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TheWoodmereAnnual 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

WoodmereArtMuseum


Woodmere extends sincere thanks and appreciation to the Drumcliff Foundation and Jeanne Ruddy and Victor Keen for their support of the exhibition and digital catalogue.


TheWoodmereAnnual 79 TH J UR IE D E X HIB ITIO N Seeing the Story

CONTENTS Foreword by William R. Valerio 4 A Conversation with David Wiesner 6 Works in the Exhibition 28

June 5–August 29, 2021

WoodmereArtMuseum


FOREWORD

Above, left to right: Spot: iOS mobile application, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist); The End of the World Monday Morning, 2016, by Abraham Murley (Courtesy of John and Ashley McGinnis)

Woodmere’s Annual, now in its 79th iteration, is

With regard to the Annual exhibition, it is uncanny

especially thought-provoking this year. As always

to pick up the threads of ideas that had been

with the Annual, the assembly of work by 48 artists

formed a year ago and realize how much our

stands on its feet as a statement about the art

thoughts have changed. Now, looking at the same

being made in Philadelphia in the present moment.

works of art, themes of fear and isolation pervade.

Yet, this particular exhibition was intended to take

The relationship of the individual to society seems a

place a year ago, and like many other projects, was

constant concern. And finally, strange juxtapositions

placed on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

of forms and haunting narratives seem to portend

The selection of works had been made, but the

a world on the brink. A painting that seems to have

implementation of the show as imagined and

foreseen such changes is Chenlin Cai’s Identity

planned by our juror, David Wiesner, changed in

& Masks. An artist drawing from international life

profound ways. Since last March, our biological

experiences, he knew that masks would soon

vulnerability became viscerally apparent, and

become a presence in our lives.

countless violent tragedies forced a new urgency to address a lack of racial equity in our social contract.

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Robobaby, 2020, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist)

Woodmere is deeply honored to collaborate with

Woodmere cannot organize any exhibition

David, one of the great narrative artists of our times,

without the generosity of our funders. We thank

whose own work tests the boundaries of illustration

Jeanne Rudy and Victor Keene, and the Drumcliff

and fine art. David’s interest in storytelling as an

Foundation, who for many years have made

underlying driver of human interaction serves as a

the Woodmere Annual possible. On behalf of

central idea in his call to artists and a subsequent

Woodmere’s entire community, thank you again,

theme in the works selected. The nature of art as a

David, for sharing and exploring your interests with

storyline that accompanies life is especially relevant

us and for becoming a member of the Woodmere

in Philadelphia, a city in which illustration plays

family.

a major role in visual culture, going back to the years of Ben Franklin’s famous printing press and permeating the arts through the advent of Curtis

WILLIAM R. VALERIO, PHD

Publishing and so much else. Thank you, David,

The Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and CEO

for orchestrating a fascinating exhibition of works that simultaneously speak to our unusual present moment and hearken back to our city’s longstanding cultural history.

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A CONVERSATION WITH DAVID WIESNER

On February 4, 2021, William Valerio, Woodmere’s Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and Chief Executive Officer; Rick Ortwein, Deputy Director of Exhibitions; Rachel Hruszkewycz, Assistant Curator; and Hildy Tow, the Robert McNeil, Jr. Curator of Education, spoke with David Wiesner, the juror of the Museum’s 79th Annual Juried Exhibition. WILLIAM VALERIO: When the Museum shut down

David, we are thrilled to finally talk about and

on March 13, 2020, we thought we were facing a

install your Annual. We are including a selection of

two-week closure. As we came to understand the

your drawings for Spot, the app you developed,

severity of the pandemic, it became clear that the

and Spot itself will be on a monitor. Tell us about

79th Annual Juried Exhibition would have to be

this project.

postponed. The disruption to exhibition schedules and museum activity was one of many upheavals. So much changed in life as we knew it. The exhibition is the result of a process that evolves over the course of a year. As with previous iterations, the period from January to March was an important time in the annual cycle. We released the call to artists on January 13, 2020, with submissions closing about a month later, on February 10. Selections were made in the weeks that followed. Artists were notified of their acceptance on March 9. Then, everything changed. We postponed the show for a year, and here we are almost a year later recording this conversation via Zoom. The opening is now set for June 5, 2021. It’s so interesting that looking at works selected for the show in a time before COVID-19, we perceive them now in new ways. The pandemic affected us all differently, but experiences of isolation, loss, and fear inevitably shape perspective, outlook, and, as a result, interpretation of art.

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Spot: Cat World, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist)


DAVID WIESNER: When I began Spot, I was

were right behind me building the architecture. At

thinking about how I could use the tablet in a way

the point I finished my art it was only about two

that is inherent to the digital medium, a way that

weeks until the app was finished. That’s so unlike

doesn’t just replicate the way a book works and

book publishing, where I finish and then a year later,

looks. The main navigation tool is the pinch and

after the production phase, the book comes out.

zoom, which allows you to go deep into a picture, to go farther and farther into it. That’s an idea that has fascinated me for a long time. Fortunately when I mentioned this idea to my publisher, they said, “Oh, we were thinking about doing an original app and asking you.” And I said, “Well, I have an idea.” Spot does everything I wanted it to. The key thing was I didn’t want any puzzles or games or activities to enter into the story, because that’s a narrative killer. It completely stops the story. In the middle of

Spot doesn’t fit into a neat category. People ask, is it a game? It’s not a game; you don’t keep score. And it’s not a story in the traditional sense. It’s in that funny place where it doesn’t quite fit in anywhere, which is my favorite place to be. But an awful lot of people didn’t know what to do with it! VALERIO: It’s a self-directed journey. You can go

anywhere your curiosity takes you. It’s a story, but it’s not linear; it’s an exploration.

reading you go and do an activity or solve a puzzle,

WIESNER: You read into it. You infer things. At

and then when you come back to the story it’s like,

some point you might say, hey, I saw something

where were we? It just shuts the narrative down. So,

like that over in the outer space world, and maybe

for me the key was all story, all the time.

it was also in the cat world. Slowly but surely

I don’t know if anybody remembers Myst, the computer game from the 1990s. It was all about problem solving to get to these different worlds, which were beautifully rendered in digital graphics of the time. I just wanted to go see those places. I didn’t want to unlock all the puzzles and look for the keys or any of that. The gaming stuff really didn’t interest me, but visiting the worlds did. In creating Spot it had to be all narrative. Nothing could stand in your way. You can go anywhere you want, as fast or as slow as you want. You can go back and forth between worlds or you can go methodically from world to world, one at a time. I didn’t want any barriers between the viewer, the reader, and the experience. It took us a year to do it. We had a developer and I

you pick up these connections. There’s a simple overarching story that’s going on, but the rest of it is what you make of it. From the moment you open it—particularly if there’s two people, a kid and an adult—all you’ve got to do is ask what’s going on, and you probably won’t stop talking through the rest of it, because it’s really whatever the viewer brings to it. It got a great reaction in Europe, which was nice, and was reviewed very well. I created so much material, hundreds of drawings. I ended up taking some of the characters from one of the worlds and creating a whole new story for them, which is the book I just published this last fall, Robobaby. VALERIO: Can you talk about the preparatory

drawings?

was cranking out drawings and paintings and they

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WIESNER: I did the whole thing in pencil so we

up the checklist and start looking at the work after

could make sure it worked. That’s exactly the way I

almost a year. All of a sudden I was having this

work in my books. I draw it out, a mock version, and

whole other reaction to a number of pieces, which

then make the real thing. So, it’s fun to show those

started with Chenlin Cai. Filtering a lot of these

pencil tests because they have a certain life to them

through what’s happened over the last year gives

and that’s different—they’re hand-drawn, just toned

them new meaning for me. When we made the

pencil drawings, and they have a very different feel

selections in February 2020, COVID-19 was thought

than the more finished piece.

to only be spreading abroad.

VALERIO: Let’s turn to your selections by other

HILDY TOW: The virus was soaring through China.

artists for the exhibition, which looks like it’s going to

In December, January, I remember hearing reports

be a beautiful show.

of people saying, I can’t get my father into the

WIESNER: It feels like we made these selections a

million years ago. It was really interesting to open

Identity & Masks, 2015-16, by Chenlin Cai (Courtesy of the artist)

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hospital. He has cancer, there’s no room in the hospital.


Second Line, 2020, by Kate Samworth (Courtesy of LeMieux Galleries)

VALERIO: Prior to the pandemic, for most of us

VALERIO: That is great to hear. Let’s talk about

these sorts of masks were used in medical settings

Kate Samworth’s drawings—they are haunting.

only and they were generally white or blue. He’s made them red.

WIESNER: They’re really extraordinary. This

series depicts a time when animals take back the

RICK ORTWEIN: The one in the middle looks a bit

environment. She explores the relationship between

like the virus itself.

humans and the natural world with humor and great

VALERIO: I’ve had masks that tie in the back, I’ve

had masks with elastic that goes around my ears, I’ve had masks with buttons on the side, I’ve had masks that are rectangles with the fanned-out elements. We can probably all relate to the array of mask types. It’s wild. RACHEL HRUSZKEWYCZ: When I followed up with

sympathy. In Second Line, we see a procession of animals, like a New Orleans burial. The initial procession is very solemn and then the second half is boisterous. The animals have instruments, and the cart is drawing the body of a bear. VALERIO: The virtuosity is incredible. What’s the

scratchboard medium?

the artists to let them know about the rescheduled

WIESNER: Scratchboard is a technique in which

dates for the show, many said, “We’re really looking

white clay-like material on a board is covered with

forward to it.” A few people told me: “This is going

black paint. You scratch into the black, which then

to be my return to normal—having work in a show

leaves a white line. It’s painstaking and somewhat of

is going to make me feel normal again.” Some said,

a reverse way of working, from dark to light.

“This is a sign of hopeful things.” THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Page 173 from the graphic novel Trish Trash: Rollergirl of Mars, 2018, by Jessica Abel (Courtesy of the artist)

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Above, left to right: Pages 160 and 143 from the graphic novel Trish Trash: Rollergirl of Mars, 2018, by Jessica Abel (Courtesy of the artist)

What connected me to the works chosen for the

Comics are all about the space in between the

exhibition was the narrative quality, the element

images, because that’s where the viewer is filling in

of story, no matter what form or medium the work

parts of the story. The artist has to be able to make

was done in. Obviously the submissions that were

those jumps interesting, to create varied pacing.

sequential or included multiple images were things

You don’t want the jumps between panels to be

that I immediately responded to because that’s the

too similar or too incremental. The reader should

way that I tend to look at things.

have to make some effort to connect the images.

There were a number of comic artists who submitted to the show, and a number of picture

Finding that balance can be a hard thing. Abel does it beautifully.

book people who submitted to the show. Jessica

Her husband, Matt Madden, is also in the show. He

Abel works in a very classic comics way, but she’s

works in a very different way stylistically, but also

at the height of that tier of people who do this. It’s

is doing some really interesting visual things in the

always a joy to see someone who can play with

way his story moves in and out of different types of

time, perspective, and point of view.

storytelling and different places. The art shifts style THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Above, left to right: Pages 69 and 70 from the graphic novel Ex Libris, 2020, by Matt Madden (Courtesy of the artist)

completely when it moves to different parts of the

Panel layouts can vary wildly. There are people who

story, which is great. There are all these different

like the more formal, regular layout. What Madden’s

visual signifiers to tell you what you’re seeing, to

doing within that regular layout, though, by shifting

help you understand, “Oh, this is different, we’ve

stylistically is kind of a trade off. He’s leaving the

moved somewhere else.” The dialogue is telling you

general design roughly the same, but creating more

one thing but the pictures are really the things that

variation within the panels themselves.

are telling you what’s happening. It’s a wonderfully subtle medium in which you can do so much to communicate in visual terms what you’re trying to say.

HRUSZKEWYCZ: Madden explained that the main

character is showing us some of her favorite comics. As the stories change, the settings change. She’s going from story to story. He says, “It’s a book

VALERIO: They’re both dealing with the concept of

outer space.

about books about comics.” WIESNER: I did something like this with my book

WIESNER: Madden’s following a more regular

The Three Pigs, having characters leave one story

layout, but within the panels a lot is happening

and enter different stories, and as they go into the

visually. Abel is telling a very active story:

other stories they suddenly become part of the

rollerblading, roller skating, roller derby outer space

illustration styles of the stories.

action adventure. She’s breaking that up into some really interesting page layouts that are very kinetic.

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Page 71 from the graphic novel Ex Libris, 2020, by Matt Madden (Courtesy of the artist)

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Harry Potter’s Last Chapter, 2019, by Eliza Auth (Courtesy of the artist)

VALERIO: A work that caught my attention was

WIESNER: This is the opposite of the sequential

Eliza Auth’s Harry Potter’s Last Chapter. Having

pieces; it’s the single painting that encompasses

read the Harry Potter books over a roughly ten-year

the storytelling. On a formal level I love the way the

period with my own son, who’s now twenty-five, I

artist works your eye around the canvas. It is really

felt a pang of nostalgia. The stylization is soft-focus

beautiful, expertly done. Your eye starts with the

and softly lit. I don’t want to place it in the 1950s or

arm that comes up to the book then moves to the

anything, but there’s something Norman Rockwell-

character at the top, to her bent arm, back down to

like about it. And that fits with the sentiment of the

the head. Auth creates a circular movement through

subject. My son was a little boy at the start of the

the painting. I’d love to see Harry Potter’s First

Harry Potter phenomenon, as were the characters

Chapter. How old were the characters when they

in the books, and he grew up reading the stories,

started reading?

cutting his teeth as a reader, so to speak, and seeing the movies. Like the girl in the painting, he was a teenager when he finished the last chapter of the last book, which I recall as being dark, Deathly Hallows.

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HRUSZKEWYCZ: She explained that when she

saw your title, Seeing the Story, she immediately thought about this painting, because these are her daughters. It’s very much like your experience, Bill: they read Harry Potter to each other throughout


Wave Sequence I, 2020, by Christopher Houston (Courtesy of the artist)

their childhood. She’s “seeing the story” as her sister

WIESNER: I agree. I also want to discuss Hanna

reads to her.

Vogel’s sculpture. In the description she included

WIESNER: That’s great. I also responded to

Christopher Houston’s work Wave Sequence I. It feels like some kind of story to me. There’s some narrative, some relationship between all the pieces of paper. I love that there’s no color; it’s just

with her submission, Vogel posited that these are abodes, potential places where someone or something lives. I’ve read enough science fiction/ fantasy that I had instant associations with this very otherworldly kind of living situation.

texture, shape, line to a certain extent, and there’s

VALERIO: There’s also something scary about the

something very pure about those basic elements. In

cocoon-like entities; they remind me of Invasion of

different settings the shadows alone can set up very

the Body Snatchers.

different experiences.

WIESNER: Yeah, there’s an element of that. They

ORTWEIN: The changes suggest the time passage,

have a relationship to the natural world, too. They’re

and the time passage automatically then leads you

also just beautiful shapes. I love that the light and

into some kind of development or story, which is

shadow become part of the environment they

consistent throughout a lot of the selections.

create. It’s its own world. Anyone seeing it can formulate whatever interpretation they’d like. THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Elsewhere, 2017, by Hanna Vogel (Courtesy of the artist)

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VALERIO: This is another work that seems so

relevant to our current moment: a creature emerges from a cocoon in a new form. Hopefully we are on the verge of being able to do that as well. WIESNER: I agree. Looking next at John Costanza’s

painting, it’s a brick wall with a window at the top and a big shadow nearly across the entire surface. An elderly figure is looking out of it. I remember initially wondering what was going on from that story standpoint. But when I looked at it the other day for the first time since last year, it had a whole different meaning. Isolated from the world behind a wall, it’s like, “Don’t come near me.” These are now horrifying. Having watched my wife’s mother where she’s living and suddenly at her age cut off from others gave this image a whole new meaning. I’ve been hearing stories from other people talking about their parents, where they’re safe physically, but the isolation has been a roller coaster for them. Top: Weathering the Storm, 2019, by Chris Cox (Courtesy of the artist); bottom: NYP18 what’s going on out there #2?, 2017, by John Costanza (Courtesy of the artist)

This painting is exactly the visual representation of that feeling, which I didn’t think about or feel when I selected this work last year. VALERIO: Our minds are in such a specific kind

of place. I felt similarly when I looked again at the painting by Chris Cox called Weathering the Storm. It’s hard not to read those forms as figures that are isolated.

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ocean’s immensity. Here’s an enormous animal in a vast space, but floating alone. HRUSZKEWYCZ: There are two big fish in this

show! David, you also selected Jeff Brown’s painting Swim: Locust Street. WIESNER: When I saw this I was reminded of

photographer Jerry Uelsmann, who was one of the first people I was aware of who was combining images in a dark room without the computer, making transformational kinds of things, impossible situations. Computer software now makes it possible to create a more seamless alteration of reality than older methods. The fish, of course, is near and dear to my heart. Fish are a big part of my work, especially fish where they shouldn’t be. Blue Boy, 2019, by Robert Beck (Courtesy of Morpeth Contemporary, Hopewell, NJ)

WIESNER: I had that reaction when I looked at this

as well. There was always that quality to it, but it was even more pronounced.

There’s a surrealist connotation, a Magritte-esque quality. Again, it’s an empty environment. TOW: The other thing about the whale painting is

that whales are social. They travel in groups, and that whale is alone, whereas the surreal quality of Swim: Locust Street suggests a different kind of

VALERIO: One work that’s different in spirit is

ironic humor. The fish isn’t distressed, but why is it

Robert Beck’s painting of a whale.

so large and traveling through Philadelphia?

WIESNER: You read into that face, and it’s

WIESNER: Yes, the humor in Brown’s piece is a big

weathered and massive. There’s something about

part of its appeal to me. It’s literally a fish out of

the weight of it just hanging there. It also has a

water!

humorous side.

VALERIO: We know the work of Lynne Campbell

VALERIO: The title made me laugh too, Blue Boy,

at Woodmere. We’ve shown her paintings of cats

of course, is one of Thomas Gainsborough’s great

before in other contexts. She’s always got this

masterpieces. And that “blue boy” is of course, an

lone cat on a journey. The cat takes on human

English aristocrat. So is Beck’s painting a comment

characteristics the way the whale did.

on social hierarchy? At the same time, the whale is isolated, alone in the vast ocean. An important element of the composition is the view upward to the patches of light on the surface of the water. The suggestion of the sky above conveys a sense of the 18

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WIESNER: The cat appears almost frozen, not

because of snow, but immobilized, and you recognize that feeling of, what do I do? How do I cope with everything?


VALERIO: If you know cats, it’s all conveyed in

the stance of the tail, the head, the ears. Again, it’s astonishing how we can’t help but apply our pandemic sensibility to the interpretation of art. I know and admire Lynne’s work, and I’ve always had a sense that her cats were on a journey, but now I do not see it in the same way. WIESNER: Matthew Borgen uses a classic ligne

claire (“clear line”) approach to standalone images that intentionally reference the comic book style. All the disparate elements seem to signify different tropes from pulp novels and movies. VALERIO: For me, Borgen’s work asks questions

about traditional gender assignments that were Top: Swim: Locust Street, 2020, by Jeff Brown (Courtesy of the artist); bottom: Winter (Ginger Cat), 2020, by Lynne Campbell (Courtesy of the artist)

reinforced by popular illustration. The figure of the THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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The Letter, 2020, by Matthew Borgen (Courtesy of the artist)

Gas Phase Orbiter, 2019, by Charles Emlen (Courtesy of the Mutherland Collection)

woman is not just repeated in the lamp, but she’s

steampunk, retro, Sputnik wonderful summation of

tied to it. Is the guy going to rescue her, or is he the

a lot of iconography of old science fiction, and Jules

villain?

Verne type things, stories from the past.

WIESNER: The woman on the floor feels like she’s

HRUSZKEWYCZ: It also seems like it could move.

out of Mary Worth or one of those 1950s comics. It also feels like film noir. Borgen is using a lot of the archetypes of that sort of classic comic presentation. VALERIO: It feels like a story inside the story. She’s

reading a letter, and perhaps what we’re seeing is a manifestation of what’s on her mind. I look forward to seeing it so I can puzzle it out.

WIESNER: Yeah, I want to launch the thing and see

it take off. HRUSZKEWYCZ: There’s a work that caught my

attention by Mikel Elam. When he submitted his painting, he explained, “Suits is a narrative about our culture at large. We’re consumed with buying, selling. While making I thought of three artists: Robert Longo, because of his large-scale men

WIESNER: Me too. I keep coming back to thinking I

in suits drawings; Romare Bearden, who utilizes

can’t wait to see all of these in person.

collage in way that speaks to me; and Francis

HRUSZKEWYCZ: There’s not a lot of sculpture,

but you did choose Gas Phase Orbiter by Charles

Bacon, who took figurative art into abstraction by means of dragging, smearing, and smudging.”

Emlen.

WIESNER: That’s a great triumvirate.

WIESNER: I smiled as soon as I saw it. Now of

VALERIO: They’re expressionistic figures. I love the

course I look at it and I think, hey, it’s coronavirus.

figure with the huge ear and the figure on the left

I thought of Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers. It’s got a

with the intense gaze. He’s looking off at something,

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Suits, 2020, by Mikel Elam (Courtesy of the artist)

but what’s he seeing out in the world? Each figure

storytelling, it’s probably the most ancient narrative

represents a different sensory relationship.

in the show, coming from Greek mythology:

WIESNER: I love the blurring, the smearing of the

figures. You’re right, there seems to be something very different going on with each of them that’s hard to pinpoint—and maybe that’s the point.

the Judgment of Paris. On the face of it, there couldn’t be a more sexist story, and we have to ask why an artist like DuSold, whose sensibility is forward looking, would focus our attention on it today. Forced to select that most beautiful of the

VALERIO: The historic placement is also important;

Olympian goddesses, the mortal, Paris, chooses

the dark suits and ties suggest the late 1960s and

Aphrodite, who is of course the goddess of beauty.

the civil rights era, and so do the bright, graphic

I presume she is the figure at right in shadow,

colors. That the figures are connected from

emerging from the water. But in this rendering, the

shoulder to shoulder suggests a unity in the face of

goddesses do not seem to need Paris’s approval.

external threat. That an artist today wants us to look

They seem confident. The reclining figure in the

back in this way speaks to the degree to which so

lower left even seems self-absorbed. And the

much hasn’t changed with regard to the struggle

process was corrupt to begin with. In exchange for

for racial equality.

the prize, Aphrodite had promised Paris to arrange his marriage to Helen of Troy, thereby setting in

History also plays a role in the work you selected

motion the Trojan Wars and the violent upheaval

by Paul DuSold, who is a friend and a teacher

of the Greek world. Again, I can’t help but interpret

in Woodmere’s studio program. In terms of

the painting somewhat darkly, despite the rococo THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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The Judgment of Paris, 2019, by Paul DuSold (Courtesy of the artist)

colorations and DuSold’s creamy handling of paint

such that water and fire are destroying large swaths

and sensual sensibility: what are the temptations

of the planet, and diseases travel from bats to

and flawed decisions that we imperfect humans

humans? The question at the heart of the ancient

make with regard to nature and social structure,

narrative remains important.

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Embark Discovery, 2018, by Arthur Haywood (Courtesy of the artist)

feels like it’s in Alpha Centauri. There’s something about the setting that relates to science fiction and film, almost futuristic. Haywood uses both a very classical presentation with elements that are strange and otherworldly. I think these paintings will be an interesting juxtaposition in the show. VALERIO: Also Adelyne Rizzo’s Kingdom is

authentically romantic, but the realism of the figures makes them feel contemporary. I wanted to ask you to talk about your selection from Woodmere’s Kingdom, May 2019, by Adelyne Rizzo (Courtesy of Kim and Mike King)

collection. You are including Rob Matthews series Knoxville Girl. Why did you select this?

WIESNER: I agree that DuSold’s painting feels

WIESNER: How fortuitous that this work from

very classical, but the figures also strike me as

Rob Matthews came to Woodmere in time for this

contemporary individuals. It’s the mix of modern

exhibition given that narrative and sequence are

and ancient, new and old that I like so much. He’s

essential to its presentation. I’m reminded of the

trying to push this forward into current times. There

satirical morality sequences that William Hogarth

are other pieces that have a strong classical feel to

created in his series of prints, A Rake’s Progress and

them and it was interesting to see this group begin

A Harlot’s Progress.

to form as I was going through the submissions. The dichotomy between the contemporary and the ancient world we were just talking about is what is so striking. Arthur Haywood’s Embark Discovery

I also connected the final image, The Park, with Michelangelo Antonioni’s film, Blow-Up, with its obsessive examination of a landscape—a park—and whether a murder had happened there. Matthews’ THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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image of the park asks the viewer to consider the violent events of the story in the idyll of the wider, seemingly peaceful, world. Matthews uses the sequence of images in the way comics do, by having the spaces between the images as places for the viewer to fill in their own narrative connections and in his choices of what and what not to show in telling his story. I want to mention two artists in particular, Matt Phelan and Judy Schachner. They’re both remarkable storytellers. Phelan is a fabulous draftsman, and Schachner uses collage and paint and pencil and all sorts of stuff. An amalgam of disciplines go into book making, including typography, graphic design, drawing, and painting. Often when people see the original paintings or process work for a picture book they go, oh, I had no idea so much work went into it! I think many people think these books just magically appear, or it takes a couple of weeks to make one. The picture book is as deeply considered as any other art form, at least in the hands of a good artist. I’m delighted to be able to showcase a couple of the best. VALERIO: In our activities and exhibitions at

Woodmere, we are always exploring what is it that distinguishes art in Philadelphia from art in New York or Chicago or California or anyplace else. Something that distinguishes the culture of Philadelphia going back to Benjamin Franklin’s time and up through Curtis Publishing is the illustration arts. Storytelling is part of the DNA of the arts in our city, and I’m thrilled with this exhibition for that reason. WIESNER: More power to you for the continuous

focus on illustration! For many museums, showing the work of illustrators is a one-time thing. At

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Top to bottom: Knoxville Girl: Approval; Knoxville Girl: Retrieval; Knoxville Girl: The Deposition, 2007, by Rob Matthews (Gift of the artist and Rebecca Kerlin in honor of Joe Yohlin, 2020)


Knoxville Girl: The Park, 2007, by Rob Matthews (Gift of the artist and Rebecca Kerlin in honor of Joe Yohlin, 2020)

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Portrait of Frederick Douglass, 1973, by Jerry Pinkney (Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2020)

Sesame Street, for TV Guide, 1980, by Charles Santore (Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the artist, 2017)

Woodmere, it’s wonderful to see that Jerry Pinkney

WIESNER: It is about community and connection.

and Charlie Santore are part of the family, and their work is given the exposure and serious consideration it deserves. I’m thrilled that I’m part of this community and can access it, and that illustration is part of the mix of things that you present. VALERIO: It’s a big part of what the Philadelphia

art community is about, but there’s also something very satisfying about art that tells a story. Reading an image like Schachner’s Stretchy McHandsome, with the cat’s two different color eyes and heartshaped nose is a magically sweet experience. There’s so much about it that’s warming, and that’s an important function of art. TOW: So, this work isn’t about isolation?

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TOW: It is, and it’s playful. It shows that the world is

also a sweet place. VALERIO: Thank you, David! On behalf of everyone

at Woodmere, we’re grateful to you for putting such thoughtfulness into the selections, and I can’t wait to see the show.


Clockwise from top right: From the book Little Robot Alone by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest, 2018, illustrations by Matt Phelan (Courtesy of the artist); Spot: Robots, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist); Stretchy McHandsome, 2019, from Stretchy McHandsome, by Judy Schachner (Courtesy of the artist)

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WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION DAVID WIESNER, JUROR

American, born 1956

Spot: Robots, 2015 Watercolor on paper, 11 x 14 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist

Spot: Cat World, 2015 Watercolor on paper, 10 3/4 x 14 1/2 in.

Spot: iOS mobile application, 2015 Watercolor on paper, 20 1/2 x 23 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Spot: iOS mobile application, 2015 Watercolor on paper, 19 1/2 x 22 in. Courtesy of the artist

Spot: Bug Lab final drawing, 2015 Pencil on tracing paper, 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of the artist

Spot: Bug Lab preliminary sketch, 2015 Pencil on tracing paper, 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of the artist

JESSICA ABEL

American, born 1969 Page 173 from the graphic novel Trish Trash: Rollergirl of Mars, 2018 Ink on Bristol board, 19 x 13 in. Courtesy of the artist

Page 160 from the graphic novel Trish Trash: Rollergirl of Mars, 2018 Ink on Bristol board, 19 x 13 in. Courtesy of the artist Above: Collar, 2018, by Betsey Batchelor (Courtesy of the artist); right: White Flag, 2017, by Betsey Batchelor (Courtesy of the artist)

Page 143 from the graphic novel Trish Trash: Rollergirl of Mars, 2018 Ink on Bristol board, 19 x 13 in. Courtesy of the artist

ELIZA AUTH

American, born 1951 Harry Potter’s Last Chapter, 2019 Oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist

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Left to right: My Studio, 2001, by Ed Bronstein (Courtesy of the Station Gallery, Greenville, DE); Burn: 41°55’35.7”N, 74°51’12.0”W, 2019, by Jeff Brown (Courtesy of the artist)

BETSEY BATCHELOR

ED BRONSTEIN

CHENLIN CAI

American, born 1944

Chinese, born 1984

Collar, 2018 Oil on canvas, 44 x 56 in.

My Studio, 2001 Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the Station Gallery, Greenville, DE

Identity & Masks, 2015–16 Oil on transparent plexiglass, 28 x 38 in.

American, born 1952

White Flag, 2017 Gouache on board, 6 1/4 x 7 1/2 in.

Courtesy of the artist

JEFF BROWN

LYNNE CAMPBELL

American, born 1959

American, born 1967

Burn: 41°55’35.7”N, 74°51’12.0”W, 2019 Archival pigment print, 36 x 44 in.

Luck in Spring, 2020 Acrylic on wood, 11 x 11 in.

Blue Boy, 2019 Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of Morpeth Contemporary, Hopewell, NJ

Swim: Locust Street, 2020 Archival pigment print, 30 x 40 in.

New Year (Black Cat), 2020 Acrylic on wood, 11 x 11 in.

Courtesy of the artist

ROBERT BECK

American, born 1950

MATTHEW BORGEN

American, born 1974

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Winter (Ginger Cat), 2020 Acrylic on wood, 10 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

The Letter, 2020 Inkjet print on archival paper, 28 x 28 in. Courtesy of the artist THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Luck in Spring, 2020, by Lynne Campbell (Courtesy of the artist)

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Top to bottom: Lump, fall 2019, by Barrett Capistran (Courtesy of the artist); New Year (Black Cat), 2020, by Lynne Campbell (Courtesy of the artist)

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My Pirate Life, 2017, by Lisa Conn (Courtesy of the artist)

BARRETT CAPISTRAN

American, born 1996

Lump, fall 2019 Ink and gouache on paper, 9 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

My Pirate Life, 2017 Ink and watercolor on paper, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1983 You Are the Moon Made of Cheese, 2017 Ink and watercolor on paper, 12 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

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American, born 1950 Standing Still, 2019 Oil on canvas, 24 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist

JOHN COSTANZA

American, born 1924 LISA CONN

CHRIS COX

NYP18 what’s going on out there #2?, 2017 Oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist

Weathering the Storm, 2019 Oil and cold wax on board, 12 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist


You Are the Moon Made of Cheese, 2017, by Lisa Conn (Courtesy of the artist)

MEGHAN COX

PAUL DUSOLD

CHARLES EMLEN

Self-Portrait, GO AWAY!, 2018 Oil on linen over panel, 40 x 32 in.

The Judgment of Paris, 2019 Oil on canvas, 68 x 72 in.

Gas Phase Orbiter, 2019 Welded steel, 31 x 22 x 22 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the Mutherland Collection

CORINNE DIETERLE

MIKEL ELAM

TRACY EVERLY

Suits, 2020 Mixed media collage on wood panel, 18 x 36 in.

Secret Place, 2019 Oil on birch panel, 10 x 10 in.

American, born 1979

American, born 1952 Spider in His Peaceable Kingdom, 2019 Oil on panel, 34 1/2 x 34 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1963

American, born 1957

American, born 1964

American, born 1968

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

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Standing Still, 2019, by Chris Cox (Courtesy of the artist)

DREW FALCHETTA

KIRBY FREDENDALL

DAINA HIGGINS

Cinderella Trophy Room, 2018 Watercolor and ink on paper, digitally scanned and retouched, 12 3/8 x 8 1/4 in.

Finding a Path 7, 2020 Oil on acid-etched tin, 14 x 12 in.

Roman’s Pizza (Day), 2018 Oil on panel, 24 x 30 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Finding a Path 8, 2020 Oil on acid-etched tin, 14 x 12 in.

Roman’s Pizza (Night), 2018 Oil on panel, 24 x 30 in.

3 Little Pigs Cover, 2018 Watercolor and ink on paper, digitally scanned and retouched, with hand-drawn digital lettering, 8 3/4 x 5 3/4 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

RICHARD HARRINGTON

CHRISTOPHER HOUSTON

Courtesy of the artist and American Reading Company

Bristol Coronet, 2019 Gouache on toned tan paper, 11 x 11 1/2 in.

Wave Sequence I, 2020 Torn paper, 14 1/2 x 18 in.

American, born 1982

Courtesy of the artist and American Reading Company

SADIE FRANCIS

American, born 1966

American, born 1959

A Constellation of Strange Victories, 2019 Foraged robin skeleton, brass insets, gold leaf, robin egg, tea leaves, soil, monarch chrysalis, Japanese anemone flowers, epoxy resin, shadowbox, 10 x 10 in.

ARTHUR HAYWOOD

Courtesy of the artist

Embark Discovery, 2018 Oil on linen, 17 x 30 in.

American, born 1990 A Cure, 2018 Oil on linen, 9 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1955

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1981

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American, born 1979

MICHAEL KOWBUZ

American, born 1966

Afternoon Window, 2019 Ink, watercolor, and gouache on Arches paper, 6 1/2 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery, Philadelphia

Approaching, 2019 Ink, watercolor, and gouache on Arches paper, 6 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. Private Collection


Above, left to right: Spider in His Peaceable Kingdom, 2019, by Corinne Dieterle (Courtesy of the artist); Self-Portrait, GO AWAY!, 2018, by Meghan Cox (Courtesy of the artist)

JUNE YONG LEE

South Korean, born 1978

Page 71 from the graphic novel Ex Libris, 2020 Ink on Bristol board, 12 3/4 x 9 3/4 in.

ABRAHAM MURLEY

Courtesy of the artist

Canadian-American, born 1975 The End of the World Monday Morning, 2016 Acrylic and gouache on linen, 22 ½ x 29 ½ in.

LAURA MADELEINE

Courtesy of John and Ashley McGinnis

TOM LEONARD

Wedding, 2010 Batik painting on silk, 16 x 16 in.

BETTINA NELSON

Becoming Bach, 2016 Acrylic paint on illustration board, 12 x 24 in. From Becoming Bach (Roaring Brook Press, 2017)

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Centennial Avenue Morning, 2019 Ink and colored pencil on paper, 31 x 12 1/2 in.

Untitled, 2018 Archival pigment print, 13 1/4 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist

American American, born 1955

MATT MADDEN

American, born 1968 Page 69 from the graphic novel Ex Libris, 2020 Ink on Bristol board, 12 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist

Page 70 from the graphic novel Ex Libris, 2020 Ink on Bristol board, 12 3/4 x 9 3/4 in.

JANICE MERENDINO

American, born 1952

American, born 1989 The extra kiss on Friday night, all the dogs at High-Line: (selfesteem, security, pride), 2020 Cloth, fabric, thread, and batting, 10 x 8 x 6 in. (closed); 10 x 16 x 3 in. (open) Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery, Philadelphia

TERESA NICOLO

NANCY BEA MILLER

You Can’t Hurry Love, 2020 Pastel on paper, 19 1/2 x 27 1/2 in.

American, born 1963

American, born 1955

Courtesy of the artist

Aftermath, 2010 Oil on linen, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Secret Place, 2019, by Tracy Everly (Courtesy of the artist)

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Clockwise from top right: 3 Little Pigs Cover, 2018, by Drew Falchetta (Courtesy of the artist and American Reading Company); A Constellation of Strange Victories, 2019, by Sadie Francis (Courtesy of the artist); Cinderella Trophy Room, 2018, by Drew Falchetta (Courtesy of the artist and American Reading Company)

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Above, left to right: Finding a Path 7, 2020, by Kirby Fredendall (Courtesy of the artist); Finding a Path 8, 2020, by Kirby Fredendall (Courtesy of the artist)

MATT PHELAN

MARK RICE

KATE SAMWORTH

From the book Little Robot Alone by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018) Pencil and watercolor on Arches cold-pressed paper, 11 x 21 1/2 in.

One of the Art Buildings, 2019 Linocut print, 36 x 24 in.

Second Line, 2020 Scratchboard, 16 x 20 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of LeMieux Galleries

One of the Literature Buildings, 2018 Linocut print, 36 x 24 in.

Summoning Foxes, 2021 Scratchboard, 12 x 9 in.

American, born 1970

Courtesy of the artist

From the book Little Robot Alone by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018) Pencil and watercolor on Arches cold-pressed paper, 11 x 21 1/2 in.

American, born 1980

One of the Music Buildings, 2018 Linocut print, 36 x 24 in.

JUDY SCHACHNER

Courtesy of the artist

Stretchy McHandsome, 2019 From Stretchy McHandsome Acrylics, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 11 x 12 in.

ADELYNE RIZZO

American, born 1954

The Deep End, 2019 Oil on canvas, 16 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist and Church Street Gallery, West Chester, PA

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Private Collection

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

PETER QUARRACINO

American, born 1967

American, born 1994 Kingdom, May 2019 Oil on canvas, 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of Kim and Mike King

American, born 1951

Courtesy of the artist

Cloud Ponies, 2017 From Sarabella’s Thinking Cap Acrylics, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 9 1/2 x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist


Above: A Cure, 2018, by Arthur Haywood (Courtesy of the artist); left: Bristol Coronet, 2019, by Richard Harrington (Courtesy of the artist)

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STUART SHILS

American, born 1954 Touch and Look Up, 2020 Wood, graphite, mirror, paper and paint, 59 x 16 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist

KRISTA SVALBONAS

American, born 1977

Ansbach 2, 2018 Layered laser-cut pigment print, 12 x 21 in. Courtesy of the artist and Klompching Gallery, NY

ALEXANDRA TYNG

American, born 1954

The Letter A, 2016 Oil on linen, 42 x 46 in. Courtesy of the artist and Dowling Walsh Gallery

LOUISE VINUEZA

American, born 1959 A Passing, 2019 Oil on panel, 10 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

A Passing, 2019 Oil on panel, 10 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

A Passing, 2019 Oil on panel, 10 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

A Passing, 2019 Oil on panel, 10 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist Top to bottom: Roman’s Pizza (Day), 2018, by Daina Higgins (Courtesy of the artist); Roman’s Pizza (Night), 2018, by Daina Higgins (Courtesy of the artist)

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HANNA VOGEL

JULIA WAY

Elsewhere, 2017 Site-specific installation: steel wire, abaca and cotton paper pulp, pigment, rust, sealant; dimensions variable

Subconscious Wandering II, 2018 Watercolor on paper, 11 x 14 in.

American, born 1986

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1975

Courtesy of the artist

Subconscious Wandering IV, 2018 Watercolor on paper, 11 x 14 in.

Afternoon Window, 2019, by Michael Kowbuz (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery, Philadelphia)

Courtesy of the artist

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Above: Approaching, 2019, by Michael Kowbuz (Private Collection); right: Becoming Bach, 2016, from Becoming Bach, by Tom Leonard (Courtesy of the artist)

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Clockwise from top right: Untitled, 2018, by June Yong Lee (Courtesy of the artist); Aftermath, 2010, by Nancy Bea Miller (Courtesy of the artist); Centennial Avenue Morning, 2019, by Janice Merendino (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts Gallery, Philadelphia)

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You Can’t Hurry Love, 2020, by Teresa Nicolo (Courtesy of the artist)

Spot: iOS mobile application, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist)

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The extra kiss on Friday night, all the dogs at High-Line: (self-esteem, security, pride), 2020, by Bettina Nelson (Courtesy of the artist)

WORKS FROM WOODMERE’S COLLECTION ROB MATTHEWS

American, born 1974 Knoxville Girl: The Walk, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 in. Knoxville Girl: The Walk, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 in. Knoxville Girl: The Threat, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 1/4 in. Knoxville Girl: The Threat, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 1/8 in. Knoxville Girl: Murder, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Spoils, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 in. Knoxville Girl: The Spoils, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Revelation, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 3/4 in. Knoxville Girl: The Mark, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 in.

Knoxville Girl: Odds and Evens, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 1/4 in.

Knoxville Girl: Disposal, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.

Knoxville Girl: Approval, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 8 1/2 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Spring, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 in.

Knoxville Girl: Retrieval, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 8 1/8 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Park, 2007 Graphite on paper, 12 x 20 1/2 in

Knoxville Girl: Murder, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 1/8 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Deposition, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 9 7/8 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Final Blow, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Walk Home, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 10 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Final Blow, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.

Knoxville Girl: The Revelation, 2007 Graphite on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.

Gift of the artist and Rebecca Kerlin in honor of Joe Yohlin, 2020

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Clockwise from top left: The Deep End, 2019, by Peter Quarracino (Courtesy of the artist and Church Street Gallery, West Chester, PA); One of the Art Buildings, 2019, by Mark Rice (Courtesy of the artist); Wedding, 2010, by Laura Madeleine (Courtesy of the artist)

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Above, left to right: One of the Literature Buildings, 2018, by Mark Rice (Courtesy of the artist); One of the Music Buildings, 2018, by Mark Rice (Courtesy of the artist)

From the book Little Robot Alone by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest, 2018, by Matt Phelan (Courtesy of the artist)

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Subconscious Wandering II, 2018, by Julia Way (Courtesy of the artist)

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Subconscious Wandering IV, 2018, by Julia Way (Courtesy of the artist)


Cloud Ponies, 2017, from Sarabella’s Thinking Cap, by Judy Schachner (Courtesy of the artist)

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Clockwise from top: Ansbach 2, 2018, by Krista Svalbonas (Courtesy of the artist and Klompching Gallery, NY); Touch and Look Up, 2020, by Stuart Shils (Courtesy of the artist); The Letter A, 2016, by Alexandra Tyng (Courtesy of the artist and Dowling Walsh Gallery)

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Clockwise from top left: A Passing, 2019; A Passing, 2019; A Passing, 2019; A Passing, 2019, by Louise Vinueza (Courtesy of the artist)

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Spot: Bug Lab preliminary sketch, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist)

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Spot: Bug Lab final drawing, 2015, by David Wiesner (Courtesy of the artist)

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Woodmere Art Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Support provided in part by The Philadelphia Cultural Fund.

© 2021 Woodmere Art Museum. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. Catalogue designed by Christina Warhola and edited by Gretchen Dykstra. Front cover: The Deep End, 2019, by Peter Quarracino (Courtesy of the artist and Church Street Gallery, West Chester, PA) THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 79TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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