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High School Graduates of Colusa County located inside....

May 20, 2011

b Volume 4 • Issue 10 a

next edition • june 3, 2011

b FREE publication a

field of dreams host annual kids fishing day

Field of Dreams Kids Fishing Day Participants 2011. (Submitted Photo)

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ield of Dreams, Inc. is a group of local outdoor enthusiast that are dedicated to providing an outdoor experience to special needs children and wounded U.S. military veterans that otherwise might not get the opportunity. It started with an idea from two caring men and now seven years later has grown into a non-profit corporation that holds several events each year at no cost to those they host. The first event provided a fishing trip to a single youth and now the annual Kids Fishing Day host numerous special needs children and their families. The children participating have serious illnesses or physical disabilities or are the children of an American soldier killed in combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. This year the event kicked off on May 13th with dinner at the Granzella’s Banquet

Facility in Williams that allowed the participating families to meet their host as well as each other and a number of special guest donating their time for the very worthy cause. This years special guest included Stephanie Brown-Traxton the woman’s discus gold medal winner in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing China, Jamie Susslin, the host of the Verses Chanel’s “The Ultimate Sportsman” and Wes Simms, a UFC mixed martial arts fighter. Highlights of the evening included special recognition to The Colusa County Fish and Game Commission and the California Deer Association for their ongoing support to make the event possible. A special moment in the evening came when the Field of Dreams group recognized the efforts of thirteen year old Derik Jellison. The

young man who was one of the first to participate in the Field of Dreams event several years ago, sold oranges and candles at a roadside stand to raise money to donate to the group so that other children could attend in the future. His donation three years ago started an endowment in his name which today allowed the group to host an additional child and their family. The next day started with a breakfast at the Wilderness Unlimited Headquarters near Williams with the cooking being done by members of the California Outdoor Heritage Alliance, Colusa County Community Foundation, Maxwell American Legion and others. A drive to the western hills took them to the Stonyford Ranch where they were hosted by the Marks family for the third straight year. Continued on Page 3 The day included bass fishing, boating, ranch activities and

colusa musicians thriving

Sax Quartet solo sign - Left to right, Thomas Critchfield, tenor sax, Sidney Wills, alto sax, Efren Fuentes, bari sax, Lupita Ramos, alto sax. (Submitted Photo)

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leven young musicians from the Colusa Unified School District once again proved their worth at the California State Solo and Ensemble Music Festival on May 13th and 14th, at Sacramento State University. Colusa HS sophomore Alexia Vargas and senior Emanuel Ramirez

on Trumpet, sophomore Lupita Ramos on Alto Sax, Egling Middle school 8th grader Cai Dunham on Trombone, and CHS junior Josh Rector on Tuba combined forces as the Colusa Brass Quintet to earn a silver medal, as did the Colusa Saxophone Quartet with Ramos and

sophomore Sidney Wills on Alto Sax, eighth grader Thomas Critchfield on Tenor Sax, and sophomore Efren Fuentes on Baritone Saxophone. Ramos and Critchfield then traded in their instruments to team up as an oboe duet, winning the gold medal. In the solo competition, Wills earned a silver medal on alto sax as did sophomore flautist Nancy Lopez, Alexia Vargas on trumpet, and Egling 6th grader Raphael Delgado on snare drum. CHS junior Crystal Garcia, soprano, sang her way to the gold medal, along with Efren Fuentes on Bari Sax and Thomas Critchfield on Tenor Sax. Lupita Ramos earned top honors for the State with a Gold Medal and Command Performance on her oboe, which, coincidently, occurred on the same day as the Virginia Yerxa Community Read. The oboe Ramos earned her awards was purchased through donations made in memory

of Virginia a year ago. After a third consecutive day of performances, Ramos was home less than half an hour when she had to turn around and present her debut performance as the oboist of the Yuba Sutter Symphony. After an extremely busy spring, and after seven days of performances in the past two weeks, the musicians are getting the chance to slow down somewhat, with only a few presentations in the final three weeks of school. The rest will be short-lived, however, as most of the medal winners will be rehearsing with the Colusa Jazz band through the summer in preparation for their concert in the park on August 25th. Many students have already begun getting ready for their next round of competitions in the fall for honor groups and solo festivals, and a few may have ambitions of performing at Carnegie Hall in early 2012.


Williams pioneer review • Call US: (530) 473-2525

May 20, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Page 2

www.williamspioneerreview.com

Williams fun run to be a blast! Williams is scheduled to host its annual Fun Run and Walk on Saturday, May 21, 2011. Putting their race headgear in preparation, Kathy Manor and Cindy Gobel sport golden hats that feature the Williams Arch. This year the proceedes of the Fun Run will benefit the Sacramento Valley Museum. The

run/walk begins at 8:00 a.m. at the Williams Unified School District Office and there are two different distances through the city streets of Williams: a 1 mile and a 5 K. Come out an enjoy the FUN!

YCCD Announces 3 Finalists in YCCD NAMES NEW Chancellor Search Process, Public CHANCELOR Forums to be Held May 9th and 10th!

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he Yuba Community College District (YCCD) Board of Trustees has announced the selection of Dr. Douglas B. Houston as YCCD’s next Chancellor. Dr. Houston currently serves as the Superintendent/President of Lassen Community College District and once approved will assume the post of YCCD Chancellor effective July 1, 2011, replacing Dr. Nicki Harrington who announced her intent to retire in January at the end of this academic year. The Board of Trustees is expected to formally appoint Dr. Houston at a special meeting set for Wednesday, May 18th at 5:30 P.M. in the District Board Room. Dr. Houston’s appointment marks the culmination of an extensive national search process that began in February. The comprehensive search was initiated by the YCCD Governing Board, with the assistance of consulting services by the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT). The process started with campus forums February 22-23, 2011 to garner input from the public and the campus community on the development of a Chancellor Profile. Applications and nominations for the position of YCCD Chancellor were accepted through mid-April. A strong applicant pool was attained and the search committee selected candidates for interview, ultimately narrowing to three finalists being forwarded to the Board for consideration in final interviews. On May 9-10 public forums were held for each final candidate at Woodland Community College, Yuba College, and for the Clear Lake Campus to allow the public, students and staff an opportunity to observe the three candidates, hear each one’s views as the prospective next Chancellor, pose questions, and provide feedback. YCCD Board Chairman Xavier Tafoya stated, “The hard work of the search committee, chaired by YCCD Board Vice-Chair Brent Hastey, is to be commended. The committee worked tirelessly over several months and forwarded to the Board three exceptionally well-qualified final candidates for the Board’s consideration. Following the open public forums and final interviews by the Board of Trustees, Dr. Houston was selected as the next Chancellor for our District.” Dr. Houston received a doctorate in Educational Leadership from Pepperdine University. He earned his Masters and Bachelors of Science Degrees in Physics, both from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Prior to his role as CEO for the Lassen Community College District, Dr. Houston served in various administrative positions at Butte College. in Oroville, California and at Barstow College in Southern California. The Yuba Community College District spans eight counties and nearly 4,200 square miles of territory in rural, north-central California. It has colleges in Marysville and Woodland, an educational center in Clearlake, outreach operations at Beale Air Force Base and in Williams, and will be adding an outreach facility in Sutter County as part of the Measure J facilities bond. For more information about YCCD please visit our website at www.yccd.edu.

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CCD Announces 3 Finalists in Chancellor Search Process, Public Forums to be Held May 9th and 10th Marysville, CA – After an extensive national search, the Yuba Community College District Board of Trustees is pleased to announce that there are three Chancellor finalists. Each Chancellor finalist will participate in a public forum at each college. We invite and encourage everyone to attend the open public forums. The public forum sessions are open to administration, faculty, staff, students and the general public. There will be a brief introduction of each candidate followed by a question and answer session. Comment forms will be given to all who attend and the completed comment forms will be collected and given to the Yuba Community College District Board of Trustees for review. The Public Forums Schedule: Monday, May 9, 2011 – Dr. Ron Erickson 9:00am to 9:50am, CLC Forum via Tandberg, Room 800 11:15am to 12:05pm, YC Forum, YC Theater 3:00pm to 3:50pm, WCC Forum, Room 852 Monday, May 9, 2011 – Dr. Douglas Houston 10:00am to 10:50am, CLC Forum via Tandberg, Room 800B. 11:00am to 11:50pm, WCC Forum, Room 852 4:00pm to 4:50pm, YC Forum, YC Theater Tuesday, May 10, 2011 – Dr. Jim Riggs 10:00am to 10:50am, CLC Forum via Tandberg, Room 800B 1:30pm to 2:20pm, WCC Forum, Room 852 4:00pm to 4:50pm, YC Forum, Room 201 The Yuba Community College District chancellor finalists are (in alphabetical order):

Dr. Ron Erickson serves as President of Hocking College, OH. Previously, Dr. Erickson served as Vice President of Academic Affairs and Institutional Planning at Dakota County Technical College, MN. Dr. Douglas Houston serves as Superintendent/President at the Lassen Community College District, CA. Previously, Dr. Houston served as Vice President for Human and Information Services at the Butte-Glenn Community College District, CA. Dr. Jim Riggs serves as Professor Community College Education/Interim Doctoral Program Director at CSU Stanislaus, CA. Previously, Dr. Riggs served as President of Columbia College, CA. For more information on the finalists, please visit the Chancellor Search site at; http://www.yccd.edu/chancellorsearch/index.html For further information on the public forums please contact Cathy Richter, Executive Secretary to the Chancellor (530) 741-6971, crichter@yccd.edu. Should you have any search related questions or suggestions, please feel free to reach out to our Search Consultants: Dr. Narcisa Polonio, ACCT, Vice President of Board Leadership Services npolonio@acct.org or (202) 775-4670 (office) or (202) 276-1983 (mobile); or Julie Golder Alion, J.D., ACCT, Board Leadership Services Specialist jgolder@acct.org or (202) 775-4466 (office) The Yuba Community College District spans eight counties and nearly 4,200 square miles of territory in rural, north-central California. It has colleges in Marysville and Woodland, an educational center in Clearlake, outreach operations at Beale Air Force Base and in Williams, and will be adding an outreach facility in Sutter County as part of the Measure J facilities bond. For more information about YCCD please visit our website at www.yccd.edu.

YCCD MOVES FORWARD WITH ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS

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t its regularly scheduled meeting last week, the Yuba Community College District (YCCD) Board of Trustees adopted a resolution authorizing financing for the Central Plant Energy Efficiency Project. The total cost of the project is approximately $6.3 million, $6.2 million of which is for project expenditures and the remainder coming in financing costs. In order to obtain the best available financing, YCCD filed applications with the California Debt Limit Allocation Committee (CDLAC) and the California Energy Conservation Commission (CEC). Both agencies offer financing at well below market terms. Currently, the terms include 15 year payment schedules and interest rates of approximately 3%. The interest rates are subsidized by the federal government, which equates to an interest rate savings of at least 1.5% over conventional tax-exempt rates. On March 26, 2011, CDLAC notified the District that it was allocating the full $6.3 million in Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to YCCD. As a result, the District will be able to fund the creation of the Central Plant at Yuba College with a single QECB.

The Central Plant will bring tremendous energy savings to the Marysville Campus, making Yuba College more energy efficient as it will no longer rely on individual boilers and coolers to heat and cool its buildings. In addition to the Central Plant Energy Efficiency Project, YCCD has also accepted SunPower’s proposal to design, build and maintain Solar Photovoltaic Arrays/Panels at Yuba College, Woodland Community College, the Colusa County Outreach Facility in Williams, CA and the future Sutter County Campus for a Guaranteed Maximum Price not to exceed $17,996,628. In turn, YCCD will receive “turn-key” long term generation of 3.08 megawatts of electricity. “The Central Plant and Solar Panels Projects at YCCD will complement and further enhance the $190 million Measure J Bond Construction Program passed by voters in 2006,” said Dr. Nicki Harrington, Chancellor, YCCD. “More importantly, these projects will lead to long-term energy efficiencies that will move a large

Williams Pioneer Review PUBLICATION 570 6th Street • PO Box 1124 Williams, CA 95987

www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com

530.473.2525 FAX: (530) 473-2524

Editor in Chief: Lloyd Green Jr. Contributors: Pat Ash • Kim Giffin • Kathy Craigo Denise Denton-Rinzler

Submissions, Editorials, Press Releases, Community Breifs, and Advertising Requests EMAILED TO: publisher@williamspioneerreview.com OR FAXED TO: (530) 473-2524

portion of the District off the grid.” “Moving forward with a central plant and solar panels sends a strong and clear message to our communities that we are committed to green technology and energy efficiency as stated in our Sustainability Board Policy 6610,” said YCCD Board of Trustees Vice Chair, Brent Hastey. “I would like to thank all of our staff for making this possible and for freeing up precious operational dollars in the future for educational services to students and our communities.” The Yuba Community College District spans eight counties and nearly 4,200 square miles of territory in rural, north-central California. It has colleges in Marysville and Woodland, an educational center in Clearlake, outreach operations at Beale Air Force Base and in Williams, and will be adding an outreach facility in Sutter County as part of the Measure J facilities bond. For more information about YCCD please visit our website at www. yccd.edu.

We reserve the right to accept or refuse submissions and edit for content and length. We also reserve the right to refuse advertising that in our opinion does not reflect the standards of the newspaper. The opinions expressed, whether by paid advertisement or editorial content does not necessarily reflect the views of this newspaper. Content submitted may be reprinted and acknowledged without consent unless specifically requested. We are not responsible for any errors, omissions or representations contained in the articles, letters, etc. within these pages.

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Williams pioneer review • Call US: (530) 473-2525

May 20, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Page 3

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WILLIAMS THIRD GRADERS TAKE TO THE OREGON TRAIL

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un Bonnets and Cowboy Hats are back in fashion at Williams Elementary School as third graders prepare for their 2,000-mile trek from Independence, Missouri to California. With a “virtual” wagon train scheduled to depart on Wednesday, students have been gathering supplies and loading their wagons. Students and teachers take on new identities, have pioneer “families”, attend a one-room schoolhouse, and dress in period costumes during the month of May. Scheduled special events include visits from mountain men, trappers, old west doctors, and Indian traders, pioneer craft days, Dutch Oven cooking, and a field trip to Ide Adobe State Park. Last week, students visited the Sacramento Valley Museum where special attention was given to the “General Store” where many of the supplies for the journey are on display. The unit will conclude with a Pioneer Graduation on May 26th.

DMV now offers veterans plate online! Customers can now easily show their support for California Veterans

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he California Veteran special interest license plates can now be easily ordered through the DMV’s online services with a click of a mouse. Proceeds of these popular specialty plates go to the Veterans Service Office Fund and are used to expand important veteran services statewide. “We are pleased to now offer the sale of Veterans plates online to our customers,” said George Valverde, Director of the California Department of Motor Vehicles. “These plates reflect the rich and storied history of the contributions of California Veterans.” The plates are available in sequential (original $30/renewal $30) as well as personalized (original $40/ renewal $30). “Veterans plates make it easy for Californians to show their support and pride in the men and women of our military, National Guard, Reserve Services and our veterans,” said Peter James Gravett, Secretary of the California Department of Veterans Affairs. Since the inception of the Veterans plate program in 1995, approximately 24,500 Veteran plates have been issued resulting in $6.8 million raised and distributed by the California Department of Veterans Affairs to benefit participating county veteran service offices and to commemorate veteran organizations.

Photo captions: TOP: The Vallejo Family children, (Jasmine Arreola, Dariana Magallanes, Christopher Ruiz and Israel Perez) are skeptical about leaving their home and friends to embark on a 2,000-mile journey along the Oregon Trail. LEFT: Citlali Martinez and her mother have a look around the Blacksmith Shop at the Sacramento Valley Museum. The Williams Elementary Third Graders toured the museum last week where many of the items they have been learning about are on display.

field of dreams host annual kids fishing day a barbeque. A customized Jeep was displayed my members of the California Deer Association. The four-wheel drive vehicle is equipped with special equipment including a wheelchair lift to allow special needs children and wounded veterans to participate in hunting.T he Stonyford Ranch was recognized for its continued support with Steve Marks Sr. accepting the award on behalf of his family. In doing so Marks invited Field of Dreams to return for a forth year. The day ended with more outdoor activities. Field of Dreams group was aided by personnel from Kittle’s Outdoors, the Colusa County Rugby Club and the Maxwell FFA as well as other volunteers during the day. The following morning a sendoff breakfast was held at Granzella’s in Williams and all agreed it was a weekend to remember.

sponsors welcomed at fair It isn’t too late to be a Colusa County Fair sponsor. The 72nd annual Colusa County Fair is June 9-12. Fair CEO Carolan Meek said this week that the Fair relies heavily on sponsorships and volunteers to continue bringing the best possible fair to the county. “We have longstanding and dedicated groups, clubs, businesses and individuals who return year after year to support our fair as sponsors and volunteers,” said Meek. “We could not continue without this support,” she added. New to the fair this year is the Premier Mushroom L.P. Demonstration Stage in Festival Hall. Ongoing demonstrations of food preparation will be showcased here, and Meek is still filling time slots of interested exhibitors for the stage. Other opportunities to sponsor fair events are also still available. Gold Level sponsors who donate $5,000 or more in cash or product receive signage at the sponsored event, in the schedule of events, newspaper coverage, Sponsors’ Dinner invitation, 20 Fair Time Reception Dinner tickets, 20 season fair credentials, inclusion on the fair’s webpage, inclusion in pre-fair insert, and venue to carry sponsor’s name. Silver Level sponsors donating $1,000-$4,999 in cash or product are recognized with signage at the sponsored event, in the schedule of events, newspaper coverage, Sponsors’ Dinner invitation, 10 Fair Time Reception Dinner tickets, 10 season fair credentials, inclusion on the fair’s web page, and inclusion in pre-fair insert. Bronze Level sponsors donating $500-$999 in cash or product receive recognition including receive signage at the sponsored event, in the schedule of events, newspaper coverage, Sponsors’ Dinner invitation, 6 Fair Time Reception Dinner tickets,

6 season fair credentials, inclusion on the fair’s web page, and inclusion in pre-fair insert. Blue Level sponsors donating $150-$499 in cash or product receive recognition including signage at the sponsored event, in the schedule of events, newspaper coverage, Sponsors’ Dinner invitation, 2 Fair Time Reception Dinner tickets, 2 season fair credentials, inclusion on the fair’s web page, and inclusion in pre-fair insert. White Level sponsors donating $50-$149 in cash or product receive recognition including signage at the sponsored event, in the schedule of events, newspaper coverage, Sponsors’ Dinner invitation, 1 Fair Time Reception Dinner ticket, 1 season fair credentials, inclusion on the fair’s web page, and inclusion in pre-fair insert. Also available for sponsorship at the 2011 Colusa County Fair are; $25 photography award, $500 window decorating contest, $500 lobby decorating contest, $300 Karaoke contest, $300 Ag Mechanics Best of Show, $500 Swine Carcass Contest, $300 Guitar Hero contest, $500 pony ride, $1,000 Information Booth, $500 sheep carcass contest, $250 or $500 one or two side barricade signage, $1500 Dutch oven cook off, $5,000 Butterfly Adventure, or $1500 Walking Puppet Stage. Meek commented that there are also special events contests for which any amount of sponsorship is appreciated. Some of these events are; bean spitting, bubble gum chewing, tortilla toss, diaper derby, and sandbox treasure hunt. “Every donation, no matter how large or how small is important to the fair,” said Meek. “We truly appreciate every effort made by each donor,” she added. To secure your sponsor ship event at this year’s fair call the Colusa County Fair Office at (530) 458-2641.


Williams pioneer review • Call US: (530) 473-2525

May 20, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Page 4

www.williamspioneerreview.com

a OPINION & LETTERS b trading in

By lloyd green, publisher

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t’s that time of year. Text books are being turned back in and the lockers start to resemble the empty cages they once were. Finals are being completed and lines are formed for picking up cap and gowns. This is it, the final weeks of school. Hearts are pumping; today’s youth is jumping at that moment when they are finally declared adults. Those special words “by the power vested in me by the State of California” that can only be replaced with a future is to become. Yearbooks are being signed with “keep in touch”; phrases of “freedom to become” fill the hallways and are the core to senior-ittus. Today a realization came over me as my brother sat on the floor here at the office and put on his Graduation cap. How really short life is. We see the days to come, but we forget the minutes, the seconds that pass us. I did not believe when my parents and grandparents would joke about time going faster as you got older. Oh how true. It seems like yesterday he was just a little kid; holding us hostage in the house because he gained control of the water hose and wouldn’t let anyone near him. Or the little kid in cowboy boots singing “shine on” with a three string guitar. I remember when I was graduating high school I said to myself, “When my brother graduates I will be 25 years old….” Boy did it seem like a long time away and how quickly it really

came. In just a few weeks he will officially become an adult. No more school. It sometimes is hard to wrap my mind around that. He too, soon will be starting his own life. Just as each and every one of you will. Here is my message to the Class of 2011. You are about to trade in your youth to become adults. As embarrassing and humiliating as it may be for your parents to be pressuring you to try on your cap and gown, and everyone having to take photos of you wearing the silly outfit, treasure every single last moment of it. You are beginning a new life one of the unknowns. This new life does not come with a schedule, or syllabus, or even a text book. Its one you will have to figure out on your own. It won’t always be glorious, and you will have some of the best moments in your life. With this, take each day for what it is. Wake up each morning and make a purpose for that day. As difficult as times may get, find a way to smile. When life is good savor it. When life gets you down, don’t sulk. Figure out what you did wrong and get back on your feet. “Don’t cry over spilt milk!” as Ms. Little used to say. You will make some of the most important decisions in your life. Do so with an educated mind and follow your gut. Never look back with regrets and always forgive, but never forget. Treat others with the same kindness and respect as you would like to be treated, and when you feel you’re being treated

unfairly let it be known. Volunteer and help out your community. Don’t just sit back and complain, do something about it. It has been seven years since I took that stride of “Pomp and Circumstance” and that is when I have learned that I traded in. In this new life, I didn’t know where I was going. There was no road map. I had no idea that I would be the owner of a print shop; it started out as website design and computer repair. I really had no idea that I would also become a publisher and owner of a newspaper; let alone a newspaper that has grown to become the leading news publication in Colusa County and has more to come. Set yourself goals and when you start something finish it! If you fail, it does not define that you have reached your finish line, it means that you should take your lesson learned and get back up on your feet and continue or start over, but don’t ever stop. Not a day goes by do I ever regret a decision I made in my life. “it is what it is” as they say. I remind myself of my lessons and I count my blessings. Class of 2011. I wish you all the best of luck in the future, may your dreams come true through hard work and dedication. Lloyd Green Jr. is the Owner and publisher of the Williams Pioneer Review and can be contacted at lloyd@ lloydsprintandcopy.com.

have a question for your city council? or community leaders? email them to publisher@williamspioneerreview.com or fax them to 530.473.2525 and we will help get your questions answered.

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letter to the editor kudos Colusa county!!!

here have been many wonderful accomplishments & events lately around here… It’s a partial list, there are many more to note… Nice flower bed & sign greeting at RR track in Williams thanks to the Citizens for a Better Williams, Williams Post Office flower bed plantings look good thanks to the Colusa Co. Master Gardeners; much better signage to the treasure box Sacramento Valley Museum in Williams are thanks to the City of Williams; always enjoy the lovely garden in downtown Arbuckle thanks to the Arbuckle Revitalization Committee; the restoration of the Arbuckle Oddfellows building as well, great to preserve heritage, thank you Mike Doherty & others involved; the flowers in barrels I understand are thanks to Homer Danley, bravo super Maxwell High Students for keeping the traditional High School Rodeo going! Bravo on a job well done of the Colusa County General Plan effort, thanks to committee & CC Board of Supervisors & Planning Commission; the opportunity for input was appreciated; wh &at a fabulous celebration of the Colusa County Courthouse with festooning of the Pacific Flyway Quilters masterpiece quilts, hostess in 19th century costume, I missed the reenactment event alas but heard it was fantastic too, LOVED the art display for the Colusa Co. Arts Council, wow, what area talent!; the Colusa Co. Friends of the Library events of wine tasting

& previous book author lecture on the Basque, were so interesting! Mazeltov groups that paint over graffiti to keep our cities clean & safe, we have the BEST Sheriff, Scott Marshall, in any CA county; kudos for the responsiveness of the WiIliams CA Highway Patrol to a question I had in the past, very helpful; Congradulations to the Colusa County Rotary Club for the staircase levee access! The first Williams Cinco de Mayo celebration in Williams by Eddie Johnson & organization of soccer clubs by Tim Miller was great ( & to the Williams Parks & Recreation activities too for Zumba Classes now available!).Welcome to Colusa County The Film Commission, have delighted in the events – the music groups, the old films, the café in the lobby (brilliant!!!) at the historic architectural gem Colusa Theater, young bright entrepreneur Mike Wilkerson’s preservation effort so

do you have an opinion? we would like to hear it! email to: lloyd@williamspioneerreview.com or fax to: 530.473.2524

worth support. The new WIlliams Town Square looks great, an attractive green touch.. How about a mural now of the old Williams Hotel or House or both? I’m so glad that the Williams Community Center now has a nest, the former VFW Hall & wish for full fruition of your long dedicated efforts as soon as possible. And lastly, a big kudo goes to the Williams Cemetery for their distinguished award well deserved! Indeed, this is a quick short list, there are many, many more worthy mentions, certainly to all dedicated sports volunteer coaches, among them. Thank you all for making such enhancements to our county’s ambience with these activities & improvement efforts! Dixie La Grande, Colusa County resident


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

2011 High School Graduates of Colusa County

Williams High School HS W 011 2

Andres Ambriz Congratulations! All Star Realty

HS W 011 2

Kyle Anderson Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS W 011 2

Katrina Bowen

Best Wishes Williams Police Dept.

HS W 011 2

Jesus Camarena Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS W 011 2

Juan Cervantes

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

HS W 011 2

Jesenia Contreras

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Sandra Cruz

Steven Duong

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

HS W 011 2

Sandra Gonzalez Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

HS W 011 2

Luis Hernandez Congrats! T&P Farms

HS W 011 2

Jace Lilly

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

HS W 011 2

Daniel Guerrero Congrats! T&P Farms

HS W 011 2

Blanca Herrera

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

HS W 011 2

Cindy Lopez

Best Wishes Williams Police Dept.

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Madison Andronico Congratulations! Selovers

Brenda Arambula Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Rebecca Cano Best Wishes! Richies Florist

Devon Carr

Congratulations! Dixie LaGrande

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Alberto Coretes Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

Mariela Cortez

Best Wishes Williams Police Dept.

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Emilio Eliserio Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

HS W 011 2

Kyle Hatfield Best Wishes! Richies Florist

HS W 011 2

Devin Herrick Best Wishes! Richies Florist

HS W 011 2

Gilberto Lopez

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

Marco Estrada Congrats! T&P Farms

HS W 011 2

Diego Hernandez Best Wishes Williams Police Dept.

HS W 011 2

Marissa Katleba Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS W 011 2

Bernardo Maldonado Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

www. williamsPioneeReview. com

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Veronica Ascencion Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

Pedro Boites

Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Carlos Castillo

Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

Miguel Castillo

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Mayra Cortez Congratulations! Images by Pam

Abigail Cranford Best Wishes Harpers Auto Repair

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Juan Flores

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

Julie Galindo

Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Jessica Hernandez

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

Juan Hernandez Best Wishes Williams Police Dept.

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Diana Landeros Best Wishes Harpers Auto Repair

Erika Leos

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Ivan Martinez Best Wishes! Richies Florist

Luis Ricardo Martinez Congrats! T&P Farms


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Williams High School HS W 011 2

Rocio Martinez Congratulations! All Star Realty

HS W 011 2

Elsa Mora

Limbet Mena

Daniel Mendoza

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

HS W 011 2

Saven Patel

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

HS W 011 2

Marina Ramirez

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

HS W 011 2

Eric Rodriguez-Torre Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

HS W 011 2

Jonathan Solis Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

HS W 011 2

Carlos Velazquez

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

Cesar Perez

Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS W 011 2

Natalie Reyes

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

Martin Salcedo

HS W 011 2

Karen Rico

HS W 011 2 Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

HS W 011 2

Mario Teran-Alvarez

Anna Ramirez

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

Eric Sanchez

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

Congratulations! Selovers

HS W 011 2

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

HS W 011 2

Dulce Velazquez

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

HS W 011 2

William Povlsen

Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

HS W 011 2

Miguel Ocampo

HS W 011 2

Jose Gustavo Rivera Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

HS W 011 2

Mariela Santos Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS W 011 2

Maria De Jesus Vega Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

HS W 011 2

Yvette Velazquez

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

HS W 011 2

Lisa White

Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

2011 www. williamsPioneeReview. com

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Maria Rosemary Mendoza Mariah Montoya-Pedroia Best Wishes! Richies Florist

Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2 Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

HS W 011 2

Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

Cecilia Navarro

Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS W 011 2

Maria Berenice Mendoza

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

Elizabeth Munoz

Best Wishes! Richies Florist

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Rebecca Ogaz Best Wishes! Richies Florist

Emily Padilla

Congratulations! Lorena Padilla Insurance

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Brenda Ramirez Congratulations! Images by Pam

HS W 011 2

Selene Rivera Best Wishes! Richies Florist

Jesus Ramirez Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

HS W 011 2

Jose Rodriguez

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

HS W 011 2

HS W 011 2

Daniel Schaefer Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

Elizabeth Segura Best Wishes! Richies Florist


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Princeton High School S PH011 2

Janet Alvarez Congratulations! Images by Pam

S PH011 2

Claudia Cedillo Congratulations! Selovers

S PH011 2

Nicholas Hansen Congratulations! Selovers

S PH011 2

Jordan Leonard Congratulations! All Star Realty

S PH011 2

William Rippe Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

S PH011 2

Roda Rodriguez

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S PH011 2

Erika Donohugh Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

S PH011 2

William Martin Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

S PH011 2

Tayler Stillwell

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

S PH011 2

Viki Elwood

Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

S PH011 2

Aimeth Padilla Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

S PH011 2

Derek Studebaker Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

S PH011 2

Emma Gonzalez Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

S PH011 2

Cody Hansen

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S PH011 2

Josue Perez Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Luis Perez

Congratulations! All Star Realty

S PH011 2

Kyle Wilson

Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

- Congratulations! ~Maxwell High School HS M 011 2

HS M 011 2

Araceli Alcaraz Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

Sam Alcaraz Congratulations! All Star Realty

HS M 011 2

HS M 011 2

Tori Burrious

Congratulations Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

Stephanie Castillo Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

HS M 011 2

HS M 011 2

Dylan Dewit

Best Wishes ! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Kent Leber

Best of Luck! Colusa Wellness Center

Ethan Fry

Best Wishes! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Kelsey McKinley Best Wishes ! Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

HS M 011 2

Derrick Azevedo Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS M 011 2

Brittney Criner Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS M 011 2

Bayley Fusaro

Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS M 011 2

Derek Mench

Best Wishes! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Jillian Barsotti

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

HS M 011 2

Joeseph Davis

Congratulations Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Eztibaliz Garcia Congratulations! Images by Pam

HS M 011 2

Jacob Newman Congratulations! Selovers

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HS M 011 2

Heather Blosser Congratulations! All Star Realty

HS M 011 2

Jordan Dennis

Best of Luck! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Edwardo Gomez Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

HS M 011 2

Jesus Ocampo Congratulations! Selovers

HS M 011 2

James Bowen

Congratulations! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Kerri Dennis

Best Wishes ! Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

HS M 011 2

Sissy Iniguez

Best Wishes ! Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

HS M 011 2

Amie Pearson

Best Wishes! Harpers Auto Repair


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Maxwell High School HS M 011 2

Jake Pearson Congratulations! Images by Pam

HS M 011 2

Emily Sites

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

HS M 011 2

Tyler Wells

Best Wishes Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Lane Pearson

Congratulations! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Kayla Strand Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS M 011 2

Steven Perry

Best Wishes! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Tyler Swanson

Congratulations! Colusa Wellness Center

HS M 011 2

Hugo Rolon

Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

HS M 011 2

Randy Ruiz

Christopher Schmidt

Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS M 011 2

Laramie Vargas Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

HS M 011 2

HS M 011 2

Kendall Vierra

Best Wishes Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

HS M 011 2

Laura Wells

Best Wishes Ooh-La-La Salon & Spa

HS M 011 2

Aaron Wilson

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

- best wishes! ~Colusa High School

S CH011 2

Michelle Ahola

Congratulations! Dennis, Lora, Drake and Dylan Fusaro

S CH011 2

Jodi Charter

We are proud of you! Bill Charter & Elizabeth Kalfsbeek

S CH011 2

Lucas Espindola

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

S CH011 2

Henry Garcia Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S CH011 2

Maria Avalos Congratulations! Images by Pam

S CH011 2

Lauren Charter

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

S CH011 2

Clinton Fouse Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

S CH011 2

Jessica Garcia

Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

S CH011 2

Julissa Ayala Congratulations! Images by Pam

S CH011 2

Andee Clare

Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

S CH011 2

Edith Frutos

Hair by Charley Secrets of Attraction Salon

S CH011 2

Thomas Gentil

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S CH011 2

Mariel Beccera Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

S CH011 2

Daniel Cunha

Best Wishes Harpers Auto Repair

S CH011 2

Erandy Fuentes Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

S CH011 2

Nicole Girimonte Best Wishes Harpers Auto Repair

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S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Elizabeth Berrera

Alberto Cervantes

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Best of Luck Colusa Wellness Center

Jake Doberstein Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

S CH011 2

Drake Fusaro

Congratulations! Lloyd & Jennie Green Family

S CH011 2

Andrea Godinez

Best of Luck! Heidi Stamps - Avon Rep.

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

Matthew Doble

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S CH011 2

Andreina Galvez Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

S CH011 2

Collin Goodman Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Colusa High School S CH011 2

David Goodman Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

S CH011 2

Alex Hinely Congrats! T&P Farms

S CH011 2

Gabriela Martinez

Nails by Courtney Secrets of Attraction Salon

S CH011 2

Tori Noal

Ciera Green

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S CH011 2

Brenda Ramirez Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

S CH011 2

Ivan Rodriguez

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S CH011 2

Martin Vasquez Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

Lauren Grib

Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

S CH011 2

Kori Holbrook Congratulations! Selovers

Katelyn Mena Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

Mackenzie Jeffries Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

S CH011 2

Emanuel Ramirez

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

S CH011 2

Tenille Tauscher Congratulations! All Star Realty

S CH011 2

Alyssa Velazquez Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

Vincente Gutierrez Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

Jessica Jimenez Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

Vanessa Mendez Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

S CH011 2

Linda Pacheco Congrats! T&P Farms

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

Noemi Padilla

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

Adriana Torres

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

Xochitl Villasenor Congratulations! All Star Realty

S CH011 2

Caroline Meyers

Erica Meza

Congratulations Davison Drug & Statonery

Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Diana Paniagua

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

Marisa Perez

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S CH011 2

Marina Rinzler

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Congratulations! Images by Pam

S CH011 2

S CH011 2 Nails by Nikki Secrets of Attraction Salon

Heather Kaps

Best Wishes Colusa Wellness Center

Congrats Valedictorian! Mom & Dad

Ana Torres

S CH011 2

Rylee Kampf

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

S CH011 2

Congratulations Colusa Wellness Center

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Michael Richard

Taylor Herrick

Congratulations! Selovers

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Janelly Ramirez

Brandon Harakh

S CH011 2

Sergio Mendez

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

S CH011 2 Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Gerardo Ocampo

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

S CH011 2

S CH011 2

Matthew Torres Congrats! T&P Farms

S CH011 2

Daisy Rivas

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S CH011 2

Diego Valdivia Best Wishes! Juan & Margaret

S CH011 2

Jacob Wright Best Wishes! Richies Florist

2011

Graduation Party Invitations? Graduation Annoucnements? Banners? Yard Signs? Custom T-Shirts?

LLOYDS PRINT & COPY CENTER 570 6th Street • Williams (530) 473-2525 • Monday - Friday 9am to 6pm

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Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Pierce High School S PH011 2

Monica Albiso Congratulations! All Star Realty

S PH011 2

Marjani Allen Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Brandon Anguiano

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

Best Wishes WPD Chief Jim Saso

Nayeia Avila

Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

Laura Carona

Raul Cardenas Congratulations! Selovers

Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

Evan Cutter

Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

S PH011 2

Yasmin Garcia Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Julian Hernandez Congrats! T&P Farms

Nichole Hernandez Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Tim Kalfsbeek

We are proud of you! Bill Charter & Elizabeth Kalfsbeek

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Natalie Bezarus Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Edgar Cardona Congrats! T&P Farms

Kyle Kent

Congratulations, Were Proud of You! Love Mom, Dad & Sisters

S PH011 2

Priscilla Lomeli

Silvia Lopez

Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardwaer

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Martha Ambriz

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S PH011 2

Mary Diaz

Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Ivan Gonzalez Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Noemi Hernandez

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Kevin Hel-Horno Best Wishes WPD Chief Jim Saso

S PH011 2

Sylvia Lopez

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

S PH011 2

Ricardo Ambriz

Best wishes! Garth E. Moore Insurance Co.

S PH011 2

Zareen Buhari Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Nicky Clark Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Tianny Garcia

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S PH011 2

S PH011 2 Congratulations! We love you! Mom& Dad

Jorge Ambriz

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Joana Cano

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Kyle Duncan

Congratulations! Lloyd’s Print & Copy

S PH011 2

Travis Green

Congratulations, you did it! The McKinney Family

S PH011 2

Jessica Hetherington Congratulations! Images by Pam

S PH011 2

Jessie Khagura Congratulations! Selovers

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Arturo Calderon Congrats! T&P Farms

S PH011 2

Armando Colsa Best Wishes! Juan & Margaret

S PH011 2

DeVenna Garcia Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Fernando Hernandez

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Tania Ibarra

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S PH011 2

Eduardo Lievanos Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Alejandro Martinez Johnathon Martinez Congratulations! Rudy & Darcy Godinez

www. williamsPioneeReview. com

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Guillermo Amezola Best Wishes WPD Chief Jim Saso

S PH011 2

Adriana Calzada

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

S PH011 2

Chevy Cooper Congratulations! Images by Pam

S PH011 2

Oscar Garcia

Best Wishes! Filiberto & Theeta Corona

S PH011 2

Jesus Hernanzez Congratulations! NVFP Medical Group

S PH011 2

Exsaelth Jimenez Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Martha Lievanos Congratulations! Shear Class Salon

S PH011 2

Jose Martinez

Best Wishes WPD Chief Jim Saso


Williams pioneer revieW • may 20, 2011 • graduation edition 2011

Pierce High School S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Mitch McCullough

Brittany Mendoza

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Sheyonna Narbaiz

Gerardo Oliveros

S PH011 2

S PH011 2

Congratulations Hawkins Hutson & Nye Insurance

Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

Berenice Pimentel Best Wishes WPD Chief Jim Saso

S PH011 2

Nayeli Raygoza

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S PH011 2

Leonardo Saavedra Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Dulce Silva

Congratulations! Valley Service & Supplies

S PH011 2

Alexis Velazquez

Job well done! Fouch & Son Pharmacy

Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

We are proud of you! Filiberto & Theeta Corona

Rafaela Preciado

Hair by Valerie Secrets of Attraction Salon

S PH011 2

Justin Reis

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

S PH011 2

Mariela Salud

Congratulations! Valley Service & Supplies

S PH011 2

Dolores Solmayra Congrats! Cathy DeLay, FNP

S PH011 2

Edgar Velazquez

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Rafael Meza

Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Antonio Oregel

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S PH011 2

Jose Ramirez

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Abel Ricardez

Congratulations! Lloyd & Jennie Green Family

S PH011 2

Elias Sanchez Good Luck! Neighborhood Salon

S PH011 2

Bibiana Tapia

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S PH011 2

Angel Villa Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Haithem Mohammed Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Jonathon Orozco Congratulations! Rudy & Darcy Godinez

S PH011 2

Luis Ramirez

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Salvador Rivera-Torres

Best wishes! Steelhead Lodge Bar & Grill

S PH011 2

Shannen Schaad Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Paola Tapia

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

S PH011 2

Michael Villanueva Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Jamie Moreno

Congratulations! Rudy & Darcy Godinez

S PH011 2

Saul Orozco

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Aidee Ramos Congratulations! Superior Tire Co.

S PH011 2

Alexis Rosalia Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Kyle Shadinger Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

S PH011 2

Ana Valencia

Congratulations! www.ColusaCustomPrinting.com

S PH011 2

Kenzie Williams Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank

Enid Prine

S PH011 2

Nathan Wilson Congratulations! All Star Realty

High School

HS1 EP 01 2

Betty Crabtree

Good luck in your future! Colco Insurance Svcs.

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HS1 EP 01 2

Joseph Pearson

Congratulations! Alsco Geyer Irrigation

S PH011 2

Shelby Murillo Congratulations! Images by Pam

S PH011 2

Cecilia Ortiz

Congrats! Cathy DeLay, FNP

S PH011 2

Marcela Ramos

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S PH011 2

Leticia Ruiz

Congratulations! Alsco - Ace Hardware

S PH011 2

Kevin Shelton

Job well done! Kittles Outdoor Sport Co.

S PH011 2

Daniel Valencia

Congrats! Granzella’s Restaurant

S PH011 2

Jaci Wilson

Congratulations!!!!! Umpqua Bank


colusa county school days - then & now.... By: DIXIE LaGRANDE

L

ocal schools are almost out, graduation ceremonies will be soon… The seasons cycle. What about yesteryear’s students in our area? Colusa County has a very interesting school history.... & future!!! Before the 1848 Northern California gold discovery, our area’s population consisted of several Native American villages along the Sacramento River & in the West Coast foothills, not in the valley due to perrenial flooding, nor was there any Spanish presence here, no missions. By the 1820’s fur trappers arrived prior explorers & later wagon trains, John Sutter, transplant from Switzerland, would build his supply fort on the confluence of the American & Sacramento Rivers in 1839, became a Mexican citizen & their government representative to distribute land in the interior & the first inland non-native permanent resident in the Sacramento Valley. All would change in a heartbeat when that shiny metal was found by his carpenter, James Marshall, building a saw mill in 1848 for Sutter in the area just under official occupation by the U.S. military at the conclusion of the MexicanAmerican War. Then “the world rushed in”… as we know ‘the rest of the story’. Post California Gold Rush, this blessed fertile (with water) Sacramento Valley played a key role in feeding the masses who would come here next. Merchants would provide products

& services in our rural ag communities to those who sowed & reaped the crops, raised the livestock & transport it all to markets, near & far. These pioneers would create the foundation of our local economy today... Colusa would become the navigation head on the Sacramento River (before Red Bluff) to ship ag products back down to the growing metropolis of Sacramento & San Francisco & beyond just as California secured statehood in 1850. T w o decades later the t ransp ortation mode would become the railroad & the westside of then Colusi County (today’s Colusa & all of Glenn & parts of southern Tehama Counties, one of California’s original 27 counties, now there are 58) would grow our RR Depots towns of Arbuckle, Williams & Maxwell, especially to ship the wheat south, by rail, no longer by boat. Post mining era, as families settled down to create communities in the Sacramento Valley, children needed to be educated. One-room school houses fit the bill in rural areas for Grades 1-8 to teach the basics. Boys & girls sat in separate sides of the classroom, they had to bow or curtsy to show respect to their teacher when called upon to answer a ”ciphering” question, a pragmatic arithmetic word problem, or to read a moral tale or American patriotic story from the McGuffey Reader, or to practice their penmanship on a chalk board slate. Teachers then could not marry and lived with the students’ families. The families

took turns providing a hot lunch for all the students; the students cleaned the school. There weren’t many high schools in small towns until the early 20th century. Students used to go live with relatives or family friends to attend classes beyond Grade 8, or work for their room & board while studying in bigger towns in public schools or often, schools with a religious affiliation. From Colusa County, many a student attended Hisperian College in Woodland, or Snell’s Seminary in Oakland or Catholic Academy in Red Bluff or more locally Peirce Christian College, why College City & Pierce (spelling changed) Unified School District of Arbuckle exist today. Williams built its first high school in 1911. It graduated classes 19121956. Some of its better known graduates included Turk Murphy of Earthquake McGoon’s Jazz Club in San Francisco, CA & Ken Zumwalt, editor of Stars & Stripes during WWII. On Saturday September 3, Labor Day weekend of this year 2011, there will be a big bash, PUBLIC ALL WELCOME!!!, Centinennial Celebration of this beautiful 16,000 square foot space building, which was reincarnated into The Sacramento Valley Museum (SVM) in 1963 thanks to Lu Salter, Officer in the National Women’s Club & wife of Dr. Ney Salter (my mother was his nurse during The Great Depression). It will include an ALL CLASS reunion. Please mark your calendars now to come join in the fun! The Sacramento Valley Museum

features the late 19th century lifestyle of these early residents of our various communities & features special theme exhibits such as to honor the history of the Fraternity of Masons, profile of all graduates from the old WHS buidling, now the museum. Look forward to a future special feature of our military heroes, especially from WWII & Korean War & on area religions… Museum vistors & school groups enjoy the displays to learn about general store supplies, Victorian era furnishings, blacksmithing, saddlerly, the western hills’ area hotspring spas (Wilbur Hot Springs still a county feature) & interconnecting stage coach stops, one such, the Mountain House, was managed by current CA Governor Jerry Brown’s ancestors, the Schuckman’s. He mentioned his Colusa County pioneering family roots in his inaugeral speech & a great photo of his grandfather sheering sheep in one of the exhibits. The exhibits also include a way pre cell phone era telephone switch board (remember Dorothy Abel, the operator?), a doll display featuring fashions from pre Roman times, inspired by a similar one at the 1915 Panama Exhibition in San Francisco. There are 19th century wedding gowns, 2 of 4 finials of the Old Meridian Bridge, the other 2 are in the Sutter Memorial Museum in Yuba City, the story of the local Fouch family of pharmacists, lithographs of area ranches & businesses from the 1870’s, CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


Williams pioneer review • Call US: (530) 473-2525

May 20, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Page 13

www.williamspioneerreview.com

a COMMUNITY BRIEFS b

CATHOLIC CHURCH OF THE ANNUNCIATION 627 8th Street Williams “Meet & Greet Coffee Club” Every Third Sunday of the Month after 9:30 a.m. Mass Join us for refreshments and conversation CELEBRATE RECOVERY Meets every Friday night at 6:30 P.M. at the First Presbyterian Church (north annex building) at 4th & Jay Streets in Colusa. CELEBRATE RECOVERY is a free program that addresses issues of alcoholism, codependency, drug addiction, and other hurts, habits and hang ups. CELEBRATE RECOVERY is open to anyone who is experiencing pain, brokenness, or just wants support and encouragement. We are an anonymous program. For further information, please call 458-2802. MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR COMMUNITY! The citizens for a better Williams hold meetings the 4th Thursday of every month beginning at 6:00pm. meetings are held at the Williams City Hall, everyone is welcome!! PACIFIC FLYWAY QUILTERS The county’s quilt guild. monthly meetings will be held the 3rd Wednesday of every month. Meeting starts at 7:00pm located at the Colusa Masonic Hall 311- 5th street. CALLING ALL WOMEN OF AGRICULTURE Are you a woman dedicated to the survival of Agriculture? Unite as “California Women for Agriculture” (CWA) promote, and educate the importance of Agriculture. Meetings are held the 4th Wednesday of each month at 6:00 PM. For more Information, contact Melodie Johnson at (530) 458-5130. ARBUCKLE REVITALIZATION COMMITTEE Become involved in your community. The month ARC Meetings are held the 1st Tuesday of every month at the ARC /APRD office 309 5th Street, Arbuckle. COLUSA GRIEF SUPPORT OFFERED Trinity United Methodist Church, on the corner of 5th and Oak Streets, Colusa, is offering a free grief support group on the third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. For further information: 458-4509 or 458-4750 WILLIAMS FUN RUN You can walk, run, stroll, or shuffle your way around 2 different courses. The 5K route is 3.1 miles and there is a 1 mile course around beautiful downtown Williams. If you just want to walk a ½ mile, or go around a block or two, we can accommodate you wishes! The date is Saturday, May 21 and the gun goes off @ 8:00 a.m. All courses are loops that take you away from and back to the Williams Middle School. Flyers will be out soon but if you want more information right now, contact Rachel LaGrande @ 864-4262 or Cindy Gobel @ 6818919. The entry fee of $20 will get you a souvenir cap or T-shirt and all the refreshments you could want. Proceeds this year go to the Sacramento Valley Museum. ELEANOR AZEVEDO MEMORIAL YOUTH EMPOWERMENT SERVICE (Y.E.S.) Offering funds to families suffering

hardships, and would like to have their children involved in self enrichment activities. We can help with registration, safety equipment, and sponsor fees. If your child would like to participate in an activity such as scouts, recreational sports, camps, visual or performing arts, we would like to help fund those activities. Please contact Terri Rivera at the Colusa County One Stop Partnership 530-4580326 ext.109 for more information. Or email eam.yes17@yahoo.com to receive an application. CAR SEAT SAFETY CLASSES Do you know what car seat is right for your child? Do you know how to properly install your child’s car seat? Is your child safe in your car? Colusa County Public Health can help! Certified child safety seat technicians are currently offering classes that will answer all your questions. The cost of the class is $20 and may qualify low income families for a free car seat. Classes are held monthly in English and Spanish. Space is limited so call ahead to reserve your space. Colusa County Public Health can be reached at 458-0380 CALIFORNIA SMOKERS HELPLINE: There are over 7,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke that can increase your risk of heart attack and death. If you wish to quit smoking, Colusa County Public Health invites you to call the California Smokers Helpline at 1-800-NO-BUTTS. Your medical provider can also help. Contact them and inquire about “Ask, Advise, & Refer.” PIONEERING THROUGH THE DECADES Well it’s time to mark your calendars. Williams Pioneer Day is quickly approaching. This year the parade will be June 4, 2011. And the theme is “Pioneering through the decades”. We hope to see a ot of creative ideas on using this years theme for parade entries. Entry forms and posters should be appearing in May. We look forward to seeing you there. WILLIAMS COMMUNITY CENTER ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES Veteran’s Hall, 9th & ‘C’ Street, Williams, CA. To rent Hall contact 430-501-3029. MONDAY NIGHT BINGO:Everyone Welcome! Early Bird Games Starting Time at 6:00 P.M. Regular Games Begin at 6:30 P.M. WE WILL NOT BE PLAYING ON 5TH MONDAYS THIS YEAR. Refreshments Available at Reasonable Prices, Home Made Desserts. Game Day: Third Wednesday of the month 1: PM. Join us to play games, have fun and meet people! Movie Day: Fourth Wednesday of the month 1:00 PM. May 25, 2011: The Bucket List. June 22, 2011: O Brother Where Art Thou? Price: FREE. Refreshments: Popcorn, Soda & Candy are available at a low price. (Bring a Pillow-the seats are hard) IN THE LAVENDER FIELDS FUNDRAISER FOCUS: Hands Helping Children will hold its annual spring fundraiser "In the Lavender Fields..." on Saturday, June 4, 2011, from 9 AM to 3 PM at Bayliss Ranch in Biggs, CA. Spend a relaxing, carefree day in the fragrant, scenic venue of the Bayliss Lavender Ranch & Estate (www.bayliss-ranch.com ) in Biggs,

California. Enjoy strolling and browsing through antique stalls, a handmade quilts exhibit, and a fine arts show. Shop for distinguished gifts at the FOCUS Boutique, learn about growing lavender organically during a tour of the fields, and then unwind over a yummy luncheon. Besides the above, there will be multiple opportunities to purchase tickets for wonderful raffle prizes and silently bid on exciting vacation options as well as exquisite, handmade, and oneof-a-kind specialties. Tickets are still just $20 each, which includes admission and luncheon. Tickets are selling quickly and only a limited number of tickets will be sold, so purchase your tickets today at: www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/163018 or 1-800-838-3006 . DUNSMUIR 3RD ANNUAL PIE SOCIAL May 28th 10a.m.-5p.m. or til pies are sold out. Funds to benefit AMTRAK Depot, Railroad Display Room and re-establishment of the Dunsmuir Museum. Info: 530-2350839. “BLUE JEANS AND COUNTRY DREAMS” 2011 Colusa County Fair. June 9th - 12th, 2011. Application deadlines. Flat Track Motorcycle Races. Friday, June 10th, 2011. Grandstands - Colusa County Fair. Applications Received Until Race Day. Tuff Truck/Mud Drag/ Quad Racing. Saturday, June 11th, 2011. Grandstand - Colusa County Fair. Applications Received Until Race Day. Destruction Derby. Sunday, June 12th, 2011. Grandstand - Colusa County Fair. Application Received Until Race Day. Applications Are Available At www.colusacountyfair.com A REMINDER FROM COLUSA COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH AND COLUSA COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL If you or your animal has direct contact with a bat, or a bat is found in your sleeping area do not touch it with your bare hands, and do not freeze it but call Animal Control at 458-0200. COLUSA SOCCER CLUB STILL TAKING SIGN-UPS The Colusa Soccer Club will be continuing to take sign-ups for players throughout the county ages 4 (Birthdays by August 1st) to 19 (Birthdays after August 1st) for play in the Yuba Sutter Youth Soccer League. Registration fee is $70.00 (checks made out to Y.S.Y.S.L.). New players will need a copy of their birth certificate when signing up. Contact Dan and Toni Kiely at (530) 458-8538 for more information

Colusa May 26 - 6pm to 8pm Rural Fire Dept RabiesVaccination $7 1 YR License, Spayed/Neutered $10 1 YR License, Non Spayed/Neutered $20 1 YR License, Senior Citizens 60+ Fixed Dogs $7 3yr License, Spayed/Neutered $25 3yr License, Non Spayed/Neutered $50 Colusa County Animal Control (530) 458-0229 ARBUCKLE PARKS AND RECREATION DIST. EVENTS AND PROGRAMS SUMMER 2011 Youth Flag Football, Volley Ball and Tennis Camp Signups May 24 & 31, 5:30pm to 6:30pm. APRD Office 301 5th St. Adult Softball Games to start June 12th. Teams need to be turned in by June 8th. $250 per team. Limit 15 people per team. Adult Volleyball Open Gym Format. PHS Girls Gym. $25/Mo. or $5 Night. Tuesdays and Thursdays starting June 14. CRMC, INC. ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING CRMC campus, 6pm, July 20, 2011 AUXILIARY SCRUB SALE CRMC main lobby, 8am - 4pm, September 7, 2011 FOUNDATION “SWING FOR LIFE” GOLF TOURNAMENT Colusa Golf Club, 11am shotgun, September 23, 2011 AUXILIARY HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE AND BAKE SALE CRMC main lobby, 8am - 1pm, November 18, 2011 AUXILIARY “BOOKS-R-FUN” SALE CRMC main lobby, 8 - 4pm, December 9, 2011 ______________________________ SUBMIT YOUR COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS TO publisher@ williamspioneerreview.com or Fax to: 530.473.2525 or Mail to: PO Box 1124 Williams, CA 95987

death notices

Sharon elyce moore of Stonyford Born: November 13, 1936 • Passed: May 2, 2011. COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY Arrangements under the direction of CELEBRATES SECOND ANNUAL McNary-Moore Funeral Services DIA DE LOS NINOS • The Colusa County Library is having Raymond Zaragoza our second annual Día de los of Colusa Born: December 7, 1937 • Niños/Día de los Libros, Children’s Passed: April 29, 2011. Arrangements Day/Book Day, on May 21st, 2011 under the direction of McNaryat the Colusa Library, 738 Market Moore Funeral Services Street. This is a family event, and • is open to all county residents. The Carmen Faye Urrutia event goes from 10:00-12:00. We of Stonyford Born: October 23, are having 2 Story Times in English 1927 • Passed: April 25, 2011. and Spanish, crafts, Literacise, Arrangements under the direction of and face painting. The Fratello McNary-Moore Funeral Services Marionettes will present “The • Vaudeville Follies” at 11:30. Each Raymond zaragoza child attending will be given a book Born: December 7, 1937 • Passed: to take home. Refreshments will April 29, 2011. Arrangements under be provided. Also, this event offers the direction of McNary-Moore volunteer opportunities for teens Funeral Services needing to complete community • service hours. Call 458-0373 Deborah Marie Divelbiss for more information regarding Born: December 6, 1951 • Passed: either the event or volunteer April 24, 2011. Arrangements under opportunities. the direction of McNary-Moore Funeral Services COLUSA COUNTY RABIES • Death Notices are published at no cost CLINICS, VACCINATIONS/ and information is published using public LICENSES Arbuckle May 24 - 6pm to 8pm LaVanche Hursh Park

information sources. The WPR does not warrant the accuracy nor takes the responsability of the information placed in the Death Notices.


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May 20, 2011 - June 3, 2011

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a AGRICULTURE b

multiple horses with equine herpes virus in california

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quine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM), caused by Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1), has been confirmed in 10 horses in California, in Kern, Placer, Stanislaus, Amador and Napa counties. One horse in Kern County was euthanized after showing severe neurologic signs often associated with the disease. All of the infected horses recently attended the National Cutting Horse Association’s Western National Championships in Odgen, Utah on April 30 – May 8, 2011, where they were most likely exposed to the virus. All California horses that have been in contact with an infected horse and show signs of disease or test positive for EHM will be placed under a CDFA quarantine in order to limit spread. This disease outbreak is evolving and CDFA will continue to investigate cases and provide updated information. The California Department of Food and Agriculture has contacted all 54 exhibitors from California who participated in the Odgen, Utah event and asked them to isolate and monitor their horses for clinical signs of EHV-1. A rectal temperature in excess of 102F commonly precedes other clinical signs. Therefore, horse owners

with potentially exposed horses are urged to take temperatures on each individual horse twice a day. If a temperature above 102F is detected, the horse’s private veterinarian should be contacted immediately for evaluation and laboratory testing. Equine Herpes virus is a contagious disease and may spread quickly among horse populations. EHV1 is not transmissible to humans. Horse-to-horse contact, aerosol transmission, and contaminated hands, equipment, tack and feed all play a role in disease spread. Horses infected with the neurologic strain of EHV-1, may show any of the following clinical signs: nasal discharge, lack of coordination, hind-end weakness, lethargy, urine dribbling and diminished tail tone. There is no specific treatment for EHM. Treatment may include intravenous fluids, anti-inflammatory drugs and other appropriate supportive treatment. Immediate separation and isolation of identified suspect cases and implementation of appropriate biosecurity measures are key elements for disease control. Currently, there is no equine vaccine that has a label claim for protection against the neurologic strain of this virus.

commentary: to ‘eat local, buy california grown’ benefits all! By Fiona Ma and Cathleen Galgiani

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s members of the Assembly Committee on Agriculture, it's important to us that our constituents and all Californians have access to wholesome, affordable food. Because of that, we've taken a keen interest in the health and vitality of California farms and ranches, and we are encouraged to see more people paying attention to the source of their food and what goes into bringing it from the farm to the table. California enjoys a rich heritage as one of the world's most prolific agricultural regions. California foods are justifiably famous for their abundance, diversity, freshness and high quality—and all Californians can help to maintain that heritage and fame, whether they live in the city or the country. Buying California-grown food helps local family farmers as well as California consumers. In addition, buying California-grown agricultural products helps all those employees who work producing, processing and transporting California agricultural products, and helps their families as well. Food production contributes billions of dollars to local economies in California each and every year. Surveys show that 85 percent of California consumers say it's important to them to purchase

foods grown in California, and 41 percent of California consumers say the California-grown designation is more important to them today than it was a year earlier. When Californians buy Californiagrown food, it benefits the environment and ensures a higher level of food safety and food-safety standards. Farmers and ranchers certainly understand how strictly the state regulates food producers for the benefit of consumers. California-grown produce, livestock, milk, fish, flowers, nursery products and wine are produced under the strictest safety and qualityassurance standards of any state in the nation—or the world. Buying California-grown food helps ensure that family farmers will maintain their historical production systems and the valuable land that grows crops and sustains livestock. In a time of economic distress for our state, the support of Californiagrown products will help to keep critical dollars within the state for the benefit of all Californians. That, in turn, will strengthen the state's communities, economies and businesses. By purchasing locally produced foods, consumers will boost local businesses and that, in turn, helps local and state governments through increased tax revenues. For all those reasons, we have

introduced a resolution in the state Assembly—Assembly Concurrent Resolution 42—promoting the purchasing of California-grown products. Families, restaurants and grocers should be encouraged to buy California-grown foods, because supporting California-grown food products will result in higher food quality, improved food safety, higher environmental and animal-welfare standards, as well as significant economic benefits. And restricting oneself to California-grown food hardly represents a sacrifice. After all, California farmers and ranchers grow more than 300 food products, including livestock, poultry and seafood, produce, grains, dairy products and wine valued at nearly $35 billion a year. Once Californians find out how easy it is to buy California-grown foods and how plentiful, healthful and affordable they are, we are confident that families will want to "Eat Local, Buy California Grown" each and every day of the year. Find out more about the Eat Local, Buy California Grown project at www.facebook.com/ Eatlocalbuycaliforniagrown.

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE: fACTS

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alifornia produces Fresh, high quality, cheap, safe and abundant variety of meats, fruits and vegetables. California is the top producer of agricultural products in the nation. It has been the #1 food and agricultural producer in the United States for more than 60 consecutive years. California ranks first in the nation in total crops production. The list of individual crops where California is the “number one” producer in the country is impressive. Crops Ranked First in Production Percentage of Total U.S. Production:

• Almonds – 100 • Avocados – 96 • Broccoli – 92 • Celery – 93 • Greenhouse/nursery – 21 • Hay – 14 • Lemons – 89 • Lettuce – 71 • Onions – 31 • Peaches – 34 • Pistachio nuts – 100 • Plums – 97 • Strawberries – 83 • Tomatoes – 53 • Walnuts - 100 California agriculture is a $36.6 billion dollar industry that generates another $100 billion in

related economic activity. This makes it one of the state’s largest overall industries. California agriculture employs 1.1 million people. Every $1 billion in farm sales, there are 18,000 jobs created in the state, about 11,000 in the farm sector plus another 7,000 in other industries. No other state compares to California in agricultural output. California agriculture is instrumental in nature’s ecosystem and protects the environment. Farmers care about sustaining their land, keeping it strong and healthy, and preserving it for future generations. California agriculture fortifies our homeland security by providing a domestic food supply and jobs. The earth’s population is around 6.5 billion people. It is expected to grow to over 8 billion by 2030. California agriculture must be allowed and prepared to face the challenge of feeding our future population.

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colusa county RCD seeks public input for colusa basin watershed management plan The Colusa County Resource Conservation District (CCRCD) has taken the leadership role in the Colusa Basin Watershed, addressing holistic watershed health and facilitating stakeholder input in addressing watershed-wide natural resource issues. CCRCD is currently developing a management plan for the Colusa Basin Watershed and we are seeking stakeholder input throughout this process. The Colusa Basin Watershed spans an area of approximately 1,045,4 45 acres, or 1634 square miles. The watershed extends from the Cache Creek watershed in upper Yolo County to the lower Stony Creek watershed in Glenn County and from the Sacramento River westward to the ridge crest of the Coast Range foothills. A watershed of this size encompasses many natural resource issues, and the purpose of the Colusa Basin Watershed Management Plan is to address those issues that are of greatest importance to the people that live and work in the watershed. Working with our partners at the Glenn and Yolo County RCD’s, the Colusa County RCD is taking a community-based watershed management approach. This approach facilitates productive dialogue among local stakeholders within the watershed to establish a clear set of management goals and develop collaborative, innovative solutions to achieve those goals. During the planning process, we will strive to balance agricultural, environmental, economic, and social concerns, while taking into consideration other watershed management work being done at the local, regional and state levels. To date, we have finalized the mission, vision, goals and objectives of the Colusa Basin Watershed Management Plan, based on stakeholder input. We are currently in the process of interviewing a variety of stakeholders that live and work in the watershed to help us determine appropriate actions to achieve the Plan’s goals and objectives. The eight goals that will be addressed in the Plan are: Goal 1: Protect, Maintain and Enhance Water Quality Goal 2: Promote activities to ensure a dependable water supply for current and future needs Goal 3: Preserve ag land and open space Goal 4: Manage invasive plant species Goal 5: Reduce destructive flooding Goal 6: Enhance soil quality and reduce erosion Goal 7: Preserve and enhance native habitat Goal 8: Address Unknown Future Affects of climate change If you have an interest in any or all of these goals, the CCRCD Watershed Coordinator would like to hear from you and set up an interview. Interviews can be conducted in person, by phone or by email. During the interview process, stakeholders are asked a set of questions for each goal that they would like to address. To become involved in the process, or if you have questions, please contact: Mary Fahey, Colusa County Resource Conservation District Watershed Coordinator. 530.458.2931 x117 | email: mary.fahey@ca.usda. gov For more information on the Management Plan and the Colusa County RCD, please visit our website at: www.colusarcd.org


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a THE NEWS BACK THEN b Contributed by: Pat Ash

Williams Farmer 5/20/1939- EDITORIAL To America, facing disturbed world conditions and struggles against economic troubles, will come next Sunday a message of assurance and courage. It will come from the men who gave their lives for America when the country was facing a warring enemy twenty years ago. The message will be in such simple form that every one, even the children can understand. It will come in the form of little red poppies worn on the coat lapels. It will speak of days when Americans were dying for their country and will urge the same spirit of courageous patriotism in facing the dangers of today. The poppy is the flower that grew in the shell churned soil of the battle front in France and Belgium, the only touch of beauty surviving war’s destruction and the only floral tribute for the dead. It became and remained a symbol of the highest patriotic sacrifice. On Poppy Day each year The American Legion and Auxiliary bring it to us with its eloquent message from the dead. Can anyone wear a poppy without feeling a glow of pride in his country? Can anyone see the poppies blooming brightly on coats without knowing a surge of confidence in America? Reminded by the poppies, can anyone doubt that the nations capable of such effort and sacrifice twenty years ago will be victorious over today’s difficulties? Every American should wear a poppy on Poppy Day and all America should catch the poppy’s message. The brave little blossom says; “Remember the dead and the disabled and carry on for America.” Williams Farmer 5/2/1958-FRANH SCHUCKMAN CELEBRATES 90TH BIRTHDAY Frank Schuckman was the son of August and Augusta Schuckman, born 1868 in the Freshwater district five miles northwest of Williams and will celebrate his 90th birthday on May 4. His mind is very alert and he loves to talk of the past. He had the misfortune to break his hip about four years ago, and had several slight strokes, which keep him in a wheel chair. He has his devoted wife and companion Margaret Henneke Schuckman, to comfort him. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary two years ago. Most of their lives were spent in and around Williams. One of the old landmarks in Antelope Valley is the Mountain House which Schuckman built 50 years ago. As a post office, it was called Venado. His father and mother were the owners before Frank took possession. The building was built in 1855 and was a hotel and stage stop for the stages to change their horses. It is located 12 miles west of Williams and the first stop before

going over the Leesville Grade. The stages brought passengers to Bartlett, Allen, Hough, Cooks, and Wilbur Sulphur Springs and used form six to eight horses to pull the stage coach. The bottling wagons of 10 and 12 mules that hauled out the mineral water also made the Mountain House their stopping place. Mr. Schuckman’s parents came to this country from Germany in 1852 and landed in St. Louis. There were eight children, five sons and three daughters born to them, two of which are still living, Frank Schuckman and a sister Ida Brown of San Francisco, the mother of California’s Attorney General Edmund (Pat) Brown. Mr. Schuckman’s parents left St. Louis the 10th of March in 1852 and most of the trip was made by wagon; the train consisting of nine wagons, 81 oxen, 18 horses and carried 53 people. They suffered many hardships and trouble with the Indians. The Indians were given a 700-mile tract of land from the state under contract not to molest the white people, but some of them still made war with the whites, these Indians being called the Sioux. There were many buffalos and antelopes. They saw 10,000 buffalo in one herd. At some of the rivers they had to cross, they had to pay as high as $5.00 a wagon and $1.00 per head for stock. Coming by the way of the Platte River, they met up with 100 wagons. In one part of the desert they come upon thousands of dead horses, mules, and cows and saw many broken wagons. They too, lost some from thirst before arriving in California the first of August. The town of Williams was laid out by W. H. Williams when it became known that the Northern Railroad would make Williams a station. The first train arrived in 1877. The town began to grow. Buildings were made of clay as this material was suitable for brick. The first newspaper was called the Central News and was edited by G. B. Henderson. The present paper, the Williams Farmer, was edited in 1887 by S. H. Callen. The united census was taken in 1850 and the population of the county was 115. This was two years before Mr. Schuckman’s parents arrived. Frank Schuckman is the oldest citizen of the community and the oldest member of the Masonic Lodge, Tuscan 261, 67 years in December. The citizens of Williams join in a single voice to wish Mr. Schuckman a most happy birthday and continued good health. May 31, 1957- HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES THIS EVENING Commencement exercises for the Williams High School Class of 1957 will be held at eight o’clock tonight in the high school gymnasium; the first class to receive diplomas in the new building. Twenty five seniors

comprise the class rolls. Student speakers include Theodore R. Olds, Jr. Salutatorian; Linda Anne King, Valedictorian and John J. Troughton Jr., Historian. Guest speaker will be Floyd Myers Marsh. The public is cordially invited to attend tonight’s Commencement. 1941-CORTINA SCHOOL PUPILS VISIT WILLIAMS BUSINESSES The pupils of the Cortina School South of Williams, accompanied by their teacher, Mrs. Leonore Sanderson, enjoyed a visit to several of the local business houses yesterday morning. Among the places visited were the grocery stores, bank, Union Ice Company, hardware store, City Hall and Fire Department and Williams Farmer. Those pupils enjoying this inspection excursion included: Mary Gonzales, Johnnie Gonzales, Herman Gonzales, Leonard Green, Roddy Sanderson, Gilbert Wright and Willie Wright. Williams Farmer 5/25/1961-GOFORTH—A JUST NAME FOR AN EXPANDING BUSINESS One of the most progressive and expanding firms in the county is, without a doubt, Goforth Brothers. In fourteen short years the business which was operated by three brothers making cement blocks and roofing tiles has expanded to a large firm with 18 men on its payroll. The latest step in the steady growth of this firm was brought to Williams this month on five railroad flat cars. It is an asphalt plant which is being constructed on the eastern portion of the present Goforth Brother’s location. Jack Goforth, who was instrumental in this phase of the firm’s expansion, explained that this plan will enable Goforth Brothers to move into the road construction and paving field. This area has long needed such a plant and this one, which will be operative in four weeks, will serve all the area’s asphalt needs. Previously the asphalt had to be trucked in at least ten miles. In addition to the asphalt plant Goforth Brothers offer other services in the construction field including ready-mix concrete, sand and gravel and equipment rentals. Goforth Sulfur Inc. processes and distributes S-Bar-S Soil sulfur which is widely accepted by the farmers of Northern California. There are three brothers involved in the Goforth Brothers organization. Jack, who prior to starting a cement block business in Williams, was employed in the road construction business, Elmer, who moved to Williams from Covelo, and Frank who had been residing in the valley for several years. In 1947 they joined forces and opened a cement block and roofing tile yard on the site presently occupied by the Williams Paint and Body Shop. In 1950 they expanded and moved to their present location east of the track. In 1958 they entered into their sulfur venture and now in 1961 into asphalt into asphalt paving. The on-the-road equipment of Goforth Brothers is most impressive.

Williams Farmer 5/25/1961 Eagleton given two trophies Fifty-six boys, including JV and Varsity players and incoming freshmen selected the winners of the two perpetual trophies at Williams High on Wednesday. The Gene Mays Memorial trophy for the outstanding lineman was awarded to John Eagleton. The perpetual trophy given by the class of 1928 for the Most Valuable Player was also presented to John Eagleton. The boys of the teams determine winners of these two trophies. Contributor’s Note- In honor of the fallen heroes that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our country at Memorial Day and the upcoming parades that will be going on around the county these next few weeks, I think it’s important to reprint the following article. HELLO, REMEMBER ME? Some people call me Old Glory, others call me the Star Spangled Banner, but whatever they call me, I am your Flag, the Flag of the United States of America. Something has been bothering me, so I thought I might talk it over with you….because it is about you and me. I remember when people would line up on both sides of the street to watch a parade, and naturally, I was leading it, proudly waving in the breeze. When your daddy saw me coming , he immediately removed his hat and placed it against his left shoulder so that the hand was directly over his heart…..remember? And you, I remember you -standing there straight as a soldier. You didn’t have a hat but you were giving the right salute. Remember your little sister? Not to be outdone, she was saluting the same as you with her right hand over her heart…. remember? What happened? I’m still the same old flag. Oh, I have a few more stars since you were a boy. A lot more blood has been shed since those parades of long ago. But I don’t feel as proud as I used to. When I come down your street you just stand there with your hands in your pockets and I may get a small glance and then you look away. Then I see the children running around and shouting….they don’t seem to know who I am…I saw one man take his hat off, then look around, and when he didn’t see anyone else with theirs off he quickly put his back on. Is it a sin to be patriotic anymore? Have you forgotten what I stand for and where I’ve been? Anzio, Guadalcanal, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan? Take a look at the Memorial Honor Rolls of those who never came back in order to keep this Republic free…One Nation Under God….when you salute me, you are actually saluting them. Well, it won’t be long until I’ll be coming down your street again. So, when you see me, stand up straight, place your hand over your heart….and I’ll salute you by waving back…and I’ll know that… YOU REMEMBERED!


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colusa county school days - then & now.... Over the decades the museum has hosted lots of events, from Vintage Fashion Shows to author lectures on River Steam Boats, very historic quilt displays, to ice cream socials & has accomplished creating a fine non-circulating Archives Library, many documents contributed by the Colusi County Historical Society in memory of Barbara Ash, open to the public during museum hours,T HU-SAT 10 am to 4 pm & NOW SUNDAYS 1-4 pm, or by appointment. T h e Sacramento Valley Museum, former Williams High School, has also accomplished a major project-the exterior restoration of the last known standing Colusa County oneroom school house, Glen Valley. Its last student, Harold La Grande, recently passed away. The teacher who taught him to read was his big sister, Georgia Traynham, of Woodland, CA, still alive & well at age 102. It was built in the 1875 & closed 1935, originally located 9 miles NW of Williams in the Harlan Hills by Glen Creek & provided an elementary education to adjacent families. The Sacramento Valley Museum plans are to feature a display of each school house history as well as offer old fashioned school sessions, fee-based, as fund raisers for the museum & other area non-profit worthy organizations. The Glen Valley School House & others like it, educated the Greatest Generation in the Basics, ‘the country kids’ who became subsequent military & civilian leaders in our area… and the old rural Williams High School (now SVM) & other schools like it, solidfied that sound education . Here they got their roots then took off with their wings… the two lasting gifts that parents first, along with schools, can give their children. Colusa County is still forming a fine future of

our current students graduating, now off to jobs, more schooling; many to our military. Colusa County, Williams in particular, is so lucky to have two former schools, uniquely side by side, dedicated to telling the history of education. History IS story telling. And as our elders pass on, it is our honor & responsibility to carry on their legacies left, to acknowqeledge them for their unique contributions to our northern

end of our diverse state… How did these former schools end up together? Sometime after closing, the Glen Valley School House was moved to the town of Williams on Venice Blvd. It served as a Grange Social Hall, scout cabin, church & last reincarnation, as the champion Colusa County (CC) Rugby Team’s Club House. At some point a kitchen wing was added. The C.C. Rugby Club group donated the building to the Sacramento Valley Museum (without kitchen wing therefore exposing one side to the elements that had caused so much deterioration for so many years awaiting restoration, for some unknown reason, not accomplished when donated in 1984.) The interpretation of the building’s history as a school house would be incorporated in the SVM exhibits & would include the stories & photos of ALL the other Colusa County one-room school houses. Such contributions of such documentation would be so appreciated. It’s other more recent uses would also be documented & on display, especially

the era of its donors, the amazing Colusa County Rugby Club. The Sacramento Valley Museum is located at 1491 E St., Williams, CA 95987 across from the Williams’ award winning Elementary School on the south side & west end of Business Highway 20 through town, 6 blocks heading for the West Coast Range Mountains from Williams’ icon Arch.. . Its adjacent neighbor & non-profit umbrella supporter, the Sacramento Valley Museum, is open for visiting Spring to Fall. Please do come visit this treasure box of late 19th & early 20th century rural Northern California UPDATE!! The Glen Valley School House, has been tidied up on the exterior THANKS TO ALL THE FOLLOWING (outof-state contributors detailed) of monetary or in-kind labor or rendered services and/ or materials. Now the plans are to take on the interior to offer fee-based old fashioned school sessions as fund-raisers for other local non-profits. Please add your name or your business to this growing list of supporters!... We are seeking volunteer teachers, more donations of your time & talents & of course funds. Please make your tax-deductible check & mark SCHOOL HOUSE RESTORATION in the memo, to: The Sacramento Valley Museum, PO Box 1437, Williams, CA 95987 phone (530) 473-2978. www. sacvalleymuseum.com THANK YOU VERY, VERY MUCH!!!..... ALLEGRINI, Paul •ARMSTRONG, Andi • ASH, Pat • BACHMAN, Troy, • Building Contractor of Chico, CA who secured the building Fall 2009 • BALLATINE, Robert & Diane • BERGSON, Chuck, City of Williams Administrator • BOYES, Jean • BOYES, Vance of Edward Jones Financial Services in Colusa • BROOKINS, Rusty of Brookins Equipment Repair in Arbuckle • BROWN, Gary of Williams Hardware in Williams • CHARTER, Lyle & Lauren • CHARTER, Ross of 100% Construction of Arbuckle, CA who restored the exterior Fall 2010 • Citizens for a Better Williams • Colusa County Office of Education • Colusa County Records Department • Colusi County Historical Society, www.colusi.com • CONRADO, Emily • DeLUCA, Richard & Kathleen• EBERSOLE, Mary • ETCHEPARE, Frances • FERRINI, Matt & Coleen •FREED, Bob & Cindy • FULCHER, Keith & Angie • GOBEL, Cynthia • GOFORTH, Dave • GRAF, Mary Ann • GREEN, Lloyd of Loyd’s Print & Copy Shop in Williams • HONICKMAN, Lorne & Kathy of Toronto, Ontario, Canada • HOWE, Gretchen of Richie’s Florist in Colusa • KALFSBEEK, Elizabeth

• KATSARIS, Anthony & Beth • KIRKLAND, Elizabeth • LA GRANDE, C.J. & Rachel • LA GRANDE, Dan & Ann • LA GRANDE, Dennis • LA GRANDE, Hedy •LAUSTEN, Norm • LORENZ, Alex & Dianne • LOZA, Jesus • MALTBY, Jerry & Sherrie • MANOR, Bill • MANOR, Dave & Kathy • MASON, Dee • Mayberry’s Flooring in Colusa • MAYBERRY, Barbara • MOORE, Jean • MOORE, Andrea • NISSEN, John & Dawn • Old School House Museum in Old Sacramento, CA • ORNBAUN, Marilyn •PENCE, George, Delores & Angelica •Rice Brothers Movers of Yuba City, CA •RICH, Debbie, City of Williams Building Inspector • ROPER, Gary of Depue Warehouse in Williams • ROTHWELL, Dennis & Dorothy in AZ • Sacramento Valley Museum Board of Directors 2000-present, www.sacvalleymuseum.com • SANER, Reverend Gary • SCHAAD, Pat • SCHALL, Brian of KHSL, in Chico, CA •SPOONER, Marie SPURGEON, Kay •TERKILDSEN, Jean WILCOX, Mr. • Williams City Councils 2009-present • Williams Fire Department • Williams Pioneer Day Committee • Williams Unified School District

Since learning is forever, inside & outside the classroom, (it does NOT end at graduation) the Sacramento Valley Museum is seeking volunteers to work in our Archives Library, participate in organizing events, create displays… Ideas (partial list) both of past & more contemporary themes might be…. Wintun traditional response to seasonal flooding, Hispanic first families here, Basque sheep herder lifestyle, Portuguese diarymen communities & culture, original Hindu, Siekh & Fijian transplants & traditions, Chinese business families, Japanese horitculturists.. Let’s hear from the ‘bloom where you’re planted” tales from the Irish, Hmong, Bavarians who came here to Colusa County…. Others! Your support is crucial to the continued enjoyment of the museum & schoolhouse, other Colusa County attractions too & so appreciated. Also, it all helps put Colusa County on the map! Coming up, here are the fund raisers to enjoy, all in Williams! Sat 21 May 11 Fun Run; Fri 3 Jun 11 Golf Tournament; 4 June 11 Pioneer Day; & not to be missed 3 Sep 11 Williams Old High School/Sacramento Valley Museum Centennial! Thank you again, Dixie La Grande, Glen Valley School House Cheerleader & SVM Board Member

Fridays & Saturdays

Sunday - Thursday

$500 Drawings at

Drawings at

April 1st - May 14th

May 1st -May 31st

6pm • 8pm • 10pm • Midnight

Noon • 4pm m • 8pm • Mid Midnight id

Play with your Colusa Rewards Club card to be entered into drawings and win your share of

Visit any Sunday - Thursday in May to enter for your chance to drop three Plinko chips and win your share h re of up to

Tickets only 100 points!

Tickets only 100 points!

Visit the Colusa Rewards Club for details. Management Reserves All Rights ©2011.

Visit the Colusa Rewards Club for details. Management Reserves All Rights ©2011.

3770 Highway 45, Colusa, CA • 530-458-8844 • www.colusacasino.com

WPR 05202011  

Williams Pioneer Review

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