moulon, The WRO Biennale, transl. G. Finch, http://www.mediaartdesign.net/EN_wro15.html.


KRZYSZTOF PERZYNA SIMULACRA

Presented at the WRO 2015 exhibition in Wrocław’s new University Library, Simulacra by Karina Smigla-Bobinski is an experimental, optophysical installation in which the artist seeks to bridge the gap between technology and philosophy of perception. The work consists of four LCD monitors assembled at an adult’s eye-level into a lightboxresembling configuration without the lower and upper panels. As if pouring out from inside the arrangement, tangled coils of cables with fitted speakers, routers and other power-control devices connect the monitors with the floor, imbuing the composition with a dynamic quality. And magnifying lenses dangling on thin chains offer a clue and give direction to the audience. The “lit up” screens showcase light as the main medium Smigla-Bobinski engages with in her work. As the installation’s shining monitors have had one layer of the polarising film scraped off them, viewers cannot see the picture in its entirety. Looking through a magnifying lens, however, one can catch a glimpse of an image coming into sight on the screen, an image of a figure “locked up” in what seems an aquarium of screens: the figure emerges from a milky whiteness, from a void, apparently. Feet, hands or contrasting, black hair appear every now and then, pushing into visibility only when they “touch” the screen from the inside, so to speak. It takes both the viewer’s direct contact with the installation and the actor’s with the screen. Interestingly, the viewer’s contact depends only on his/her will while the contact of the person “inside” with the screen is short-lived, with body parts emerging only fleetingly, drifting in and out of our field of vision. The visual contact fails to take place. The optical constraint within the four monitor-walls makes the figure seem imprisoned in the virtual non-being and yearn to break free from the multimedia aquarium into reality. The figure’s motions are smooth fluid 35


and unhampered, and the whole projection resembles a 3D ultrasound of a foetus just before delivery. The WRO Biennale website tells us that: “It [Simulacra] penetrates deep into the discourses of subject and view, image and reality. It creates an awareness for the visual culture of the virtual space and its process of imagination. We move through our worlds in constant interaction between internal and external images and ourselves. Virtuality and reality are questions of perception, and perception is a matter of awareness.” Smigla-Bobinski’s work visualises the impalpability of virtual space. She relies on a unique illusion and explores processes that accompany the imagination. The Dictionary of Foreign Words defines the imagination as a capacity to create mental images in the semblance of real ones. I would add, emphatically, that the process requires a preparation. The individual must have a moment of his/her own in the confines of his/ her mind, isolated from most stimuli but extra-sensitive to those s/he filters in. By putting the mind into resonance, into a rhythm-pulsating trance, something can be created in the self and the imagination can be moulded depending on the designer of the stimulus and the interpretation of the recipient. Similarly, the image in Smigla-Bobinski’s installation will change depending on the angle of sight, mutating from the real one into – nearly – a negative; and when one looks through two lenses, the vision becomes distorted, effectively resembling stereophotography. Additionally, SIMULACRA is enveloped in a dual narrative. It cannot do without the viewer’s presence, and that presence requires interaction. The light, the image and its modalities suggest inspirations from Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida. But their interplay can also be read as a subtle commentary on the madness of contemporary society engrossed in consumption of virtual images that leaves hardly any material trace behind. The virtual space seems to be our increasingly frequent replacement of the imagination as it resides at the similar level of “nonexistence”. This reality forms now an inseparable part of our everyday. Craving to abandon the impalpable world, the figure in the video stands in opposition to the viewer, who lives in society that pursues complete computerisation and dreams of inhabiting the digital world without limits. The viewer feels trapped in the real space, so to speak. Physical being is enmeshed in multiple constraints while being online offers an entry into unbounded matter. In Nicolaes Maes’s The Eavesdropper, we cannot look behind the painted curtain. SmiglaBobinski gives us a chance to do so if we use the “magic” lens. It makes the image real even though it does not make the image itself – the image is there, on the screen, all the time. What cannot be seen becomes virtual, and a reversal unfolds in which “empty spaces” in the image come to symbolise the real world.

36


Another element that deserves attention is sound. The sound transmitted from a space probe in real time is the installation’s only technically unprocessed component. Combined with a mass of wires, which net the multimedia installation like wild ivy, it accrues special prominence as it resembles the sounds a child hears in the mother’s womb. It suffuses the work with rhythm and harmony, imparting a mystical quality to it. Simulacra makes the viewer experience directly the interaction between the magic of the image and its perception in the face of virtual reality. The viewer may directly relate to the figure on the screen. The perception-imagination and image-representation relations affect each other and the viewers, fostering reflection on reality between appearance and being.

37


ROGER MALINA THE CRISIS IN DATA REPRESENTATION: RE-IMAGINING WAYS OF EXPLORING AND INHABITING DATA

In the face of the topic of the WRO 2015 conference: What can art do for science?, I have a hard nut to crack, because I totally disagree with it. I guess I have two problems: I don’t think science is a homogenous culture, and I don’t think art is a homogenous culture. I think we all run the danger of oversimplifying human experience and understanding of things. So, today I’m gonna take a slightly different question, which is maybe the question of how art can change science rather than how art can help science. One of the most wonderful things in the last fifty years is a community of practice all over the planet in many disciplines. Place building allows this community to do its work and disseminate it. Moreover, the art & science community, I think, is not only a place building community, it is a network of networks community. Sometimes, we just build temporary places, where we can do things safely, experiment and try out new ideas, and then maybe move on, close down the place and start another one. The Leonardo journal is one of such places. I’m fascinated by the idea of place making: what we do is not only develop ideas, but we develop places where those ideas can be developed. For example, the art & science community has recently been moving with amazing interest into the whole area of the so-called smart agriculture: from urban gardening to re-thinking the way that we have a sustainable planet. So, in this context, what I want to talk about is what I’m calling the crisis in representation. This is kind of a self-evident truth, which is if you look at 10 thousand years of human history, the way we’ve represented the world around us has been an ever-shifting methodology with technologies that have come and gone, shifted the way that we do it, e.g. the telescope was not just an amplifier of images, it restructured a lot of thinking about the micro universe 38


and the macro universe, and what part of the world we should represent. And so, indeed, the interaction between the arts and technology is on one side technical, but on the other side it’s ontological, it’s structural, it’s cognitive. And so now if we think back to the invention of three dimensional perspective, the system of perspective, indeed also had social implications, the observer and the world, and the whole way that it’s structured, the relationship between the viewer and the world around them. It seems to me that we are in the middle of an exciting period like that. That right now we’re all accessing data. And so, indeed, the date influx into our cognition is increasing. And, I think, we have no idea yet how we will represent the world around us in twenty years, because of the changes that are going on. In 2011 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of Marshal McLuhan, and he had a very nice statement: “New media are not bridges between humans and the world, they are part of the world”. And so I think we are very misled by this idea of the interface, it’s been a very misleading metaphor. McLuhan talked about “moving the frontiers of what’s real” and that “the speed of electricity has intensified to the extreme the human sense of responsibility”. We often forget how these transformations of representation redefine who we view as our community, who we’re responsible too, and how we act in the world with those responsibilities. And so the internet is not ethically neutral. The first cell phone… The 1990s. We had wonderful vocabulary: “calm technologies”, “distributed sensing”, “locative media”. We lost it, though, and some of the dreams from then has now becoming to be a nightmare. As individuals we have a duty to collect data about our world and our environment, and we have to share it. We have right to data that had been collected about us, and we had a duty to contribute data. Artists have done very interesting work in this idea of mediated senses, and I would like to present a couple of them. I call them an “intimate science”. Luke Jerram did this very simple work (Tide) to measure the changes in gravity in a room. You probably don’t know it, but in this room gravity is changing every second, and he made it visible through a device where the water went up and down in this room as the gravity changed. Our body has no sense for this, but he made it evident to anybody. And if you had this in your living room, you’d know where the moon was, because the gravity changes in your room as the moon orbits the earth. Jerome also did a project in Liverpool called First Breath where he had a laser shine up to the sky whenever a baby was born in the neighbourhood. And so you could look over the city at night and see where babies had just been born. What a visceral experience! It almost wanted to make you sing in joy at the birth of all these babies. So I call that “intimate science” where data has somehow become into the personal space in a way that it’s visceral, emotional and so on.

39


So if we talk about the art and science of data representation, in the last twenty or thirty years there have been three shifts in data representation. In the 1990s, it was no longer called “scientific illustration”, but it became “scientific visualisation”. So there was a very deep understanding that we won’t just illustrating things, but we would visualize them. And that shift changes which part of your cognitive process is really playing the lead role, how do you visualise, how do you imagine something. “Information visualisation” has quickly became a new discipline. And then in the last few years, data science and information science have also developed as very extensive areas of research. Couple of years ago there were people started talking about deep learning which is a lot of the ways that you can actually extract meaning from data. And there are all kinds of new buzz words floating around the internet: “data mobilization”, that is how do you get the data you need when you need it, and what when you don’t need it, “data narratives” (on the job of being the data narrativist), “data dramatisation” (a lot of data turns performative). We are in the stone age of living in data. Back in the 1990s, a historian of technology, Daniel Boorstin, said: “We have gone from a world that is meaning rich and data poor to one that is data rich and meaning poor”. If you go to Charles Darwin’s college in England and look at his data fits on two shelves, all the data he had that allowed him to develop ideas about human evolution, he could have in his living room, he could touch, he could read. How difficult it is now to make sense of data! And so Boorstin just insisted that more data is not just more data. That there are deep epistemological consequences of how we know things that mechanised observers have introduced into human cognition. If you make reasonable projections of how much digital data is accumulating on this planet, it’s worse than climate change, let me tell you. We’re talking about doubling times which are much quicker than climate change. And of course, all the data sensors are now consuming more and more energy, if you actually calculate the energy consumed by data sensors in 2030, it’s a little bit frightening. We’re building a 1.5 gigapixel camera going on a telescope in Hawaii which will observe the sky and it’ll be available to you. And with this we’re talking about not as much data as enters your human eye every second, but we’re getting up there. And, indeed, in a very real sense our survival now depends on space data. And so, indeed, in many areas data is now a survival good. And we’ve become in a very real sense a data culture at the same time that we’ve entered the atmosphere. And there are many ways, of course, that we interface the data, we augment them (the microscope and the metaloscope), we translate them, our eyes cannot see X-rays, but we can take X-rays and convert them into visible light, so we can extend our senses, but then, indeed, we need totally new senses. So how do we create those new senses? So how do we rethink data representation as a challenge in my argument about the crisis of representation? So we know as human beings that curiosity is embodied, scientists don’t like 40


that idea, for them data is objective, not embodied. It’s enacted, as human beings we perform things, we talk, we structure them. Curiosity is cultural, not everybody is curious in the same way. Curiosity is social, that’s what we’re doing right now, we’re listening to each other and exchanging ideas. And it’s collective. So we think about representation in a very different way than scientists think about it, where curiosity is non-embodied, it’s non-enacted, it’s not cultural, it’s not social and not collective. I have recently written an article on the new sublime in art and science. I’m beginning to see the emergences are result of what I call “the new humanities”. Together with an art historian, Max Schich, I develop issues related to data driven humanities, cultural analytics, and hard humanities. It’s clear that the humanity is being transformed by this new data situation and this is only just a beginning to figure out how we rethink understanding human culture in this new data environment, and the systems of representation are fundamental to them.

41


PIOTR WYRZYKOWSKI

MOBILE APPLICATIONS FOR PISSEDNESS EXPRESSION

Thank you for inviting me to the Hacking of the social operating system WRO 2015 conference. It’s an honour to join such a distinguished company. It’s been food for thought, too. It actually made me realise that, as an artist, I had been involved in hacking for years. I understand “hacking” as penetrating the system, whereby the penetration is a goal in and by itself. No other agenda is involved. Hacking aims neither to steal nor to destroy anything; instead, it aims to break the system which, theoretically, seems impervious. One can penetrate the system in many various ways. As an artist, I have myself made many more or less successful attempts to do so, each time seeking – and that is an important thing, too – to evacuate the material from artwork, to create works stripped of materiality as much as possible and to make them invisible to the utmost. I wanted them to abolish the distance that divides us from them. With this, we may find ourselves in an absurd situation in which people who create artworks are not longer aware of dealing with them. This is what actually matters a lot to me – engaging with a project without actually realising the fact … Before I address my eponymous theme, I would like to discuss the projects which have paved the path to my latest work, that is applications for pissedness expression. First, let me mention the project developed in January 2014 for the I’m Ukrainian. Shoot! exhibition. Titled Training for Extremists, the project referred directly to Putin’s allegation that training camps for Ukrainian extremists were being set up in Poland. I decided to join the information war and produced my own fake news. My assumption was that if such training sessions were indeed organised they would take place on Skype. I developed a training manual with instruction protocols for particular emergencies, specifying what to do, how to behave 42


and organise, how and where to obtain information in order to effectively oppose the state, the police, the army… Another project aimed to change life-styles and modes of communication with the artworld. In 1995, the Central Office for Technical Culture (COTC) was founded – an artistic group framed as a quasi-office furnished with all the bureaucratic paraphernalia, such as seals, letter templates, identification badges, etc. We set it up because we wished to change the practice of contacting institutions involved with arts. We stopped communicating as individual artists, giving up our individuality for the sake of collective consciousness: our correspondence with the institutions was based on formal letters and official fax messages signed by the staff of the Central Office for Technical Culture, using nicknames or aliases instead of names. And I must admit that we were remarkably successful as the secretaries’ reactions were clearly different on hearing that the Central Office for Technical Culture, rather than some sort of artist, was on the phone. [laughter] Other projects I want to talk about were launched by the COTC. The first of them, from 1996, was titled Community Work for the Town of Bytów. We applied to the mayor of Bytów and the head of the local job centre to allot us, the Central Office staff, some community work we could do for the town’s residents under a newly launched pilot scheme for the unemployed. At the time, Bytów was one of the towns with the highest unemployment rate in Poland. We submitted the application, and soon enough we received an officially signed contract for revamping summer houses for tourists. Importantly, what we did was utterly identical with reality, and our work was practically indiscernible to people, who on visiting the place declared: “Well, not much going on here; some guys revamping houses, that’s about all.” Now such strategies are common, but back then they were not as popular yet, not as transparent. We “staged” a unique, invisible performance. Interestingly and amusingly, we even had a squabble with a group of the unemployed from the area who claimed that we were working too fast, while working so fast was no good, and taught us how to slow down and make breaks more frequently … Art Day (1999), in turn, was an attempt at hacking the education system. We approached one of Gdynia’s high schools with a one-day schedule of lessons we wanted to teach. At the same time, we sent a formal letter to the President of Poland with a request to put the Art Day on the official calendar of holidays. Our proposal was that on 22 February artists would open their studios to the public and all kinds of events would be organised… It resembled quite a lot what we now refer to as the Night of Museums, but there wasn’t anything of this kind back then; nor was such thinking common. What mattered to us was that the students coming to school that day did not know what was going on and were utterly surprised when all of a sudden instead of a geography or Polish lesson they had classes in 3D graphics, hypertext, video art or digital music. 43


Another project titled Cyborg’s Sex Manual was a handbook for cyborgs devised to enhance their emotional reactions. The work was driven by our belief that there were cyborgs among us, that they did exist, on the one hand, and by a debate on sexual education at schools that kept Poles engaged in 1999, on the other. The project obtained the approval of the Council for Art at the Ministry of Culture and Art of the Republic of Poland and was co-financed under the August funding system. I wanted the CD-ROM to be used by schools as an official textbook, which, of course, did not happen. Having reviewed the interactive materials, an official from the Ministry [of Education] declared that the project did not meet the criteria for content. Another project I seem never to be able to leave out from my talks [sic!] is an election campaign of Victoria Cotc running for the President of the Republic of Poland. Launched in 1999/2000, the campaign’s slogan was “Politicians are redundant.” Victoria Cotc was an interface of CES – Citizens’ Electoral Software – through which the voters could file in their postulates. We believed that politicians could be easily replaced with such virtual entity. For a whole year, the campaign unfolded in most cities in Poland, but also in Chicago and Berlin. The enterprise was enormously successful, with interviews with Victoria featured in the most prominent Polish and foreign newspapers. Collecting signatures in favour of Victoria Cotc’s candidacy, we stumbled over the law stipulating that a presidential candidate in Poland must have a PESEL (national identification) number… We considered a name change and cosmetic facial surgery, but it was not what we were after… Still, many ideas that popped up during the campaign, except doing away with politicians, were in fact executed. For example, “Victoriometers” (i.e. infoboxes helping in many matters, common in offices now) were installed to enable those with no access to the Internet to get in touch with Victoria. Undoubtedly, Victoria influenced also the First Lady’s image. Now, as to the eponymous theme of my talk, that is applications for pissedness expression, I would like to present two apps: Protest and Self-Immolation. I’ve always made a point that my projects should not fake anything… I have a feeling that the projects I have worked on so far and just talked about in fact repeatedly faked something… And I felt ultimately that I wanted to create a tool with a particular function, a tool that really had a purpose. A tool for pissedness expression seemed the thing to me. First I developed the Protest app. It allows you to record a short video clip and post it online. If you click the slogan typed in earlier, the app will refer you to the recorded footage. You can “connect” with a given protest and support or object to it. Protests have limited “lifetimes” calculated based on four values: the overall number of protests in the system, the duration of a given protest, the number of supporting clicks and the number of objections. They determine how long a given protest will last on the “protest line”. The mobile app is connected with a website which gives access to all protests launched at a given moment. 44


Self-Immolation is, definitely, the most “selfish” application, one for taking dire selfies. You type in what pisses you off or paste a link, and your self-immolation will proceed immediately. The application generates a GIF, which will be stored, geo-located and made available to others. The GIF can also be shared in other social media. I believe in the power of a single protest, and I believe in the power of peaceful protest. Protest is possible, and the systems may collapse. Thank you.

45


JOANNA ZYLINSKA FOSSILS AS MEDIA: PHOTOGRAPHY AFTER EXTINCTION

What can art do for geology? This article takes the horizon of extinction as a reference point against which I will think the ontology of photography and its agency. In the argument that follows, I will explore what photography can do with and in the world, what it can cast light on, and what the role of light is in approaching questions of life and death on a planetary scale. Arising out of the geo-political sensibility encapsulated by the term ‘Anthropocene’, a geological epoch in which the human is said to have become an agent whose actions have irreversible consequences for the whole planet, the ‘after extinction’ designation of my title is not aimed at envisaging a future time when various species, including the one we are narcissistically most invested in – ourselves – have disappeared. Rather, it points to the present moment, a time when extinction has entered the conceptual, visual and experiential horizon of the majority of global citizens, in one way or another. Extinction will thus be seen as a current affective fact: something to be sensed and imagined here and now.1 Thinking photography under the horizon of extinction will allow me to draw two temporal lines in the history of this particular medium: one extended toward the past, the other – toward the future. Considering the history of photography as part of the broader naturecultural history of our planet, I will trace parallels between photographs and fossils, and read photography as a light-induced process of fossilization occurring across different media. Seen from this perspective, photography will be presented as containing an actual material record of life, rather than just its memory trace. But I will also go back to photography’s original embracing of the natural light emanating from the sun to explore the extent to which photographic practice can tell us something about energy sources, and about our relation to the star that nourishes our planet.

46


Yet, in a certain sense, we have always lived in the time ‘after extinction’ and hence under its horizon. Five mass extinctions are said to have taken place during the history of our planet, each wiping out significant populations of living beings. At the same time, extinction is first and foremost a process rather than an event: it is an inextricable part of the natural selection that drives evolution. Indeed, geologists talk about ‘background extinction’, a prolonged course of action unfolding across scales of cosmic time, with the average ‘background extinction rate’ of mammals roughly calculated as 0.25 per million species-years. 2 Mass extinctions – of which we are currently said to be awaiting the sixth – can therefore be described as moments of intensification on the timeline of continuous expiratory duration. But even though we have always lived ‘after extinction’, extinction did not enter our conceptual spectrum until the eighteenth century, when it was brought in to provide an explanation for the existence of fossils for which no living correlates could be found. All the scientific explanations notwithstanding, the awareness of extinction as a bio-geological fact still does not seem to have become fully embraced by the human population. Biologist Ilkka Hanski claims that, due to our ‘cognitive incapacity to perceive large-scale and long-term changes’, our present grasping of significant geological transformations is very limited. And, as ‘the apparent stability of the current state of the world is deceiving our senses’, 3 we have failed to develop a responsible long-term response to climate change. Dwelling under the horizon of extinction without turning our gaze away from it therefore presents itself as an ethical task – as well as a condition of any meaningful non-parochial politics. It is the question of the material manifestation of this geological significance of our current period that is of particular interest to me at this point, precisely because it allows us to confront the transience of our human needs, desires and memories with the more permanent record of human and nonhuman life that endures in time. Stratigrapher Jan Zalasiewicz, an expert on the Anthropocene, claims that the extraordinary geological significance of our current period in which the human has become an agent of geological change will be reflected in the fossils left to future generations.4 As Elizabeth Kolbert aptly highlights with this rather humbling image, ‘a hundred million years from now, all that we consider to be the great works of man – the sculptures and the libraries, the monuments and the museums, the cities and the factories – will be compressed into a layer of sediment not much thicker than a cigarette paper’.5 If we think in terms of deep history, we can say that the past leaves an imprint of itself in the rocks, or even – although this may perhaps yet still seem like an association too far – that the past photographs itself. Yet, in what follows, I will argue that the link between fossilisation and photography is more than just a metaphor and that this conceptualisation can tell us something new both about the photographic medium and about its conditions, which are also the conditions of our existence: light, energy, the sun.

47


The manner of thinking about media in geological terms inscribes itself in what Jussi Parikka identifies as the wider ‘drive toward geological and geophysical metaphors in media arts and technological discussions’.6 This drive can be accounted for by the fact that science itself ‘implicitly perceived the earth as media’, analysing as it did, and still does, fossils in terms of ‘records’, ‘indices’ and ‘biofilms’.7 Writing, reading and interpretation therefore seem to reside at the very heart of what have becomes known as earth sciences.8 Indeed, John Durham Peters explains that both for Darwin and his close friend Charles Lyell – known as the founder of geology – ‘the earth is a recording medium’.9 The medium of photography as a practice of ‘drawing with light’ has also been connected with inscription from its early days. But the actual process of making a mark on the surface was originally seen as a function of a nonhuman agent. In The Pencil of Nature, one of the first commercially available books of photography, published between 1844 and 1846, William Henry Fox Talbot writes that ‘the plates of this work have been obtained by the mere action of Light upon sensitive paper. … They are impressed by Nature’s hand…’.10 The leaving of marks can be cultivated, but, for Talbot, Nature beats the human in precision stakes. Talbot was very much aware of the fragility of the resultant photographic recording – indeed, he put much effort into trying to reduce this fragility and fix an image on paper for a prolonged period of time. But the very idea of light acting as ‘the pencil of Nature’, making semi-permanent inscriptions to be interpreted by others, positions photography in its nascent state alongside the then newly emergent discipline of geology (with Lyell’s Principles of Geology having been published between 1830-1833), resulting in photographs being seen as thin fossils. Let us dwell for a moment on this link between photography and geology as different forms of temporal impression by turning to the work of William Jerome Harrison, an English scientist, teacher and writer. In the late nineteenth century Harrison authored two seemingly unrelated volumes: A Sketch of the Geology of Leicestershire and Rutland (1877) and History of Photography (1887).11 Adam Bobbette shows how, for Harrison, ‘photography and geology are constituted by similar processes’.12 Full of painstaking detail on the chemistry of early photographic processes, Harrison’s History of Photography occasionally attempts to make a bigger point about the medium – for example, when he pronounces that ‘There is nothing new under the sun – especially in photography’.13 The link between photography and geology is not just metaphorical for him: ‘Harrison characterizes the protagonists of the art form as apprentices of impressions. According to his assessment, “impressioning” is a process as ancient as the tanning of human skin under the sun, or the bleaching of wax by the sun. In each case, the sun has created an impression on a body. For Harrison, this was the earliest and most basic form of photography’.14 Specifically, Harrison looks at the working processes of one of the many simultaneous inventors of photography, Nicéphore Niépce. Niépce’s account of photography (called heliography, or 48


‘sun-writing’), in which light ‘acts chemically upon bodies’, ‘solidifies them even; and renders them more or less insoluble’, 15 provides another link between photography and fossilisation. This link becomes even more evident once we take into account the fact that ‘Niépce studied lithographic forms of image reproduction, the geological implications of which are evident: litho is Greek for stone…. Niépce considered, radically, that light could be substituted for human labour as the agent for copying images into stone’.16 For Harrison, the history of photography is therefore literally a geological history – while Harrison himself becomes the first narrator of the nonhuman history of photography. In the closing words of History of Photography he considers the photographic process to be part and parcel of the geological history of the earth, pointing out ‘How beautifully it exemplifies the theory of evolution, process rising out of process…’.17 Via its link with fossils, photography reveals itself to be also coupled with extinction. In making this link, not only does Harrison pinpoint the nonhuman element of the photographic inscription but he also seems to intimate that photography has always been there, in cosmic deep time. It ‘just’ needed to be discovered and then fixed for a little longer – rather than invented. If photography and fossilisation are both practices of ‘the impression of softer organisms onto harder geological forms’, photography is not a new process but, instead, a ‘modern, mediated extension’ of the ancient-long ‘impressioning’ activity enabled by light, soil and various minerals. The human element comes into the picture, literally, as the ‘apprentice to impressions enabled by the technical-material apparatus of the camera, plate, chemicals and light’.18 This step into deep time – on Harrison’s part, but also on my part here – is an attempt to go beyond the history of photography as part of human history, one that is primarily driven by human motivations and needs. André Bazin’s argument in which photography, together with other plastic arts, is linked with the ‘practice of embalming the dead’19 as a way of achieving victory over time, can be seen as the key representative of the humanist approach. No text made this link more explicit than the celebrated Camera Lucida by Roland Barthes.20 Barthes’ book is a meditation on the death of his mother, prompted by seeing a photograph of her, and, more broadly, on images as affective devices that become placeholders for melancholia and mourning. Yet this narrative ends up confining photography to a permanent struggle against death. Telling a ‘deep history’ of photography as part of the history of the earth the way I have attempted to do it here, a history that transcends human desires and needs, can allow us to outline a different approach to the photographic medium and process. If we recognise that the earth is ‘a source of invention through the entanglements of form and matter’, 21 while the sun is a source of energy and ultimately life on this earth, we can read photography as partaking of their vibrant and life-giving (rather than just life-conserving) properties. From the perspective of cosmic time, fossilisation can therefore be seen not just as the preservation of life but also as the transmission of its evolutionary principle. It is therefore apposite to try, together with Claire Colebrook, to ‘Imagine a species, after humans, “reading” 49


our planet and its archive: if they encounter human texts (ranging from books, to machines to fossil records) how might new views or theories open up? ’.22 One attempt to envisage such an archive was recently undertaken by photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto in the exhibition Lost Human Genetic Archive held at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris in 2014. Incidentally, the concept of fossilisation underpins the whole of Sugimoto’s oeuvre. Lost Human Genetic Archive presents the visitor with a rich collection of objects.23 Placed somewhere between Dante’s Inferno and an enormous toy shop (there are both Barbie dolls and sex dolls on display!), the basement of Palais de Tokyo presented a Wunderkammer for the age of extinction in which new things popped up from around every corner, on their way to go with a bang. Yes, we are going to die, Sugimoto-the-roguish-curator-of-doom seemed to want to remind us, but what a blast we’ve had – and yet, he frowned, look what a mess we’ve made. This dual emotion of playfulness and melancholia was conveyed by the conflicting visuality of the setup. The visitors wandered round corrugated metal maze-like structure, to be constantly presented with amazing objects: fossils from the Cambrian to the Eocene, one of Sugimoto’s own Seascapes, astronauts’ poo. In a variation on the trope of the sublime in art, whereby the work evokes pleasure and pain, for aesthetic as well as moral effect, Sugimoto mischievously declared: ‘Imagining the worst conceivable tomorrows gives me tremendous pleasure’.24 Yet the exploratory fun carried a serious message: ‘Where is this human race heading, incapable of preventing itself from being destroyed in the name of unchecked growth? ’.25 Alexa Horochowski’s visually restrained project Club Disminución (Club of Diminishing Returns), instigated during her residency at Casa Poli in Chile, offers an interesting counterpart to Sugimoto’s opulent archive. Club Disminución takes to the task the modernist dream of an ideal society which was to be achieved thanks to the developments in technology and engineering. Casa Poli, a minimalist, cement cube, stands on a jagged cliff overlooking the Pacific. The artist polluted this white modernist masterpiece with objects and materials found outdoors: rubbish, fossils, kelp. Kelp, or cochayuyo, as it is known in Chile, is a shore seaweed that resembles a thick cable and that arranges itself into unusual quasi-sculptural tangles. Attracted to its rubbery texture and its strange beauty, in the early stages of the project Horochowski started collecting the plant in large amounts, and then hanging it in various places in the white cube of Casa Poli. Cochayuyo as a plant that could easily pass for a technological object thus became an inspiration for her to interrogate the intertwining of nature and culture, extinction and obsolescence. The visitors to Horochowski’s exhibition at The Soap Factory in Minneapolis were greeted by large-screen videos showing this cable-like product, with images cut and mirrored to form a kaleidoscope of poetic movement. These were accompanied by another playful take on modernist visual art: cube-like structures which may have been made of kelp, cable or metal 50


wire. Even if we touched them, we were not entirely sure. The displayed objects arranged themselves into what the artist herself has described as ‘a post-human natural history of the future’, whereby ‘A fossil of a credit card [one of the most intriguing objects in the show! – JZ], heralds a post-consumer future’.26 This latter artefact raises an intriguing question: what will future generations make of the fossils of those small embellished plastic rectangles that the humans of the late capitalism era have endowed with so much value? Yet Horochowski offers us more than the familiar lamentation over the passing of man and his worldly wealth. As Christina Schmid has put it, the artist’s ‘more-than-vaguely vaginal imagery suggests a gendering of the dialogue: it challenges macho modernism’s tragic-heroic quest for mastery’27 – so evident in the jeremiads by the various Anthropocene-era male prophets of doom and gloom who seem to take delight in pronouncing our imminent death.28 Club Disminución, in which ‘the diminishing returns’ also refers to the seemingly pointless activities such as straightening kelp, drying it, and fitting it into cuboid shapes, envisages a future beyond the human. It thus becomes a quintessential example of ‘art after the human’, still appreciated ‘as art’ from our human position of here and now, yet appreciated precisely for its placement against the horizon of extinction. In its playful reflection on the passage of time, the work seems to be ‘encouraging the United States to join the club of formerly great nations and have-beens who lament the waning of past glories’. Yet Schmid insists – and I would agree with her – that ‘Club Disminución is not a depressing show’. ‘Calmly and not without humor…, Horochowski proposes that we dare look into the dark. We can face the sunset, her work argues. Club Disminución gathers in the fading light and dwells, affectionately, in the lengthening shadows of the human age’.29 So, if we humans can never face the sun, what does it mean for us to be able to face the sunset? This question has been addressed, although from a slightly different vantage point, by photoartist Penelope Umbrico, perhaps best known for her large-scale project Suns (From Sunsets) from Flickr. Began in 2006 (when ‘sunset’ was the most tagged word on Flickr), the project explores ideas of originality and replication in the culture of online sharing. The artist zooms on a snapshot she finds that features a sunset, cuts out the sun from it, resizes it and adds it to the ever growing grid of burnt out white globes placed against orange-red background. These sun tapestries are then displayed as large printouts on gallery walls, but also return to the Internet in different guises – as small grids, a screensaver, a set of virtual postcards. It is therefore not the banal visuality of the sunset but rather participation in the collective practice of sharing something you cannot claim authorship over that is of principal interest to Umbrico. Yet she also admits to being interested in the sun as the light source, and the transformations of this light source, both on the level of image and matter. Alongside her exploration of the digital environments, Umbrico’s concerns are aligned with the traditional perception of photography as a practice of drawing with light, and with the energetic 51


transformations its geological actions undergo on the Internet. In what sounds like a playful rebuttal of the more solemn tenor of certain philosophical propositions about the death of the sun, Umbrico pronounces that ‘the sun is dead but we make our own light’30 – and then goes off to rephotograph the suns from Flickr as displayed on the screen with her iPhone, and to explore the new light effects produced in the process. The result is a followup project, Sun/Screen (2014), in which sunset-like hues merge with a moiré pattern caused by the superimposition of the pixel grids, meshes or dot patterns upon an image. The image then emits an uncannily beautiful light, which does not belong to the sun anymore, but which is not entirely ours either. Yet our human perception, with its specific visual apparatus and its colour recognition capabilities, is required to acknowledge this very denaturalisation of the sun into a moiré pattern. In other words, the denaturalised sun needs the human body to experience this ‘denaturalisation’. Umbrico’s playful projects can be seen as an unwitting response to the philosophical problem posed by Jean-François Lyotard in his essay ‘Can Thought Go On Without A Body? ’, first published in 1987 and included in The Inhuman. Lyotard declares there that the ‘sole serious question facing humanity today’31 is the solar explosion that awaits us in 4.5 billion years, as a result of which ‘everything’ will come to an end. The sun’s death presents itself to us as the ultimate event of extinction. Yet, for Lyotard, the actual disaster that should concern us involves the disappearance not of the solar system as our matrix of reference but rather of the body, i.e. the extinction of the human as we know it – while we are still around. Accusing philosophers of extricating matter from their writings, Lyotard reminds us that the materiality of the human and of the Universe needs to be read alongside its technicity, with matter being taken ‘as an arrangement of energy created, destroyed and recreated over and over again, endlessly’.32 He pinpoints that As anthropologists and biologists admit, even the simplest life forms, infusoria (tiny algae synthesized by light at the edges of tidepools [now termed Protista – JZ]) a few million years ago are already technical devices. Any material system is technological if it filters information useful to its survival, if it memorizes and processes that information …– that is, if it intervenes on and impacts its environment, so as to assure its perpetuation at least.33 Positioning the emergence of life in early microorganisms as a technical process, Lyotard goes beyond the humanist logic of originary technicity that shaped the work of his contemporaries, such as Bernard Stiegler, whereby it is the human that is seen as constituted by, and emerging with, technicity. For Lyotard, technicity is already the condition and driving force of primordial life. Picking up on this idea, I want to suggest that the process of the emergence of life also reveals itself to be inherently photographic, with light being needed to initiate photosynthesis, i.e. to make a lasting change on an organism, and then triggering off further changes. Yet, even if we continue pursuing this expanded understanding of photography as a nonhuman process 52


that exceeds human acts involving cameras and photosensitive material, we are nevertheless returned here, with Lyotard, to the phenomenological experience of light cast upon a human body, located on the Earth which is being lit by its middle-aged sun. Indeed, for Lyotard, corporeality is the condition of knowledge but also of the phenomenological experience that enables openness, generativity and generosity – and that allows for the transmutation of the technical action of information transfer into an ethical act. This returns us to the issue of the human’s inability to face the sun yet still having to take on the task of facing the sunset. The death of the sun, the universe and ourselves is repositioned here from an ontological to an ethico-political problem. It is because being able to face the sunset also means coming to terms with the problem of energy – and of the depleting resources not just from the solar domain but also from the terrestrial (or, more specifically, subterranean) realm. Being able to share the sunset, in the Umbrico manner, hints at the possibility of thinking – even if not yet actually implementing – a more generous, less exploitative, mode of engaging with those resources. It is precisely the (mis) management of energy sources as fossil fuels by the human that is referenced as one of the symptoms of the Anthropocene, a state of events that has resulted in the change of the composition of the atmosphere – and thus, in the alteration of the nature of light that reaches us through it. Facing the sunset is therefore a way of suspending what Finnish philosopher Tere Vadén has called ‘fossil sense’: 34 an assumption that, because things have been a certain way for the last 150 years – with the intertwined logic of economic growth and fossil fuel exploitation shaping our modern ways of life – they will always be this way. Fossil sense is therefore actually nonsense: it involves a forgetting of the deep time of history, fuelled by myopic self-interest and species narcissism. The modern human is himself fossil-fuelled, with the very core of not just his physical but also economic and socio-political identity being shaped by hydrocarbons. While our own bodies are made of the (same) starstuff, they now also carry a record of industrially processed hydrocarbons: shards of coal, remnants of oil. We have thus become a photograph – and a fossil – of our way of life. Living under the cloud of oil fumes and global pollution, we seem to have forgotten about the sun. Grand as this proposition may sound, I want to suggest that photography can be mobilised to address the present fossil crisis in two ways: by expanding the temporal perspective from which this issue is normally seen (or not seen, as the case may be), and by helping us outline a different, less deadly solar economy. Some claim that it can most easily undertake this task by serving as a record of the terrible damage done to the environment. We can reference here, for example, the series called Oil by Edward Burtynsky, which features large-scale images of oils fields in Azerbaijan, the US and Canada, discarded or burning tyre piles in California, and oil refineries. This kind of representational art visualises the environmental destruction and our damaging relationship to various sources of energy, including the sun. Yet there is also a danger that such images will actually perpetuate the act of forgetting about the sun, with aesthetics acting as an anaesthetic against the urgency of the environmental situation. 53


As the increasing proliferation of images of disaster and suffering in various media testifies, there is no evidence for perception being a trigger for (moral) action. Indeed, visual oversaturation may actually lead to non-action. However, the argument of my paper is that photography as a whole is a quintessential practice of life, not just in the sense that it records our lives non-stop, or that it can show us life and death, but also in the deeper philosophical sense of encompassing life as duration through making incisions in it. In other words, all photography, with its capacity to capture light and make it act upon surfaces, acts as a cue for the goings-on of deep-time, well beyond human control and human existence. Antti Salminen goes so far as to suggest that ‘In the fossil nihilist age, photography acts as a reminder of the sun’35 – and thus of life itself. Photography as an embalmer and a carrier of imprints testifies to the continued existence of solar energy and to its photosynthesis-enabling capabilities. Rhetorically placing photography under the horizon of extinction – a horizon under which it has arguably unfolded on a material level since time immemorial – has allowed us to come out on the side of life, and to think fossils beyond the currently dominant fossil nihilism. Fossils and/as photographs can be seen as more than just forms of memento mori: they are also ethical injunctions, pointing and reaching out to life, in both its actual and virtual forms. This is where photography as a process of fossilisation that keeps a record of time becomes an ethical task, a form of countermourning the passage of time by casting light on solar light. By turning and returning to the sun, we can take first steps towards envisaging a new energetics, one that develops a more ethical relationship to fossils as ‘layers of ancient, non-human death’. Photography as an original practice of light, now often undertaken under the glow of electricity as often as under the glow of the sun, can get us to engage with light anew.

54


1

I am borrowing the concept of ‘affective fact’ from Brian Massumi. Extinction yields itself to being interpreted through this concept not because is stands in opposition to some actual facts (such as climate change, deforestation, or depletion of energy sources), but rather because it affects us mainly as a threat of things to come. Threat, for Massumi, is ‘affectively self-causing’. Brian Massumi, ‘The Future Birth of the Affective Fact: The Political Ontology of Threat’, in The Affect Theory Reader, ed. Melissa Gregg and Gregory J. Seigworth (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010), 52-54.

2

Elizabeth Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History (New York and London: Bloomsbury, 2014), Kindle edition.

3

Ilkka Hanski, ‘The World That Became Ruined’, EMBO reports, Vol. 9 Special Issue, Science and Society, 2008, S34.

4

Referenced in Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction.

5

Ibid.

6

Jussi Parikka, The Anthrobscene (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014), Kindle edition.

7

Ibid.

8

As Claire Colebrook argues, ‘The fossil record opens a world for us, insofar as it allows us to read back from the brain’s present to a time before reading…’, Death of the PostHuman: Essays on Extinction, Vol. 1 (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2014), 23.

9

John Durham Peters, ‘Space, Time, and Communication Theory’, Canadian Journal of Communication [online], 28.4 (2003): n. pag.

10

H. Fox Talbot, The Pencil of Nature (London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1844), Project Gutenberg online edition.

11

W. Jerome Harrison, A Sketch of the Geology of Leicestershire and Rutland (William White: Sheffield, 1877); W. Jerome Harrison, History of Photography (New York: Scovill Manufacturing Company, 1887).

12

Adam Bobbette, ‘Episodes from a History of Scalelessness: William Jerome Harrison and Geological Photography’, Architecture and the Anthropocene, ed. Etienne Turpin (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2013): 45-58, 51.

13

Harrison, History of Photography, 107.

14

Bobbette, ‘Episodes from a History of Scalelessness’, 52.

15

Harrison, History of Photography, 19.

16

Ibid., 52.

17

Ibid., 129. The linearity of Harrison’s evolutionary narrative reflects the understanding of evolution as logical progression and betterment across time, rather than, as Stanisław Lem put it nearly eighty years later, ‘a chaotic and illogical designer [that] does not accumulate its own experiences’, Stanisław Lem, Summa Technologiae, trans. Joanna Zylinska (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014), 339-340.

18

Bobbette, ‘Episodes from a History of Scalelessness’, 53.

19

André Bazin, ‘The Ontology of the Photographic Image’, Film Quarterly, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Summer, 1960): 4-9, 4.

20

See Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida (New York: Hill and Wang, 1981).

21

Bobbette, ‘Episodes from a History of Scalelessness’, 53.

22

Colebrook, Death of the PostHuman, 39.

23

Lost Human Genetic Archive was not the first show in which Sugimoto explored the history of the human against the horizon of deep time. In 2005-2006 he staged an exhibition called History of History at Japan Society in New York, in which his own photographs were displayed alongside other artefacts: scrolls, wood sculptures, and, most interestingly for us here, fossils. The appearance of fossilised ammonites, trilobites and sea lilies in the exhibition was most apposite, according to the artist, given that the fossils are ‘the oldest form of art’ and a kind of ‘pre-photography’ (cited in Michaels, 431), providing a genealogy for

55


his art. From the vantage point of deep time, photography can therefore be seen as ‘the first art, prehistoric, prehuman’ (ibid., 432). See Walter Benn Michaels, ‘Photographs and Fossils’, in Photography Theory, ed. James Elkins (New York and London: Routledge, 2007): 431-450. 24

Cited in Adrian Searle, ‘Hiroshi Sugimoto: Art for the End of the World’, The Guardian, May 16, 2014, http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/may/16/hiroshi-sugimoto-aujordhui-palais-de-tokyo-paris-exhibition

25

Exhibition description on the Palais de Tokyo website, http://palaisdetokyo.com/en/exhibition/aujourdhui-le-monde-estmort-lost-human-genetic-archive.

26

Alexa Horochowski, ‘Club Disminución’, Photomediations Machine, January 13, 2015, http://photomediationsmachine. net/2015/01/13/club-disminucion/.

27

Christina Schmid, ‘A Club at the End of the World’, October 16, 2014, MN artists website, http://www.mnartists.org/article/ club-end-world.

28

For a critique of the masculinism of the dominant discourses of, and debates on, the Anthropocene, see my book, Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2014).

29

Schmid, ‘A Club at the End of the World’.

30

Talk at The Photographers’ Gallery, London, January 16, 2015.

31

Jean-François Lyotard, The Inhuman, trans. Geoffrey Bennington and Rachel Bowlby (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991), 9.

32

Ibid.

33

Ibid., 12.

34

Tere Vadén, ‘Fossil Sense’, Mustarinda, Helsinki Photography Biennial Edition HBP14: 99-101, 99.

35

Antti Salminen, ‘Photography in the Age of Fossil Nihilism’, Mustarinda, Helsinki Photography Biennial Edition HBP14: 65-70, 70.

56




Rozwój sztuki mediów pozwolił na emancypację dzieł, na przekazanie przez twórcę części kompetencji widzom oraz na wykroczenie poza autonomiczny świat sztuki i oferowane przezeń doświadczenia. Otwarcie formy dzieła, wykorzystanie technik znanych z pozaartystycznych zastosowań, odwołanie do nowych praktyk komunikacyjnych dzisiejszych widzów, wreszcie asymilacja licznych kulturowych i społecznościowych kontekstów oraz mechanizmów partycypacji, nie tylko pozwalają na eksperymentowanie ze sposobami prezentacji sztuki mediów, ale wręcz ich wymagają. W wypadku Biennale Sztuki Mediów WRO, organizowanego od 1989 roku i posiadającego swoją całkiem liczną publiczność, z góry można założyć znaczną rozpiętość doświadczeń widzów – i tych, którzy pojawili się po raz pierwszy, i tych posiadających własne kontakty zarówno ze sztuką mediów, jak z poprzednimi edycjami biennale. W tę różnorodność jest wpisana także wielość postaw wobec codziennych współczesnych mediów: aktywnie uczestniczące lub unikające, refleksyjne lub powierzchowne – by posłużyć się samymi tylko opozycjami – a przecież paleta możliwych postaw jest tu ogromna. W każdym razie ci, których zwyczajowo określa się ciągle mianem odbiorców mają coraz bogatsze i różnorodne doświadczenia z mediami, i w praktyce, na co dzień wykorzystują podobne narzędzia jak artyści. Część publiczności odwołać się może do doświadczeń nabytych w trakcie poprzednich edycji biennale. Wspomnieć należy, iż trzy ostatnie edycje Biennale WRO składają się na pewien ciąg programowy. Alternative Now – pokazanie nurtów żywej twórczej kontestacji, krytycznych praktyk pozainstytucjonalnych, indywidualnych temperamentów i odwagi artystycznych eksperymentów było tematem Biennale WRO 2011. Hasło Pioneering Values z 2013 roku stało się okazją dla refleksji nad historią sztuki mediów – pokazania zarówno odmienności jej form, jak ciągłości i tożsamości utrzymywanej na przestrzeni półwiecza 59


jej nieprzerwanego rozwoju. Z kolei hasło Test Exposure przyjęte dla całego programu Biennale WRO 2015 określa skupienie się na twórczości najbardziej aktualnej, zespolone z testowaniem rozmaitych strategii jej wystawiania i oddziaływania. Test Exposure to hasło wieloznaczne i może okazać się zwodnicze – oznacza ekspozycję testową, ale też testującą. Już sam angielski termin exposure może oznaczać zarówno wystawienie, wyeksponowanie i naświetlenie, jak też ujawnienie, zdemaskowanie, obnażenie, nawet narażenie na szwank. Program ostatniego Biennale WRO w założeniu był takim wielostronnym testem, jakiemu sztuka najnowsza została poddana w kontakcie z publicznością, a publiczność – w kontakcie ze sztuką w różnych przestrzeniach, okolicznościach i kontekstach. To swoisty test dla autonomii i odporności sztuki, która – będąc częścią współczesnego życia jest narażona nie tylko na przechwycenia i zniekształcenia w takich obszarach, jak polityka czy ekonomia konsumpcji, ale też podlega wyzwaniom pochodzącym z kultury popularnej formatującej nasze – publiczności – oczekiwania, zakresy akceptacji oraz nawyki estetyczne. Jak daje sobie radę dzisiejsza sztuka wobec roszczeń atrakcyjności i zrozumiałości? Jak zostaje przyjęte przez publiczność i krytykę to, co odbiega od normy, od mainstreamowego dyskursu i wymaga samodzielnego odczytywania znaczeń, wreszcie – po prostu – uwagi i zaufania do własnej wrażliwości? Ekspozycja jako sposób interpretacji W Test Exposure ograniczyliśmy rolę formułowanych explicite deklaracji programowych i interpretacji na rzecz sposobu wystawienia, tworzenia wartości wystawienniczej, rozumianej jako forma kształtowania wystawy, organizacji kontekstu i architektury percepcji, skłaniającej do samodzielnego formowania przez widzów swego doświadczenia, odkrywania i nadawania 60


znaczeń. Przedmiotem ekspozycji stało się też badanie zakresu, w jakim dzieła sztuki komunikują odbiorcom swoje znaczenia, w jakim stopniu dodatkowe informacje o niesionych przez nie treściach i wartościach nie muszą wyprzedzać aktu odbioru, w jakim stopniu widz stanie się autonomicznym interpretatorem, wydobędzie z wystawy, odkryje lub wymyśli dla siebie porządek znaczeń i wartości. Interpretacja polega na wydobyciu z dzieła lub wypowiedzi, jaką jest wystawa, pewnego zbioru elementów, które uważa się za najbardziej znaczące. Znaczenie może wykraczać znacząco poza świadome intencje twórcy. Istnieje trudna do wyznaczenia granicy między walorami dzieła a jego interpretacją wynikłą z odbioru, różnorodnych przeżyć i doświadczeń indywidualnych, wreszcie wielostopniowości znaczeń oraz możliwej wielości odczytań i konfiguracji tych samych elementów. Jednocześnie zainteresowani widzowie mogą skonfrontować swe wrażenia, zaglądając do rozbudowanych opisów na stronach internetowych, rozmawiając z przewodnikami po wystawach, uczestnicząc w licznych oprowadzaniach kuratorskich, warsztatach i akcjach mediacji sztuki, w których specjalne miejsce zajął rozbudowany projekt Małego WRO – przeznaczonego dla młodszych widzów. W tych działaniach nastąpiła próba odstąpienia od uprzywilejowania autorskich czy kuratorskich interpretacji na rzecz szeroko pojmowanej mediacji sztuki, rozumianej jako budowanie wartościowej relacji między zjawiskami sztuki a widzami. Postanowiliśmy uwzględnić udział widzów już we wstępnych pracach programowych Biennale WRO 2015. WRO od lat zajmuje się kulturalną i artystyczną partycypacją – od interaktywności, po udział w performansach i projektach sieciowych – teraz doszliśmy do wniosku, że w naszej relacji z widzami pora też na podzielenie się odpowiedzialnością i wątpliwościami.

61


Temu służyły otwarte spotkania, w wyniku których została ukształtowana znaczna część pokazów wideo. Nowe formy wspólnych, otwartych dla publiczności pokazów pozwoliły na odejście od wyłącznie eksperckiego, kuratorskiego kształtowania programu. Główne wystawy biennale Hasło Test Exposure miało też swój wymiar czysto praktyczny, odnoszący się do lokalizacji największej z wystaw tegorocznego WRO w nowym – oczekującym na otwarcie gmachu Biblioteki Uniwersyteckiej. Wstąpienie do nowego gmachu – dopiero oczekującego na przyszłe użytkowanie – pozwoliło na przetestowanie budowli pod kątem jej nie planowanej wcześniej przydatności. Prace zostały umieszczone na czterech poziomach w monumentalnych przestrzeniach, przywodzących na myśl modernistyczne idealne muzea sztuki. Wręcz anonimowe, pełne rozproszonego światła, utrzymane w monochromatycznej tonacji wielkie sale i łączniki pozwoliły na operowanie chłodnymi perspektywami i złożonymi ciągami ekspozycyjnymi, trudnymi zazwyczaj do osiągnięcia poza przestrzeniami muzealnymi. Wystawa w kontekście architektury przestrzeni i bryły budynku, także jej urbanistycznego otoczenia, była więc testem pewnej iluzji muzeum sztuki współczesnej. Opozycję i równowagę dla tej chłodnej neutralności stanowiła wystawa w niewielkim mieszkaniu w podupadłej kamienicy, nieodległej od gmachu biblioteki, która – wraz z działaniami integrującymi, skierowanymi do mieszkańców – miała charakter site-specific, odnoszący się mocno do realnego otoczenia społecznego. Z kolei wystawa w Muzeum Narodowym, umieszczona w XIX-wiecznym centralnym hallu budowli, ukazywała napięcie pomiędzy materialnością i niematerialnością w pracach medialnych widzianych jako obiekty i obrazy oglądane w sąsiedztwie rzeźb i malarstwa stałej muzealnej ekspozycji. 62


Wystawa w Centrum Sztuki WRO, miejscu z założenia pełniącego funkcję przestrzeni eksperymentalnej, była poświęcona dziełom z pogranicza sztuki i biologii, których autorzy wykorzystali udział nie-ludzkich aktorów oraz zjawiska naturalne charakteryzujące obiektywne procesy rozwoju, integrując przy tym w dziełach organizmy biologiczne i technologie trans-gatunkowej komunikacji. Inspiracją dla większości z pokazanych prac była idea stymulacji realnie zachodzących procesów, a nie ich cyfrowa symulacja. Ostatnia z głównych wystaw biennale wykorzystywała przestrzenie publiczne działającego Domu Towarowego Renoma, jednego z najstarszych w Europie. Zważywszy iż Renomę w trakcie wystawy odwiedziło ponad 700 tysięcy klientów, to ta wystawa WRO 2015 Test Exposure była forpocztą zachęcającą do odwiedzenia pozostałych miejsc biennale. Ta wystawa była testem dla sztuki odbieranej w rozproszeniu, w warunkach dalekich od kontemplacji, zaskakującej obecnością i stanowiącej ingerencję w przebiegi komunikacyjne o autonomicznej celowości. Program wystaw, dopełniony pokazami wideo oraz performansami, prezentowanymi w przestrzeniach dawnego dworca kolejowego oraz w innych miejscach publicznych, stał się więc złożonym testem dla sztuki zrealizowanym w przestrzeniach przejmowanych, adaptowanych, umownych, niekiedy przedefiniowanych. Różnorodność ekspozycyjna programu WRO 2015 Test Exposure – realizowana w tych rozmaitych, zawsze wyrazistych, ale nieograniczających kontekstach – służyła zaprezentowaniu złożoności aktualnych form sztuki, ukazaniu wielości jej odniesień oraz sprzyjała otwartości interpretacji wynikłych z bogactwa postaw i oczekiwań wobec najnowszej sztuki.

63


TEST EXPOSURE TEKSTY

REDAKCJA: PIOTR KRAJEWSKI I VIOLETTA KUTLUBASIS-KRAJEWSKA


64

Dagmara Domagała CITY EXPOSURE. ŚLADY I MIASTO OTWARTE

69

Magdalena Kreis MAŁE WRO

82

Kamila Wolszczak GG-SUW – SAMONOŚNE UNIWERSALNE WYSTAWY

76

Dagmara Domagała PIERWSZY KONKURS NAJLEPSZYCH DYPLOMÓW SZTUKI MEDIÓW

83

Krzysztof Dix DOKĄD JEDZIE DYWAN?

86

Krzysztof Perzyna SIMULACRA

89

Roger Malina KRYZYS W REPREZENTACJI DANYCH. W POSZUKIWANIU NOWYCH DRÓG EKSPLOROWANIA I PRZYSWAJANIA DANYCH

93

Piotr Wyrzykowski APLIKACJE MOBILNE DO WYRAŻANIA WKURWIENIA

97

Joanna Zylinska SKAMIELINY JAKO MEDIA. FOTOGRAFIA PO WYGINIĘCIU

65


DAGMARA DOMAGAŁA

CITY EXPOSURE. ŚLADY I MIASTO OTWARTE

Miasto jest fenomenem znajdującym się na granicy patrzenia i doświadczania. Jest kołem zamachowym i kolebką postmodernizmu, labiryntem znaczeń, bijącym sercem współczesnej cywilizacji i wielkim spektaklem o charakterze wizualnym. Często bywa bohaterem obszernie opisywanym i dokumentowanym. Jest odnawialnym źródłem tematów, ponieważ jest życiem: ciągle prącym, ciągle pędzącym i kształtującym nieokreśloną przyszłość. Miasto, któremu się przyglądam nie musi mieć imienia, bo choć lokalnie posiada różne oblicza, to działa podobnie do skrupulatnie opracowanego mechanizmu. Z tą jedynie różnicą, że rozwija się spontanicznie i poniekąd bez niczyjej ingerencji. Pierwiastek ludzki gubi się w splątanej sieci anonimowych instytucji. Pierwiastek ludzki jest tejże sieci anonimowym aktorem, tak dalekoplanowym, że można pomylić go ze statystą. Test Exposure, czyli testowanie paradygmatu widzenia zapośredniczonego przez medium, testowanie przestrzeni ekspozycji, a przede wszystkim własnych zmysłów prowadzi niepewną i nieokreśloną ścieżką, nie sprzyjając immanentnemu i bezrefleksyjnemu nurzaniu się w temacie wystawy. Przemierzam miejsca, które są fizycznie odległe. Widzenie i doświadczanie jest zapośredniczone poprzez rozszerzony świat sztuki głęboko związanej z rozwijającym się przemysłem technologicznym. Jak wskrzeszony Dżiga Wiertow, krok po kroku, obraz po obrazie mogę rozszyfrować poetykę miasta jako powidoku, odszukać tajne Artepolis pośród wielokrotnie nadpisywanych palimpsestów. Miasto, którego powidok kreśli się na powiekach jest focaultowskim przeciw-miejscem1, wirtualną heterotopią, która znajduje się zawieszona pomiędzy swoją fizyczną lokalizacją a doświadczeniem transsubiektywnym ponowoczesnego homo viatora posiadającego niesamowitą swobodę zmiany swojego punktu widzenia. Gerarda Lebika Saccades. 66


Dekonstrukcja continuum czasoprzestrzennego jest miejscem-hybrydą nieposiadającą żadnego fizycznego odniesienia. Zawieszenie dźwięku w czasie i przestrzeni dekonstruuje mechanizmy widzenia. Jest to paradoks, który w pewnym stopniu wywołuje nieufność wobec zmysłów. Poszukiwanie źródła dźwięku sprawia, że oczy zaczynają rejestrować obraz. Surowa architektura szkła i betonu w połączeniu z niepokojącą fonią dostarcza znaczeń. Nie-miejsce zostaje umiejscowione w kontekście skojarzeń i doświadczeń. Brzęczenie Saccades wywołuje lawinę procesów i staje się bodźcem do otworzenia pierwszych kart tego ponowoczesnego miasta znajdującego się w swoistej między-przestrzeni: pomiędzy tym, co fizyczne, widziane, a tym co mentalne, doświadczane. W „miejscach jednoczesnych”2 powoływanych do życia przez audiowizualne media granica pomiędzy zmysłami zostaje zatarta. Doświadczenie przestrzeni zostaje uwypuklone dzięki słyszanym dźwiękom. W tym wypadku instalacji Lebika ideowo zupełnie blisko do wizjoniki Paula Virilio. Zapośredniczone wirtualnie doświadczenie bliżej nieokreślonego miasta pojawia się w wideo Listed Seoungho Cho. Rejestracja z elementami subiektywnej prozy stanowi strumień nieświadomości: zapis obrazów mijanych codziennie mimochodem i puszczanych w niepamięć. Impresjonistyczna weduta Cho jest oderwana od swojego fizycznego miejsca i choć obraz jest bogaty w szczegóły, nie istnieje w żadnym ponadjednostkowym wymiarze. Autor w wideoautopsji portretuje miejsce usytuowane w swoim życiorysie, w swoim kontekście, bez którego znajomości obraz staje się nieczytelny. Może pozostać jedynie impresją pozbawioną znaczenia. Rzeczywistość jednak pełna jest takich ś l a d ó w , które wypełniają się znaczeniem. Dekonstrukcyjne odczytywanie miejskich ścieżek zakłada jego konieczną obecność. Bez śladu nie ma potoczności, jak bez życia nie ma śmierci3. L'espace vécu, przestrzeń przeżyta spaja ze sobą czas i miejsce w derridiańskim nieświadomym i nieobecnym rozsunięciu4. Miejsce staje się czasem, konkretnym jednostkowym zdarzeniem niosącym doświadczenie. Ślad odziera miejsce z fizyczności zwracając się ku współistnieniu i współprzenikaniu5 człowieka i przestrzeni. Miasto staje się „amorficznym sensorium”6, szczególnym generatorem ponadjednostkowych bodźców sensualnych, często mających źródło w jednostkowym doświadczeniu. Małgorzata Goliszewska w wideo Komunikaty (Idę) również dokonuje dekonstrukcji bodźców pośrednicząc w przeżywaniu krajobrazu miasta zasypanego reklamami. Współczesny flâneur nie przeciwstawia się rytmowi miasta. Refleksja o ruchomej tkance nie odbywa się tutaj z pozycji meta- lecz w zadyszce. Nietypowy flâneuryzm uprawia również Lena Dobrowolska (Przejazd). Powolne safari po rumuńskich slumsach jest pozornie bezpieczne i powierzchowne. Filmowy krajobraz można potraktować bezrefleksyjnie – jak każdy mijany w wyobrażonym mieście. Lecz zwolnione tempo odwraca uwagę od samego patrzenia, uwypukla niewidzialnego dotąd człowieka, który jest aktorem w tym wyciętym fragmencie rzeczywistości. Nie są to obrazy-śmieci, martwe zapisy silące się na obiektywizm, lecz świadomy zabieg dekonstruujący ten urbanistyczny passus. Medium niegdyś oddalające źródło doświadczenia dziś staje się jego pełnowartościowym 67


pośrednikiem. Jak świadectwem gentryfikacji Nowego Jorku może być obraz harlemskich slumsów i uwidocznienie niewidocznej biedy w przestrzeni miasta (Hans Scheugl, Homeless New York 1990). Naznaczone śladem miejsca są tylko umownymi punktami tworzącymi wirtualny twór, wyobrażone miasto, miasto-widmo będące polem walki pomiędzy organami zarządzającymi pamięcią tych miejsc a jej faktycznymi uczestnikami, tworzące nietypowy memoryscape: płynny krajobraz konstytuowany poprzez wyobrażenia swoich podmiotów7. Obrazy oszukują, naginają granice istnienia i nieistnienia, nie funkcjonując pars pro toto jak słowa, lecz raczej jako rękojmie będące gwarantem rzeczywistości, z której rzekomo pochodzą8. Obraz poszukujący śladu nie jest obiektywny, dzięki czemu przenika przez powierzchowność krajobrazu umożliwiając dostęp do memoryscape'ów. Zarejestrowane reifikcje odsłaniają swoje indywidualne biografie, pozwalają zapełnić się znaczeniem. Wyludnione Ateny z wideo As to Posterity Mariny Gioti to nie tylko miasto pozbawione ludzi. To pełne śladów ludzkiego istnienia postapokaliptyczne horrendum, które jawi się jako bardzo prawdopodobna przyszłość. Obraz przedstawia puste ulice, budynki, sklepowe witryny, ptaki, drzewa i wystawowe manekiny. Czysty zapis ze świadomą intencją pominięcia czynnika ludzkiego staje się jasnym komunikatem, parabolicznym śladem o odwróconym znaczeniu. Tytuł, Ku potomności, nakreśla wyraźną przestrogę. Moment pomiędzy cywilizacją a jej ruiną wydaje się nieuchwytny. Fotosfery z Czarnobyla (Sasha Litvintseva, Immortality. Home and Elsewhere), niedokończone (David Krems, Yo no veo crisis) lub zniszczone (Marek Wasilewski, Zatoka martwych hoteli) kompleksy hotelowe wyrywają miejsca z ich fizycznej kolebki za pośrednictwem wirtualnego medium. Przestrzenie nabierają cech uniwersalnego memoryscape'u, czystego zapisu widzialnego świata. Interpretacja dodaje to, co niewidzialne. W świadomości istnieje tylko miasto umowne – pewne jego wyobrażenie, ślad doświadczenia, który konstytuuje jego postrzeganie. Czyste obrazy nie istnieją. Wideo dokonuje odwrócenia miejskiego palimpsestu: rekonstruuje zawarty w nim ślad poprzez digitalizację obrazu. Nadpisuje znaczenia w sferze miejsc-nie-miejsc, dając wrażenie subiektywnego obcowania z intersubiektywnym uniwersum miejskich symboli. Artepolis jest miastem umownym, amalgamatem miejsc widocznych we fragmentach, wyrwanym z korzeniami bytem metapolis. „To przestrzeń gubienia i znajdywania”9, jest procesem odbijającym powidoki przeciw-miejsc istniejących często jedynie jako byty mentalne. Nowe media to narzędzia współczesnej Mnemozyne, która – poprzez zarejestrowany obraz – odnajduje to, co zagubione. Fenomen powidoku nie wymaga do zaistnienia doświadczania całościowego miasta. Powidoki powstają na styku percepcji indywidualnej i zbiorowej świadomości, na styku doświadczeń i wyobrażeń. Przeżywany obraz miasta staje się określony przez to, co niewidzialne dla oka, ponieważ sfera widzialna stanowi tylko ubogą część całego doświadczenia. Kontrast następczy 68


chwyta to, co jednostkowe wśród zsocjalizowanych śladów z Google Street View. Po-widoki Aleksandra Janickiego jako wędrówka przez wirtualny interfejs demaskują nadpisane warstwy pamięci i historii kulturowej miejsca. Flâneur ma do dyspozycji cały świat wirtualny. Doświadczenie zapośredniczone przez medium nie ukrywa jednak żadnego z aspektów doświadczenia realnego. Struktura i poetyka pracy zbudowana jest na kulturowym kontekście w połączeniu z immersyjną mocą wirtualnego doświadczenia drogi Wschodniego Wybrzeża w Japonii (Tōkaidō). Przepływające obrazy są powidokami nadpisywanych palimpsestów, nawarstwiających się kulturowych znaczeń począwszy od XVII-wiecznej podróży Bashō po współczesne podróże samochodem Google. Wirtualny obraz drogi od Kioto do Tokio, wraz z rozszerzeniem powszechnej świadomości, stracił wszelkie znamiona symulakry, stając się gwarantem i reprezentacją wirtualnej świadomości. Czas i przestrzeń nie istnieją. Rozszerzone przez media zmysły pozwalają na doświadczenie miasta nie warstwa po warstwie, lecz symultanicznie w płynnym czasoprzestrzennym continuum. Powtarzając za Umberto Eco: ponowoczesność oczekuje od dzieła sztuki tego, czego nie można przewidzieć10. Nieciągłość i nieokreśloność narracji, ucieczka od tego, co trwałe i pewne zamieniają indywidualne doświadczenie w wewnętrzną eksplorację. Aura transcendentna zamienia się w immanentną: zarówno wewnątrz dzieła jak i samego odbiorcy, który poszukuje znaczeń zakorzenionych głęboko pod warstwami tekstu. Jednak to nie tekst jest językiem nowoczesności. Obraz w połączeniu z hipertekstem mediów cyfrowych czy wirtualnych – czyli coraz głębsze płaszczyzny widzenia i s(t)ymulowanego odczuwania – jest językiem współczesnego Artepolis. Znaczenie nadawane indywidualnie okaże się jednak zupełnie rozpuszczone w intersubiektywnym uniwersum przeczuć i symboli. Miasto jako ekspozycja multimedialna stanowi paradygmat postrzegania przez doświadczanie. Ekspozycja miasta może zatem dokonać się w otwartej do interpretacji formie śladów i powidoków. City Exposure to współczesne Artepolis, opera aperta zanurzone w postmodernistycznej płynnej rzeczywistości. Miasto otwarte oglądane przez wirtualne kino-oko zaprasza w podróż immersyjną bez potrzeby generalizacji czasu i przestrzeni. To miejsce-hybryda, które jednocześnie występuje w świadomości jako meta-byt oderwany od swojej przestrzeni i fizyczne miejsce zaznaczone umownym punktem na mapie. Wirtualne nawarstwienie uwypuklone przez wirtualne media zaprasza w podróż po obrazach i przeżyciach, po przestrzeniach i miejscach, po sensualnych bodźcach estetycznego doświadczenia i meandrach pamięci kulturowej.

69


1

M. Foucault, O innych przestrzeniach. Heterotopie, tłum. M. Żakowski, „Kultura Popularna” 2006, nr 6(16), s. 9.

2

B. Kita, Między przestrzeniami. O kulturze nowych mediów, RABID, Kraków, 2003, s. 36.

3

J. Derrida, O gramatologii, tłum. B. Banasiak, Wydawnictwo KR, Warszawa, 1999, s. 95.

4

Tamże, s. 102.

5

E. Rybicka, Modernizowanie świata. Zarys problematyki urbanistycznej w nowoczesnej literaturze polskiej, Universitas, Kraków, 2003, s. 126-127.

6

Tamże, s. 108.

7

E. Rybicka, Pamięć i miasto. Palimpsest vs pole walki, „Teksty Drugie”, 2011, nr 5, s. 201-211.

8

Zdrada jest próbą mistrza. Rozmowa z Arturem Danielem Liskowackim; w: J. Borowczyk, M. Larek, Rozmowa była możliwa. Wywiady z pisarzami, Stowarzyszenie „Czasu Kultury”, Poznań, 2008, s. 120.

9

G. E. Karpińska, Miasto wymazywane. Historia łódzkiego przypadku, w: I. Bukowska-Floreńska (red.), Miasto – przestrzeń kontaktu kulturowego i społecznego, Katowice, 2004, s. 165.

10

U. Eco, Dzieło otwarte. Forma i nieokreśloność w poetykach współczesnych, tłum. J. Gałuszka, L. Eustachiewicz, A. Kreisberg i M. Oleksiuk, Czytelnik, Warszawa, 1994, s. 153.

70


MAGDALENA KREIS

MAŁE WRO

Program Małego WRO, obecny od lat w koncepcji biennale, w ramach tegorocznej edycji silniej niż dotychczas splata się z wydarzeniami głównymi. W szerszym kontekście, to także jedna z części całorocznego programu mediacji sztuki realizowanego przez Centrum Sztuki WRO. Małe WRO staje się komplementarną częścią Biennale WRO, wynikającą z wyborów kuratorskich. Mocniej akcentuje też wspólny udział w wystawach i wydarzeniach dzieci i ich bliskich, rodziców, nauczycieli czy opiekunów. Z głównego programu Biennale WRO 2015 zostały wybrane prace szczególnie interesujące dla młodych i mniej doświadczonych odbiorców sztuki. Ta decyzja była powodowana chęcią „niedodawania” kolejnych prac czy też tworzenia nowej, „dziecięcej” wystawy. Stąd też pomysł na Przewodnik Małego WRO, czyli bezpłatną papierową publikację przedstawiającą 15 prac wybranych spośród wszystkich prezentowanych na wystawach WRO 2015, zlokalizowanych w 10 różnych miejscach we Wrocławiu. Każda z prac zyskała przystępny opis, zrozumiały zarówno dla dziecka, jak i niewtajemniczonego odbiorcy sztuki najnowszej. Wybór prac do Przewodnika Małego WRO został pomyślany tak, by nie tylko zachwycać wyjątkowością technologiczną i wprawiać w zachwyt nad możliwościami sprzętów technologicznych, komputerów i maszyn, ale też by w przystępny sposób opowiedzieć odbiorcy o bliskich mu tematach i codziennych doświadczeniach. Poszczególne prace zostały opisane na osobnych kartach, dzięki czemu każdy mógł samodzielnie wyznaczać kolejność oglądanych dzieł i odwiedzanych miejsc. To propozycja usamodzielniająca widza: zaproponowanie mu narzędzia 71


mediacyjnego, które odpowiada wybranemu fragmentowi obszernej prezentacji Biennale WRO. Przewodnik Małego WRO dawał możliwość zwiedzana wystaw bez osoby przewodnika opowiadającego o pracach (choc warto w tym miejscu dodać, że i wspólnych, grupowych oprowadzań nie zabrakło w ramach Małego WRO – z autorskim komentarzem przewodników i artystów). Zachęcał do indywidualnego spacerowania po ekspozycjach, poznawania prac, samodzielnego czytania tekstów o nich i rozwiązywania zadań. Znalazło się tu jednak miejsce na współpracę rodzica i dziecka. Prace z Przewodnika Małego WRO to skromny wybór, ale spacerowanie po wystawach z publikacją zakładało także „wirusowe” poznawanie innych prac. Szukając w ramach ekspozycji jednej, opisanej w Przewodniku, można było natknąć się na inne interesujące dzieło, które zwróciło uwagę i spróbować rozgryźć, jak zostało zrobione, w jaki sposób „działało” i co przedstawiało. W Przewodniku Małego WRO każdemu opisowi prac towarzyszyło proste zadanie, które zostało przygotowane w oparciu o poszczególne dzieło. Część z nich zakładała wykonanie ich od razu podczas zwiedzania z użyciem dowolnego pisaka, inne – zachęcały do kontynuowania działań w domu czy szkole. Twórcze ćwiczenia pobudzały do zgłębiania doświadczenia sztuki mediów, ale też pokazywały ich prostsze, analogowe wersje, pozwalając zrozumieć wielość odniesień współczesnych dzieł sztuki do codzienności i bliskich nam zagadnień. Kolejnymi elementami programu Małego WRO 2015 były także Rozgrzewka i  Dogrywka – dwie ścieżki tematyczne prezentowane na stanowiskach komputerowych w Czytelni Mediów w Centrum Sztuki WRO. Rozgrzewka miała swoją premierę miesiąc przed rozpoczęciem Biennale WRO 2015. Zawierała ona prace z poprzedniej edycji Biennale WRO i na ich podstawie tłumaczyła podstawowe zagadnienia związane ze sztuką mediów, takie jak na przykład animacja komputerowa, performans dokamerowy, instalacja interaktywna, realizacja site-specif ic czy mapping. Z kolei Dogrywka to ścieżka przygotowana z myślą o wystawie WRO Résumé; zachęcała do kontynuowania przyglądania się pracom zaprezentowanym w Przewodniku Małego WRO – teraz w formie dokumentacji zebranych w Czytelni Mediów WRO. Taka koncepcja zakładała ciągłość działań i propozycji dla dzieci i ich bliskich, a ścieżki weszły w skład Kolekcji WRO udostępnianej stale w Czytelni Mediów. Z programem głównym łączył się ściśle także program prac wideo. Realizacje prezentowane w specjalnym 9. programie Małego WRO zostały wyłonione podczas otwartego naboru prac na Biennale WRO 2015 – chociaż nie ogłaszaliśmy osobnej 72


kategorii „filmów dziecięcych”. Premierowy pokaz w ramach Niedzielnego Poranka Filmowego, podobnie jak inne pokazy, odbył się z udziałem artystów w kinie biennalowym w nowym budynku Biblioteki Uniwersyteckiej we Wrocławiu. W każdą sobotę w okresie trwania Biennale WRO były organizowane także projekcje powtórkowe, a zapoczątkowana wtedy współpraca z artystami rozwinęła się w kolejne pokazy realizowane w kolejnych miesiącach. Ważnym elementem program Małego WRO były także dwie instalacje interaktywne – Pies i  Malowanie. Obie związane są z Interaktywnym Placem Zabaw, ale z okazji Biennale WRO 2015 zystały nowe formy. Pies to praca, która powstała w 1994 roku, w ramach specjalnej edycji Biennale WRO we wrocławskim Dużym Studiu TVP. Później instalacja stała się integralną częścią Interaktywnego Placu Zabaw. Pies mieszka w drewnianej budzie i głośnym szczekaniem, uruchamianym dzięki komputerowi połączonemu z czujnikami ruchu, z umieszczonego w budzie telewizora, wita odbiorców wystawy, reagując szczekaniem na przechodzących widzów, budząc wesołe i życzliwe reakcje. Prezentacja instalacji miała miejsce także w ramach Biennale 2015 (nowy gmach Biblioteki Uniwersyteckiej), ale dodatkowo zyskała miniaturową formę do samodzielnego odtworzenia. Wraz z rozpoczęciem Biennale WRO 2015 została udostępniona aplikacja na urządzenia mobilne wraz z szablonem budy do przygotowania w domu. Tym samym, Pies mógł zamieszkać w dowolnym miejscu na świecie – wystarczyło pobrać aplikację i poskładać papierową budę według instrukcji umieszczonej na stronie www.pies.wrocenter.pl. Z kolei Malowanie to nowa wersja pracy Malowania światłem, której autorem jest Paweł Janicki. Z okazji Dnia Dziecka, który przypadał w trakcie trwania Biennale WRO 2015, w Centrum Sztuki WRO została udostępniona przestrzeń do wspólnej, sieciowej zabawy światłem, ruchem, obrazem i dźwiękiem. Przez cały dzień, w dwóch miejscach na świecie – we Wrocławiu i Johannesburgu – dzieci korzystały z instalacji za pomocą połączenia internetowego. Gra była możliwa dzięki tej samej strefie czasowej Polski i RPA. Korzystając ze świecących zabawek i przedmiotów emitujących światło, uczestnicy interakcji „zamalowywali” ekran kolorowymi kształkami, podczas gdy druga grupa, w innym miejscu świata, „wymazywała” te same plamy, figury i kompozycje. Osoby znajdujące się w różnych lokalizacjach tworzą tą samą, audiowizualną kompozycję dzięki stwoistej platformie do niebezpośredniej komunikacyjnej. Małe WRO zyskało również nową identyfikację wizualną. Zaprojektował ją młody grafik i ilustrator, współtwórca studia Arizona, Michał Loba. To opracowanie graficzne, podobnie jak cały program Małego WRO, wynikało z generalnej 73


koncepcji wizualnej Biennale WRO 2015, czerpało z jej kolorystyki i motywów, tworząc spójną estetycznie całość. I tak, na poziomie programowym, jak i graficznym Małe WRO łączyło się ściśle z Biennale WRO 2015, pokazując, że młodszego, mniej doświadczonego odbiorcę można traktować poważnie, proponując mu wartościowy, niezinfantylizowany sposób poznawania sztuki współczesnej. Dzięki komplementarnym elementom programu – tekstom, oprowadzaniom, programowi wideo, instalacjom interaktywnym – dzieci, ale także rodzice, nauczyciele, opiekunowie mieli szansę poznać współczesne narzędzia twórcze oraz sposoby ich użycia w obszarze sztuki. Wierzę, że choć w minimalnym stopniu wpłynęło to na większą świadomość – wszystkich młodszych i starszych odbiorców Biennale WRO – dotyczącą możliwego zastosowania nowomedialnych narzędzi, współczesnej estetyki, ale też relacji społecznych.

74


KAMILA WOLSZCZAK GG-SUW – SAMONOŚNE UNIWERSALNE WYSTAWY

Projekt artystyczno-kuratorski Kamili Wolszczak Został zrealizowany w ramach 16. Biennale Sztuki Mediów we Wrocławiu przez Centrum Sztuki WRO, ujmując hasło TEST EXPOSURE jako eksperyment na polach przestrzeni wystawienniczych. GG to piąta edycja projektu Samonośnych Uniwersalnych Wystaw zainicjowanego przez Kamilę Wolszczak w 2012 roku we Wrocławiu. SUW kolejny raz testuje alternatywną przestrzeń wystawienniczą, którą tym razem stało się wrocławskie mieszkanie przy ul. Łukasza Górnickiego 4/11. Mieszkanie o powierzchni 40 m2 (usytuowane na drugim piętrze kamienicy z przełomu XIX i XX wieku) stało się dla artystów polem do realizacji projektów-komunikatów interpretujących temat i miejsce. Z jednej strony punktem wyjścia była opuszczona przestrzeń mieszkalna, z drugiej – sposoby porozumiewania się w kontekście pierwszego polskiego komunikatora internetowego z lat dwutysięcznych, używanego do prywatnych i grupowych rozmów. Gadu-Gadu to narzędzie do budowania relacji międzyludzkich bez fizycznej obecności. Wraz z początkiem internetu w Polsce, komunikator stał się bardzo popularny i zyskał miliony użytkowników, a jego formuła z biegiem czasu była zapożyczana przez inne programy i portale społecznościowe. Na rynku pojawiło się wiele konkurencyjnych zamienników, a z perspektywy czasu Gadu-Gadu stało się formą disco polo sieci. W 2007 roku program został wykupiony przez Naspers, koncern medialny z RPA. GG-SUW było analogową formą komunikatora, w którym projekty site-specific i ich autorzy stanowili medium przekazu.

75


Do projektu zostało zaproszonych dwunastu artystów wybranych z otwartego naboru. Po ogłoszeniu wyników grupa artystów, wraz z kuratorką, zapoznała się z przestrzenią mieszkania, okolicą i kontekstem miejsca. Efektem działań była kolektywnie przygotowana wystawa dla okolicznych mieszkańców i przybyłych gości. Formuła SUW-u była skierowana zatem do artystów poszukujących dialogu z odbiorcą i współdziałania w grupie, jak i do odbiorców, którzy w jednym miejscu mogli poznać twórców i ich dzieła. Kamila Wolszczak o projekcie: SUW wyrasta z idei niezależnych działań kuratorskich w przestrzeniach prywatnych i kolektywnego podejmowania decyzji programowych przez artystów i organizatorów. Działania pod szyldem SUW-u odbywają się według uniwersalnych zasad. SUW to proces, którego punktem kulminacyjnym jest wystawa w przestrzeniach pozainstytucjonalnych. Tym razem główną bazą i punktem wyjścia było opuszczone mieszkanie przy ulicy Górnickiego 4 we Wrocławiu. Po „wizji lokalnej” na podstawie zebranych informacji został ogłoszony konkurs na projekty dedykowane tej dzielnicy i jej mieszkańcom. Spośród ponad 30 zgłoszeń dotyczących bezpośrednio mieszkania i okolicy wybrano dziewięć projektów. Grupa 12 artystów realizowała swoje koncepcje wraz z sąsiadami oraz osobami zainteresowanymi partycypacją. Artystom towarzyszyło również czterech mediatorów, którzy dbali o płynność komunikacji na różnych płaszczyznach. Zależało nam na symbiotycznej spójności miejsca i gości, nie kreowaliśmy galeryjnego „white cube’a” – szukaliśmy rodzinnej, domowej atmosfery, gdzie tematy o pogodzie przeplatały się z performansami i nowymi technologiami. Regularnie odwiedzali nas sąsiedzi, a w szególności pani Ania, która podczas naszego pobytu na Górnickiego ośmieliła się pokazać swoje rysunki i w fazie końcowej dołączyła do wystawy GG-SUW jako lokalny artysta. W dbałości o płynność komunikacji, wystawa została zaprojektowana z myślą o potrzebach różnych odbiorców: prace zostały wykonane różnymi technikami – były i performansy, i instalacje, i interwencje. Wyzwaniem było wkomponowanie wystawy w przestrzeń zastaną i nie ingerowanie w charakter PRL-owskiego mieszkania. Można ją było zwiedzać na cztery sposoby: — korzystając z mapki oraz opisów umieszonych przy pracach — w trakcie zorganizowanych spacerów po okolicy i mieszkaniu — dzięki kodom QR przenosząc się na bloga — korzystając z pomocy przewodników sztuki i artystów przebywających w mieszkaniu podczas specjalnie zaplanowanych dyżurów towarzyszących godzinom otwarcia. 76


Intensywny czas z mieszkańcami, artystami i licznymi przyjaciółmi SUW-u zaowocował wieloma refleksjami ku kolejnym przemianom. Ilość osób, które odwiedziły wystawę przekroczyła najśmielsze oczekiwania. Wiele opinii od różnych grup odbiorców inspiruje do kreowania nowych pomysłów i postaw dla kolejnych przestrzeni. Najważniejszym efektem działań jest wymiana i dialog. W zamian za zaufanie, które otrzymaliśmy, mieszkańcy otrzymali od artystów – dedykowane właśnie im – projekty: „Czekając na windę” Krzysztofa Bryły oraz „Pranie brudów. Welcome” Karoliny Balcer i Kingi Krzymowskiej. Prace do dziś znajdują się na klatce schodowej przy ul. Górnickiego 4 we Wrocławiu, gdzie można je zobaczyć. Ta sytuacja nauczyła nas wzajemnego szacunku do pracy i czasu, który został zainwestowany we wspólne działanie. Za każdym razem, kiedy pojawiamy się przy kamienicy, mieszkańcy chcą rozmawiać i pytają, gdzie teraz „działamy”. Pani Ania wciąż rysuje; czasami można ją spotkać przy wrocławskiej Katedrze, inspiruje się architekturą. Podwórko zarządzane przez spółkę Wrocławskie Mieszkania doczekało się projektu planu przebudowy i dostosowania infrastruktury do potrzeb lokalnych. Proces przemiany trwa.

77


DAGMARA DOMAGAŁA

PIERWSZY KONKURS NAJLEPSZYCH DYPLOMÓW SZTUKI MEDIÓW

Publiczne uczelnie artystyczne z ośmiu polskich miast (Krakowa, Warszawy, Łodzi, Poznania, Katowic, Wrocławia, Gdańska i Szczecina) połączyły siły pod patronatem Ministerstwa Kultury i Dziedzictwa Narodowego. Postanowiono wyodrębnić sztukę mediów, jako progresywny choć niedookreślony obszar zainteresowania młodych twórców, i pokazać ją w ramach 16. Biennale Sztuki Mediów WRO 2015. Powstała niekonwencjonalna wystawa dyplomowa, wyeksponowana niezależnie i poza środowiskiem akademickim. „Media”, które znaleźć można w prezentowanych pracach nie zawsze są oczywiste. Zdają się wypadkową kilku, jeśli nie kilkunastu różnych warsztatów, których elementy przenikają się. Są niejako wytrychem do kreatywnej pracy twórczej, testem rozpraszającym ekspozycję i przełamującym zazwyczaj linearną narrację wystaw i konkursów dyplomowych. Z perspektywy czasu, to pierwszy, choć niewielki i bardzo cichy krok w przełamaniu konwencji myślenia o tego typu wydarzeniach artystycznych. WRO 2015 Test Exposure stało się polem do eksperymentu. Absolwenci szkół artystycznych zostali wystawieni wraz z artystami o niejednokrotnie ustabilizowanej już pozycji. Nie wszystkim udało się to udźwignąć, jakkolwiek dyplomy Natalii Balskiej, Aleksandry Trojanowskiej i Justyny Orłowskiej mogły dzięki temu rozwinąć skrzydła i dać się zauważyć w przestrzeni wystawy jako autonomiczne i dojrzałe dzieła, które przy okazji wzięły udział w konkursie na najlepszy dyplom.

78


Natalia Balska, B-612 Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Krakowie, Wydział Intermediów opieka: prof. Artur Tajber (Pracownia Sztuki Performans, Katedra Metod Sztuki) + dr hab. Grzegorz Biliński, prof. Marek Chołoniewski (Katedra Obszarów Sztuki) nagroda w Pierwszym Konkursie Najlepszych Dyplomów Sztuki Mediów (ex aequo) Instalacja interaktywna nie z tej planety przywodząca na myśl cyberpunkowy remake Małego Księcia. Sztuczne Sieci Neuronowe o imionach Jamie i Joey, korzystające z dwóch różnych algorytmów, utrzymują przy życiu mniej lub bardziej anonimową roślinę zapewniając jej dostateczny dobowy dopływ wody. Natalia Balska stworzyła zaawansowany projekt badający współzależność dwóch organizmów: żywej rośliny i wirtualnego systemu A.I. Nie czujemy doliny niesamowitości, ponieważ Mali Książęta z B-612 nie silą się na organiczny mimesis, zachowując prostą formę elektronicznej konstrukcji. Komputer zbiera dane i podejmuje działania. Sieć neuronowa posiada umiejętność uczenia się, zapamiętywania akcji wpływających pozytywnie na stan rośliny monitorowany przez niezależną aparaturę. Sieci neuronowe mogą się rozwijać, tylko jeśli roślina się rozwija. Jednak oba byty nie są świadome swojego istnienia. B-612 jest światem pośredniczącym między dwoma organizmami żyjącymi w dwóch różnych rzeczywistościach: realnie i wirtualnie. Liczba bodźców jest ograniczona do minimum. Na tej planecie nie ma wulkanów, baobabów ani baranka. Refleksja estetyczna ustępuje głębokim problemom filozoficznym, które płyną z pracy. Balska, uzależniając od siebie roślinę i komputer w jednym połączonym systemie, tworzy coś w rodzaju hybrydy dwóch współzależnych organizmów. Daleko im jeszcze do formy cyborgicznej, ale zdecydowanie B-612 wykracza poza osiągnięcia współczesnej agrotechnologii. Jamie i Joey wchodzą z rośliną w interakcję tworząc jeden zamknięty system. Ich przetrwanie i rozwój zależą od utrzymania organizmu w dobrym stanie. Woda jest ich wspólnym zasobem i SSN musi wyuczyć się kompromisu pozwalającego przeżyć obojgu. Immersyjność tego love story polega na prostej zależności. Jeśli roślina umrze, Jamie i Joey zapomną o wszystkim. B-612 uchyla się od generalizacji i znacznie wychodzi poza tendencyjny narcyzm artystów młodego pokolenia. Jej uniwersalność jest trudna, ale niezaprzeczalna. Balska ucieleśnia idee znane z książek Dicka i w akcie kreacji staje się wręcz demiurgiem swojej małej planety. Jej sztuka jest ekspansywna, reprezentuje ewolucyjny pogląd mcluhanowskiej teorii przedłużania zmysłów i wprowadzania sztuki w obszary naukowego mistycyzmu.

79


Marta Mielcarek, Inwersja Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Warszawie, Wydział Sztuki Mediów opieka: dr Prot Jarnuszkiewicz (aneks do dyplomu: prof. Mirosław Bałka, Pracownia Działań Przestrzennych) nagroda w Pierwszym Konkursie Najlepszych Dyplomów Sztuki Mediów (ex aequo) Dwukanałowa instalacja wideo konfrontuje ze sobą dwa pozornie identyczne obrazy. Zmultiplikowana postać kobiety odarta jest z tożsamości. Chodź posiada płeć, to nie posiada żadnych znaków szczególnych. Ubrana jak na szkolnym apelu jest skromna i neutralna, jednak spod spodu przebija niepokojące skojarzenie z przaśnymi dziećmi z Białej wstążki Hanekego. Obraz numer jeden daje sygnał, obraz numer dwa odpowiada. Ten synchroniczny dialog gestów usytuowany jest gdzieś na pograniczu sportowych igrzysk, pierwszomajowego pochodu i antycznej tragedii. Bo oto stoi przed widzem uwspółcześniony chór grecki. Do tego podwójny. Tytułowa inwersja odbywa się na wielu poziomach odbioru i interpretacji. Koryfeusz nie jest przewodnikiem. Zespół jest tak naprawdę solistą. Wszystko nam się rozjeżdża i rozpływa w rozprawie o jednostkowej tożsamości, która ginie w masie zbiorowego naśladownictwa. Nie ma jednostki, nie ma zbiorowości. Mamy kombinacje klawiszy Ctrl+c i Crtl+v, które produkują kopię za kopią jak w jakimś totalitarnym koszmarze. Co więcej, artystka zapożycza gesty kulturowo oczywiste. Ksiądz, policjant, dyrygent i stewardessa stają się narzędziem jej wyimaginowanego reżimu. Chór u Mielcarek jest jak u Ajschylosa i Nietzschego: jest niebezpiecznym narzędziem demaskującym kłamstwo pozornej rzeczywistości, ma urealnić bohatera i jego tragedię, zaszczepić w widzach poczucie wspólnoty, ujednolicić myślenie i uwolnić dionizyjskie nastroje. Inwersja jest spektaklem do bólu przerysowującym wewnętrzne rozdarcie autorki w poszukiwaniu jej własnej tożsamości. Ja definiuję zbiorowość – powie – w tym samym stopniu, co zbiorowość definiuje mnie. Unifikacja niesie poczucie bezpieczeństwa, może jednak obudzić estetyczny sprzeciw. Marsz, oklaski, ćwiczenia werbalne – wszystko w naiwnej estetyce perfekcyjnego unisono. Ruch na obrazie przypomina lot kart w Windowsie po wygranej w pasjansa. Chciałoby się, żeby nagle któraś z tych martwych figur popełniła błąd i złamała szyk. Nic się jednak nie przesuwa i nie psuje. Raj dla perfekcjonisty. Piekło dla kogoś, kto pominie skomplikowany i analityczny koncept Inwersji. Karina Madej, Sztuka zżycia Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Łodzi, Wydział Sztuk Wizualnych opieka: dr Artur Chrzanowski (Pracownia Fotografii) + prof. Wiesław Karolak (Pracownia Intermediów)

80


Trzy obrazy nakręcone kamerą 8 mm z charakterystycznym brudem na błonie pojawiają się i znikają. Droga, opuszczony szpital, upiorne mieszkanie, suknia ślubna wisząca na karniszu. Nielinearna narracja, kręcenie z ręki, wszystko wprowadza w stan przytłaczającego niepokoju. Obrazy przenikają się, dni płyną sennie, a dramat wyczuwa się właśnie w tej powolnej linii prowadzenia widza przez obraz. Instalację dopełniają trzy zdjęcia kreślące kontekst przygnębiających wideo. Wujek, dla którego w wyniku wypadku zatrzymał się czas. Madej dokonuje czegoś w rodzaju auto-arteterapii, przepracowując rodzinną traumę w procesie planowania i kształtowania dzieła sztuki. Wyrywa obrazy z pamięci, która obsesyjnie powraca do tych samych motywów. Madej nie boi się obudzić demonów, jednak stany emocjonalne płynące z pracy są czytelne tylko i wyłącznie dla samej autorki. Odbiorca widzi estetyczny wynik procesu zabliźniania ran. Artystka na swoim blogu relacjonuje krok po kroku postępy prac, ewolucję konceptu, tworzy archiwum zdjęć. Na piedestale stawia życie, które przetrwało, ale w okaleczonej formie. Sztuka zżycia to intymny dziennik „zżycia”, ale i „z życia”. Nie jest to jednak koncepcja sztuki totalnej, jakiej hołdował Fluxus. Nie ma w niej dziecięcej radości, nie jest to sztuka amatorska i wolna, pozbawiona ograniczeń i znosząca bariery potocznego myślenia o sztuce. Proza życia została przekuta w sztukę, nie odwrotnie. Sztuka zżycia pokazuje tego życia ograniczenia, stając się dokumentem i świadectwem czyjegoś losu. Madej oddaje głos wujowi znosząc tabu osamotnienia i zachęcając widza do wojeryzmu o wątpliwym statusie etycznym. Tomasz Koszewnik, Lucid dream Uniwersytet Artystyczny w Poznaniu, Pracownia Audiosfera opieka: prof. dr hab. Leszek Knaflewski (as. Daniel Koniusz) Pytanie o czystość intencji artystycznych jest pułapką na odbiorcę. Rozbudowana instalacja Koszewnika rozpoczyna się od upozorowanej egzotycznej plaży. Tło fotograficzne zachęca do przyłączenia się do mistyfikacji i wciągnięcia w filozoficzny labirynt, o którym nie ma się pojęcia. Scenografia prowokuje do zrobienia zdjęcia. Tym samym Koszewnik zwraca uwagę na metody perswazyjne w sztuce, na wszelkie środki i zabiegi mające zdobyć przychylność odbiorcy i na jego zakłopotanie z tym związane. Cyniczna kompozycja ustawiona w przestrzeni międzynarodowej wystawy ma uprawomocnić status dzieła sztuki. Wywieszony dyplom uzyskania tytułu uczelni artystycznej tym bardziej. Czy jednak aby na pewno widz tak łatwo daje się do tego przekonać? Przy Lucid dream powstaje pytanie, czy mamy tutaj do czynienia z demistyfikacją naiwnego odbiorcy, czy autodemistyfikacją naiwnego twórcy, który za pomocą najprostszych sztuczek retorycznych próbuje odbiorcę przekonać, że nie-sztuka zaiste jest sztuką. Kto w tym momencie 81


ma moc nadawania znaczeń? A wydawałoby się, że debata strukturalizm vs. postmodernizm już dawno jest za nami. Sarkastyczny konceptualizm odsłania się wraz z esejem, który towarzyszy ekspozycji. Cytowani Montaigne, Arendt, Derrida i Platon nie pochylają się jednak w żaden sposób nad tytułem, który może poprowadzić w inne obszary refleksji. Lucid dream (ang. świadome śnienie) pojawia się w tekstach kultury jako element podświadomości mającej realny wpływ na życie śniącego. Stan świadomego snu jest doświadczeniem indywidualnym i indywidualnie postrzeganym. Zachowanie klarowności myślenia nawet w fazie REM wpływa na możliwość kontrolowania treści własnych snów. Więc swego rodzaju kłamstwo i automanipulacja naszego umysłu stają się próbą zamaskowania niewygodnej prawdy. Być może pod tym względem, według mechanizmów podwójnego zaprzeczenia, Lucid dream próbuje być maską, która uwypukli miałkość i momentami absurdalną konceptualność sztuki współczesnej. Alicja Boncel, WiktorJa Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Katowicach, Wydział Artystyczny Pracownia Interpretacji Literatury opieka: prof. Grzegorz Hańderek Tym, co nas ogranicza, są przede wszystkim granice naszej wyobraźni, przynajmniej do pewnego stadium rozwoju – nieskrępowanej i wyjątkowo silnej. W dzieciństwie znosi się więcej absurdu i nie poddaje mu się tak łatwo. WiktorJa jest demiurgiem nonsensu. Gra na skrzypcach kozie i ogrodową konewką podlewa kłosy pszenicy. Nie wiemy kim jest, więc może być każdym z nas. A każdy z nas chciałby wrócić do niczym nieskrępowanej wolności i dziecięcej swobody, by na chwilę zapomnieć o cyklu życia i unurzać się w beztroskim absurdzie. W zielonym pokoju oswajamy się zatem ze śmiercią. W krainie, w której śmierci nie ma albo przynajmniej, gdzie traktuje się ją z dziecięcą swadą. WiktorJa jest entomologiem i strażnikiem kwiatów. Morduje żuki i inne szkodniki, a potem przypina je w gablocie wśród stołów prosektoryjnych i gumowych rękawiczek. Sielska atmosfera fraszek Kochanowskiego, którą widzimy na wideo jest skontrastowana z otaczającymi je instalacjami. Wypadające mleczaki, spreparowane insekty i dziwna aparatura w swoim absurdalnie kolorowym wymiarze oswajają życie ze śmiercią. Zabawna forma maskuje ten upiorny zabiegowo wydźwięk, popychając odbiorców w coraz bardziej absurdalne skojarzenia.

82


Aleksandra Trojanowska, Pytania na wszystkie odpowiedzi Akademia Sztuk Pięknych im. Eugeniusza Gepperta we Wrocławiu Wydział Grafiki i Sztuki Mediów opieka: prof. Wiesław Gołuch (ad. Maja Wolińska, as. Jakub Jernajczyk) Pracownia Perswazji Medialnej (aneks: Pracownia Fotomediów, pod opieką prof. Andrzeja Batora) Autorka pośrednio przybliża sylwetkę swojego cierpiącego na autyzm brata. Nie ma go jednak w materiale wideo, nie usłyszymy jego głosu. Pytania na wszystkie odpowiedzi są pracą o jego nieograniczonej wręcz kreatywności słowotwórczej i wyjątkowej komunikacji ze światem, obalającą tym samym mit o przygnębiająco niemym charakterze tej choroby. Trzy niebieskie ekrany reprezentują świat zewnętrzny. Przesuwa się po nich cień, czemu towarzyszy dźwięk fraz powtarzanych mimowolnie w echolalii. Bez zbędnego patosu można abstrakcyjnie spojrzeć na świat oczami brata autorki, usłyszeć i poznać jego sposób porozumiewania się i przełamywania bariery komunikacyjnej będącej jednym z objawów choroby. Praca próbuje wskazać zmysłowe ograniczenia i zagubienie w świecie pełnym bodźców. Nie jest to jednak pokazane poprzez banał i dosłowność. Trojanowska podejmuje bardzo trudny temat w sposób indywidualny i wrażliwy. Nie jest to cudowna historia jak z Rain Mana, lecz spójny obraz rodzinnego poświęcenia i bezwarunkowej miłości pokazanej nie wprost, ukrytej za wymyśloną przez Trojanowską symboliką. Pytania na wszystkie odpowiedzi to praca, która wymaga namysłu i przypatrzenia się przede wszystkim słowom, które obiektywizują się w formie zadrukowanych nimi książek i luźnych fraz niejako porozrzucanych dookoła ekspozycji. Dotykanie słów nabiera w tym kontekście zupełnie nowego znaczenia. Justyna Orłowska, Postrzyżyny Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Gdańsku, Wydział Rzeźby i Intermediów Pracownia Działań Transdyscyplinarnych opieka: prof. Grzegorz Klaman Włosy niosą w sobie potężny ładunek znaczeń. Ich obcięcie jest aktem symbolicznym mającym w naszym rodzimym odniesieniu cechy rytuału przejścia, z historii znanym jako rytuał zarezerwowany dla młodych chłopców. W pracy Orłowskiej postrzyżynom poddaje się kobieta i to o wiele starsza od piastowskich ziemowitów. Wideo pokazuje, jak dziewczyna wyrywa z ziemi dwumetrowy korzeń splątany z włosów, zwierzęcej sierści i trawy. Z jednej strony jest on dowodem przymierza trzech różnych gatunków, z drugiej, zupełnie odwraca naturalny porządek. Włos zdaje się najbardziej reprezentatywnym materiałem zawierającym ludzkie DNA. Splątanie włosów z sierścią i trawą ma wymiar transgresyjny. Kołtun jest synonimem 83


nieczystości rasowej czy klasowej. Orłowska próbuje przekroczyć granicę pomiędzy naturą a kulturą, tworząc coś na kształt hybrydy splątanej w jedną organiczną masę. Powstaje korzeń, który jest symbiozą trzech zamkniętych dotychczas dla siebie światów. Korzeń, który stanie się źródłem czegoś nowego, będąc jednocześnie symptomem przeszłości, którą wraz z jego odcięciem należy porzucić. W tej posthumanistycznej idei kryje się również wymiar czysto ludzki. Powrót do korzeni jest powrotem do tradycyjnego obrzędu, do ludowej melodii o Jasieńku i białym płótnie, powrotem na kolanach na łono natury. Symboliczne odcięcie korzenia jest wyjściem w nieznane, wyjściem spod kurateli matki i narażeniem się na niepewne niespodzianki przyszłości. Przewartościowanie problemu na stronę kobiecą może być feministyczne, ale jest również bogate w znaczenia i obrazy. Obcięcie długich włosów przez kobietę jest elementem rozstawania się z przeszłością, poszukiwania nowej tożsamości. Obcięcie włosów symbolizuje siłę i niezależność – w przeciwieństwie do samsonowej męskiej słabości. Orłowska w Postrzyżynach jest sobą. Performans ma wymiar transgresyjny również dla autorki, która zmaga się z wizją wkroczenia w dorosłe życie. Ręce matki odcinają korzeń. Do przeszłości nie ma już powrotu. Na szczęście odcięty kołtun można zabrać ze sobą. Rafał Żarski, Układ zamknięty Akademia Sztuki w Szczecinie, Pracownia Działań Multimedialnych opieka: prof. Agata Michowska + prof. Wojciech Łazarczyk Układ zamknięty jest ironicznym dokamerowym performansem wykraczającym poza błahość codzienności. Badanie domowej audiosfery z zaciętością inżyniera z NASA. Artysta zapisuje dźwiękowy krajobraz swojego mieszkania i pokazuje swoje aktualne położenie zielonym lokalizatorem na rzucie przestrzeni. Żarski poprzez swój swobodny dystans i za pomocą prostych środków podnosi banał do rangi zjawiska godnego zainteresowania. Z wyczuciem godnym realizacji Bruszewskiego prezentuje prozę życia, nie przypisując jej żadnych wyższych celów i szczególnych właściwości. Budzi widza z rutyny niedostrzegania świata rzeczy nas otaczających.

84


KRZYSZTOF DIX

DOKĄD JEDZIE DYWAN?

Vincent Voillat zatytułował swą pracę Tapis roulants i gestem tym otworzył semantyczny sezam. W najbardziej podstawowym znaczeniu „tapis” to dywan, zaś „roulant” to „przesuwny, ruchomy, dający się przemieścić dzięki przymocowanym kółkom”. Na tym jednak nie koniec. Istnieje w języku francuskim wyrażenie, jakiego użył artysta – „tapis roulant” – tyle że oznacza ono coś, czego nie zobaczymy w jego instalacji; chodzi bowiem o „ruchomy chodnik” (niekiedy zwany też „trottoir roulant”) i „bieżnię treningową”. Zakres znaczeniowy słowa „roulant” nie wyczerpuje się w byciu synonimem „mobile” i można je przetłumaczyć jeszcze jako „zabawny” czy „pocieszny”; ponadto „krzyżowy ogień” to „feu roulant”, „kapitał obrotowy” – „fonds roulants”, a jako rzeczownik „un roulant” nazywa „członka załogi obsługującej pociąg czy autobus”. „Tapis roulant” kojarzy się też – i rymuje – z „tapis volant”: „latającym dywanem”. To zaś kieruje już gdzieś w stronę Bliskiego Wschodu oraz Księgi tysiąca i jednej nocy i nie jest to kierunek całkiem błędny, bo Voillat przenosi odbiorcę na ulice Kairu. Na instalację składają się zarejestrowane dźwięki jakiejś ruchliwej arterii egipskiej stolicy oraz pasiaste, barwne, napełniane powietrzem worki, które – jak przeczytać możemy w opisie pracy – są pokrowcami samochodowymi przywiezionymi z Egiptu przez artystę. Jako że – z racji swojego przeznaczenia – kształtem przypominają samochód, a wrocławska ekspozycja pomyślana jest tak, że zajmuje miejsca na jednym z parkingów Domu Handlowego Renoma, wrażenie, jakie sprawiają jest nieco nadrealne – jednocześnie pasują tam i nie pasują, zdają się być na właściwym miejscu, choć przecież tak nie jest; mogą budzić konsternację niewtajemniczonych klientów Renomy, ale trudno przecież o bardziej naturalne i stosowne miejsce dla pokrowca samochodowego niż parking. Podobnie jest z dźwiękową instalacją – przez ułamek sekundy można dać się zwieść wrażeniu, że odgłosy nie pochodzą z głośników, a dobiegają z zewnątrz. Dopiero wówczas, gdy zaskoczeni ich natężeniem i żywą zgiełkliwością, 85


uświadamiamy sobie ich źródło, zaczynamy się w nie wsłuchiwać, chcąc dociec skąd faktycznie pochodzą, gdzie mogły być nagrane – strzępy charakterystycznej mowy, nawoływań, śpiew muezina każą domyślać się krajów arabskich. Przy innych o wiele bardziej zaawansowanych technologicznie pracach pokazywanych na WRO, Tapis roulants są pomyślane raczej skromnie – zapis dźwiękowy i trzy pokrowce rozdymające się do kształtu samochodu, to wszystko. Autor nazwał ją „snami (czy też marzeniami) samochodów”, kolory pokrowców miały – w jego intencji – kojarzyć się z barwami typowymi dla Kairu, a rytm, w jakim pompowane jest do nich powietrze – odpowiadać regularności oddechu. Instalacja jest efektowna, choć unika spektakularności, ale ta efektowność, pozwalająca czerpać z jej oglądania i słuchania estetyczną satysfakcję, skrywa enigmatyczność jej wymowy. Wieloznaczny tytuł wskazuje na możliwą mnogość wykładni dzieła. Nie będzie zbyt śmiałym założyć, że istnieje analogia między tytułowym dywanem i pokrowcami, ale czemu nazywać je „roulants”, a nie na przykład „respirants”? Ani się nigdzie nie toczą, ani nie działają na zasadzie taśmy przesuwnej, jak w elektrycznej bieżni… Czyżby więc chodziło po prostu o „pocieszne dywany”? Ich wygląd, przypominający wielkie dziecięce zabawki, wcale tego nie wyklucza, ale ich kształt i pierwotna funkcja mogą zasadnie nasuwać tłumaczenie „jadące dywany”. Tytuł, najzręczniej nawet odczytany i przełożony, nie jest kluczem do odczytania pracy, ale jeszcze jednym z jej aspektów. Jednym z możliwych tropów interpretacyjnych jest trop kontemplacyjno-turystyczny, w którym instalacja jawi się jako refleksyjne odbicie wrażeń, jakie Voillat-rezydent wyniósł z egipskiej stolicy w 2014 roku. Drugi trop jest polityczny – on nastręcza więcej problemów, bo o czym też miałyby informować klientów wrocławskiej Renomy pasiaste samochody z tkaniny i powietrza oraz dźwięki obcej ulicy? Czym ma być dla nich zanurzenie się w iluzorycznej przestrzeni Kairu, gdzie dźwięki rozlegają się nie wiadomo skąd, a samochody są lekkie, puste i czułe na dotyk? Nie umiem na to pytanie odpowiedzieć z taką pewnością siebie jak Dominique Moulon, który stwierdził, że Tapis roulants mają wrocławianom uświadomić, iż „Europa, aby nadal mogła się rozwijać, nieuchronnie będzie musiała ściślej współpracować z krajami południa basenu Morza Śródziemnego”1, uwieńczając tę wypowiedź wykrzyknikiem. Pewne jest jednak, że artysta, każąc odbiorcy znaleźć się na niewidzialnej ulicy odległego miasta, które staje się nagle nadzwyczaj bliskie, kieruje jego uwagę na kraj, którego bieżących losów nie sposób w Europie ignorować. Nie pierwszy raz Voillat sięga po audiosferę jako środek wyrazu artystycznego; nie pierwszy też raz wykorzystuje inspirację kairską. W 2008 roku brał udział w przedsięwzięciu Sound Delta, w ramach którego 30 artystów nagrywało dźwięki z otoczenia i tworzyło z nich kompozycje. Takie działanie odpowiada jego ogólniejszym zainteresowaniom, w których na pierwszy plan wysuwa się związek ludzi, rzeczy materialnych i niematerialnych, i przestrzeni – tak miejskiej jak, nazwijmy ją, naturalnej (na stronie autora można obejrzeć film Kiitos zrealizowany

86


w okolicach podbiegunowych). W ten nurt silnie wpisują się prace artysty związane z jego pobytem w egipskiej stolicy: pierwszą była antena satelitarna wyrzeźbiona w wapieniu, z którego budowano piramidy (Kamienne anteny satelitarne nr 1, Kair); drugą, Betonowe fale, pamiątka rewolucji będąca tyle politycznym komentarzem, co wykorzystaniem estetycznego potencjału murów ochronnych zbudowanych po wydarzeniach w 2012 roku. Jej koncept zasadzał się na wykonaniu alabastrowych figurek w kształcie wygiętej płyty o falistym kształcie, z których były wznoszone mury. W tym kontekście Tapis roulants byłyby trzecim ogniwem kairskiego tryptyku, w którym atrakcyjna wizualnie forma jest sprzężona z jednej strony z czymś namacalnym i konkretnym, a z drugiej – z abstrakcyjną ideą. W przypadku pierwszego dzieła impulsem twórczym był widok dziesiątek anten, zwróconych – jak kwiaty do słońca – w tym samym kierunku oraz, towarzysząca ludziom od zarania, idea komunikowania się z niebem; w drugim przypadku, widok porewolucyjnych rozwiązań w dziedzinie bezpieczeństwa został zderzony z turystyczną potrzebą posiadania pamiątki; w trzecim rzecz wydaje się najbardziej złożona i najmniej jasna – niematerialny dźwięk przypisany jednej przestrzeni zostaje porwany w zupełnie inną, zaś obiekt materialny – pokrowiec – utracił swe przeznaczenie i zamiast pełnić swoistą rolę służebną względem samochodu, próbuje nim być – co więcej, zanimizowanym, sprawiającym wrażenie, że oddycha. Wszystko ucieka z dala od powszedniego kontekstu, ale jest w tym jakiś spokój, zgoda, nawet coś, zgodnie z tytułem „roulant” – „zabawnego”. Wrocławianin w Renomie na moment staje się takim kairczykiem, jak pokrowiec samochodem, ale chwila tej ułudy, dziwnego zawieszenia, pozwala na odczucie uniwersalnej sympatii, tego, że wszystko – rzeczy, przestrzenie, dźwięki, myśli – nie są zaklęte w kamień, ale mogą się wzajemnie przenikać, zamieniać rolami, oderwawszy uprzednio od zwyczajnego położenia.

1

D. Moulon, La biennale WRO, „Artpress”, 2015, 3 czerwca, http://www.artpress.com/2015/06/03/la-biennale-wro/, [dostęp: 14 czerwca 2015].

87


KRZYSZTOF PERZYNA SIMULACRA

Simulacra, instalacja Kariny Śmigła-Bobińskiej, prezentowana na wystawie WRO 2015 w nowym gmachu Biblioteki Uniwersyteckiej we Wrocławiu, to optyczno-fizyczna, eksperymentalna instalacja, w której artystka stara się zbudować most między technologią a filozofią percepcji. Praca składa się z czterech monitorów LCD, zamontowanych na wysokości oczu dorosłego odbiorcy, skomponowanych na wzór light-boxa, pozbawionego górnej i dolnej podstawy. Wychodzące – jakby z wnętrza – zwoje kabli z zamontowanymi głośnikami, routerami oraz innymi urządzeniami do sterowania zasilaniem łączą monitory z podłogą i dynamizują kompozycję. Dodatkowo, przymocowane do nich na subtelnych łańcuszkach zwisające lupy nadają trop oglądającemu. „Zapalone” monitory ukazują światło jako główne medium, którym w pracy posługuje się Śmigła-Bobińska. Lśniące ekrany użyte w instalacji zostały bowiem pozbawione jednej warstwy polaryzacyjnej, która umożliwia odbiorcy zobaczenie pełnego obrazu. Przykłądając lupę do oka, można zobaczyć, jak na monitorze maluje się obraz; obraz postaci „zamkniętej” w swoistym ekranowym akwarium: postać ta wychodzi z mlecznej bieli, z pustego miejsca. Pojawiające się od czasu do czasu stopy, dłonie, czy kontrastujące, czarne włosy stają się widoczne tylko wówczas, kiedy niejako „dotykają” ekranu od wewnątrz. Potrzebny jest zatem zarówno bezpośredni kontakt widza z instalacją, jak i kontakt aktora z ekranem. Co ciekawe, kontakt odbiorcy uzależniony jest tylko od jego woli, natomiast kontakt osoby „wewnątrz” z ekranem jest krótkotrwały, części ciała pojawiają się w bardzo ulotny sposób, przypływając i odpływając z pola naszego widzenia. Kontakt wzrokowy nie następuje. Optyczne ograniczenie przez cztery ściany monitorów powoduje, że postać sprawia wrażenie uwięzionej w wirtualnym niebycie, pragnie wyjść 88


z multimedialnego akwarium i stać się rzeczywistą. Jej ruchy są płynne, swobodne, a całość projekcji przypomina badanie USG płodu w technice 3D tuż przed porodem. Na stronie internetowej Biennale WRO czytamy: „Aranżacja wchodzi głęboko w dyskurs przedmiotu i oglądu, obrazu i rzeczywistości. Tworzy świadomość kultury wizualnej, przestrzeni wirtualnej i procesu jej wyobrażenia. Wszyscy w naszych światach poruszamy się w ciągłej interakcji miedzy wewnętrznymi i zewnętrznymi obrazami siebie. Wirtualność i rzeczywistość są kwestią percepcji, a percepcja jest kwestią świadomości”. Śmigła-Bobińska w swojej pracy wizualizuje problem nienamacalności wirtualnej przestrzeni. Posługuje się swojego rodzaju iluzją, opowiada o procesach towarzyszących wyobraźni. Według Słownika Wyrazów Obcych, „wyobraźnia” (imaginacja) to zdolność do tworzenia obrazów myślowych na wzór i podobieństwo rzeczywistych. Uzupełniłbym tę definicję o proces, który wymaga przygotowania. Człowiek musi przez chwilę istnieć tylko w swoim umyśle, odizolowany od większości bodźców, a wyczulony na te, które do siebie dopuści. Wprowadzanie umysłu w swoisty rezonans, trans, wybity rytmem może nie tylko dać możliwość stworzenia czegoś w samej jaźni, ale nawet modelować tę imaginację w zależności od projektanta, bodźca oraz interpretacji jego odbiorcy. Podobnie w instalacji Śmigła-Bobińskiej w zależności od kąta widzenia oraz perspektywy, obraz będzie się zmieniał – od rzeczywistego po – niemalże – negatyw, a przyłożenie dwóch szkieł spowoduje zakłócenia w odbiorze, dające efekt podobny do stereofotografii. Dodatkowo, Simulacra została opatrzona podwójną narracją. Jest skazana na obecność widza, a ta obecność wymaga interakcji. Posługując się światłem, obrazem i jego dyferencjami można dostrzec inspirację książką Światło obrazu Rolanda Barthesa. Może to być również odebrane jako subtelny komentarz do szaleństwa współczesnego społeczeństwa, pochłoniętego konsumowaniem wirtualnych obrazów, które nie pozostawia po sobie materialnego śladu. Wirtualna przestrzeń zdaje się coraz bardziej zastępować nam wyobraźnię, ponieważ znajduje się na podobnym poziomie „niebytu”. Rzeczywistość ta jest obecnie nierozerwalną częścią codzienności. Postać ukazana w wideo pragnie wyjść z nienamacalnego świata, stoi w opozycji do odbiorcy, który funkcjonuje w społeczeństwie dążącym do pełnej komputeryzacji, marząc o przeniesieniu się w digitalny świat pozbawiony limitów. Ten odbiorca czuje się niejako uwięziony w realnej przestrzeni. Fizyczny byt niesie za sobą różne ograniczenia, bycie on-line pozwala na wejście w nieograniczoną materię. W pracy Nicolaesa Maesa Podsłuchująca służąca nie mamy możliwości zajrzenia za namalowaną kurtynę. Śmigła-Bobińska pozwala na to przy pomocy „magicznej” lupy. Dzięki niej obraz staje się rzeczywisty, chociaż to nie lupa tworzy obraz – ten jest obecny na ekranie przez cały czas. Wirtualnym staje się to, czego nie widać – następuje odwrócenie sytuacji, w której „puste miejsca” w obrazie stają się symbolem rzeczywistego świata. 89


Kolejnym elementem wartym uwagi jest dźwięk. Sygnał transmitowany w czasie rzeczywistym z sondy kosmicznej jest jedynym komponentem dzieła, który nie uległ obróbce technicznej. To połączenie z natłokiem kabli, które – niczym dziko rosnący bluszcz – oplatają multimedialną instalację, staje się szczególnie istotne – przypominają dźwięki słyszane przez dziecko w łonie matki. Rytmizują oraz harmonizują pracę, nadając jej mistyczny charakter. Simulacra pozwala oglądającemu na bezpośrednie doświadczenie interakcji między magią obrazu i jego pojmowaniem w obliczu rzeczywistości wirtualnej. Widz może wejść w bezpośrednią relację z postacią na ekranie. Relacje między percepcją a imaginacją, obrazem i zobrazowaniem wzajemnie na siebie oddziałują, działając też na odbiorcę, skłaniając go do refleksji na temat rzeczywistości między pozorem a bytem.

90


ROGER MALINA KRYZYS W REPREZENTACJI DANYCH. W POSZUKIWANIU NOWYCH DRÓG EKSPLOROWANIA I PRZYSWAJANIA DANYCH

W obliczu tematu przewodniego konferencji WRO 2015: Co sztuka może zrobić dla nauki, mam twardy orzech do zgryzienia, ponieważ kompletnie się z tym pytaniem nie zgadzam. Nie wydaje mi się, by nauka była homogeniczna, i nie wydaje mi się, by sztuka była homogeniczna. Sądzę, że stoimy tu przed niebezpieczeństwem upraszczania ludzkiego doświadczenia i rozumienia rzeczy. Dlatego dzisiaj chciałabym zadać nieco inne pytanie: nie, co sztuka może zrobić dla nauki, ale jak sztuka może zmienić naukę. Jednym ze wspanialszych zjawisk, jakie miały miejsce w ostatnich 50 latach jest społeczność praktyki różnych dyscyplin powstała na całym świecie. Budowanie miejsc pozwala społeczności praktyki tworzyć i dzielić się wynikami swojej pracy. Zresztą, społeczność art & science w tym sensie jest nie tyle społecznością budującą miejsca, ile swoistą społecznością połączonych sieci – budującą miejsca tymczasowe, eksperymentującą, próbującą nowych pomysłów, zamykającą i otwierającą nowe miejsca. Jednym z takich miejsc jest magazyn Leonardo. Fascynuje mnie idea tworzenia miejsc; to, co robimy jest nie tyle wymyślaniem pomysłów, ile rozwijaniem miejsc, w których możemy je wymyślać. Na przykład, społeczność art & science zwraca się ostatnio z coraz większym zainteresowaniem w stronę tzw. inteligentnego rolnictwa (smart agriculture) – od miejskiego ogrodnictwa po kwestie związane ze zrównoważoną planetą. W tym kontekście chcę powiedzieć o kryzysie w reprezentacji. To rodzaj oczywistej prawdy, jeśli spojrzymy wstecz na 10 tysięcy lat ludzkiej historii. Sposób, w jaki reprezentujemy świat jest nieustannie zmieniającą się metodologią zarządzania technologiami, które pojawiały się i znikały, za każdym razem zmieniając nasz dotychczasowy sposób myślenia o rzeczach, 91


np. teleskop nie jest zwykłym urządzeniem służącym do powiększania obrazów; wynalezienie go zreorganizowało nasze myślenie o mikro- i makrowszechświecie – o tym, jaką jego część winniśmy, czy będziemy teraz reprezentować. Relacja między sztuką a technologią z jednej strony jest ścisła, ale z drugiej jest też ontologiczna, strukturalna, poznawcza. Wynalezienie technologii trójwymiarowej perspektywy także miało swoje głębokie społeczne skutki; system perspektywy wywarł wpływ na relację między widzem a światem dookoła, na to, jak jest ustrukturyzowany; odcisnął piętno na niemal każdym aspekcie myślenia o jednostce i otaczającym ją świecie. Odnoszę wrażenie, że znajdujemy się w centrum niezwykle ważnego okresu w dziejach ludzkości. Wszyscy mamy dostęp do danych. Istotnie, napływ danych dostępnych do naszego poznania rośnie, dane stały się nieodłączną częścią naszego życia. Nie mam pojęcia, w jaki sposób będziemy reprezentować świat za 20 lat ze względu na tempo zmian, które zachodzą. W 2011 roku obchodziliśmy 100 rocznicę urodzin Marshala McLuhana. McLuhan powiedział, że: „Nowe media nie są pomostem między człowiekiem a naturą, one są naturą”. Myślę, że łatwo dajemy się zwieść idei interfejsu, jak bardzo myląca to metafora. McLuhan mówił o „przesuwaniu granic tego, co prawdziwe”. Mówił też, że: „Połączenie z elektroniczną prędkością wszystkich funkcji społecznych i politycznych w nagłej implozji ogromnie zwiększyło ludzkie poczucie odpowiedzialności”. Często zapominamy o tym, jak przemiany reprezentacji redefiniują, kogo postrzegamy jako element społeczności, za kogo jesteśmy odpowiedzialni i jak działamy z tą odpowiedzialnością w świecie. Internet również nie jest etycznie neutralny. Pierwszy telefon komórkowy… Lata 90. To stamtąd wywodzą się terminy: „ciche technologie”, „rozproszone zmysły”, „media lokacyjne”. Dzisiaj nie ma już po nich śladu. A niektóre z ówczesnych marzeń zaczynają przeradzać się w koszmar. Jako istoty żywe mamy obowiązek gromadzić dane na temat naszego świata i środowiska, i dzielić się nimi. Mamy prawo do danych, które zostały o nas zebrane, i mamy obowiązek robić z nich użytek. Artyści wykorzystują dane na wiele sposobów. Chciałbym zaprezentować parę projektów zorientowanych wokół idei zapośredniczonych zmysłów. Nazywam ją „intymną nauką”. Pierwszym z nich są „Pływy” [Tide] Luke’a Jerrama do pomiaru zmian grawitacji w pomieszczeniach. Pewnie o tym nie wiecie, ale grawitacja w tej sali zmienia się co sekundę. Jerram zbudował proste urządzenie, pozwalające nam dosłownie „zobaczyć” grawitację. Wystarczy, że napełnimy naczynie wodą. W zależności od zmian grawitacji, będziemy mogli obserwować zmianę poziomu wody w naczyniu. Nasze ciało tego nie odczuje, ale „zobaczymy” to. Mając takie urządzenie w swoim pokoju, moglibyśmy też obserwować zmianę orbity Księżyca względem Ziemi, ponieważ ciała te powiązane są siłami grawitacji. Jerram jest także autorem instalacji „Pierwszy oddech” [First Breath], pokazywanej w Liverpoolu, polegającej na 92


tym, że za każdym razem, gdy w okolicy rodziło się dziecko, laser wypuszczał w niebo wiązkę światła. W ten sposób mogliśmy spojrzeć na wieczorne niebo i zobaczyć, gdzie właśnie urodziły się dzieci. Cóż za instynktowne doświadczenie! To właśnie nazywam „intymną nauką”; dane „wnikają pod skórę”, dotykają sfery osobistej. Mówiąc o reprezentacji danych w sztuce i nauce, chciałbym też powiedzieć o trzech punktach zwrotnych, jakie miały miejsce w sferze reprezentacji danych w ostatnich 20 czy 30 latach. W latach 90. „reprezentację” przestano nazywać „naukową ilustracją”, a zaczęto nazywać ją „naukową wizualizacją”. Pojawiło się przekonanie, że rzeczy nie będzie się już tylko ilustrować, że od teraz będzie się je wizualizować. Ta zmiana, to przesunięcie miały wpływ na to, która część naszego procesu poznawczego będzie teraz odgrywać główną rolę, jak teraz będziemy wizualizować rzeczy. „Wizualizacja informacji” szybko stała się nową dyscypliną. W ostatnich kilku latach także nauka oparta o dane kosmiczne i informatyka rozwinęły się w bardzo rozległy obszar badań. Od kilku lat mówi się o tzw. „deep learning”, czyli pogłębionym procesie systematyzacji metod ekstrahowania znaczeń z danych. W internecie krążą tysiące nowych modnych słów, takich jak: „mobilizacja danych”, czyli sposoby uzyskiwania potrzebnych nam danych i radzenia sobie z nimi, „narracje danych” (pojawiła się nowa profesja „opowiadacza” danych), „dramaturgia danych” (dane coraz częściej mają charakter przedstawieniowy). Żyjemy w epoce „kamienia łupanego danych”. W latach 90. historyk technologii Daniel Boorstin powiedział, że: „Uciekliśmy ze świata, który jest bogaty w znaczenie i biedny w dane do świata, który jest bogaty w dane, a biedny w znaczenie”. Jeśli pojedziemy do Darwin College, do Cambridge, to zobaczymy, że dane, które były potrzebne Darwinowi, by rozwinąć teorię ewolucji, mieszczą się na dwóch półkach. Darwin mógł je mieć w swoim salonie, mógł ich dotknąć, przeczytać. Jak trudno to zrozumieć! Boorstin twierdził, że więcej danych to nie tylko więcej danych; że ma to swoje głębokie konsekwencje epistemologiczne tego, jak rozumiemy rzeczy, jakie zmechanizowani obserwatorzy wprowadzili do ludzkiego poznania. Gdyby przedstawić prognozy, ile cyfrowych danych gromadzi się na naszej planecie, statystki byłyby bardziej przerażające niż zmiana klimatu. A mówimy o świecie, który zmienia się dwa razy szybciej niż klimat. Sensory danych zużywają obecnie jeszcze więcej energii. Gdyby zmierzyć zużycie energii w 2030 roku, byłoby to trochę przerażające. Obecnie uczestniczę w procesie budowania 1,5-gigapixelowego aparatu do teleskopu na Hawajach, który będzie obserwować niebo, obraz będzie dostępny dla wszystkich. W tym momencie mówimy już nie tyle o tym, ile danych dostanie się do ludzkiego oka w każdej sekundzie, my w nich po prostu będziemy. W bardzo realnym sensie nasze przetrwanie zależy teraz od danych dotyczących przestrzeni kosmicznej. W wielu dziedzinach dane są dobrem niezbędnym do przetrwania.

93


W momencie wejścia do atmosfery, staliśmy się – w jeszcze bardziej realnym sensie – kulturą danych. Istnieje wiele sposobów, w jakie naruszamy interfejs danych, np. nasze oczy nie widzą promieni X, ale potrafimy zrobić zdjęcie rentgenowskie i przekształcić je w światło widzialne – potrafimy rozszerzać nasze zmysły. Potrzebujemy nowych zmysłów. A jak stworzyć nowe zmysły? Ludzka ciekawość jest subiektywna – dane są obiektywne. Jako istoty ludzkie wyrażamy dane, nadajemy danym strukturę. Ciekawość jest kulturowa, nie każdy jest ciekawy w ten sam sposób; ciekawość jest społeczna, to jest to, co robimy teraz, słuchamy siebie nawzajem i wymieniamy myśli. Jest zbiorowa. O reprezentacji myślimy w zupełnie inny sposób niż naukowcy – dla nich ciekawość jest nieobiektywna, niewyrażona, nie ​​ jest kulturowa, społeczna, ani zbiorowa. Niedawno napisałem artykuł o nowej sublime w sztuce i nauce. Zaczynam rozumieć, że nowe emergencje są wynikiem tego, co nazywałem „nową humanistyką”. Wraz z historykiem sztuki Maxem Schichem, rozwijam kwestie społeczności napędzanych danymi, analityki kulturowej „twardej” nauki. Ludzie są przekształcani przez dane, a to dopiero początek zrozumienia, jak człowiek rozumie kulturę w tym nowym środowisku danych. Systemy reprezentacji mają fundamentalne znaczenie dla tego zrozumienia.

94


PIOTR WYRZYKOWSKI

APLIKACJE MOBILNE DO WYRAŻANIA WKURWIENIA

Jestem zaszczycony, że mogę wziąć udział w konferencji WRO 2015 – Hakowanie społecznego systemu operacyjnego – w takim gronie. Dało mi to bardzo dużo do myślenia. Zdałem sobie sprawę, że jako artysta od lat zajmuję się przecież hakowaniem. „Hakowanie” to według mnie przeniknięcie do systemu; przeniknięcie, którego celem jest tylko i wyłącznie przeniknięcie – nic więcej. Celem hakowania nie jest wykradzenie czegoś czy zepsucie, ale złamanie systemu, który – teoretycznie – wydaje się niemożliwy do złamania. Przenikać do systemu można na wiele sposobów. Ja, jako artysta, podejmowałem wiele mniej lub bardziej udanych prób tego typu, za każdym razem – co też ważne – starając się niwelować materialną stronę dzieła sztuki; tworzyć prace, które – najbardziej jak to możliwe – są pozbawione materialności, i uzyskiwać ich jak największą niewidzialność. Zależało mi, by pozbawiały nas one dystansu do siebie. W tym momencie możemy dojść do pewnego absurdu, że ludzie przestają być świadomi, że mają do czynienia z dziełem sztuki. I to, tak naprawdę, jest dla mnie ważne: być w otoczeniu danego projektu, a tak naprawdę nie zdawać sobie z tego sprawy… Zanim przejdę do tytułowej części swojej prezentacji, chciałbym przedstawić projekty, które doprowadziły do powstania najnowszej pracy, czyli aplikacji do wyrażania swojego gniewu. Pierwszą pracą jest projekt ze stycznia 2014 roku powstały na wystawę pt. Jestem Ukraińcem, strzelaj. Szkolenie ekstremistów, bo taki jest jej tytuł, nawiązuje bezpośrednio do stwierdzenia Putina, jakoby w Polsce były budowane obozy szkoleniowe dla ukraińskich ekstremistów. Zdecydowałem się wejść w pole tej wojny informacyjnej i wyprodukowałem własny fake news. Założyłem, że jeżeli takie szkolenia rzeczywiście miałyby miejsce, odbywałyby się 95


zapewne przez Skype’a. I taką też formę przyjęła moja praca. Stworzyłem podręcznik szkoleń z instruktażami, co robić w danej sytuacji, jak się zachowywać, organizować, jak i gdzie zdobywać wiadomości, by móc skutecznie przeciwstawiać się sile państwa, policji, armii… Kolejna praca miała za zadanie zmienić styl życia i rozmowy ze światem sztuki. W 1995 roku powstał Centralny Urząd Kultury Technicznej (CUKT) – grupa artystyczna, mająca formę niby-urzędu, z całym zapleczem przynależnym biurokracji, czyli pieczątkami, pismami, identyfikatorami. Stworzyliśmy go, bo chcieliśmy zmienić sposób prowadzenia rozmowy z instytucjami zajmującymi się sztuką. Przestaliśmy komunikować się jako indywidualni artyści, zrezygnowaliśmy ze swojej indywidualności na rzecz zbiorowej świadomości: korespondowaliśmy, wysyłając oficjalne pisma i faksy, przedstawiając się jako urzędnicy Centralnego Urzędu Kultury Technicznej, używając też zresztą nie nazwisk, a nickname’ów czy jakichś pseudonimów, i tak dalej. I, muszę przyznać, że odnieśliśmy sukces, ponieważ panie sekretarki od razu inaczej reagowały, słysząc, że dzwoni do nich Centralny Urząd Kultury Technicznej, a nie jakiś tam artysta (śmieję się). Następne projekty, o których chcę opowiedzieć, są autorstwa CUKT-u. Pierwszym z nich jest Czyn dla miasta Bytowa z 1996 roku. Zwróciliśmy się do prezydenta miasta Bytowa i dyrektora urzędu pracy o przydzielenie nam, jako urzędnikom Centralnego Urzędu, prac społecznych, które moglibyśmy wykonać dla mieszkańców miasta w ramach uruchomionego właśnie pilotażowo projektu dla osób bezrobotnych. Bytów był wtedy jednym z miast posiadających najwyższy procent osób bezrobotnych. Wysłaliśmy pismo i po jakimś czasie podpisaliśmy oficjalne porozumienie na prace remontowe turystycznych domków jednorodzinnych. Co ważne, ta praca była kompletnie tożsama z rzeczywistością, była praktycznie niezauważalna dla ludzi, którzy tam przychodzili i twierdzili, że „no, tu się nic nie dzieje, jacyś faceci remontują domy i tyle”. Tego typu strategie są teraz, oczywiście, normalne, ale w tamtym czasie, to nie było jeszcze tak popularne, tak czytelne. „Odegraliśmy” swoisty niewidzialny performans. Co ciekawe, doszło do zabawnej sprzeczki między nami a innymi bezrobotnymi z tego rejonu, z którymi pracowaliśmy, ponieważ oni twierdzili, że my za szybko pracujemy, że tak szybko pracować nie można i uczyli nas, jak pracować wolniej, częściej robić sobie przerwy… Innym projektem jest Dzień sztuki z 1999 roku, będący próbą zhakowania systemu edukacji. Zaproponowaliśmy liceum z Gdyni jednodniowy plan lekcji z przedmiotami, których chcielibyśmy uczyć. Jednocześnie wysłaliśmy oficjalne pismo do prezydenta Polski z propozycją umieszczenia w kalendarzu świąt Dnia Sztuki – 22 lutego, w którym artyści otwieraliby swoje pracownie, organizowano by różnego rodzaju wydarzenia… Było to bliskie temu, co dzisiaj nazywamy Nocą Muzeów, ale wtedy nie było tego typu myślenia. Ważne było to, że uczniowie, którzy przychodzili tego dnia do szkoły, o niczym nie wiedzieli, byli absolutnie zaskoczeni, że nagle zamiast geografii czy języka polskiego, mają wykłady z grafiki 3D, hipertekstu, wideo artu czy muzyki cyfrowej. 96


Kolejna praca to Cyborg’s Sex Manual – podręcznik dla cyborgów, mający pomóc im w zwiększeniu reakcji emocjonalnej. Impulsem do powstania tej pracy było nasze przeświadczenie, że cyborgi są wśród nas – że one, tak naprawdę, istnieją – oraz dyskusja, tocząca się w Polsce w 1999 roku, na temat edukacji seksualnej w szkołach. Projekt został merytorycznie zaakceptowany przez Radę Sztuki Ministerstwa Kultury i Sztuki RP w ramach systemu dofinansowania „August”. Chciałem, żeby ten CD-rom wszedł do szkół jako oficjalny podręcznik; oczywiście, do tego nie doszło. Po przejrzeniu interaktywnych materiałów przedstawiciela ministerstwa szkolnictwa stwierdził, że projekt nie spełnia warunków merytorycznych… Projektem, bez którego nie może obyć się żadne moje wystąpienie [sic!], jest kampania wyborcza kandydatki na Prezydenta Rzeczypospolitej Polski Wiktorii Cukt z lat 1999/2000, odbywająca się pod hasłem „Politycy są zbędni”. Wiktoria Cukt była interfejsem programu OSW – Obywatelskiego Software’u Wyborczego, umożliwiającemu wyborcom zgłaszanie doń swoich postulatów. Uważaliśmy, że polityków można spokojnie zastąpić takim wirtualnym tworem. Kampania trwała rok, odbywała się w większości polskich miast, ale też w Chicago i Berlinie, i odniosła ogromny sukces. Wywiady z Wiktorią pojawiły się w najważniejszych tytułach w Polsce i za granicą. Zbierając podpisy poparcia pod kandydaturą Wiktorii Cukt, odbiliśmy się o jedną ustawę, która wymaga, że kandydat na prezydenta w Polsce musi mieć PESEL… Zastanawialiśmy się nad zmianą nazwiska i operacją plastyczną, ale nie o to chodziło. Tak naprawdę wiele pomysłów, które miały miejsce podczas tej kampanii – oprócz zredukowania polityków – zostało zrealizowanych, na przykład „wiktoriomaty”, czyli takie infoboxy, powszechnie występujące teraz w urzędach, ułatwiające załatwienie różnych spraw, a wtedy umożliwiające kontakt z Wiktorią ludziom, którzy nie mieli dostępu do internetu. Niewątpliwie Wiktoria miała również wpływ na image Pierwszej Damy. Przechodząc do tytułowej części mojego wystąpienia, czyli aplikacji do wyrażania wkurwienia, chciałbym zaprezentować dwie aplikacje: Protest i Samospalenie. Zawsze starałem się, by moje projekty niczego nie udawały. Odnoszę wrażenie, że projekty, które do tej pory realizowałem, a które przed chwilą zaprezentowałem, ciągle, tak naprawdę, coś udawały… Doszedłem do wniosku, że chciałbym stworzyć narzędzie, które ma określoną funkcję, służy czemuś naprawdę. Takim narzędziem wydało mi się narzędzie do wyrażenia gniewu. Na początku powstała aplikacja Protest. Umożliwia ona nagranie krótkiego klipu wideo i umieszczenie go w sieci. Po naciśnięciu na wpisany przez nas slogan, aplikacja odeśle nas do zarejestrowanego przez nas materiału. Możemy „podłączyć się” pod dany protest – poprzeć go lub sprzeciwić się mu. Protesty posiadają określony „czas życia”, wyliczany na podstawie czterech wartości: ogólnej ilości protestów w systemie, czasu trwania danego protestu, ilości poparć i ilości sprzeciwów. Od tego zależy, jak długo dany protest będzie żył na „linii

97


protestów”. Aplikacja mobilna jest połączona ze stroną internetową, na której są dostępne wszystkie protesty w danym momencie tworzone. Samospalenie jest zdecydowanie bardziej „egoistyczną” aplikacją – do tworzenia złych selfie. Wystarczy napisać, co jest powodem naszego wkurwienia, lub wkleić link, a nastąpi nasze samospalenie. Aplikacja wygeneruje gif, który jest zapisywany, geolokalizowany i udostępniany innym do obejrzenia. Możemy się nim również podzielić w innych serwisach społecznościowych. Wierzę w siłę pojedynczego protestu i wierzę w siłę protestu pokojowego. To jest możliwe – systemy mogą upaść. Dziękuję.

98


JOANNA ZYLINSKA

SKAMIELINY JAKO MEDIA. FOTOGRAFIA PO WYGINIĘCIU

Co sztuka może zrobić dla geologii? W niniejszym eseju horyzont wymierania stanowi punkt odniesienia do refleksji nad ontologią i sprawczością fotografii. W poniższych rozważaniach zastanawiam się, co fotografia może zrobić ze światem i w świecie, na co może rzucić światło i jaką rolę światło odgrywa w rozpatrywaniu kwestii życia i śmierci na skalę całej planety. Tytułowa fraza „po wyginięciu”, zakorzeniona w geopolitycznej wrażliwości wyrażającej się w pojęciu „antropocenu” – geologicznej epoki, w której człowiek stał się podmiotem sprawczym, którego działalność niesie nieodwracalne skutki dla całej planety – nie ma kierować nas ku jakiemuś momentowi w przyszłości, gdy z powierzchni Ziemi znikną już różne gatunki, w tym gatunek narcystycznie nam najdroższy – my sami. Fraza ta wskazuje raczej na chwilę obecną, na czas, gdy wyginięcie, w taki czy inny sposób, zadomowiło się już w pojęciowym, wizualnym i doświadczeniowym horyzoncie większości mieszkańców świata. Wyginięcie będę więc traktować jako zaistniały fakt afektywny: coś, co przeczuwamy i wyobrażamy sobie tu i teraz1. Umieszczając problematykę fotografii w horyzoncie wymierania nakreślę w moich rozważaniach dwie osie czasowe dziejów tego szczególnego medium: jedną sięgającą w przeszłość, drugą zaś biegnącą w przyszłość. Przyjąwszy założenie, że historia fotografii to część obszerniejszej, naturalno-kulturowej historii naszej planety, przyjrzę się podobieństwom między fotografią a skamielinami oraz zinterpretuję fotografię jako napędzany światłem proces fosylizacji zachodzący w rozmaitych mediach. W takim oglądzie, jak stwierdzam, fotografia zawiera rzeczywisty materialny zapis życia raczej niż zaledwie jego ślad pamięciowy. Ale powrócę również do początków fotografii, gdy korzystała ona z naturalnego światła emanującego ze słońca, i zastanowię się, co praktyka fotograficzna może powiedzieć nam o źródłach energii i o naszej relacji z gwiazdą, która podtrzymuje życie naszej planety.

99


Trzeba jednak pamiętać, że w pewnym sensie od zawsze żyjemy w czasach „po wyginięciu”, a więc i w horyzoncie wymierania. Uważa się, że w dziejach naszej planety miało miejsce pięć masowych wymierań, z których każde starło z powierzchni ziemi liczebne populacje żywych istot. Jednocześnie wymieranie jest przede wszystkim procesem, nie zaś pojedynczym wydarzeniem: stanowi ono nieodłączną część doboru naturalnego, siły napędowej ewolucji. Geologowie mówią o zwykłym wymieraniu – „wymieraniu w tle” – ustawicznym zjawisku zachodzącym w czasie kosmicznym, przy czym „bazowy współczynnik tempa wymierania” dla ssaków wynosi szacunkowo 0,25 na milion gatunków rocznie2. Masowe wymierania, a uznaje się, że obecnie stoimy w obliczu szóstego, można zatem opisać jako epizody wyjątkowego natężenia w regularnym procesie nieustannego zanikania gatunków. Lecz chociaż zawsze żyliśmy „po wyginięciu”, wyginięcie nie funkcjonowało w naszym spektrum pojęciowym aż do XVIII wieku, gdy przywołano je, aby wyjaśnić, skąd wzięły się skamieniałości, dla których nie sposób było znaleźć żywych odpowiedników. Pomimo wszelkich naukowych objaśnień ciągle wygląda na to, że świadomość geobiologicznego faktu wymierania nie rozpowszechniła się jak do tej pory wśród ludzkiej populacji. Biolog Ilkka Hanski twierdzi, że ze względu na „naszą kognitywną niezdolność dostrzegania zmian zachodzących długofalowo na wielką skalę” mamy bardzo nikłe pojęcie na temat istotnych przeobrażeń geologicznych. A ponieważ „pozorna stabilność obecnego stanu świata łudzi nasze zmysły”, 3 nie udało nam się opracować odpowiedzialnych, długoterminowych działań w odpowiedzi na zmiany klimatyczne. Dlatego też dla nas, których życie zakreśla horyzont wymierania, nieodwracanie odeń oczu staje się zadaniem etycznym – a także warunkiem konstruktywnej, niezaściankowej polityki. Kwestia materialnych objawów owej geologicznej istotności naszych czasów szczególnie mnie teraz zaprząta właśnie dlatego, że pozwala nam ona skonfrontować przemijalność naszych ludzkich potrzeb, pragnień i wspomnień z trwalszym zapisem ludzkiego i nie-ludzkiego życia, który nie poddaje się czasowi. Stratygraf Jan Zalasiewicz, specjalista od problematyki antropocenu, twierdzi, że niezwykłą geologiczną ważkość naszych czasów, czasów w których człowiek stał się siłą sprawczą zmiany geologicznej, odzwierciedlą skamieliny pozostawione przyszłym pokoleniom4. Jak trafnie podkreśla Elizabeth Kolbert, posługując się tym dość zawstydzającym obrazem, „za sto milionów lat wszystko, co uznajemy za wielkie dzieła człowieka – rzeźby i biblioteki, pomniki i muzea, miasta i fabryki – będzie jedynie sprasowaną warstwą osadu niewiele grubszą od bibułki papierosowej”5. Myśląc w kategoriach głębokiej historii, można powiedzieć, że przeszłość pozostawia swój odcisk w kamieniu, a nawet – choć może to jeszcze o jedno skojarzenie za daleko – że przeszłość robi sobie zdjęcia. Poniżej chcę jednak pokazać, że powiązanie między fosylizacją a fotografią to coś więcej niż metafora zaledwie i że takie ujęcie mówi nam coś nowego zarówno o fotografii jako medium, jak też o tym, co ją warunkuje, a jednocześnie warunkuje także nasze istnienie: o świetle, energii i słońcu.

100


Myślenie o mediach w kategoriach geologicznych wpisuje się w ogólniejszą tendencję, którą Jussi Parikka określa jako „skłonność do geologicznych i geofizycznych metafor cechującą sztukę mediów i debaty nad techniką”6. Skłonność tę tłumaczy fakt, że sama nauka, która analizowała – i nadal analizuje – skamieniałości w kategoriach „zapisu”, „rejestru” i „biofilmów”, „postrzegała ziemię implicite jako media”7. A zatem wydaje się, że istotę tego, co nazywamy naukami o ziemi, stanowią zapisywanie, odczytywanie i interpretacja8. W rzeczy samej, John Durham Peters stwierdza, że tak Darwin jak i jego bliski przyjaciel Charles Lyell, uznawany za ojca geologii, widzieli w „ziemi rejestrujące medium”9. Medium fotografii – „rysowania światłem” – od swego zarania splecione jest z inskrypcją. Ale faktyczny proces zostawiania znaków na powierzchniach postrzegano pierwotnie jako pochodną działania czynnika nie-ludzkiego. W The Pencil of Nature, jednej z pierwszych szeroko dostępnych książek o fotografii opublikowanej między 1844 a 1864 rokiem, William Henry Fox Talbot oznajmia, że „ryciny zamieszczone w niniejszym dziele powstały w wyniku oddziaływania Światła na czuły papier. … Odcisnęła je ręka Natury …”10. W pozostawianiu znaków można się ćwiczyć, ale w oczach Talbota Natura nieodmiennie przewyższa człowieka pod względem precyzji. Talbot dobrze zdawał sobie sprawę z kruchości fotograficznego zapisu – sam zresztą poświęcił wiele starań, aby kruchości tej przeciwdziałać i na dłużej utrwalić obraz na papierze. Ale sama koncepcja światła działającego jako „ołówek Natury”, który pozostawia półtrwałe inskrypcje poddawane później interpretacji, wiąże raczkującą fotografię z wyłaniającą się dyscypliną geologii (Principles of Geology Lyella opublikowano w latach 1830-1833), co sprawia, że fotografie postrzega się jako cienkie skamieliny. Zastanówmy się chwile nad tym, co łączy fotografię i geologię – dwie odmienne formy czasowego odcisku – sięgając po prace Williama Jerome’a Harrisona, angielskiego naukowca, nauczyciela i pisarza. Pod koniec XIX wieku Harrison napisał dwa pozornie niepowiązane ze sobą dzieła: A Sketch of the Geology of Leicestershire and Rutland (1877) oraz History of Photography (1887)11. Adam Bobbette pokazuje jak, według Harrisona, „fotografię i geologię stanowią podobne procesy”.12 W History of Photography, pośród drobiazgowych opisów reakcji chemicznych zachodzących w procesie powstawania wczesnych fotografii, Harrison od czasu do czasu stara się sformułować ogólniejsze przemyślenia na temat tego medium, orzekając na przykład, że „nie ma nic nowego pod słońcem – zwłaszcza w fotografii”.13 Powiązanie miedzy fotografią a geologią nie jest dla niego jedynie metaforą: „Harrison opisuje bohaterów tej formy sztuki jako terminatorów kunsztu odcisków. W jego oglądzie «odciskanie» to proces tak stary jak opalanie się ludzkiej skóry na słońcu czy też bielenie wosku przez słońce. W każdym z tych przypadków, słońce pozostawia odcisk na materii. Wedlug Harrisona była to najwcześniejsza i najbardziej podstawowa forma fotografii”14.

101


Konkretnie zaś, Harrison wgłębia się w dokonania jednego z wielu równoczesnych wynalazców fotografii – Niéphore’a Niépce’a. W ujęciu Niépce’a w fotografii (zwanej heliografią, czyli „pisaniem słońcem”) światło „oddziałuje chemicznie na ciała”, „utwardza je nawet, oraz sprawia, że stają się w mniejszym lub większym stopniu nierozpuszczalne”15. Jest to kolejne ogniwo łączące fotografię i fosylizację. Powiązanie to staje się jeszcze oczywistsze, gdy weźmiemy pod uwagę fakt, że „Niépce badał litograficzne formy reprodukcji obrazu, co ma ewidentne geologiczne implikacje: litho to kamień po grecku…. Niépce żywił radykalne przekonanie, że światło mogłoby zastąpić człowieka w roli siły replikującej obrazy w kamieniu”16. Dla Harrisona dzieje fotografii są zatem dosłownie dziejami geologicznymi – on sam zaś staje się pierwszym narratorem nie-ludzkiej historii fotografii. W ustępie zamykającym History of Photography Harrison uznaje proces fotograficzny za nieodłączną część geologicznej historii ziemi, wskazując „jak wybornie obrazuje on teorię ewolucji, proces wyłaniający się z procesu …”17. Poprzez swoje powiązania ze skamieniałościami fotografia objawia również swój związek z wymieraniem. Wskazując na to powiązanie, Harrison nie tylko wyłapuje nieludzki element fotograficznej inskrypcji, ale także wydaje się sugerować, że fotografia istniała zawsze w głębokim, kosmicznym czasie. Trzeba ją było „jedynie” odkryć, a następnie raczej utrwalić na nieco dłużej, niż wynaleźć. Jeśli i w fotografii i w fosylizacji zachodzi „odciskanie bardziej miękkich organizmów w twardszych formach geologicznych”, fotografia nie jest nowym zjawiskiem, a „nowoczesnym, zapośredniczonym przedłużeniem” prastarego procesu „odciskania” zachodzącemu dzięki światłu, glebie i rozmaitym minerałom. Gdy na scenie pojawia się czynnik ludzki, dosłownie „jest on w terminie u odcisków powstających dzięki techniczno-materialnym instrumentarium aparatu, kliszy, chemikaliów i światła”18. Sięgając w daleką przeszłość, tak Harrison jak i ja staramy się wykroczyć poza historię fotografii wpisaną w historię człowieka, historię, której napędem są ludzkie motywacje i potrzeby. Rozumowanie André Bazina, który kojarzy fotografię i inne sztuki plastyczne z „praktykami balsamowania zmarłych”19 widząc w nich sposoby na pokonanie czasu, jest reprezentatywne dla ujęcia humanistycznego. W żadnym tekście powiązanie to nie jest uwypuklone tak dobitnie jak w słynnym Świetle obrazu Rolanda Barthesa20. Książka Barthesa to wywołana zdjęciem matki medytacja nad jej śmiercią oraz, w szerszym sensie, nad obrazami w roli afektywnych instrumentów służących jako nośniki melancholii i żałoby. Jednak w efekcie takiej narracji fotografia wtłoczona zostaje w wąski gorset nieustannej walki ze śmiercią. Opowiadając „głęboką historię” fotografii, wpisaną w historię ziemi, tak jak starałam się zrobić powyżej, historię wykraczającą poza ludzkie pragnienia i potrzeby, mamy okazję nakreślić inne podejście do medium i procesów fotografii. Jeśli zrozumiemy, że ziemia jest „źródłem wynalazków powstających z gmatwaniny formy i materii”21, słońce zaś jest źródłem energii, a zatem i życia na tej ziemi, dostrzeżemy, że w fotografii tętni ich żywiołowa, życiodajna (a nie tylko utrwalająca życie) moc.

102


Z perspektywy czasu kosmicznego fosylizację uznać można nie tylko za formę konserwacji życia, ale także za formę przekazywania jego ewolucyjnej zasady. Dlatego też warto spróbować wraz z Claire Colebrook „wyobrazić sobie gatunek, który po człowieku «odczytywać» będzie naszą planetę i jej archiwum: jeśli natknie się na teksty człowieka (od książek poprzez maszyny po skamieliny), jak wpłynie to na powstanie nowych poglądów lub teorii? ”22 Próbę wyobrażenia takiego archiwum podjął niedawno fotograf Hiroshi Sugimoto w ramach wystawy Lost Human Genetic Archive zorganizowanej w paryskim Palais de Tokyo w roku 2014. Tak na marginesie, koncepcja fosylizacji przewija się przez całą twórczość Sugimoto. Lost Human Genetic Archive prezentuje zwiedzającemu bogaty zbiór przedmiotów23. Podziemia Palais de Tokyo zaaranżowane jako melanż Piekła Dantego i ogromnego sklepu z zabawkami (wystawione są i lalki Barbie i seks-lalki!) przeobraziły się w Wunderkammer wieku wymierania – na każdym kroku pojawiają się jakieś nowe przedmioty, które istnieją jeszcze, lecz wkrótce/ kiedyś ich już nie będzie. Tak, umrzemy, wydaje się przypominać nam Sugimoto, hultajski kurator zagłady, ale było odlotowo, nie? A jednak, marszczy brew, patrzcie, jak strasznie przy tym namieszaliśmy. Tę emocjonalną dwoistość żartobliwości splecionej z melancholią odzwierciedlała też niezborna wizualna aranżacja wystawy. Zwiedzający błąkali się po przypominającej labirynt konstrukcji z falowanej blachy, ciągle natykając się na coraz to nowe zadziwiające obiekty: skamieniałości od kambryjskich po eoceńskie, jeden z fotograficznych pejzaży morskich autorstwa samego Sugimoto, odchody astronautów. W wypowiedzi, pobrzmiewającej nawiązaniami do wzniosłości w sztuce, gdy dzieło wywołuje jednocześnie przyjemność i ból w celach tak estetycznych jak i moralnych, Sugimoto szelmowsko oświadczył: „Wyobrażanie sobie najgorszych ewentualnych wariantów jutra daje mi ogromną przyjemność”24. Jednakże ta badawcza rozrywka niosła poważne przesłanie: „Dokąd zmierza rodzaj ludzki, niezdolny do zapobieżenia własnej zagładzie w imię niekontrolowanego wzrostu? ”25 Wizualnie zdyscyplinowany projekt Alexy Horochowski Club Disminución (Klub nieefektywnych wysiłków26), opracowany podczas jej rezydencji w Casa Poli w Chile, przedstawia interesującą przeciwwagę dla rozbuchanego archiwum Sugimoto. Club Disminución to rozliczenie z modernistycznym marzeniem o idealnym społeczeństwie, które miało się urzeczywistnić dzięki technice i inżynierii. Casa Poli, minimalistyczny betonowy sześcian, stoi na poszarpanym klifie nad Pacyfikiem. Artystka zaśmieciła białe modernistyczne arcydzieło przedmiotami i materiałami znalezionymi na zewnątrz: odpadami, skamielinami, wodorostami. Przybrzeżne wodorosty, nazywane w Chile cochayuyo, podobne do grubych kabli, łączą się w niezwykłe, przypominające rzeźby kłęby. Horochowski, którą zafascynowała ich gumiastość oraz dziwne piękno, zaczęła zbierać całe ich naręcza i obwieszać nimi biały sześcian Casa Poli. Cochayuyo, roślina, która łatwo mogłaby uchodzić za jakiś techniczny komponent, zainspirowała ją do krytycznej refleksji nad splotem natury i kultury, wymierania i przestarzałości.

103


Zwiedzających wystawę Horochowski w The Soap Factory w Minneapolis witały wielkoekranowe projekcje wideo, w których począstkowane, zwielokrotnione obrazy owych kablopodobnych tworów układały się w ruchomy, poetycki kalejdoskop. Towarzyszyła im kolejna żartobliwa wariacja na temat modernistycznej sztuki wizualnej: sześcienne konstrukcje zbudowane z materiału, którym mogły być równie dobrze wodorosty, kable lub metalowe druty. Nawet dotknięcie ich nie dawało pewności. Wystawione przedmioty układały się w, jak to określiła sama artystka, „post-ludzką historię naturalną przyszłości”, w której „skamielina karty kredytowej [jeden z najbardziej intrygujących przedmiotów w całej kompozycji! – JZ] wieszczy post-konsumpcjonistyczną przyszłość”27. Ten ostatni artefakt pobudza do namysłu nad intrygującym pytaniem: jak przyszłe pokolenia zinterpretują skamieniałości tych ozdobnych plastikowych prostokącików, które były tak cenne dla ludzi epoki późnego kapitalizmu? Lecz Horochowski oferuje nam coś więcej niż tylko dobrze już znany lament nad przemijaniem człowieka i jego ziemskich dóbr. Jak ujmuje to Christina Schmid, artystka tworząc dzieło „bynajmniej nie mgliście waginalne podejmuje upłciowiony dialog: jej praca podważa tragiheroiczne dążenie do zwierzchności charakterystyczne dla macho-modernizmu”28 – jakże oczywiste w jeremiadach rozmaitych proroków mroku i zagłady ery antropocenu, którzy wydają się rozkoszować przepowiadaniem nieuchronnie nadciągającej śmierci29. Praca Club Disminución, której tytułowe „nieefektywne wysiłki” odnoszą się również do pozornie bezcelowych działań, takich jak prostowanie wodorostów, suszenie ich i upychanie w sześcienne formy, przedstawia wizję przyszłości sięgającej poza rodzaj ludzki. Tym samym staje się kwintesencją „sztuki po człowieku”, w której rozpoznajemy jeszcze „sztukę” z perspektywy naszego ludzkiego położenia tu i teraz, dlatego jednak właśnie, że umiejscawia się ona w horyzoncie wymierania. Snując żartobliwe rozważania nad upływem czasu praca wydaje się „zachęcać USA do przyłączenia się do ongiś wielkich narodów i niegdysiejszych mocarstw opłakujących upadek dawnej chwały”. Lecz Schmid stwierdza – a ja jestem skłonna zgodzić się z nią – że „Club Disminución nie jest przygnębiającą wystawą”. „Horochowski ze spokojem i nie bez humoru …, zachęca, abyśmy odważyli się spojrzeć w ciemność. Możemy stanąć twarzą w twarz z zachodzącym słońcem, przekonuje jej dzieło. Club Disminución powstaje w przygasającym świetle i trwa, z tkliwością, w wydłużających się cieniach epoki ludzi”30. Jeśli my, ludzie, nie jesteśmy w stanie spojrzeć w słońce, co oznacza dla nas możliwość patrzenia na zachód słońca? Nad kwestią tą zastanawia się, z nieco innego punktu widzenia wprawdzie, fotograficzka Penelope Umbrico, której najbardziej znanym dziełem jest zapewne wielkoformatowy projekt Suns (From Sunsets) from Flickr. Zapoczątkowany w roku 2006 (gdy „zachód słońca” był najczęściej tagowanym hasłem na Flickr) projekt rozważa koncepcje oryginalności i replikacji w kulturze dzielenia się w sieci. Artystka wybiera zdjęcia przestawiające zachód słońca, wycina z nich samo słońce, powiększa je i dodaje do nieustannie rozrastającej się szachownicy wypalonych białych kul odbijających się od 104


pomarańczowo-czerwonego tła. Te słoneczne gobeliny wywieszane są następnie w postaci wielkoformatowych wydruków na ścianach galerii, ale także powracają do internetu w różnorakich odmianach – jako miniaturowe szachownice, wygaszacze ekranu, zestawy wirtualnych pocztówek. A zatem Umbrico interesuje przede wszystkim nie tyle banalna wizualność zachodu słońca, co uczestnictwo w zbiorowej praktyce dzielenia się czymś, czego autorstwa nie możemy sobie przypisać. Przyznaje ona jednak, że zaprząta ją także słońce jako źródło światła oraz przekształcenia tego źródła światła na poziomie tak obrazu, jak i materii. Choć Umbrico zgłębia środowiska cyfrowe, nie przestaje zajmować się zagadnieniami związanymi z tradycyjnym postrzeganiem fotografii jako praktyki rysowania światłem oraz dynamicznymi transformacjami, jakim jej geologiczne działania poddane są w internecie. Umbrico wydaje się z humorem odrzucać wybrzmiewające pełną powagą filozoficzne rozważania nad śmiercią słońca, stwierdzając, że „słońce umarło, ale my tworzymy nasze własne światło”31 – a następnie zabiera się za fotografowanie na nowo słońc pobranych z portalu Flickr z ekranu swego iPhone’a i zgłębianie efektów świetlnych towarzyszących tym działaniom. Owocem tego przedsięwzięcia jest kolejny projekt – Sun/Screen (2014), w którym kolory zachodzącego słońca mieszają się z morą powstałą przez nakładanie siatek pikselowych, oczek lub układów kropek na obraz. Obraz tchnie wtedy niesamowicie pięknym światłem, które ani nie należy już do słońca, ani też nie jest w pełni nasze. Lecz aby stwierdzić, że owo denaturalizowanie słońca stającego się układem prążków moiré faktycznie nastąpiło, potrzeba naszej ludzkiej percepcji z jej specyficznym aparatem wzrokowym i zdolnością rozpoznawania kolorów. Innymi słowy, odnaturalnione słońce potrzebuje ludzkiego ciała, aby doświadczyć tego “odnaturalnienia”. Swobodne projekty Umbrico można postrzegać jako bezwiedną odpowiedź na filozoficzny problem sformułowany przez Jeana-François Lyotarda w eseju Can Thought Go On Without A Body? opublikowanym po raz pierwszy w roku 1987 i włączonym do The Inhuman. Lyotard orzeka, że „jedyną poważną kwestią, którą przejmuje się dziś ludzkość”32 jest wybuch słońca, który za jakieś 4,5 miliarda lat ma przynieść koniec „wszystkiego”. Śmierć słońca wydaje nam się ostatecznym aktem wymierania. Jednakże według Lyotarda rzeczywistą katastrofą, którą powinniśmy się niepokoić, jest zatrata nie tyle słońca jako naszego punktu odniesienia, ile raczej ciała, tj. wyginiecie ludzi w znanej nam formie – podczas gdy jeszcze istniejemy. Oskarżając filozofów o to, że wyrugowali ze swych pism materię, Lyotard przypomina nam, że materialność człowieka i Wszechświata należy łączyć z technicznością, przy czym materia jawi się jako „układ energii tworzony, niszczony i odtwarzany na nowo raz po raz bez końca”33. Lyotard wskazuje, że: „Jak przyznają antropolodzy i biolodzy, nawet najprostsze formy życia – wymoczki (maleńkie algi syntetyzowane przez światło na obrzeżach zbiorników pływowych [nazywane obecnie protistami – JZ]) – sprzed kilku milionów lat były już urządzeniami technicznymi. Każdy układ materii to twór techniczny, o ile filtruje informacje przydatne do

105


przetrwania, zapamiętuje je i przetwarza – to jest o ile ingeruje w środowisko i oddziałuje na nie, aby przynajmniej przedłużyć swe trwanie.”34 Uznając powstanie życia we wczesnych mikroorganizmach za proces techniczny, Lyotard odchodzi od humanistycznej logiki pierwotnej techniczności, która ukształtowała koncepcje jego współczesnych, np. Bernarda Stieglera – logikę przyjmującą, że to człowiek ustanawiany jest przez techniczność i wraz z nią się wyłania. Według Lyotarda techniczność jest warunkiem i siłą napędową już pierwotnego życia. Wychodząc z tej koncepcji, chciałabym zasugerować, że proces wyłaniania się życia również objawia się jako nieodrodnie fotograficzny, przy czym światło jest niezbędne do zapoczątkowania fotosyntezy, co oznacza spowodowanie trwałej zmiany w organizmie, a następnie wywoływanie kolejnych zmian. Lecz nawet jeśli, podążając tym tropem, dostrzeżemy w fotografii, ogólnie, proces nie-ludzki rozciągający się poza działanie człowieka wyposażonego w aparat i światłoczułe materiały, i tak powiedzie on nas – i Lyotarda – z powrotem do fenomenologicznego doświadczenia światła padającego na ciało człowieka, które zamieszkuje ziemię ciągle oświetlaną przez jej niemłode już słońce. Rzeczywiście, według Lyotarda, cielesność jest warunkiem wiedzy, a także fenomenologicznego doświadczenia, które umożliwia otwartość, generatywność i hojność – co tłumaczy, dlaczego techniczna czynność przekazu informacji staje się aktem etycznym. To kieruje nas ponownie ku zagadnieniu ludzkiej niezdolności patrzenia na słońce, która nie zwalnia człowieka z konieczności stanięcia twarzą w twarz z zachodzącym słońcem. Śmierć słońca, wszechświata i nas samych z problemu ontologicznego staje się problemem etyczno-politycznym. Jest tak ponieważ zdolność spojrzenia w zachodzące słońce oznacza również oswojenie się z problemem energii – oraz kurczenia się zasobów nie tylko słonecznych, ale także ziemskich (czy też precyzyjniej rzecz ujmując, podziemnych). Zdolność podzielenia się zachodem słońca na sposób Umbrico wskazuje na możliwość wyobrażenia sobie – jeśli nie faktycznie wdrożenia – hojniejszego, mniej łupieżczego sposobu obchodzenia się z tymi zasobami. To właśnie (rabunkowe) gospodarowanie źródłami energii w postaci paliw kopalnych uznaje się za jeden z symptomów antropocenu. Taka działalność człowieka doprowadziła do zmiany składu atmosfery, w wyniku czego zmieniła się również natura docierającego do nas przezeń światła. Spojrzenie w zachodzące słońce jest zatem formą zawieszenia logiki, którą fiński filozof Tere Vadén nazwał „racjonalnością skamielinową”35 opartą na założeniu, że ponieważ przez ostatnie 150 lat wszystko toczyło się pewnym ustalonym torem, włączając w to logikę wzrostu gospodarczego i eksploatację paliw kopalnych – wyznaczniki naszego nowoczesnego stylu życia – to pozostanie tak już na zawsze. Racjonalność skamielinowa jest wiec faktycznie irracjonalna: zasadza się ona na puszczeniu w niepamięć głębokiego czasu historii, na zapomnieniu spowodowanym naszym krótkowzrocznym egoizmem i narcyzmem gatunkowym. Człowiek nowoczesny funkcjonuje dzięki kopalinom, a sam rdzeń jego nie tylko fizycznej, ale też ekonomicznej i społeczno-gospodarczej tożsamości formują węglowodory. Choć nasze własne ciała powstały z (tego samego) pyłu kosmicznego, noszą one teraz w sobie zapis 106


przemysłowo przetworzonych węglowodorów – okruchy węgla, resztki ropy. Obróciliśmy się zatem w fotografię – a także skamieniałość – naszego sposobu życia. Żyjemy w zanieczyszczonym świecie, a nad naszymi głowami rozciąga się chmura naftowych oparów. W takich warunkach najwyraźniej zapomnieliśmy o słońcu. Uważam, choć być może jest to propozycja na wyrost, że fotografia może w dwojaki sposób pomóc nam stawić czoła bieżącemu kryzysowi paliw kopalnych. Po pierwsze może ona poszerzyć perspektywę czasową, z której zazwyczaj patrzy się (a poniekąd nie patrzy) na ten problem. Po drugie fotografia może pomóc nam wypracować inną, mniej śmiercionośną gospodarkę solarną. Niektórzy twierdzą, że zadanie to fotografia może spełnić choćby przez podsuwanie nam dowodów na straszliwe zniszczenia poczynione w środowisku. Przykładem byłaby tutaj wielkoformatowa seria Oil Edwarda Burtynsky’ego ukazująca pola naftowe w Azerbejdżanie, USA i Kanadzie, sterty porzuconych lub płonących opon oraz rafinerie naftowe. Tego rodzaju sztuka uwidacznia, jak spustoszone jest środowisko i jak destrukcyjnie odnosimy się do rozmaitych źródeł energii, w tym słońca. Istnieje jednak niebezpieczeństwo, że – wręcz przeciwnie – wizerunki takie tym bardziej skłonią do zapominania o słońcu, a ich estetyka stanie się anestetykiem znieczulającym nas na dramatyzm kryzysu środowiskowego. Pleniące się w mediach obrazy katastrof i cierpienia świadczą, że postrzeganie niekoniecznie jest bodźcem do (moralnego) działania. Przesycenie obrazami może w rzeczy samej spowodować zaniechanie działania. Jednakże główną myślą, którą chcę tu wyrazić jest to, że fotografia jako całość stanowi fundamentalną praktykę życia, nie tylko dlatego, że bez przerwy rejestruje nasze życie lub że ukazuje nam życie i śmierć, ale także w głębszym filozoficznym sensie, gdyż ujmuje życie jako trwanie, wcinając się w nie. Innymi słowy, fotografia jako taka, zdolna uchwycić światło i sprawić, że oddziałuje ono na powierzchnie, jest znakiem poczynań (z) głębokiego czasu, poza ludzką kontrolą i ludzkim istnieniem. Antti Salminen posuwa się nawet do stwierdzenia, że „w epoce skamielinowego nihilizmu fotografia przypomina nam o słońcu”36 – a zatem i o życiu jako takim. Fotografia jako balsamista i nośnik odciśniętych śladów jest świadectwem istnienia energii słonecznej i jej mocy umożliwiającej fotosyntezę. Retoryczne ulokowanie fotografii w horyzoncie wymierania, horyzoncie, który od niepamiętnych czasów zakreśla przestrzeń jej materialnego rozwoju, pozwoliło nam przejść na stronę życia i skonceptualizować skamieniałości odmiennie niż czyni to dominujący obecnie skamielinowy nihilizm. Skamieliny i/jako fotografie postrzegać można jako coś więcej niż zaledwie memento mori: są one również etycznym nakazem, który wskazuje na życie i zwraca się ku niemu, obejmując tak rzeczywiste jak i wirtualne jego formy. W ten sposób właśnie fotografia jako proces fosylizacji tworzący zapis czasu staje się zadaniem etycznym, formą przeciwstawienia się opłakiwaniu przemijającego czasu poprzez rzucenie światła na światło słoneczne. W zwrocie i powrocie do słońca stawiamy pierwsze kroki ku projektowi nowej energetyki, energetyki, która bardziej 107


etycznie podchodzi do skamieniałości, widząc w nich „warstwy prastarej, nie-ludzkiej śmierci”. Fotografia jako pierwotna praktyka światła, podejmowana teraz równie często w elektrycznej jasności jak w promieniach słońca, może skłonić nas, abyśmy podeszli do światła zupełnie na nowo.

1

Pojęcie „faktu afektywnego” zaproponował Brian Massumi. Wymieranie można interpretować jako taki fakt nie dlatego, że sprzeczne jest z rzeczywistymi faktami (takimi jak zmiany klimatu, wylesienie czy kurczenie się zasobów energii), ale dlatego, że oddziałuje na nas głównie jako groźba tego, co dopiero nadejdzie. Groźba, według Massumiego, jest zjawiskiem „afektywnie samonapędzającym się”. Brian Massumi, The Future Birth of the Affective Fact: The Political Ontology of Threat, w: The Affect Theory Reader, red. Melissa Gregg and Gregory J. Seigworth (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010), ss. 52-54.

2

Elizabeth Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History (New York and London: Bloomsbury, 2014), edycja Kindle.

3

Ilkka Hanski, The World That Became Ruined. Raporty EMBO, t. 9 , Numer specjalny, “Science and Society”, 2008, S34.

4

Za Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction.

5

Tamże.

6

Jussi Parikka, The Anthrobscene (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014), edycja Kindle.

7

Tamże.

8

Jak dowodzi Claire Colebrook, „skamielinowy zapis otwiera nam świat, w tym sensie, że umożliwia odczytującemu umysłowi cofniecie się z chwili obecnej w czasy sprzed odczytywania …’, Death of the PostHuman: Essays on Extinction, Vol. 1 (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2014), s. 23.

9

John Durham Peters, Space, Time, and Communication Theory, “Canadian Journal of Communication” [online], 28.4 (2003): bs.

10

H. Fox Talbot, The Pencil of Nature (London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1844), z Project Gutenberg online.

11

W. Jerome Harrison, A Sketch of the Geology of Leicestershire and Rutland (William White: Sheffield, 1877); W. Jerome Harrison, History of Photography (New York: Scovill Manufacturing Company, 1887).

108


12

Adam Bobbette, Episodes from a History of Scalelessness: William Jerome Harrison and Geological Photography, w: Architecture and the Anthropocene, red. Etienne Turpin (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2013), ss. 45-58, 51.

13

Harrison, History of Photography, s. 107.

14

Bobbette, Episodes from a History of Scalelessness, s. 52.

15

Harrison, History of Photography, s. 19.

16

Tamże, s. 52.

17

Tamże, s. 129. Linearność ewolucyjnej narracji Harrisona odzwierciedla myślenie o ewolucji w kategoriach logicznego postępu i doskonalenia zachodzącego z biegiem czasu, nie zaś wyobrażenie zaproponowane przez Stanisława Lema niemal osiemdziesiąt lat później, w którym ewolucja „jako konstruktor jest … chaotyczna i nielogiczna [oraz] nie kumuluje własnych doświadczeń”, Stanisław Lem, Summa Technologiae, (Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, 2000), ss. 431-432.

18

Bobbette, Episodes from a History of Scalelessness, s. 53.

19

André Bazin, The Ontology of the Photographic Image, “Film Quarterly”, t. 13, nr 4 (lato, 1960), ss. 4-9, 4.

20

Zob. Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida (New York: Hill and Wang, 1981) (wyd. pol. Ronald Barthes, Światło obrazu. Uwagi o fotografii, tłum. J. Trznadel, Warszawa: Aletheia, 2008).

21

Bobbette, Episodes from a History of Scalelessness, s. 53.

22

Colebrook, Death of the PostHuman, s. 39.

23

Lost Human Genetic Archive to nie pierwsza wystawa, w której Sugimoto skupiał się na historii człowieka w odniesieniu do głębokiego czasu. W latach 2005-2006 na wystawie zatytułowanej History of History w nowojorskim Japan Society wystawił on fotografie swojego autorstwa wraz z innymi artefaktami: zwojami, drewnianymi rzeźbami i, co najbardziej interesujące dla nas, skamieniałościami. Włączenie do eksponatów skamieniałych amonitów, trylobitów i liliowców było zdaniem artysty wielce stosowne, jako ze skamieliny to „najstarsza forma sztuki” oraz „pre-fotografia” (za Michaels, 431), wskazująca na genealogię jego sztuki. Z perspektywy głębokiego czasu fotografię można zatem uznać za „pierwszą sztukę, prehistoryczną i przed-ludzką” (Tamże, 432). Zob. Walter Benn Michaels, Photographs and Fossils, w: Photography Theory, red. James Elkins (New York and London: Routledge, 2007), ss. 431-450.

24

Za Adrian Searle, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Art for the End of the World, “The Guardian,”16 maja 16, 2014, http://www.theguardian. com/artanddesign/2014/may/16/hiroshi-sugimoto-aujordhui-palais-de-tokyo-paris-exhibition

25

Opis wystawy ze strony internetowej Palais de Tokyo, http://palaisdetokyo.com/en/exhibition/aujourdhui-le-monde-est-mortlost-human-genetic-archive.

26

W oryginale: Club of Diminishing Returns, czyli dosł. Klub malejących przychodów / zwrotów. Fraza ta odnosi się do ekonomicznej zasady, której sformułowanie weszło do obiegu popularnego, oznaczając sytuację, w której coraz bardziej desperackie starania przynoszą coraz mniej rezultatów, co prowadzi do tym większego natężenia wysiłku skutkującego tym

27

niższym efektem. Alexa Horochowski, Club Disminución, “Photomediations Machine”, 13 stycznia, 2015, http://photomediationsmachine.

28

net/2015/01/13/club-disminucion/ Christina Schmid, A Club at the End of the World, 16 października, 2014, MN artists website, http://www.mnartists.org/article/

29

club-end-world Na temat krytyki maskulinizmu dominujących dyskursów i debat o antropocenie, zob. Joanna Zylinska, Minimal Ethics for the

30

Anthropocene (Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2014).

31

Schmid, A Club at the End of the World.

32

Wykład w The Photographers’ Gallery, Londyn, 16 stycznia, 2015.

109


33

Jean-François Lyotard, The Inhuman, tłum. Geoffrey Bennington i Rachel Bowlby (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991), s. 9.

34

Tamże.

35

Tamże, s. 12.

36

Tere Vadén, Fossil Sense, w: Mustarinda, Helsinki Photography Biennial Edition HBP14, ss. 99-101, 99. Antti Salminen, Photography in the Age of Fossil Nihilism, w: Mustarinda, Helsinki Photography Biennial Edition HBP14, ss. 65-70, 70.

110



UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

NATIONAL MUSEUM

WRO ATELIER

ENTROPIA GALLERY

GG – SELF-SUPPORTING

POKOYHOF PASSAGE

UNIVERSAL EXHIBITIONS

WRO BY NIGHT

FIRST COMPETITION FOR MEDIA ARTS

WORKS AVAILABLE IN THE

GRADUATION PROJECTS

WRO ON TOUR PROGRAM

(VARIOUS LOCATIONS)

(VARIOUS LOCATIONS)


VENUES / PROJECTS D TE

LTIVA CU

CU

LT

URES

CULTIVATED CULTURES

RENOMA DEPARTMENT STORE

WRO ART CENTER

POLSKI THEATRE ŚWIEBODZKI STAGE

LITTLE WRO (FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES IN VARIOUS LOCATIONS)

WROCŁAW PHILHARMONIC


NEW BUILDING OF THE WROCŁAW UNIVERSITY LIBRARY / NOWY GMACH BIBLIOTEKI UNIWERSYTECKIEJ WE WROCŁAWIU Cécile Babiole (FR) + Jean-Marie Boyer (FR) / Lucas Bambozzi (BR) / Mikhail Basov (RU) + Natalia Basova (RU) / Cécile Beau (FR) + Nicolas Montgermont (FR) / Alicja Boncel (PL) / Chloe Cheuk (HK) + Kenny Wong (HK) / Grayson Cooke (NZ) / Thierry De Mey (BE) / Marek Deka (PL) / Elektro Moon Vision – Popesz Csaba Láng (HU) + Elwira Wojtunik (PL) / César Escudero Andaluz (ES) / Mounir Fatmi (MA) / Alessandro Fonte (IT) / Lara Gavriely (IL) / Małgorzata Goliszewska (PL) / Marta Hryniuk (PL) / Filip Ignatowicz (PL) / Paweł Janicki (PL) + Zbigniew Kupisz (PL) / Anna Jochymek (PL) / Daniel Jolliffe (CA) / Wolf Kahlen (DE) / Szymon Kaliski (PL) + Marek Straszak (PL) / Olga Kisseleva (FR) / Ralph Kistler (DE) / Adrian Kolarczyk (PL) / Tomasz Koszewnik (PL) / Afroditi Psarra (GR) + Maria Varela (GR) + Marinos Koutsomichalis (GR) / Julia Kurek (PL) / Piotr Kurka (PL) / Gerard Lebik (PL) / Dominik Lejman (PL) / Karina Madej (PL) / Seiichiro Matsumura ( JP) / Marta Mielcarek (PL) / Justyna Misiuk (PL) / Dobrosława Nowak (PL) / Maciej Olszewski (PL) / Justyna Orłowska (PL) / panGenerator – Piotr Barszczewski (PL) + Krzysztof Cybulski (PL) + Krzysztof Goliński (PL) + Jakub Koźniewski (PL) / PDP – Pracownia Działań Przestrzennych Mirosława Bałki (PDP: Mirosław Bałka’s Studio of Spatial Activities) (PL) / Bertrand Planes (FR) + Arnauld Colcomb (FR) / Shuai Cheng Pu (TW) / Quayola (IT/UK) / Hector Rodriguez (ES) / Izabela Sitarska (PL) / Karina Smigla-Bobinski (PL/DE) / Samuel St-Aubin (CA) / Paweł Stasiewicz (PL) / Maria Stożek (PL) Stefan Tiefengraber (AT) / Maria Toboła (PL) / Kasper T. Toeplitz (PL/FR) / Jacob Tonski (US) / Suzanne Treister (UK) / Patrick Tresset (FR/UK) / Aleksandra Trojanowska (PL) / Lech Twardowski (PL) / Kay Walkowiak (AT) / Marek Wasilewski (PL) / Marta Węglińska (PL) / Krista van der Wilk (NL) / Szymon Wojtyła (PL) / Kamila Wolszczak (PL) / Piotr Wyrzykowski, a.k.a. Peter Style (PL) / Cyryl Zakrzewski (PL) / Joanna Zemanek (PL) / Rafał Żarski (PL)

114


115


THE NATIONAL MUSEUM IN WROCŁAW / MUZEUM NARODOWE WE WROCŁAWIU Kuba Borkowicz (PL) / Jaś Domicz (PL) / Wojciech Gilewicz (PL) / Magdalena Golba (PL) / Aleksander Janicki (PL) / Irena Kalicka (PL) / Igor Krenz (PL) / He-Lin Luo (TW) / Dani Ploeger (NL/UK) / Gilbertto Prado (BR) / Maciej Rudzin (PL) / Sebastian Schmieg (DE) + Silvio Lorusso (IT) / Julia Taszycka (PL)

116


117


D TE

LTIVA CU

CU

LT

URES

CULTIVATED CULTURES / KULTURY KULTYWOWANE WRO ART CENTER / CENTRUM SZTUKI WRO Natalia Balska (PL) / Michał Brzeziński (PL) / Katrin Caspar (DE) + Eeva-Liisa Puhakka (FI) / Jarosław Czarnecki, a.k.a. Elvin Flamingo (PL) / Simona Halečková (SK) / Maciej Markowski (PL)

118


119


RENOMA DS / DH RENOMA Michael Candy (AU) / Wioleta Kaminska (PL/US) / Vincent Voillat (FR) / Kenny Wong (HK) / Marcelo Zammenhoff (PL)

120


121


SELF-SUPPORTING UNIVERSAL EXHIBITIONS / GG SUW – SAMONOŚNE UNIWERSALNE WYSTAWY projekt artystyczno-kuratorski Kamili Wolszczak an artistic-curatorial project by Kamila Wolszczak mieszkanie przy ulicy Górnickiego 4/11 Górnicki Street 4/11 apartment

Mariusz Andrzejczyk (PL) + Dominika Borkowska (PL) / Karolina Balcer (PL) + Kinga Krzymowska (PL) / Krzysztof Bryła (PL) / Matej Frank (CZ/PL) + Jakub Frank (CZ/PL) / Anna Kosarewska (UA/PL) / Paweł Marcinek (PL) / Irmina Rusicka (PL) / Ewelina Turkot (PL) / Aleksandra Wałaszek (PL)

122


123


PIERWSZY KONKURS NAJLEPSZYCH DYPLOMÓW SZTUKI MEDIÓW / FIRST COMPETITION FOR MEDIA ARTS GRADUATION PROJECTS wystawa najlepszych prac dyplomowych obronionych w 2014 roku na wydziałach i kierunkach medialnych publicznych uczelni artystycznych w: Gdańsku, Katowicach, Krakowie, Łodzi, Poznaniu, Szczecinie, Warszawie i Wrocławiu / exhibition of the best graduation projects submitted in the year 2014 to the departments and faculties of media art at public art academies in Gdansk, Katowice, Cracow, Lodz, Poznan, Szczecin, Warsaw and Wroclaw Natalia Balska (PL), B-612, instalacja / installation Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Krakowie / Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow Alicja Boncel (PL), WiktorJa / Ivictoria, zestaw prac wideo + obiekt / set of videos + object Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Katowicach / Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice Tomasz Koszewnik (PL), Lucid Dream, instalacja / installation Uniwersytet Artystyczny w Poznaniu / University of Arts in Poznan Karina Madej (PL), Sztuka zżycia / Art of Familiarity, instalacja / installation Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Łodzi / Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz Marta Mielcarek (PL), Inwersja / Inversion, dwukanałowa instalacja wideo / two-channel video installation, Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Warszawie / Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw Justyna Orłowska (PL), Postrzyżyny / The First Haircut, obiekt + wideo / object + video Akademia Sztuk Pięknych w Gdańsku / Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk Aleksandra Trojanowska (PL), Pytania na wszystkie odpowiedzi / Questions to All Answers, instalacja / installation, Akademia Sztuk Pięknych im. Eugeniusza Gepperta we Wrocławiu / Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art and Design in Wroclaw Rafał Żarski (PL), Układ zamknięty / Closed Circuit, instalacja wideo / video installation Akademia Sztuki w Szczecinie / Academy of Art in Szczecin

124


Natalia Balska (PL), B-612, nagroda / Award (ex aequo)

Marta Mielcarek (PL), Inwersja / Inversion, nagroda / Award (ex aequo)

125


LITTLE WRO / MAŁE WRO Vincent Voillat (FR) / Quayola (IT/GB) / Samuel St-Aubin (CA) / Jacob Tonski (USA) / Seiichiro Matsumura ( JP) / Michael Candy (AU) Kenny Wong (HK) / panGenerator: Piotr Barszczewski + Krzysztof Cybulski + Krzysztof Goliński + Jakub Koźniewski (PL) / Stefan Tiefengraber (AU) / Karina Smigla-Bobinski (PL/DE) / Simona Halečková (SK) / Małgorzata Goliszewska (PL) / Alessandro Fonte (IT) / Szymon Wojtyła (PL) / Katrin Caspar + Eeva-Liisa Puhakka (DE/FI)

126


127


WRO ATELIER / ATELIER WRO Dorota Błaszczak (PL) / Paweł Janicki (PL) + Zbigniew Kupisz (PL)

128


GALERIA ENTROPIA / ENTROPIA GALLERY Marcelo Zammenhoff (PL)

129


POLSKI THEATRE ŚWIEBODZKI STAGE / TEATR POLSKI SCENA NA ŚWIEBODZKIM Krzysztof Cybulski (PL) / Roch Forowicz (PL) + Jarek Grzesica (PL) / Ya-Wen Fu (TW) / Ryo Ikeshiro ( JP/UK) / Katarzyna Justka (PL) / Joachim Montessuis (FR) / Przemek Ostaszewski, a.k.a. Osmo Nadir (PL) / Katsuki Nogami ( JP) / Bioni Samp (UK) / Stefan Tiefengraber (AT) / wechselstrom: Christoph Theiler (DE) + Renate Pittroff (DE) / Łukasz Szałankiewicz, a.k.a. Zenial (PL) + Adam Donovan (AU)

130


THE WROCLAW PHILHARMONIC / FILHARMONIA WROCŁAWSKA Kazimierz Serocki (PL), Pianophonie, utwór na fortepian Mason Bates (US), Alternative Energy, symfonia energetyczna Luc Ferrari (FR), Brise-Glace / Lodołamacz, światowe prawykonanie w nowej orkiestracji, z towarzyszeniem projekcji wideo / live performance with the new orchestration and video (the world premiere) wykonawcy / performers: Orkiestra Symfoniczna NFM / NFM Symphony Orchestra dyrygent / conductor: Benjamin Shwartz fortepian / piano: Toros Can elektronika / electronics: Cezary Duchnowski, Marcin Rupociński aktor (recytator) / actor (reciter): Anne Sée projekcja cyfrowa / digital projection: David Jisse wideo / video: Bartosz Konieczny (koprodukcja z Centrum Sztuki WRO / coproduction with WRO Art Center) projekt realizowany wspólnie z festiwalem Musica Electronica Nova / project carried out with Musica Electronica Nova festival partner projektu / partner of the project: Narodowe Forum Muzyki / the National Forum of Music

131


PASAŻ POKOYHOF / POKOYHOF PASSAGE WRO BY NIGHT Psie kłaki – Marcelo Zammenhoff (PL) + Fumos Fumowicz (PL) / Gerard Lebik (PL) / Eric Stil (FR) / Tomek Wódkiewicz (PL)

132



ARTISTS AND WORKS A Borja Rodríguez Alonso

136

Katrin Caspar

155

Cèsar Escudero Andaluz

137

Emma Charles

156

Mariusz Andrzejczyk

138

Chloe Cheuk

157

APOTROPIA

139

Seoungho Cho

158–160

Maria Raquel Atalaia

140

Arnauld Colcomb

260

Eden Auerbach Ofrat

141

Anna Comiotto

161

Emmanuel Avenel

142

Grayson Cooke

162

Krzysztof Cybulski

163

Jarosław Czarnecki, a.k.a. Elvin Flamingo

164

B Cécile Babiole

143

Krzysztof Bagiński

256

D

Karolina Balcer

144

Matilde De Feo

165

Natalia Balska

145

Thierry De Mey

166

Lucas Bambozzi

146

Marek Deka

167

Piotr Barszczewski

256

Carla Della Beffa

168

Mikhail Basov

147

Douve Dijkstra

169

Natalia Basova

147

Alexei Dmitriev

170

Cécile Beau

148

Lena Dobrowolska

171

Dorota Błaszczak

149

Jaś Domicz

172

Alicja Boncel

150

Adam Donovan

296

Kuba Borkowicz

151

Dominika Borkowska

138

E

Jean-Marie Boyer

143

Elektro Moon Vision

Max Brück

258

Krzysztof Bryła

152

Tymek Bryndal

258

Liliana Farber

174

Michał Brzeziński

153

Thereza Farkas

270

Mounir Fatmi

175

Clement Fay

187

Luc Ferrari

176

C Michael Candy

134

173

154

F


Alessandro Fonte

177

J

Roch Forowicz

178

Aleksander Janicki

200

Nuno Fragata

179

Paweł Janicki

201

Jakub Frank

180

Anna Jochymek

202

Matej Frank

180

Daniel Jolliffe

203

Ya-Wen Fu

181

Katarzyna Justka

204

Fumos Fumowicz

264

K

G

Wolf Kahlen

205

Lara Gavriely

182

Irena Kalicka

206

Wojciech Gilewicz

183

Szymon Kaliski

207

Marina Gioti

184

Wioleta Kaminska

208

Marie-France Giraudon

142

Monika Karczmarczyk

258

Magdalena Golba

185

Olga Kisseleva

209

Zuzanna Golińska

258

Ralph Kistler

210

Krzysztof Goliński

256

Adrian Kolarczyk

211

Małgorzata Goliszewska

186

Bartosz Konieczny

176

Mitch Goodwin

187

Meliti Kontogiorgi

212

Stephan Groß

188

Anna Kosarewska

213

Laura Grudniewska

258

Tomasz Koszewnik

214

Marie Grunwald

258

Marinos Koutsomichalis

263

Barbara Gryka

258

Jakub Koźniewski

256

Jarek Grzesica

178

David Krems

215

Vanita Gupta

189

Igor Krenz

216

Kinga Krzymowska

144

Zbigniew Kupisz

201 217

H Simona Halečková

190

Julia Kurek

Constantin Hartenstein

191

Piotr Kurka

218

Anna Hawkins

192

Agata Kus

219, 220

Antje Heyn

193

Sören Hiob

258

L

Paul Horn

194

Pedro Lacerda

Marc Norbert Hörler

258

Popesz Csaba Láng

173

Marta Hryniuk

195

I

221

Gerard Lebik

222, 223

Dominik Lejman

224

Philippe Leonard

225

Filip Ignatowicz

196

Sasha Litvintseva

226

Ryo Ikeshiro

197

Robert Löbel

227

Ignace Van Ingelgom

198

Silvio Lorusso

283

Yuk-Yiu Ip

199

Eve Luckring

228

135


He-Lin Luo

229

P

Michael Lyons

230

Cristiano Panepuccia

139

panGenerator

256

Ł

Alexander Pawlik

257

Magdalena Łazarczyk

258

PDP: Pracownia Działań Przestrzennych

258

Justyna Łoś

258

Mirosława Bałki / Mirosław Bałka’s Studio of Spatial Activities

M

Renate Pittroff

317

Karina Madej

231

Bertrand Planes

260

Juha Mäki-Jussila

232

Dani Ploeger

261

Paweł Marcinek

233

Gilbertto Prado

262

Maciej Markowski

234

Afroditi Psarra

263

Lukas Marxt

235

Psie kłaki

264

Tom Maryniak

236

Shuai Cheng Pu

265

Seiichiro Matsumura

237

Filip Gabriel Pudło

266

Holly McLean

236

Eeva-Liisa Puhakka

155

Marta Mielcarek

238

Antonella Mignone

139

Q

Justyna Misiuk

239

Quayola

267

Haruka Mitani

240

Młodzi Obleśni

241

R

Thomas Mohr

242

Iwo Rachwał

258

Joachim Montessuis

243, 244

Hannes Rall

268

Nicolas Montgermont

148

Letícia Ramos

270

Daniel Moshel

245

Oliver Ressler

271

Helmut Munz

246

Arash T. Riahi

297

Michalina Musielak

258

Józef Robakowski

272

Hector Rodriguez

274

Marcin Romaniuk

258

ronnie s

275

N Christian Niccoli

247

Katsuki Nogami

248, 249

Luiz Roque

270, 276

Arnont Nongyao

250

Maciej Rudzin

277

Dobrosława Nowak

251

Irmina Rusicka

278

Agnieszka M. Nowak

258

S

O

Bioni Samp

279

Maciej Olszewski

252

Hans Scheugl

280

Justyna Orłowska

253

Marko Schiefelbein

281

Maria Ornaf

254

Johanna Schmeer

282

Przemek Ostaszewski, a.k.a. Osmo Nadir

255

Sebastian Schmieg

283

136


Manuel Schüpfer

161

U

Sašo Sedlaček

284

Piotr Urbaniec

Antje Seeger

285

258

Jana Shostak

258

V

Izabela Sitarska

286

Krista van der Wilk

310

Monika Skomra

258

Daniel van Westen

311

Karina Smigla-Bobinski

287

Maria Varela

263

John Smith

288

Roy Villevoye

312

Mikołaj Sobczak

258

Vincent Voillat

313

Karolina Spyrka

289

Samuel St-Aubin

290

Julia Staniszewska

258

Kay Walkowiak

314

Paweł Stasiewicz

291

Aleksandra Wałaszek

315

Eric Stil

292

Marek Wasilewski

316

W

Christopher Steel

293

wechselstrom

317

Grzegorz Stefański

258

Marta Węglińska

318

Maria Stożek

294

Rafał Wilk

319

Marek Straszak

207

Jayne Wilson

320

Peter Style, a.k.a. Piotr Wyrzykowski

326

Elwira Wojtunik

173

Arya Sukapura Putra

295

Szymon Wojtyła

321

Łukasz Szałankiewicz, a.k.a. Zenial

296

Tomek Wódkiewicz

322

Kamila Wolszczak

323

Kenny Wong

157, 324

Timo Wright

325

Piotr Wyrzykowski, a.k.a. Peter Style

326

Ś Marcin Świetlicki

241

T Julia Taszycka

299

Z

Saša Tatić

300

Cyryl Zakrzewski

327

Christoph Theiler

317

Marcelo Zammenhoff

264, 328

Stefan Tiefengraber

301, 302

Joanna Zemanek

329

Maria Toboła

303

Kasper T. Toeplitz

298

Ż

Jacob Tonski

304

Rafał Żarski

Suzanne Treister

305

Patrick Tresset

306

Aleksandra Trojanowska

307

Ewelina Turkot

308

Lech Twardowski

309

330

137


BORJA RODRÍGUEZ ALONSO, ES GOOGLE 03: SO RUDE, SO POOR, SO HOT wideo / video, 2014, 5:28

138


CÈSAR ESCUDERO ANDALUZ, ES TAPE_BOOK instalacja / installation, 2014

139


MARIUSZ ANDRZEJCZYK + DOMINIKA BORKOWSKA, PL PERFORMANS KOMUNIKACYJNY / COMMUNICATION PERFORMANCE performans / performance, 2015

140


APOTROPIA – ANTONELLA MIGNONE + CRISTIANO PANEPUCCIA, IT SINGLE # DOUBLE # TRIPLE wideo / video, 2013, 8:53

141


MARIA RAQUEL ATALAIA, PT A MINHA CASINHA / MY LITTLE HOUSE wideo / video, 2014, 7:30

142


EDEN AUERBACH OFRAT, IL SCAPEGOAT wideo / video, 2014, 3:10

143


EMMANUEL AVENEL + MARIE-FRANCE GIRAUDON, CA REJECTIONS wideo / video, 2013, 3:15

144


CÉCILE BABIOLE + JEAN-MARIE BOYER, FR CONVERSATION AU FIL DE L’EAU / STREAM OF CONVERSATION instalacja / installation, 2015 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

145


KAROLINA BALCER + KINGA KRZYMOWSKA, PL PRANIE BRUDÓW. WELCOME / CLEARING THE AIR: WELCOME obiekt / object, 2015

146


LTIVA CU CU

B-612

D TE

NATALIA BALSKA, PL

LT

URES

instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2014 Nagroda w Pierwszym Konkursie Najlepszych Dyplomów Sztuki Mediów (ex aequo) / The First Competition for Media Arts Graduation Projects Award (ex aequo)

147


LUCAS BAMBOZZI, BR MULTIDÃO / MULTITUDE instalacja wideo / video installation, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Instytut Adama Mickiewicza / project supported by Adam Mickiewicz Institute

148


MIKHAIL BASOV + NATALIA BASOVA, RU ФИЛЬМ ДЛЯ ВООБРАЖАЕМОЙ МУЗЫКИ / FILM FOR IMAGINARY MUSIC wideo / video, 2014, 6:29

149


CÉCILE BEAU + NICOLAS MONTGERMONT, FR RADIOGRAPHIE / RADIOGRAPHY instalacja / installation, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

150


DOROTA BŁASZCZAK, PL PRZESŁUCHANIE DANYCH. NOŚNIKI (SONIFIKACJA METADANYCH Z BAZY ARCHIWUM POLSKIEGO RADIA) / HEARING THE DATA: DATACARRIERS (SONIFICATION OF THE METADATA FROM THE DATABASE OF THE POLISH RADIO ARCHIVE) instalacja / installation, 2014

151


ALICJA BONCEL, PL WIKTORJA / IVICTORIA instalacja / installation, 2014

152


KUBA BORKOWICZ, PL ENDURANCE instalacja + wideo / installation + video, 2014

153


KRZYSZTOF BRYŁA, PL CZEKAJĄC NA WINDĘ / WAITING FOR THE LIFT instalacja malarska / painting installation, 2015

154


LTIVA CU CU

MOWA CIAŁA / BODY LANGUAGE

D TE

MICHAŁ BRZEZIŃSKI, PL

LT

URES

instalacja / installation, 2014

155


MICHAEL CANDY, AU BIG DIPPER rzeźba kinetyczno-świetlna / kinetic-light sculpture, 2014 Nagroda WRO 2015 (ex aequo) / The WRO 2015 Award (ex aequo)

156


LTIVA CU CU

WHISPERS

D TE

KATRIN CASPAR + EEVA-LIISA PUHAKKA, DE/FI

LT

URES

instalacja / installation, 2014

157


EMMA CHARLES, UK FRAGMENTS ON MACHINES wideo / video, 2013, 17:10

158


CHLOE CHEUK + KENNY WONG, HK IRIS instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2014

159


SEOUNGHO CHO, KR B1 wideo / video, 2014, 8:21

160


SEOUNGHO CHO, KR LISTED wideo / video, 2014, 10:16

161


SEOUNGHO CHO, KR UNCONCERNED wideo / video, 2013, 19:18

162


ANNA COMIOTTO + MANUEL SCHÜPFER, CH LEUCHTSTATION / ELECTRO-LUMINESCENT ROCK wideo / video, 2013, 6:23

163


GRAYSON COOKE, NZ AGX instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

164


KRZYSZTOF CYBULSKI, PL SPECTRAL SCORE performans dźwiękowy / sound performance, 2013 artyści / artists: mały kontrabas / double bass: Krzysztof Cybulski skrzypce / violin: Łukasz Czekała gitara elektryczna / electric guitar: Przemek Daniłowicz saksofon altowy / alto saxophone: Bolek Jezierski saksofon sopranowy / soprano saxophone: Lena Romul trąbka / trumpet: Kamil Szuszkiewicz viola da gamba: Piotrek Zalewski

165


LTIVA CU

środowisko / environment, 2012-2034 Nagroda Krytyków i Wydawców Prasy Artystycznej / The Critics and Editors of Art Magazines Award

166

CU

SYMBIOTYCZNOŚĆ TWORZENIA / SYMBIOSITY OF CREATION

D TE

JAROSŁAW CZARNECKI, A.K.A. ELVIN FLAMINGO, PL

LT

URES


MATILDE DE FEO, IT IL MIO CORPO A MAGGIO / MY BODY IN MAY wideo / video, 2014, 1:00

167


THIERRY DE MEY, BE FROM INSIDE interaktywny tryptyk wideo / interactive video triptych, 2007 projekt realizowany wsp贸lnie z festiwalem Musica Electronica Nova / project carried out with Musica Electronica Nova Festival program festiwalu / program of the festival: musicaelectronicanova.pl partner projektu / partner of the project: Narodowe Forum Muzyki / National Forum of Music

168


MAREK DEKA, PL NIC DODAĆ / NOTHING MORE obiekt mechaniczny / mechanical object, 2014

169


CARLA DELLA BEFFA, IT BUSINESS AS USUAL wideo / video, 2014, 2:30

170


DOUVE DIJKSTRA, NL DÉMONTABLE wideo / video, 2014, 12:06

171


ALEXEI DMITRIEV, RU THE SHADOW OF YOUR SMILE wideo / video, 2014, 3:05

172


LENA DOBROWOLSKA, PL PRZEJAZD / DRIVE BY wideo / video, 2014, 19:44

173


JAĹš DOMICZ, PL ELEVATOR AND A KID instalacja wideo / video installation, 2015

174


ELEKTRO MOON VISION – POPESZ CSABA LÁNG + ELWIRA WOJTUNIK, HU/PL RANDOM EYE CHECK: REC instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2014

175


LILIANA FARBER, UY WHERE X AND Y wideo / video, 2014, 2:34

176


MOUNIR FATMI, MA SLEEP instalacja wideo / video installation, 2012

177


LUC FERRARI, FR BRISE-GLACE / LODOŁAMACZ koncert–wideoperformans / concert–video performance, 2015 światowe prawykonanie w nowej orkiestracji, z towarzyszeniem projekcji wideo / live performance with the new orchestration and video (the world premiere) wykonawcy / performers:
Orkiestra Symfoniczna NFM / NFM Symphony Orchestra
 dyrygent / conductor: Benjamin Shwartz
fortepian aktor (recytator) / actor (reciter): Anne Sée
 projekcja cyfrowa / digital projection: David Jisse
 wideo / video: Bartosz Konieczny (koprodukcja z Centrum Sztuki WRO / coproduction with WRO Art Center) projekt realizowany wspólnie z festiwalem Musica Electronica Nova / project carried out with Musica Electronica Nova Festival partner projektu / partner of the project: Narodowe Forum Muzyki / National Forum of Music


ALESSANDRO FONTE, IT UNISONO instalacja wideo / video installation, 2013

179


ROCH FOROWICZ + JAREK GRZESICA, PL OPTIKON / OPTICON performans audiowizualny / audiovisual performance, 2012-2014

180


NUNO FRAGATA, PT SÓ / ALONE wideo / video, 2013, 6:30

181


JAKUB FRANK + MATEJ FRANK, CZ/PL ŚCIANY SZUMÓW / NOISE WALLS performans dźwiękowy / sound performance, 2015

182


YA-WEN FU, TW SPACE-IN-BETWEEN performans-instalacja / performance-installation, 2014

183


LARA GAVRIELY, IL EMPIRE SNAKE BUILDING wideo / video, 2013, 15:00

184


WOJCIECH GILEWICZ, PL PAINTER’S PAINTING instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

185


MARINA GIOTI, GR AS TO POSTERITY wideo / video, 2014, 12:00


MAGDALENA GOLBA, PL LOT: LANDING ON TEMPELHOF instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014


MAŁGORZATA GOLISZEWSKA, PL KOMUNIKATY (IDĘ) / MESSAGES (I GO) instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

188


MITCH GOODWIN + CLEMENT FAY, AU/FR MINERAL MACHINE MUSIC wideo / video, 2014, 9:15

189


STEPHAN GROSS, DE LETSWORKTOGETHER wideo / video, 2014, 3:33

190


VANITA GUPTA, IN BALLOON TRILOGY wideo / video, 2012, 1:06 1 2 3

Pranayam (Breath Control) Breathless Liberation

1

2

3

191


LTIVA CU

instalacja / installation, 2014

192

CU

TRANSORG

D TE

SIMONA HALEČKOVÁ, SK

LT

URES


CONSTANTIN HARTENSTEIN, DE ALPHA wideo / video, 2014, 11:12

193


ANNA HAWKINS, CA WITH OUTTHURST ARM wideo / video, 2014, 4:58

194


ANTJE HEYN, DE PAWO wideo / video, 2015, 7:38

195


PAUL HORN, AT TRAFO wideo / video, 2014, 12:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

196


MARTA HRYNIUK, PL BAHASA SUNDA wideo / video, 2014, 12:13

197


FILIP IGNATOWICZ, PL AUTOPORTRET / SELF-PORTRAIT zestaw autoportretów wytworzonych metodami przemysłowymi na różnych nośnikach + wideo / a set of industrially made self-portraits on various media + video, 2014

198


RYO IKESHIRO, UK/JP CONSTRUCTION IN KNEADING generatywny performans audiowizualny / generative audiovisual performance, 2013 projekt wsparty przez / project supported by the EU-Japan Fest Committee

199


IGNACE VAN INGELGOM, BE NOW OR NEVER IGNACE VAN INGELGOM FOR EVER! wideo / video, 2013, 5:57

200


YUK-YIU IP, HK THE PLASTIC GARDEN wideo / video, 2013, 11:00

201


ALEKSANDER JANICKI, PL POWIDOKI / AFTERIMAGES instalacja / installation, 2015

202


PAWEĹ JANICKI + ZBIGNIEW KUPISZ, PL PIES / THE DOG instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2015

203


ANNA JOCHYMEK, PL ZDOBYĆ PRZESTRZEŃ! / INVADE THE SPACE! dwukanałowa instalacja wideo / two-channel video installation, 2014

204


DANIEL JOLLIFFE, CA NEAREST COSTCO, MONUMENT OR SATELLITE instalacja / installation, 2013-2014

205


KATARZYNA JUSTKA, PL ELECTR째CUTE performans audiowizualny / audiovisual performance, 2014

206


WOLF KAHLEN, DE VIDEO TAPES: 1969-2014 biblioteka mediów / media library, 2015 prace Wolfa Kahlena z kolekcji Fundacji WRO / Wolf Kahlen’s works from the WRO Foundation collection

207


IRENA KALICKA, PL CO SIĘ STAŁO, TO SIĘ NIE ODSTANIE / WHAT HAPPENED WILL NOT UNHAPPEN cykl fotografii / series of photographs, 2014

208


SZYMON KALISKI + MAREK STRASZAK, PL SONIC EXPLORER kinetyczno-dźwiękowa instalacja interaktywna / sound-kinetic interactive installation, 2014

209


WIOLETA KAMINSKA, PL/US FOG. AND THE WHOLE WORLD STOPS video installation / instalacja wideo, 2013

210


OLGA KISSELEVA, RU/FR POWER STRUGGLE instalacja interaktywna na urzÄ…dzenia mobilne / interactive installation for mobile devices, 2014

211


RALPH KISTLER, DE SOCIAL NETWALKS instalacja wideo / video installation, 2012

212


ADRIAN KOLARCZYK, PL KOMPRESJA / COMPRESSION dwa obiekty + wideo / two objects + video, 2014

213


MELITI KONTOGIORGI, GR HISTORY LESSONS: DÖNER wideo / video, 2014, 6:03

214


ANNA KOSAREWSKA, UA/PL ZAGADAJ / SPEAK TO ME performans / performance, 2015

215


TOMASZ KOSZEWNIK, PL LUCID DREAM instalacja / installation, 2014

216


DAVID KREMS, AT YO NO VEO CRISIS / I DON’T SEE NO CRISIS wideo / video, 2014, 15:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

217


IGOR KRENZ, PL 8 instalacja wideo / video installation, 2015

218


JULIA KUREK, PL LUCHA LIBRE instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

219


PIOTR KURKA, PL EASY READER instalacja / installation, 2014

220


AGATA KUS, PL GOOD SHAPE

wideo / video, 2014, 2:27

221


AGATA KUS, PL KOCHANKA / MISTRESS wieloekranowa instalacja wideo / multi-screen video installation, 2014 Nagroda WRO 2015 (ex aequo) / The WRO 2015 Award (ex aequo)

222


PEDRO LACERDA, BR NO PLACE LIKE GNOME wideo / video, 2014, 9:00

223


GERARD LEBIK, PL SACCADES. DEKONSTRUKCJA CONTINUUM CZASOPRZESTRZENNEGO / SACCADES: DECONSTRUCTION OF THE SPACE-TIME CONTINUUM ośmiokanałowa instalacja dźwiękowa / eight-channel sound installation, 2015

224


GERARD LEBIK, PL SACCADES live act

225


DOMINIK LEJMAN, PL SZPARA W PODŁODZE / LEAK IN THE FLOOR fresk wideo / found multiple footage, 2014-2015

226


PHILIPPE LEONARD, CA [T] wideo / video, 2015, 12:00

227


SASHA LITVINTSEVA, RU/UK IMMORTALITY, HOME AND ELSEWHERE wideo / video, 2014, 12:26

228


ROBERT LÖBEL, DE WIND wideo / video, 2013, 3:49

229


EVE LUCKRING, US THE JUNICHO VIDEO: RENKU BOOK wideo / video, 2014, 27:10

230


HE-LIN LUO, TW DIGITAL BUDDHA instalacja / installation, 2014

231


AUTOSELBSTREPARATUR / AUTO-REPAIR MICHAEL LYONS, CA wideo / video, 2014, 6:06

232


SZTUKA ZŻYCIA / THE ART OF FAMILIARITY KARINA MADEJ, PL instalacja / installation, 2014

233


JUHA MÄKI-JUSSILA, FI ÄKKIÄ VIIME KESÄNAA / SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER wideo / video, 2013, 4:21

234


PAWEĹ MARCINEK, PL OBECNY / PRESENT instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2015

235


LTIVA CU

(WSPÓŁPRACA / COOPERATION: MARCIN OŻÓG, RAFAŁ SUMISŁAWSKI, PL) generatywna kompozycja dźwiękowa / generative sound composition, 2015

236

CU

KWARTET NA POMIDORY / QUARTET FOR TOMATOES

D TE

MACIEJ MARKOWSKI, PL

LT

URES


LUKAS MARXT, AT REIGN OF SILENCE wideo / video, 2013, 7:20 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

237


TOM MARYNIAK + HOLLY MCLEAN, UK TAKE ME TO THE GREEK wideo / video, 2012-2014, 15:38

238


SEIICHIRO MATSUMURA, JP DANCING MIRROR instalacja interaktywna / interactive installation, 2013 projekt wsparty przez / project supported by the EU-Japan Fest Committee

239


MARTA MIELCAREK, PL INWERSJA / INVERSION dwukanałowa instalacja wideo / two-channel video installation, 2014 nagroda w Pierwszym Konkursie Najlepszych Dyplomów Sztuki Mediów (ex aequo) / The First Competition for Media Arts Graduation Projects Award (ex aequo)

240


JUSTYNA MISIUK, PL ACTORZY / ACTORS czterokanałowa instalacja wideo / four-channel video installation, 2013

241


HARUKA MITANI + MICHAEL LYONS, JP/CA RENAI NO DAIKYOUEN / BANQUET OF LOVE wideo / video, 2014, 6:30 projekt wsparty przez EU-Japan Fest Committee / project supported by the EU-Japan Fest Committee

242


MŁODZI OBLEŚNI – AGATA KUS + MARCIN ŚWIETLICKI, PL KOCHAŁEM JĄ BARDZO / I REALLY LOVED HER wideo / video, 2014, 1:56

243


THOMAS MOHR, NL ON HANNE DARBOVEN / IN CONCLUSION wideo / video, 2014, 8:27

244


JOACHIM MONTESSUIS, FR LE VRAY REMÈDE D’AMOUR performans / performance, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

245


JOACHIM MONTESSUIS, FR VOCAL CODES ekstremalny psychotropowy trans i noise’owy rytuał na głos, sensory i komputer / ultimate psychotropic vocal trance and noise ritual for voice, sensors and a computer, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

246


DANIEL MOSHEL, DE METUBE: AUGUST SINGS CARMEN “HABANERA” wideo / video, 2014, 4:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

247


HELMUT MUNZ, AT THE CONSTRUCTION OF ANSTALT 3000 wideo / video, 2013, 5:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

248


CHRISTIAN NICCOLI, IT OHNE TITEL / UNTITLED wideo / video, 2013, 4:15

249


KATSUKI NOGAMI, JP 山田太郎プロジェクト / YAMADATAROPROJECT performans partycypacyjny w przestrzeniach publicznych / participatory performance in public spaces, 2014 projekt wsparty przez EU-Japan Fest Committee / project supported by the EU-Japan Fest Committee

250


KATSUKI NOGAMI, JP レキオン-礫音- / REKION-CREPITATIONperformans dźwiękowy / sound performance, 2014 projekt wsparty przez EU-Japan Fest Committee / project supported by the EU-Japan Fest Committee

251


ARNONT NONGYAO, TH DRINK SKY ON RABBIT’S FIELD (LOST CONTROL) wideo / video, 2014, 6:55

252


DOBROSナ、WA NOWAK, PL WSZYSTKO, CO LUDZKIE JEST MI OBCE / EVERYTHING HUMAN IS ALIEN TO ME instalacja wideo / video installation, 2013

253


MACIEJ OLSZEWSKI, PL DIY (DESTROY IT YOURSELF) cykl wideo ujęty w kanał tematyczny + zestaw obiektów / video series forming a thematic channel + a set of objects, 2014

254


JUSTYNA ORŁOWSKA, PL POSTRZYŻYNY / POSTRIZINY obiekt + wideo / object + video, 2014

255


MARIA ORNAF, PL BENIGHTED wideo / video, 2014, 7:00

256


PRZEMEK OSTASZEWSKI, A.K.A. OSMO NADIR, PL THE RITE MACHINE performans audiowizualny / audiovisual performance, 2014

257


PANGENERATOR – PIOTR BARSZCZEWSKI + KRZYSZTOF CYBULSKI + KRZYSZTOF GOLIŃSKI + JAKUB KOŹNIEWSKI, PL ECHOOOOOOOO kinetyczno-dźwiękowa instalacja interaktywna / interactive audio-kinetic installation, 2014

258


ALEXANDER PAWLIK, PL NATURA PIEKナ、 / NATURE OF HELL wideo / video, 2014, 3:55

259


MIROSŁAW BAŁKA’S STUDIO OF SPATIAL ACTIVITIES / PDP – PRACOWNIA DZIAŁAŃ PRZESTRZENNYCH MIROSŁAWA BAŁKI, PL

WSPOMNIENIE PŁACZĄCEGO DRZEWA I MOTYLA, PIJĄCEGO ŁZY, JEST JAK ŚWIATŁO W KOŚCIELE, DO KTÓREGO PROWADZI MOST WIODĄCY PRZEZ RZEKĘ I JEJ BRZEG, NA KTÓRYM STOI GROMADA NIOSĄCA W CISZY WYKŁADZINĘ DO BIBLIOTEKI, GDZIE SĄ SZKLANE DRZWI, PORZĄDEK I ALARM / THE MEMORY OF A CRYING TREE AND THE BUTTERFLY, FEASTING, IS LIKE THE LIGHT OF A CHURCH, FROM WHICH A BRIDGE IS LEADING ACROSS THE RIVER AND ITS BANKS, ON WHICH THE CROWD IS SILENTLY CARRYING A CARPET TO THE LIBRARY, WHERE THE GLASS DOORS AND ORDER, AND ALARM ARE projekt dopasowany do miejsca, powstały w ramach warsztatów Pracowni Działań Przestrzennych Mirosława Bałki (as. Anna Jochymek), Wydział Sztuki Mediów Akademii Sztuk Pięknych w Warszawie / a site-specific exhibition as a result of an interdisciplinary workshop with students from the Mirosław Bałka’s Studio of Spatial Activities (asst. Anna Jochymek), Faculty of Media Art, Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw 2015 Uczestnicy-studenci / Students-participants: 1

Krzysztof Bagiński (PL)

2

Max Brück (DE)

3

Tymek Bryndal (PL)

4

Zuzanna Golińska (PL) + Magdalena Łazarczyk (PL)

5

Laura Grudniewska (PL)

6

Marie Grunwald (DE)

7

Barbara Gryka (PL)

8

Sören Hiob (DE)

9

Marc Norbert Hörler (CH)

10

Monika Karczmarczyk (PL)

11

Justyna Łoś (PL)

12

Michalina Musielak (PL)

13

Agnieszka M. Nowak (PL)

14

Polen Performance ( Justyna Łoś, Mikołaj Sobczak)

15

Iwo Rachwał (PL)

16

Marcin Romaniuk (PL)

17

Jana Shostak (PL) + Piotr Urbaniec (PL)

18

Mikołaj Sobczak (PL)

19

Monika Skomra (PL)

20

Julia Staniszewska (PL)

21

Grzegorz Stefański (PL)

260

1


2

7

12

17

3

8

13

18

4

9

14

19

5

10

15

20

6

11

16

21

261


BERTRAND PLANES + ARNAULD COLCOMB, FR MODULATEUR-DEMODULATEUR / MODULATOR-DEMODULATOR instalacja / installation, 2014 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

262


DANI PLOEGER, NL / UK CHARGING instalacja / installation, 2014

263


GILBERTTO PRADO, BR ENCONTROS / MEETING OF WATERS instalacja / installation, 2015 projekt wsparty przez Instytut Adama Mickiewicza / project supported by Adam Mickiewicz Institute

264


AFRODITI PSARRA + MARIA VARELA + MARINOS KOUTSOMICHALIS, GR OIKO-NOMIC THREADS system interaktywny / interactive system, 2014

265


PSIE KŁAKI – MARCELO ZAMMENHOFF (PL) + FUMOS FUMOWICZ (PL) BEZ TYTUŁU / UNTITLED performans dźwiękowy / sound performance

266


SHUAI CHENG PU, TW 意志陀螺計畫 / CONSCIOUSNESS SPIN PROJECT dwukanałowa instalacja wideo / two-channel video installation, 2014 projekt wsparty przez / project supported by the National Culture and Arts Foundation, Taiwan

267


FILIP GABRIEL PUDŁO, PL OPERATION CASTLE wideo / video, 2013, 4:20

268


QUAYOLA, IT/UK CAPTIVES rzeźby / sculptures, 2014

269


HANNES RALL, DE SI LUNCHAI wideo / video, 2014, 8:36

270


HANNES RALL, DE DAS KALTE HERZ / THE COLD HEART wideo / video, 2013, 29:00

271


LETÍCIA RAMOS, BR Future Perfect: The Time Out of Joint – Letícia Ramos and Luiz Roque in Videobrasil collection / Letícia Ramos i Luiz Roque w kolekcji Videobrasil kurator / curated by: Thereza Farkas
 projekt wsparty przez Instytut Adama Mickiewicza / project supported by Adam Mickiewicz Institute

Letícia Ramos, Vostok, 2014, wideo / video, 35mm, 7:00

1

Letícia Ramos, ERBF – Instantâneo Sequencial 1 e 3, 2008, wideo / video, 35mm, 2:30

2

Letícia Ramos, Jardim fantástico, 2014, 35mm/HD, 3:00

3

Letícia Ramos + Luiz Roque, Estufa, 2004, wideo / video, 35mm, 3:00

4

1

2

3

4

272


OLIVER RESSLER, AT THE VISIBLE AND THE INVISIBLE wideo / video, 2014, 20:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

273


JÓZEF ROBAKOWSKI, PL ZAPISY DOKAMEROWE JÓZEFA ROBAKOWSKIEGO (CZĘŚĆ I) / JÓZEF ROBAKOWSKI’S NOTES ON TAPE (PART 1) prezentuje / presented by: Józef Robakowski

Zapis. Czyszczenie sztuki / Art Cleaning: REC, 1972, Galeria Zero, Warszawa,

1

35 mm, transfer to video, 4:00

Ewa Partum, Zmiana / Change, 1974, Galeria Adres, Łódź, film 35mm transferred to video, 2:30

2

Andrzej Różycki + Borys Różycki, Akcja w Galerii Wschodniej / Action at the Wschodnia Gallery, 1990, Łódź, wideo /

3

video, 8:30

Dwa żywe obrazy / Two Tableaux Vivants, 1990, CSW Warszawa, wideo / video, 3:30

4

Andrzej Partum, 363092, 1990, Cmentarz na Ogrodowej, Łódź, wideo / video, 8:00

5

Ewa Zarzycka, Wieża / Tower, 1990, Zamek Książąt Pomorskich, Darłowo, wideo / video, 5:00

6

Zbigniew Warpechowski, Papier / Paper, 1993, Zamek Krasiczyn, wideo / video, 19:00

7

Leszek Knaflewski (koncert na trumnę), For You, 1999, Galeria Wschodnia, Łódź, wideo / video, 11:00

8

1

5

2

6

3

7

4

8

274


JÓZEF ROBAKOWSKI, PL ZAPISY DOKAMEROWE JÓZEFA ROBAKOWSKIEGO (CZĘŚĆ II) / JÓZEF ROBAKOWSKI’S NOTES ON TAPE (PART 2) prezentuje / presented by: Józef Robakowski

Idę / I’m going, 1973, film-performance 35 mm transferred to video, 3:00

1

Bliżej-Dalej / Nearer-Farther, 1985, wideo / video, 4:00

2

Mój teatr / My Theatre, 1985, wideoperformans / video performance, 8:30

3

Taniec z Lajkonikiem / Dance with the Lajkonik, 1991, wideo / video, 4:00

4

Reinkarnacja (Mistrzowi) / Reincarnation (for the Master), 1974, film 35 mm transferred to video, 8:00

5

Jestem elektryczny / I am Electric, 1996, wideo / video, 14:00

6

O palcach / About Fingers, 1981, 16mm, 5:00

7

Ojej! boli mnie noga… / Ouch, My Foot Hurts…, 1990, wideo / video 3:00

8

Koncert na głowę z Rudzikiem / A Concerto for the Head with Rudzik, 2009, wideo / video, 4:30

9 10 11 12

Piegi / Freckles, 2014, wideo / video, 10:00

La-Lu (z lalką) / La-Li (with the Doll), 2014, wideo / video, 2:20

Manifest energetyczny / The Energy Manifesto, 2003, wideo / video, 2:00

1

5

9

2

6

10

3

7

11

4

8

12

275


HECTOR RODRIGUEZ, ES THEOREM 8 trzykanałowa instalacja wideo / three-channel video installation, 2013-2014

276


RONNIE S, NL/NO RONNIE S IN LESS THAN 7 MINUTES (PART 6: OVERCOMMITED) wideo / video, 2014, 6:32

277


LUIZ ROQUE, BR Future Perfect: The Time Out of Joint – Letícia Ramos and Luiz Roque in Videobrasil collection / Letícia Ramos i Luiz Roque w kolekcji Videobrasil kurator / curated by: Thereza Farkas
 projekt wsparty przez Instytut Adama Mickiewicza / project supported by Adam Mickiewicz Institute 1 2 3 4 5

Luiz Roque + Letícia Ramos, Estufa, 2004, wideo / video, 35mm, 3:00

Luiz Roque, Geometria Descritiva, 2012, instalacja wideo / video installation

Luiz Roque, O Novo Monumento, 2012, film 16mm transferred to video, 5:35 Luiz Roque, O Triunfo, 2011, wideo / video, 3:15

Luiz Roque, Ano Branco, 2013, wideo / video, 7:00 (współprodukowany z 9. Mercosul Biennial w Porto Alegre / co-produced by the 9th Mercosul Biennial in Porto Alegre)

1

2

3

5

278

4


MACIEJ RUDZIN, PL DISPLACEMENT dyptyk / diptych, 2014

279


IRMINA RUSICKA, PL HETEROTOPIE / HETEROTOPIAS działanie w przestrzeni / space intervention, 2015

280


BIONI SAMP, UK BEESPACE OR HIVE SYNTHESIS performans audiowizualny / audiovisual performance, 2013

281


HANS SCHEUGL, AT HOMELESS NEW YORK 1990 wideo / video, 1990-2014, 18:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

282


MARKO SCHIEFELBEIN, DE RETAIL THERAPY wideo / video, 2015, 4:43

283


JOHANNA SCHMEER, DE BIOPLASTIC FANTASTIC: BETWEEN PRODUCTS AND ORGANISMS wideo / video, 2014, 4:00

284


SEBASTIAN SCHMIEG + SILVIO LORUSSO, DE/IT 56 BROKEN KINDLE SCREENS instalacja / installation, 2012

285


SAŠO SEDLAČEK, SI JOBLESS AVATARS (THE REAL CURRICULUM) wideo / video, 2014, 5:41

286


ANTJE SEEGER, DE NAMEDROPPING wideo / video, 2014, 4:02

287


IZABELA SITARSKA, PL POMIĘDZY / BETWEEN instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

288


KARINA SMIGLA-BOBINSKI, PL/DE SIMULACRA instalacja / installation, 2013

289


JOHN SMITH, UK WHITE HOLE wideo / video, 2014, 6:42

290


KAROLINA SPYRKA, PL THE MOST WONDERFUL WOMAN THAT I KNOW wideo / video, 2014, 5:19

291


SAMUEL ST-AUBIN, CA TABLESPOONS instalacja / installation, 2015

292


PAWEŁ STASIEWICZ, PL SŁUCHOWISKO DO WYŚWIETLANIA / RADIOPLAY FOR DISPLAY instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

293


ERIC STIL (FR) BEZ TYTUŁU / UNTITLED dj set

294


CHRISTOPHER STEEL, UK MY GRANDAD KILLED YOUR GRANDAD, DOODAH DOODAH wideo / video, 2015, 4:55

295


MARIA STOŻEK, PL TERYTORIA / TERRITORIES instalacja wideo / video installation, 2013

296


ARYA SUKAPURA PUTRA, ID E-RUQYAH wideo / video, 2013, 2:08

297


ŁUKASZ SZAŁANKIEWICZ, A.K.A. ZENIAL + ADAM DONOVAN, PL/AU SATURN3 performans dźwiękowy / sound performance, 2013

298


ARASH T. RIAHI, AT THAT HAS BEEN BOTHERING ME THE WHOLE TIME wideo / video, 2013, 10:00 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

299


KASPER T. TOEPLITZ, PL/FR INFRA_EXPOSURE pięciodniowy performans / a five-day long performance, 2015 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

300


JULIA TASZYCKA, PL A VERY SAD STORY wideo w portalu społecznościowym + obiekt / video released onto one of the social media accounts + object, 2014

301


SAŠA TATIĆ, BA LIGHT DEFENSE wideo / video, 2014, 3:05

302


STEFAN TIEFENGRABER, AT USER-GENERATED SERVER DESTRUCTION instalacja generatywna / generative installation, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

303


STEFAN TIEFENGRABER, AT WM_EX10 TCM_200DV A1.2FPP BK26 performans audiowizualny / audiovisual performance, 2014 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

304


MARIA TOBOナ、, PL TAKE ME TO YOUR DEALER wideo + zestaw pasteli / video + oil pastels, 2014

305


JACOB TONSKI, US BALANCE FROM WITHIN obiekt / object, 2012

306


SUZANNE TREISTER, UK HEXEN 2.0 instalacja / installation, 2009-2011

307


PATRICK TRESSET, FR/UK 5 ROBOTS NAMED PAUL (5RNP) instalacja robotyczna / robotic installation, 2012

308


ALEKSANDRA TROJANOWSKA, PL PYTANIA NA WSZYSTKIE ODPOWIEDZI / QUESTIONS TO ALL ANSWERS instalacja / installation, 2014

309


EWELINA TURKOT, PL ROZPRAWA O GRAFICE / TREATISE ON GRAPHICS ingerencja / ingerention, 2015

310


LECH TWARDOWSKI, PL DEKOMPRESJA CZASU / DECOMPRESSION OF TIME wideo + obiekt / video + object, 2015

311


KRISTA VAN DER WILK, NL CUBEBENDER instalacja dopasowana do miejsca / site-specific installation, 2015

312


DANIEL VAN WESTEN, DE RECENTLY IN THE WOODS wideo / video, 2013, 1:00

313


ROY VILLEVOYE, NL VOICE-OVER wideo / video, 2015, 21:19

314


VINCENT VOILLAT, FR TAPIS ROULANTS / ROLLING CARPETS instalacja / installation, 2015 projekt wsparty przez Institut Français w Paryżu / project supported by Institut Français in Paris

315


KAY WALKOWIAK, AT MINIMAL VANDALISM instalacja wideo / video installation, 2013 projekt wsparty przez Austriackie Forum Kultury w Warszawie / project supported by the Austrian Cultural Forum in Warsaw

316


ALEKSANDRA WAŁASZEK, PL NA ŻYWO / LIVE działanie na żywo / live act, 2015

317


MAREK WASILEWSKI, PL ZATOKA MARTWYCH HOTELI / DEAD HOTLES’ BAY wideo / video, 2013, 3:49

318


WECHSELSTROM – RENATE PITTROFF + CHRISTOPH THEILER, DE FLUID CONTROL performans multimedialny / multimedia performance, 2012

319


MARTA WĘGLIŃSKA, PL PONOWIONE SYTUACJE / REPEATED SITUATIONS wideo + zapis dźwiękowy + książka / video + sound record + book, 2013-2014

320


RAFAŁ WILK, PL CZARNA DZIURA (OSTATNIA AKCJA DYNAMICZNA) / BLACK HOLE wideo / video, 2013, 7:51

321


JAYNE WILSON, UK ON AIR: TUNING INTO WIRELESS wideo / video, 2014, 6:01

322


SZYMON WOJTYナ、, PL AC instalacja kinetyczna / kinetic installation, 2014

323


TOMEK WÓDKIEWICZ (PL) BEZ TYTUŁU / UNTITLED dj set

324


KAMILA WOLSZCZAK, PL NAWARSTWIANIE / BUILD UP installation / instalacja, 2014

325


KENNY WONG, HK SQUINT instalacja / installation, 2014

326


TIMO WRIGHT, FI UNFIT wideo / video, 2013, 8:27

327


PIOTR WYRZYKOWSKI, A.K.A. PETER STYLE, PL PROTEST aplikacja obywatelskiego sprzeciwu / civilt revolt app, 2015

328


CYRYL ZAKRZEWSKI, PL METAMORPHOSIS instalacja / installation, 2015

329


MARCELO ZAMMENHOFF, PL NIEWYGODNY KOMUNIKAT / AN INCONVENIENT ANNOUNCEMENT instalacja / installation, 2015 praca powstała na zamówienie Narodowego Centrum Kultury / work commissioned by the Narodowe Centrum Kultury

330


JOANNA ZEMANEK, PL AFTERBEFORE instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014, 1:27

331


RAFAŁ ŻARSKI, PL UKŁAD ZAMKNIĘTY / CLOSED CIRCUIT instalacja wideo / video installation, 2014

332


CONFERENCES


WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE: CONFERENCE / KONFERENCJA CO SZTUKA MOŻE DAĆ NAUCE? WHAT CAN ART DO FOR SCIENCE? kurator / curated by: Ryszard W. Kluszczyński
 CZĘŚĆ I / PART 1:
 Olga Kisseleva (FR), Pantheon-Sorbonne University, Paris Artysta jako badacz: nowe procesy i materiały w sztuce współczesnej / Artist as Researcher: New Process and New Materials in Contemporary Art Ingeborg Reichle (DE), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Sztuka, nauka i społeczeństwo: kiedy sztuka staje sie zinstytucjonalizowana praktyka społeczna / Art, Science, and Society: When Art becomes Institutionalized Social Practice Ryszard W. Kluszczyński (PL), University of Łódź art@science vis-à-vis citizen science: produkcja wiedzy w Wiki świecie / art@science vis-à-vis citizen science: Knowledge Production in the Wiki World CZĘŚĆ II / PART 2: Roger Malina (US), University of Texas, Dallas Kryzys w reprezentacji danych: w poszukiwaniu nowych dróg eksplorowania i przyswajania danych / The Crisis in Data Representation: Re-imagining Ways of Exploring and Inhabiting Data
 Joanna Zylinska (PL/UK), Goldsmiths College, University of London Skamieniałości mediów: fotografia po wyginięciu / Fossils as Media: Photography after Extinction Monika Bakke (PL), Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań Sztuka ciała roślin: dlaczego roślin nie należy rozumieć nieprawidłowo / Plant-Body Art: Why Plants Don’t Need to Be Understatement
 Andreas Broeckmann (DE), Lüneburg Universität, Germany

Trudny dialog między „sztuką” a „nauką” / The Difficult Dialogue Between “Art” and “Science”

334


335


WRO 2015 TEST EXPOSURE: CONFERENCE / KONFERENCJA HACKING OF THE SOCIAL OPERATING SYSTEM HAKOWANIE SPOŁECZNEGO SYSTEMU OPERACYJNEGO kurator / curated by: Edwin Bendyk
 CZĘŚĆ I / PART 1:
 Piotr Wyrzykowski (PL), Aplikacje mobilne do wyrażania wkurwienia / Mobile Applications for Anger Expression Oliver Ressler (AT), Widzialne i Niewidzialne / The Visible and the Invisible
 Alain Renk (FR), Wikibuilding: Architektura open source’owa / Wikibuilding: Open Source Architecture CZĘŚĆ II / PART 2: Bogna Świątkowska (PL), Antyprojekt. Przejęcie / Antiproject: A Take Over
 Maciej Frąckowiak (PL), Nie wszystko w mieście musi być sexy. Zatory i miejski rozwój /
 Not Everything in the City Has to Be Sexy: Congestion and Urban Development
 Karol Piekarski (PL), Dataaktywizm oraz inne formy walki o kontrolę miejskich interfejsów / Dataactivism and Other Forms of Struggle to Control City Interfaces

WORKSHOPS ACCOMPANYING THE CONFERENCE WARSZTATY TOWARZYSZĄCE KONFERENCJI Alain Renk (FR), Unlimited Cities DIY
 Karol Piekarski (PL), Infoaktywizm dla początkujących / Infoactivism for the Beginners


337


CREDITS Dyrektor / Director: Violetta Kutlubasis-Krajewska Dyrektor artystyczny / Artistic director: Piotr Krajewski Główni producenci / Chief producers: Zbigniew Kupisz Małgorzata Sikorska Kuratorzy / Curators: Piotr Krajewski Dagmara Domagała Paweł Janicki Klio Krajewska Magdalena Kreis Agnieszka Kubicka-Dzieduszycka Kamila Wolszczak Współpraca kuratorska / Curatorial cooperation: Krzysztof Dobrowolski Dominika Kluszczyk Barbara Kręgiel Michał Michałczak Małgorzata Sikorska Zaproszeni kuratorzy / Guest curators: Thereza Farkas Piotr Choromański Jakub Fereński Agnieszka Wolny-Hamkało Publiczność pokazów preselekcyjnych / Preview audience

338

Kuratorzy konferencji / Conference curators: Edwin Bendyk Ryszard W. Kluszczyński Produkcja i koordynacja konferencji / Conference production and coordination: Dominika Kluszczyk Identyfikacja wizualna / Visual design: Bartosz Konieczny Michał Loba (Małe WRO / Little WRO) Ewa Głowacka (GG-SUW) Informacja & PR / Information & PR: Krzysztof Dobrowolski Webmaster: Michał Szota Tłumacze symultaniczni / Interpreters: Ewa Kanigowska-Gedroyć, Paweł Granicki Producenci poszczególnych miejsc / Venue producers: Marie Magneron (Biblioteka Uniwersytecka / Wroclaw University Library) Maciej Markowski (Muzeum Narodowe / National Museum in Wroclaw) Jan Tarnowski (DH Renoma / Renoma Department Store) Open Up – Kinga Dobrowolska (Teatr Polski – Scena na Świebodzkim / Polski Theatre – Świebodzki Train Station Stage) Dominika Kluszczyk (Filharmonia Wrocławska / Wroclaw Philharmonic)


Zespół realizacyjny / Production team: Michał Michałczak Tomasz Bagnowski Adam Bagnowski Filip Bazarnik Grzegorz Hoja Igor Jurkiewicz Michał Kielan Fabien Lédé Agnieszka Michałowska Sergiy Petlyuk Jakub Robaszewski Wojciech Skiba Szymon Wojtyła Konrad Zwojszczyk Teatr Polski – Scena na Świebodzkim / Polski Theatre – Świebodzki Train Station Stage: Dariusz Bartołd Danuta Bartyna Kazimierz Blacharski Adam Buraczek Jacek Cimicki Maciej Kabata Klaudiusz Łuszczyna Jeremi Majczyk Jacek Nowak Andrzej Sus Joanna Śliwa Agnieszka Tiutiunik Robert Wnukowski Przygotowanie projekcji wideo / Video screenings preparation: Bartosz Konieczny Paulina Mielnik

Współpraca architektoniczna / Exhibition architecture cooperation: Piotr Choromański Technika projekcyjna i multimedia / Screening technology and multimedia: Eidotech Polska: Radek Pater – dyrektor techniczny / technical director Paweł Wolski – dyrektor techniczny / technical director Michał Dominik Sebastian Góreczny Jarosław Jóźwiak Rafał Król Andree Wochnowski Technika dźwiękowa / Audio technology: PogoArt: Wojciech „Siemion” Igielski, Marcin Maksymiec, Rafał Skiba Współpraca realizacyjna / Realisation cooperation: Barbara Brzezińska (Biblioteka Uniwersytecka / Wroclaw University Library) Natalia Klingbajl (Filharmonia Wrocławska / Wroclaw Philharmonic) Robert Obarski (Biblioteka Uniwersytecka / Wroclaw University Library) Katarzyna Popiel (Musica Electronica Nova Festival) Andrzej Rerak (Galeria Entropia / Entropia Gallery) Piotr Ziółek (Muzeum Narodowe / National Museum in Wroclaw) Księgowość / Accounting: Jan Dorawa, Bożena Horodniczy

339


Wykonanie elementów ekspozyjnych / Exposition elements preparation: Radosław Maślankowski Metal-Spaw Public Address Polska Michał Michałczak Zespół Centrum Sztuki WRO Druki wielkoformatowe / Large prints: Print and Fresc – Michał Maliszewski Technika informatyczna / IT technology: Goodpaint – Jarosław Ćwirzeń Transmisja konferencji / Conference streaming: Grownet Limited: Justyna Stefańska, Mariusz Dąbrowski, Michał Stenzel Prace wysokościowe / Work at height: Elbrus – Paweł Jarowicz Zakwaterowanie / Accomodation: Magdalena Woronowicz – Puro Hotel Katarzyna Kwinta – B&B hotel Transfer z lotniska / Shuttle service: Michał Słodkiewicz Stażyści / Interns: Aleksandra Błażków, Laura Grande, Katarzyna Jeleń, Kamil Kawalec, Sebastian Siepietowski, Maurycy Wiliczkiewicz Wolontariusze / Volunteers: Klaudia Baśko, Natalia Borkowska, Daniel Brewiński, Patrycja Budzyk, Joanna Chlebowska, Maja Dubowska, Iryna Fedorenko, Daniel Filipek, Iuliia Glushak, Yelyzaveta Goloborodko, Agnieszka Górniak-Korzeń, Marta Gruca, 340

Estera Gundlach Fober, Aleksandra Horn, Hélène Ioannidis, Izabela Jagosz, Iwona Januszewska, Anna Kalakutska, Iwona Kałuża, Adrianna Kaźmierczak, Ewa Kilar, Jagoda Kozon, Narcyza Krajewska, Klaudia Kula, Marta Krzyśków, Ewelina Lipczak, Daria Ławniczak, Sebastian Łąkas, Julia Łowińska, Martyna Łykowska, Anna Malinowska, Anna Masłoń, Michał Mejnartowicz, Maria Violetta Mishchenko, Weronika Morańska, Kateryna Olieshko, Katarzyna Otrębska, Agata Polak, Michał Pietrzak, Kamila Pisarek, Bartosz Przybylski, Małgorzata Reszka, Damian Salachna, Maja Sądel, Liubov Shynder, Natalia Sidorska, Karolina Słowińska, Szymon Stoczek, Aleksandra Strączek, Natalia Szeligowska, Krystian Szeloch, Mateusz Szczerba, Agnieszka Trybel, Olga Walkowiak, Klaudia Widz, Irmina Witos, Karolina Wojciechowska, Marek Włoch, Magdalena Wujec, Michał Wysocki, Małgorzata Zych * Redakcja tekstów przewodnika i publikacji elektronicznych / Editors of the WRO guide and online publications: Violetta Kutlubasis-Krajewska, Barbara Kręgiel, Dagmara Domagała, Krzysztof Dobrowolski Redakcja Gazety na WRO / Editors of the Gazeta na WRO paper: Agata Saraczyńska, Violetta Kutlubasis-Krajewska, Barbara Kręgiel


Tłumaczenie tekstów / Translation: Sherill Howard Pociecha Barbara Kręgiel Agnieszka Kubicka-Dzieduszycka Dagmara Domagała Jan Tarnowski Klio Krajewska Magdalena Krypiak Szymon Stoczek Kalina Jarosz Dokumentacja wideo / Video documentation: Bartosz Konieczny Dawid Biernat Daniel Filipek Paulina Mielnik Michał Stenzel Artur Szczepaniak Redakcja programów Telewizji Polskiej / Editors of the programs for the Polish Television: Iwona Rosiak (redaktor główny / chief editor) Lidia Chojnacka (producent / producer) Andrzej Jóźwik (redaktor / editor) Paweł Gołębski (redaktor / editor) Marcin Wenzel (operator kamery / cameraman) Bartosz Kieres (dźwięk / sound) Robert Piechnik (montaż / editing) Realizacja audycji radiowych / Radio broadcasts: Grzegorz Chojnowski – szef redakcji / chief editor – Radio Wrocław Kultura Maciej Przestalski – Radio Wrocław Kultura Konrad Zalewski, Maja Kawiak – Akademickie Radio LUZ / Academic LUZ Radio

Podziękowania / Special thanks: Jarosław Broda – dyrektor Wydziału Kultury, Urząd Miejski Wrocław / Director of the Department of Culture of Wroclaw’s Municipal Office Ali Dadressan – prezes Verity Development Sp. z o.o. / CEO, Verity Development Ltd. Marcin Fajfruk – koordynator zespołu ds. promocji, Biuro Rektora Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego / Promotion and Information Office, Rector’s Office, University of Wroclaw Iwona Furmanik – Adcapital, Pokoyhof Passage Mariusz Jodko, Alicja Jodko – Galeria Entropia / The Entropia Gallery prof. Piotr Kielan – rektor Akademii Sztuk Pięknych im. Eugeniusza Gepperta we Wrocławiu / Rector of the Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art and Design in Wroclaw Anna Klimczak – prezes Fundacji Griffin Art Space / President of the Griffin Art Space Foundation Andrzej Kosendiak – dyrektor Narodowego Forum Muzyki / Director of the National Forum of Music Przemysław Krych – założyciel, prezes zarządu, Griffin Real Estate / Founder & CEO, Griffin Real Estate

341


Krzysztof Mieszkowski – dyrektor Teatru Polskiego / director of the Polski Theatre in Wroclaw dr Andrzej Ostrowski – kierownik Biura Rektora Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego / Director of the Rector’s Office, University of Wroclaw dr hab. Piotr Oszczanowski – dyrektor Muzeum Narodowego / Director of the National Museum in Wroclaw Grażyna Piotrowicz – st. kustosz dyplomowany, dyrektor Biblioteki Uniwersyteckiej / senior certified custody, director of the Wroclaw University Library Andrzej Saj – redaktor naczelny magazynu Format / editor-in-chief, Format magazine Elżbieta Sikora – dyrektor artystyczna festiwalu Musica Electronica Nova / Artistic Director, Musica Electronica Nova Festival prof. Jacek Szewczyk – dziekan Wydziału Grafiki i Sztuki Mediów Akademii Sztuk Pięknych im. Eugeniusza Geppert we Wrocławiu / Dean of the Faculty of Graphic Arts and Media Art, The Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art and Design in Wroclaw Barbara Wójcik – dyrektor DH Renoma / Director, Renoma Department Store

Redakcja katalogu / Editors of the catalog: Violetta Kutlubasis-Krajewska Piotr Krajewski Barbara Kręgiel Tłumaczenia / Translation: Patrycja Poniatowska Barbara Kręgiel Projekt graficzny i skład / Graphic design and typesetting: Bartosz Konieczny Zdjęcia / Photos: Mirosław Emil Koch Bartosz Konieczny Zbigniew Kupisz Marcin Maziej Roland Okoń Artur Szczepaniak Aleksandra Bełz-Rajtak Andrzej Rerak Opracowanie materiałów fotograficznych / Photo editor: Kolen – Adam Kolenda Korekta / Proofreading: Dorota Sapińska Druk / Print: Grafix Centrum Poligrafii, Gdańsk Organizator / Organizer: Fundacja WRO Centrum Sztuki Mediów / WRO Center for Media Art Foundation Centrum Sztuki WRO / WRO Art Center www.wrocenter.pl

All rights reserved © 2016, the WRO ART CENTER and respective artists and authors ISBN: 978-83-944401-0-7


Dofinansowano ze środków Gminy Wrocław / Co-funded by Municipality of Wroclaw www.wroclaw.pl | www.kreatywnywroclaw.pl Dofinansowano ze środków Ministra Kultury i Dziedzictwa Narodowego / Co-funded by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage www.mkidn.gov.pl


17th MEDIA ART BIENNALE WRO 2017

OPENING EVENTS: MAY 17th–21st, 2017



346