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FEB 2019

Dr. Kristy Todd Mitigating the Risk Factors of Heart Disease

Matters of the

Heart

American Heart Association Go Red for Women Heart Health Tips SPO N SO R ED B Y


Save 25% February 4 – 9 in The Museum Store

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ONLINE ONLY CONTENT We have too much great content to fit it in all in the print edition every month. Please visit womenslifestyle.com for exclusive online content featuring:

From the Editor

A

s we created the edition you hold in your hands, my thoughts were frequented by a startling statistic: 1-in-3. As I read through the harrowing personal accounts of strokes and heart attacks, of ambulance rides and hospital rooms, I thought: 1-in-3. While Jennifer Denboer held in her palm a hunk of metal resembling a car part as she explained to me how it kept her alive after she suffered a massive cardiac arrest, I thought: 1-in-3. It’s a staggering number, and there is no getting around it: 1-in-3 women die of heart disease. It is a difficult fact to swallow; it is even more difficult to admit that we are all at risk. But, there is hope: The risk of heart disease can be lowered by as much as 80 percent through lifestyle choices. Within these pages you will find advice on how to turn your diet into one that nourishes your body and transform a sedentary lifestyle into an active one that strengthens your heart.

SHE BREWS Founder’s Brewer Laura Houser on creating our city’s most iconic craft beer

WMEAC

Honor Area Women with the Women, Community & The Environment Series

Happy Valentine’s Day to You

Mod Bettie Founder Elise Kutt on Self-Love

African American History is Grand Rapids History:

A Historical Look at the African American Women Who have Shaped Our City

Change is hard and self-improvement is intimidating, but there is no greater gift you can give yourself or your loved ones than your health. The American Heart Association, our partner for this edition, recommends the first step to understanding and mitigating your risk is knowing your numbers: blood pressure, body mass index, fasting blood sugar and cholesterol. As I enter the third decade of my life, I consider something that I now find astounding: I don’t know my numbers. When I consider making an appointment with my doctor to find out, I feel scared: What will they find? Am I at risk? Will I be able to make changes if I need to? I don’t know—but I need to. In that sense, my life is in my hands. This month, I am moved by stories of women who survived their cardiac events, and I ache for those who didn’t. I invite you to take the first step with me and make an appointment with your healthcare provider to know your numbers. I invite you to make small, gradual changes with me as we all work together to support one another in the face of such a staggering statistic. I invite you to be inspired by the incredible women within these pages who took control of their health after suffering cardiac events that no one saw coming. I invite you continue the conversation after you are done reading; talk to your mom, your sisters, your aunts and your friends about their risk and what you can all can do to increase your likelihoods of living long, healthy lives free of heart disease.

MOVEMEDIA: HANDMADE

Q&A with Grand Rapids Ballet Artistic Director James Sofranko

-Elyse Wild, Editor

Read previous editions online at WomensLifeStyle.com

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Grand Rapids|Holland|Grand Haven

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Grand Rapids|Holland|Grand Haven

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JAN 2019

Kelly Peterson

Health

FOUNDER AND CEO OF GRAND RAPIDS NATURAL HEALTH

&Happiness

Joy

U N W R A P THE

Uptown Holiday Shop Hop Recipes • Decor • Gift Guide The Women Transforming Heartside

Women’s LifeStyle is a dynamic multi-media platform designed to make beneficial connections in our community. The positive, upbeat, award winning and popular locally owned publication is supported by a dynamic mobile friendly online presence and an interactive website (including an events calendar, embedded video), as well as friendly, helpful and consistent social media interaction with the community. With 490+ distribution locations, Women’s LifeStyle is favored by an active, engaged and progressive audience. You are now looking at the 251st edition. All content ©Women’s LifeStyle, Inc. 2019.

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


February 2019

The People Who Make It Happen

Edition #251

Founder Victoria Ann Upton 1955 - 2018

womenslifestyle.com

ON THE COVER: Dr. Kristy Todd | Photo by Two Eagles Marcus

Publisher Two Eagles Marcus Associate Publisher Roxanne O’Neil Editor Elyse Wild elyse@womenslifestyle.com

LIFE 6 Ten Ways to Care for Your Heart in February

16 Go Red Profile: Jennifer DenBoer 20 Go Red Profile: Beverly Buchanan

Content Producer Sarah Anderson Production Designer Larissa Espinosa Contributing Writers Beth McEwen Danea Mather

22 Go Red Profile: Tara Robinson 26 Have Faith in Heart 28 Dr. Kristy Todd on Mitigating the Risk Factors of Heart Disease 32 Living and Parenting with PTSD 36 “Rowing, Not Drifting:” The Grand Rapids Study Club

Elyse Wild

28

Dr. Kristy Todd on Mitigating the Risk Factors of Heart Disease

Joyanne Huston-Swanson Kayla Sosa Kelsey Emmanuel

HEALTH

Naomi Silas Peaches McCahill

8 Create a Cardio Routine You’ll Love 12 Go Red for Women

Photography

FOOD

August Nyson Two Eagles Marcus

34 Recipes: Sweet Treats for February

LEARN & DO

Advertising Sales Susie Gordon / Sales Manager

11 Our Community

susie@womenslifestyle.com

10 Her Legacy: Emma Ford

Sarah Anderson

30 It’s a Date: Five Fabulous Ideas for a Date Night in Grand Rapids

sarah@womenslifetyle.com Eve Shetterly eve@womenslifestyle.com

38 Event Spotlight: Better Body Image Conference

CALL US: (616) 458-2121

40 Reader’s Lounge

EMAIL US:

42 We’re Out There

info@womenslifestyle.com

44 February Events 48 Event Spotlight: Giant’s Awards

SEND MAIL:

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3500 3 Mile Rd NW, Ste A Grand Rapids, MI 49534

Jen DenBoer

49 Black History Month Events 2019 50 A Human Guide to Canine Etiquette

Some of the best things in life are free — including Women’s LifeStyle Magazine! Thank you to our community advertising partners for making it possible. Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

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10 Ways2 to Care for Your Heart in

FEBRUARY

1

The heart muscle is the most important of all; without it, we cease to exist. Here are 10 ways to take care of this precious organ. BY PEACHES MCCAHILL

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Try to go vegan one day a week. Eat nuts and seeds for protein.

Add whole grain oats to your diet to reduce cholesterol.

Rid soda and artificial drinks from your diet. Be aware of the signs and symptoms of heart disease. Support GO RED.

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Limit your sodium to 2,300 mg a day.

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Cook with fresh pressed olive oil. Oleic acid in the oil reduces inflammation and may have beneficial effects on genes linked to cancer.

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“The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched — they must be felt with the heart.” -Helen Keller. Rotate coffee to green tea to help dissolve plaque from your body.

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Get outdoors. There is nothing better for your heart and soul than a brisk walk.

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Stay hydrated!

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Eat your broccoli! This year-round veggie is filled with calcium and vital nutrients for heart conduction.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Peaches McCahill is founder and president of The McCahill Group, a leading provider of health, wellness, beauty and talent solutions, and owner of M Power Studio. She has a passion to inspire others with simplistic lifestyle suggestions.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


e c n e d i n o C f r o l Co WITH

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How to Create a

Cardio Routine

R

You’ll Love

unning is a great cardiovascular exercise, but it is not everyone’s cup of tea. Fortunately, you don't need to run your shins off on a treadmill in order to achieve optimal cardiovascular strength. There are so many ways to improve your heart health: Cross training and switching up exercises is key when it comes to preventing injuries, becoming a stronger athlete and staying motivated in workouts. Now, for those of you opposed to running let’s get comfortable with the word “cardio” and create a cardio routine that you love!

HIGH-INTESITY INTERVAL TRAINING

It is 7 p.m., and you just finished doing some errands. Your favorite show is about to start in 60 minutes, and you didn't work out yet today. You grab your phone and set a 10-minute timer and pull up a recent HIIT workout you saved on Pinterest. You crank out a 10-minute workout of jumping jacks, push-ups, squats and wall-sits, and voilà! Your cardio workout is complete, and you still have time to take a shower and be on time to watch the new episode of Modern Family. Efficiency is just one perk to HIIT training. Many studies have shown that completing a 10-minute highintensity interval training session is more beneficial, burns more calories and achieves better progress than jogging at a steady pace for an hour. HIIT workouts are low maintenance because they don’t require equipment. Plyometric movements such as high knees, jump squats, burpees and planks with shoulder taps will get your heart rate pumping and leave you in a sweat puddle after 10 minutes. If you are feeling eager to spice up your quick workout, you can add a kettlebell or nearby unopened bag of dog food to your movements for an extra challenge.

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BY KELSEY EMMANUEL

SPORTS AND RECREATION

With the ease of the Internet, we can easily organize groups and join local clubs that offer recreational sports. Pick-up games are a fun way to socialize and sweat! Get some good laughs in with friends while playing a pick-up game of basketball, pickleball, frisbee golf or volleyball. Getting involved in healthy competition and meeting new people are two bonuses that come with this heart-healthy activity. Creating good camaraderie with a group of people can also help hold you accountable to coming to the next event. Teamwork, sportsmanship, friendship leadership, confidence, motivation, and happiness are all things people can learn and grow through recreation.

LOW IMPACT CARDIO EXERCISES FOR PEOPLE WITH JOINT PAIN

Besides playing your favorite sport or doing a quick HIIT workout, you can get a cardio session in through different activities such as rowing, cycling, swimming, going for a brisk walk with a friend in the park, faster-paced yoga, and much more! These low-impact exercises help prevent putting a high amount of stress on your joints but still allow you to benefit from cardiovascular exercise. When people start to suffer from joint pain, it’s tempting to stop physical activity overall. Instead of eliminating all exercise, it is best to use low-impact workouts in order to work the muscles and tendons that provide stability and strength around the joints. If you are just coming out of an injury or starting to exercise regularly, low impact exercises are ideal and safe. Kelsey Emmanuel is a certified CrossFit Level 1 trainer. Follow along with her workout tips and tutorials on Instagram @kelsey. emmanuel and on Facebook at Kelsey’s Health Journey.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Comfort Keeps the Conversation Lively

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Introducing Stressless dining chairs with BalanceAdapt™, allowing the seat and back to respond to the body’s movement. 4181 - 28th Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49512 616-940-9911 www.DesignQuest.biz

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

9


HerLegacy Meet the Women of West Michigan Who Made History

Emma Ford

(1863-1937) Civil Rights Activist

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GRAND RAPIDS PUBLIC LIBRARY

well-known community organizer who challenged Jim Crow laws and protested discrimination in the late19th and early-20th centuries, Emma S. Warren Ford was an outspoken advocate for both women’s and civil rights. Well respected, she was a force with which to be reckoned. This early trailblazer used her voice and influence to set an example for others to fight for the rights of all.

support of the women’s suffrage movement.

Emma Ford began her work in the African Methodist Episcopal Church and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). At the 1892 WCTU state convention in Benton Harbor, she was appointed superintendent of the “Work Among Colored People” and coordinated activities with national leader Lucy Thurman. Mrs. Ford became a popular speaker and writer who traveled the state advocating for African Americans and women while protesting against the negative images used against them in the media. Her husband, Joseph C. Ford, supported her work. When he was vice president of the Equal Rights League for Kent County, the organization adopted a resolution in

As president of the Phyllis Wheatley Club in 1907, Mrs. Ford published an article in the Grand Rapids Herald protesting prejudicial practices in a local theater: “We the Phyllis Wheatley circle protest against this discrimination and that we be [accorded] the rights of all citizens which is given by the laws of Michigan.”

In 1894 Mrs. Ford was a founding member of the Married Ladies Nineteenth Century Club. Hosting meetings and leading activities for the first literary and social club for African American women in Grand Rapids, she promoted their uplift at the same time she led them into the newspapers to protest injustice with a united voice.

In 1913 Emma Ford was chosen by Governor Woodbridge Ferris to represent the state of Michigan at the 50th anniversary celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation in New York.

The Greater Grand Rapids Women’s History Council is dedicated to educating the community and celebrating the legacies of local women, preserving knowledge of their past and inspiring visions for their future. For more information or to get involved, visit ggrwhc.org

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Spotlight on Community Initiatives

Matters of the Heart Sponsored by Grand Rapids Community Foundation

Literacy Center of West Michigan

Work alongside an adult learner in our community as they improve their reading, writing and English language skills. Start out by attending a volunteer tutor orientation this month at The Literacy Center during a time and date that works best for you. Visit literacycenterwm.org/volunteer to learn more.

Creative Youth Center

The Creative Youth Center provides free creative writing programming to all 1st-12th graders attending Grand Rapids Public Schools. Students learn creative writing skills, interact with professional writers and artists, collaborate on exciting projects, and become published authors. Volunteers are needed to help with reading comprehension and creative writing sessions. Apply at creativeyouthcenter.org/volunteers.

Artists Creating Together

Artists Creating Together empowers individuals with disabilities through robust arts programming. They have a wide range of volunteer opportunities, including helping with weekly enrichment classes for GRPS transition students, Winter-Spring ACTion Choir and Adult Art Classes. Fill out an application at artistscreatingtogether.org/volunteer.

Refugee Education Center

The Refugee Education Center serves refugee families living in West Michigan who were forced to flee their home countries. They provide education and resource to help them thrive and become fully contributing members of the community. The center is seeking committed volunteers at least 14 yeas of age to act as tutors, interpreters, drivers and interns. To apply, visit refugeeeducationcenter.org.

Women’s Resource Center

The Women’s Resource Center assists women in finding their strengths and talents to overcome obstacles and achieve employment and financial independence. Volunteers are needed to teach participants computer skills with various Microsoft Office programs, such as MS Word, Excel and Powerpoint. Learn more at grwrc.com/supporters.

Affinity Mentoring

Affinity Mentoring, a local women-led nonprofit, is dedicated to interrupting the cycle of poverty through mentoring relationships that help Kindergarten-8th grade students improve academics and socio-emotional skills. Using a strength-based approach, Affinity meets students where they are at by developing inclusive, diverse, and holistic programming. They work in partnership with schools, families, and organizations to lift up students through a supportive network. Affinity staff are bilingual (English/ Spanish) with backgrounds in social work and/or education. They play a vital role in establishing and coordinating a team of support around the student. They provide on-site training, resources and support in the Mentor Centers to ensure a successful mentoring relationship. To get involved, visit affinitymentoring.org.

“It’s the best part of my week. Her smile lights up her whole face. It’s awesome. Everyone can use a little more love in their life. At 53 I can still grow too.” —Stacey Coffman, Office Manager at Aon, Mentor at Burton Elementary School

Ready for college or trade school? We’re here to help pay for your education. This year we’re giving more than $1 million in scholarships to Kent County students. Apply at grfoundation.org/scholarships.

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS MARCH 1, 2019. Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

11


Go Red For Women

O

ur mothers, daughters, sisters and friends are at risk. Heart disease and stroke cause 1-in-3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. Fortunately, 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes.

Get informed about the risks of heart disease and stroke; know the red flags and know your heart health story. Go Red For Women inspires women to make lifestyle changes, mobilize communities and shape policies to save lives. Together, we are working to improve the health of women in your community.

Take action at GoRedForWomen.org. Here are a few ways to take action today: • Visit GoRedForWomen.org to learn what you can do to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. • Encourage your family and friends to take small steps toward healthy lifestyle choices to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke, too. • Explain “What it means to Go Red” by sharing the following acronym: Get Your Numbers: Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose. Own Your Lifestyle: Stop smoking, lose weight, be physically active and eat healthy.

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Raise Your Voice: Advocate for more women-related research and education.

Educate Your Family: Make healthy food choices for you and your family and teach your kids the importance of staying active.

Donate: Show your support with a donation of time or money. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES FACTS FACT 1: Cardiovascular diseases cause 1-in-3 women’s deaths each year in the U.S., killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds. • An estimated 44 million women in the U.S. are affected by cardiovascular diseases. • Ninety precent of women have one or more risk factors for heart disease or stroke. • Eighty percent of heart disease and stroke events can be prevented. FACT 2: Scientific evidence proves heart disease is different in women as compared to men. • Fewer women than men survive their first heart attack. • The symptoms of heart attack can be different in women and are often misunderstood, even by some physicians. • Women have a higher lifetime risk of stroke than men. • Each year, about 55,000 more women than men have a stroke. (continued on page 15)

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


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February 2019

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February 2019


FACT 3: Heart disease and strokes affect women of

all ethnicities. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for African American women, killing nearly 50,000 annually. • Research shows that African Americans are more likely than Caucasians to experience sudden cardiac arrest at a much earlier age. • Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years earlier than Caucasian women. • Only 36 precent of African American women and 34 precent of Hispanic women know that heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, compared with 65 percent of Caucasian women. • Of African American women ages 20 and older, 48 percent have cardiovascular disease but only 14 percent believe heart disease is the greatest health problem facing women. • Only about 50 percent of African American women are aware that pain which spreads to the shoulders, neck or arms is a sign of heart attack.

FACT 4: Women who are involved with the Go Red For Women movement live healthier lives. • Nearly 90 percent have made at least one healthy behavior change. • Almost half have lost weight. • More than 50 percent participate in regular physical exercise. • 6 out of 10 have changed their diets.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

• •

More than 40 percent have checked their cholesterol levels. One-third have talked with their doctors about developing heart-healthy plans.

FACT 5: When you get involved in supporting

Go Red For Women by advocating, fundraising and sharing your story, more lives are saved. • More than 670,000 women have been saved from heart disease and stroke since the launch of GRFW. • About 300 fewer women are dying per day.

ABOUT GO RED FOR WOMEN Launched in 2004, Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. The good news is that 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Women who Go Red live healthier lives. National Wear Red Day is Friday, Feb. 1, 2018. The 2019 Grand Rapids Go Red for Women Luncheon happens Feb. 13, at 20 Monroe Live. The event includes a a silent auction, health screenings and pampering. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed in fitness apparel and sneakers to encourage women to #GoRedGetFit (wear red if you have it!).

When you support Go Red for Women by advocating, fundraising and sharing your story, more lives are saved.

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February 2019


Jen DenBoer, 30 | Grand Rapids, Michigan | Heart Disease For Jennifer DenBoer , January 7, 2013, started as just a regular day. In the morning, she worked at her restaurant job before going straight home. At some point she called her mom and brother to see if they were OK — she just had a weird feeling that something was wrong. Everyone was fine, and she went about her day. At 2 a.m., she was eating snacks and watching TV with her then boyfriend. Suddenly, he looked over at her and he said later - she looked like she was choking. He called 911 and performed CPR. Little did either of them know, she was seizing from cardiac arrest. She was 24-years-old. DenBoer flatlined several times in the back of the ambulance before making it to the hospital where she had emergency treatment. At the time, DenBoer didn’t know that she had cardiomyopathy, a disease in the heart muscle that runs in her family. A combination of the cardiomyopathy and several other factors, including having spent time in the hot tub, led to her heart losing function, otherwise known as cardiac arrest. According to the American Heart Association, over “350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of a hospital setting” and are often fatal. The Mayo Clinic says that the lack of oxygenated blood can cause permanent brain damage or death in seconds. While people can go into cardiac arrest without having heart disease or

Symptoms of a heart attack: •

• • •

Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest that lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. Shortness of breath, with or without chest discomfort. Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

As with men, the most common heart attack symptom in women is chest pain or discomfort. It’s important to note that women are more likely to experience other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

February 2019

a previous heart issue, most are caused by a preexisting problem. Some risks include a family history, “smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, obesity, diabetes and a sedentary lifestyle.” The average rate at which your heart is supposed to pump blood in and out is about 65 percent. When DenBoer went into cardiac arrest, she was in the single digits. After paramedics worked on her from the house to the hospital, DenBoer was put into a chemically-induced coma, in which the brain and body are cooled to prevent organs from shutting down. This was to keep her alive and functioning while the doctors focused on treating her. Still in the coma, DenBoer had another major cardiac arrest, and the toll on her body was significant. DenBoer ’s family became rock-solid support for her, taking up the entire waiting room in the ICU. “My dad was the director,” she expressed. “He would talk to the doctors and tell people when they could come and see me. My brother was always quiet and would read; my mom would cry; my stepdad would try to make everybody laugh. Everyone handles things differently.” When DenBoer was aroused from the coma and gained back some memory, she couldn’t have prepared herself for the journey ahead of her; her whole life had shifted. She had a pacemakerdefibrillator put in and wasn’t allowed to work or drive for six months. (continued on page 18)

What to do during a heart attack If you experience any of these signs or symptoms:

Why itʼs important to know the symptoms of a heart attack

Women who consider themselves healthy often misdiagnose the symptoms of a heart attack because they don’t think it could happen to them. That is why it’s crucial to learn about heart disease and stroke, know your numbers, live a heart-healthy lifestyle and be aware of the risk factors of heart disease.

• •

Do not wait to call for help. Dial 9-1-1, make sure to follow the operator’s instructions and get to a hospital right away. Do not drive yourself or have someone drive you to the hospital unless you have no other choice. Try to stay as calm as possible and take deep, slow breaths while you wait for the emergency responders.

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Out of the hospital, DenBoer was taking medication to take the pressure off of her heart and make it easier for her body to operate. Her family banded together and helped with day-to-day tasks and getting to and from appointments.

“They have to attach it to your heart; cut your side, break your ribs, put this mini, mini motor, take a piece of your heart off, attach it, run a cord out to your stomach, attach it to batteries,” DenBoer said. “You’re battery operated.”

LVAD

Transplant

Flash forward to May, 2016: DenBoer ’s health has been slowly improving. She has headed her doctor’s advice and pushed through the all of the challenges she faced as a result of the cardiac arrest. It’s Mother’s Day, and she’s working back at the restaurant. “I’m working and it’s really hard, I’m hot and slowing down, and I can’t catch my breath,” DenBoer said. The next day, she called her doctor and told them she thought something was wrong. She was admitted to the Spectrum Health Heart Center, and then take to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) to get a right heart cath put in. A heart cath is a thin tube inserted into a vein in the neck or groin, and sensors in the catheter measure the pressure and blood flow of the heart. After the procedure, DenBoer ’s doctors told her she was going to need a heart transplant. “I was kind of stunned for a second,” DenBoer expressed. “I said, ‘OK, what are we gonna do?” DenBoer was put on the heart transplant list, and in the meantime was administered an IV-drip medication called Milrinone that helped her heart pump and relaxed the blood vessels doing the bulk of the work. While the medication worked for a while, it wasn’t long before she noticed she was becoming fatigued very quickly, even after walking up just three steps of stairs. While the medication began to work less and less, and she waited for a heart, doctors fitted DenBoer with an LVAD, a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

On May 3, 2017 DenBoer went in for heart transplant surgery. “He literally held my old heart and my new heart in his hands,” DenBoer said of her doctor. “Which is crazy.” The operation was hard on DenBoer ’s body.During surgery, she was hooked up to an ECMO machine, which pumps and oxygenates the blood outside of the body; it was keeping her alive when her body couldn’t. When DenBoer woke up after surgery, she didn’t recognize her family and was even confused about who she was. It was then that the doctors realized she had lost so much blood in the surgery that she had a stroke. It was 45 days until DenBoer was released from the hospital. Today, DenBoer stands healthy, scars and all, and is still optimistic despite all the barriers she faced. Reflecting on all she’s experienced and learned in the past six years, DenBoer said that if you feel something is not right with your body, always get a second opinion. Six months before she went into cardiac arrest, she had felt something was wrong; she had palpitations and would often get light headed. “If you know something’s wrong, if you feel it, and somebody tells you no, get a second opinion,” DenBoer said. “Listen to your body, because only you know what it’s telling you. Even if you don’t, go to a doctor and try to find out.”

Signs that you may be having a stroke: • • • • •

Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Sudden trouble seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known cause

You should never wait more than five minutes to dial 9-1-1 if you experience any of the signs above. Remember, you could be having a stroke even if you’re not experiencing all of the symptoms. And remember to check the time. The responding emergency medical technician or ER nurse at the hospital will need to know when the first symptom occurred.

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Doctors fitted DenBoer with a Left Ventricle Assist Device (LVAD) while she waited for a heart transplant.

Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T

Face Drooping, Arm Weakness, Speech Difficult, Time to Call 911 Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


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Beverly Buchanan, 60 | Columbia, South Carolina | Heart Disease As a nurse who teaches cardiac classes for hospital staff and patients at Dorn Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center in Columbia, South Carolina, Beverly Buchanan knew she had increased risks for heart disease. Her dad struggled with plaque in his arteries before dying from a heart attack at 58.

Again, everything came back normal, although the symptoms continued to recur. She eventually consulted with her cardiologist and was given a Holter monitor to identify electrical problems with her heart. A couple weeks after the monitor was in place, Beverly was awakened by a sharp pain in her chest.

She also had risks that she could control through lifestyle. After being diagnosed with hypertension in her early 40s and struggling with medication, she reduced the amount of medication needed to control her blood pressure through weight loss.

“I felt like I was going to die,” she said. “It was so intense.

Beverly’s cholesterol had been high starting in her 20s, but was always outweighed by higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good” cholesterol. By age 54, that ratio had flipped and her doctor recommended medication to help control it. Beverly rejected the idea, hoping she could get her cholesterol numbers down through diet and exercise. During a routine checkup in 2010, her doctor asked if she ever had chest pain. She said yes, but had assumed it was stress. The doctor ordered a full cardiac workup, and the results came back normal. But starting in March 2012, Beverly, then 54, began to have episodes where she’d suddenly feel like she was about to pass out. After a particularly bad episode while she was at work, she decided to have an EKG.

Beverly checked with the company monitoring the Holter’s data, but no heart events were recorded. Without consulting with her doctor, she discontinued using the Holter monitor halfway through the 30-day plan after discovering the latex leads were irritating her skin. “Looking back, I should have gotten it checked out right away and talked to my doctor about getting a non-latex option so I could keep wearing it,” she said. Beverly planned to travel overseas to visit her daughter, and didn’t want to risk being hospitalized. So she decided to push for more answers. Her doctor ordered a repeat of the cardiac testing she’d done in 2010, but this time testing revealed something was wrong. A catheterization procedure the next day revealed a major blockage in her left anterior descending artery — sometimes called the “widow maker” because the survival rate from a heart attack is so low. Beverly underwent open-heart bypass surgery and cardiac rehab, constantly pushing herself to make progress. She ended up taking her overseas trip, although the pain and fatigue she experienced made her regret not heeding the doctor’s advice to postpone. She now shares her story in her classes to encourage her colleagues and patients to know their numbers, take symptoms seriously and trust their medical providers. “I stress that it is important to know your numbers, and have conversations with your healthcare providers,” she said. “I was trying to be in control, but you can’t fix everything yourself. I’m quicker to follow my doctor’s advice and accept that he knows what he’s talking about.”

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


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February 2019

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Tara Robinson, 45 | Fort Worth, Texas | Heart Disease It took surviving three heart attacks in a week for Tara Robinson to recognize the importance of advocating for herself and understanding her health history.

had died of heart disease. She also learned her mother had high blood pressure.

Robinson, a teacher and Army veteran in Fort Worth, Texas, began experiencing strange health symptoms in late 2013, including numbness in her left arm and tightness in her neck. Then 40, she complained during her regular checkup, and her doctor suggested it could be stress.

The experience has made Tara take a different approach to her health, becoming a stronger advocate for herself and taking more responsibility for understanding her risks.

For the next four months, the symptoms kept recurring and worsening, but she didn’t return to the doctor. Then, on April 10, 2014, she awoke at 2 a.m. with new symptoms: nausea, numbness in her jaw, a burning sensation in her chest and back pain. Tara had her husband take her to the nearest hospital, where her symptoms seemed to go away and testing failed to reveal any answers.

“No one ever talked about it,” she said.

“I knew the symptoms of a heart attack, but I never thought it could happen to me,” she said. Tara also learned that although she has a strong family history , she could manage the 80 percent of heart disease that may be preventable through education and lifestyle. She eliminated fried food and added more whole grains, vegetables and fish to her diet. She exercises several times a week, and does yoga to help manage her stress.

“The doctor said, ‘You’re too young to be having a heart attack,’ and after that visit, I never thought it could be a possibility,” she said. “Now I tell women, ‘Don’t leave the hospital without an answer just because you’re exhausted or frustrated.’”

Now 45, Tara is an advocate for raising awareness about heart disease and understanding your risks and encourages families to talk about their health history.

A few days later, the symptoms returned, this time while she was in the classroom, where she worked with kids with behavior issues. While dealing with a student, Tara suddenly fell to her knees from the pain. Her assistant called the school nurse and 911, but by the time the EMT crew arrived, she felt fine and an EKG reading again failed to show anything.

“Heart attack can happen to anyone, but we never think it can happen to us,” she said. “We need to have those conversations and take care of ourselves.”

Even so, her assistant urged her to go to the ER. When testing again failed to provide answers, she returned home after an overnight stay. “I was never adamant about finding out what was going on,” Tara said. “I didn’t insist on staying until I got an answer because I just wanted to get home.” The next morning, Tara was cleaning her shower when the symptoms returned. She crawled to her bedroom, feeling weak and wanting to nap. But her husband took her back to the hospital. This time, the symptoms didn’t subside and she learned at the hospital she was having a heart attack — her third that week. Doctors found a 99 percent blockage in her main artery and placed a stent. Tara struggled to understand what had happened, and began digging into her family history. She had limited communication with her father’s side of the family, and was shocked to learn that her grandfather and four uncles

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February 2019


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February 2019

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Have Faith in Heart:

Program Brings Heart Health Awareness to Area Churches

BY ELYSE WILD | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TWO EAGLES MARCUS

Back Row: Earnestine Tolbert, Eva Lauchie, Shirley Edmondson, Rhonda Coleman, Mary Thompsan, Jeanne LaSargeBono Front Row: Lisa Baker, Annie Edwards, Larua B. Moody, Mia Gutridge

T

he statistics behind heart disease are staggering: As the number one killer of women, it claims the lives of more than 400,000 per yeaer, exceeding breast cancer by nearly 350,000. One-in-three women will die from it. Within that group are especially vulnerable populations: Nearly 50 percent of African American women over the age of 20 have heart disease, and Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 year earlier than any other racial group. Fortunately, changes in lifestyle can result in lowering one’s risk of heart disease by as much as 80 percent. Three years ago, the West Michigan American Heart Association launched the Have Faith in Heart Campaign to empower the communities affected most by this silent killer. The campaign offers educational materials and programs to churches, including heart healthy recipe books, blood pressure testing, informational fliers and more. “The American Heart Association has been looking to close the gap in the disparities of health,” Cindy Bouma, communications director at the West Michigan AHA, said. “Recent studies show that increased awareness about cardiovascular disease and stroke through the church is most effective in changing behavior.” This year’s campaign is sponsored by Mercy Health and includes nearly 40 churches across West Michigan. Along with educating their congregations, churches also participate in National Wear Red Day to further raise awareness for heart disease.

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Eva Lauchie is the Health Minister at Grace for Nations Church in Grand Rapids. Lauchie leads the Mind, Body and Spirit campaign at the church and became involved in Have Faith in Heart last year. “We are putting our efforts toward not only being spiritually healthy, but physically healthy,” she commented. “What better way than to focus on the heart?”

“Studies demonstrate that programs such as Have Faith in Heart are successful in mitigating the risks of heart disease among the participating congregations. Lauchie explains how the church implements the provided materials: She reminds church-goers of Go Red as she greets them; the pastor includes an announcement before his sermon; information cards and fliers on how to cut out sugar, incorporate nutritious foods into one’s diet and increase exercise are provided; and one Sunday a month, they provide free blood pressure screenings to parishioners.

“Awareness allows conversations to happen,” Lauchie expressed. “It allows us to be open about our physical needs and health issues.” Studies demonstrate that programs such as Have Faith in Heart are successful in mitigating the risks of heart disease among the participating congregations. A 2019 report published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes showed a greater drop in systolic blood pressure in participants who received their information from their faithcommunity than those who had received it through typical public health education programs. This year, Lauchie’s church is implementing heart health programming provided by the West Michigan AHA not only in February, but all year long, each month covering a different topic related to cardiovascular wellness. “You don’t know what you don’t know,” Lauchie said. “When we respond before a crisis occurs, that is when we begin to mitigate our risk.” When she is not editing for WLM, Elyse enjoys traveling to far off lands, taking photos, listening to live music and spinning records.

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February 2019


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K

risty Todd always knew that she wanted to be a nurse; she recalls visiting her doctor’s office as a little girl and how the crisp, clean smell and one-on-one attention made her feel safe and cared for. Now, the Director of Cardiac Service Line at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s works to imbue that same feeling of safety and care into the cardiac patient experience across the five campuses within the Mercy Health System. “Sometimes being in the hospital is the worst part of a patient's life,” Todd expressed. “As a nurse, I would always tell my patients, ‘I am going to be here for you and you are going to have great care while you are here.’ That is what continues to drive me.” Todd has a wide breadth of experience in cardiac health. She began her career 30 years ago as a floor nurse after graduating from Duke University. For 12 years, she worked on a cardiac intensive care unit, where patients are less stable than those on regular units and have one-on-one contact with their care team. In 2009, she moved to Grand Rapids from North Carolina and worked as a clinical nurse specialist at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s. In 2012, she graduated from Duke University again, this time with a doctoral degree in nursing. Today, she oversees all procedures and services related to heart health within the healthcare system. Mercy Health performs a variety of treatments, diagnostic services and non-invasive procedures in heart and vascular. These range everywhere from telemetry monitoring to open heart surgery. More than half a dozen cardiac departments report to Todd as she works to shape positive outcomes for patients through policy and procedures. Additionally, she meets with state legislatures to advocate for statewide healthcare policy.

Dr. Kristy Todd on Mitigating the Risk Factors of Heart Disease

BY ELYSE WILD | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TWO EAGLES MARCUS

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While Todd’s role as service line director doesn’t allow her direct patient contact, she remains in touch with the passion that first drew her into healthcare; she works one weekend a month as a nurse practitioner performing check ups at nursing homes and assisted living facilities across West Michigan. “It’s so rewarding to me,” she smiled. “As a nurse, you get so much more than you give.”

1-in-3

According the American Heart Association, heart disease claims the lives of 1-in-3 women, and 80 percent of cardiac events in women may be prevented by lifestyle choice. While Todd has forged a career out of her passion for creating positive outcomes for individuals with heart

disease, she herself has a strong family history disease; both her father and paternal grandmother died of aneurysms. At the time of our interview, Todd kept her cell phone close, as her mother was undergoing cardioversion (a non-invasive procedure that restores a normal heart rhythm to those with an abnormal beat) in Cleveland. She emphasizes that she is aware of her risk factors for heart disease, and those which she can and cannot control. “I cannot control my age, my gender or my family history,” she stated. “But I can control my diet, my weight and my activity level.” The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends adults get a weekly total of at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity to lower blood pressure and LDL cholesterol or “bad cholesterol.” Moderate aerobic activities include walking, gardening, ballroom dancing, water aerobic or biking; and vigorous aerobic activities include running, biking, aerobic dancing, swimming laps, hiking uphill or heavy yard work. Todd exercises 30-minutes a day, five days a week at a fit body boot camp and has an ardor for running (she’s ran four marathons.).She notes that while committing to such activity keeps her physically fit, it helps her to stay mentally healthy, as well; excessive stress levels can have a big impact on the body by increasing blood pressure and resulting in behaviors that lead to heart disease, such as physical inactivity, overeating and smoking. “Stress and depression can lead to heart disease,” Todd expressed. “We all have stress, and we need to figure out to how to manage it, whether it is meditation or exercise or a hobby.” Todd encourages women to know their numbers and to be strategic, realistic and specific when making lifestyle adjustments to mitigate their risk factors; instead of overhauling your diet, commit to eating healthy five days week, build up your activity level day-by-day and set time aside to de-stress. “As healthcare professionals, we need to meet people where they are at with their lifestyle and give them three things they can do to reduce their likelihood,” she said. “There are things we know that, if not prevent it completely, at least slow it down. Knowledge is power and prevention is key.” When she is not editing for WLM, Elyse enjoys traveling to far off lands, taking photos, listening to live music and spinning records.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


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It’s a Date:

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re you and your special someone looking for something unique and fun to do on date night this month? From enjoying international cuisine to cheering on your favorite team to exploring the great outdoors, we've got you covered.

The Foodies

Grand Rapids has become the ideal place for a couple of foodies looking to try something new. From breathtaking views of the growing metropolis to sampling dishes from all over the world, there’s something for everyone in this town. For those with an adventurous palette, ROAM by Sanchez features street food from all over the globe. From Moroccan carrots and Chebureki (empanadas from Croatia) to Singapore curry and Okonomiyaki (cabbage pancakes from Japan), there’s sure to be something to please anyone’s palate. Just down the street, check out Cygnus 27 for fine dining and a beautiful view looking over the Grand River and downtown Grand Rapids. And for those who want something a little more handson, take a cooking class at The Downtown Market or Amore Trattoria Italiana.

Artsy Lovers

For those artistic couples who want to really get a taste of the arts scene in our fair city, the first stop should definitely be the Grand Rapids Art Museum (GRAM). Located in the heart of downtown, the GRAM features

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Five Fabulous Ideas for a Date Night in Grand Rapids

a permanent and rotating collection ranging from screen prints to photography to sculpture to everything in between. For a contemporary feel, head up the street to the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts (UICA) and explore their multilevel, interactive gallery which often features powerful works that comment on current issues and considers social justice movements as they occur. Then, check out Light Gallery GR on Division SE. This gallery and studio is brimming with affordable art by local creators and offers up a list of workshops from weaving to printmaking to calligraphy.

A Couple Sports Fans

Visit the Van Andel Arena where you and your sweetie can enjoy a chilly Grand Rapids Griffins hockey game throughout the winter season. There, you can also catch the Grand Rapids Drive basketball team and various traveling events, like WWE Raw and the Harlem Globetrotters. To challenge your partner in a little one-on-one, head to the David D. Hunting YMCA located right off of US-131 downtown. There, you can sign up for a monthly membership for access to the facility’s swimming pool, basketball courts, an indoor track and racquetball and squash courts. Nothing like a little competition to keep the fire alive!

BY KAYLA SOSA

The Adventure Seekers

If you’re looking to infuse some adventure into your relationship, head north to Cannonsburg Ski Area where you can choose to go down the giant, snowy hill on a tube, snowboard or skis. While you’re out there, take a wintery hike on one of their four trail options. Alternatively, explore the ground of Blandford Nature Center via snowshoes every Saturday at 10:30 a.m. throughout the winter months.

The Glamorous Pair

Need an excuse to wear your fanciest outfits and feel like celebrities? Suit up and have dinner at The New Hotel Mertens. This eatery specializes in French classic dishes and traditional cocktails replicated from the original New Hotel Mertens drink menu circa 1940s. Located at the original site of the hotel that first opened its doors in 1914, this is one dining experience that will transport you to another time and place. After dinner, grab seats for a night out at the Grand Rapids Symphony, enjoy a play at Grand Rapids Civic Theatre or take in performance at the Grand Rapids Ballet. Kayla Sosa is a multimedia journalism student at GVSU. She’s a local freelance writer and enjoys spending time with her husband, her kitty and her family. When she’s not writing, she likes to go on nature walks, do yoga and paint. .

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


MAKE YOUR VALENTINE’S

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

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Living and Parenting with PTSD:

Naomi Silas Shares How Her Experience as a Trauma Survivor Influences Her Role as a Mother BY NAOMI SILAS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIA LEWIS PHOTOGRAPHY, 2015

I

am a survivor of child and domestic abuse. I have complex trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). I am also the parent of a beautiful 7-year-old son. When it comes to parenting, some days are good and some aren’t. The same can be said for living with PTSD. When parenting while living with PTSD, sometimes those good and not so good days don’t always sync up. In her article“Understanding Complex Trauma, Complex Reactions, and Treatment Approaches,” Dr. Christine Courtois summarizes complex traumatic events and experiences as stressors as: (1) repetitive, prolonged, or cumulative (2 ) most often interpersonal, involving direct harm, exploitation, and maltreatment including neglect/abandonment/antipathy by primary caregivers or other ostensibly responsible adults, and (3) often occur at developmentally vulnerable times in the victim's life, especially in early childhood or adolescence, but can also occur later in life and in conditions of vulnerability associated with disability/ disempowerment/ dependency/ age / infirmity, and so on. It's estimated that 1 out of 10 women will get PTSD at some time in their lives. Women are about twice as likely as men to develop PTSD. I was raised in what can only be described as a religious cult. Everything from what I ate and wore was dictated by some sort of “law” of the church. When I was 12, I was caught skipping math class which lead to be me being accused of everything from doing drugs to having sex. I don’t even know how skipping math class could equate to either of those accusations in someone’s mind. Nonetheless, my parents were told to “beat the truth out of me,” and they complied. After a week of continuous beatings, I falsely admitted to my parents,“Whatever you think I did, I did,” just to make it stop. They didn’t believe that I just hated math.

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I was a kid, and my small world got even smaller when I was excommunicated from the “church.” I was able to live at my parent's house, unlike other children who were excommunicated. I was so naive that I didn’t know that this was abuse. My parents used to say that they “beat me because they love me.” They are not in my life anymore. It took me years to understand that love does not hit or harm. I learned this lesson the hard way in my early 20s. I was in a relationship with a former Special Forces Army Veteran who served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most days he was great, but sometimes he would get a glossy look in his eyes,and I knew in his mind he was in a war zone. He drank mostly to forget, and so did I. Our relationship was codependent; we both felt like we were broken and looking for someone else to make us whole. When I tell people it ended badly, they usually think I mean that my heart was broken, but it ended with me in the hospital. I can’t recall how many stitches were in my nose anymore, but I needed a plastic surgeon to stitch me up. It was when I was alone in the hospital after being put back together by a plastic surgeon that I finally realized my worth. It took going through all of that to realize that I deserved better than that, even if I didn’t know what better felt like. Love does not hurt or harm. Love builds you up, supports and envelops you with warmth. I’m fortunate that my son is a healthy and happy child. I work hard to protect him in ways that I was not protected. I’m honest with him, I fuel his creativity and curiosity and allow him a voice to express and challenge — things I was denied. I make sure he knows that he’s loved and that I can be wrong and he can be right. I support him in any new adventure he wants to take. I’m raising an adult that will be ready to take on the world. I’m being the parent I never had,

and am giving him everything I needed when I was growing up. Beyond that, I carry extreme guilt because I have this secret. He doesn’t know that I’ve suffered and struggled and have PTSD. It’s a tough conversation for which he is not ready. One day I will tell him, but for now, I want to protect his innocence. It’s hard for me to think about telling him about any of my trauma. Will he be 10? 12? 16? He’s such a sweet child that I imagine him knowing this about me would bring him pain and sadness. He’s asked me before if I had parents and if they were dead; I simply told him that they aren’t in our lives for a reason. I let him know that sometimes people grow apart or don’t always agree on things, and while you should do your best to make sure that doesn’t happen, unfortunately, sometimes it does. I quickly reassured him that it would never happen between us. That isn’t to say that my living with PTSD hasn’t affected him or our household because it has. It was easier when he wasn’t old enough to ask me if I’m OK when I’m having an off day. On my worst day, it’s almost like time is just passing, and I have zero emotional response or attachment to anything or anyone. I feel like a shell of a person, uninterested in the things around me. My mind turns off the day-to-day processes of dreaming, thinking and engaging; and focuses only the trauma that found its way up through the form of a trigger. I’m glad to say that I haven’t had one of those days in quite some time. I am aware of my trauma and tend to stay away from watching movies or the evening news in order to not to stir it up. WebMD describes triggers as, “Anything that reminds you of what happened right before or during a trauma is a potential trigger. They’re usually tied to your

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


senses. You may see, feel, smell, touch or taste something that brings on your symptoms. While triggers themselves are usually harmless, they cause your body to react as if you’re in danger.” I am very self-aware. When I find myself on the edge, I retreat to my room and calm down. I’ll take some deep breaths, but mostly I just need to give my brain time to process what’s going on around me. Being mindful is another way that I cope; I find joy, amazement and the good in everything that comes my way. I have a grand scale in my mind, and tend to weigh things compared to my life experience—most things in my current life tend to be “no big deal” in comparison to my past.

“Children learn by observation; they model their behavior after their parents. My son learned to freeze from me.” It’s vital for me to have time to retreat and be away from people, which isn’t always easy with a child wanting every waking moment of your attention. If finding worklife balance is already hard for most people, finding a balance to being a parent and mental wellness tips the scales at times. Children learn by observation; they model their behavior after their parents. My son learned to freeze from me. Even though I knew this, and did my best to hide my PTSD and any signs of it from my son. At times, I struggle to project my feelings. I’ve been called a robot; I’ve been told that I don’t seem excited about things I truly am excited about.

One afternoon, when he was 4-years-old, he decided to hang off of our refrigerator door. The door came off and fell on top of him. My husband and I heard only a loud bang, followed by silence; my son didn't make a sound. It was the first time I realized that he should have at least yelled for help or at least called out. He was unscathed (the refrigerator wasn’t). Afterward, I explained to him that he should have reacted differently — he should call for help or shout, or merely express his fear or surprise if something like that were to happen again. At the time of the refrigerator incident, I didn’t realize that it was perhaps my fault that he didn’t know how he should react. It wasn’t until one day when I accidentally dropped a glass bottle in the gymnasium of his school after an awards ceremony did I realize that I freeze. Several adults nearby sprung into action, and I was frozen where I stood. The sound of shattering glass elicited flight or fright in me, and my mind was taken back to a time where I was lost. It took me several days to process what happened and why I couldn’t snap out of what felt like a trance. In that time of reflection, I saw the correlation of my freezing and my son not being able to react in an appropriate emotional response. In the time between 4 and 7-years-old, my son has developed his voice. He spent time working with an excellent speech pathologist, which has allowed him to mature and articulate his emotions clearly. Having my son was scary (and unexpected), but the single most rewarding thing I’ve ever done. My hope for my son is that he never knows the pain that I’ve known and never feels that I was ever anything other than supportive of his wants, needs and dreams. When I look at his face and hear him tell me about his day, I feel whole. He is the reason that I am choosing to speak out on traumatic things that I’ve survived. If me talking about things can help people find the courage to get out of a bad situation, or lets them know that they aren’t alone and that the can and will experience joy. Naomi Silas is a graphic designer with more than 10 years of expertise. She founded Seventh Creative, an independent design studio, in 2017. Being the youngest of seven children and growing up in Gary, Indiana is something that she never forgets; no matter where life takes her.

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

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Sweet Treats for

February

BY DANEA MATHER | PHOTOS BY AUGUST NYSON @EATQUANTUM

T

hese super simple chocolate-based goodies are the perfect treat for your sweetheart, your sweet friends, or your very own sweet tooth! With minimal ingredients and easy instructions, you can wow anyone in just a few minutes of active cook time. Make this holiday easy and spend more time doting on someone special- including yourself.

Cinna-Coco Sipping Cocoa Makes 4 mugs of cocoa 1 1/2- 2 cups of dark chocolate, chopped very small 2 cups non-dairy milk (recommended: Almond milk) 1 cup coconut cream or milk 1 generous pinch of cinnamon Garnish: Gelatin free mini marshmallows

In a medium sized pot, combine almond milk and coconut cream or milk. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Whisk in chopped dark chocolate and continue to whisk until completely melted. Whisk in cinnamon until combined, then transfer Cocoa to large mugs. Top with mini marshmallows, dust with cocoa powder or extra cinnamon and enjoy!

Dark Chocolate Raspberry Fudge Tarte Makes 1 large tarte 2 cups dark chocolate, chopped very small 1 cup coconut cream or milk 1 1/2 cups frozen real raspberries, thawed 1/4-1/2 cup coconut oil, melted Garnish: Freeze dried or fresh raspberries, extra melted chocolate, powdered sugar Chop dark chocolate into small pieces, than place in a heat safe bowl. Bring coconut cream or milk to a low boil, then pour evenly over chocolate in bowl. Cover with a lid or plate and allow to sit for several minutes.

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Stir chocolate with a spatula until completely creamy, then transfer to a shallow pie or other round dish. Set aside. In a high speed blender, add thawed raspberries and melted coconut oil. Puree until completely blended, then pour mixture over chocolate in pie dish. Transfer to freezer to set minimum of 2 hours. Serve from freezer with just a few minutes set out on counter before serving. Garnish with drizzled chocolate, freeze dried or fresh raspberries and powdered sugar.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Valentine’s Hand Dipped Pretzels Makes 15+ pretzels 1 cup or more dark chocolate, chopped very small jumbo pretzel sticks (gluten free optional) freeze dried strawberries or raspberries mini marshmallows (gelatin free) drizzles of extra melted dark chocolate Drizzles of raspberry magic shell: Pureed 1 cup thawed frozen raspberries with 1/4 cup melted coconut oil Garnish: Sprinkles, powdered sugar and more! Create a double boiler by bringing a medium sized pot, half full of water to a boil. Set a glass, metal or other heat safe bowl gently inside the pot of boiling water. Make sure that the water will not spill over the sides of the pot.

Add chopped dark chocolate to the empty bowl. Allow to heat gently, and begin to stir as the chocolate melts. Continue stirring until chocolate is completely smooth. Remove from heat, but keep chocolate bowl in the hot water. Set out a sheet pan or cutting board covered with parchment paper to rest pretzels on. One at a time, dip pretzels into the melted chocolate. Use a spoon or spatula to drizzle chocolate half-way or more up the pretzel. Allow excess chocolate to drip off pretzel, then transfer to parchment paper. Garnish each pretzel with your favorite toppings before the chocolate hardens. When all pretzels are decorated, carefully transfer to the refrigerator. Serve cool from the fridge, or set out just a few minutes to warm before serving to keep chocolate from melting.

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February 2019

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BY KAYLA SOSA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TWO EAGLES MARCUS Back row: Shirley Miles, Harriet Singleston, Jo Ellyn Clarey. Front Row: Yvonne Sims, Maggie Hankins Annie Edwards, Bettye Posey

T

“Rowing, not Drifting:”

he Grand Rapids Study Club was formed in 1901 by eight women (then known as the Grand Rapids Study Class), was one of the first organization for black women in the area and remains as one of the oldest operating African American women’s clubs in the country. The club was founded amidst a booming movement of women’s social clubs during a time when women had little or no access to education. Black women found themselves not only banned from social clubs made up of white women, but also those made up of black men; and by 1900, nearly every black community in the nation was home to a woman’s club. Many club members worked as maids for wealthy white families in the area. Thursdays were a typical “maid’s day off,” so they gathered once a month on Thursdays to educate themselves, stay abreast of current events — especially issues impacting African Americans— and support one another in their endeavors. “They meant ‘study’ in its purest form,” current Grand Rapids Study Club member Yvonne Sims explained. “They wanted to know what was going on in the world because women were excluded from everything... if you went to City Hall, everything was men, from scrubbing the floor all the way up.” A review of the group's yearly booklet, available for viewing at the Grand Rapids Public Library Digital Collections, shows the breadth and vitality of their programming, with sessions and presentations including: “The Chinese Revolution and It’s Causes,” “The Benefits of a Nursing Home;” “The Study of Psychology,” “Women’s Invasion of the Business World,” “History of Paper Making,” “Music and Art After the War;” and much more.

As club membership grew, the focus expanded from self-improvement to include activism as they supported various charities and causes that impacted the black community in Grand Rapids. The group brought renowned speakers to Grand Rapids, including African American poet, playwright, novelist and activists Langston Hughes, and African

36

The Grand Rapids Study Club Continues to Meet 100 Years On

American journalist and author, Louis Lomax, bringing diverse cultural programming the city otherwise lacked. Members took turns hosting meetings in their homes until 1934 when club members took out a mortgage on a house on James Avenue SE for $45 a month.

“They meant ‘study’ in its purest form. They wanted to know what was going on in the world because women were excluded from everything.” —Yvonne Sims, Current Grand Rapids Study Club Member

“Rowing, not drifting.” That’s the club’s motto, implying an active stance toward taking charge of one’s life. The group’s meeting format is largely unchanged from its origins. They begin always with a greeting, then an opening song, and they recite the Club Women’s Collect: Keep us, O God, from pettiness Let us be large in thought, in word, in deed. Let us be done with fault-finding, And leave off self-seeking. Teach us to put into action our better impulses, Straight forward and unafraid, Let us take time for all things Make us grow calm, serene, and gentle. May we put away all pretenses, And meet each other face to face Without pity and prejudice. May we never be hasty in judgment

And always be generous. Grant that we may realize that it is the little things that create differences, That in the big things of life we are one. And may we strive to touch and to know The great common woman’s heart of us all, And, Oh Lord, let us not forget to be kind. Next, each member takes a turn reciting an inspirational quote. The group covers a different topic each month, ranging anywhere from healthy aging to driver-less cars. At the beginning of the club's calendar year, which ranges from October to May, members volunteer to research selected topics and then discuss it on the designated month. Today, the club provides a textbook scholarship to students pursuing post-secondary education. To fund their research and scholarship fund, the club does fundraising through various events, including the Parade of Homes. The group has remained true to the original commitment to education; whether it be self-education within the group or through the textbook scholarships. Sims said the importance of continuing the legacy and tradition of the study club is because “there’s always new things to learn.” Ten-year club member Harriet Singleton encourages young women to join the club in order to discover more about themselves and their potential. “I think they spend a lot of time on social media, but they don’t spend a lot of time in depth talking about self-issues and self-fulfillment,” she said. “I think that’s what the Grand Rapids Study Club can really help people get anchored into who they are a young women.”

The group is looking for fresh, young members to continue the legacy of the study club. Young women are invited to learn more by visiting their website at grandrapidsstudyclub.org.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


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Crafts, gifts, Valentine’s school parties, home and office décor, and lots more... oh my goodness... you have to stop by to check it out!

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February 2019

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EVENT SPOTLIGHT

Let us help diversify your reading! We Are LIT is an independent, multicultural bookshop offering new, diverse books across all genres. Our inventory is hand selected to connect readers of all ages to their interests through thoughtfully curated books. • New, multicultural books across all genres • A celebration of diversity in literature • A community built on book culture • Shop local, online

Come See Us!

Pop Up Bookshop at Downtown Market Grand Rapids! Saturday, February 9th 9:00 am to 8:00 pm

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Better Body Image Conference BY KAYLA SOSA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESS WEAL

T

he Better Body Image Conference, which takes on Saturday, March 2, on the second floor of the Grand Valley State University Eberhard Center, welcomes Grand Rapids residents for an afternoon of supportive dialogue and stimulating programming. Conference founders Bri Luginbill and Connie Flachs met in 2017 and, realizing they had similar interests and goals around body image work. Body image is how a person views their own body, and other people’s bodies, and how it affects their lives. This can range from negative self-talk and eating disorders to depression and anxiety. The conversation around body image also includes how our society views bodies, and in that, race and gender. “A lot of body shame comes from isolation, so it was so important for us to create a community,” Flachs expressed. “There are great online communities out there, and [we wanted] to create one that actually exists in Grand Rapids.” The first body image conference was held in March 2018 at Wealthy Theatre and attracted nearly one hundred attendees who gathered to watch a film, attend workshops, hear from speakers and even participate in a yoga class. In the course of a year, Luginbill and Flachs established the conference as a nonprofit and set up an advisory board. We have four other women, and they all range in body sizes, so we really increased the size representation in who is organizing,” Flachs said. Luginbill and Flachs stressed that the conference is about providing a space

for attendees to connect and support each other.

“It’s about being that connector and giving a voice to people who don’t have that opportunity, ” Luginbill expressed. “It's about educating ourselves as well as others about different perspectives and upbringings. Everyone experiences their own body image journey differently and we need to have those conversations in a safe, inclusive environment.” This year’s conference begins with a social hour and includes workshops and a final movement practice. The keynote speaker is Dianne Bondy, renowned yoga teacher and activist, who will explore the pros and cons of the body positive movement. Workshops will also expand to talk about disability, ethnicity and LGBTQ+ body image. Flachs emphasizes that body-positivity is more than just feeling good about how you look. “It’s really a public health issue,” Flachs said. Partners for the conference include the Michigan Eating Disorder Association and Partners for a Racism-Free Society.

What: The Better Body Image Conference When: Saturday, March 2, 10 a.m — 4 p.m. Where: Grand Valley State University Eberhard Center Cost: $40

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Exceptionally yours, from fierce

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Make a purchase that makes a difference by shopping Better Way Designs! Every piece of jewelry, bag, journal, and even cup of coffee comes with a story of hope and healing for the woman who made it. See you soon!

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

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READER’S BY JOYANNE HUSTON-SWANSON

Love is in the air this February, and with Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it’s the perfect time to discover some amazing romance novels. Not sure where to find your next engrossing read? Get ready for some toe-curling, hearts in your eyes, and warm, fuzzy feelings because I’ve got a few of my favorite romance titles to share with you.

The Last Chance Matinee

The Woman Left Behind

Three women are brought together when their famous father dies, and his lawyer contacts them for the reading of the will. The catch is, their father had two families, unbeknownst to them. As per conditions of the will, these three disparate women, Allie, Des and Cara, move to a small town in the Pennsylvania Pocono Mountains, where they discover more about the father they each thought they knew. In spite of themselves and the circumstances which initially brought them together, these women begin to form relationships with each other and the community members they meet along the way. Cara is especially drawn to one interesting man, the general contractor who is helping them restore the town’s old Matinee. You will not be disappointed if you pick this one up as new love blooms, friendships develop, old rivalries resurface, and a mystery regarding their father’s past comes to light.

Meet Jina, a communication techy for a paramilitary organization, who likes to put an end to the bad guys’ plans through virtual special ops from a control room. However, when she scores highly on an aptitude test, she is assigned to a field unit as an on-site drone operator, which would be fine if she liked to sweat, run, swim for miles, jump out of an airplane or shoot an actual gun. Left with no choice, Jina reluctantly agrees to the assignment. The sparks start flying when she meets the team leader, Levi, who immediately doubts her ability to keep up with his team. Throughout Jina’s training, the chemistry and tension between them builds and finally comes to a breaking point, but not before the team is put through some harrowing experiences and treachery behind the scenes is exposed. Fans of romances with a suspenseful edge will truly enjoy this title.

My Lady’s Choosing

A Midsummer’s Kiss

In this book, just like the forerunners of our childhood, you get to choose your own path, find true love and your own version of happily ever after. As a penniless heroine in the middle of 18th-century society, will you plan your future by getting to know Baronet Sir Benedict Granville or turn back 20 pages to find love with highlander Captain Angus McTaggart? Many intriguing fates await and you can try them all, don’t delay!

Lord Graelem Dayne needs a wife in 30 days, or he will lose his inheritance, but he doesn’t want to marry for love. Laurel Farthingale will only marry for love, and in fact, has set her sights on a childhood friend for the role as husband. Fate has a different plan and Laurel, while riding her horse in the countryside, runs into Graelem and ends up breaking his leg. This accidental meeting begins with a farce as Laurel becomes reluctantly betrothed to Graelem in order to atone for her horse breaking his leg, but will it end in true love? You’ll have to read it to find out!

by Mariah Stewart

by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris

by Linda Howard

by Meara Plat

Joyanne Huston-Swanson has connected patrons to their next great read for the last 8 years at KDL. In her position as an Outreach Specialist, she gets to put her love of reading into practice through visits at area schools and Community events with KDL’s new bookmobile.

40

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


10

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February 2019

41


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February 2019


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February Events Mondays

Beginner Adult Ballet Classes. This class is led by trained company dancers and teaches you how to get your ballet technique on pointe. Grand Rapids Ballet. 6:30-7:45 pm. grballet.com

Tuesdays

Tuesdays and Thursdays

Intermediate Adult Ballet Classes. Recommended to those with 2-3 years of experience, this class is led by trained company dancers and teaches you how to get your ballet technique on pointe. Grand Rapids Ballet. 6:30-7:45 pm. grballet.com

Wednesdays

Meijer Free Tuesdays means free admission and explorations to the Grand Rapids Art Museum. 10 am-5 pm. artmuseumgr.org Meanwhile Movie. Kick back for a viewing of a cult classic, with titles varying every week in the Wealthy movie theater. Bar privileges open to members. Wealthy Theatre. 8 pm. Grcmc.org Nature Buds: Winter Edition. Guided and self-guided play for the little kids ages 1-4.. Each week has a new Nature Based theme. Blandford Nature Center. 9: 30 am. Blandfordnaturecenter.org

Advanced Beginner Adult Ballet Classes. Recommended to those with 2-3 years of experience. Grand Rapids Ballet. 6:30-7:45 pm. Grballet.com

Wednesdays Through Feb 20

The Chilly Challenge. A free sevenweek series of 45 minute walks downtown Grand Rapids. Meet in the lobby of the JW Marriott at Noon. Downtowngrinc.com

Thursdays

Meijer Free Thursday Nights means free admission and an evening of art pieces. The Grand Rapids Art Museum. 5-9 pm. artmuseumgr.com

Saturdays

Curiosity Lab. Hands-on activities themed around science for all ages. Free with general admission. Grand Rapids Public Museum. 10 am-2 pm. Grpm.org.

Jan 31—Feb 3

The Burnt Part Boys. This play takes place in rural West Virginia in 1962.

Drop-In Family Saturdays welcome families to join the fun and participate in exciting art activities in the museum’s Education Studio. Grand Rapids Art Museum. 11 am-5 pm. Artmuseumgr.org

Creativity Uncorked: The Art of Calligraphy takes place at the GRAM on Feb. 14.

Through Feb 9

Who’s Who LowellArts Members Exhibition. Lowell Arts. Tues-Fri, 10-6 pm. Saturdays, 10-5 pm. Lowellartsmi.org

Through April 28

Warm Water: New Works by Charles Edward Williams. Warm Water is a collection of re-narrated visual works based on the event that sparked the Chicago Race Riot of 1919. Urban Institute of Contemporary Arts. UICA.org

2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees St.Cecilia Music Center 2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees PRESENTS 2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees

Thursday, March 14th 2019 Honorees 2019 Honorees hMarch 14th 14th Thursday, 11:30 am - 1:30March pm 14th Thursday, March 14th 14th JW Marriott 2019 Honorees 0h-pm am 1:30 pm Thursday, March 14th 1:30 pm11:30 Thursday, March 14th JW pmThursday, 11:30 am -1:3014th 1:30 11:30 amMarriott -1:30 pm pm arriott March 11:30 am pm JW Marriott Reserved table for 10: $850 Individual Tickets: $75   Sponsorship and ticket info @ grwrc.org Thursday, March 14th JW Marriott 2019 Honorees Reserved table for 10: $850 Individual Tickets: $75   Reserved table for 10: $850 Individual Tickets: $75 Sponsorship and14th ticket info @ grwrc.org Sponsorship and ticket info @ grwrc.org am - 1:30 pm Thursday, March Individual Tickets: $75   Reserved table for 10: $850 Sponsorship ticket info @ grwrc.org s: $75  11:30Reserved table for 10: $850 Sponsorship andandticket info @ grwrc.org

Indian Mounds Rock and Mineral Club will be at Forge n’ Gorge at The Hot Spot GR on Jan. 15.

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February 2019


Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

45


Garage Sale

Art Fair An art fair with garage sale prices run by local artists. Saturday Feb 23 9-4 $5 entry

www.GarageSaleArtFair.com

Kalamazoo Expo Center

GRAAMA Founder George Bayard will discuss the origins and results of the uprising of black during the summer of 1967 at the Main Library on Feb. 14 A young boy and his older brother try and come to terms with their past so they can move ahead to the future. Actor’s Theatre Grand Rapids Jan 31- Feb 2 at 8 pm. Feb 3 at 3 pm. Actorstheatregrandrapids.org

Feb 1-Feb 2

GR Symphony Presents Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Grand Rapids Symphony. Feb 1 at 7:30 pm, Feb 2 at 2 pm. DeVos Performance Hall. Devosperformancehall.com

Feb 2-3

Vera Bradley Annual Outlet Sale

V.I.P. Experience

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• Transportation via deluxe highway motorcoach • Three meals: Breakfast snacks and coffee, lunch, and an Amish style dinner at the Blue Gate Restaurant • VIP Vera Bradley Annual Sale Experience *VIP drop-off/pick-up at private entrance * Exclusive check-out area & VIP lounge with refreshments and a free gift • A visit to the award-winning Country Heritage Winery & Farm Market, with time for wine tasting and shopping • A visit to Moose Lake Christian Craft Village, for a nice lunch and time to shop their nineteenth century general store • Tax and tips for all inclusions (driver’s tip appreciated) • Services of a Countryside Tour Director

Your Price: $159.00 per person

Call our office for a detailed brochure or sign up online!

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46

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, abridged and revised. Three ambitious actors attempt to perform all of Shakespeare’s plays in 90 minutes. Dog Story Theater. Feb 2 at 7:30 pm. Feb 3 at 2:30 pm. Facebook.com/dogstorytheater

Feb 7

Local First returns to CityFlatsHotel for the 2nd Lakeshore Annual Meeting. CityFlatsHotel, Holland. 6:30-8:30 pm. Localfirst.com

Feb 8-9

Grand Rapids Symphony Presents Tchaikovsky Festival. DeVos Performance Hall. Performances being at 8 pm on both dates. Devosperformancehall.com

Feb 14

That’s Amore: A Romantic Evening in Italy. Make ravioli from scratch in this hands-on Valentine’s Day Class. Downtown Market. 6-8:30pm. Downtownmarketgr.com Valentine’s Day Beer Dinner: Latin Inspiration. Part of the Beer Dinner Series, this 5-course dinner is inspired by cherish Latin dishes. Founders Brewing Co. 6 pm. Foundersbrewing.com Creativity Uncorked: The Art of Calligraphy. Discover examples of calligraphy in GRAM’s collection and discuss its cross-cultural significance during an after-hours tour. Learn the basics of calligraphy and create your own valentine, note or clever saying. Grand Rapids Art Museum. 6:45-9 pm. Artmusuemgr.org Riot, Race and Reconciliation. George Bayard will discuss the origins and results of the uprising of black during the summer of 1967. Main Library. 7-8:30 pm. Grpl.rg

Feb 14-16

Feb 8, 9, 10

MoveMedia:Handmade. Grand Rapids Ballet. Friday and Saturday at 7:30 pm. Sunday at 2 pm.

Feb 10

Enamel Glow Heart. Create a glow in the dark copper heart pendant. The Hot Spot GR. 10am-1pm. Thehotspotgr.com

Feb 13

healthy lifestyles, building awareness and raising critically-needed funds to support research and education initiatives. 20 Monroe Live. 10:30am1:15 pm. Ahagrandrapids.ejoinme.org

2019 Grand Rapids Go Red for Women Luncheon. This empowering event focuses on preventing heart disease and stroke by promoting

Downtown Market Ice Bar: Tropical Chill. Grab a tropical cocktail from the Ice Bar and embrace the cold with some frozen tundra yard games. Downtown Market. Feb 14, 4-7 pm. Feb 15, 4-8 pm. Feb 16, 12-8 pm. Downtownmarketgr.com

Feb 14-17

The Seagull. Dog Story Theatre. A modern version of the classic Anton Chekhov play as written by Christopher Hampton. Dog Story Theater. 8 pm. Facebook.com./ dogstorytheatter

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Grand Rapids’ Black History. 12 pm. Downtowngr.org

Feb 19

A February Affair — Sight and Sound. A unique evening combining live painting and music. Annie Huff from Brush Studio renders an orchidinspired painting while Steve Talago plays the piano live. Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. 6:30-9pm. Meijergardens.org. Shibori Indigo Tote Bag Workshop. Learn the technique of Shibori Indigo Dyeing and create your own unique tote bag to bring home. Light Gallery and Studio. 6-8 pm. Lightgallerygr.com

Feb 19-Feb 24

Broadway Grand Rapids Presents: On Your Feet! DeVos Performance Hall. Feb 19- 21 at 8 pm. Feb 2223 at 8 pm. Feb. 23 at 2 pm. Feb 24 at 1 pm. Feb 24 at 6:30 pm. Devosperformancehall.com

note Cohen will give the key Soft Heart, Shannon Luncheon on Feb. 13. n me Author of Tough Skin, Wo for d Re Grand Rapids Go speech at the 2019

World of Winter Festival. Four-day festival organized by Downtown Grand Rapids Inc. and partners designed to take advantage of Michigan’s cold climate. Featuring a human hungry hungry hippos tournament and a silent disco on ice! Downtowngr.org

Feb 15-16

Roger That! Public Celebration. Join the GRPM to celebrate space exploration and the life of Roger B. Chaffee through exciting and educational exhibitions and activities throughout the day. Grand Rapids Public Museum. Feb 15, 11 am- 3 pm. Feb 16, 11 am-4 pm. Grpm.org

Feb 15-Feb 17

Ice Sculpture Walking Tours. Enjoy a tour about the ice sculptures on display for the World of Winter Festival. Tours start at Rosa Parks

Circle. Friday at 6 pm. Saturday at 10 am, 2 pm & 6 pm. Sunday at 12 pm and 3 pm. Downtowngr.org

Feb 16

I Love the 80s featuring Sixteen Candles. 20 Monroe Live. 8pm. 20Monroelive.com Drop-In Programming: Tracking. Get a close up-view of animals you may never encounter otherwise. First 20 people to check in get spots. Blandford Nature Center. 10:30 am12pm Blandfordnaturecenter.org Grand Rapids Symphony Presents Black Violin in Concert. 8 pm. DeVos Performance Hall. Devosperformancehall.com Grand Rapids Black History Walking Tour. Enjoy a walking tour through

Feb 21-Feb 23

Women, Community and the Environment Series. This series will deliver inspiring social and learning opportunities, raise awareness towards actionable environmental issues in the community, bring together a wide-ranging network of women, as well as provide connections and resources for civic engagement. Feb. 21, 5-7 pm at The Loft at Luna; Feb. 22, 7-9 pm at Grand Rapids Community College; Feb. 23 at the Kroc Center.

Giant’s Awards and Banquet. Honor and celebrate 13 AfricanAmerican individuals and organizations for their exemplary contributions to our community. DeVos Place. 6 pm Grcc.edu/ awoodrickcenterforequityandinclusion

Feb 24

Introduction to Screen Printing. Learn the basics of screen printing with Solstice Handmade. Lions & Rabbits. 3 pm-4:30pm. Lionsandrabbits.com

Feb 27

Join Greg Meyer and the Road Warriors for hill training at John Ball Zoo (meet in the south parking lot) followed by hops (location to be announced). John Ball Zoo. 6-7:30 pm. Amwayriverbankrun.com

Feb 28

56th Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival Traveling Tour. These interesting and often challenging short films span many genres: experimental, documentary, animation, narrative, and hybrids. In addition, the Pickle Fort Film Collective will host a hands-on experimental film workshop. A short discussion will follow the program. Wealthy Theatre. 7-9 pm. Grpl.org

Feb 22-24,27-28

Mama Mia! A mother. A daughter. Three possible dads. And, a trip down the aisle you’ll never forget. Wednesday through Saturday at 7:30 pm. Sunday matinees at 2 pm. Grand Rapids Civic Theatre. Grct.org

Feb 23

Backyard Sugaring. Learn how collect and cook maple syrup from trees in your yard. Blandford Nature Center. 2 pm4pm. Blandfordnaturecenter.org

For more event listings, visit womenslifestyle.com

Read six books and receive a Let It Snow prize mug! Read an additional four books to be entered into a drawing to win an iPad or a one-year Costco Membership.

kdl.readsquared.com

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

Winter Adult Reading Program JANUARY 2 – MARCH 31, 2019

47


EVENT SPOTLIGHT

The 37th Annual

O

Giants Awards and Banquet

n Saturday, Feb. 23, the 37th annual Giants Awards and Banquet will honor and celebrate 13 African American individuals or organizations for their exemplary service to the Grand Rapids community.

Founded by Dr. Patricia Pulliam and Cedric Ward in 1983, the Giants Awards are organized by The Bob and Aleicia Woodrick Center for Equity and Inclusion at Grand Rapids Community College. Each Giants Award category is named after a historical African American leader who incited change in Grand Rapids, such as Floyd Skinner, Ethel Coe and Milo Brown. Through their devotion and passion for equality, these pioneers brought employment rights, arts participation and business opportunities to people of color in Grand Rapids and laid the groundwork for future generations of advocates. The awards are given to those who currently exemplify these original initiatives through their participation in the community. This year’s recipients include Victoria Ann Upton (posthumously) (William Glenn Trailblazer Awards), India Manns (Raymond Tardy Community Service Award) and Lisa M. Knight (Ethel Coe Humanities Award).

BY WLM

The Giants Awards and Banquet celebration was previously held at the Ford Field House on GRCC’s campus, but due to steadily increasing attendance, it expanded to Devos Place in 2010 where it has been held ever since. All proceeds from the event are given to the GRCC Foundation’s Milo M. Brown Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded annually to two African American students attending GRCC as full-time returning sophomores.

Founder of Women’s LifeStyle Magazine Victoria Ann Upton is the winner of the William Glenn Trailblazer Award (posthumously) at this year’s Giant’s Awards and Banquet.

Always a highlight of the ceremony is the much-anticipated reveal of the Giant Among Giants Award. This honor is bestowed upon a previous Giants Award recipient who continues to demonstrate extraordinary dedication to advancing the mission of equality throughout our city. Previous awardees include superintendent of Grand Rapids Public Schools Teresa Weatherall Neal and internationally renowned local artist Paul Collins. Civil Rights icon and the first African American woman president of the National YWCA, Helen Claytor, was the first recipient of the award at the inaugural celebration in 1983.

2019 Giants Award Honorees Floyd Skinner Justice Award Not awarded this year.

Phyllis Scott Activist Award Cole Williams

Walter Coe Public Service Award Mari Beth Johnson-Jelks

William Glenn Trailblazer Award Victoria Ann Upton (Posthumously)

Eugene Browning Medical Service Award Jason Slaikeu MD, MBA

Raymond Tardy Community Service Award India Manns

W.W. Plummer Humanitarian Award LaSandra A. Gaddy

H.C. Toliver Religious Life Award Bishop Dennis J. McMurray & Dr. E. Jean Lackey-McMurray

Ethel Coe Humanities Award Lisa M. Knight Milo Brown Business Award Troy Yarbrough of Preferred Construction Group 48

Hattie Beverly Education Award Not awarded this year. Martha Reynolds Labor Award Carrie L. Jackson

What: The 37th Annual Giants Awards & Banquet Where: DeVos Place, 303 Monroe Ave NW When: February 23 at 6 p.m. Cost: $100 Individual Ticket Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Celebrating

CELEBRATE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE & HERITAGE

Black History Month 2019 Events in Grand Rapids

WE ARE NOT INVISIBLE Dr. Rik Stevenson, Professor of African American Studies, Grand Valley State University Friday, February 1, 12:00 - 1:30 pm 2204, Pere Marquette, Kirkhof Center

A presentation on the significance and importance of Black History Month and it’s transition from Negro History Week. This presentation will include an exhibit of the experiences of several Black students through their own artistic lens; followed by a Taste of Soul which includes a presentation on the scraps that African-American people were given to feed themselves. BLACK FAMILY HISTORY SERIES Joyce Daniels February 9, 10:00 am - 3:30 pm Grand Rapids Public Library

TASTE OF SOUL

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 17, 2019 1:00 – 4:30 PM

TASTE OF SOUL SUNDAY Thursday, February 17, 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm Grand Rapids Public Library Join us as we celebrate African American history and culture at Taste of Soul Sunday. Sample African American art, music, literature, history, and food. Performances by Tom Cutts, Yolanda Lavender, Asamu Johnson and the Associates of Blues, and The Gospel Believers. Presentations by author Stephen Mack Jones, storyteller Shani Womack, the Ebony Road Players, and New Hope Baptist Live African American Museum. Free food samples provided by: TaDow BBQ, The Candied Yam, Irie Kitchen, and Flavorful Pound Cakes. Free and open to the public. Visit www.grpl.org/tasteofsoul for more information.

LISTEN

Tom Cutts Yolonda Lavender Asamu Johnson and the Associates of the Blues The Gospel Believers

LEARN

Author Visit: Stephen Mack Jones Scenes from “The Meeting” by Ebony Road Players New Hope Baptist Church Live African American Museum

MORE BLACK HISTORY EVENTS ONLINE AT:

womenslifestyle.com/black-history-month-2019 TALK BACK TUESDAY Collaboration with The Center for Women and Gender Equity Tuesday, February 12, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm 1201, Center for Women and Gender Equity, Kirkhof Center

GET YO MIND RIGHT Latrece McDaniel, Coordinator of Multicultural & Diversity Initiatives at Grand Valley State University Tuesday, February 19, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm 2263 Kirkhof Center

A conversation on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault in the Black Community.

A discussion on the mental wellbeing of students of color with strategies to identify when you should seek help.

POSITIVE BLACK WOMAN LUNCHEON Thursday, February 14, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Grand River Room, Kirkhof Center An annual event hosted by GVSU Positive Black Women to give honor and recognition to those that have made a way and shaped “our” history. PBW presents: Loving Our History. This event will highlight black women who have made notable contributions, but have had their work intentionally overlooked or left out. Women that have carried the load and worked tirelessly with no honorable mentions. The tribute will include various forms of art for inspiration and provide space for examination of this pernicious phenomenon of erasing and editing “our” stories. All are welcomed to attend. Lunch will be provided.

CONVERSATIONS OF COLOR Wednesday, February 20, 12:00 - 1:00 pm Office of Multicultural Affairs, 1240 Kirkhof Center

EAT

Save Our African American Treasures Crafts for Kids African American Pottery Workshop Sankofa: Black History Through Storytelling Let’s Move Dance Party The Candied Yam Flavorful Pound Cakes & Treats Irie Kitchen TaDow! BBQ

A discussion involving the treatment of African-American women within health care and how they are constantly ignored and fatally suffering as a result. Conversations of Color are conversations initiated and facilitated by students. Topics and issues will vary every session. This small and open venue offers students the opportunity to share, talk, discuss, and learn from each other, as well as initiate programming on areas and topics of issue or concern. BLACK GIRLS ROCK! Tuesday, February 26, 6:00 - 8:00 pm 2204, Pere Marquette, Kirkhof Center An award ceremony that honors some of Grand Valley’s influential Black women professionals.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

PRESERVE CREATE

FREE FAMILY EVENT!

What parent or grandparent hasn’t had a child ask where they came from? While these family history questions are universal, answers can sometimes be challenging to find. This is especially true for African Americans interested in their family history. Join us for a series of workshops that will help people of African American ancestry learn and document your family’s genealogical history. Hosted by local genealogist Joyce Daniels. Registration is not required, however a free lunch will be provided if you RSVP to rsvp@grpl.org. Co-sponsored by the Western Michigan Genealogical Society.

RIOT, RACE AND RECONCILIATION George Bayard Monday, February 14, 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Grand Rapids Public Library George Bayard will discuss the origins and results of the uprising of black during the summer of 1967. His documentary, Riot, Race and Reconciliation will serve as a backdrop for the talk. In the documentary, local residents and historians share their recollections of that tumultuous time. Artifacts from the African American Museum and Archives will add further context to the talk. This program is co-sponsored by the Grand Rapids Historical Society.

February 2019

616.988.5400 WWW.GRPL.ORG/TASTEOFSOUL MAIN LIBRARY 111 LIBRARY STREET NE 49503 Donate: 616.988.5399 or www.grplfoundation.org.

49


A Human Guide to

Canine Etiquette

BY SNICKERS, CHIEF MISCHIEF OFFICER OF MIND YOUR MANNERS DOG TRAINING TRANSLATED BY ELIZABETH MCEWEN, CANINE LANGUAGE EXPERT

I

have a bone to pick. Some of my canine friends from Europe recently visited the United States, and apparently our humans are known as being socially insensitive toward canines. I think we can do better, and that a little education goes a long way, so I have enlisted the help of my favorite humans to help me get the message out to you, the dog-loving public.

LETʼS TALK TURKEY

Humans talk. A LOT. Verbal communication seems to be your primary means of interaction. However, please understand that Human is a second language for us. Most canines communicate primarily with body language and resort to audible noise far less frequently than humans. This results in frequent misunderstandings between humans and dogs. Of the human average 16,000 words per day, it is challenging for most canines to differentiate WHICH of those words are relevant to us, and even more so, which words require a response! The more socially appropriate way to communicate with your canine friends is using a “less is more” approach. The fewer words, the better. Gestures can help, but better yet, SHOW us what you want us to do. The more humans drone on, the more likely we are to tune you out. Human country music artist Toby Keith got it right when he sang, “... a little less talk, and a lot more action!”

DON'T JUST SAY NO

Speaking of words we hear a whole lot, “NO” is definitely on the top of that list. In fact, it happens so frequently that there is even a joke about it where one dog introduces himself to another dog by saying, “Hi! My name is No-No-Bad-Dog. What’s yours?” Obviously, it is important for us to know which of our normal doggy behaviors are considered inappropriate. However, most people aren’t very interested in telling us when we are on the right track. Throw us a bone (both figuratively and literally), and tell us when we are getting it right! After all, we are just dogs trying to make it in a human world.

50

GREETINGS!

BENDING OVER

“Reaching over a dog’s head can be construed as threatening, while hugging may be interpreted as restraint, and can make us exceedingly uncomfortable.

The more polite way is to meet us on our level. For most humans, that means bending your knees and squatting down rather than bending over at the waist. Which, if I understand my human correctly, is considered proper form for humans anyway. Combine this kneeling technique with the indirect approach and sniff, and you will have mastered the polite canine greeting!

Oh my, where to even begin? This is probably the biggest breach of canine etiquette in the entire realm of human/dog interaction! Dog greetings (when free to do so our own way), are very predictable. We are watching body language long before we approach each other.

We never approach head-on (unless we are picking a fight), preferring to circle each other while we sniff to get to know each other. Meanwhile, we continuously communicate our intentions through our body language. Human tendency to march straight up to us is highly confrontational. Sometimes humans show some wiggly body language that helps us to know your intentions are friendly, but often you are quite stoic. Humans rarely sniff us, or allow us to sniff before engaging physically with us, which catches many of my dog friends off-guard. The more best way to greet canines is an indirect approach. If you aren’t willing or able to circle and sniff, at least turn your body sideways, and allow us to sniff you before you reach for us. If the dog turns away from you, that is him politely telling you he doesn’t want to interact with you today. Please respect that. While some dogs have gotten used to humans’ unconventional greetings, many dogs will find this approach a breath of fresh air, and are much more likely to appreciate the greeting!

Yet another problematic behavior (and often combined as part of the average human greeting) is the tendency you have to loom over us by bending at the midsection. This is considered highly confrontational to most canines, and frequently results in us attempting to defer to, and/or appease you by urinating at your feet or having to jump up to reach you and lick under your chin. A dog who is having a bad day may instead decide to inform the offending human of how rude this behavior is by growling or even snapping at them.

NOT A HUGGER

Most dogs I know love our human families. We cuddle with them and accept physical attention from them most any time. However, it’s considered exceptionally rude by some to solicit or accept physical attention from unknown humans. Especially hugging and patting on the head. Reaching over a dog’s head can be construed as threatening, while hugging may be interpreted as restraint, and can make us exceedingly uncomfortable. Would you allow a complete stranger to wrap themselves around you?

THE BOTTOM LINE

As your dog’s caretaker, you have the ability to better communicate with other humans than we do, and we are relying on you to keep our best interest in mind. If a human is attempting to interact with us in a way that is considered rude, please inform them about how they can do it more appropriately. Better yet? Just gently let them know that we are “in training,” and not able to play with anyone at the moment. Then take us home and give us all the belly rubs and cookies we can handle.

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


VALENTINE’S SPECIAL

Monday: 16” Pepperoni- $8.50 Spaghetti- $6.45

Treat your office to pizza for lunch. WE DELIVER!

Salads, subs, entrées are also available for delivery. Call today - They’ll love you for it!

Tuesday: 16” Pepperoni- $8.50 Lasagna- $9.99 Wednesday: $1.00 off Whole Subs Thursday: Sampler Plate $8.99 Happy Hour All day Monday. Tues - Sat 3 - 5. $1.95 select drafts

3 cheeses • Almonds • Dried fruit • Crackers • Indulgence chocolate bar • Wine Gift Wrapped - $45.00

Or customize your own valentine gift basket! Call the store to order

315 Fuller Ave NE | Grand Rapids, MI (616) 242-9880 | www.thecheeselady.net /thecheeseladygrandrapids Tu-Fr: 10a-6p | Sa: 9a-4p | S: Closed | M: Closed

HOURS: M-TH 11AM to 10PM, FRI. 11AM to 11PM, SAT. 12PM to 11PM, SUN. CLOSED • www.FREDSPIZZA.com

3619 Plainfield Ave, NE • Grand Rapids, MI • (616) 361-8994

MARCH 7 – 17, 2019 10 days of free and ticketed events including stand-up, improv, film, showcases and a variety of seriously funny stuff!

JO KOY

LONI LOVE

ED ASNER

ALI WONG

Tickets can be purchased at laughfestgr.org or ticketmaster.com by searching LaughFest laughfestgr.org All proceeds benefit the free cancer, grief, and emotional health support programs offered through Gilda’s Club Grand Rapids

Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

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Please join us as we honor and celebrate African American individuals

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3 377th th Annual Annual Awards and Banquet 3 Annual 77th 3 th Annual Awards and 37th Annual Banquet

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Awards and Banquet Saturday, February 23, 2019 Saturday, February 23, 2019 6:00 P.M.

Saturday, February 23, 2019 DeVos Place, Steelcase 6:00 P.M. Ballroom Saturday, February 23, 2019 303 MonroeDeVos Avenue NW, Steelcase Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503 Place, Ballroom Saturday, February 23,Michigan 2019 attire 303 Monroe AvenueSemiformal NW, Grand Rapids, 6:00 P.M. 6:00 P.M. Saturday, February 23, 2019 49503

Semiformal attire DeVos Place, Steelcase Ballroom 6:00 P.M. DeVos Steelcase Ballroom Social Gathering 6:00Place, P.M. • 6:00 Dinner 6:30 P.M. • Program 7:15 P.M. P.M. 303 MonroeDeVos Avenue NW, Steelcase Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503 Place, Ballroom Gathering 6:00 P.M. • Dinner 6:30Rapids, P.M. • Program 7:15 P.M. DeVos Place, Steelcase Ballroom 303 Social Monroe Avenue NW, Michigan 49503 Semiformal 303 Monroe Avenue NW,Grand Grandattire Rapids, Michigan 49503 Proceeds will support the Milo M. Brown Scholarship and the Junior Giants Fund. 303 Monroe Avenue NW, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503 Semiformal attire Semiformal attire Proceeds will support the 6:00 MiloP.M. M.Semiformal Brown Scholarship the Junior Giants Fund. attire Social Gathering • Dinner 6:30 P.M. • and Program 7:15 P.M. Social Gathering 6:00 P.M. • Dinner 6:30 P.M. • Program 7:15 P.M. Social Gathering •Dinner Dinner 6:30 P.M.P.M. • and Program 7:15 P.M. Proceeds will support the 6:00 MiloP.M. M.• Brown Scholarship Junior Giants Fund. Social Gathering 6:00 P.M. 6:30 •theProgram 7:15 P.M.

Proceeds

For nominations, sponsor information, reservations, and/or additional details, Proceeds will support the Milo M. Brownreservations, Scholarship and theadditional Junior Giants Fund. please visit: grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390. For nominations, sponsor information, and/or details, Proceeds will support the Milo M. Brown Scholarship and the Junior Giants Fund. please visit:M. grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390. will support the Milo Brown Scholarship and the Junior Giants For nominations, sponsor information, reservations, and/or additional details, For nominations, sponsor information, reservations, and/or additional details, please visit: grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390. For nominations, sponsor information, reservations, and/or additional details, please visit: grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390. please visit: grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390.

Impact. When you become a Laker, you look outward, focusing on others instead of yourself. With professors’ caring guidance, you learn how to make a meaningful, lasting difference. Then, as you enter the world, you’re good to go forward, tackle challenges, and make meaningful contributions. Like West Michigan itself, your positive impact will be far reaching. That’s the Laker Effect. And we can’t Fund. wait for you to become part of it.

For nominations, sponsor information, reservations, and/or additional details, All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390. please visit: grcc.edu/giants or call (616) 234-3390. All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390.

gvsu.edu

104994 10/18 104994 10/18

2019 Giants Award HONOREES

All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390. 104994 10/18

All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390. 104994 10/18 contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390. All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please

Floyd Skinner Justice Award Not awarded this year. 104994 10/18

Walter Coe Public Service Award Mari Beth Johnson-Jelks

All are welcome. Those in need of special accommodations please contact the Diversity Learning Center at (616) 234-3390.

Eugene Browning Medical Service Award Jason D. Slaikeu, MD 104994 10/18

W.W. Plummer Humanitarian Award LaSandra A. Gaddy Ethel Coe Humanities Award Lisa M. Knight Milo Brown Business Award Troy Yarbrough Phyllis Scott Activist Award Cole Williams William Glenn Trailblazer Award Victoria Ann Upton (Posthumously) Raymond Tardy Community Service Award India Manns H.C. Toliver Religious Life Award Bishop Dennis J. McMurray & Dr. E. Jean Lackey-McMurray Hattie Beverly Education Award Not awarded this year. Martha Reynolds Labor Award Carrie L. Jackson

©2018 NCL Corporation Ltd. Ships’ registry: Bahamas and USA. *Restrictions apply.

DOLPHIN VACATIONS Zeeland: 616-772-9660 Grand Rapids: 616-954-2977 www.DolphinVacations.net

Giant Among Giants to be announced.

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019

53


14TH ANNUAL

CoCKTAILS, CuISINE AND Support FOr parkinson's disease research Please join us for an evening of culinary delights, delectable wine and cocktails, and a chance to bid on amazing silent auction packages, all for an incredible cause —

THurSDAY, FEBruArY 21, 2019 6-10 PM | CASCADE HILLS COUNTRY CLUB

Proceeds benefit Parkinson’s disease research at

supporting Van Andel Institute’s lifechanging Parkinson’s disease research.

RSVP TODAY • Online: vai.org • Call: Sarah Rollman at 616.234.5712 • Tickets: $150 per person

($75 per ticket is tax deductible) Smart casual attire recommended

F EBRUARY 21 - MARC H 2 Women & the Environment Symposium is now the Women, Environment & Community Series that focuses on empowering people to protect their environment and learn about how women’s issues and the environment intersect. FILM | ADVOCACY | AWARDS | NETWORKING | KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

KENOTE SPEAKER S TAT E S E N AT O R S T E P H A N I E C H A N G

Stephanie is serving her second term representing Michigan House District 6, where she is Minority Vice-Chair of the House Committee on Law and Justice and serves on the House Committees on Education Reform and Natural Resources.

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Women’s LifeStyle Magazine

February 2019


Welcome home, Women’s LifeStyle Magazine.

Innovation thrives where community and collaboration collide. Learn more about the Blue35 community at blue35gr.com


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FOOD, BEVERAGES & RESTAURANTS

n Aperitivo n Beltline Bar n Bistro Bella Vita n Brewery Vivant n Byron Center Meats n Daddy Pete’s BBQ, LLC n Erb Thai n Essence Group n Ferris Coffee & Nut n Field & Fire n Grand Central Market n Grand Rapids Brewing Company n Grand Rapids Cheesecake Company n Grove n HopCat n Malamiah Juice Bar n Matchbox n Nutcase Vegan Meats n One Trick Pony n Ottawa Beach Inn n Railside Golf Club n Reserve Wine & Food n Rockwell / Republic n 6eight Coffee n Stella’s Lounge n The B.O.B. n The Cheese Lady n The Cottage Bar n Terra GR n Twisted Rooster n The Green Well n The Waldron Public House n Wheelhouse

FLORAL & GARDEN n Ball Park Floral & Gifts n Eastern Floral n Flowerland n Romence Gardens

SHOPPING & RETAIL

n Art of the Table n Better Way Designs n Bill & Paul’s Sporthaus n Family Sewing n Frames Unlimited n Gazelle Sports n Iris Boutique n Rylee’s Ace Hardware n Spirit Dreams n Shakedown Street n Stonesthrow n Supermercado Mexico n Switchback Gear Exchange n The Shade Shop n Two Dutch Hens

PET PRODUCTS & SERVICES n Chow Hound Pet Supplies n Fido & Stitch

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n 616 Lofts n A-1 Locksmith n EPS Security n Gerrit’s Appliance n Gordon Water n HBA of Greater Grand Rapids n Morris Builders n Rockford Construction n Standale Interiors n Tazzia Lawn Care n Verhey Carpets n William’s Kitchen + Bath

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TRAVEL & LODGING n Breton Travel n City Flats Hotel n Countryside Tours n Witte Travel

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

n Grand Rapids Community Media Center (GRCMC) n Grand Rapids Public Library n Grand Rapids Public Schools n Grand Rapids Opportunities for Women (GROW) n Neighbors Development n Slow Food West Michigan n The Rapid n The Rapidian n West Michigan Environmental Action Council (WMEAC)

HEALTH, BEAUTY & WELLNESS

n Design 1 Salon Spa n Grand Rapids Center for Mindfulness n Grand Rapids Natural Health n Grand Rapids Wellness n Grand Ridge Orthodontics n Harvest Health Foods n Manic Muse Salon n Renew Mama Studio n The Hairport n The Village Doula GR

FINANCIAL & LEGAL n Adventure Credit Union n United Bank

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT n ArtPrize n Celebration Cinema n Community Circle Theatre n Grand Rapids Art Museum n Grand Rapids Civic Theatre n Grand Rapids Public Museum n GRandJazzFest n GRTV n LaFontsee Galleries n LowellArts n River City Improv n Sanctuary Folk Arts n Showspan n The Ruse Escape Room n Triumph Music Academy n UICA n Wax Poetic n Wealthy Theatre n West Michigan Whitecaps n WYCE 88.1 FM

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Women's LifeStyle Magazine, February 2019, Matters of the Heart  

Women's LifeStyle Magazine, February 2019, Matters of the Heart