Willamette Living August/Sept 2020

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Willamette

LIVING August/September 2020

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

Our Biggest Issue Ever! +

Stress Relief The Valley Art Scene The Ultimate Spa Retreat


Start the Decade Right Showcase your business in Willamette Living Magazine Willamette

June / July 2019

LIVING

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

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Willamette

Willamette

December / Januaî ¸y 2019

LIVING LIVING October / November 2019

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

Anniversary Issue! Celebrating

Ten Years of Willamette Living! azine • Winn ag

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The Tillamook Coast

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Comfort Food Art Focus: Lee Kitzman Oregon History

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Our Annual Best of the Valley Winners! Fifty Miles of Art in the Valley Fun & Fireworks on the Tillamook Coast

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In This Issue

Wellness Retreat

Tî ¸aditions old & New • Philomath • Cî ¸anberries!

SWAP PAGE

Targeted Advertising In a Beautiful Format That Readers Enjoy • Hundreds of distribution spots • Digital version emails to thousands • “eBlastsâ€? to supercharge your mailings • Magazine advertising sticks around • The most trusted advertising medium

• An engaged readership • Special sections, and themes • The valley’s favorite color glossy • Ten years of successful growth • Scores of happy advertisers!

WWW.WILLAMETTELIVING.COM/ADVERTISE


Mercedes Benz of Salem Presents The CLA-Class

The CLA-Class The all-new Mercedes-Benz CLA four-door coupe raises the bar with an

The new CLA has grown in size compared to its predecessor, and

updated sleek design, powerful performance, the latest Mercedes- Benz

its updated design underlines the sporty coupe character with its

safety innovations and impressive in-car technology. The new Coupe

stretched form, while the redesigned interior showcases a dashboard

boasts all of the virtues of the new-generation compact-car family

with a free-standing widescreen display and touchscreen. Ambient

with the latest Mercedes-Benz design language and the revolutionary

lighting and newly designed air vents in turbine-look accentuate the

MBUX (Mercedes-Benz User Experience), featuring a completely new

modern interior.

user interface, natural speech recognition, touchscreen capabilities and a new Touchpad. The new Mercedes-Benz CLA will also receive

With its standard MBUX interface – Mercedes-Benz User Experience –

additional standard equipment features compared to its predecessor.

Mercedes- Benz is revolutionizing in-car operation and communication.

Arriving in U.S. dealerships by late 2019, the 2020 CLA 250 will start

The interface surpasses conventional automotive standards by

from $36,650 and the CLA 250 4MATIC from $38,650.*

incorporating a powerful computer, brilliant screens and graphics, customizable display, software that can learn, as well as Voice Control

The new Mercedes-Benz CLA Coupe is not only progressive and

with natural language understanding and available full color Head-Up

modern in its design--it is also highly intelligent. The intelligence of the

Display and Augmented Video for Navigation. Thanks to innovative

new CLA expands further with ingenious details when it comes to the

technology, MBUX now supports the occupants by making various

understanding of natural voice commands, improved aerodynamics,

comfort and MBUX functions even simpler and more intuitive.

newly available driver assistance systems and features such as Augmented Reality for Navigation.

* Mercedes Benz USA MSRP

Mercedes Benz of Salem 2405 Commercial St. SE Salem | Sales: 800.336.4148

www.valleymb.com


Captivating country living close to town on 10 gently rolling acres. This beautifully appointed 3,928 sq ft home, plus 360 sq ft studio, offer commanding views of the valley, Cascades and Coastal ranges, and wide-open spaces inside and out. Light and bright, with vaulted ceilings, oor-to-ceiling windows, stunning custom woodwork, and spacious living space, this luxurious home offers three en-suite bedrooms, a magnificent great room, and a first-oor study/office with easy access to the patio. With both first and second oor master bedrooms, exibility abounds. Enjoy single level living on the first oor or opt for dual/shared living with the second oor dedicated to the second master suite. The main living area includes a striking showpiece fireplace and a wall of windows overlooking the Cascades and the Three Sisters to the east and Coastal range to the west. The chef’s kitchen holds a breakfast nook, oversize center island with 5 burner gas cooktop, walk-in pantry, wall ovens, wine fridge, stainless appliances, and granite countertops. On the second oor the second master suite boasts a sitting room, walk-in closet, gas fireplace and sweeping views of the Willamette Valley. An adjacent space has room for a library, exercise studio, or whatever else you need. With expansive wrap-around patios and large manicured lawns, this property is designed for entertaining and easy living. The sweeping circular drive includes a covered portico at the front door. Immaculately landscaped, the property includes a detached shop with half bath, and detached studio. The heated studio is wired for entertainment and includes a hot tub and more large windows with great views. Installed solar panels provide up to 40 KWH per day of electricity, enough to power current household use. Shown exclusively by appointment, call today for your private showing.

Annette Sievert

Number one Coldwell Banker agent in Oregon! 541-207-5551 | asievert@valleybrokers.com

“Have Expectations� www.valleybrokers.com/asievert

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit oerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

Witt Consulting

Individual Tax Help Business Tax Help

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Are you looking for help with your personal or business Finances? Then look no further than Witt Consulting.

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

“Bill, Leslie, and Co. are an indispensable part of our dayto-day business. They’ve also become good friends over the years. If you need clarification, Witt Consulting should be your first choice. With vast knowledge of tax law, creativity, and an always positive outlook, they’re not your average accounting firm.� Scott Alexander, Publisher Willamtte Life Media


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In This Issue...

Aug/Sept 2020

23

The Ultimate Getaway

Regulars 16 Art in the Mid-Valley 20 The Bookshelf 40 Kris on Health 41 Lookin' Good! 42 Style 43 Gardening With Brenda 44 Real Estate Update 45 Sten: On the Money

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Early Oregon

facebook.com/willametteliving

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Busy Kids!

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Fun, Fall, & Food!

Seniors & Tech

pinterest.com/willamettelivin

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

coming in the Oct/Nov 2020 Issue

@WillametteLiving

advertising information www.willametteliving.com ads@willametteliving.com 541-740-9776

issuu.com/willametteliving


call us at 541-752-0805

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kitchens | bathrooms | additions | remodels

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We are now open M-Sat 10-5pm Safety protocols in place. You can check our current status on our facebook page: Facebook.com/TheNattyDresser Or by visiting our website below.

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Thank You for Your Support

www.TheNattyDresser.com 425 1st Avenue W. Historic Downtown Albany Santiam Place Wedding & Event Hall

You’ve prepared for a rewarding retirement. We can help you make the most of it.

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Š 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. (03/19)

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• Reunions • Barbecues • Meetings & Lectures • Presentations & More!

Shown by Appointment, Call Today: 541-259-4255 *party rentals available on-site!

Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.

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Your special place for:

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Your vision of retirement is unique, and your financial plan should be too. As an Ameriprise private wealth advisory practice, we have the qualifications and knowledge to help you grow and preserve your wealth. Whether it’s investment management, tax strategies or legacy planning, we’ll work with you to find the right financial solutions for your individual needs. And we’re backed by the strength and stability of one of America’s leading retirement planning companies.

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Pump or Water Issues?

Relax... Midway

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NW Sycamore Ave. Corvallis, Oregon d-valleytileinc.com 541.745.5305 mvtcorvallis@gmail.com

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is your local go-to, family owned, full service plumbing resource. Whether you’re a contractor in search of a sub-contractor, a home owner looking for upgrades or repairs, or a farmer who needs to make it rain, Midway is always your logical answer. In business in Albany since 1964!

Yes! We can solve your well pump and water treatment challenges!

“Professional, competitive, respectful, flexible.� “Polite, and nice to my dog!� “...would recommend them in a minute.�

homeowner, contractor, designer friendly! Mid-Valley Tile & Design, Inc. 2428 Three Lakes Rd. Albany, OR 97322

541-928-7927

Residential • Commercial

907 NW Sycamore Ave. Corvallis, Oregon mid-valleytileinc.com 541.745.5305

CCB: 180409

Light up Your Life

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Carpet • Hardwood • Countertops • Vinyl • Tile & Stone • Area Rugs Window Treatments • Cabinet Hardware • Decorative Sinks

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Voted “Best of the Valley� once again by Willamette Living Readers!

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It Begins With the Perfect Floor

Lighting • Gifts • Home Decor & More

Local & Family Owned Serving Albany for over 50 years!

(541) 757-8553 • BensonsInteriors.com 415 NE Circle Blvd. • Corvallis 8

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

www.J-Jelectric.com

885 22nd Ave. SW in Albany • 541-928-8488


Willamette

LIVING

T H E L I F E S T Y L E M AG A Z I N E F O R W E S T E R N O R E G O N

Publishers

Scott & Gayanne Alexander

Willamette Living is published every two months by Willamette Life Media LLC

Inquiries / Suggestions

feedback@WillametteLiving.com

Contributing Photographer Trevor Witt Trevor@willametteliving.com

Find Us

In print at hundreds of locations in the Willamette Valley. The digital edition is free online at www.willametteliving.com

Subscriptions

Subscribe online at willametteliving.com, or send a check to our mailing address below. Check current subscription rates on our website.

YACHATS

Event Calendar

Submit your events at: willametteliving.com. Please submit as far ahead as possible. Please check your submission for accuracy. Please allow time for approval. Select events may also appear in the print magazine.

Gem Of The Oregon Coast

Mailing Address

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All editorial material, including comments, opinion and statements of fact appearing in this publication, represents the views of the respective authors and does not necessarily carry the endorsement of Willamette Living or its officers. Information in Willamette Living is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed. The publication of any advertisements is not to be construed as an endorsement of products or services offered unless it is specifically stated in the ad that there is such approval or endorsement.

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*Products/books/samples for review to same address please.

PHOTO: DARREN WHITE

e r u t a n ic whertes m g a i s k r o w

Willamette Living 922 NW Circle Blvd Suite 160 - 179 Corvallis, OR 97330

yachats.org | hikebikepaddle.org | 800.929.0477 www.willametteliving.com

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From the Home Office in Corvallis...

Publisher's Update

Scott Alexander, Publisher

Plotting an escape in our vintage camper, gotta go somewhere this summer, but where....?

On the Cover

"Combine" By Lori Westling "The focus of my photography is animals and agriculture. My goal is to make the ordinary come alive through photos."

Take a look at this issue online, just visit our website and click to view the digital edition. Plus, there are more in our archive, and you can take a look at them all, for free.

Okay, this pandemic was kind of novel when it started, but this is starting to get a little stale. Even though summer is only at the halfway mark, it's starting to feel like we're missing out on summer fun. But are we though? Every summer we feel like we can't quite pack in enough "summering" before the rain starts again. But the weather has been great, we've been out walking all over the place, we've been BBQing and gardening (STILL waiting for more than one measly tomato at a time), and we've enjoyed one of the culinary highlights of the summer, fresh Oregon Albacore Tuna, so good! Apparently we're not alone. Gardening is suddenly even MORE popular in the valley. Who thought that was possible? Having spent the majority of my life on the California coast, where all we could grow successfully was Iceplant and maybe Poison Oak, it IS nice to live somewhere where things actually grow. I've eaten a LOT of lettuce in the past few weeks. Now it seems like it's all about stress relief. We have a few suggestions in this issue from some of our regular contributors. Cheryl at Oregon Permanent Makeup sent us an article about getting a facial, looking good and relieving stress. Kris Denning, our Health & Fitness contributor not only sent in her stress relief tips, but shes putting her Downward Dog where her mouth is and offering yoga and pilates classes online. Check out her offerings at: www.healthytothesoul.com. And if you're

interested in total stress relief, check out this month's article about the Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa's getaway. Despite the 24/7 apocalyptic news on TV, not all local business news is bad. Take a look at local screen printers Ken and Linda Johnson at Specialty Screen Printing. They're rocking it! This time has brought some changes to the way we do business for sure. If you don't already know, our regular contributor Bonnie Milletto, is also the founder and host of the "Amazing You Conference." Originally a live event culminating in last year's mega-event at the Salem Convention Center, it has now moved online. I'm sure she won't mind my saying, Bonnie is not exactly super high-tech, but she is the highest of high when it comes to people. So initially it was a shock, but now she's put it together and will be able to reach a much wider audience on the web. The world is now her convention center! This is a bizarre summer for sure. I hope you and yours are doing well, and having some fun. Count the things we DO have, not what we can't do, and with any luck we'll all see each other in-person sometime soon!

Scott

Visit Lori on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3iqcH3W

Don't forget! If you have events planned, even events that are way off in the future, you can post them for free on our website at: www.willametteliving.com ALSO Don't forget, call for takeout!

www.willametteliving.com/subscribe Spending more time at home? Spending ALL your time at home? Save yourself the trip to pick up a free copy, and subscribe to Willamette Living.

We've made a change on the website! For a long time now, we've had a stream of our Instagram posts, but now you can share your favorite Willamette Valley Pics too! Just add the hashtag: #WillametteLiving to your Insta posts, and your photos will show up on our web site. Got new products? Having a special event? Trips to your favorite outdoor spots? A particularly cute dog? Winery fun? Tag 'em!

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


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Corvallis

Hours of Operation Monday - Saturday 9am - 5pm Sunday 10am - 5pm

Check garlandnursery.com for any changes to hours of operation.

204 SW Madison Ave. 541-752-5518

Eugene 323 Oakway Rd. Suite F 458-210-2827

clothes-tree.com

/ClothesTree

Locally owned and operated since 1962, The Clothes Tree provides exceptional quality merchandise and excellent customer service for all ages and sizes.

•

A Sampling of the Quality Brands We Carry... NYDJ

Renvar

Hobo Bags

Sanctuary

Fenini

Charlie B

Pendleton

UGG Apparel

Tribal

Uno de 50

Liverpool

Joseph Ribkoff

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Worlds Away

A recent review: Stay here if you can! The pictures can’t even show what a wonderful house this is! Everything you would want is there and we saw seals and whales right in front of the house!

Rest, relax & recharge at a luxuriously well-appointed beachfront rental on the central Oregon coast For booking information availability and more visit

www.vrbo.com/773292

Valerie H. - Stayed Sept, 2019 Five Stars!

www.willametteliving.com

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Unstoppable

Bonnie Milletto

The "Amazing You" Conference Adapts to a Digital Reality

facing page: photos from past events. Reading online?

GET YOUR TICKETS HERE

A Quick Q and A with Bonnie Milletto, Conference Founder and Host How many years have you done the Women’s conference? This October 2 will be the 7th Annual Event.

to fill a convention center. In addition to Oregon, women last year came from Washington, California, Colorado and Oklahoma.

What was your motivation to start this venture? A conference of this magnitude was not something I had ever thought about. My motivation was to help a dear friend move forward after the passing of her husband, who was also a close friend.

In the past it’s been a women only event, now I see you’re expanding the invite, to men? AmazingYOU, orginally designed as a full-day conference for women, welcomes everyone to join us this year for the virtual full-day premier event. Men’s voices have been added to the line-up, along with singer/songwriters and entertainers.

After the first year I thought my job was done, but the voices from the event echoed the same thing, “What you started for one means so much to many, please don’t let this go.” What goes on at the conference? We start with an enhanced optional session prior to the main event - yoga - movement to get you going, relaxed and ready for the day . Keynote and featured speakers, cameo & celebrity Speakers, videos, musical entertainment and much, much more! Is it local people only? What started with 64 women locally grew

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For the past 6 years, you’ve held the event at a local venue, with last year’s event held at the Salem Convention Center. This year, in light of the situation, you’ve had to pivot to the web. What are some of the challenges/benefits of a virtual event? Taking a high-touch interactive event into the unknown virtual world was terrifying. I’m high on the people scale and not so much on the technical side. After my initial freak out I began to see the opportunities started to outweigh the challenges. Now more people can attend from all over the world from the comfort

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

and safety of their own home or offices in a relaxed environment. You do not need to walk around a large venue to find your table or even the restroom; you can sit on your couch and just enjoy the presentations, music and videos. We also have a morning yoga session you can participate in to get you moving, relaxed and ready to take in the day. There’s no travel or parking expense and no dress code! What do you want people to know about this year’s event? A lot of organizations are cancelling their events. We’ve expanded AmazingYOU as an all-virtual event over three days. If you can’t be with us on October 2, you will now have two extra days to take in the entire event - or repeat favorite sessions - so you won’t miss a thing. You will get to hear speakers on becoming a powerhouse storyteller, on confidence and empowerment, social awareness, business insights, overcoming challenges, and be delighted by singer/songwriters, with than 20 additional cameo speakers highlighted throughout the day with a variety of topics that will uplift, entertain and resonate with current events.


www.willametteliving.com

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Local Business

A small-town specialty screen printer stands out in a big way By Kim Beeler Specialty Screen Printing co-owner Ken Johnson said you name it, the 41-year industry veteran can print on it.

“We can custom fit anything from window and bumper stickers, promotional products on plastics and metal, such as circuit boards and membrane switches,” he noted, adding “not a lot of shops are doing those now. Our strength is in our different substrates and materials.” Mark Smith, owner of FASTSIGNS® in Salem, said there are good old-fashioned, simple reasons why he has selected Specialty Screen Printing to order, in bulk, its corrugated plastic screen printing.

Ken and Linda Johnson

Sometimes it is the simple things that stand out and lead to a business’ success, even during a global pandemic. Specialty Screen Printing, is a small, two-person business that specializes in the latest innovations in screen printing, but it thrives on good old-fashioned, quality customer service. The 16-year-old business offers custom fabrication screen printing on any surface you can imagine for commercial and marketing agency clients. Recently, work transitioned from more traditional signage, product displays, labels, and direct mail campaigns to graduation celebration signs we all have seen scattered along various Oregon communities’ front lawns due to COVID-19. Specialty Screen Printing separates itself from its competition, in part, with its innovative screen-printing services that uses multi-colored ink on any surface you can imagine. Its client list includes Audix Microphones, Chemwest Systems, Inc., and FASTSIGNS® in Salem as well as local causes like this one in Newberg, www.Don’tGiveUpSigns.com.

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“His customer service, timing, and prices led us to not look anywhere else,” Smith said. 'That’s how we choose almost all our vendors. There are a lot of screen printers out there.' He delivers when he says he will. It’s really that simple.” Specialty Screen Printing was originally founded in Tigard in 2004. In 2013 owners Ken and Linda Johnson were seeking more of a quaint, small-town lifestyle while still wanting to operate their business close to their clients in the Portland metro and Salem areas. Specialty Screen Printing works with commercial and marketing agency customers within a 60-mile radius of Yamhill. Along with their five-monthold pug, Rocky, the husband-and-wife operation runs from a 500-square-foot space in the couple’s Yamhill home. In his spare time, Ken said he’s trying to learn how to operate a drone, which he hopes to use the technology to help showcase his work soon on the company website: www.specialtyscreenprinting. com. If you’d like more information, please visit the website or call Ken at (971) 998-8274

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

Rocky the Pug Puppy

Work in Progress, And Below, Finished


Stress-Less

Reduce Your Stress, Get a Facial By Cheryl Lohman We are all experiencing some level of stress and anxiety in these covid times. For sure there are better days ahead. However the stress of all the uncertainty can take a toll on us. What are some things you can do to minimize the impact of stress? • • • • •

Get plenty of Sleep Exercise Talk with friends Watch funny movies And take a time out with a professional facial.

Instead of thinking about facials as just a beauty treatment, let’s explore how and why facials can help reduce the impacts of stress. You have hundreds of pressure points on your face. During a facial, the pressure points get massaged. Massaging produces more blood flow and lymph drainage, which reduces the physical and psychological stress in your body. Most of us do not know where the facial pressure points are. That is why it is good to have a professional facial. Professionals are trained on

methods and techniques that improve circulation and encourage the muscles to relax. At the end of your facial, you will feel the stress has melted away. In addition to the stress reduction, facial massages will help you accelerate the cell regeneration process in your skin. It also helps reduce puffiness, and sagging skin. A facial can also increase the production of collagen under your skin and when that happens, it helps reduce the visible signs of stress. How often should you get a facial? Clearly, this is dependent on your budget and time constraints. Regular frequency is recommended and ideally monthly or at a minimum 4 times a year. When the seasons change is a great time because the skin needs are different as the seasons change. Prices will vary with the esthetician you choose. You can expect paying in the range of $65 to $130 depending on what special treatments are performed.

Did You Know? You have hundreds of pressure points on your face. During a facial, the pressure points get massaged. Massaging produces more blood flow and lymph drainage, which reduces the physical and psychological stress in your body.

If you decide to try a facial for stress reduction and a little time out from the crazy world, you wont regret it! Enjoy!

www.willametteliving.com

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Art

Art in the Mid-Valley By Brian Egan

The past few months have been a time of learning for artists, finding new ways to express themselves and sell their work. Normally many artists spend their summer weekends at art fairs, Saturday markets, and other outdoor venues selling their work. Those sources of income have disappeared during the pandemic, forcing artists to be creative in online/virtual sales. To many of us art is like comfort food, feeding our mental well-being; so, where do you find art when the galleries are closed and the fairs are shut down? Buying Art During the Pandemic More people are buying art online than ever before, not only from artist websites or online stores, but also on social media websites like Instagram and Facebook. You can tell plenty from locating and researching an artist’s online profile these days, including in many cases being able to view a significant selection of their art. In fact, so much information is now available online for artists that you could acquire a complete collection without ever

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having to set foot in a gallery. Not that you would want to do that when we have so many great local galleries, but it is an option. Regardless of the level of personal involvement you want to have, here are some helpful guidelines for researching and buying art directly from artists online. Search, locate and review as much information as possible about artists whose work you’re considering. This includes social media pages (Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.), stores, shops or galleries on group art websites, and so on. If you’re in the preliminary stages of looking, you can do basic image searches on Google for either specific artists, subject matters, or types of art you’re interested in. Once you have a list of artist names, visiting their personal websites is generally the best way to start. There you can usually find information like the artist’s statement, biographical details, resume of shows and experience, selections of their art, specialties, descriptions or explanations of their art, what materials or mediums they

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

use, contact information and more. Here are links to a few local websites to connect with artists: Corvallis Art Guild: corvallisartguild.net Willamette Valley PhotoArts Guild: photoartsguild.org/~photoav0 River Gallery: www.rivergalleryart.com Viewing art online is not the same as seeing it in person, so be sure to ask the seller about their return policy. Most artists will accommodate returns, just as they want your return business!

Around Oregon Annual Exhibit at The Arts Center: Now until August 26th, The Around Oregon Annual exhibit is open to artists living in all parts of our state. This exhibition recognizes the quality and diversity in the creative expression of artists throughout


Art

Oregon. Our intent is to show young and upcoming, as well as mature and established artists as a group. The Around Oregon Annual also recognizes and encourages excellence by awarding prizes to the most outstanding artists in the group. Each year, a juror from outside The Arts Center is chosen to curate the exhibit. Jane Brumfield serves as the 2020 AOA juror. She is the co-owner of Imprint Gallery in Cannon Beach.

Arts Alive! A Corvallis Arts Center Virtual Event August 14th and 15th Arts Alive is a community arts event dedicated to raising the visibility of working artists in our city and region. Each summer we bring together artists, writers, performers, and musicians from all over the area to share their studio process and art with the larger community. The artists are creating work onsite so you can check out their materials and techniques in person. In the past, we’ve had ceramicists, jazz

musicians, printmakers, glass artists, jewelers, poets, and more participate in Arts Alive! Our 3rd Annual Arts Alive! has become virtual. We’ll be offering a number of ways to interact online through panels, recorded and live events, social media and more! Bring Arts Alive! from The Arts Center plaza to your home this year and join us in discovering more artists, more music, more poems, and more art. This is a great opportunity to grab a drink, eat some food, and of course, watch, make, and participate. See up to date event details at theartscenter.net/arts-alive

Susan Johnson Retrospective at The Arts Center: September 4th to October 17th As an artist, teacher and arts administrator, Susan has been a valuable member of the Mid-Valley arts scene for many years. She has been working with oil sticks, colored pencil, ink and various collage materials for the last 25 years

after serving 8 years as Executive Director of The Corvallis Arts Center. Her work is primarily abstract outdoor images as seen through or slipping out of an inner window, with pathways being a common subject matter. This retrospective will show how her art has evolved over many years. You can see recent work on her website, https://susanjohnson-artoregon. com. Art is good for the soul; if you are a working artist, keep on revealing your heart and soul. If you are an art lover, support your local artists and enjoy some food for ARTS your CENTER own HOURS soul! Check our website for current gallery and Artshop hours www. theartscenter.net

Phone 541-754-1551

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GALLERY

Anna Mallard, Traditional hooked rug. Wool on linen

For hours please check our website and Facebook

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

FRIDAY NIGHT FUNNY: A SHOWCASE OF ALL KINDS OF COMEDY FROM ALL OVER THE PNW STAND-UP, SKETCH SHOWS, AND IMPROV THEATRE. IF IT'S FUNNY, IT'S FAIR GAME. FRIDAYS | 7:30 PM MAJESTICPIECE THEATRE: A SERIES OF REHEARSED ONLINE COMMUNITY THEATRE PRODUCTIONS OF PUBLIC DOMAIN PLAYS, PRESENTED BY PASSIONATE LOCAL DIRECTORS AND ACTORS FROM THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY AND ALL OVER THE WORLD. SATURDAYS | 7:30 PM MAJESTIC’S GOT TALENT: A VIRTUAL VARIETY SHOW! PREVIOUSLY RECORDED SKITS, SCENES, DANCES, OR OTHER PERFORMANCES. THE FIRST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

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ENJOY A VARIETY OF SHOWS AT THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME

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Fine Art and Unique Gifts by Local Artists 209 SW 2nd St, Corvallis • Tues. thru Sat 11-4 www.artinthevalley.net

ART Trail

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Benton County residents urged to enroll in statewide COVID-19 study Participants in OHSU-led study will help protect their communities About 200 Benton County residents have signed up to report their temperature and other COVID-19 symptoms for up to one year. Why? To provide state and local officials information that will help them make decisions about how to keep Oregon open and safe. Since it was announced in May, the Oregon Health & Science University-led Key to Oregon study has been measuring COVID-19 prevalence throughout the state. So far, nearly 9,000 Oregonians have enrolled statewide. The study aims to enroll up to 100,000 randomly selected Oregonians, who will spend less than 10 minutes a day to report their temperature and other symptoms on a secure website. Up to 10,000 of those enrolled will also be selected for asymptomatic testing, or testing those who do not have symptoms, to better measure an often-invisible source of COVID-19’s spread. Those who take part are helping protect their families and communities. OHSU will share study findings with state and local leaders, who can use the data to make decisions to meet the state’s economic and social needs – including reopening or closing local businesses and schools – while also protecting human health and lives. “We are deeply grateful to those willing to volunteer their time to this important work,” says the study’s lead researcher, Jackie Shannon, Ph.D. “Each person who spends less than 10 minutes a day on this study will help us better understand how the virus is affecting Oregonians. If you were randomly selected, please consider taking part to help your community stay open and safe.”

HEALTH FITNESS

A total of 1750 Benton County households were invited to participate in the study and should have received mail notices in May. Those mailings included instructions about how to enroll online. If you lost your invite but are interested in enrolling, please send an email to KeyStudy@ohsu.edu.

The most current state-of-the-art fitness equipment, and trained staff available to answer your questions. More than 120 hrs. per week of group exercise classes including Zumba, Nia, Pilates, 3 types of yoga, Step, Cardio, Goup Power (weights) and even Line Dancing!

Those interested in following the study’s progress can learn more at www.ohsu.edu/key-to-oregon.

Aquatic Exercise Classes

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2 indoor pools for classes and lap swimming Warm water pool for therapy fitness for arthritis, fibromyalgia and orthopedic type issues Connect with us on Facebook for current events, specials and more!

facebook.com/TimberhillAthleticClub

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Books A Beginner’s Guide to the End By BJ Miller and Shoshana Berger

home, forage, and more. This book is a love poem to birds and bird lovers. It is bright and charming and glowing with admiration for our feathered friends. I loved this ode to their immense diversity and quirky birdly behaviors. I dare say I love birds even more now than I did before reading this book. -Charnee

Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer The author, a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, shows how all

As You Wish By Cary Elwes and Joe Layden Death and dying are not always pleasant topics to discuss, but important nonetheless. From a mindful passage for the dying, to compassionate insight for those helping along the way, this book covers many topics of interest. I found this book helpful for planning for myself and will use this information as a conversation starter for my loved ones as we all approach the final goodbye. - Tammy

From Cary Elwes, who played the iconic role of Westley in The Princess Bride, comes a first-person behindthe-scenes look at the making of the film. William Goldman’s incredibly inventive yet groundedin-fable novel, The Princess Bride, is truly a top fave book for me! The movie is now a cult classic and is enjoyed by all ages. This fun behindthe-scenes look at the making of the movie is easy to read, and a must for fans of the story, as well as those who enjoy reading about the positive experiences of others. - Ruth Rose

The Bird Way By Jennifer Ackerman This engaging book invites you into the fascinating world of birds. The author’s own love and knowledge of birds is evident. She expertly highlights familiar and peculiar species and research from around the world to chronicle how they care for young, journey

living beings, plant and animal, have gifts and lessons to share. Kimmerer guides us through an exploration of our connection to nature and the consciousness of our relationship with the Earth. She shares her indigenous background and heritage, and advocates a return to the things most precious to her. While she is a scientist by career, her indigenous roots connect her to the spirit of the science. I loved this book. - Petrichor

Librarian’s Picks

Corvallis-Benton County

PUBLIC LIBRARY

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper By Phaedra Patrick Arthur Pepper has had the same routine every day since his wife Miriam died. Up at 7:30, he waters his fern named Frederica and spends time in his garden. On the one-year anniversary of his wife’s death, things change. In Miriam’s things he discovers a charm bracelet with very unique, specific charms. He embarks on an adventure to discover the meaning behind the charms that takes him from London to Paris to India. In meeting people that knew a different Miriam, he gets to know a side of her that he was unaware of, and makes new and lasting friends along the way. I enjoy Phaedra Patrick’s books, this one is filled with wonderful characters and is a feel good story. I finished it with a smile on my face.- Tammy

Dictionary for a Better World By Irene Latham and Charles Waters This inspiring resource for middlegrade readers is organized as a dictionary; each entry presents a word related to creating a better world, such as ally, empathy, or respect. For each word, there is a poem, a

quote from an inspiring person, a personal anecdote from the authors, and a “try it� prompt for an activity. This is a book I love because it’s so accessible, and allows the reader to explore all aspects of each concept. Beautiful illustrations are the key to what makes this book a successful introduction to concepts children need to know about today. - Ruth Rose

Dragon Hoops By Gene Luen Yang Award-winning graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang readily admits that he doesn’t know much about sports, but what he does know is the art of storytelling. When the men’s basketball team at the high school where he teaches is having yet another standout season in their pursuit to win the elusive California State Championship, he discovers a story that he wants to tell. In Dragon Hoops, Gene Luen Yang immerses himself in the team and gets to know the players, the coaches, and the history of the school’s basketball program. While he deftly captures the exciting on-court action, it is the personal stories that he shares that are even more compelling, including the impact that they have on his own life. Whether you are a basketball fan or not, this is a young adult graphic novel you don’t want to miss. And the book cover even feels like a basketball! - Heidi

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone By Lori Gottlieb This book discusses therapy from many angles: a therapist with her clients, a therapist as a broken person, a therapist in therapy. Lori Gottlieb gives a thoughtful and compassionate look at life in a time of crisis and the work that it takes to come back. I enjoyed this funny, poignant and wise book about life passages, and the interesting peek behind the curtain of therapy. - Tammy

A Murderous Relation By Deanna Raybourn Veronica Speedwell and Stoker star in the delightful mystery series set in Victorian England, where the eccentric pair of late-Victorian detectives delve into a case involving potential scandal for the royal family. At the same time, London is being terrorized by a notorious and elusive serial killer -- Jack the Ripper. As secrets start swirling, Victoria and Stoker need to find the truth before it is too late for all of them. I love books with strong character development and Deanna Raybourn’s characters are inventive yet true to their era. Richly detailed and sassy! - Ruth Rose

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I N D O W N T O W N C O RVA L L I S A C C E P T I N G C O N S I G N M E N T S 7 D AY S A W E E K A L L I T E M S TA K E N S E A S O N A L LY

SECOND GLANCE 3 1 2 S W 3 R D S T. 541-753-8011 www.willametteliving.com

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COPING WITH ENORMOUS STRESS ?

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INSOMNIA : ANXIETY : WORRY : LOW ENERGY : HEADACHES : HEARTBURN : POOR DIGESTION LOW LIBIDO : HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Rejuvenate at The Ulti Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa invites you to immerse yourself in the beauty, bounty, and adventure of the North Coast with their new Coastal Reset Experience. A curated seasonal offering that features the best of

the coastal lodge from adventure, Tidepools Spa, and Meridian Restaurant & Bar. “We strive to create an authentic North Coast experience for our guests that reflects the best of the season here,� says Jennifer

CHOOSE ACUPUNCTURE LIVE LIFE : FEEL BETTER CALLÂ BALANCE POINT ACUPUNCTURE 541-754-2225 Acupuncture is often the last resort with the best results. CALL TODAY 541-754-2225 BALANCE POINT ACUPUNCTURE : 999 NW CIRCLE BLVD. CORVALLIS OR. 97330

CASH BUYER OLD GOLD JEWELRY • ROLEX WATCHES STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & JEWELRY

Photos: Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa

541-758-4055 22

5th & Madison Downtown Corvallis

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


Tillamook Coast

imate Spa Escape on the Tillamook Coast Nelson, Director of Lodging for Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa. “Our new experience invites you to reset through heart-pumping adventures and restorative moments inspired by the season.”

with a variety of special moments curated to the guest’s preference, including healing spa treatments, lively adventures, and coastalinspired cuisine. Here is a look into the new summer Coastal Reset at Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa:

The current summer Coastal Reset Experience embodies Headlands’ Hospitality, Oregon-style promise

Headlands Coastal Lodge and Spa www.willametteliving.com

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Fabulous Ocean View Rooms

About the Logo... Pacific City is the only wintering spot in the world of the Semidi Island Aleutian Cackling Geese. Each year, the geese fly south more than 2,000 miles from their small Alaskan nesting islands to Oregon’s North Coast. Every evening during their annual Pacific City stay, they leave the grassy pastures in the Nestucca Valley and soar across a mile of ocean to roost on Haystack Rock—the same towering monolith that Headlands guests can see from their rooms and cottages. Our logo is reminiscent of these special birds because they capture our Headlands spirit: rugged, beautiful and ready for adventure. We feel the same way about our geese as we do about our guests—eagerly awaiting their arrival, cherishing their stay with us and looking forward to their eventual return.

Adventure: This summer’s Coastal Reset is anchored deep in the spirit of adventure. Choose from five inspiring hikes from scenic old-growth trails perched high above the Pacific Ocean at Cape Lookout or explore Sitka Sedge Natural Area that spills out onto the protected nesting areas of the Western Snowy Plover. No trip to Pacific City, is complete without an exhilarating climb up the giant dune of Cape Kiwanda, and an oceanside bonfire with handcrafted marshmallows for s’mores nestled on the Northside of the cape at McPhillips Beach. After your hike, venture out to their outdoor patio to experience a North Coast favorite— fresh locally foraged steamed clams. A Headlands’ Adventure Coach will guide you through how to prepare and cook the perfect steamed clams with Pelican Brewing Company beer to pair them with for an authentic North Coast culinary experience. Dune Hike With Aleution Geese Overhead

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


Hot Tub Couple

Tidepools Spa: Rejuvenate and restore through their hypnotic scalp, neck, and shoulder massage with ocean-inspired Head and Sole treatment. Featuring wild lime and avocado seed oil that flows seamlessly into a revitalizing peppermint treatment for the feet and lower legs. This pairing of services works synergistically to promote a deep state of relaxation, the perfect complement to your North Coast adventures. Meridian Restaurant & Bar: Savor the summer bounty of the North Coast at Meridian Restaurant & Bar with their thoughtfully crafted Northwest Chef’s Tasting and Oregon Wine Pairing. This pairing features locally sourced Meda Quark cheese from Nestucca Valley Creamery on guest’s favorite Peach and Beet Salad paired with a Pinot Noir 2019 Elk Cove “La Sirene” Willamette Valley, Ore. The 4th course includes Sole with a tonnato sauce, duck fat fingerling potatoes perfectly paired with Chardonnay 2018 Roco “Marsh Estates” Willamette Valley, Ore. Summer Coastal Reset Experience Inclusions: This three-night and four-day experience makes you feel relaxed, restored, and reset for your return home. The new experience is the pinnacle offering of the coastal lodge and includes the following: • Three-night stay in an Oceanfront Signature guestroom with optional room upgrade

• Four-course Northwest Chef’s Tasting Menu with Oregon Wine Pairings at Meridian • In-room seasonally curated dessert and cocktails for two delivered to your door on the night of choosing. • Total Price: $3,325, gratuity included To book this summer’s Coastal Reset Experience and see how your experience can unfold, visit Headlands Coastal Lodge and Spa here: https://headlandslodge. com/coastal-reset/

About Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa The Nestucca Ridge Family of Companies, founded in Pacific City, Oregon, in 1990, is a group of organically grown businesses, including Pelican Brewing Company, one of Oregon’s fastest-growing craft beer brands. Headlands is locally owned and owner-operated, employing 60 people from Pacific City and the surrounding area. For more information, visit www.headlandslodge.com or call 503-483-3000.

• Private guided Fat Tire bike outing for two on our local trails. • Private guided hike and Meridian picnic lunch with an Adventure Coach. Choose from: Three Cape Lookout Trails – South Trail, Cape trail, or North Trail; Sitka Sedge or Whalen Island. • Private sunset dune hike followed by bonfire + handcrafted marshmallows for s’mores at nearby McPhillips Beach.

Bring Your Furry Friend

• Two 60-minute Head and Sole Body Treatments at Tidepools Spa. • An afternoon culinary adventure— experience steamer clams on the patio cooked by your Adventure Coach, paired with beer from Pelican Brewing Company.

In-Room Breakfast

Meridian Fireside Room View

Meridian Breakfast


Keeping 'em Busy

Fun Phone Apps for Kids to Stimulate Thinking and Creativity By Kimberly Blaker With a massive sea of kids’ phone apps on the market, which ones best maximize kids’ media time? The following is a selection of kid-tested and parent-approved apps to help boost kids’ critical thinking skills and creativity. Piano Kids – Music & Songs. Free for Android. Ages 3+. This top-rated app teaches kids and parents how to play musical instruments, including the piano, xylophone, and drums. It exercises children's memory, concentration, creativity, listening skills, and motor skills.

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to defeat Dr. Excuses.

and complete their missions.

Heads Up! Free for Android. $1 Apple. Ages 6+. Based on the Heads Up! game created by Ellen DeGeneres, this family game is a blast for all ages. A player holds the phone on their head with an image facing out for the other players to see. The player’s teammate then acts out the image shown on the phone while the teammate holding it up has to guess what his teammate is acting out.

Doodle Magic Joy. Free for Android. Ages 3+. This drawing app, with colors ranging from soft pastels to bright neons, offers a variety of art tools including pen, calligraphy, airbrush, crayon, pastel, sponge, eraser, and more. When doodles are complete, the art can be saved and even played back as a cartoon. This is a fun app for kids to adults.

Flow Free. Free for all platforms. Ages 8+. This color-based game offers various levels of play to sustain the interest of grade-school kids on up to adults. It improves complex thinking skills as players try to connect the dots to create pipes without crossing over another color.

Kids Build & Crash Blocks Game. Free for all platforms. Ages 1 – 4. Toddlers and preschoolers can build tall towers with colorful blocks while learning their colors and numbers. When they›re done building, children thrill at crashing the tower. Your child can never lose in this game. The app also features fun sound effects and animations.

Super Family Hero. Free for all platforms. Ages 4+. Kids and parents can enjoy this family game with individual levels of difficulty that make the game challenging yet fair to all players. Create custom Avatars, then use Interactive Stories to play mini-games, and attempt

Lego City My City 2. Free for Android. Ages 7 – 14. With 15 mini-games in all, players go on thrilling car chases to catch thieves, blast off into space, and do underwater exploration. As players move through the game, they earn blocks and components to build vehicles

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

Unblock Me Free. Free for all platforms. Ages 7+. This mental workout boasts 16,000 puzzles in all. The object of the game is to unblock the red block in as few moves as possible. Kids and adults can compete with friends and players around the world. 3/2 Chess. Free for Android. Ages 5+. Played much like standard chess for two players, this game is designed for up to three players. 3/2 Chess is a strategy game that boosts creativity and critical thinking skills. Hoopa City 2. $3.99 for all platforms. Ages 5 – 10. Kids can build the city of their dreams with skyscraper apartments,


shopping malls, and beach resorts in this 3D game app. Then they can play inside the city they've built, dress up their citizens, and even switch to night mode to see their city lit up. Magic Tiles 3. Free for all platforms. Ages 7+. This massively popular piano game requires players to tap the black tiles while avoiding the white ones to generate beautiful, high-quality music. The app features additional instruments such as guitar, as well as a battle mode where kids can compete with other players around the world. ColorMinis Kids. Free for all platforms. Ages 3+. With this color and design app, kids experiment with a variety of colors and materials, including Real 3D gloss, clay, glass, metal, and more. They can color and design anime figures, animals, robots, castles, and much more. When their design is complete, they'll create animated gifs of their creations.

for young children when riding in the car, waiting for appointments, and on shopping trips. In addition to thousands of videos of their favorite shows, they'll also be introduced to the “Weekly Pick” of educational videos.

Drawing for Kids! Learning Games for Toddlers. Free for Android. Ages 2 – 5. This app is an easy way for even the youngest toddlers to learn how to draw. It includes fun sounds and animations as each drawing comes to life.

The player’s teammate then acts out the image shown on the phone while the teammate holding it up has to guess what his teammate is acting out.

PBS Kids Video. Free all platforms. Ages 2+. Kids can watch their favorite PBS Kids shows wherever you go. This app is a fun form of educational entertainment www.willametteliving.com

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Seniors Are Embracing Technology:

From Healthcare Needs to Binge Watching Just call them ‘Silver Techies’. Medicare eligible seniors are embracing technology and loving it. Six in ten are embracing technology more during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new healthinsurance.com survey. Seniors are using technology for their healthcare needs. The survey reveals an incredible 340% increase in telemedicine usage among Medicare recipients since the start of COVID-19. Onethird report ordering their prescriptions from an online pharmacy. And it›s not just telemedicine and the internet. Nearly one-third say they monitor their health using a wearable. In fact, 4 in 10 are interested in a wearable that helps them and those around them maintain appropriate social distance. The survey also explores seniors’ internet usage, healthcare cost concerns, Medicare enrollment, grandma and grandpa’s bingewatching habits, and more.

COVID-19 Impact The coronavirus pandemic is affecting seniors’ daily habits and family life; 38% haven›t seen their kids or grandkids in person since mid-March. More than half have put off a dentist appointment because of COVID-19. Six in ten have only left the house to go food shopping or to the pharmacy during COVID-19. On the flip side 27% say they have left their house whenever they

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

wanted during the pandemic. 35% are worried about contracting COVID-19 because they may be hit with a surprise bill. Nearly 4 in 10 think those who have a Medicare Advantage plan and who contract COVID-19 are getting better care. 12% used the special enrollment period to enroll in Medicare during COVID-19.

Telemedicine Is Trending Telemedicine is trending among those on Medicare. Prior to COVID-19 only 1 in 10 used telemedicine. During COVID-19, 44% have used telemedicine and 43% say they intend on using it after. Of those who used telemedicine, 58% say they have used it just once and 30% report using it once a month. Two-thirds of those who haven›t tried telemedicine said the reason is simply because they haven›t needed the service.

Grandparents Are Binge Watching Binge-watching doesn’t have an age limit; 75% of respondents say they have a smart TV or use a streaming device, with 47% admitting to binge-watching. But Grandma and Grandpa aren›t totally sold on cutting the cord, 66% of seniors still have Cable TV.

Liking Social Media A majority of senior citizens are hitting the like button; 73% are on social media with 83% saying they use Facebook the


most. 52% say they use social media to stay in touch with family and friends and 21% say they use it to get news.

Making Use Of Video Chatting Seniors are using technology to stay in touch with both family and friends during COVID-19. More than half video chat with their kids and grandkids at least once a month, with 50% saying they video chat more since the start of COVID-19. And it›s not just with family, 32% say they video chat with their friends.

Satisfied With Smartphones

Nine in ten seniors say they have a smartphone and like to use it. 71% say their preferred method of communication is either texting or talking on their cell phone. And it›s not just smartphones, two-thirds say they also have some type of tablet. 11% have used the COVID-19 pandemic as a reason to start using a smartphone.

2020 Election In the upcoming election, nine in ten say lowering drug prices is important to them. 68% say the economy and healthcare are the two most important issues to them in the 2020 election. How seniors are going to vote is split; 58% say they will vote via a mail in ballot, and 42% say they will vote in person in November. When asked about the outlook of the United States, 84% say they haven›t seen the country more divided in their lifetime than it is now.

Medicare Enrollment Habits

Nearly 8 in 10 research their Medicare options online. But not all beneficiaries enroll online; 44% sign up using the internet, and the remaining 56% sign up either in person or on the phone. When looking for a plan, 4 in 10 look for a Medicare plan that accepts their doctor. For 26%, a Medicare plan with low monthly premiums and copays is most important, while 22% are looking for a plan that has extra benefits like dental, vision, hearing or fitness programs. More than two-thirds with a Medicare Advantage plan are happy with it. Two in ten intend to use the annual enrollment period beginning in October to adjust their current Medicare plan. 26% say they intend to switch from an Original Medicare to a Medicare Advantage plan and 22% plan to change their prescription drug plan. When asked if the age to be eligible for Medicare should be lowered to 60, 51% said yes.

Healthcare Cost Worries

Two-thirds are worried about out-of-pocket medical costs. Six in ten are worried about an unexpected medical bill, so much so that 36% have put off seeing a doctor because of cost. 89% think prescription drug prices are too high. One-third spend more than $50 a month on prescription drugs. As far as future costs are concerned, 50% of respondents say they have money set aside for their family to use for their health needs. View the full survey results here: https://www.healthinsurance. com/learning-center/article/medicare-eligible-seniors-survey

www.willametteliving.com

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Finn J.D. John's Offbeat Oregon History

Timberline Lodge Could Have Been a Gaudy Skyscraper By Finn J.D. John HIGH UP ON THE SIDE OF MOUNT HOOD, TIMBERLINE LODGE HAS OVER THE YEARS BECOME AN OREGON ICON. Its rustic, WPA-financed design and construction strike most visitors as a good fit for the state’s general reputation for woodsy civility. But had it not been for a particularly persnickety U.S. Forest Service manager, Timberline might have looked a lot different. How different? Think “Bauhaus school of architectural design.” With nine stories of concrete and glass, and a cable-car tramway. The cable car wasn’t such a bad idea, although that sort of thing depends a lot on how it’s implemented. A cable tramway of sorts was actually installed at Mount Hood in 1950, but it was objectively awful and closed for good twelve years later (see sidebar). But however fun it might be to ride a cable car up the side of Mount Hood, the idea of scabbing a Manhattan-style skyscraper onto the side of Oregon’s tallest mountain probably doesn’t strike anyone as a good idea. The whole scheme had its roots in the early 1920s after the Good Roads movement started resulting in … well, good roads. Once the roads were no longer terrible, and getting stuck in the mud in the middle of nowhere was no longer a real danger, people started venturing out in their Ford Model Ts, Nash Tourings, and Chevrolet Superiors to explore the state. And lots of them explored their way out to the mountain, driving on the freshly built Mount Hood Scenic Loop.

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Once there, they started looking for a place to stay so that they wouldn’t have to drive all the way home in the dark. And on that score, most of them were out of luck. There was a hotel on the mountain — the Cloud Cap Inn, built in 1889 as a sort of permanent base camp for mountain climbers — but at 3,500 square feet, and with just a few guest rooms, it was woefully inadequate to this new surge of demand. Meanwhile, business people in Portland weren’t slow to see the commercial potential in having a mountain so close, now that anyone could just drive on out and visit it. By developing some destination features there, they could generate a bunch of money from tourism, not just for the owners of the development, but for everyone else along the way. So they started thinking about ways to make Mount Hood a more desirable place to spend vacation time … and, of course, money. But to a group of locals who had the requisite magic combination of money, health and leisure, this was not a welcome development. These lucky souls preferred to keep the mountain just as it was — a quiet, magical place of solitude and wildness. They worried that it would be turned into a sort of alpine Coney Island, a wasteland clogged with hamburger stands and tacky roadside attractions, full of noisy children and irresponsible teenagers and other non-Walden-Pond-ish features. Hah, the businessmen retorted. You just want to keep it as your own personal rich-person playground. (Which, let’s be honest here — was a fair comeback.)


This image is from a postcard showing one of the rustic but comfortable rooms at Timberline Lodge; it dates from roughly 1950.

This postcard, showing Timberline Lodge on a sunny winter day, was postmarked in 1950.

This debate got more heated as the 1920s wore on. But it was all just so much talk until a businessman named L.L. Wyler — as part of a committee — came forward with an $800,000 plan to develop the mountain with a flashy, modern hotel and resort, with gas station and cable tram car. The Mazama Club — the local mountaineers’ organization, which was open only to those who had been on Mount Hood’s summit — geared up for battle. But it was over before they knew it. To the surprise of most people on both sides, Forest Service District Forester W.B. Greeley turned the project down flat, calling it a “profit-making eyesore.” Wyler’s outfit pressed on, making changes to the plan to try to win the Forest Service over. They refined the plan into that ninestory skyscraper mentioned above, still involving a tram, and went over Greeley’s head with it. Perhaps they thought the glitz factor of such a modern design would win approval. This would be logical, since the administration of Calvin Coolidge (the President who famously said, “The business of America is business”) was in charge in D.C. at the time. They thought wrong. Coolidge’s Forest Service planners turned the plan down flat. They thought it looked inappropriate for the scenery. Much scrambling ensued as various parties tried to come up with something that would look more appropriate. At length they came up with a more rustic-looking lodge plan, which the Forest Service green-lighted. All was clear for the developers … well, sort of clear. The problem was that by the time all this wrangling was done, it was 1929; the country was sliding into the Depression, and the Portland businessmen were suddenly unwilling or unable to take on the financial obligation. So, nothing happened. But some important issues had been settled: Yes, development on the mountain could go forward. But it would have to respect the mountain. There matters stood for about five years, as the country plunged into the Depression and started trying to claw its way back to normalcy. Part of that process, of course, was the Works Progress Administration, which was offering government grants for infrastructure projects. Of course, the proponents of Timberline Lodge were not slow

This postcard image, from a note mailed in 1909, shows the tiny Cloud Cap Inn on Mount Hood, with the peak behind. Built in 1889, the Cloud Cap was the only hotel onthe mountain until Timberline was built, and after guests started arriving in cars rather than on horses, it proved woefully inadequate to serve the demand for lodgings there. in getting their application in. They formed the Mount Hood Development Association and drew up plans for a 300-bed hotel, costing $275,513 and following the general outlines of the plan that had been approved in 1929. Their plan was approved (or re-approved) in 1935, and construction on Timberline Lodge got started the following year. When the place was finished, the government invited the king of Norway to come demonstrate a wild new sport called “alpine skiing.” They needn’t have bothered. Plenty of Oregonians of Scandinavian and Swiss descent were able and eager to show the way. Perhaps the most enduring symbol of Timberline is the 750-pound bronze weathervane, crafted in a sort of abstract primitive design suggesting a bird. Most people assume it’s a Native American design, and perhaps it is — but the workers who built it actually cribbed the design from a Camp Fire Girls handbook. (Sources: Rose, Judith. Timberline Lodge: A Love Story, a book by Judith Rose published in 1986 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing; Hiking Oregon’s History, a book by William L. Sullivan published in 2006 by Navillus Press)

Continues next page... www.willametteliving.com

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The Skiway aerial trolley works its way along with the mountain in the background. The trolleys were of the doubleender type, with one running on each of two sets of cables.

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So far, only one has been built, and it was an immediate and colossal failure: The Skiway Tram project.

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If the idea of cable car service to Timberline Lodge strikes you as a not particularly bad one, you’re not alone. Over the years since the Wyler group proposed the glass-and-steel mountaintop skyscraper, several proposals have been floated for cable-car service up the mountain.

The Skiway (originally “Skyway,� but that name turned out to already be trademarked) was the brainchild of Dr. J. Otto George, who came up with the idea just after the Second World War, as the popularity of skiing started to explode nationwide. With a group of other investors, he formed the Mount Hood Aerial Transportation Co. to implement his plan. The idea would be, rather than properly engineering a six- or eight-passenger gondola in the usual way, to incorporate the latest skyline-logging technology to hoist an entire city bus into the air and haul it up the side of the mountain. Each bus — there were two of them — was modified somewhat crudely to transfer the power from the drive wheels up to a 1.5-inch overhead traction cable, which it would claw its way along up and down the mountain. The whole project would use off-the-shelf parts and equipment modified to work in this new context, so it would be relatively cheap from a research-and-development standpoint. Most truly bad ideas are good ideas gone awry through some key detail being overlooked or superadded. Not this one. The Skiway was a bad idea through and through, from the very start. It was slow, loud, and expensive. Enormous amounts of force had to be applied to the traction cable just to move it up the side of the mountain, so the trolleys required two regular bus engines, one at each end, running flat out. The engines weren’t diesels, so they could have been louder; but nonetheless they were plenty noisy, too loud for passengers to carry on a conversation during the trip.


- - Eyebrow & Eyeliner

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“I’ve ridden the tramway,� board member George Rauch said, at one of the later company meetings, as the failure of the venture was becoming obvious. “I’ve listened to the shrieks and I’ve taken the jolts over those, what you call them — the saddles, and I’ve heard what people say.�

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It was also terrifying. A city bus full of passengers weighs 15 to 20 tons, which is a lot of weight to have dangling from a cable in the air. The weight dragging down the cable would make it sag deeply as the bus moved from one piling to the next, so that the trip up the mountain became a roller-coaster-like cycle of the tram clawing its way up to one of the towers and then almost free-falling down the other side (nose down, of course) before starting the climb to the next. It was not for the faint of heart, nor for the afraid-of-heights.

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The Skiway aerial trolley emerges from its “hangar� in Government Camp for a run up to Timberline Lodge. (Image: Oregon Historical Society/ Al Monner)

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All these issues might have been OK, but at just about the same time the Skiway opened for passengers, improvements to the highway to Timberline eliminated one of its primary reasons for being. One could now drive to Timberline, or take a groundbased shuttle bus, and get there ten minutes quicker (and, in the case of the bus, for 25 cents less; the tram was 75 cents oneway, and the buses were 50). When the Skiway flying-bus service opened in 1951, there was considerable nationwide fanfare, and lots of people lined up to ride it. But for most of them, once was enough. Activity quickly dropped off to the point where the sky-buses were idle for months on end. By 1956, the run was shut down, and the Mount Hood Aerial Transportation Co. board was faced with some hard decisions. Should they pull the buses and replace them with smaller cars? What about investing in a ground-traction system, like ski lifts use, to reduce the weight and noise? But all these options cost money, and the board had no stomach for risking further sums. A liquidation committee was formed, and by the early 1960s the sky-bus line was no more. (Sources: “Most Extraordinary of Buses ‌,â€? an article by Lindsay Benjamin published on Jan. 7, 2020, on the Oregon Historical Society’s blog at ohs.org/blog; “Skiway Tram,â€? an un-by-lined article published on Jan. 5, 2020, at portlandhistory.net) -------------------Finn J.D. John teaches at Oregon State University and writes about odd tidbits of Oregon history. His book, Heroes and Rascals of Old Oregon, was recently published by Ouragan House Publishers. To contact him or suggest a topic: finn@ offbeatoregon.com or 541-357-2222. www.willametteliving.com

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French Pastry Hotline: 541-752-1785 34

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


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Viva Corvallis!

Apricot

Pain aux Raisin

Walnut Cinnamon Ham & Cheese

Ham & Cheese With JalapeĂąo Desserts

Fruit Tart

Chocolate Éclair Vanilla Éclair Swan

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In our on-going effort to help support our local business', may we present Le Patissier, the best little French bistro in the Valley. Owners Trinidad and Didier Tholognat, work tirelessly to bring us the freshest, most delicious morning treats and specialized lunches. Didier is normally there at an ungodly hour to create the fresh pastries the patisserie offers daily -- nothing is frozen, nothing is not straight from the oven. Not an average 'cook' Didier is the real deal. He is from France and is a bona fide French Chef. So if you're looking for real french flavor and style, you're done looking. Le Patissier is on Circle Blvd. Just west of Market of Choice, in the same complex.

Almondine

Lunch Selections

French Lentil Soup BL T CA

Ham & Cheese Sandwich (Baguette or Croissant ) Turkey Sandwich

Quiche a la Carte or with a Salad

Loraine, Spinach, Mushroom & Semi-Caramelized Onion, or Leek Le Patissier is also offering custom cakes with an advance notice of at least one week, two if you can. At this time, everything is to go only. Orders must be placed (at least) one day ahead for pick up. French Pastry Hotline: 541-752-1785

French Pastry Savory Dishes Wedding Cakes Special Events

All prepared in-house from the freshest ingredients available.

541-752-1785

956 NW CIRCLE BLVD CORVALLIS

Vive la France ! www.willametteliving.com

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In-Season

Grapes Grape Sorbet • • • •

3 cups frozen grapes 2 Tbsp sugar or honey 1 tsp lemon zest 1 tsp lemon juice

Fruit Salad This recipe is more of a reminder than a recipe, because how easy is it?

Freeze the grapes for about three hours then pulse frozen grapes in a food processor until chunky, add remaining ingredients and puree until smooth. Grape sorbet will keep in the freezer for a month or two! Variation: try this recipe but substitute a cup of frozen strawberries for one of the cups of grapes, or whatever fruit you like. Another option… skip most of this recipe, and just freeze the grapes for a few hours, take them out of the freezer, wait a few minutes until they form a frost on the skin, and eat them! Kids love them, and you will too.

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

• Grapes • Watermelon, or Honeydew, or both • A Banana or two • Strawberries • Cantaloupe • Kiwi slices

Slice all into bite sized chunks, add a spritz of lemon juice to maintain color, and chill for a bit. Bonus activity: Walk around and find some blackberries to add or visit a U-Pick farm for blueberries! Both are all over the valley, and wild blackberries are free!


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Fruity Dessert Pizza Cookie dough ingredients: • • • • • •

1 stick of butter (or vegan alternative) 1/2 cup sugar 1 cup flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Topping ingredients: • • • •

8 oz cream cheese (or vegan alternative) 1 Tbsp sugar 2 Tbsp orange marmalade Fruit for decoration

Instructions: • Mix together cookie dough ingredients in a mixer until well mixed. Put in refrigerator to cool a bit. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a pizza pan and spread cooled dough on pan evenly. Bake for 10 – 12 minutes or until starting to turn golden brown. Allow to cool completely before applying cream cheese topping. • Soften 8 oz cream cheese and mix well with sugar. Spread over the baked, cooled cookie. Arrange fruit
in a decorative pattern. Thin orange marmalade with a little water and drizzle over fruit pizza. Make no more than four hours ahead of serving. • Ideas for the fruit: grapes, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, kiwi, peaches, nectarines, plums and cherries are excellent choices for a good range of color.

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Natural Sprinkles Co. is a bakery that celebrates local ingredients, like the ones used this ‘Farmer’s Market Cake.� Now there’s some veggies your kids will love, for sure.

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Fresh Oregon Albacore Tuna, It's Time!

202 Second Ave SW, in Albany | For Information, Call: (541) 704-0445

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Tuna Salad Variations: Add Avocado in place of some of the mayo. Try different mustards Toss in some cucumber Chopped Egg Dill Relish Sweet Relish Dried dill weed Fresh parsley Chives

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Seafood Market

Wild Caught & Ocean Fresh!

Salmon Halibut Crab

Live Tanks! Hot Soup!

Tuna Lobster Rockfish

Cod Shrimp Clams

1925 SE 3rd St. in Corvallis | 541-752-0558 | paciďŹ caseafood@gmail.com Open Wednesday through Sunday 10AM - 6PM

/PacificaSeafoods 38

If you haven't had fresh Oregon tuna, right out of the water, then you don't know what you're missing. I remember a while back (quite a while back come to think of it) a local was ranting and raving about how he was going to eat some of his homecanned tuna. And I remember thinking to myself, "what's the big deal? Everyone has had canned tuna." Then a few years later I was given a tuna fillet, we cut a few steaks and had a sizeable tail piece left, so I just dropped it in simmering water for about 20 minutes, let it cool and popped it in the fridge. The next day, I made tuna salad, as normal, except for the tuna, and the ranting and raving all became clear. Fresh tuna is to canned tuna as frozen Salisbury Steaks are to USDA prime, grass fed filet mignon. The difference is night and day -- more than that. And as a bonus, most every tuna recipe is dead simple. Even as simple as tossing a chunk on the BBQ, at high heat, sear for a few minutes leaving the inside rare, and then slice over a salad.

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

Try a salad Nicoise (below), except cheat on the dressing - Paul Newman makes a great Oil and Balsamic Vinegar dressing that you can use to circumvent work. Prepare the veggies, eggs, lettuce and tuna, drizzle with dressing, enjoy on a hot summer day!


HELP OUR RESTAURANTS THROUGH THIS, CALL FOR TAKEOUT!

Queen’s Chopstick

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Mon, Wed & Thurs: 8:00 - 8:00 Friday: 8:00 - 9:30 Saturday: 7:30 - 9:30 Sunday: 7:30 - 4:00 Closed on Tuesdays 208 2nd St. SW in Albany

Albany’s new sushi sensa�on. Kaiyo Sushi is the place for a quick lunch mee�ng, date night, or family night out. Watch as expertly prepared sushi oats past your seat on our conveyor, and pick your favorites.

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A taste of Japan, in Albany. Come by today and have some sushi! Open 11 am to 10 pm 2826 San�am Hwy SE, Albany, OR 97322 (Next to Elmer’s)

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Fresh ingredients & skilled chefs combine to bring you savory dishes your whole family will love.

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Owners LupĂŠ & Carlos invite you to come have breakfast, lunch or dinner. Delicious, authentic Mexican foods prepared in-house.

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Delicias Valley Cafe

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A local landmark for over 30 years. Our bakers and chefs are at work around-the-clock preparing all your favorite dishes and baked goods using only the finest ingredients. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, or anything in between. Now offering catering too. Mon-Sat 7:00 - 9:00 Sunday 8:00 - 8:00

Kaiyo Sushi

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New Morning Bakery

219 SW 2nd St. Downtown Corvallis NewMorningBakery.com 541-754-0181

541-967-9488 www.novakshungarian.com

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Today, locally sourced ingredients, sustainable practices, and the same love from the “old country� goes into every dish.

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Opened in 1984 by Joseph and Matilda Novak, Novak’s is Oregon’s only Hungarian restaurant!

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136 SW Washington Ave Suite 102, Corvallis 541-753-2222

2329 Kings Blvd Corvallis

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An exciting menu of new Latin fusion cuisine. Fabulous riverfront bar, special events, extensive wine list. A truly memorable dining experience.

Our Asian fusion menu will delight you. You’ll love our chic new restaruant, and our delicious menu items presented with style. Many reviewers have called ours “the best asian food in Corvallis,� come find out why.

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Not just Chinese food!

HELP OUR RESTAURANTS THROUGH THIS, CALL FOR TAKEOUT!

Mon - Sat: 8:00 - 9:00 Sunday: 8:00 - 8:30 Breakfast Buffet Sat & Sun Only: 9:00 - 12:00 933 NW Circle Blvd in Corvallis

(Across the street from Market of Choice)

541-753-0599 www.deliciasvalleycafe.com www.willametteliving.com

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HEALTH & FITNESS

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Balance After Covid Today, as I write this, I feel a primal need to get an exhaustive, stress relieving workout. This morning, a fire broke out in our yard debris bin, burning it to the ground and catching some nearby branches on fire. Immediately I was in fight or flight mode. I rushed to throw my husband the fire extinguisher as I ran for the hose. Without thought, we quickly went to work extinguishing the flames until it was clearly out. Then I sat. Staring at the 4 by 4-inch section of what was left of our yard cart, thinking about how lucky we were that we managed to put the fire out before it had engulfed our trees, and then

our home. My breath was shallow and quick. My stomach was in knots with all the nervous tension, and my mind was on a continuous loop pondering all the “what-ifs”. During stressful situations like these, when our fight or flight mode is activated, our sympathetic nervous system floods our body with hormones like adrenaline. The heart rate, blood pressure, and the pace of our breath increase as our body prepares to deal with the stress. This is good if the stress is acute, as when we are facing an emergency. I needed that adrenaline to help me leap out of my bed and to the fire extinguisher. This can be problematic however, when the issue is ongoing and involves underlying stress. When our mind interprets an event as stressful - even if we just get worked up watching the news, our sympathetic nervous system creates the same reaction. If we don’t “fight”, or “flight” (physically react to the stress), the continued stress response just festers inside of us, increasing our risk for obesity, hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. Even more critical, in this current age of the pandemic, is that underlying stress breaks down our immune system. Almost of us are at least a little bit

stressed right now. The news is on a 24hour virus watch, and social media feeds are reflecting the stress that everyone is projecting out, when they should probably just be running it off or meditating. The bottom line is that we cannot afford for our immune systems to be suffering right now. Here are some ways to keep your mind and body in the right place – even if there’s a fire… Start your morning off with peace. Rather than waking up to worries, let your first thoughts be of gratitude. There is always something to be grateful for. Perhaps listen to positive affirmations or a guided meditation. Drink water first thing and throughout the day. Eat nutritious healthy foods to fuel your body. Sugar breaks down the immune system, so keep that to a minimum. If ya gotta have the cake, then ditch the soda. Take vitamin D daily. Avoid the news and social media or give yourself a set amount of time to watch it then leave it. Exercise every single day even if just taking a 20-minute walk. Engage in activities that bring you joy. When you do find yourself under stress over things you have no control over, acknowledge it. Then close your eyes and take deep, calming breaths. Trust in knowing, that like everything else you have survived in your life – this too shall pass. We are all in this together. Take care of yourself, stay positive, and mask up.

Kris Kris Denning is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist and a yoga/pilates teacher at Timberhill Athletic Club. Contact her at

www.healthytothesoul.com

healthytothesoul.com

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


Making the Best of the COVID Crisis

LOOKIN' GOOD

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

What did you do with your time off over the Covid-19 shutdown earlier this year? I’ve heard about many people starting gardens, learned how to make bread, tried many different recipes, and did a lot of crafting and art projects. A lot. Plus there are unexpected benefits that came from this “down time”. New habits, new realizations. I heard many people share about how much they enjoyed not having to get dressed up and put makeup on to go to work or out and about. Some people complained about having to put makeup when their zoom calls started. Some just didn’t wear makeup at all. Which one were you? There is freedom and a lot of benefits with not putting makeup on all the time. You don’t have makeup melting off or melting into your eyes. You can get to do the fun stuff faster. (Applying and removing makeup at least 10 mins a day adds up to 61 hours a year.) Plus you eliminate the stress of trying to draw that perfect brow or perfect eyeliner everyday. With our new normal and the need to wear masks everywhere we go now, all we can see are the eyes and eyebrows. Those eyes need to look great and show off! How would you like to experience the freedom of not putting makeup on and still look great like you were wearing makeup? Natural permanent makeup treatments are a great solution and people won’t know its permanent makeup.

Now, more than ever, it’s important to look for an artist who will keep you safe with covid precautions. Additionally someone who can make your makeup look natural. If you’d like to explore the possibility of permanent makeup, it is essential to have a consultation with a highly trained and qualified artist. This is not a service you want to bargain shop for and you will want to see actual photos of their work. Today, most professional permanent

Cheryl Lohman CPCP, is a Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional and owner of Oregon Permanent Makeup. Contact her at 541-740-1639 Learn More at

cosmetic artists are members of the world’s leading, not-for-profit society devoted to this field, the Society of Permanent Cosmetic Professionals (SPCP). This organization sets standards of practice for its members, which assures the public of the highest levels of professionalism and safety. After permanent makeup — you’ll be among those who enjoy a carefree natural look that last a long time.

Cheryl

www.oregonpermanentmakeup.com

www.OregonPermanentMakeup.com

www.willametteliving.com

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STYLE GUIDE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Get a Better Table and Better Service By Oscar B Hult, Haberdasher I was reminded recently of the importance of dressing well when going out. We went wine tasting with friends. The ladies were both wearing fun sun dresses and sandals. We guys were wearing linen button up shirts, with nice trousers and dress shoes, and of course we were all wearing straw hats. when we walked into the first winery and were escorted to the nicest table on the patio, I was delighted. The view was awesome, it was 100 degrees, but there was a nice breeze that kept our table cool under the large umbrella. I noticed that others who had arrived just before us were seated in a spot that was closer to the building, they too had an umbrella, but the building blocked their breeze, and part of the view. They were noticeably uncomfortable with the heat, despite being dressed in tee shirts, shorts and flip flops. This pattern repeated itself at the next two wineries as well. We were seated in great spots and our servers were very attentive. While in the periphery you could see other tables trying to catch the

server’s attention. The only difference between us and them seemed to be the way we were dressed. A study from hospitality researchers at the University of Missouri says that waitstaff give more attentive service to diners wearing nice clothes. Researchers found that diners who are well-dressed are more likely to receive good service from restaurant waitstaff. The study shows that waiters perceive guests who have made an effort with their clothing to be more generous tippers. And better tips lead to a better quality of service. 222 current and former restaurant waiters were shown pictures of people of different races, genders, and dress, and then asked who they thought would leave good tips. The results showed that race did not significantly affect servers’ perception of how they’d tip, but the way they were dressed did. According to Dae-Young Kim, an associate professor of hospitality

www.facebook.com/thenattydresser

management in the MU College of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources; “Busy servers, often have to make decisions about how to best devote their time and energy, so they look for ways to identify which customers will reward them the most for their service. The more professionally dressed a customer is, the more likely a server is to stereotype them as a good tipper.” So, take a moment to put on something nice the next time you are heading out to eat, you will find that you will have a more enjoyable evening. Remember to tip well, for the great service. Dress Well, Be Confident, Find Success! (and good service)

Oscar Oscar B. Hult is a co-owner of The Natty Dresser in Downtown Albany. 541-248-3561 Contact him at

www.thenattydresser.com

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020


Mindful Gardening By Brenda Powell The wind rustles the ornamental grass blades. Light sifts through the oak branches, casting flickering shadows across the lawn. A hummingbird dances by, its wings making whirring sounds. As I immerse myself in my surroundings my shoulders soften and I breathe deeply. The tension drains away. I feel peace.

with broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, spinach and more. I figured the more I grew the less often I’d have to go to the grocery store and I wouldn’t have to worry about running out. I filled my planters on the deck with flowers including two salvia to attract the hummingbirds. I needed a lot of flowers!

Through this crazy spring and summer I found solace in the garden. So many days, after working in what felt like an underwater world, I could barely do more than cook dinner and sit outside to watch the sunset. When I had a day off, though, I planted. First a kitchen garden

My husband and I inherited property in the country. We are trying to plant those things that we miss from our previous house. The neighboring farm took down the hedgerow that separated and protected us. So, we planted blueberries, natives and a butterfly garden to create

definition between the two properties. When we started taking care of this land, my husband decided he wanted to farm it. He wanted to be the long-haired old guy with a pony tail selling produce at the farmer’s market. Currently we are in the testing stage. So we planted pumpkins, tomatoes, squash, beans and a slew of greens and root vegetables. He found it so rewarding that he decided to retire early. Currently we are completing a cottage garden border. I love the look and all the flowers. This will end the planting phase for a few months. I need to focus on watering, weeding and pruning.

GARDENING

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

For me gardening is relaxing. It is my sanity in an insane world. I don’t have to wear a mask and I don’t need to talk (or listen) to anyone. Well, except my husband, but we’re working on that. Gardening is familiar. I don’t have to do something different or in a different way unless I choose to do that. If I do, then it is a mind-strengthening activity. It is good exercise. I feel stronger, more muscles and stamina. I’ve lost weight. When I’m out in nature I focus on the plants, the birds, the bees. I am mindful. It is an active meditation. I’m not reading the news, obsessing about my safety, nor am I worrying. Don’t get me wrong, there is cause to be aware of what is going on. We are citizens of this country and this earth. We can’t bury our heads in the sand and pretend that nothing is happening. But I know that I cannot take an onslaught of chaos and fear. I need to unwind and relax. If I’m honest, I want to have something of which I feel in control. So I garden. If you choose to garden as well, I hope your endeavors are blessed with abundance and peace.

Brenda Brenda Powell is a fourth generation owner of Garland Nursery in Corvallis.

www.garlandnursery.com

Follow her writing at garlandnursery.wordpress.com

www.willametteliving.com

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REAL ESTATE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Ask Annette

Do Not Let Them in… Prematurely By Annette Sievert Our market is tight. Nobody understands that better than yours truly. When we list houses and the “coming soon” sign goes up, buyers excitedly try seeing it before it even goes on the market and more often than not there is a knock on the door. “Can we see it…” and the homeowners, thinking they are helping, let them in and do just the opposite. Here are the reasons why not to let people look at your house before it goes officially on the market

1: Price Results In our very competitive market, it pays off to expose a house to the market. Priced correctly, it will most likely fetch

much more than the asking price, and a true market price cannot be reached by listening to just one voice

2: Liability Any buyer should always be accompanied by their agent who is responsible for whatever happens during a visit. Doors left open, damages, etc. A lot can happen, and you want somebody who can be held accountable

3: Safety Unprepared visits can result in prying eyes seeing paperwork with data they should not be privy to, valuables, lay outs. It happens that somebody scouts out a

house for different reasons than wanting to see the hardwood floors. You do not know that stranger you let in; you are alone with them. You would never do that in other situations so please do not do it when your house is listed.

4: Loss of Control An unannounced visitor might ask questions you are neither prepared nor willing to answer, yet the pressure of the situation can lead to divulging information detrimental to your negotiating power. Chatting away and getting personal, the divorce, the illness or any other pressure to sell is often all of a sudden out in the open.

5: premature offers When a person who was allowed a prelisting visit writes an offer and your broker has scheduled other visits for the launch date, it is grossly unfair to the people who played by the rules. That offer creates undue pressure. The seller will be under the gun to decide if this is good enough to just take or pass on and cannot compare the offer with what might otherwise be submitted. My best advice, when confronted with a person trying to force their way in: Have a business card from your listing broker handy, give it to them, ask them to talk to your broker, turn around and close the door. Happy selling.

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each office is independently owned and operated. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each office is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

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Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

Annette Do you have a real estate question? Ask Annette, at Coldwell Banker Valley Brokers in Corvallis 541-207-5551


YOUR FINANCES

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Now May Be the Time for A Financial Reassessment Compliments of Sten Carlson We’re experiencing a period of upheaval in the world today, which has also had an impact on the economy and markets. Given the spike in volatility and uncertainty we’re seeing in the broader economy, it may be time to step back and carefully review your financial life. Take some time to assess where you stand and whether it may be appropriate to make any adjustments in your strategy. Here are four key questions to ask about your current financial circumstances. 1. Do you have enough cash to meet short-term needs? A healthy cash reserve is important in times like these. A general rule of thumb is to have enough cash on hand (held in readily accessible accounts) to meet three to six months’ worth of expenses. But given today’s economic uncertainties, it may make sense to set aside up to nine months’ worth of cash. 2. Are you comfortable with the level of risk in your portfolio? Investment markets have been volatile since the start of 2020 and may continue to be for the coming months and maybe years. Unsettled markets can be a real test of whether you are comfortable with your investment strategy or if the level of risk in your portfolio is keeping you up at night. Given the disruption that’s been occurring, a portfolio review makes sense. 3. Do you have a solid protection strategy in place? This is an opportune time to make sure

that you and your family are adequately insured. Health insurance is a good place to start, particularly if your work situation has changed in recent months. The importance of adequate life insurance is more evident in times like these to protect the wellbeing of your family. Look at other protection options too, such as disability income insurance and long-term care coverage to meet specialized care needs, especially as you grow older. 4. Is your financial plan still on track? Finally, take a careful look at your overall financial plan. Are you still on track

Sten Carlson, CFP®, CLTC, CKA, MBA, is a Financial Advisor with PacWest Wealth Partners, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. in Corvallis, Oregon. He offers fee-based financial planning and asset management strategies and has been in practice for 25 years. To contact him, visit the team website at www.PacWestWealthPartners.com or call at 541-757-3000. Office address is 2396 NW Kings Blvd., Corvallis, OR.

to achieve the key goals you initially established? Does your plan require adjustments based on circumstances that have changed? Given all of the events of recent months, this is the right time to review your plan to make sure you are still heading in the right direction. Be sure to connect with your financial advisor to explore these questions in more detail and keep your financial life in order.

Sten Sten Carlson PacWest Wealth Partners in Corvallis, OR. Contact him at Sten.E.Carlson@ampf.com 541-757-3000

Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

www.willametteliving.com

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Historic Nye Beach

*Mecca for the literary, scholarly and artistic.

Queen of Hearts

Nye Beach Wine Cellar

Gifts & Lingerie 255 NW Coast St.

541-265-3292

708 NW Beach Dr.

541-265-2118

Jovi 232 NW Coast St. Suite B

541-265-8220

A Taste of Ireland on the Oregon Coast Traditional Irish Fare, Imported Irish Beers on Tap, Full Bar, Minors welcome until 10pm, Patio Seating, Live Music. Winter Hours Sunday-Thursday 11am-9pm Friday and Saturday 11am-10pm

www.nanasirishpub.com 46

613 NW 3rd St.

Willamette Living Magazine August / September 2020

541-574-8787


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Until we can perform again ... get to know us better by taking our quiz:

1. What year was The LaSells Stewart Center built? a) 1971 b) 1975 c) 1980 d) 1985 2. How many people can Austin Auditorium seat? a) 800 b) 1000 c) 1200 d) 1500 3. Who of the following has appeared at The LaSells Stewart Center? a) David Sedaris b) Ira Glass c) Branford Marsalis d) Pink Martini e) Paula Poundstone f) All are correct

5. Is The LaSells Stewart Center the only building on campus not paid for with state funds? a) True b) False 6. Who was the first major performer at The LaSells Stewart Center? a) Karen Carpenter (of the Carpenters) b) B.B. King c) Mary Travers (Peter, Paul and Mary) d) Arlo Guthrie EXTRA CREDIT QUESTION: 7. What was the first OSU mascot? a) A beaver named Benny b) A coyote named Jimmie c) A bear named Max d) A wolverine named Sammy

7. b

Check our website for up-to-date information.

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Staff are working remotely to assist clients and book future events.

2

6. c 2. c 1. c ANSWERS:

Current information at: lasells.oregonstate.edu

3. f

875 SW 26 Street Corvallis OR 97331 541-737-2402

4. b

The LaSells Stewart Center

a) Construction and Engineering Hall b) Oregon State Conference Room c) Agriculture Production Room d) Wells Fargo Bank Room

5. a

4. Which is not a room at The LaSells Stewart Center?

Additional trivia : lasells.oregonstate.edu/trivia

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The LaSells Stewart Center remains temporarily closed.

inner!

COVID-19 update:

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THE premier performing arts, meeting and conference center serving the Corvallis area, located on the Oregon State University campus.

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We miss you and hope that you, your family and friends are safe and well.

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The LaSells Stewart Center


See Sales Representative for details. All information subject t in our models, displays or written materials. Built by Legend Homes, CCB #55151.