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TheWoodmereAnnual 73RD JURIED EXHIBITION

JUNE 14 – SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

TELLING THE STORY OF

PHILADELPHIA’S ART AND ARTISTS


Funding thank you text 90 words max.


The Woodmere Annual 73rd Juried Exhibition

CONTENTS Foreword 2 A Conversation with Juror Sarah McEneaney 4 Schnader Gallery 24 Kuch Gallery and Dorothy J. del Bueno Balcony Galleries 42 Stairwell Gallery 134 Works in the Exhibition 150

June 14 - September 1, 2014

TELLING THE STORY OF

PHILADELPHIA’S ART AND ARTISTS


FOREWORD

WILLIAM R. VALERIO, PHD

Through the generosity of the

The Patricia Van Burgh Allison

American Academy of Arts and Letters,

Director and CEO

McEneaney’s magical Solstice Five-0 (2005) has become a treasured part of

Woodmere Art Museum has always

Woodmere’s collection. The painting—

engaged with Philadelphia’s living artists.

which depicts a nude, nighttime fete on a

With our annual juried exhibition, newly

San Francisco beach—is an embellished

renamed the Woodmere Annual, we roll

account of a solstice celebration that the

up our sleeves and explore the great

artist attended, a moment of liberation

range of our city’s arts in all mediums,

from the restraints of modern life.

investigating the many questions our McEneaney’s vision is one in which the

artists raise about our times.

elements of nature and the city are The Annual exhibition has also taken

mixed. Anyone who knows her personally

on new dimensions as Philadelphia’s

is aware of her leadership in the effort

art scene has grown bigger and more

to “green” the Reading Viaduct, an

diverse. Every year, I meet more and

abandoned railroad and viaduct that

more young artists who have graduated

runs through her North Philadelphia

from our city’s great art schools and are

neighborhood. In the conversation

choosing to build their careers here. “I’m

transcribed in this catalogue, McEneaney

a painter, and I not only enjoy being part

talks about how her civic, social interests

of the community of dedicated painters

influence her artistic practice, as well as

in Philadelphia, but I also feel the positive

her selections for the exhibition.

energy of the expanding community of We are deeply grateful to Sarah

artists,” says Sarah McEneaney, juror of

McEneaney for every aspect of her

this year’s Annual.

work as juror of this year’s Annual. It is 2


work as juror of this year’s Annual. It is

express gratitude to Victor Keen for

a beautiful, interesting exhibition with

generous support that completed the

many surprises, and it is sure to please

funding for the exhibition. Thank you

our visitors. We thank Woodmere’s staff,

all for helping Woodmere to make

including Sally Larson, Rachel McCay,

Philadelphia a better, more interesting

and Rick Ortwein, who handled the

place for artists to live and work.

complicated logistics of the exhibition, and Emma Hitchcock, who produced the digital catalogue. We extend our appreciation to the Drumcliff Foundation for again supporting the Annual, and

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A CONVERSATION WITH JUROR SARAH MCENEANEY

On Thursday, April 3, 2014, Sarah McEneaney, juror of the Woodmere Annual: 73rd Juried Exhibition met with William Valerio, the Museum’s Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and CEO; Rachel McCay, Assistant Curator; and Rick Ortwein, Deputy Director of Exhibitions, to talk about the work selected for this year’s Annual exhibition. WILLIAM VALERIO: We are now calling the

a huge fire, take their clothes off, go in the

juried exhibition the Woodmere Annual. This

water, come back out to stand around the fire

year’s show is an exciting array of works

and warm up, dry off, and then share food.

selected by our juror, Sarah McEneaney. Sarah, I’m particularly excited that the exhibition becomes a framework through which we can understand your interests and your painting. I’ve always loved your painting Solstice Five-O in Woodmere’s collection—there’s a glorious bonfire on the beach and all these joyous, naked people! SARAH MCENEANEY: It was a solstice celebration on Pacific Beach in San Francisco. It was December 2004 and the title is Solstice Five-O because I painted it the following January when I turned 50. I was visiting friends Solstice Five-O, 2005, by Sarah McEneaney

who regularly attend this solstice celebration

(Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the American

that happens at both the winter and the

Academy of Arts and Letters, New York;

summer solstice. It’s where all these local San

Hassam, Speicher, Betts, and Symons Funds, 2006)

Francisco pagan types go to the beach, build

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RICK ORTWEIN: They share food naked?

really cold. So, that’s one way I edit. And, aside from my friends, I didn’t know anyone else at the

MCENEANEY: Yeah! Then people, slowly, start

event. I just made them up. There are 50 naked

putting their clothes back on. So, there’s people

people, again, to symbolize turning 50 years

taking their clothes off and there’s a big fire. I’ve

old. So, I just started making up characters as I

included myself sketching at lower left, as if I were

was painting. For some of their poses I used art

standing there naked making art. And my friends

reference books that I have at home that contain

Paz and her now-husband Michael are pictured.

nude photographs from the 1950s. They include

In actuality, people were passing around organic

poses like a woman ironing naked. (laughs) I kept

crackers and corn chips, but in my painting I made

adding people from the poses in the book. I work

it into fruit and wine. I thought I should “take it

with egg tempera and it’s really hard to make a lot

back to the roots” and convey the feelings of a

of changes. So, I made sketches of various figures

bacchanalian celebration.

before I painted them and those are included in the exhibition as well. I have a guy here laughing

ORTWEIN: It’s unprocessed!

his head off at something; his pose is taken MCENEANEY: Right, unprocessed. I made it, in my

directly from a Ben Shahn image of two guys—one

opinion, even more of a ritualized event.

talking and one laughing.

VALERIO: So, it’s a freedom painting.

MCCAY: Have you ever participated in the solstice celebration again?

MCENEANEY: Yes, but it’s a depiction of something that really happened. Whenever I paint

MCENEANEY: I haven’t been back there, but I saw

things that are real, there’s always a lot of editing

these friends in San Francisco when I was there

or supplementing to make the painting. It’s not a

in January and they said, “Oh yeah, we did it last

strict, journalistic account.

month!” (laughs)

RACHEL MCCAY: So, you weren’t sketching on the

VALERIO: Does any lovemaking happen during

beach?

this event?

MCENEANEY: No, I wasn’t really sketching. I was

MCENEANEY: Um, I did not see that, but um

standing by the fire trying to warm up. I went in

(laughs) certainly it’s possible. It’s San Francisco.

and out of the water really fast because it was

It wouldn’t be out of step. I heard that, some

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years, the cops come and try to disperse the

Philadelphia. He’s a very inspiring artist.

event because having a fire on the beach is illegal, VALERIO: It would be great to talk about your

apparently. They usually turn a blind eye as long as

other large bathing picture that will be on view.

everything gets put out. But it was still going on when we left.

MCENEANEY: It’s titled Rio Grande Hot Springs. In 2009, I was in residence at the Chinati Foundation

ORTWEIN: Public nudity is fine, but the fire isn’t.

in Marfa, Texas. Each resident artist has a show at

(laughs)

the end of their stay. A couple of artist friends who VALERIO: Returning to Ben Shahn, is he an artist

live in New Mexico came down for my opening.

that you look at a lot?

The following day the three of us went to Big Bend National Park, which is this huge, sprawling park

MCENEANEY: Yes, he’s an artist that I look at a lot.

along the Rio Grande between Texas and Mexico.

VALERIO: Is it because of his social content? I

We did some hiking and, at the end of the day,

think of you as a very socially-engaged artist.

visited the ruins of actual hot springs. The water still feeds into the crumbling sections of what were

MCENEANEY: Yeah, it’s because of the content

giant, communal bathtubs that had been built by

and it’s because of his drawing.

the National Park Service in the 1920s or ’30s. A big storm or flood destroyed them, but if you go

VALERIO: He’s a great draftsman.

there, you can get in. The water is very hot, but MCENEANEY: And composition. And the way he

you can step out and cool off by stepping into the

painted bricks.

river for a little bit. The green land in the distance is Mexico. We could have swum across to Mexico. I

VALERIO: You selected Julius Bloch’s portrait of

have a great love of water, hot springs, and I seek

Horace Pippin from Woodmere’s collection to be

them out wherever I can.

on view during your exhibition. I wanted to say that I’m thrilled that you’ve chosen it— it’s such a

VALERIO: Both of these paintings depict purifying

loving, poignant tribute. And I believe Pippin is one

experiences with water. Your paintings will be

of your favorite artists?

on view concurrently with our Jessie Drew-Bear exhibition. This was, of course, an intentional

MCENEANEY: Yes, he’s one of my favorites.

overlap because your work and hers are

I learned about Pippin when I moved to

stylistically related. Drew-Bear described herself as 6


a “sophisticated primitive.”

anymore and I think, within the last twenty years, there has been a resurgence of figurative painting,

MCENEANEY: Did she really use that term?

and even a personal reinvention of figuration.

VALERIO: That was her own term.

VALERIO: You attended PAFA (Pennsylvania

MCENEANEY: That’s interesting, because I used

Academy of the Fine Arts). When you walked in

that semi in jest to describe myself years ago.

the door there, were your paintings very different?

Then I stopped.

MCENEANEY: Not particularly. I had gone to PCA

MCCAY: I think Jessie Drew-Bear used it in a

(Philadelphia College of Art, now the University

similar way. The juxtaposition of the two terms

of the Arts) for two years first. Then, I switched

is contradictory and meant to be humorous and

over to PAFA because I just wanted to paint. I

playful.

didn’t want to have to take courses in all the other academic fields of study. PAFA accepted me, but

MCENEANEY: That’s the joke.

they asked me to go into the first-year program. I was like, “Well, I’ve already been in college for two

VALERIO: How do you describe the kind of art you

years!” But, anyway, I did it and then it was cast

make?

and figure drawing and still life painting. After a MCENEANEY: I’d say it’s representational,

semester, they let me bump up to the second year.

narrative, autobiographical. In the past I was

I ended up staying there for three and a half years.

lambasted by some critics who claimed I was a VALERIO: There’s a lot we have to talk about. You

“faux” primitive, because I did go to art school and

studied with Edith Neff—what kind of lessons did

I know what I’m doing. But what bothers me about

you absorb from her? She’s an artist who’s very

that is who’s to say that somebody who didn’t go

important here at Woodmere.

to art school, like Jessie Drew-Bear, didn’t know what she was doing. She certainly did.

MCENEANEY: I remember being really aware of Edie and getting to know her a little better later,

VALERIO: Of course she did.

when I was starting to show and I’d go to her MCENEANEY: But, I avoided that term, because

shows.

in the past I was labeled as a posing as an VALERIO: She’s autobiographical.

“untrained” artist. But, that doesn’t happen

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MCENEANEY: I like her figuration. I like how she

rooms and shared a bathroom. For the most part,

described places. That’s something that we have in

we were just in our studios, working our butts off

common. Her use of paint is totally different from

all the time. We had twenty-four-hour access to

mine, but she does it fabulously. She develops the

the building.

paint surface in a really great and crazy way. VALERIO: I’ve heard that Ben Kamihira worked MCCAY: What was your work like when you first

through the night in his studio in the Peale House.

got out of school?

Was he ever your teacher?

MCENEANEY: When I was in school, I started

MCENEANEY: He was. He was a very good painter.

in a big figure painting class, and instead of just

He could be a little taciturn. But he also could be

painting the model, I painted the whole room. I

very insightful. He liked my work enough that he

painted the big columns of the studio at PAFA

would spend time with me.

and all the other students and the skylight and VALERIO: Let’s begin to talk about the exhibition.

anything else in the room, including myself in the

Out of the 600 or so artists who applied to be in

corner. I started looking at a bigger picture in a

this exhibition, you’ve selected work by 50

narrative way. Then, when I was finishing at PAFA I was painting portraits of myself in my studio; a portrait of my studiomate, Bill Scott, in his studio; a portrait of the guy who sat at the front desk where we all came in. So, I was looking at my environment and making these narratives. I was starting that when I was in school with large oil paintings. VALERIO: What was it like sharing a studio with Bill Scott? MCENEANEY: Bill was great! We remain friends. We were in the Peale House, which was an old hotel. The studios were these hotel rooms that

Black Cat (Little Sisters of the Poor), 2011, by Lynne Campbell (Courtesy of the artist and Morpeth Contemporary)

had great privacy. He and I had two little adjoining

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of them. Some of the work—for example, Lynne

abstraction. It’s mostly painting, but there’s also

Campbell’s Black Cat (Little Sisters of the Poor)—

photography. There’s also some sculpture.

appears to be related to your own. VALERIO: Rick, you made an observation about MCENEANEY: Well, it has a cat in it, and I paint

the relationship between moments of happiness

cats too, but I’m not the only person who paints

and sadness throughout the exhibition.

cats too, but I’m not the only person who paints ORTWEIN: The landscapes are largely

cats. Her painting is a narrative scene in a

characterized by emptiness—there’s little or no

backyard. But it’s really nothing like my work, if

human presence in many of them. For example,

you think about the paint and the way it’s applied,

in Catherine Mulligan’s Taco Bell or Jonathan

the color, and the palette.

Ryan’s Lot, maybe it has to do with living in MCCAY: I think it’s more atmospheric than your

Philadelphia, or it could be global, but there’s a

work.

sense of loneliness and abandonment. Even when there’s humor, like in Salvatore Cerceo’s Mush

MCENEANEY: Right. Looking around at the

Head, the subject seems to say, in the way that

works I’ve selected, you can make connections

it’s photographed standing alone in a field, “I’m all

to paintings of mine, but I think all of them have

alone in the world.”

their own voice and they hold up individually as well as cohesively. They’re great works of art.

MCENEANEY: The way Cerceo’s photographed

There is a lot of figuration, but there’s also a lot of

his subject is really interesting because he’s only

Lot, 2013, by Jonathan Ryan (Courtesy of the artist)

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a little over a foot tall. But, the way the artist

and, in most cases, has messed it up.

has photographed him, he looks enormous! He’s VALERIO: I think H. John Thompson expresses a

given a monumental quality to this little guy. I

similar sentiment in his sculpture, A Natural

understand the feelings of loneliness that you’re perceiving, but it also makes me think of Sidney Goodman’s mural in West Philly that depicts a boy raising his hand and Walt Whitman’s quote “I am large, I contain multitudes.” It’s a great quote. ORTWEIN: Are those things that I’m just seeing? MCENEANEY: No. I understand what you’re saying. I tend to un-people my landscapes or I populate them with one person: myself. For me, that harkens back to the work of Caspar David Friedrich and the way he’d often have a solitary figure viewed from the back who’s looking at the same landscape that you’re looking at as the viewer. ORTWEIN: Do you think the inclusion of a single figure is to give scale to a grand landscape? MCENEANEY: For scale, and I think it’s also a way to confirm that people are here, people have been here. MCCAY: It’s interesting because as a person you’re so community oriented, but in your work you often portray yourself alone. MCENEANEY: That’s true. I feel like, in terms of landscapes, any place we all go, man has been,

Coped Staircase Redux (upper) and A Natural History of Window Renovation (lower), 2014, by H. John Thompson (Courtesy of the artist)

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History of Window Renovation. The window or staircases in Coped Staircase Redux crash through each other and are at the same time intertwined. It’s like a bad marriage; it makes for a compelling sculpture because of that. MCENEANEY: I don’t know. I can see Coped Staircase Redux as a coming together and becoming one. VALERIO: A good marriage! It would be great to talk about some of the portraits, like Catherine Mulligan’s Playboy Self-Portrait or Sam Shaffer’s Variation on Pink (p. 90).

Playboy Self-Portrait, 2013, by Catherine Mulligan (Courtesy of the artist)

MCCAY: Shaffer’s work is a loosely based selfportrait that began as a drawing. It combines the

make this painting.

features of himself and his wife.

MCCAY: Yes, she does dress up in these guises.

VALERIO: It doesn’t appear to be a happy self-

In a discussion with the artist she explained that

portrait.

in another self-portrait in Woodmere’s collection,

MCENEANEY: I don’t read it as unhappy either,

Self-Portrait with Tiara, she painted herself while

maybe a little melancholy. But we bring our own

looking in the mirror, wearing a tiara and a bathing

reads to the work.

suit. She uses this ongoing series of self-portraits to explore stereotyped notions of femininity—the

VALERIO: Tough.

princess, the bunny—as well as issues of sexuality and the fluidity of human identity, among other

MCCAY: Pained.

really interesting investigations of materiality, MCENEANEY: Mulligan’s portrait is funny, but it’s

surface, and finish.

also a little sad. I can’t stop looking at her and MCENEANEY: She’s really looking at herself and, in

she’s looking right at us. It’s so direct. I think it’s

turn, looking at us.

great. I can imagine that she put on this getup to 11


VALERIO: There is a performative aspect to it. MCENEANEY: She put this bow tie on, but didn’t bother to adjust it so it’s neat and straight. VALERIO: Let’s look at another portrait: Bloom by Mickayel Thurin. It’s an outstanding painting of extremes. The colors are so intense and the eyes are huge and dilated; it’s figurative but no longer real. MCCAY: The smile is almost maniacal. MCENEANEY: At first glance, it’s funny. You might laugh because it seems like the figure is expressing such joyousness. And then it becomes unsettling. There’s definitely a tension between poles of emotion, which is part of what makes it great. The

Bloom, 2013, by Mickayel Thurin (Courtesy of the artist)

little girl in Jay Muhlin’s (Overlooked Spaghetti) is also very complex. You might think she’s sad and

““of the plate of food. We really don’t know what’s

lonely, but she looks serious as she sits in front

going on with her. MCCAY: I feel as if she’s finished eating, but her parents are saying “you have to finish your meal,” and so she sits dejectedly in her chair, slumped over her plate. MCENEANEY: I like her intentness—how thoughtful and intentional she seems. VALERIO: I like the provocative juxtaposition of

(Overlooked Spaghetti), from the series Sleeve on My Heart, 2014, by Jay Muhlin (Courtesy of the artist)

her beautiful hair and the plate of spaghetti.

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MCCAY: There’s another moment of poignant self-reflection in Morgan Hobbs’s A New Haircut. The artist explained that her figural paintings are always loose self-portraits. This work in particular is based on her interest in the habits of the mentally ill, including staring into the mirror. MCENEANEY: The image is a bit of an interior Caspar David Friedrich moment. The viewer is also the subject, the mirror. Who’s looking back, the A New Haircut, 2013, by Morgan Hobbs (Courtesy of the artist)

painter or the viewer? ORTWEIN: The spigot, the handles, and the bowl

back and the back of the head is painted.

of the sink create a face that appears to be looking out as well.

VALERIO: It’s beautifully painted. The hair of the actual person is longer than the hair in the

MCENEANEY: Yes! That’s right. I love the way this

reflection. There’s a difference between the reflection in the mirror and reality. MCCAY: Yes, this painting also explores the complexities of self-perception. MCENEANEY: Another portrait in the show is Philippa Beardsley’s Secret Admirer. It harkens back to the traditional portrait in an old, oval frame, but it’s a faceless person holding some sort of bouquet and there are some three-dimensional elements to it. MCCAY: This one, like the others, combines melancholy with humor.

Secret Admirer, 2013, by Philippa Beardsley (Courtesy of the artist)

MCENEANEY: Right. 13


Living Room (Yogi 2), 2013, by Becky Suss (Courtesy of the artist and Fleisher/ Ollman, Philadelphia)

ORTWEIN: There are a lot of types of reflection in

a painting on the wall or a romantic view onto

this exhibition: looking in the mirror, looking out at

another reality—a window out onto a Caspar

you as if you were a mirror.

David Friedrich kind of expanse of atmospheric mountains. As beautiful as the patterns are, you

MCENEANEY: Yes, that’s definitely a reoccurring

get a claustrophobic feeling in the room, and the

theme. Another theme is images reconstructed

view is a release.

from memory. Becky Suss made her painting Living Room (Yogi 2)—which shows the interior

MCCAY: Yes, the patterns are visually

of her grandparents’ house—from memory. Then

overwhelming. They create a very flat space

she made ceramic objects that represent the

that offsets the immense landscape outside the

remembered objects she depicts in the painting.

window.

ORTWEIN: That is one pristine living room.

VALERIO: There’s some abstraction in the exhibition. Sarah, what appealed to you about the

MCENEANEY: It’s not a living room—it’s a painting.

abstract works?

VALERIO: I like the juxtaposition of Suss’s painting

MCENEANEY: They’re all very different, but color

with Anne Canfield’s A Tune Without Any Words;

is key for me. I tend to find a story or a form in

both are interior spaces.

abstraction. Because I’m a representational painter, I tend to think that way. For example, Untitled by

MCENEANEY: I do, too.

Anne Seidman is some type of character. VALERIO: The window in Canfield’s work is like 14


MCENEANEY: I still identify narrative elements in abstract paintings. ORTWEIN: And Seidman’s other work in the exhibition is really a landscape. MCENEANEY: It’s very much a landscape or even an urban-scape. But that’s not to say that a painting has to become something else—it is what it is. It’s a painting. It’s a work of art. Maria Dumlao’s prints vacillate between different media. She’s mostly a video artist and these are stills from Untitled, 2012, by Anne Seidman (Courtesy of Schmidt-Dean Gallery)

when her computer crashes. She captures these moments when things go haywire. But they look like paintings to me. They look like interesting

VALERIO: It’s all about the illusion of a flat surface

landscapes. That’s what attracted me to them.

that an artist uses to play with the mind of the viewer. As if the artist is saying, “I can play with you. I can play with you this way, I can play with you that way.” I respond in a positive way. It’s like a challenge. MCENEANEY: Yes, Angela McQuillan’s fiber work is interesting in this category-defying way as well. I call it a sculpture, but it sits on the floor. It looks like a rug, but it’s not a rug. It looks like it has a lot more depth. VALERIO: Is it crocheted pieces that she

A Tune Without Any Words, 2012, by Anne Canfield (Courtesy of the artist)

purchased in thrift stores and put together? MCENEANEY: It’s an assortment of different fabrics and materials put together. It’s hard to 15


know what she collected and what she actually stitched or created herself. It’s really intriguing. It’s really sculptural and it’s really colorful. It just said to me: “I want to be in the show!” VALERIO: Well, there’s an amorphic, surrealist quality to it that’s really nice. Rochelle Toner also employs organic shapes—they become like narrative characters. MCENEANEY: I’m attracted to the repetitive mark making in her watercolor Port (p.84). I like work that reminds me of the trance the artist can get into when she or he is doing repetitive actions

Crash (6/17/13, 3:19:32 PM), from the series Crash, 2014, by Maria Dumlao (Courtesy of the artist)

reminds me of the trance the artist can get into when she or he is doing repetitive actions.

MCCAY: His arms were bitten off!

ORTWEIN: Betsey Batchelor, Bonnie Levinthal, and Maria Dumlao’s work all use repeated patterns or

MCENEANEY: Mid-Sneeze and Robber are

shapes that remind me of units of measure.

Cooper’s other pieces. I think there’s a story going on with all three of these.

MCCAY: Batchelor’s Peninsula looks like cells under a microscope. All three images contain

MCCAY: Yes, Cooper conceives of all his work as

precise or repeated geometric shapes that lack

diptychs, with each object depicting the moment

depth—it creates an overall field of colors and

just before or after a catastrophic event—those

forms that are a bit disorienting.

events are sometimes ones that he’s invented and sometimes they’re based on actual stories.

VALERIO: One work we have to talk about is Scott Cooper’s Great Outdoors (Severed Arms).

VALERIO: The way he creates these hands— they’re so pointed.

MCENEANEY: Something happened in the great outdoors!

ORTWEIN: In all three of his works, the hands signal some type of distress. 16


VALERIO: I agree. Mid-Sneeze uses a variety of

VALERIO: That’s quite a story! I also love Seneca

repeated patterns: the even pattern on the shirt,

Weintraut’s Labor Day. This is a depiction of

which is right up against the picture plane, the

Philadelphia. Here the neighborhood is having

hair, and the grassy hill, which appears to recede

a Labor Day block party. The color palette is

into space.

largely shades of brown and other earth tones, except for the large slide on the right side of the

MCENEANEY: Again, here’s our Caspar David

composition. Sarah, you, of course, make pictures

Friedrich figure.

of Philadelphia as well.

VALERIO: The “subject” is very strong.

MCENEANEY: This is great. It’s true that the city

MCCAY: According to the artist, it’s a depiction of

contains a lot of brown, but I don’t see it as being

the calm just before some sort of invented deity

dark or scary. There’s a lot of loving detail in terms

was possessed by a sneezing fit. The sneezing fit

of the depiction of the rowhouses. The people

was so powerful that it cleared the land of all the

and their activities bring the bits of color to the

living creatures and caused all the stars to fall from

city. On the far left, there’s the yellow tape and the

the sky.

Winnebago that’s often used to block the street. Last year we had a block party fundraiser in our

Mid-Sneeze, 2013, by Scott Cooper (Courtesy of the artist)

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neighborhood for the Reading Viaduct Project,

and very dramatic.

and I learned that Philadelphia has more block MCENEANEY: Yes, it’s a simple, abstract curving

parties than any other city in the country. We’re

shape. Perhaps people from outside the city

the king of block parties!

won’t know what this stilted platform is meant to VALERIO: Interesting!

represent, but having lived in Philadelphia for 40 years, it perfectly describes what it is.

MCENEANEY: In summer, you’re always getting stopped by somebody’s lawn chairs or yellow tape

VALERIO: You know it’s there all the time and it’s

blocking a street. A lot of people don’t have yards

always active. The images on the billboards and

or access to a park. So they just make a recreation

on the signs are very active and present too—even

space out of their street. This painting is really

the Fishtown sign with the fish on it. Is there a sign

celebrating that.

for Fishtown that looks like that?

VALERIO: There’s a certain flatness to the forms

MCENEANEY: I wouldn’t be surprised if there is,

in the painting, almost like different elements are

but I don’t know.

collaged together. Another nice thing about Labor VALERIO: If there isn’t, there should be.

Day is the treatment of I-95. It’s a strong presence

Labor Day, October 2013, by Seneca Weintraut (Courtesy of the artist) 18


MCENEANEY: No parking. No parking. No parking. VALERIO: Forget it! It’s a joyous depiction of Philadelphia. We talked a bit about sculpture, but I feel like we should dissect Kathran Siegel’s One More Time. MCCAY: He’s already dissected something. VALERIO: He’s holding an organ skewered on an arrow in his left hand. MCCAY: The shape suggests a heart, but it could be some other organ as well. His face is frightening. It’s a little too happy. ORTWEIN: Well, there’s blood on his pants and in the street. He runs along, victorious. He’s triumphant. VALERIO: The heart is still dripping. And the nerve: in the view of him, from behind, his pants are falling down.

One More Time, February 2013, by Kathran Siegel (Courtesy of the artist)

MCENEANEY: Or, he wears them low. VALERIO: One More Time. So, he’s a lover who’s

way his shoe lifts up slightly from the road as if

coming back one more time?

he’s about to take a step. There’s a lot of attention to specific details without it being fussy and picky.

MCENEANEY: He could be. I like that he has a lot of personality and a character to him. The whole

MCCAY: It’s also a personification of the phrase

thing is very curious. And I like the way the piece

“you ripped my heart out.”

is made. It really is very descriptive both in the VALERIO: Yes, that’s how I read it: you’ve ripped

pose and the action. Yet, it’s also funny. Even the

out my heart. 19


MCENEANEY: That’s one interpretation.

of volume and the fact that the canvas is stitched together in pieces, as if it were something that was

VALERIO: Sarah, are there other pieces that you’d

reassembled, makes him appear weightier, like an

like to comment on? We haven’t talked about

amalgamation of parts.

everything, and we probably can’t, but Colleen Rudolf’s I’ll Meet You on the Moon is unique in a lot

MCCAY: It’s another image of a solitary creature.

of ways.

Its singularity is conveyed visually but also because of its near extinction.

MCENEANEY: Well, I see this bison as a drawing. The bison is a symbol of the lost America that

MCENEANEY: We were talking about the

existed when the Europeans got here. They almost

exhibition and some of the paintings being so

were exterminated. But, now they have farms and

evocative of Philadelphia, and yet, Paul Rider’s

we eat them the way we eat cows. But they’re a

photographs, for example, Strange but Beautiful

symbol of America.

02, might seem like an anonymous place because there’s no signage, no indication, no people and

VALERIO: They have historical resonance.

it’s close-up. To me, it feels very Philadelphian.

MCENEANEY: And they’re massive. The image is

VALERIO: To me too.

a strong silhouette, but it’s more than a silhouette

MCENEANEY: Anybody who’s lived here for a

because of the way she’s drawn him. He has a lot

I’ll Meet You on the Moon, 2011, by Colleen Rudolf (Courtesy of the artist)

20


length of time knows neighborhoods that are like

elements. I like Michael Secor’s Port Richmond

this, and yet the way Rider has cropped the image

Evening (p.96).

makes it appear abstract. Still, it’s very evocative ORTWEIN: The painting seems to be lit by

of this place where we live. And, in fact, I pass this

moonlight. And the moon has a face.

place every time I take my pets to the veterinarian.

VALERIO: The moon has a smiley face!

MCCAY: The areas of color fit together in such a beautifully cohesive way, I thought it was a

ORTWEIN: It may not be a moon—it may be a

textured collage.

strange, artificial light.

VALERIO: It’s interesting in the sense that there’s a

MCENEANEY: Port Richmond, another

“texture” of Philadelphia.

neighborhood.

MCENEANEY: Yes, just as there’s a texture

VALERIO: Yes. It’s Philadelphia, too.

to every city. Throughout the show there are reflections and light coming from inside and

ORTWEIN: A lot of the paintings have a

outside of structures and urban architectural

temperature about them, and a smell. VALERIO: (laughs) They do! ORTWEIN: I lived in that neighborhood for a few years and there was a brewery and a soft pretzel factory… MCENEANEY: Really yeasty! ORTWEIN: It permeated the air; it was like living inside a pretzel. MCCAY: That’s a great description. Do you want to talk about Anda Dubinskis’s Chrysanthemum (.p. 48)?

Strange but beautiful 02, 2013, by Paul Rider (Courtesy of the artist)

MCENEANEY: Sure. When I was first looking

21


through all the submissions, of course, color

about the urban. But, we also need nature for our

jumped out at me, but graphic black and white

souls. That can be found in the exhibition as well,

is a great thing, especially when you’re putting

especially in Mariel Capanna’s Week-Long Music-

together a group show like this and you’re trying

Fest, Early-Morning Fly-Fishing.

to make sense of things. It’s not curated. You have MCCAY: Yes, this is a festive painting. The artist

to make sense of what you’re given. This piece

explained that the scene is based on the Roskilde

is beautifully drawn and it has a great range of

music festival in Denmark, which she attended in

values. As the artist describes, Chrysanthemum

the summer of 2012. She painted herself into the

contains “a background of observed turkey tail

crowd. The landscape derives from her memory of

mushrooms.” So she drew those from observation,

Denmark and Finland.

interlaced with floral details from Tibetan thangka paintings. I like how she’s mixing these different

ORTWEIN: It’s interesting in relation to other

things that inspire her and making these cohesive

paintings in the exhibition, like Weintraut’s Labor

and really interesting and, like you say, organic

Day and Virginia Leigh Werrell’s Development,

compositions.

each of which offers a very unusual perspective on landscape. They’re both full of information, but

VALERIO: They’re growing. I think one of the

each has its own unique rhythm. Capanna’s is also

interesting things about this show, as in previous

striking because she uses a square format for a

years, is that you see different elements of the

subject that’s traditionally shown as a rectangle,

language of contemporary art. So, even very

and because a “square” is an urban park.

different kinds of objects, like Angela McQuillan’s Lilypad and Dubinskis’s Chrysanthemum have

MCCAY: It’s interesting that you mention the shape

similarities; in this instance, they share an organic,

of the painting, because it began as a small square

growing energy. Organic energy, unleashed, takes

panel consisting of just the group of people, but

the world back, somehow.

the artist felt it was too congested so she created the expansive landscape that surrounds them.

MCENEANEY: Yes, they talk to each other. They’re really different, but they absolutely have a

MCENEANEY: Parks have become the new urban

relationship.

spaces, because everyone realizes how much we need to have access to green areas and trees. It’s

VALERIO: This is a Philadelphia show and it’s

why cities are planting trees everywhere these

about urban culture, in a way. We talked a lot

days. 22


ORTWEIN: So when visitors leave this exhibition,

what I like about the art world today is that there’s

they’re going to come away with what view of

all kinds of work being made and it’s all being

Philadelphia? Or is there a view of Philadelphia?

looked at, considered, and talked about. There’s not one ism that is the ism of the day. If anything,

MCENEANEY: I don’t know that it’s necessarily

that’s the ism. There’s all kinds of work being

a view of Philadelphia, but it’s a slice of

made. Go out there and make your work and it can

contemporary art now in Philadelphia. I like to say,

be any kind of work. You just have to work at it

and I’ve been saying this for several years now,

and work at it. And make it. And make it good.

Week-Long Music-Fest, Early-Morning Fly-Fishing, 2013, by Mariel Capanna (Courtesy of the artist)

23


Schnader Gallery, Woodmere Art Museum 24


SCHNADER GALLERY

Now in its 73rd year, the Woodmere Annual is a juried exhibition that presents the work of contemporary artists living within a 50-mile radius of the Museum. This year’s juror, Sarah McEneaney, chose work by 50 artists for inclusion. A renowned painter who has lived and worked in Philadelphia for over four decades, McEneaney is also the co-founder of Friends of the Rail Park (formerly the Reading Viaduct Project), a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a park and recreation path along the historic elevated Reading Viaduct and City Branch rail line in Philadelphia. Her own penchant for storytelling and self-reflection brings a special energy to this year’s exhibition. This Annual includes representational and abstract imagery in a range of media, from collage and sculpture to photography and painting, all informed by the particulars of our city’s cultural environment, artistic community, and history. A selection of McEneaney’s own work is on view, including Solstice Five-O, from Woodmere’s collection. McEneaney’s choice of a group of works from Woodmere’s holdings that relate to the themes of the Annual is presented in the Stairwell Gallery. Woodmere is deeply grateful to Sarah McEneaney for her work as juror. We also extend sincere thanks and appreciation to Victor Keen and the Drumcliff Foundation for their generous

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SCOTT COOPER American, born 1988

Cooper’s recent works are depictions of hypothetical and fictional situations invented by the artist. The paintings and sculptures are made as diptychs, each object representing the moment before

(upper)

or after a terrible event. Great Outdoors

Great Outdoors (Severed

(Severed Arms) shows the unfortunate

Arms)

end of a safari during which a jaguar

2014

was killed and a man lost his arms. MidSneeze depicts a calm scene just before a

Acrylic on wood

deity was possessed by a sneezing fit so powerful that it killed all living creatures and caused the stars to fall from the sky.

(center)

Robber portrays a couple embracing.

Mid-Sneeze

At right, the devil’s hand reaches up to

2013

steal their worldly possessions and to rob them of each other.

Oil and acrylic on canvas

Cooper received his BFA and certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of the

(lower)

Fine Arts. In 2014 his work was included

Robber

in the group exhibition Kyoot Jungle at

2014

Goldilocks Gallery in Philadelphia. In 2013 his work was included in the 1st Annual

Oil and acrylic on canvas

Juried Exhibition at Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio, also in Philadelphia. Courtesy of the artist

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SARAH MCENEANEY American (born Germany) 1955

participated in this event while visiting

Solstice Five-0 2005 Egg tempera on plywood

herself sketching the festive scene at the

friends who regularly attend the celebration, which occurs at the winter and summer solstices. The artist included lower left. The title refers to the artist’s age when she painted the work. McEneaney attended the University of the Arts and the Pennsylvania

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the American

Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), both

Academy of Arts and Letters, New York;

in Philadelphia. Her work is in many

Hassam, Speicher, Betts, and Symons Funds,

public and private collections, including

2006

the Philadelphia Museum of Art, PAFA, Woodmere Art Museum, the Neuberger Museum of Art at SUNY-Purchase, the Rhode Island School of Design, Johnson and Johnson, and Microsoft Corporation. McEneaney has received numerous awards, including an Anonymous Was a Woman grant, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, and residencies at the Joan Mitchell Center, the Chinati Foundation, the Fundación Valparaíso, the MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo. Recent group exhibitions include The Female Gaze: Women Artists Making Their World at PAFA and Intimacy! Baden in der Kunst/

In this joyous painting McEneaney

Bathing in Art at Kunstmuseum Ahlen in

depicts a 2004 solstice celebration on

Ahlen, Germany.

Pacific Beach in San Francisco. She 29


30


SARAH MCENEANEY American (born Germany) 1955

At the end of her artist residency at

Rio Grande Hot Springs 2009 Egg tempera on linen

along the Rio Grande River between

the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas, McEneaney and two friends visited Big Bend National Park, a sprawling area Texas and Mexico. After a day of hiking they visited the ruins of hot springs. Here McEneaney portrays herself and her companions in what were giant,

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy,

communal bathtubs fed by the hot

New York

springs that had been built by the National Park Service in the 1920s and 1930s. McEneaney works primarily in egg tempera, which allows her to achieve the brilliant color and detailed brushwork of paintings like this and Solstice Five-O (previous page). She mixes her paint from egg yolk and powdered pigment, while making her gesso from powdered limestone and rabbit-skin glue.

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VIRGINIA LEIGH WERRELL American, born 1987

In this work Werrell depicts a memory of

Development 2013 Oil on canvas

away behind fields and small farms,

Courtesy of the artist

snakes around the landscape, pulling

the neighborhood where she grew up. She explains, “My house had been tucked and when I was about twelve a housing development was built, surrounding our small property. In this painting, a road with it matching houses and cul-desacs, and encroaching upon our smaller, solitary property. This painting is about the way that we accept the loss of wild, undomesticated natural settings, and about how that terrain cannot be completely lost.� Werrell received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Her work was included in a recent group exhibition In Our Own Backyard at Gross McCleaf Gallery and in the 1st Annual Juried Exhibition at Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio, both in Philadelphia.

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34


KRISTA PROFITT American, born 1989

This painting, like Profitt’s larger body

The Museum 2013 Oil on canvas

articulate the sometimes vague nature

of work, is based on a remembered experience. The dissolving figures of memory. Her paintings affirm “the distance between reality and memory,” according to the artist.

Courtesy of the artist

Profitt obtained her BFA in painting from Arcadia University. She is currently pursuing her MFA in painting from Illinois State University.

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36


RAPHAEL FENTON-SPAID American (born Italy), 1983

Self-Portrait depicts the artist sitting on

(upper) Self-Portrait 2013 Acrylic, cardboard, felt, contact paper, and found objects on Masonite

Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So

a zebra-print rug. On the television is Richard Hamilton’s Just What Is It that Appealing? (1956). An epoch-defining image that described postwar American consumerism, Hamilton’s work is a pivotal and canonical example of British pop art. The artist sits before the image, passively absorbing Hamilton’s critique of American culture that is itself now mediated through the television. Both

(lower) Couple Portrait 2013 Acrylic, fabric, Astroturf, Kanikko crabs, wire, collage, and found objects on Masonite

this work and Couple Portrait embody

Courtesy of the artist

elementary and middle school in North

Fenton-Spaid’s interest in combining materials that are flat and threedimensional, while retaining a dialogue with painting. Fenton-Spaid obtained his MFA in painting from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art in 2014. Prior to graduate school he taught art education at an Philadelphia. He has also had a solo exhibition at LGTripp Gallery.

37


38


ANNE CANFIELD American, born 1976

immediate environment, among other

(upper) A Tune Without Any Words 2012 Oil on panel

Ashbery’s poem Self-Portrait in a Convex

sources. A Tune Without Any Words is loosely based on an excerpt from John Mirror: That the soul is not a soul, Has no secret, is small, and it fits Its hollow perfectly: its room, our moment of attention. That is the tune but there are no words

(lower) Fugue State 2014 Oil on panel

The words are only speculation

Courtesy of the artist

experiencing the conflicting desire to

Canfield painted Fugue State after a period of contemplation about selfidentity. The work explores the need to feel a sense of home and belonging while escape and live anonymously in a new location. She explains, “It, for me, is about being known and loved, enjoying that, and still desiring anonymity. Within this painting there are likely ghosts from a past time.” Canfield has a BFA from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. This fall she will be a resident artist at Soaring Gardens, an artist retreat in northern Pennsylvania. In November she will have a two-artist exhibition at the Norristown

Canfield’s representational work typically

Arts Building’s Pagus Gallery. 39


Kuch and Dorothy J. del Bueno Galleries, Woodmere Art Museum 40


KUCH & DOROTHY J. DEL BUENO BALCONY GALLERIES

41


42


SALVATORE CERCEO American, born 1973

Cerceo says that artmaking allows him

(upper) Mush Head 2011 Plaster, rope, wood, steel, resin, and acrylic paint

to understand and communicate with

to “understand myself and it is through understanding myself that I am able the world around me.� On the Shelf began when the artist started gluing together random pieces of cardboard. He often repurposes rejected materials like cardboard and trash to create something new. The artist first conceived of Mush Head as a sculpture before he

(lower) On the Shelf 2014 Cardboard, poly clay, and wood

incorporated it into a number of his photomontages. Through the creation of the photomontages, Mush Head became a character with a variety of identities including a king and a hip-hop artist. The work is also a humorous and loosely based self-portrait.

Courtesy of the artist

Cerceo obtained his MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2001. He is currently working to publish his first novel, which includes over sixty illustrations.

43


44


MARILYN HOLSING American, born 1946

In her ongoing series of drawings,

Toil 2014 Acrylic on paper

modern times. Here the queen and her

Holsing tells imagined stories about the life of a young Marie Antoinette in ladies in waiting, maids, valets, and other companions engage in various outdoor activities.

Courtesy of Gallery Joe, Philadelphia

Originally from Canton, Ohio, Holsing received her BFA from the Ohio State University and her MA from the University of New Mexico. In 2012 she had a solo exhibition, Further Tales of Young Marie Antoinette, at Gallery Joe in Philadelphia. In 2012 she was the recipient of a Fellowship in the Arts grant from the Independence Foundation in Philadelphia.

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46


CATHERINE MULLIGAN American, born 1987

the process of completing a painting.

(upper) Taco Bell 2014 Oil on paper

gradually and incrementally. Taco Bell is

She creates detailed underpaintings and uses multiple glazes, building up forms a small fragment of a city street, inspired by a view seen from a moving bus. The artist wanted the building to feel small but monumental. She explains, “I was thinking of framing a modern city street in the language of Canaletto’s cityscapes.

(lower) Playboy Self-Portrait 2013 Oil on Masonite

This should read as specific and precise but fleeting and trivial.” Playboy Self-Portrait is part of an ongoing series of self-portraits. Combining products of mass culture,

Courtesy of the artist

including tiaras and bunny ears, with her penetratingly somber expression, the paintings address issues of gender, sexuality, regression, and childhood. Mulligan received a certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and her BFA from the University of Pennsylvania. She was the 2012 recipient of a grant from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation. She was also awarded a residency at Vermont Studio Center. Mulligan is also preparing

Mulligan is a representational, realist

an upcoming solo exhibition at F.A.N.

painter, although she does not work

Gallery in Philadelphia.

exclusively from life. She examines a 47


48


ANDA DUBINSKIS American, born 1952

Dubinskis considers these atmospheric

(upper) Chrysanthemum 2013 Charcoal and Conté crayon on Stonehenge paper

explains, “I pick a pattern or element

and calligraphic drawings to be part of a process-oriented body of work. She that intrigues me, then combine it with another, and perhaps another, until they are all tangled together, undulating in and out of one another. The process is intuitive, both additive and reductive.” The basis of the imagery is an arc or spiral; the form is repeated in several

(lower) Adelphia Continued (bottom) 2013 Charcoal and Conté crayon on Stonehenge paper

iterations throughout the composition. Dubinskis received her BFA from Cooper Union in New York and her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania. Her work was recently included in an installation at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University in Philadelphia. She also had a recent solo exhibition at ICON Contemporary Art in Brunswick, Maine.

Courtesy of the artist

Her work also appeared in the April 2014 art issue of Maine Home & Design magazine.

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50


ANGELA MCQUILLIAN American, born 1982

McQuillan continually challenges herself

Lilypad 2014 Yarn, fabric, and thread

began to incorporate into her work. Her

Courtesy of the artist

she was thinking about the way that cells

to use new kinds of materials, including fabric and yarn, which she recently work is informed by both art history and science, specifically fluorescence microscopy. When she created Lilypad, cluster together to form an organism. Each section of fabric was an experiment that, when assembled and sewn together, became a colorful and multitextured ecosystem. McQuillan was born in Washington D.C. and has been living in Philadelphia for the past ten years. She received her BS in biology from the University of Texas at Austin and a BFA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. She was a member of the curatorial collective Little Berlin from 2011 to 2013, for which she received a John S. and James L. Knight Foundation grant to establish the Little Berlin Fairgrounds Project, an outdoor community garden and art space in Philadelphia.

51


52


P. TIMOTHY GIERSCHICK II American, born 1976

Gierschick utilizes sign painting and

(upper) Insect 1-3 2013 Collage and latex on panel

in his work. In Looking for America 1–4 he

folk craft techniques such as stencils, templates, scribes, compasses, and grids investigates space and evokes light and emotion. The title references a Simon and Garfunkel song. In Insect 1–3 he unifies geometric shapes with those found in the natural world.

(lower) Looking for America 1-4, 2014 Latex on panel

Gierschick has a BA from Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. He recently had a solo exhibition at LGTripp Gallery in Philadelphia. His work is in the permanent collection of the Prints and Drawings Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

Courtesy of the artist

53


54


BECKY SUSS American, born 1980

In the wake of her grandparents’ death

(upper) Living Room (Yogi 2) 2013 Oil on linen

painting and catalogue. Her grandparents

and the subsequent demolition of their home, Suss began a series that is both were born in Brooklyn to Russian Jewish immigrants and, according to Suss, “became teenage leftist activists and borderline communists.” The belongings that she depicts in her paintings and the ceramic objects she creates construct

(lower) Untitled (Moai Head, Sculpture, Stack of Books) 2013 Low-fire ceramic and stoneware with glaze

a fuller account of her grandparents’ identity. Placed here in the gallery, the ceramic books and sculptures also blur the distinction between the room that the viewer stands in and the room depicted in the painting. Suss received her MFA from the University of California, Berkeley. In 2013

Courtesy of the artist and Fleisher/Ollman, Philadelphia

she attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She is also a member of Vox Populi in Philadelphia.

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56


CHRISTINA DAY American, born 1977

Day’s work uses everyday materials

Casement #1 2013 Found Polaroid, custom trim work, and house paint

wooden juncture made of a divided-

to render functional objects useless. In Casement #1 the artist inserted a light windowpane over the lens of the camera, preventing the inner mechanism of the camera from working properly. Presenting ordinary materials and objects such as this in an environment of

Courtesy of the artist

visual inspection raises questions about functionality and perspective. Day participated in and organized CITYWIDE: A Collective Exhibition with over 25 artist-run art collectives in Philadelphia in November 2013. She is also the editor of the “Exhibition Essay” series for the NAPOLEON artist collective. This fall she will have a solo exhibition at the Philadelphia Art Alliance.

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58


BONNIE LEVINTHAL American, born 1958

Levinthal’s works in this exhibition were

(upper) Havana 1 2014 Oil, acrylic, and gouache on wood

overlapping geometric shapes explore

inspired by the artist’s three recent trips to Havana, Cuba. The defined but themes of isolation and ownership, as well as boundaries and borders. The artist explains, “I see the images as openended explorations of places and spaces, both mental and physical.” Levinthal received her MFA in

(lower) Havana 2 2014 Oil, acrylic, and gouache on wood

printmaking from the Pennsylvania State

Courtesy of the artist

sponsored by the University of Havana.

University. She was recently involved in Women in Trees: Mujeres en los Arboles, a collaborative project with Cuban artists that culminated in an exhibition in Cuba in conjunction with the Women in the 21st Century International Conference, Levinthal was awarded the Ogontz ‘65 Career Development Professorship from Penn State Abington as well as grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. She was the recipient of a 2014 Nes Artist Residency in Skagaströnd, Iceland. She is currently an associate professor of visual art at Penn State Abington.

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60


MARIEL CAPANNA American, born 1988

This work combines Capanna’s two

Week-Long Music-Fest, Early-Morning Fly-Fishing 2013 Oil on panel

painting, the artist paints while watching

creative processes, movie painting and memory painting. To create a movie a film, racing to capture any fleeting information before it exits the screen. The resulting image is a tightly spaced field of movement, color, and activity. Week-Long Music-Fest, Early-Morning

Courtesy of the artist

Fly-Fishing began as a small, square panel. Using her movie-painting process, Capanna filled the picture with a busy and colorful crowd surrounded by detailed, clashing patterns. The painting, however, felt more claustrophobic than happily energetic. Rather than painting over the crowd, she enlarged the panel so that the figures were surrounded by a memory painting of an expansive landscape of the Norwegian and Finnish countryside. Capanna’s memory painting involves a simpler, slower process that balances the frenzied activity of her movie painting approach. Capanna obtained her BFA and certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA). She received a Kittredge Fund Grant in 2013 and a Cresson Travel Scholarship from PAFA in 2012. 61


62


KEVIN FINKLEA American, born 1958

Finklea’s work is part of a series

Parakeet for Palermo, Group #4 2013 Acrylic on plywood and pine

he went into his studio to make simple

Courtesy of Pentimenti Gallery, Philadelphia

for some time. The paint is also reused; it

dedicated to the memory of German artist Blinky Palermo. It began when wooden forms. He explains, “The rule I set for myself was to not think about it too much. Simply put: glue it, screw it and paint it.” For this work, Finklea utilized previously cut pieces of lumber and plywood that had been in his studio is previously mixed colors that were used in completed compositions. Finklea obtained his BA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. His work was included in the 2014 group exhibition Janson’s and Other Stories at 37PK Platform for the Arts in the Netherlands. In 2013 the artist was included in a two-person exhibition at the 91 Orange Street Gallery in New Haven. In 2011 he had a solo exhibition, Things We Said Were Important but Now Forgotten, at Pentimenti Gallery in Philadelphia.

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JONATHAN RYAN American, born 1989

Ryan’s expansive compositions are

(upper) Six Feet Two In. 2014 Oil on canvas

the contemporary landscape—a parking

largely characterized by emptiness. Although he depicts familiar features of lot and a garage—their enormity and desertion makes them feel alien and unknown. The lines and directional symbols appear more like abstracted patterns of a painterly composition than recognizable elements of human-made

(lower) Lot 2013 Oil on canvas

structures. Ryan obtained his MFA in painting from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. He has been awarded a residency at the Vermont Studio Center. In 2013 his work

Courtesy of the artist

was included in the group exhibition Low Rumble at Crane Arts in Philadelphia.

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H. JOHN THOMPSON American, born 1979

Thompson’s work is informed by his exploration of space and architectural elements and how they disclose differences due to time and use. He explains, “Both works point to an

(upper) Coped Staircase Redux 2014 Latex paint, pine, and poplar

awareness of the constructed world and the individual histories existing within the places we inhabit. Whether these habitations are long or short in duration, an imprint is left on a place. Through renovation, demolition, reconstruction, and even concentrated observation, we

(lower) A Natural History of Window Renovation 2014 Latex paint, pine, and poplar

become more familiar with our spatial

Courtesy of the artist

a collective gallery space in Philadelphia.

and temporal environment.” Thompson obtained his MFA in studio art from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. He is a lecturer, exhibitions coordinator, and fabrication studio coordinator at Penn State Abington. He is also a founding member of NAPOLEON, He recently participated in CITYWIDE: A Collective Exhibition, which included over 25 artist-run art collectives in Philadelphia.

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PAUL RIDER American, born 1962

Rider’s photographs are representational

(upper) Strange but Beautiful 02 2013 Archival pigment print

conceptual underpinnings that guide his

because of their documentary nature, but his subject matter is informed by the practice. He explains, “I use a camera to photograph what I perceive describes my thoughts or gives the best representation of the idea I am trying to convey.” Rider received his MFA in photography

(lower) Strange but Beautiful 15 2013 Archival pigment print

from Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia. In 2012, he had a solo show, Drawn to the Light, at LGTripp Gallery in Philadelphia.

Courtesy of the Artist

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LYNNE CAMPBELL American, born 1967

Campbell painted these two works on a

(upper) Black Cat (Little Sisters of the Poor) 2011 Acrylic on wood

imagined wanderings of a feral cat that

leaf of her neighbors’ discarded dining room table. The imagery derives from her lives in her neighborhood. She created Black Cat (Little Sisters of the Poor) after a snowy walk during which she came upon an empty field. The artist explains, “There was a gate at the edge of the field which read, ‘The Little Sisters of the Poor.’ The convent was no longer there,

(lower) Winter (Black Cat) 2009 (reworked by the artist, 2012) Acrylic on wood

just the plaintive field and gate. I made the painting from memory after that walk.” Campbell’s work was included in the Korean and American Modern Artists’ Hanji Exhibition at the Youngdam Hanji Art Museum in Seoul in 2013, and in

Courtesy of the artist and Morpeth Contemporary

a three-person exhibition at Morpeth Contemporary in Hopewell, New Jersey. She has had solo and group shows at the More Gallery in Philadelphia and is the recipient of three painting fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Her work has also been published in the national periodical New American Paintings.

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COLLEEN RUDOLF American, born 1981

Rudolf sewed together discarded

I’ll Meet You on the Moon 2011 Charcoal on stitched canvas

the buffalo. The work was inspired by

scraps of canvas to create this drawing that honors the majestic existence of Rudolf’s 2011 trip to the American West, where she encountered herds of buffalo. She was captivated by the animals’ freedom to roam the expansive plains as well as their imposing mass.

Courtesy of the artist

Rudolf received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Her sculptures are installed at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, New York; Burlington County Community College; and the Little Berlin Fairgrounds in Philadelphia.

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ELI VANDENBERG American, born 1979

relationship with his father and his two

(upper) Some Things from 10 Years Together 2012 Ink on paper

build things, but because he was born

(lower) The Men in My Family 2012 Ink on paper

acknowledgment of the relationship we

Courtesy of the artist

together began when they were both in

grandfathers. VandenBerg always wanted his grandfather to teach him how to a girl he was not allowed to play with tools. Another item pictured is a knife. VandenBerg explains, “My grandfather didn’t know me as his grandson, only his granddaughter, but my father gave me his knife and this was an may have had.” Some Things from 12 Years Together is a collection of items from VandenBerg’s relationship with his wife. Their life their twenties and when the artist was a lesbian. He explains, “We have spent a lot of time growing and changing, but we have always shared similar values and interests.” VandenBerg obtained an MFA in

These drawings are part of a larger series

printmaking from Pratt Institute. Recent

in which VandenBerg asked the question,

exhibitions include a solo show at the

“How do we organize our lives and

University City Arts League and inclusion

memories with the items found on our

in the exhibition No Man Is an Island: The

shelves and in our dresser drawers?”

Masculine Landscape in the 21st Century

The Men in My Family is an accumulation

at the Printmaking Center of New Jersey,

of items that in some way relate to his

in Branchburg. 75


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MICKAYEL THURIN American, born 1987

Bloom is a portrait of a friend. Thurin

(upper) Bloom 2013 Acrylic and mixed media on canvas

and I still think it is pretty creepy.” The

explains, “This is the only successful portrait I’ve ever done of anyone smiling way the artist has painted the large, staring eyes in two shades of blue and in slightly uneven sizes makes the woman appear more crazed than happy. LW is a portrait of Thurin’s coworker. The artist added beads to the surface of the painted portrait, achieving a

(lower) LW 2013 Mixed media on canvas

grotesque texture that contrasts with the delicateness of the sitter’s features. Thurin completed the dual BFA/ certificate program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the

Courtesy of the artist

University of Pennsylvania. Her work was recently included in the exhibition Women and Biography at Woodmere.

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SENECA WEINTRAUT American, born 1988

Labor Day is from a larger body of work

Labor Day October 2013 Acrylic and oil on birch panel

Having grown up in a small town in

that Weintraut created after moving to the Fishtown section of Philadelphia. Indiana, he was interested in depicting the differences between rural and urban environments, as well as the similar feelings of community that exist in two distinct places. Here he portrays a

Courtesy of the artist

block party. Three women and a man sit on the giant slide at the right, while a Winnebago blocks the entrance to the street. The elevated curve of I-95 at the upper left soars above the homes. Weintraut included many familiar features of Philadelphia neighborhoods, such as No Parking signs and murals. Weintraut is currently pursuing his MFA in painting at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. In 2013 he was selected to attend the summer residency program at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. His work has also been published in the national periodical New American Paintings.

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KATHRAN SIEGEL American, born 1944

Siegel’s sculpture, One More Time,

One More Time February 2013 Wood, acrylic, graphite, and wire

moves confidently as the organ drips

depicts an elated man who strides down the street holding a skewered heart. He blood onto his pants and the street. The artist carved it based on photographs of a friend who posed for her while running and stopping in mid-stride. For Siegel, carving wood is similar to creating a

Courtesy of the artist

collage. In both processes, sequential additions and subtractions indicate the direction of the rest of the work. Siegel explains, “I carve the individual body parts and assemble them into the whole as needed, continuing to carve and work the elements together as I go.” Siegel obtained her MFA in painting from the University of New Mexico and her MEd from the University of Florida. She recently completed an outdoor sculpture carved from a spruce tree trunk in the 8000 block of East Mount Airy Avenue.

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PETER KENDZIERSKI American, born 1984

Kendzierski painted this work while

Storm 2013 Oil on panel

area. He completed the majority of

Courtesy of the artist

sky and the still cityscape. The artist

looking out his studio window after a storm had just passed through the the painting in one session. The quick brushstrokes echo the urgency with which he captured the tumultuous paints from direct observation of his environment, translating it into an exploration of illusion as well as twodimensionality. He notes, “A successful painting is a declaration of its own new reality.� Kendzierski received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art.

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ROCHELLE TONER American, born 1940

Toner creates work that is intimate

(upper) Port 2014 Watercolor on paper

viewing experience. The repetition of

in scale because she is interested in fostering a contemplative and meditative the interlocking forms that are neither representational nor abstract requires the viewer to pause and explore the small details of her paintings. Toner was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and

(lower) Stitch 2013 Watercolor on paper

has lived in Philadelphia since 1972. She received her MFA from the University of Illinois. She was the recipient of the Southern Graphics Council International’s 2010 Printmaker Emeritus Award. Her work was also included in the exhibition Female Gaze: Women Artists

Courtesy of the artist

Making Their World at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

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JAY MUHLIN American, born 1977

During a recent winter, Muhlin

(upper) (Car Nachos Bell Grande, No Sour Cream) 2014 Gelatin silver print From the series “Sleeve on My Heart”

a dejected girl sitting before an uneaten

photographed a variety of subjects, including a midnight trip to Taco Bell and plate of spaghetti. Muhlin did not stage his images. Instead, he captured sincere moments that record a period of the artist’s life. Muhlin obtained his BFA in photography from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and his MFA in transmedia/art photography from Syracuse University. In 2013 the artist had his first solo

(lower) (Overlooked Spaghetti) 2014 Gelatin silver print From the series “Sleeve on My Heart”

exhibition, Sleeve on My Heart, at Vox Populi in Philadelphia.

Courtesy of the artist

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ANNE SEIDMAN American, born 1950

Seidman says that through abstraction

(upper) Untitled 2012 Water-based paint on rag board, mounted on wood

but with room for spontaneity, irony, and

she “reveals a world, not unlike my everyday life: rigorous and controlled, consciousness. Without the constraints of subject matter, abstraction has allowed me to explore pure painting.� Seidman has an MFA in painting and drawing from the University of Wisconsin and an MA in 3-D computer graphics and animation from Ohio State University. She

(lower) Untitled 2011 Water-based paint on rag board, mounted on wood

was a professor of art at Moore College of Art and Design for 25 years. She had a recent solo show at George Billis Gallery in Los Angeles. She is the recipient of a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant.

Courtesy of Schmidt Dean Gallery

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SAM SHAFFER American, born 1955

Shaffer begins to paint by using

Variation on Pink February 2014 Acrylic on canvas

This self-portrait began as a drawing of

Courtesy of the artist

wife’s. He usually works on a number of

drawings from nature, his photographs, or inspiration from someone else’s work. someone else. As it developed, the figure began to look more like Shaffer and at times, the features were more like his different paintings simultaneously and his imagery often combines the forms of his various artistic endeavors. Shaffer received his MFA from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. In 2012 he had a solo exhibition of his work at the Arts and Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County.

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BETSEY BATCHELOR American, born 1952

Batchelor’s work explores the way that

(upper) Peninsula 2014 Gouache and acrylic on wood panel

work is process oriented and is inspired

the organization of color and shape can suggest a feeling and sense of place. Her by artists such as Philip Guston and Pierre Bonnard. Born in Wilmington, Delaware, Batchelor came to Philadelphia to attend the Philadelphia College of Art. She received her MFA from the Rhode Island School of

(lower) Spring Training 2014 Gouache and acrylic on wood panel

Design. In 1990 she started teaching at

Courtesy of the artist

Cuba in conjunction with the Women in

Beaver College (now Arcadia University), where she is an associate professor of art and design. She was recently involved in Women in Trees: Mujeres en los Arboles, a collaborative project with Cuban artists that culminated in an exhibition held in the 21st Century International Conference sponsored by the University of Havana. Her work was included in Woodmere’s 2012 exhibition, Doris Staffel: Painter, Teacher. Batchelor has had solo exhibitions in Philadelphia at Jeffrey Fuller Fine Art and the Jessica Berwind Gallery. She is a MacDowell Colony Fellow and has received grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.

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MORGAN HOBBS American, 1988

Hobbs’s representational paintings depict

A New Haircut 2013 Oil on canvas

the structure of her compositions by

Courtesy of the artist

younger sister and others with mental

objects and images taken from life and her imagination. She experiments with making preliminary sketches and cut paper collages. The impetus for this work is her interest in the habits of her illness. The artist explains of her sister, “Watching her stare into the mirror made me wonder how it feels to gaze at her own reflection while the collected idea of who that person is slips into shuffling, irrational thoughts. Each of my paintings reflects my broader interests in psychology, the human experience, and the sense of self.” Hobbs obtained her BFA in painting from the University of Central Missouri in 2010 and is currently pursuing her MFA at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She was the 2013 recipient of the annual scholarship for young artists from the MidAmerica Pastel Society. She recently had a solo exhibition at the Craft Studio Gallery at University of MissouriColumbia, and her work was featured in Vox magazine in conjunction with the show.

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MICHAEL SECOR American, born 1984

Secor’s imagery derives from

(upper) Port Richmond Evening Winter 2014 Oil on panel

immediate environment. He painted Port

drawings and memory. He paints in a representational manner, simplifying his Richmond Evening from a memory of an evening when he jogged down the street toward the full moon. He often explores the relationship between space and color and how such formal elements interact.

(lower) Marlborough Car Fall 2013 Oil on panel

Secor recently had a two-person show with fellow artist Katie Knoeringer at Circle of Hope Gallery in Fishtown. He received his MFA in 2012 from Louisiana State University.

Courtesy of the artist

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MICHAEL KOWBUZ Canadian, born 1966

Kowbuz is inspired by his immediate

(upper) Intersection 2012 Ink, watercolor, tempera, and gouache on paper

of his subjects by manipulating the

environment. Through the act of painting and drawing, he explores the materiality qualities of color, light, and texture. Originally from Ontario, Canada, Kowbuz obtained his MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Together with his wife, Tina Rocha, Kowbuz owns and operates Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio in Philadelphia.

(lower) Street 2011 Ink, watercolor, tempera, and gouache on paper Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio, Philadelphia

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LESLIE STAHL American, born 1984

Stahl’s work is representational and

The Dark before Dusk 2013 Oil on matboard

faithfully record the world. Instead

Courtesy of the artist

but being curious about the strange path

painted almost entirely from direct observation. It is not her intention to she explores the peculiarity of seeing. According to Stahl, “Perception is not just seeing and knowing what’s there, our eye travels.” This painting depicts a ship in a port at dusk. The composition is made up of strong verticals and horizontals, dividing the surface into areas of activity that dissolve into a flat gray field of color. Stahl obtained her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2013. In January 2014 she received her third grant from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation.

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MARGO TASSI American, born 1945

Tassi works in her studio in Philadelphia

Cormorants 2012 Oil on canvas

September. She began Cormorants on

Courtesy of Lee and Tony Junker

boulders where cormorants can be seen

for most of the year, but paints outside in Nova Scotia from June through Nova Scotia’s Short Beach, a quiet area where the rocks make it too dangerous for human swimmers. There are certain sitting and drying their outstretched wings. As she does with many of her oil paintings, Tassi completed this work in stages, taking it back and forth from the studio to the rocks while she finished it. Tassi received her MFA from Washington University in St. Louis. She recently had a solo exhibition, Nova Scotia, Edge of the Sea, at Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio in Philadelphia. Her work was also included in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 2014 juried show in the Alumni Gallery.

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ELIZABETH WILSON American, born 1959

Wilson began Pink Clouds - UK in 2008. It sat in a pile of unfinished paintings until last summer, when she added watercolor on top of the existing

(upper) Pink Clouds - UK 2008-2013 Gouache and watercolor on paper

gouache. The watercolor “finished” the

Courtesy of Rosenfeld Gallery and the artist

a personal affection for the quiet little

work by adding an interesting texture, energy, and spatial quality. Sunset, Greenport depicts a beach in the town of Greenport, New York. Wilson explains, “Having visited Greenport several times, I have developed close friendships and village that borders the Long Island Sound, which at times references English

(lower) Sunset, Greenport 2013 Gouache and watercolor on paper

and Irish fishing villages I stumbled across some years ago.” Wilson obtained a certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has a forthcoming solo exhibition at Rosenfeld Gallery in Philadelphia.

Courtesy of the artist

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CYNTHIA BACK American, born 1956

Back is a printmaker whose artistic

(upper) Dredging Along the Jersey Shore 2014 Print collage and gouache

combine existing work and print proofs

process involves recycling: her collages, including the two exhibited in this show, with paint. Incorporated as substrates or cut and layered, the images and objects she chooses have symbolic and emotional resonance. Dredging Along the Jersey Shore and Yellow Tape explore the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy at the Jersey Shore. From memory and

(lower) Yellow Tape 2013 Print collage and gouache

photographs the artist took in the months after the storm, she explores the incongruity of beautiful days and sunny beaches, and the chaos of destruction. Back earned her BFA from Minneapolis

Courtesy of the artist

College of Art and Design and a postgraduate certificate from St. Martin’s School of Art in London. In 2014 she was awarded a workspace residency at the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York.

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YVONNE LOVE American, born 1968

For these two works, Love burned the

(upper) Ash 1 2014 Modeling paste and resin on burnt clay board

moving cells or microscopic particles.

surface of the board, then used modeling paste to create an image that suggests Love approaches her work without a preconceived idea that determines her final composition. Instead, as the artist explains, “I allow the process to connect itself to itself, to have its own conversations. I never know where it will end, and the best is when the pieces

(lower) Ash 2 2014 Modeling paste and resin on burnt clay board

surprise me, revealing something new.� Love received her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania. She recently had a solo exhibition, Crystal Ash, at New Hope Sidetracks Art Gallery. Her work has also been shown at Crane Arts and LGTripp Gallery, both in Philadelphia, among others.

Courtesy of the artist and New Hope Sidetracks Art Gallery

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JENNIFER BELL American, born 1980

Bell’s multidisciplinary practice connects

(upper) Post-Concussion Syndrome Self-Portrait (MRI3) 2014 Mixed media on canvas

communicates the emotional and

her with others who share similar interests and concerns. This series physical distress that accompanies brain and spine trauma. The artist began to create these mixed media drawings after being in a car accident in the summer of 2013. The series combines the imagery from her subsequent MRI brain scans with impromptu mark making. The frenetic, swirling forms represent

(lower) Post-Concussion Syndrome Self-Portrait (MRI5) 2014 Mixed media on canvas

the unpredictable aspects of mind and

Courtesy of the artist

Faculty Exhibition, held in the Hamilton

body suffering and illustrate the optic disturbances and head pain that result from occipital neuralgia. Bell obtained her MFA in studio art from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2014. Her work was included in the 2013 Montgomery County Community College and Arronson Galleries at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

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ERICA PRINCE Canadian, born 1985

Prince’s drawings are often illustrations

(upper) Modernist Buddha 2014 Collage and acrylic on paper

Design, An Attempt to Amalgamate is

of design ideas for objects that would improve people’s daily lives. Vanity Rea design for a vanity system that would streamline and transform Prince’s beauty ritual into an opportunity for daily selfreflection. Modernist Buddha combines the visual language of two utopian worldviews that espouse a unification of art and life:

(lower) Vanity Re-Design, An Attempt to Amalgamate 2013 Gouache, pencil, acrylic, charcoal, collage, colored pencil, and Swatch watch on paper

Buddhism and modernism. This piece is an abstracted image of the Buddha on a lotus flower, reaching enlightenment under a Bodhi tree, executed in a style reminiscent of Russian Constructivist collage. Prince received her MFA in painting from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. She recently had a solo exhibition, To Sit Rather Than Slip In at Vox Populi, in

Courtesy of the artist

Philadelphia. She is an adjunct professor at Tyler School of Art, the University of the Arts, and Arcadia University.

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THOMAS VANCE American, born 1972

Vance’s painting combines imagery

KANO-birds 2013 Acrylic, ink, and sawdust on panel

strategies. He explores the relationships

derived from historical Japanese paintings and various formal and spatial between nature and architecture in his work, using a variety of materials and formal approaches. Kano refers to the Kano school, a highly influential school of painting marked by boldly rendered

Courtesy of the artist

brushwork and bright colors that dominated Japanese art for more than 300 years. Vance received his MFA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art.

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LINDA LEE ALTER American, born 1939

Throughout her life, Alter has found

Both Came First: The Chicken Is in the Egg and the Egg Is in the Chicken 2012 Acrylic on birch plywood

textures with images of plants and

Courtesy of the artist

egg and the egg is in the chicken.”

delight in the natural world; she frequently incorporates patterns and animals in her paintings. For her, art is a communicative medium through which she can engage the viewer and share a message. This work refers to the Buddhist belief in interbeing, asserting that “both came first: the chicken is in the

Alter received her MS in art psychotherapy from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital (now Hahnemann University Hospital). She is the founder of the Leeway Foundation, an organization that supports women and trans artists creating social change in the Delaware Valley. In December 2010 Alter’s collection of nearly 500 works of art was given as a gift to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and now comprises the Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women.

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EMILY STEINBERG American, born 1964

Steinberg completed this piece on-site,

Little Deer Island (detail) 2013 Oil on canvas

boathouse, built in 1845, and worked on

Courtesy of the artist

and physically express the breadth of the

at the edge of the ocean on Deer Island in Maine. She set up her studio in an old the ten panels simultaneously, lining them up along the front wall of the cabin. With this work Steinberg sought to visually landscape. Steinberg obtained her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania. Her illustrations have been published in Jewish Comix Anthology: Volume 1, a compilation of stories and illustrations in comic book format about Jewish tales and folklore. She recently had a solo exhibition at Schmidtberger Fine Art Gallery in Frenchtown, New Jersey. She teaches drawing, painting, the graphic novel, and comics at Penn State Abington.

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MICAH DANGES American, born 1979

Danges’s recent work explores the

Bathroom Scene 2013 Color photograph, enamel paint, aluminum, and museum board

to deconstruct various objects and

Courtesy of the artist

at the Print Center, Fleisher Art Memorial,

intersection of image making and sculpture. The artist uses photography environments, creating new compositions that address the formal concerns of color, texture, and material. Danges received his BFA from Kutztown University. He has exhibited most recently Rebekah Templeton Contemporary Art, Vox Populi, Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, and Fleisher/Ollman Gallery. He regularly contributes to Megawords magazine and has been included in the February/March 2013 issue of New American Painters.

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SARAH HUNTER American, born 1983

Hunter borrowed the title for this piece,

Coffin Thoughts 2013 Oil on board

of her paintings by setting up a still

Courtesy of the artist

wooden snake in a palette of mostly

Coffin Thoughts, from the novel Ulysses by James Joyce. Hunter begins each life or small arrangement that serves as a model. For this work, she used cardboard, photographs, shells, and a gray-browns. Hunter’s work was recently included in group exhibitions at Rodger LaPelle Galleries and the Cheltenham Center for the Arts. She received her BFA from the University of Pennsylvania and her certificate in painting from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

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GERARD BROWN American, born 1966

translation of Beowulf that describes

Everything Is So Large (After Seamus Heaney; For Thomas J. Brown) 2013 Ink on paper

Thomas, who recently lost his own son.

Courtesy of the artist

risky to declare plainly, which is why I

how a man feels when he loses his son. The work is dedicated to Brown’s brother

Brown often obscures his selected text using encoded writing, such as Braille, maritime signal flags, or script that is nearly illegible. He explains, “I often choose texts I feel are too personal or rely on the process of concealing them in code.” In his work he explores the different ways we interpret messages when we are looking and reading. Brown earned his BFA from Boston University and his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Brown is assistant professor and department chair of Foundations at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. He is a recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in visual art criticism. An exhibition of his paintings will open in June 2014 at the Abington Art Center. He recently organized the exhibition R/W:

An artist and a writer, Brown begins his

Reading and Writing Visual Experience

work by identifying or composing a piece

at the Hicks Art Center Gallery at Bucks

of writing. For this drawing he chose a

County Community College. He is also a

passage from Seamus Heaney’s

contributor to Title-magazine.com. 125


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MARIA DUMLA0 American (born Philippines), 1972

Dumlao works in a variety of media,

(upper) Crash (6/17/13, 3:19:32 PM) 2014 Archival print on matte fine art textured paper from the series “Crash”

moments, background sound, and

including photography, artist books, installation, performance, sound, and video. She emphasizes interstitial shadows, foregrounding often overlooked details. These two prints, cropped screenshots taken when her computer failed, are from her ongoing series Crash. In them she attempts to transform moments of panic and technological breakdown. Dumlao obtained her MFA in studio art

(lower) Crash (6/20/13, 12:11:46 PM) 2014 Archival print on matte fine art textured paper from the series “Crash”

from Hunter College in New York. She recently had a solo exhibition at Vox Populi in Philadelphia, where she is an active member. She also completed a 42-minute video animation called Solar Motel.

Courtesy of the artist

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PHILIPPA BEARDSLEY American, born 1983

Beardsley’s work combines a process-

(upper) Secret Admirer 2013 Acrylic, rag board, and paper on wood

representational imagery. Although her

oriented approach that engenders experimentation with various media with imagery derives from specific sources, her execution of the completed work is unplanned. Secret Admirer was inspired by the artist’s interest in cameo portraits and lockets. The desperation of the faceless admirer holding a bouquet of flowers is both humorous and slightly

(lower) Pizza Parlor 2014 Wood, acrylic, and mixed media on wood

unnerving. Pizza Parlor references a restaurant in Beardsley’s neighborhood. The artist explained that the texture of the work “reminds me of melted cheese and the space feels like the large glass windows that separate me from the pizza and the people as I walk by at night.”

Courtesy of the artist

Beardsley obtained her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2012.

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PERKY EDGERTON American, born 1953

Edgerton began Listening for Monkeys as

Listening for Monkeys 2013 Oil on canvas

had a problem with monkeys breaking

a memory of her time living in Sri Lanka with her husband. As she explains, “We into our house. This is a portrait of my husband in his favorite bathrobe, on his constant vigil.”

Courtesy of the artist and Gross McCleaf Gallery, Philadelphia

Edgerton received her MFA from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and two Pennsylvania Council on the Arts grants. In 2013 she had a solo exhibition at Gross McCleaf Gallery in Philadelphia. She has also had solo exhibitions at Swarthmore College’s List Gallery, Dartmouth College, and More Gallery.

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Stairwell Gallery, Woodmere Art Museum


STAIRWELL GALLERY

In conjunction with this year’s Woodmere Annual, juror Sarah McEneaney selected works from the Museum’s permanent collection. Represented here are her teachers and mentors, including Edith Neff, Louis Sloan, Cynthia Carlson, and Sidney Goodman, as well as contemporaries who inspire her, such as Judith Schaechter and Tina Newberry. McEneaney’s thoughtful grouping illustrates the way in which today’s artists interact with the legacy of some of Philadelphia’s masters, and engenders new visual and conceptual relationships that unite these works with contemporary expression.

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JUDITH SCHAECHTER American, born 1961

In her stained glass works, Schaechter

Sweets Kissed to Death 1989 Stained glass, with dovetailed oak frame, and light box

human failure. Unlike most contemporary

combines a dizzying array of textures with brilliant color to convey tales of glass artists, who create abstract objects, Schaechter often includes a figure and other narrative elements. Her work has given new meaning to the genre of stained glass by adopting and embracing its historically didactic function.

Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2014

Schaechter obtained her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. An

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

adjunct professor at the University of the Arts, she has lived and worked in Philadelphia for over three decades. She has exhibited widely, including in New York, Los Angeles, Seattle, Philadelphia, the Netherlands, Germany, and Korea. She is the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, the Corning Museum of Glass, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and numerous private collections. 135


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TINA NEWBERRY American, born 1954

Newberry’s The Three Graces is

Three Graces 1987 Oil on masonite

and beauty. In Greek mythology, the

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Frances and Robert Kohler, 1990

pleasurable social events.

a haunting interpretation of the mythological goddesses of joy, charm, Three Graces were the daughters of Zeus and the nymph Eurynome and they presided over dances, banquets, and all

They were believed to bring goodwill to Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

both gods and mortals and to endow artists and poets with the ability to create beautiful works of art. Newberry’s figures appear more like survivors living in a peculiar, apocalyptic world devoid of creativity. Their bizarrely structured, cadaverous bodies stand together under a lushly colored red cloth that contrasts with the surrounding bleakness of the landscape. Newberry received her MFA in painting from Indiana University. She teaches painting at Drexel University and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Her work has been exhibited in Pennsylvania, Washington DC, New Jersey, and Indiana and was included in the 2006 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. 137


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SIDNEY GOODMAN American, 1936–2013

Goodman was among the most

Moll 1959 Oil on canvas

Ray’s photographs of Marcel Duchamp

Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2013

conform to the expectations of realist

respected figurative artists in the United States. Here heinterprets one of Man dressed as Rrose Sélavy, Duchamp’s female alter ego. Although his work is representational, Goodman does not painting or portraiture. Instead, he unites recognizable elements with something

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

slightly beyond the visible world. Born in Philadelphia, Goodman attended the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts) and taught there from 1960 to 1978. He was a painting instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1978 to 2011. He received numerous honors, including a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, a Hazlett Memorial Award for Excellence in the Arts, and an honorary doctorate from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. His work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and many others.

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JULIUS BLOCH American, 1888–1966

In the 1930s Bloch established a national

Horace Pippin 1946 Lithographic pencil on woven paper

people. He lived in North Philadelphia for

reputation as a social realist painter who created empathetic portrayals of working most of his life and his own upbringing as a German Jewish immigrant fostered his compassionate identification with the suffering of innocent people. He made many powerful images of leaders

Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2004

and artists from the black community, including this moving portrait of Horace

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

Pippin laid to rest. Born in Kehl, Germany, Bloch moved with his family to Philadelphia at the age of five. He attended the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts) followed by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he would later teach.

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LOUIS SLOAN American, 1932-2008

Sloan often used a somber palette in

Portal of Spring Garden Street date unknown Oil on canvas

his surrounding neighborhood. Here he

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Mrs. Helen Siegl, 1979

faculty member Julius Bloch, whose

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

PAFA from 1953 to 1957. He went on to

his cityscapes, as seen in this work. He lived in West Philadelphia and painted has captured the rhythmical geometric shapes of an abandoned house. With the encouragement of Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) work is also on view Sloan attended work in the conservation department at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 1961 to 1980. He also taught still life, landscape, portrait, and figure painting classes at PAFA from 1962 to 1997. Sloan is represented in the collections of PAFA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the African American Museum in Philadelphia.

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EDITH NEFF American, 1943–1995

When asked about Neff, McEneaney

Self-Portrait 1989 Oil on canvas

Neff captures the intimacy of a familiar

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Bill Scott, 2011

and rather humorous attire.

explained, “I like her figuration. I like how she described places.” In this self-portrait, space. She stands in her home or studio in her underwear and slippers, her stern expression contradicting her casual pose

A lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Neff Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

received her BFA from the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts). In 1978, she joined the faculty at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), where she taught figure painting and drawing. Her work is in many public and corporate collections, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and PAFA. She received many awards, including a fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

145


146


CYNTHIA CARLSON American, born 1942

Early in her career Carlson began to

Sixish 1975 Acrylic on wood

well known site-specific and installation

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the artist, 2011

irregular shapes of Sixish imbue the work

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

Born in Chicago, Carlson obtained her

make heavily impastoed paintings like Sixish, which she developed into her work. She is a pioneer in the Pattern and Decoration movement, and in feminist artistic practice. The playful texture and with a pervasive energy.

BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her MFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. She taught at the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts) from 1967 to 1987. She is the recipient of numerous awards and grants, including four National Endowment for the Arts fellowships and a New York State Council on the Arts fellowship. Her work is represented in the collection of museums across the United States, including the Brooklyn Museum, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among others.

147


148


JAMES LUEDERS American, 1927–1994

Lueders often made portraits of his

Self-Portrait and Portrait of a Young Man date unknown Oil on Masonite, two-sided

the artist’s self-portrait. On the reverse,

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Armand Mednick, 2013

the Fine Arts (PAFA) from 1946 to 1950.

Photography by Rick Echelmeyer

Center for the Arts in 1953 and accepted

friends and colleagues. He painted on both sides of this panel. Shown here is and pictured below, is a likeness of a young man we have yet to identify. Born in Jacksonville, Florida, Lueders studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of He began teaching at the Cheltenham a position at PAFA in 1957, teaching there until his death in 1994. He had enduring relationships with his students and colleagues, who noted his warmth and his breadth of knowledge about the history of art. He is also remembered for the gourmet meals he prepared for friends and his passion for opera.

149


WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION WORKS BY THE JUROR

Rio Grande Hot Springs #1, 2009

SARAH MCENEANEY

Gouache on paper, 9 x 12 in.

American (born Germany), born 1955

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

Solstice Five-O, 2005

Rio Grande Hot Springs #2, 2009

Egg tempera on plywood, 48 x 48 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Hassam, Speicher, Betts, and Symons Funds, 2006 Solstice Five-O #1, 2005

Gouache and graphite on paper, 9 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York Rio Grande Hot Springs #3, 2009

Gouache on Mylar, 17 x 22 in.

Gouache and graphite on paper, 9 x 12 in.

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

Solstice Five-O #2, 2005

WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION

Gouache on paper, 19 1/2 x 25 1/2 in.

LINDA LEE ALTER

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

American, born 1939

Solstice Five-O #3, 2005

Both Came First: The Chicken Is in the Egg and the Egg Is in the Chicken, 2012

Graphite on paper, 13 3/4 x 13 5/8 in.

Acrylic on birch plywood, 24 x 24 in.

Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

Courtesy of the artist

Egg tempera on linen, 42 x 66 in. Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy, New York

Print collage and gouache, 26 x 41 in. Courtesy of the artist BETSEY BATCHELOR

American, born 1952 Peninsula, 2014 Gouache and acrylic on wood panel, 13 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist Spring Training, 2014 Gouache and acrylic on wood panel, 13 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist PHILIPPA BEARDSLEY

American, born 1983 Pizza Parlor, 2014 Wood, acrylic, and mixed media on wood, 10 x 8 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist Secret Admirer, 2013 Acrylic, rag board, and paper on wood, 9 x 7 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist

CYNTHIA BACK

Rio Grande Hot Springs, 2009

Yellow Tape, 2013

American, born 1956 Dredging Along the Jersey Shore, 2014 Print collage and gouache, 18 x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist 150


JENNIFER BELL

ANNE CANFIELD

Mid-Sneeze, 2013

American, born 1980

American, born 1976

Post-Concussion Syndrome Self Portrait (MRI3), 2014

Fugue State, 2014

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 19 x 23 1/4 in. Courtesy of the artist

Mixed media on canvas, 24 x 20 in.

Oil on panel, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist Post-Concussion Syndrome Self-Portrait (MRI5), 2014 Mixed media on canvas, 24 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist GERARD BROWN

American, born 1966 Everything Is So Large (After Seamus Heaney; For Thomas J. Brown), 2013 Ink on paper, 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist LYNNE CAMPBELL

American, born 1967 Black Cat (LIttle Sisters of the Poor), 2011 Acrylic on wood, 17 x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist and Morpeth Contemporary Winter (Black Cat), 2009 (reworked by the artist in 2012)

Robber, 2014 A Tune Without Any Words, 2012

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 24 x 26 in.

Oil on panel, 18 x 24 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist MICAH DANGES MARIEL CAPANNA

American, born 1979

American, born 1988

Bathroom Scene, 2013

Week-Long Music-Fest, Early-Morning Fly-Fishing, 2013

Color photograph, enamel paint, aluminum, and museum board, 13 3/4 x 16 3/4 in.

Oil on panel, 64 x 63 1/2 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist CHRISTINA DAY SALVATORE CERCEO

American, born 1977

American, born 1973

Casement #1, 2012

Mush Head, 2011

Found Polaroid, custom trim work, and house paint, 6 1/2 x 8 x 7 in.

Plaster, rope, wood, steel, resin, and acrylic paint, 14” x 3 3/4” x 4 1/2”

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist ANDA DUBINSKIS

On the Shelf, 2014

American, born 1952

Cardboard, poly clay, and wood, 7 1/2” x 4” x 3 1/2” in.

Chrysanthemum, 2013

Courtesy of the artist

Acrylic on wood, 17 x 17 in.

SCOTT COOPER

Courtesy of the artist and Morpeth Contemporary

American, born 1988 Great Outdoors (Severed Arms), 2014 Acrylic on wood, dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist

151

Charcoal and Conté crayon on Stonehenge paper, 50 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist Adelphia Continued, 2013 Charcoal and Conté crayon on Stonehenge paper, 50 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist


MARIA DUMLAO

KEVIN FINKLEA

SARAH HUNTER

American (born Philippines), born 1972

American, born 1958

American, born 1983

Parakeet for Palermo, Group #4, 2014

Coffin Thoughts, 2013

Acrylic on plywood and pine, dimensions variable (width of largest disc: approx. 11 in.)

Courtesy of the artist

Crash (6/17/13, 3:19:32 PM), from the series Crash, 2014 Archival print on matte fine art textured paper, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist Crash (6/20/13, 12:11:46 PM), from the series Crash, 2014

Courtesy of Pentimenti Gallery, Philadelphia

Oil on board, 9 x 15 in.

PETER KENDZIERSKI

American, born 1984 Storm, 2013

P. TIMOTHY GIERSCHICK II

Oil on panel, 48 x 36 in.

Archival print on matte fine art textured paper, 12 x 12 in.

American, born 1976

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Collage and latex on panel, 13 x 11 in. each

MICHAEL KOWBUZ

Courtesy of the artist

Intersection, 2012

PERKY EDGERTON

Insect 1-3, 2013

American, born 1953 Listening for Monkeys, 2013 Oil on canvas, 46 x 46 in.

Looking for America 1-4, 2014

Courtesy of the artist and Gross McCleaf Gallery, Philadelphia

Courtesy of the artist

Latex on panel, 15 x 13 in. each

Canadian, born 1966 Ink, watercolor, tempera, and gouache on paper, 10 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio, Philadelphia Street, 2011

RAPHAEL FENTON-SPAID

MORGAN HOBBS

American (born Italy), born 1983

American, born 1988

Self-Portrait, 2013

Oil on canvas, 34 x 46 in.

Acrylic, cardboard, felt, contact paper, and found objects on Masonite, 15 x 14 in. Courtesy of the artist Couple Portrait, 2013 Acrylic, fabric, Astroturf, Kanikko crabs, wire, collage, and found objects on Masonite, 16 x 14 in.

A New Haircut, 2013 Courtesy of the artist

Ink, watercolor, tempera, and gouache on paper, 10 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery and Studio, Philadelphia BONNIE LEVINTHAL

MARILYN HOLSING

American, born 1946 Toil, 2014 Acrylic on paper, 27 1/2 x 39 in. Courtesy of Gallery Joe, Philadelphia

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1958 Havana 1, 2014 Oil, acrylic, and gouache on wood, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist Havana 2, 2014 Oil, acrylic, and gouache on wood, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

152


YVONNE LOVE

CATHERINE MULLIGAN

American, born 1968

American, born 1987

Ash 1, 2014

Playboy Self-Portrait, 2013

Modeling paste and resin on burnt clay board, 12 x 12 in.

Oil on Masonite, 14 x 20 in.

Courtesy of the artist and New Hope Sidetracks Art Gallery Ash 2, 2014 Modeling paste and resin on burnt clay board, 12 x 12 in.

Courtesy of the artist Taco Bell, 2014 Oil on paper, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist ERICA PRINCE

Strange but Beautiful 15, 2013 Archival pigment print 15, 16 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist COLLEEN RUDOLF

American, born 1981 I’ll Meet You on the Moon, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and New Hope Sidetracks Art Gallery

Canadian, born 1985

Charcoal on stitched canvas, 72 x 60 in.

Modernist Buddha, 2014

Courtesy of the artist

ANGELA MCQUILLAN

Courtesy of the artist

Collage and acrylic on paper, 17 x 13 in.

American, born 1981 Lilypad, 2014 Yarn, fabric, and thread, 48 x 51 in. Courtesy of the artist JAY MUHLIN

American, born 1977 (Car Nachos Bell Grande, No Sour Cream), from the series Sleeve on My Heart, 2014

Vanity Re-Design, An Attempt to Amalgamate, 2013 Gouache, pencil, acrylic, charcoal, collage, colored pencil, Swatch watch on paper, 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist

JONATHAN RYAN

American, born 1989 Six Feet Two In., 2014 Oil on canvas, 39 1/4 x 69 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist Lot, 2013 Oil on canvas, 44 1/2 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist

KRISTA PROFITT

American, born 1989

MICHAEL SECOR

Gelatin silver print, 19 x 12 in.

The Museum, 2013

American, born 1984

Courtesy of the artist

Oil on canvas, 45 x 46 in.

Marlborough Car, fall 2013

Courtesy of the artist

Oil on panel, 15 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.

(Overlooked Spaghetti), from the series Sleeve on My Heart, 2014 Gelatin silver print, 27 x 19 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist PAUL RIDER

American, born 1962 Strange but Beautiful 02, 2013 Archival pigment print 02, 16 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist

153

Port Richmond Evening, winter 2014 Oil on panel, 14 1/8 x 14 1/8 in. Courtesy of the artist


ANNE SEIDMAN

EMILY STEINBERG

Coped Staircase Redux, 2014

American, born 1950

American, born 1964

Untitled, 2011

Little Deer Island, 2013

Latex paint, pine, and black walnut, 22 x 30 x 19 in.

Water-based paints on rag board, mounted on wood, 8 x 18 in.

Oil on canvas, ten 20 x 20 in. panels

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

MICKAYEL THURIN

Courtesy of Schmidt Dean Gallery Untitled, 2012 Water-based paint on rag board, mounted on wood, 17 1/8 x 17 7/8 in. Courtesy of Schmidt Dean Gallery SAM SHAFFER

American, born 1955 Variation on Pink, February 2014 Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1987 BECKY SUSS

Bloom, 2013

American, born 1980 Living Room (Yogi 2), 2013

Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 16 x 12 in.

Oil on linen, 72 x 96 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Fleisher/Ollman, Philadelphia

LW, 2013

Untitled (Moai Head, Sculpture, Stack of Books), 2013 Low-fire ceramic and stoneware with glaze, dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist and Fleisher/Ollman, Philadelphia MARGO TASSI

KATHRAN SIEGEL

American, born 1944 One More Time, February 2013 Wood, acrylic, graphite, and wire, 62 x 7 x 25 in. Courtesy of the artist LESLIE STAHL

American, born 1984 The Dark before Dusk, 2013

American, born 1945 Cormorants, 2012 Oil on canvas, 20 x 20 in. Courtesy of Lee and Tony Junker H. JOHN THOMPSON

American, born 1979 A Natural History of Window Renovation, 2014

Oil on matboard, 12 x 12 in.

Latex paint, pine, and poplar, 23 1/2 x 30 x 12 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

154

Mixed media on canvas, 16 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist ROCHELLE TONER

American, born 1940 Port, 2014 Watercolor on paper, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist Stitch, 2013 Watercolor on paper, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist THOMAS VANCE

American, born 1972 KANO-birds, 2013 Acrylic, ink, and sawdust on panel, 40 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist


ELI VANDENBERG

American, born 1979

WORKS FROM THE WOODMERE COLLECTION

Some Things from 10 Years Togther, 2012

JULIUS BLOCH

Ink on paper, 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist The Men in My Family, 2012 Ink on paper, 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist SENECA WEINTRAUT

American, born 1988 Labor Day, 2013 Acrylic and oil on birch panel, 48 x 52 in. Courtesy of the artist VIRGINIA LEIGH WERRELL

American, born 1987 Development, 2013 Oil on canvas, 36 x 32 in.

American, 1888-1966 Horace Pippin, 1946 Lithographic pencil on woven paper, 10 7/8 x 8 13/16 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2004 CYNTHIA CARLSON

American, born 1942 Sixish, 1975 Acrylic on wood, 29 x 27 in.

EDITH NEFF

American, 1943-1995 Self-Portrait, 1989 Oil on canvas, 52 x 42 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Bill Scott, 2011 TINA NEWBERRY

American, born 1954 Three Graces, 1987 Oil on Masonite, 22 x 11 7/8 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Frances and Robert Kohler, 1990

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the artist, 2011

JUDITH SCHAECHTER

SIDNEY GOODMAN

Sweets Kissed to Death, 1989

American, 1936-2013 Moll, 1959 Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.

American, born 1961

Stained glass, with dovetailed oak frame, and light box, 30 x 18 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2013

Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2014

ELIZABETH WILSON

JAMES LUEDERS

LOUIS SLOAN

American, born 1959

American, 1927-1994

Pink Clouds-UK, 2008-2013

Self-Portrait and Portrait of a Young Man, date unknown

Gouache and watercolor on paper, 8 3/4 x 9 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Rosenfeld Gallery

Oil on Masonite, two-sided, 26 1/2 x 23 1/4 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Armand Mednick, 2013

Sunset, Greenport, 2013 Gouache and watercolor on paper, 8 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. Courtesy of the artist

155

American, 1932-2008 Portal on Spring Garden Street, date unknown Oil on canvas, 40 x 36 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Mrs. Helen Siegl, 1979


This exhibition was supported in part by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Š 2014 Woodmere Art Museum. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. Photography courtesy of the artist unless otherwise noted. Front cover: A Tune Without Any Words, 2012, by Anne Canfield. (Courtesy of the artist)

9201 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19118 woodmereartmuseum.org

The Woodmere Annual: 73rd Juried Exhibition  

Woodmere’s annual juried exhibition highlights contemporary work in a wide variety of media by artists living within fifty miles of the Muse...

The Woodmere Annual: 73rd Juried Exhibition  

Woodmere’s annual juried exhibition highlights contemporary work in a wide variety of media by artists living within fifty miles of the Muse...