Willamette Living Oct 2020

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Willamette

LIVING FALL 2020

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

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Mega-Art Issue Salem Dining Month

Willamette Valley

Food & Wine




DESIGNING AND BUILDING

Your Dreams

kitchens | bathrooms | interiors | remodels | new construction www.powellconstruction.com

call us at 541-752-0805

cb#102594


Mercedes-Benz of Salem

Presents The GLC Class

The GLC-Class The Mercedes-Benz GLC has been in the market for four years, and is

The GLC Coupe stands out with its dynamic appearance and elegant

the brand’s most popular SUV model. The strengths of this mid-size

lines. This model shows how harmoniously the design features of a

model include outstanding driving characteristics both on and off

coupe can be reconciled with those of an SUV, with a descending

the road, spaciousness, practicality and comfort. Features of the new

roofline, a greenhouse that blends perfectly into the silhouette, the

model now include a more stylish appearance, a new control concept,

character line in combination with the distinctive chrome strip on the

the infotainment system MBUX, innovative driving assistance systems

high beltline, and muscular shoulders.

and a new range of engines. The numerous upgrades also benefit the GLC Coupe, which combines the sportiness of a coupe with the

Both models are now equipped with LED High Performance

practicality of an SUV.

headlamps as standard. Their contours have been significantly changed, and they are now smaller and flatter. This makes the torch-

The exterior design is characterized by sporty features. A distinctive

like outline of the daytime driving lights even more prominent, and

off-road look is accentuated by muscular surface contours and striking

the distinctive Mercedes-Benz light signature even more recognizable.

details such as the redesigned headlamps and the heavily contoured

The LED Intelligent Light System with Adaptive Curve Illumination and

radiator grille.

Adaptive Highbeam Assist is available as an option. Redesigned all-LED rear lights are also included as standard.

Mercedes Benz of Salem 2405 Commercial St. SE Salem | Sales: 800.336.4148

www.valleymb.com www.willametteliving.com

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In This Issue...

Fall 2020

36

Salem Dining Month

Cover Photo: Jolene Wilson, Natural Sprinkles Bakery in Albany

Regulars 15 Art in the Mid-Valley 20 The Bookshelf 40 Kris on Health 41 Lookin' Good! 42 Style 43 Gardening With Brenda 44 Real Estate Update 45 Sten: On the Money

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Hallie Ford Museum show of Lockwood Dennis' work

Stormy Weather Arts, Cannon Beach

facebook.com/willametteliving

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

New schedule!

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next issue: Jan/Feb 2021

River Gallery in Independence is always buzzing

pinterest.com/willamettelivin

@WillametteLiving

advertising information www.willametteliving.com ads@willametteliving.com 541-740-9776

issuu.com/willametteliving


celebrate life. AAsum-Dufour.com 805 Ellsworth St SW, Albany, OR 97321 (541) 926-5541

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234 SW 3rd Street, Downtown Corvallis • 541-752-6343 • Open 7 Days A Week! inkwellhomestore.com

Visit The Natty Dresser for all your Holiday menswear needs - Birthdays - Halloween - Thanksgiving - Christmas Gifts- Entertaining - Dinner Party & Special Occasion Clothing

The Natty Dresser is the areas only full service menswear store, our new location is scheduled to open November 5th. Just in time for the Albany Downtown’s Holiday window contest, and Holiday Open House “Downtown Unwrapped.�

Hours: Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm Please check our website for updated notices regarding closures due to the move.

r e s s e r D y t t a N The

Purveyors of quality menswear

The new home of The Natty Dresser as seen in 1912. 8

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

>>> New Location <<< 124 Broadalbin SW Historic Downtown Albany 541-248-3561 www.TheNattyDresser.com


Willamette

LIVING

T H E L I F E S T Y L E M AG A Z I N E F O R W E S T E R N O R E G O N

Publishers

Scott & Gayanne Alexander

Willamette Living is published every two months by Willamette Life Media LLC

Inquiries / Suggestions

feedback@WillametteLiving.com

Find Us

In print at hundreds of locations in the Willamette Valley. The digital edition is free online at www.willametteliving.com

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Subscribe online at willametteliving.com, or send a check to our mailing address below. Check current subscription rates on our website.

Event Calendar

Submit your events at: willametteliving.com. Please submit as far ahead as possible. Please check your submission for accuracy. Please allow time for approval. Select events may also appear in the print magazine.

Mailing Address Willamette Living 922 NW Circle Blvd Suite 160 - 179 Corvallis, OR 97330

a breath of fresh air

*Products/books/samples for review to same address please.

All editorial material, including comments, opinion and statements of fact appearing in this publication, represents the views of the respective authors and does not necessarily carry the endorsement of Willamette Living or its officers. Information in Willamette Living is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed. The publication of any advertisements is not to be construed as an endorsement of products or services offered unless it is specifically stated in the ad that there is such approval or endorsement.

DiscoverYachats.org | 800.929.0477 www.willametteliving.com

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4714 NW Veronica Place, Corvallis. 5 bd, 3 ba, 3898 Sq. Ft., 2 car garage, 2 story, lot size: .14 acre, built in 2002 This AKRO built, energy efďŹ cient, masterpiece features hardwood oors, high ceilings, open concept living with a beautiful kitchen ďŹ t enough for a large dinner party. Main level features oďŹ ce, bedroom full bath, master suite and laundry room. Downstairs: 3 bedrooms, full bath, family room with wet bar and direct access to low maintenance yard.

Annette Sievert

Number one Coldwell Banker agent in Oregon! 541-207-5551 | asievert@valleybrokers.com

“Have Expectations� www.valleybrokers.com/asievert

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

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582 NW Van Buren Ave Corvallis, OR 97330

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Bill & Leslie Witt

wittconsulting.com Ta x • L e g a l • A cco u n t i n g • Co n s u l t i n g 10

Are you looking for help with your personal or business Finances? Then look no fuî ¸ther than Witt Consulting.

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

“Bill, Leslie, and Co. are an indispensable part of our dayto-day business. They’ve also become good friends over the years. If you need clarification, Witt Consulting should be your first choice. With vast knowledge of tax law, creativity, and an always positive outlook, they’re not your average accounting firm.� Scott Alexander, Publisher Willamtte Life Media


The most common treatments for neck and back pain are surgery, injections, chiropractic, pain pills and physical therapy. Those are all excellent treatments but WHAT do you do and WHERE do you go to really heal your nagging pain and find permanent relief? You’ve tried ALL the treatments and NOTHING has worked (or only provided TEMPORARY relief). Ondria Holub, L.Ac. of Balance Point Acupuncture in Corvallis, has been successfully using a breakthrough non-surgical acupuncture treatment for people with neck and back pain caused by bulging, herniated disc and spinal stenosis (even patients that have had failed back surgeries where nothing else has worked). A 2018 study published in the Journal of Pain concluded that acupuncture is effective for a number of chronic pain conditions. Results indicated that the

effects of acupuncture were persistent over time, and that the benefits lasted for at least 12 months. Many former pain sufferers are now pain free after using this drugless, painless acupuncture outpatient procedure that decreases pain, inflammation, numbness and initiates tissue repair. Our treatments are very gentle. In fact, every once in a while we even catch a patient sleeping during sessions. And the best part about it … No Dangerous Drugs, No Invasive Surgery, and No Painful Exercises. Find out if you MAY be a candidate for Acupuncture.

Balance Point Acupuncture 999 NW Circle Blvd., Corvallis OR 97330 (541) 754-2225 NEEDLESHEAL.COM (Located in the Northwest WHITEFISH Health and Healing Center) ACUPUNCTURE

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BALANCE POINT ACUPUNCTURE

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Make an appointment to determine if your condition can be treated by acupuncture.

The most current state-of-the-art fitness equipment, and trained staff available to answer your questions. More than 120 hrs. per week of group exercise classes including Zumba, Nia, Pilates, 3 types of yoga, Step, Cardio, Goup Power (weights) and even Line Dancing!

Aquatic Exercise Classes

2 indoor pools for classes and lap swimming Warm water pool for therapy fitness for arthritis, fibromyalgia and orthopedic type issues Connect with us on Facebook for current events, specials and more!

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2855 NW 29th St. in Corvallis Call Us Today at 541-757-8559

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Art in Independence

What’s New at River Gallery? Compliments of Pam Serra-Wenz In September and October 2020, the Associate Artists at River Gallery will showcase their art pieces in the front room. Stroll by River Gallery to view the artistic creations by the following Associate Artists: Carolyn Conoy, Dean Hanson, Heather Taylor, James Hockenhull, Jo Hockenhull, Marla Brummer, Michelle Mills, Morgen Brodie, Nathelle Norfleet, Rich Bergeman, Susan Appleby, and William Shumway.

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

We are adding “Sunday Salon” by appointments only for small groups up to ten people. Would you like to have a special time to wander in the gallery and take it all in alone or with a small group (fewer than 10) of friends, or family? We are now open for private appointments on Sunday afternoons from 12 noon to 4pm when you can come in and feel comfortable to appreciate the art at River Gallery. Our Holiday Show will begin Friday, November 6th, 2020. Our annual holiday exhibit will display affordable and festive art by River Gallery artists. Be sure to stop by early to select art for your holiday gift list. Our hours for October and November 2020 are Fridays and Saturdays from 12 noon-4:00pm. River Gallery also has art on the walls at the new hotel in Independence. The

photo is in the lobby area at “The Independence” which is located next to the city park. Stop by the hotel and check out the artwork!

October 2020 Window Artist - Sue Mason

I have been reflecting on the history of ceramics during the Italian Renaissance and also Pablo Picasso’s works in clay. I’m starting my sixth decade at the potter’s wheel and my sixth Window Show at the River Gallery in October. Picasso and the Italian Renaissance will be right here with me as I work. My bugs will be with me, too.

Window/Focus Artist for November 2020 - Andrea Peyton

Andrea will display her recent new ceramic pieces in her window exhibit. She will be featuring her Pot Heads” and “Women in their Windows”. Andrea’s whimsical play with clay is a delight for the senses. Join us in November to appreciate her artful expression.


River Gallery Artists Adorn the Streets of Independence Banners have been hung about the city featuring the work of our collective. When you’re strolling the streets, look up! River Gallery 184 S Main St. Independence, OR 97351 503-838-6171 www.rivergalleryart.com Independence Hotel 201 Osprey Lane, Independence, OR 97351 503-837-0200

Nancy Wyse for Benton County Commissioner My motivation to run for commissioner stems Endorsed by from my love of our community and my desire to Oregon League of Conservation Voters see the best version of Benton County possible. I Benton County Democratic Central Committee believe I have a lot to offer: new energy and a fresh Senator Sara Gelser perspective backed by my unique experience Representative Dan Rayfield in local government. I am committed to making Benton County Commissioners: mindful, balanced decisions for Benton County, and I will diligently work to seeMythat our commuXan Augerot motivation to run for commissioner stems Endorsed by fromplace my lovefor of our to nity is a healthy, vibrant, inclusive all.community and my desire Oregon League of Conservation Voters Annabelle Jaramillo

Nancy Wyse for Benton County Commissioner see the best version of Benton County possible. I believe I have a lot to offer: new energy and a fresh

Benton County Democratic Central Committee

Pat Malone Senator Sara Gelser Core goals perspective backed by my unique experience Representative Dan Rayfield Biff Traber in local government. I am committedCorvallis to making Mayor • Foster pandemic economic impact Benton County Commissioners: mindful, balanced decisions for Benton County, recovery.

and I will diligently work to see that Corvallis our commu-City Councilors: Xan Augerot nity is a healthy, vibrant, inclusive place for Hyatt all. Annabelle Jaramillo Lytle, President

Improve public records access and Core goals transparency.

Ed Junkins Pat Malone Corvallis Mayor Biff Traber Charles Maughan Corvallis City Councilors: • Prudent steps forward on Hyatt Lytle, President • Improve public records access and Andrew Struthers implementation plan. Ed Junkins transparency. Philomath MayorCharles Eric Niemann Maughan • Protect Forest Conservation, Multi-Purpose • Prudent steps forward on the criminal justice Andrew Struthers David M. Low, Philomath Council President implementation plan. Agriculture, and Open Space zones. Philomath Mayor Eric Niemann • Protect Forest Conservation, Multi-Purpose Corvallis School Board Members: David M. Low, Philomath Council President Agriculture, and Open Space zones. Corvallis School Board Members: Sami Al-Abdrabbuh, Chair Sami Al-Abdrabbuh, Chair Sarah FingerSarah McDonald, Vice Chair Finger McDonald, Vice Chair nancywyseforcommissioner.com Vincent Adams Vincent Adams •

Foster pandemic economic impact therecovery. criminal justice

nancywyseforcommissioner.com

nancywyseforbentoncounty@gmail.com

nancywyseforbentoncounty@gmail.com

Facebook.com/NancyWyseBentonCo

Facebook.com/NancyWyseBentonCo www.willametteliving.com

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“normal” hours Tuesday - Saturday 11 to 5

For pandemic hours please check our website and Facebook

Dale Bunse, Summer Snow, acrylic

GALLERY

184 S. Main St., Independence, OR

503 838 6171

www.rivergalleryart.com

MAJESTIC THEATER'S ONLINE STREAMING

FOLLOW OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR ONLINE STREAMING AND UPDATES

facebook.com/majestictheatre

ENJOY A VARIETY OF SHOWS AT THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME

ART Trail

209 SW 2nd St, Corvallis, Tuesday through Saturday 11-4

www.artinthevalley.net

Member

Worlds Away

Yet so close...

Majestic Readers’ Theatre Company presents: Bloomsday October 24 | 7:30 PM Veterans’ Voices Project II Novemeber 11 | 7:30 PM Now. Here. This. Novemeber 14 | 7:30 PM Majestic Readers’ Theatre Company presents:Women Playing Hamlet November 28th | 7:30 PM

Pick What You Pay $10-$15-$20 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MAJESTIC.ORG

Online Streaming General Admission

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Mid-Willamette Valley

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

Rest, relax, and recharge at a luxuriously well-appointed beachfront rental on the central Oregon coast

A recent guest:

For booking information, availability, and more visit

www.vrbo.com/773292

Stay here if you can! The pictures can’t even show what a wonderful house this is! Everything you would want is there and we saw seals and whales right in front of the house! Valerie H. - Stayed Sept, 2019 Five Stars!


The Art Scene

Art in the Mid-Valley By Brian Egan

We have made it to the fourth quarter of 2020 and I hope you are all looking forward to 2021 as much as I am. This year has been too crazy and unpredictable for my liking. Next year may not be normal but it has to be better than this year. Life goes on at The Arts Center despite the pandemic and we have a full lineup of exhibits to finish this year and have most exhibits for next year in planning stages. The Susan Johnson Retrospective exhibit will continue in the main gallery until October 17th. Susan’s work covers over 55 years and includes wood sculptures, colored pencil sketches, oil stick drawings and collages. In addition to being a

working artist, Johnson has served as an educator, arts administrator, and the former executive director of The Arts Center. This show serves as a way to watch the progression of her talents over time. From October 13th to November 21st photographer Dick Keyes will be featured in the Corrine Woodman Gallery at The Arts Center. Dick’s exhibit, Livelihoods, shows photos of the (extra) ordinary people of Oaxaca, Mexico who work long hours at ancient crafts. Among those photographed are weavers, sculptors, feather artists and Mexcal distillers. Their way of life is endangered by technology

and Dick hopes to preserve images of these people and their way of life that defines Mexicans as a people and a nation. The 6 Woman Printing exhibit opens on October 22nd in the main gallery. Six women from Corvallis, Portland and Eugene display work in very different printing techniques: The group includes Gail Owen from Portland, (lino cut reduction prints), Jessica Billey from Corvallis, (woodcut), Edith Wolfe of Corvallis (drypoint in Plexiglass), Susan Ponsion from Eugene (photo transparencies), Marcy Baker from Portland (collages) and Julia Lont of

www.willametteliving.com

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Corvallis (letterpress). The diversity of this group should make for a lively and colorful exhibit. The show ends on November 21st. This year’s Holiday Show in the main gallery is titled Home Sweet Home and runs from November 28th through January 2nd. We all have a notion of what “home” means, a place where we live or grew up and where we gladly return. Usually home has a connotation of warmth and safety, a nostalgic and

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

pleasant feeling. Home is more than just a building, but a place where we relax, laugh, cry, play games, and interact with family or housemates, where our “heart” belongs. For some of us Covid 19 has changed our perception of what “home” means. Instead of that safe haven it is a place we not only return to, but where we have to stay. Has it been a positive experience? Do we know our home better now? Do we see it as a pretty prison, or an ongoing vacation house? Let’s see how artists respond to this challenge.


The Call to Artists for the Home Sweet Home show is open until November 9th so there is still time for artists to submit their work. Go to https://theartscenter.net/ call-to-artists/ for more information on submissions. Most of the art pieces at the Holiday Show will be for sale so this is a great place to purchase holiday gifts. Amongst the work are eight custom decorated birdhouses that were created by an Arts Center board member especially for this show and enhanced by local artists who wanted to help support The Arts Center. These are special items that will sell fast. Please remember our local

artists while holiday shopping; it has been a rough year for them with so many fairs and festivals cancelled. Your patronage supports their creativity and financial wellbeing. Enjoy the holidays and stay safe out there!

ARTS CENTER HOURS As of September 8th the gallery and Art Shop are open from noon to 5pm Thursday through Saturday but check our website for current gallery and Artshop hours www.theartscenter.net Social distancing protocols are still in place. We hope to extend our hours soon.

Phone 541-754-1551

- - Eyebrow & Eyeliner

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THE ARTS

McMinnville Short Film Festival

CelebratesCele Awardratin WinningMSFF Films Awar -W (a virtual fundraising e

The McMinnville Film Festival Foundation is heading to their 10th anniversary in February 2021 and along the way they are celebrating a sample of award-winning films from the past 9 years. Beginning with 2011, experience the beginnings of the film festival to where they are today. The event will be presented virtually throughout the weekend of October 16-18, 2020. Suggested ticket price is $5 per person, but this is the festival’s mid-year fundraising event so any additional amount is a donation that fuels their future! Through the generosity of supporters, the dedicated MSFF team, board of directors, and volunteers ensure that all donations are put to good use bringing this valuable arts & cultural event to all.

The selected films are works by these filmmakers:

“Sac de Merde” by Greg Chwerchak (Los Angeles, CA) - 2019 Grand Jury

“Walking Tour” by Jerry Eichten (Newberg, OR) - 2011 Over 18 Winner

“We Were There” by Saeed Vahidi (Vancouver, BC) - 2020 Best Genre

“Four Daughters” by Ray Robison (Medford, OR) - 2012 Award Nominee

To purchase tickets and for more information, go to mcminnvillefilmfest.org.

“Wake” by Austin Smagalski (Los Angeles, CA) - 2014 Sunrise Rotary Emerging Artist Award

About the foundation: The McMinnville Film Festival Foundation is a non-profit organization that seeks to encourage the work of amateur and professional filmmakers, and to provide a venue where their work can be seen.

Octo er 16-18, 2

“The Plumber” by Christian Bergmans (Portland, OR) - 2015 Grand Jury “Shanghai Faders” by AJ Gordon (Portland, OR) - 2016 Best Director “The Kenton Lead Blob*” by Zach Putnam (Portland, OR) - 2017 Recology Award

Celebrating MSFF Award-Winning Films

FF Awar -Winnin Films (a virtual fundraising event)

l fundraising event)October 16-18, 2020 18

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020


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Books Small Great Things

PI Brodie’s search for the birth parents of an adoptee. Both of them also get mixed up in a decades-old murder case. The multi-layered plot weaves back and forth in time, gradually bringing several stories together. It’s ingeniously plotted, with a wry sense of humor and wonderfully drawn characters. Great for fans of literary crime fiction. - Carrie

by Jodi Picoult

Switch: How To Change Things When Change Is Hard by Chip Heath

This novel was, at times, heartbreaking to read. It examines the roles of race and privilege in America. Told in alternating voices between a labor and delivery nurse who is Black and a white supremacist couple who lose their newborn baby in the hospital, it made me think about how I am perceived and what privileges and biases I hold. The novel had strong character development and a plot-driven focus. I’ve found myself thinking about the characters, the plot, and the themes of this novel long after I finished reading it. - Katey

Started Early, Took My Dog By Kate Atkinson Another gritty book in the Jackson Brodie series. Tracy Waterhouse, a retired police officer in Leeds, England, impulsively begins caring for a neglected child and unknowingly gets involved in

Due to COVID-19, most of us have experienced a great deal of unanticipated and, sometimes unwelcome, change. This book explored why change is hard and, even more importantly, how to help lead a group through the change process by understanding what people need to be successful at changing. I appreciated the research cited in the book as well as the actionable ideas shared by the author. - Katey

We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Neihisi Coates This nonfiction book walked through each of the eight years of Barack Obama’s presidency with a focus on the experience of being Black in America. I read many passages out loud to my family and we had productive discussions

Librarian’s Picks

Corvallis-Benton County

PUBLIC LIBRARY 20

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

Ways to Make Sunshine

By Renee Watson with Illustrator Nina Mata Ryan Hart is a girl who knows how to make sunshine even when things do not go smoothly in her life – her dad has lost his job, her family has to move to a smaller home, and her older brother bosses her around. She loves concocting new recipes with her mom and spending time with her friends, all the while trying to navigate the ups and downs of fourth grade. Ryan’s parents remind her that her name means “king” and she is determined to live up to her name and be a leader. Written by the Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Award-winning author Renée Watson, Ways to Make Sunshine is the first book in a new series set in Portland, Oregon. Growing up in Portland, Renée Watson loved reading the Ramona Quimby books as a young girl and was inspired to create her own version of Ramona. In Ryan Hart, we have a positive new voice in children’s literature with more adventures to come. -Katey


about race and privilege in America. I appreciated the historical perspectives this book brought and learned about the role incarceration has played in our country along with housing practices and Jim Crow laws. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to gain understanding of the historical events that led to today’s Black Lives Matter movement. - Katey

The Yellow House By Sarah M Broom The Yellow House tells the story of a family home in New Orleans East, specifically the lower Ninth Ward, a part of New Orleans which once promised a booming economic expansion eastward but instead, through neglect, became the poorest part of the city. The story follows the yellow house from its construction up through hurricane Katrina and its eventual destruction in the aftermath. More than the house though, this explores the family that lived in the house for most of that time, and it raises questions about home, family, race, and poverty among others. Unique to this memoir, it tells the story of hurricane Katrina as part of a larger story of neglect of this almost exclusively black part of New Orleans. It doesn’t just focus on the devastation, but also looks at the disruption to life, family, and home for people who stayed put, those who fled and returned, and those who left permanently. - Mike

Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear By Eva Holland This book examines a feeling that unifies us all: fear. It explores it from historical, physical, emotional, and very personal angles. This book invites you to get to know fear on an intimate level and acknowledge the vital role it plays in your life. This book surprised me by being more than a dry scientific look at fear. While the facts are there, they are wrapped in the heart-felt memoir of the author’s own personal struggles and triumphs over deeply rooted fears, both real and imagined. - Charnee

they spontaneously combust. It’s a quirky, hilarious novel that skewers the rich and powerful, but is also a touching story of what it means to be a family. - Carrie

Saint X By Alexis Schaitkin

Nothing to See Here By Kevin Wilson Lillian is stuck in a dead end job and living in her mother’s attic when her former high school friend asks her to take a job caring for her two step children. The children are troubled. They have recently lost their mother, and their rich and powerful politician father is distant. And, when they get emotionally upset

Not just a murder mystery, this book tells the story of how a tragic murder affects the victim’s family and the accused for years after the event. A family’s tropical holiday is torn apart when their college age daughter is murdered. The murder goes unsolved, but everyone has their suspicions as to where to put the blame. The story is told by the younger daughter, seven years old at the time of the murder, who tries to find closure for those early events that shattered her life and figure out what actually happened. As the story unfolds, it becomes clear how much race, class, and all sorts of other prejudices shape everyone’s understanding of the events. - Mike

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I N D O W N T O W N C O RVA L L I S A C C E P T I N G C O N S I G N M E N T S 7 D AY S A W E E K A L L I T E M S TA K E N S E A S O N A L LY

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Lockwood Dennis (American, 1937-2012), “Public Market,” 1992, Ed. 50, color woodcut, 15 x 12 inches, Collection of John and Pamela Olbrantz. Photo: Dale Peterson.

Lockwood Dennis (American, 1937-2012), “Depot (King Street),” 1992, Ed. 35, color woodcut, 15 x 12 in., Collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, Gift of the Lockwood Dennis Art Estate, 2014.035.012. Photo: Dale Peterson.

Lockwood Dennis (American, 1937-2012), “Kalakala,” 1993, Ed. 35, color woodcut, 15 x 12 in., Collection of the Lockwood Dennis Family. Photo: Lockwood Dennis Family.

Exhibition Features the Nostalgic Woodblock

PRINTS OF LOCKWOOD DENNIS

Starting October 24, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University presents “Lockwood Dennis: Woodcuts,” a solo exhibition featuring 36 prints as well as ephemera, of this late Port Townsend, Washington artist. Organized by director John Olbrantz, the exhibition continues through January 16, 2021 in the museum’s Study Gallery and Print Study Center. Throughout his forty-five-year career as an artist, Lockwood Dennis (American, 1937–2012), known as “Woody,” depicted subjects that reflected his travels to Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, eastern Oregon and Washington, and as far away as Colorado, Texas, and Japan. His bold, sturdy, colorful, and nostalgic compositions are populated with industrial buildings standing guard, houses watching streets, factories trying to outdo each other, and only occasionally people. Automobiles, trucks, buses, ferries, and trains become the principal characters and protagonists in Dennis’s evolving dramas. The artist wrote in 2006, “What I would like to come across [in my work] is the magic of pictorial space that is somehow animated by its components, a drama, a sense of intrigue. That’s the fun part for me, too.” Born in Portland, Oregon, and educated at Whitman College, the University of Washington, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Dennis served in the Peace Corps in Africa in the late 1960s and taught art at Yakima Valley College in eastern Washington in the early 1970s before he moved to Port Townsend, Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula in 1975. His woodcut prints can be found in numerous public and private 22

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

Lockwood Dennis (American, 1937-2012), “Industrial Neighborhood (Portland),” 1995, Ed. 52, color woodcut, 15 x 12 in., Collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, gift of the Lockwood Dennis Art Estate, 2014.035.014. Photo: Dale Peterson.


collections throughout the region, including the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. This exhibition has been supported by general operating support grants from the City of Salem’s Transient Occupancy Tax funds and the Oregon Arts Commission. About the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University As one of the finest academic art museums in the Northwest, the museum features works by Pacific Northwest and Native American artists and includes a diverse collection of traditional European, American and Asian art, as well as artifacts that date from antiquity. Frequently changing exhibitions include lectures, special events, tours, artist demonstrations, educational opportunities for children and adults, as well as important publications. The museum is located at 700 State St. in Salem. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Sunday and Monday. General admission is $6, $4 for seniors and $3 for students 18 and older. Students 17 and under and children are admitted free. Admission is free for everyone on Tuesdays.

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2020 Stormy Weather Arts Festival November 6-8 • Cannon Beach, Oregon

David Crawford

David Crawford

Georgia Gerber Mark Gordon

Randall Hodges

Participating Galleries Cannon Beach Gallery: The non-profit Cannon Beach Gallery operated by the Cannon Beach Arts Association will host its 34th Annual Miniature Show featuring small works of art 6x6” or smaller by community artists. The gallery will host a virtual reception and tour of the gallery during the Stormy Weather Arts Festival weekend. What to know: The exhibition will be in place from November 4 to December 31. Northwest By Northwest Gallery: The gallery will feature work by painter Hazel Schlesinger; renowned photographer Christopher Burkett; kiln

formed glass and paintings by Angelita Surmon; bronze sculpture by George Gerber; paintings and bronze sculpture by Don Stastny; and sculpture by Ivan McLean. What to know: Schlesinger created the art for the Stormy Weather Arts Festival Poster, titled “November Skies over Haystack Rock.” Gerber is known for her public bronze installations including Rachel the Pig, the life size piggy bank at the entrance to Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Randall Hodges Images of the West: Photographer Randall Hodges will be on site showing his latest images, sharing his adventures and personalizing copies of his book, “Images of the West.” What to know: Hodges has been photographing landscapes of the Western United States and Canada as a full-time professional photographer for over 20

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Jeffrey Hull

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

years. His work has been published over 4,500 times worldwide in books, magazines, calendars, greeting cards, post cards and newspapers. Icefire Glassworks: The working glassblowing studio in Cannon Beach’s midtown district will feature new pieces by Mark Gordon and Michelle Kaptur, as well as new work by resident artists Jim Kingwell and Suzanne Kindland. What to know: Gordon will show his battuto blown glass vessels, a technique of grinding the glass to create texture and reveal inner layers of color. Battuto is an Italian word that translates to “beaten” or “hammered.” Gordon will be in the gallery from 10am to 4pm on Friday and Saturday, and from 10am to Noon on Sunday. Archimedes Gallery: The downtown gallery curates a nice collection of contemporary artists and will feature new


Cannon Beach Galleries Showcase

SOME OF THE WEST’S MOST SUCCESSFUL ARTISTS

Stormy Weather Arts Festival November 6-8.

Anton Pavlenkol

artwork by illustrators Nicole Gustafsson and Marika Paz; and painter Josh Keyes. What to know: Keyes’ photo realistic paintings often make political statements about the collision of the natural world and urban decay. Bronze Coast Gallery: Artists in attendance will be David Crawford, Dan Chen and Carol Gold. The gallery will also feature new work by Linda Wilder and Robert Rogers. What to know: Saturday, limited attendance gallery events will showcase new work by David Crawford from 11am-1pm, and Dan Chen from 2pm-4pm. Crawford, an Oregon sculptor, is known for his quirky animal and human forms that feature intricate textures and unexpected details. DragonFire Gallery: The gallery will feature painters Anton Pavlenko, Theresa AndreasO’Leary and Bev Jozwiak. The featured artists will conduct painting demonstrations in the gallery from 11am-3pm on Saturday. Other features include a special showing and sale of 5 X 7-inch artist proofs from Tad Hetu’s limited edition photographs printed on metal. What to know: On Sunday, the gallery presents “For the Love of Tree,” where painters Pavlenko, Andreas-O’Leary and Michael Orwick will each complete a painting from 11am to 3pm. Proceeds from sale of

the finished paintings will be donated to the North Coast Land Conservancy who is in the process of acquiring a 3500acre Rainforest Reserve above Cannon Beach and Arch Cape, connecting Oswald West State Park and the Falcon Cove Marine Reserve. White Bird Gallery: The gallery with feature mixed media figurative paintings by Robert Schlegel, altered book sculpture by Valerie Savarie and encaustic bird paintings by Janel Pahl, a new artist to White Bird. What to know: Savarie uses vintage books as the centerpiece of her creations, reinventing them into unique pieces through cutting, carving, stitching and character illustrations. She will demonstrate her techniques in the gallery Saturday. Jeffrey Hull Gallery: Jeffrey Hull will be in the gallery all weekend and will showcase his newest watercolor and oil paintings; and limited-edition prints. What to know: Hull began his painting career over 40 years ago, one of the artists who was part of the early years when Cannon Beach was developing into the thriving art community it is today. He is known for his mastery of watercolor seascapes and landscapes that reflect his deep love of the Oregon Coast. For more information about Stormy Weather Arts Festival, visit cbgallerygroup.com.

Cannon Beach art galleries will shine a spotlight on some of the West’s most successful artists November 6-8, just like they have for over 30 years at Cannon Beach, Oregon’s Stormy Weather Arts Festival. With coronavirus restrictions, the 2020 festival will look different from other years and will feature only intimate, limited-attendance gallery events to assure the safety of festival attendees. Over the festival weekend, artists who create bronze sculpture, blown glass and original wall art in diverse styles will be in the galleries to, demonstrate their techniques or have their work showcased in special exhibits. There will be live musical performances with regional musicians at outdoor venues throughout the town on Saturday of the festival. Some of the highlights of the 2020 festival include: • The 34th Annual Miniature Show at the non-profit Cannon Beach Gallery • New sculpture by Georgia Gerber, known for her public works including Rachel the Pig, the life size piggy bank at the entrance to Seattle’s Pike Place Market. • Blown glass vessels by Mark Gordon created using the battuto technique that involves grinding the finished glass to create texture and reveal inner layers of color. • “For the Love of Trees” painting demonstration by three artists whose work will be sold to benefit the North Coast Land Conservancy efforts to purchase a Rainforest Reserve near Cannon Beach. • Demonstration of altered book sculpture by Valerie Savarie who starts with vintage books, reinventing them into unique art pieces by cutting, carving, stitching and character illustrations. To meet safety requirements, all events will be limited in size and masks will be required inside galleries. Hours will vary by gallery and many will offer private showings by appointment. Food and beverages will not be served at gallery events. For more information about Stormy Weather Arts Festival, visit www.cbgallerygroup.com.

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The OSU College of Agricultural Sciences

ART ABOUT AGRICULTURE

Local art information compliments of Owen Premore Art About Agriculture encourages artists to investigate the visual resources of the science and practice that sustains human life: agriculture. It strives to develop an understanding and appreciation of food and fiber production, especially among people not traditionally acquainted with agriculture.

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020


Art About Agriculture was established in 1983 as the first annual arts competition and tour exhibit with an agricultural theme. It recognizes professional and emerging Pacific Northwest artists, creates a growing, dynamic, permanent collection of fine art based on, stimulated by, and portraying agriculture, and presents the permanent collection and tour exhibit to rural and urban audiences. The collection is exhibited by loan agreement throughout Oregon and other parts of the Pacific Northwest. 2020 Art About Agriculture Competition and Exhibition: Tension/ Harmony • September 3 – October 30, 2020 • Giustina Gallery at The LaSells Stewart Center, Oregon State University • Gallery hours: Wednesdays and

Thursdays, 10am – 3pm, or by appointment: 541-737-2402 The 37th Annual Art About Agriculture Competition and Exhibition returns to the much-loved open call, juried format. This year’s theme invited artists to consider our agricultural future, exploring the relationship between the conservation of natural resources and agricultural production. What will tomorrow’s food and fiber look like when we place equal weight on conservation and use? How might farming, fishing, fibers, fashion, and food culture change in the Pacific Northwest? How might communities and connectedness change as we better understand food insecurity and market access? What would cutting-edge research, technology, and innovation look like in the march

towards finding a balanced future? Artists were provided research papers and news articles pertaining to Oregon State University’s College of Agricultural Sciences’ efforts to tackle these important questions. Tension/Harmony features 47 artworks by 35 artists, and 11 pieces received Art About Agriculture Permanent Collection Acquisition Awards. More information is available at, agsci.oregonstate.edu/art/art-aboutagriculture. We hope you enjoy the artwork. You are welcome to contact us with comments about the exhibition. Owen Premore Directing Curator, Art About Agriculture Oregon State University

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Start the Decade Right Showcase your business in Willamette Living Magazine Willamette

June / July 2019

LIVING

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

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The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020


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Healthy Indoor Air By Melanie Brown

Cooler weather is upon us, and with communities still recovering from the global pandemic of 2020, more people are working and schooling from home. As temperatures drop and thermostats rise, we will be sealing our homes with climate concerns and financial fitness in mind. However, reducing indoor fresh air flow has its own costs, especially when the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), finds that some indoor air pollution can be two to five times higher than average outdoor air pollution. What constitutes indoor air pollution? Of a handful of culprits, including radon, carbon monoxide, mold, pet dander, and secondhand smoke, one of the largest contributors is Volatile Organic Compounds (V.O.C.s) – highly carcinogenic chemicals that evaporate at room temperature and off-gas persisting in your home for up to a year. These particles float through our

homes and as we breathe them in, some are small enough to directly enter our lungs, causing irritation and leading to allergies, asthma, heart disease and even cancer. The leading V.O.C. in many homes is formaldehyde, which can be found in substances including paints and stains, varnishes on furniture or wood floors, vinyl flooring, carpets, and upholstery, among others. How do we prevent or improve polluted indoor air? We can start by making conscious purchasing decisions, including using zero and ultra-low V.O.C. paints and stains; choosing natural flooring such as bamboo and cork, or wool carpets; opting for low V.O.C. vinyl and wood floor treatments; purchase used furnishings and clothing which have already finished off-gassing; and using natural cleaners such as citrus, baking soda and vinegar. We can

also add or increase the amount of indoor plants, including Peace Lilies (Spathiphyllum), Snake Plant (Dracaena trifasciata), and Rubber Plant (Ficus elastica), which uptake carbon dioxide, and V.O.C.s including formaldehyde, and output fresh oxygen. It is also a smart idea to make sure air vents fresh air vents are not covered or blocked, and to change central air vent filters as needed. Plus, something as simple as turning off your heat and opening the windows when you leave the house from time to time, can also easily circulate the fresh air in and the stale air out. For more information and ideas, visit www.epa.gov/iaq. Melanie Brown co-owns and operates Equilibrium Painting LLC, in Corvallis

www.willametteliving.com

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Recipes

Blueberry Blondies Ingredients:

Blueberry, Feta & Honey- Caramelized Onion Naan Pizza Recipes and Photos Compliments of Jennifer Wilt of Wilt Farms / Sunset Valley Organics in Corvallis -- the best organic Blueberries you're going to find, anywhere!

• • • • • • • • • • • •

2 large eggs 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1 C light brown sugar, packed ¼ C white granulated sugar 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 tsp fresh lemon zest ¼ tsp salt 3 tbsp unsalted butter, melted,& cooled a bit 1 /8 tsp baking soda 1 C all purpose flour 1 C frozen blueberries – could also use fresh or dried blueberries

Directions:

• Preheat oven to 325° F. Because this is a relatively low fat recipe and blueberries secrete juice as they bake, the best way to prevent sticking is to create a parchment paper sling for your 8-inch square pan

Ingredients:

• 2 naan flatbreads see notes below • 1 teaspoon olive oil • 1 cup thinly sliced red onion • Salt • pinch red pepper flakes • 2 tablespoons honey • 1/2 cup ricotta cheese • 1/2 cup feta cheese • 1 cup blueberries • micro arugula or regular baby arugula

Directions:

• Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the naan/flatbread on the baking sheet and lightly spray or brush with water. Set aside. • Heat the olive oil in a medium pan over medium low heat. Add the onion and season with a pinch of salt to taste and red pepper flakes. Cook the onions until it is wilted, about 3-5 minutes and stir in the honey, letting the onions caramelize. Remove from heat. • While the onions cook, stir the ricotta and feta cheese in a small bowl. Spread the ricotta mixture over the naan/flatbread, and top with the honey caramelized onions. Sprinkle the blueberries on top. • Place the naan pizzas into the oven and bake for about 10 minutes, or until the blueberries are just about ready to burst, the cheese has softened, and the naan is toasted. Remove from oven, sprinkle with arugula and enjoy immediately.

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

• Into a large mixing bowl, break 2 eggs, add the cider vinegar, and whisk well. Add the brown and white sugars, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and salt. Whisk until well blended. Add the melted (and cooled!) butter and the baking soda. Whisk again until smooth. Now add the flour and switch to a spoon or spatula, stirring well. (Do not over-mix at this point.) Gently fold in the blueberries, trying not to smash or crush them. • Transfer batter to the prepared baking pan and bake in your well pre-heated 325° F oven for 30 to 40 minutes (exact time depends on your oven). The low temperature and long cooking time helps with even baking. The pan of blondies is done when the top is deep golden brown and firmly set. The slight cracking that you see in my photos (the kind you usually find on the top surface of a brownie or blondie) will appear when the blondies are cooled and cut. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before gently lifting by the parchment paper handles. Cut into 16 small squares and... eat & enjoy!


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The fact that Didier is a trained French chef is very evident in his work, which is more like art than baking, as we Americans know it. The Patisserie goes to great lengths to buy ingredients locally, blueberries are from Blueberry Meadows here in Corvallis, dairy is from local farms, eggs are also local and organic. The local foods are a matter of quality, which is paramount in real French cooking. The pastries are beyond good, the brioche is light and the flavor of the fresh, organic eggs is evident in every bite. The cream filled pastries, with the local dairy products and Oregon berries

A few years ago, upon finding themselves with an “empty nestâ€?, Trinidad and Didier found themselves at a turning point in life. Trinidad who is also a tax account, among other things, is always very busy during the holidays. Didier asked if it was all right with her if he went to France for Christmas to be with family whom he hadn’t seen in years. Since she knew she’d be busy with taxes, she gave him her blessing and bid him adieu. The trip home did Didier well, and helped to clarify his desires for the future. Trinidad was tired of battling the L.A. traffic, and was beginning to feel like life wasn’t just about making money. They decided to find a little space of their own where Didier could practice his craft. They decided against the L.A. area because it had become too competitive, but “not in a good wayâ€? according to Trinidad. French food is not about the lowest common denominator. It’s not about who has the cheapest and the biggest. French food is about art and tradition. So they set their sights on New Mexico. The Bohemian culture was appealing to both Trinidad and Didier. Still not sure about anything, except that they were both done with the craziness of L.A. , Trinidad got a call from her sister -- from Corvallis. A house had come on the market that was just the ticket, they came and had a look, and now we’re blessed with Le Patissier on Circle Blvd. Upon entering Le Patissier, one is greeted with the familiar “Bonjourâ€?. The mode of the day, every day, is classic French; formality, order, and quality is evident from the employees’ white coats, to the charming dĂŠcor, to the pronunciation of the French pastries. Trinidad says she wants Didier to teach the employees proper pronunciation, because her French is spoken with a Spanish accent. Truly an accomplished couple, Didier’s pastries speak of the years of study he’s put into the craft, and Trinidad is happy to greet you in French, Spanish, Italian, or even Japanese. And if you appreciate French dĂŠcor, you’ll love the intimate dining room. The original paintings hanging on the walls are very good, very European, and give the dining room a unique and inviting feel. Of course you’ll love the artworks in the pastry cases, created by Didier. And if you like the art on the walls, tell Trinidad, they are all hers.

inner!

Didier began his career as a pastry chef at the age of 14 in France. According to Didier, in France it’s not like America where anyone can call themself a chef, one begins as an apprentice, and it’s only after years of study and completing a test administered by the French government, can one call be called a chef. Usually, according to Didier, the time it takes to become a chef in France is approximately fifteen years. Upon successful completion of the test, which includes written work as well as hands-on cooking, people don’t have to look for a job, being a French chef means as Didier says, “the jobs look for you.�

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We are fortunate here in Corvallis to have such an establishment, and it is purely by chance. Through a mutual love of fine food, Trinidad, a Peruvian native met Didier, from Lyon France, in the Los Angeles area. Trinidad, who by her own admission is “always looking for great food,� used to frequent a little French shop in Glendale, CA. “They all had thick French accents, so I knew it was the real thing,� she said of her favorite,“hole in the wall.� Croissant sandwiches were a specialty of the house, and on her way to work one day Trinidad stopped in to buy a quantity of croissants for her coworkers. She then discovered that the croissants weren’t made in-house. They were purchased wholesale from another French bakery. Trinidad sought out the source and came away with the croissants she had been looking for, and something else, Didier.

are out of this world. And the croissants‌ the croissants are more of a religious experience than a food. The layers of fresh sweet butter trapped in the dough have to be refrigerated every time the dough is turned, that’s fifteen times the day before, then they are baked fresh every morning.

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hen you hear the term “a tradition of excellence� it is usually associated with sports teams, educational institutions, volunteer fire departments, or some such thing. But at Le Patissier in Corvallis, it means something much more. Trinidad and Didier Tholognat, owners of Le Patissier, arrive early each morning to pay homage to a grand old tradition, the French tradition of perfect pastry.

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The following is a reprint from Willamette Living - Issue Number One!

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French Pastry Savory Dishes Wedding Cakes Special Events

All prepared in-house from the freshest ingredients available.

541-752-1785

956 NW CIRCLE BLVD CORVALLIS

Vive la France ! www.willametteliving.com

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Potatoes

In-Season

Perfect Baked Potatoes The debate seems to continue as to how to make a perfect baked potato. Foil? No foil? Should I rub the potato with oil, or something else? Oven? Microwave? What temperature? Baking sheet? Parchment paper?

Old Fashioned Scalloped Potatoes 2 cups thinly sliced onion

Somehow the message has become mashed.

9 Tbsp. butter

To make a perfect potato, with a crisp jacket and fluffy interior, do the following:

6 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 ½ cups 2% milk 1 cup Nancy’s sour cream 2 ½ pounds potatoes 1 ½ cups cheese (choose a local mild cheese) 1/3 cups dry breadcrumbs Salt and pepper to taste In a skillet cook the onion and 2 Tbsp. of the butter over medium-low heat, stirring, until the onion is very soft. In a heavy saucepan melt 6 Tbsp. of the remaining butter, whisk in the flour and cook the roux, whisking, for 3 minutes. Add the milk, in a stream, and sour cream, whisking, and bring the sauce to a boil. Simmer the sauce, whisking, for 1 minutes and add salt and pepper to taste. Slice the potatoes into 1/8” thick slices. Spread about 1/3 of the sauce in the bottom of a well-buttered 3-quart casserole that is at least 2 ½” deep. Cover the sauce with a layer of potato slices, overlapping the slices slightly; cover the potatoes with 1/3 of the onions. Sprinkle the onions with 1/3 of the cheese; continue to layer the remaining sauce, potatoes, onion and cheese in the same manner. Sprinkle the top with breadcrumbs, melt and drizzle remaining 1 Tbsp. butter over top. Bake the mixture, covered with foil at 400F for 20 minutes. Remove the boil and bake 30-35 minutes more, or until top is golden and potatoes are tender. 34

The answer could not be simpler. The French Chef herself, Julia Child told us all how to make a perfect baked potato in the late 50's.

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

1. Select a fine, Oregon* Russet 2. Preheat oven to 500 degrees 3. Wash potato and poke three holes lengthwise with a knife, not deep, just to allow steam to escape so you don't end up with a potato-coated oven interior. 4. Place the potato on the oven rack, no baking sheet, and set a timer for one hour.

When timer goes off, you'll have a perfect potato.

*Idaho potatoes may be used, we're just biased.


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Anyone can shop &

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We dig...

Fresh

Local

Rosemary Garlic Roasted Potatoes 3 pounds small red or white potatoes 1/4 cup good olive oil

Organic Potatoes

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons minced garlic (6 cloves) A few sprigs of fresh Rosemary 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the potatoes in half or quarters and place in a bowl with the olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic; toss until the potatoes are well coated. Transfer the potatoes to a sheet pan and spread out into 1 layer. Roast in the oven for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until browned and crisp. Flip twice with a spatula during cooking in order to ensure even browning. Add Rosemary during the last 15 minutes of baking. Remove the potatoes from the oven, toss with parsley, salt and pepper to taste.

North Corvallis

2855 NW Grant Ave South Corvallis

1007 SE Third St Open daily

8am - 8pm

@firstaltcoop

www.firstalt.coop

50 years of

groceries for everyone www.willametteliving.com

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Bone-In Rib Eye Photo: Robbie Kunke

This October, Salem Dining Month Returns

20+ Local Salem Eateries & Beverage Producers 3 offerings for $30 or SDM Specials This October, Willamette Valley Vineyards will sponsor the third annual Salem Dining Month (SDM) as a way to get diners out and supporting local eateries. Approximately 20 local restaurant businesses will provide menu options that feature 2 food courses and a beverage pairing for the flat rate of $30 or their own SDM Special offerings. The month-long event was created to bring awareness to the high-quality food and beverage offerings in Salem, as well as the immediate surrounding areas, and to encourage locals and visitors to dine out during the month of October, a prime time to enjoy faire with locally sourced ingredients. ​“Watching the COVID-19 pandemic deeply impact our local businesses has been heartbreaking,” explained Willamette Valley Vineyards Winery Director Christine Clair. “It is our hope that Salem Dining Month will encourage more people to support our local chefs, hospitality industry, farmers, restaurateurs and artisan beverage producers.” 36

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

Alena Stewart


HELP OUR RESTAURANTS THROUGH THIS, CALL FOR TAKEOUT!

Queen’s Chopstick

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Mon, Wed & Thurs: 8:00 - 8:00 Friday: 8:00 - 9:30 Saturday: 7:30 - 9:30 Sunday: 7:30 - 4:00 Closed on Tuesdays 208 2nd St. SW in Albany

Albany’s new sushi sensa�on. Kaiyo Sushi is the place for a quick lunch mee�ng, date night, or family night out. Watch as expertly prepared sushi oats past your seat on our conveyor, and pick your favorites.

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A taste of Japan, in Albany. Come by today and have some sushi! Open 11 am to 10 pm 2826 San�am Hwy SE, Albany, OR 97322 (Next to Elmer’s)

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Delicias Valley Cafe

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A local landmark for over 30 years. Our bakers and chefs are at work around-the-clock preparing all your favorite dishes and baked goods using only the finest ingredients. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, or anything in between. Now offering catering too. Mon-Sat 7:00 - 9:00 Sunday 8:00 - 8:00

Kaiyo Sushi

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New Morning Bakery

219 SW 2nd St. Downtown Corvallis NewMorningBakery.com 541-754-0181

541-967-9488 www.novakshungarian.com

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Opened in 1984 by Joseph and Matilda Novak, Novak’s is Oregon’s only Hungarian restaurant!

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136 SW Washington Ave Suite 102, Corvallis 541-753-2222

2329 Kings Blvd Corvallis

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www.queenschopstick.com 11:00 am 10:00 pm Sun-Wed 11:00 am 11:00 pm Thurs-Sat

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An exciting menu of new Latin fusion cuisine. Fabulous riverfront bar, special events, extensive wine list. A truly memorable dining experience.

Our Asian fusion menu will delight you. You’ll love our chic new restaruant, and our delicious menu items presented with style. Many reviewers have called ours “the best asian food in Corvallis,� come find out why.

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Not just Chinese food!

HELP OUR RESTAURANTS THROUGH THIS, CALL FOR TAKEOUT!

Mon - Sat: 8:00 - 9:00 Sunday: 8:00 - 8:30 Breakfast Buffet Sat & Sun Only: 9:00 - 12:00 933 NW Circle Blvd in Corvallis

(Across the street from Market of Choice)

541-753-0599 www.deliciasvalleycafe.com www.willametteliving.com

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The holidays are right around the corner, let Natural Sprinkles give you a hand with the baking!

Hatch Chili Pizza Photo: Conrad Venti

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202 Second Ave SW, in Albany | For Information, Call: (541) 704-0445

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• Archive Coffee & Bar​: 102 Liberty St. NE, Suite 120 ​| ​(503) 949-2428 | http://www.archivecoffeeandbar.com/

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• Amadeus​: 135 Liberty St. NE ​| (​503) 362-8830 ​| ​http://www. amadeussalem.com

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Participating Restaurants (as of September 28, 2020):

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Seafood Market

• B2 Taphouse: ​1170 Boone Rd SE | (503) 991-5369​| https:// www.b2taphouse.com/ • Barrel & Keg: 1​ 190 Broadway St NE | (503) 584-1177​ | ​http:// www.barrelandkeg.com/ • Basil & Board: ​500 Liberty St SE Ste. 150 ​| (​503) 447-3350 | ​ https://basilandboard.com • ​Bentley’s Grill: ​291 Liberty St. SE ​| ​(503) 779-1660 |​​http:// www.bentleysgrill.com/

Wild Caught & Ocean Fresh!

Salmon Halibut Crab

Live Tanks! Hot Soup!

Tuna Lobster Rockfish

Cod Shrimp Clams

1925 SE 3rd St. in Corvallis | 541-752-0558 | paciďŹ caseafood@gmail.com Open Wednesday through Sunday 10AM - 6PM

/PacificaSeafoods 38

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

• B ​ irdie’s Bistro: ​380 High St NE |​ ​​(​503) 393-2087 | ​https:// birdiesbistro.com • ​Chira’s Restaurant: ​189 Liberty St. NE ​| ​(503) 851-8956 ​| http://www.chirasrestaurant.com/ • Christo’s Pizzeria: ​1108 Broadway St. NE ​| ​(503) 371-2892 ​| https://christospizzasalem.com/ • Gilgamesh Brewing - Campus: ​2065 Madrona Ave SE | (503) 584-1789 | https://www.gilgameshbrewing.com/menu/ • Gilgamesh Brewing - The Woods: ​555 9th Street NW


|​ (503) 584-1789 | https://www. gilgameshbrewing.com/menu/ • Gilgamesh Brewing - The River:​​ 307 S. Main Street Independence ​ | (503) 751-1486 | https://www. gilgameshbrewing.com/menu/ • Isaacs Coffee Wine & Dessert: ​201 Commercial St NE | (503) 551-3939​| https://www.isaacsdowntown.com/ • Marco Polo: ​300 Liberty St SE | (503) 364-4833​ | ​https://www. marcopolosalem.com/ • ​Masonry Grill: ​120 Commercial St NE | (971) 915-2494​| https://masonrygrill. com/ • Rafns’ Restaurant: ​479 Court St. NE | (503) 580-2936 | h​ttp://www.rafns.com/

Ritters Photo: CarlyDiaz - Jamie Gallardo

• Willamette Valley Vineyards: ​8800 Enchanted Way SE, Turner ​| ​(503) 5889463 |​https://www.wvv.com/

• To Go and Delivery options will be available as well for the specials to accommodate for COVID-19 limitations

• Rudy’s Steakhouse: ​350 Chemeketa St. NE ​| ​(503) 399-0449 ​| https://rudyssteakhouse.com/

SDM Details: F ​ rom October 1s​t-​October 31s​t​, 2020 every participating restaurant will offer special Salem Dining Month Menus featuring food courses of their choice and optional beverage pairings.

Visit ​www.SalemDiningMonth.com​ for up-to-date restaurant information, SDM Menus and additional details.

• Santiam Wine Bistro: ​1555 12th St SE #130 | (503) 589-0775​| http://www.santiamwine.com/

• Beverage offerings may include local wine, beer, cider, cocktail or a nonalcoholic drink.

• Venti’s Cafe + Taphouse: ​2840 Commercial St. SE ​| ​(503) 391-5100 ​| http://ventiscafe.com/

• The food options may consist of an appetizer and entreé; an entreé and dessert; two small plates, and so forth.

• Venti’s Cafe + Basement Bar: ​325 Court St. NE |​ ​(503) 399-8733 ​| http://ventiscafe.com/

• Multiple “3 for $30” offerings or other specials may be provided at each participating restaurant

• Ritter’s: ​102 Liberty St NE Suite 100 | (503) 339-7928​ | ​https://www. ritterseatery.com/

Follow us on Social Media to see what’s happening during Salem Dining Month! • SDM​ ​Facebook: ​www.facebook.com/ SalemDiningMonth • Salem Eats Facebook: ​https://www. facebook.com/groups/salemeats • ​Instagram: ​@SalemDiningMonth • ​Official hashtag: ​#SalemDiningMonth For questions or interest in partnering with Salem Dining Month, please contact Nicole Kri​ll at 5 ​ 03.939.0001​​or ​ salemdiningmonth@wvv.com

About Willamette Valley Vineyards Founded in 1983 by Oregon native Jim Bernau with the dream of creating world-class Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley Vineyards (WVV) has grown from a bold idea into one of the region’s leading wineries, earning the title “One of America’s Great Pinot Noir Producers” from ​Wine Enthusiast Magazine​. All WVV vineyards have been certified sustainable through LIVE and Salmon-Safe programs. WVV’s mission in growing cool-climate varietals is to create elegant, classic Oregon wines. www.willametteliving.com

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HEALTH & FITNESS

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Empower Your Immune System By Kris Denning Feeling a little bit helpless this year? Many people are, considering how many things have been thrown at us in 2020. And now with the fall/winter season upon us and this powerful virus looming, you may feel like a sitting duck. But there are things you can do. You have the power to boost your immune system and rev up your defenses, so that your body can be ready to fight, if necessary. I know this is a tough one, considering the climate, but stress reduction must be at the top of this list! Chronic stress keeps the body in fight or flight mode and can wear down the immune system. Reduce or eliminate your stress through daily meditation, yoga, walks, and any moderately intense form of exercise. Try not to use alcohol or drugs as stress relief, as these substances can break down your immune system. So, a glass of celebratory wine perhaps, but not a bottle after a hard day. Oh, and turn off the news once in a while! Get adequate sleep! If the body is in a state of exhaustion, it is not going to be

capable of fighting off a virus trying to settle in. Now would be a good time to stop smoking!! Covid-19 and other illness can greatly affect the lungs, and you need them fully functional! Even environmental pollutants can put a strain on the lungs, so for now, I suggest sticking to soaps and detergents and cleaners that are fragrance free and as natural as possible. Eat as many fruits and vegetables as you possibly can. And then have more. The nutrients and antioxidants replenish the whole body, and therefore keep your immune system functioning at its best! As a rule, stick to foods that are whole and close to nature. Decrease your intake of simple carbohydrates like sweets, baked goods, soda and pretty much anything with added sugar, which works against your immunity. Even if you get your daily allowance of 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables, you should still be taking a vitamin D

supplement. Particularly in the darker months of the year. Many studies have shown that the severity of COVID-19 is significantly increased when people have lower levels of vitamin D in their system. And, vitamin D deficiency is more common amongst COVID-19 patients. In my book, this supplement is a must! Vitamin D will also help prevent those winter blues, which can also strain the immune system. I also recommend a good quality vitamin C. Drink more water. Staying hydrated helps your body naturally eliminate toxins and other bacteria that can cause illness. Water also carries oxygen to your cells so they may function optimally. A good rule of thumb is to drink half of your body weight in ounces of water daily. More if you exercise, (hopefully you do), and more if you drink alcohol or caffeine, which can dehydrate the body. Moderate daily exercise is essential. Physical activity can help flush bacteria out of the lungs and airways. Exercise also increases the circulation of the immune cells, making them more capable of detecting illnesses faster. It is never too late to start living an active lifestyle!!! Anything that places a burden on your body is going to impair your immune system. So, make good choices! Before you take a bite or drink, ask yourself if this is going to help strengthen your immune system, or make it weaker? And – is it worth the risk? Until next time, have a wonderful holiday season, and I am happy to say‌ end of 2020!!!

Kris

Kris Denning is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist and a yoga/pilates teacher at Timberhill Athletic Club. Contact her at

healthytothesoul.com

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

www.healthytothesoul.com


Holiday Pictures? By Cheryl Lohman I know…it’s a little early for thinking about Christmas…but the holidays will be here before you know it. Imagine - Christmas Morning you are awakened by your excited children or grandchildren who insist you come right now to see what Santa left under the tree. You only have time to throw on your robe - forget about brushing your hair or putting makeup on. Now with all the cameras flashing, you realize…this look is being captured for eternity or worse for uploads on Facebook. Yikes!

LOOKIN' GOOD

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Now imagine yourself next year. When the kids wake you up, you smile knowing you look fabulous. You put on your robe and quickly brush your hair. Bring on the cameras because you discovered permanent makeup for eyebrows, eyeliner and beautiful lips. No more hiding and people will be wondering how you manage to look so good with so little effort. Who wouldn’t prefer the second senario? Its not too late for this year. And since we have to wear masks for preventing the spread of covid, now its really important your eyes and eyebrows look great all the time. Treat yourself — or someone you love — to permanent makeup or a gift certificate. Now more than ever it’s important to look for an artist who will keep you safe and provide a natural look. If you’d like to explore the possibility of permanent makeup, it is essential to have a consultation with a highly trained and

qualified artist. This is not a service you want to bargain shop for and you will want to see actual photos of their work. Today, most professional permanent cosmetic artists are members of the world’s leading, not-for-profit society devoted to this field, the Society of Permanent Cosmetic Professionals (SPCP). This organization sets standards of practice for its members, which assures the public of the highest levels of professionalism and safety. Look for

Cheryl Lohman CPCP, is a Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional and owner of Oregon Permanent Makeup. Contact her at 541-740-1639 Learn More at

an artist with the Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professionals (CPCP) credentials. After permanent makeup — you’ll be among those who enjoy a carefree natural look that last a long time and always ready for pictures.

Cheryl

www.oregonpermanentmakeup.com

www.OregonPermanentMakeup.com

www.willametteliving.com

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STYLE GUIDE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Holidays in Style By Oscar B Hult

While there is no doubt that 2020 has been a bit different (Okay a LOT different) one thing is certain, you will still probably be attending a holiday gathering or two. Even if it is just with close family and friends. What can you do to make sure that those extra “Covid Pounds” don’t make you look like a slob? Hint: Oversized is not your friend. We are all a bit sensitive about how we look whether we like to admit it or not, so it pays off well in the self-esteem realm to make sure your clothing fits well. And that goes for any holiday gathering including costume parties. Compare the two 20’s Mobster costume images that accompany this article. The one that fits well looks great, the other

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is not going to win any awards. Fit is the most important component in looking good in what you are wearing. That is especially true in everyday wear. People will almost instantly form ideas about the kind of person you are based almost entirely on how you are dressed. Here are some safe places to start practicing dressing better… That awesome Halloween party you have been invited to, your family Thanksgiving dinner, the company Christmas party. If you would like help in looking your best… I would suggest two things… 1. Check out some online fashion blogs relating to how men’s clothing should fit. 2. Make a date with your local tailor

to do a wardrobe assessment. Bring in items from your wardrobe that you like and see how they can be adjusted to fit better and find new ways to pair them with items you have to create great looking ensembles. Your local haberdasher can make suggestions on where to make upgrades in your wardrobe to get the best bang for the buck. Let’s face it, there is time to do some research, and better the way you look before the country opens back up and we get busy with life and the myriad of events that we all love. Make the most of this time to fine tune your look, whatever that might be.

Oscar

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www.facebook.com/thenattydresser

Oscar B. Hult is a co-owner of The Natty Dresser in Downtown Albany. 541-248-3561 Contact him at

www.thenattydresser.com

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020


Winter Container Ideas By Brenda Powell

use odd numbers so 3, 5, or 7. The filler and spiller elements can be more than one type of plant if you have the room. Sometimes you even see more than one type of thriller. Having contrasting textures of foliage and different flower types makes for better eye appeal. Fall and winter containers use shrubs and evergreen perennials as the core plants. You can transplant them into your landscape when you’re ready to plant summer color or leave the thriller in and work a combination around it. If you want to plant a Chrysanthemum for wow color now, just replace it when it’s done blooming, perhaps with a flowering kale or some redtwig dogwood stems. I consulted my brother Lee, who has awesome skills with foliage texture design. Here are some combinations worth trying:

GARDENING

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Combo 1: Thriller: Phormium ‘Platt’s Black’ Filler: Euphorbia x martini ‘Ascot Rainbow’ and Bergenia Spiller: Calluna (this one used ‘Clare’) and Matrix Red pansy Combo 2: Thriller: ’Wissel’s Saguaro’ Cypress Filler: Silver Veil Hellebore and Heuchera ‘Shanghai’ or other silver-laced, purpleleaved form. Spiller: Carex oshimensis ‘Feather Falls’, Club moss (Selaginella sp) and blue pansy

Do you have a planter by your entry or front door that you load up with flowers for the summer but once the geraniums (or whatever you planted) are done blooming, you just leave it empty until the next spring? There are lots of options to make that container look great all fall and winter long. My favorite planter designs use the Thriller, Filler

and Spiller concept. The thriller provides the height and/or the “wow” factor. The filler is a plant of medium height that fills in the area between the thriller and the spiller. The spiller is something that is low or trails, often a foliage plant. A note: this doesn’t mean you are only planting 3 plants. A larger pot may mean there is room for many more. I like to

Combo 3 (for the shade): Thriller: Sarcococca ruscifolia Filler: Snow Fever Hellebore and Ophiopogon ‘Nigrescens’ Spiller: Maidenhair fern and Gaultheria procumbens (Wintergreen)

Brenda Brenda Powell is a fourth generation owner of Garland Nursery in Corvallis.

www.garlandnursery.com

Follow her writing at garlandnursery.wordpress.com

www.willametteliving.com

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REAL ESTATE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Use a Local lender! By Annette Sievert

All markets are local. That does not only apply to the real estate market but very much so to the mortgage market as well. When meeting new clients and asking whether and, if yes, from whom they are preapproved, I often hear that they are working with a non-local lender, be it the friend they have in California who works in a bank, a mortgage broker they used when they bought before in another state or the big bank they have their checking account with. The issues arising from this choice are always the same. One of the biggest problems are appraisals. Appraisers hesitate to work for a lender they do not know. A non-local lender does not know our market and will likely send an appraisal back to defend or ask for explanations a local lender would not need, thus costing more time and cutting into their income. You might think that an appraisal for $900 is expensive, but a chunk of that is going to the go between lender and appraiser, the appraisal management company. If an appraiser’s fee is cut to $500 which covers time to

go to the property, inspect it, do research and write the often extensive appraisal, you probably would be careful with the invested time as well. The lender orders the appraisal from an appraisal management company, which puts it in a round robin system for an appraiser to choose it and pick it up. If no appraiser is willing to work for this specific lender, the appraisal will not be picked up and closing will be delayed. Unfortunately, this problem does not become apparent until the process is well under way and switching to another lender is not possible anymore due to timelines in place. Not all sellers grant extensions. It is possible that a buyer loses a house due to a delay, especially if a perhaps better backup offer is in place that can step in and act faster. That is only one problem a local lender can avoid. Out of state lenders often are not familiar with state specific paperwork or procedures, complicating matters by

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each office is independently owned and operated. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each office is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

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Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

requesting documents that we do not use, and they are unable or unwilling to waive. A local lender is concerned about their reputation and standing in the community. An out of area lender has no problem with that as the probability that they ever get another loan here is low. As to big banks, it is not the nice manager you know at the local branch who approves your loan. That is mostly being done in corporate offices all over the US, with the same issues as a non-local lender. So, chose to work with somebody you can personally meet, right here, who is involved in the community, has a reputation to lose and wants to build a long-term relationship with you. Ask your broker for a recommendation and follow it. It often will make a world of difference for you and your transaction.

Annette

Do you have a real estate question? Ask Annette, at Coldwell Banker Valley Brokers in Corvallis 541-207-5551


Will the Election Impact Markets & Investments? Compliments of Sten Carlson As we approach Election Day, investors are understandably wondering – and maybe even anxious – about how the U.S. presidential election will affect the stock market. Election years often come with increased market uncertainty. And this year, COVID-19 and a fragile economy have added new dimensions to what may be a landmark U.S. election cycle. Regardless of who ends up winning in November, the election will likely play a factor in the markets. Here are a few things investors should consider: Dealing with uncertainty This year’s election season has been marked by unusual circumstances. Republican incumbent President Trump is running for a second term – after a surprise victory in 2016. Whereas former Vice President Joe Biden began the campaign season competing against 25 candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination before emerging as the party’s nominee after a rocky start. There are many important issues at stake, including trade, healthcare, tax policies, social justice and our relationship with China. How well the economy is doing is also a significant influence on the election outcome, especially for an incumbent or incumbent party. But that calculus has suddenly become clouded by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. How long the virus will persist and how significant the impact on economic growth will be remains unclear at the moment. Even without these usual circumstances created by the pandemic, it isn’t uncommon for the stock market to exhibit a degree of volatility in the run-up to an election. This can be particularly true in the final weeks leading up to the election and if the race is close. Investors should be prepared for circumstances where the “noise” generated by the campaign contributes to market fluctuations.

It’s not just about the president It’s true that our president has tremendous influence in the direction our country takes. However, it is important to keep in mind that regardless of who is successful in winning the White House, there is a significant difference between proposals and policy. How much any administration can accomplish is influenced quite heavily by the makeup of the House of Representatives, Senate, local and state legislatures, Federal regulators, as well as circumstances in the economy and the country at large. In addition to electing a president this fall, voters will also be electing 35 senators, now occupied by 23 Republicans and 12 Democrats. Currently, the Republican party has a three-seat majority in the Senate. And as happens every two years, the entire House, where the Democratic party currently controls a 35-seat majority, is up for reelection. Is history a guide? While no two election years offer the same set of economic or political circumstances, it may be instructive to take a look back to see how markets have performed in the past as a means of providing some context for the present. • Historically, market volatility begins to rise about 45 days ahead, or roughly three weeks into September, before peaking one week before the election.1 • In instances where control of the White House changes parties, stock market volatility tends to increase.2 • During an election year, U.S. stocks and bonds tend to perform better compared to the year after.3 • Interestingly, there has been very little difference in the performance of the economy under Democratic and Republican presidents since 1977. According to recent analysis by Deutsche Bank, “The average growth rate for a Democrat President is 2.9% compared to 2.7% for a Republican President.”4 However, it

Sten Carlson, CFP®, CLTC, CKA, MBA, is a Financial Advisor with PacWest Wealth Partners, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. in Corvallis, Oregon. He offers fee-based financial planning and asset management strategies and has been in practice for 25 years. To contact him, visit the team website at www.PacWestWealthPartners.com or call at 541-757-3000. Office address is 2396 NW Kings Blvd., Corvallis, OR.

is acknowledged that the economic performance during a president’s term isn’t necessarily a direct result of the actions of their administration, as president’s ultimately inherit an economy shaped by their predecessor’s actions, as well as other structural factors.

YOUR FINANCES

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

What may be a more important consideration for investors than who is elected president are the longer-term drivers of economic growth and corporate profits, which are shaped by policy, but also other factors outside Washington. The impact on specific market sectors Although it’s speculative to try and predict the outcome of the election and all of the policy implications each party would impose, the result of the election is likely to influence key industries. Among the sectors of the market that could be affected in different ways are healthcare, energy and technology depending on the results of the election. What this means for your finances While it’s natural to think about the impact of the election on your investments, it’s only one factor. Stay attuned to the bigger picture of your long-term goals. Review your portfolio diversification and risk tolerance with a financial advisor for an objective perspective on your financial situation. 1 – David Joy, Ameriprise Chief Market Strategist. Aug. 2020. 2 – Ameriprise Financial: “Committee Perspectives: U.S. Election Guide” Aug. 2020. Compiled by Ameriprise Global Asset Allocation Committee. 3 – “Report: Stock Market Performance By President”, Darrow Wealth Management: 4 – Deutsche Bank Economic Analysis, 2020

Sten

Sten Carlson PacWest Wealth Partners in Corvallis, OR. Contact him at Sten.E.Carlson@ampf.com 541-757-3000

Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

www.willametteliving.com

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Historic Nye Beach

*Mecca for the literary, scholarly and artistic.

Queen of Hearts

Nye Beach Wine Cellar

Gifts & Lingerie 255 NW Coast St.

541-265-3292

708 NW Beach Dr.

541-265-2118

A Taste of Ireland on the Oregon Coast Traditional Irish Fare, Imported Irish Beers on Tap, Full Bar, Minors welcome until 10pm, Patio Seating, Live Music. Winter Hours Sunday-Thursday 11am-9pm Friday and Saturday 11am-10pm

www.nanasirishpub.com

Jovi 46

232 NW Coast St. Suite B

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

613 NW 3rd St.

541-574-8787

541-265-8220


The LaSells Stewart Center Built by the community, for the community. We Appreciate Your Business What’s in a name? A longtime connection to Oregon State.

Groundbreaking ceremonies for The LaSells Stewart Center. LaSells Stewart Center Records (RG 260), Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon.

ome 40 years ago, generous donors and friends of Oregon State University achieved something remarkable. In just three years, they raised $4.5 million to build The LaSells Stewart Center. Not only was the money raised in record time, it was the largest project ever funded entirely through private gifts at an Oregon public university. These gifts, many from local donors, continue to serve the greater Corvallis community. Since its opening in 1981, The LaSells Stewart Center has been the premier performing arts, meeting and conference center for the Mid-Willamette Valley, with many events free to the public. In a typical year, The LaSells Stewart Center welcomes 160,000 guests to the Oregon State University campus attending: • • •

Brothers Loran L. “Stub” and Faye Stewart and their sister Dorothy Chapman contributed $1 million toward construction of The LaSells Stewart Center, honoring the memory of their parents, LaSells and Jessie Hills Stewart. This gift was one of many connections between the Stewart family and Oregon State University. Both Stewart brothers were Oregon State College of Forestry alumni, Loran in 1932 and Faye in 1938. In addition Construction of The LaSells Stewart Center. LaSells Stewart Center Records (RG 260), to serving as Oregon State University Special Collections and trustees for the Archives Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon. OSU Foundation for many years, the Stewarts established the Stewart Professorship for Gene Research in the College of Science. Other gifts supported the L. L. Stewart Faculty Scholars Program, the Faye and Lucille Stewart Professorship in Forest Engineering, as well as marine mammal research and athletics. Current information at lasells.oregonstate.edu.

60 concerts and performances, including the Corvallis-OSU Symphony Orchestra, along with other local and national artists. 40 lectures and public events, featuring distinguished speakers from OSU and around the world. Up to 12 art exhibits in the Giustina Gallery, many featuring local art and artists.

Of course, 2020 has been anything but typical. But all of us at The LaSells Stewart Center look forward to welcoming our community back as soon as we can.

The LaSells Stewart Center 875 SW 26 Street Corvallis OR 97331 541-737-2402

For up-to-date information including hours, visit: lasells.oregonstate.edu

Exterior of The LaSells Stewart Center. LaSells Stewart Center Records (P208:040), Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon.



Willamette

LIVING

Magazine's

Food & Wine 2020


The Willamett wineries you ...there’s a chill atomosphere, you hang out with the winemaker in the tasting room, it’s a casual, comfortable experience, it’s hands-on, it’s intimate...


te Valley craft hear about... ...this is one of them. Emerson Vineyards Tasting Room

20 minutes north of Corvallis 30 minutes southwest of Salem A million miles from the daily grind 11665 Airlie Road, Monmouth Oregon, 97361 503-838-0944

www.emersonvineyards.com


Welcome

Willamette Living's

Food & Wine Welcome to the 2020/2021 edition of Willamette Living's Food & Wine! Great timing! Boy did we pick a year to launch our Food & Wine supplement. It's been a little rough getting things rolling with the current situation, but we salute our hospitality providers. Our local food people have been troopers, both prepared food and places like the First Alternative Co-Op, who is celebrating 50 years in business serving the locals who want fresh, local foods. Things have been a little slow at ALL of our local tasting rooms, but innovative and creative wineries in our area have kept us informed via their newsletters and even by producing short video clips like those from Tom at Emerson Vineyards. On top of the pandemic, we've been through fires in Oregon that threatened our acres and acres of wine grapes, but we've emerged from that co-crisis in what appears to be good shape. Pinot Noir, the valley's celebrated and most abundant wine grape crop has been minimally effected by the lingering smoke. Pinot grapes have a thin skin, so the smokey tinge is

able to penetrate more easily, but thanks to our rainy climate, and some favorable winds, the smoke didn't hang on the grapes for too long. Some wineries are experimenting with some of the effected grapes; smokey Brandy anyone? Most are good to go. Lots of our local restaurants have done a steady business with home delivery, and outdoor, distanced seating. The locals have rallied to the cause as well with assistance like the Corvallis Sustainability Commission's "It's On Us" program. The program operates on community donated funds which in turn are used to purchase meals from local business' which are then provided to community members at no charge, no questions asked. Donate an learn more about this great program at www.sustainablecorvallis.org. We're sure the end of this insanity is in sight, and look forward to getting out there and sampling all our area has to offer once again. In the meantime, stay strong, keep your chin up, and drink wine!

Scott

Scott Alexander, Publisher Willamette Life Media

Cover: A Local Jewel, Sybaris Bistro in Albany

Stay in Touch @WillametteLiving

facebook.com/willametteliving

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Willamette Living Magazine Food & Wine 2020

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2020/2021


Willamette

LIVING

T H E L I F E S T Y L E M AG A Z I N E F O R W E S T E R N O R E G O N

Publishers Scott & Gayanne Alexander Willamette Living Food & Wine is published annually by Willamette Life Media LLC

Inquiries / Suggestions feedback@WillametteLiving.com

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In print at hundreds of locations in the Willamette Valley. The digital edition is free online at www.willametteliving.com

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Subscribe online at willametteliving.com, or send a check to our mailing address below. Check current subscription rates on our website.

Event Calendar

delalmarestaurant.com

136 SW Washington Ave Corvallis 541-753-2222 Reservations: Opentable.com

Submit your events at: willametteliving.com. Please submit as far ahead as possible. Please check your submission for accuracy. Please allow time for approval. Select events may also appear in the print magazine.

Mailing Address Willamette Living 922 NW Circle Blvd Suite 160 - 179 Corvallis, OR 97330

*Products/books/samples for review to same address please.

All editorial material, including comments, opinion and statements of fact appearing in this publication, represents the views of the respective authors and does not necessarily carry the endorsement of Willamette Living or its officers. Information in Willamette Living is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed. The publication of any advertisements is not to be construed as an endorsement of products or services offered unless it is specifically stated in the ad that there is such approval or endorsement.

www.bonniemilletto.com www.willametteliving.com

53


Smokin’

Left to right: Owner, Eric Howitt, Hunter Benson, Hector Enamorado, Danica Sanchez, Manager, Josh Opperman

We paid a visit to the recently opened Cascade BBQ in Corvallis

Cascade owner Eric Howitt began his business in Springfield, after a year and a half, in August of 2019 he moved the operation to Corvallis – to the Winco center in the North corner of the complex. Good news for Corvallis! They’re in a great spot with their huge Applewood smoker standing by in the back, there is tons of parking and room for events outdoors. Eric noted “It’s a great sport for us despite the history of being a pizza place, we still get people walking in looking for pizza.” Something tells us they’ll be happier to see what’s happening now! Cascade BBQ first opened as 75 seat restaurant. Now they rely on the bottle shop to take up some of the slack where customers should be but aren’t because of distancing rules. They’ve really made the best of a not great situation though with trivia, karaoke, paint & wine, live music, and popular “smoke the vote” voter registration events. They’re even looking 54

Willamette Living Magazine Fall 2020

Menu Board


forward to their first annual pumpkin carving night on October 29th (5:30 – 9:00). What led up to Cascade BBQ? Eric’s Family owned restaurants and hotels, so he’s been around the hospitality industry his entire life. He worked at Bombs Away café back in the day, then became involved with college athletics for 20 years, now he’s back in the restaurant business. It’s in the blood. BBQ sauce is in his veins, maybe? Eric’s time in the college athletics world has proven very good for business with the college athletes who visit Cascade BBQ, he still enjoys a great relationship with OSU athletics. Players, coaches, and the like visit for BBQ. They even host whole-team meals with entire travel groups, the bus pulls right up – of course, that’s when they were a 75 seat restaurant. They expect that to resume as soon as it’s safe to do so. Cascade offers Tri tip, (real applewood smoked”, sandwichess salads, sides, portobello mushrooms, Eric notes “vegetarians love the fact we have those.” Erick says his BBQ style is “Oregon

BBQ” because of the salads, sides and vegetarian options. He has clients who are vegetarians who are surprised to admit their favorite place to eat is a BBQ place! In addition to the vegetarian options you will of course find ribs, chicken, links, pulled pork and the specialty, tri-tip, Eric says they were named the “Tri-Tip Mafia” when they started the business. Catering is available up to 150 diners, maybe 200 with a simple menu. Cascade does not provide wait staff, “we drop off, you eat, we pick up” as Eric puts it.

Local wines – beer and cider too!

If you’re looking for some authentic BBQ, look no further than Cascade BBQ. www.CascadeBBQ.org

Open 7 days a week

11-7 M&T as Bottleshop W-Sun: kitchen 11-9 W,Th,Sun: Rest. 11 – 8 Bottleshop 11-9 Fri-Sat: Rest 11-9, Bottleshop 11 – 10 2575 NW Kings Blvd. Corvallis, OR – in the Winco parking lot. (541) 829-2009 tritipmafia@gmail.com

Smokey ribs, mouthwatering!

Eric checking the progress of some Tri-Tip

www.willametteliving.com

55


First Alternative

Still Fresh After Fifty Years As the 20th century progressed, American diets changed, and not for the better. Fast food restaurants spread across the land, while in kitchens and at grocery stores, convenience became more important than nutrition. In response, grassroots movements began that emphasized the simple pleasures and nutritional benefits of cooking and eating fresh, whole ingredients. The movement came to Corvallis in the late 60s. A small group of OSU students, with the help of faculty advisor and associate professor of botany William Denison—father to Tom Denison of Corvallis’ Denison Farms—set out to create a place for the natural foods they couldn’t find at other stores, particularly whole grains and bulk foods.

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Willamette Living Magazine Food & Wine 2020

Papers of incorporation for First Alternative Inc., as it was initially called, were filed in March 1970. Meanwhile, volunteers were scouting supplies and looking for a permanent home. It wouldn’t be just a grocery store. As Joanne Myers, one of the founders, said in the November 16, 1970 edition of the Corvallis Gazette Times, First Alternative would be “for people who are seeking an alternative to the society we live in today — an alternative based on cooperation, not competition.” First Alternative opened for business in a small house on NW 4th Street on Monday, November 23, 1970. The store was renovated, staffed, and stocked entirely by volunteers.

Funding was piecemeal at first. Some charitable donations helped cover rent. Shoppers were asked to pay for a month’s groceries in advance, if they could. There wasn’t much to buy, either. Distributors weren’t interested in making deliveries to some tiny upstart. Instead, volunteers would hit the road in their own vehicles to purchase goods from around the valley and beyond. First Alternative caught on quickly. The environment may have been funky, and there might not have been much to buy, but there was a sense of community and an exuberance that couldn’t be contained by that tiny little house. One offshoot of this exuberance was Grass Roots Books, founded in 1971 by Jack Wolcott and Mike Nesson, two of the Co-


op’s earliest volunteers who decided to take what they’d learned starting an alternatively-focused business and use it to open a bookstore with the same against the grain mentality. Back at the Co-op, more space was needed, and in early 1972 it was found at a former burger joint on SE 3rd Street. Once again, volunteers set about renovating and expanding the new store, stocking products — still mostly bulk goods — and working the cash registers. Eco Alliance, a local non-profit organization operated by students at OSU opened a recycling center next door. Years later, when the Eco Alliance left, First Alternative took charge of the Recycling Center.

and Instagram with @firstaltcoop for all the details. Everyone is welcome to shop at the Co-op, and everyone is welcome to become an Owner. There’s never a bad time to join the 10,000 and counting people who are part of the Co-op community and become an investor in a successful, longstanding business dedicated to good food, great people, and a sustainable world.

In 1974 managers became the Coop’s first paid staff. While an all-volunteer staff had fostered connections between store and community, it also meant that on some days no one would show up for work and the store wouldn’t open. The only produce sold in these early days came from overflowing local gardens, making for a spotty selection, sometimes literally. This changed in 1975 when community members started the Willamette Growers’ Association (WGA), and opened a small produce stand called Growers’ Market outside the store. After several successful years, the WGA switched focus to a new project: the Albany and Corvallis Farmers’ Markets. First Alternative integrated the produce stand into the store, becoming an every day option for fresh, local, organic produce. Paid staff were added in the 80s to help ease scheduling and improve shoppers’ experiences, and further remodels increased First Alternative’s selection and strengthened their position as a trusted, community-owned alternative to big box food chains. In 1999, with the approval of its Board of Directors and a unanimous vote by members, the Co-op re-incorporated as a true cooperative. A massive expansion completed in 2001 doubled retail space, then in May of 2003 a second location opened at the corner of 29th Street and Grant Avenue, in what had previously been a Dari Mart, making the Co-op an easily accessible option for even more Corvallis residents. First Alternative Natural Foods Co-op will be celebrating 50 years in business in 2020—and looking forward to 50 more—with special sales, parties, and promotions. Throughout the year they will be highlighting partnerships with local businesses with special co-branded commemorative products. Keep an eye on their website, firstalt.coop, or follow them on Facebook, Twitter, www.willametteliving.com

57


New Morning Bakery

A Corvallis Tradition The Corvallis landmark New Morning Bakery began in the late 1970’s on downtown’s second street, in the space that is now the southern half of Grassroots books. It was then purchased in the early 1980’s by Ann and Joel Weinstein who broadened the menu and grew the business over the next decade. Having outgrown the space by 1990, after an extensive remodel, they moved into the current downtown location and also opened a production facility with a small retail bakery in South Corvallis. While the downtown business enjoyed continued growth though the 1990’s, the retail bakery

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Willamette Living Magazine Food & Wine 2020

in South Corvallis didn’t. The South Corvallis facility was closed to the public in 2001 but remained the primary production facility and wholesale distribution center for the business. Current owner Tristan James started working at the bakery as a dishwasher in 2001 and soon after cross-trained in all aspects of the business. After leaving to pursue a business degree in Texas and work as a logistics manager for Target he was recruited back to New Morning Bakery as a General Manger in 2005 so Ann and Joel could transition towards retirement.

In January of 2012 Tristan purchased the business f rom Ann and Joel, who were ready to retire. He and his wife Keara (who started working at New Morning Bakery in 2006) work as a team running the bakery. Recognizing the increased competition with influx of downtown eating options they further expanded the menu to included cooked-to-order breakfast. They also focused heavily on expanding the catering aspect of the business and pursuing new wholesale accounts to maximize output of the production facility.


While wholesale is a low margin business and hard to compete against the mechanized bakeries, they have successfully set themselves apart by using traditional methods and natural ingredients. By diversifying the business, they are able to keep 40 employees steadily employed throughout the year. Of course, like all other eateries the pandemic hit hard. They have worked through it with outside dining and distancing and are looking forward to getting back up to full speed ahead. In early 2019 they did an extensive remodel of the service area of the bakery and plan additional updates to the dining room in the coming years. Future plans include further expansion of the wholesale and catering aspects of the business and continuing to offer extensive made f rom scratch choices for anyone looking for breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, or any-thing in-between while in downtown Corvallis.

NOEL BARS

New Morning Bakery (Hazelnut Bars) For the crust • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 • /4 cup plus 2 tablespoons firmly packed light brown sugar • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1 stick ( 1/2 cup) unsalted butter, cut into bits

For the topping • • • • • •

1 1/2. cups firmly packed light brown sugar 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 /2 teaspoon baking powder 3 large eggs, beaten lightly 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped hazelnuts, toasted

Make the crust: In a bowl whisk together the flour, the brown sugar, and the salt, add the butter, and blend the mixture until it resembles meal. Press the mixture onto the bottom of a baking pan, 13 by 9 by 2 inches, and bake the crust in the middle of preheated 350° F. oven for 12 minutes. Let the crust cool in the pan on a rack. Make the topping: In a bowl whisk together the brown sugar, the flour, the baking powder, the eggs, and the vanilla and stir in the hazelnuts Pour the topping evenly, over the crust and bake the mixture in the middle of the preheated 350° F. oven for 25. to 30 minutes or until it is golden. Let the mixture cool completely in the pan on a rack cut it into 12 bars. Makes 12 bars.

www.willametteliving.com

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21. Willamette Valley Vineyards (4B)

26335 Greenberry Rd, Corvallis, OR 97333

20. Tyee Wine Cellars (2F)

10705 Airlie Rd, Monmouth, OR 97361

19. Treos (3C)

24880 Orchard Tract Rd, Monroe, OR 97456

18. TeBri Vineyards & Lavender (2H)

24843 Kyle Rd, Monroe, OR 97456

17. Sweet Earth Vineyards (2H)

2920 NW Scenic Dr, Albany, OR 97321

16. Springhill Cellars (3D)

810 Applegate St, Philomath, OR 97370

15. Compton Family Wines (2F)

26436 Coon Rd, Monroe, OR 97456

14. Silver Coyote Estates Winery (2H)

8175 Buena Vista Rd, Independence, OR 97351

13. Redgate Vineyard (3B)

1731 Pheasant Ct, Philomath, OR 97370

12. Pheasant Court Winery (2E)

3328 Stoneboro Pl, Philomath, OR 97370

11. Panache Cellars (2E)

3300-, 3798 S PaciďŹ c Hwy W, Independence, OR 97351

10 . Namaste Vineyards (3B)

24000 Cardwell Hill Dr, Philomath, OR 97370

9. Lumos Wine Co. (2E)

22937 Harris Rd, Philomath, OR 97370

8. Harris Bridge Vineyard (2E)

11665 Airlie Rd, Monmouth, OR 97361

7. Emerson Vineyards (3C)

24241 Cardwell Hill Dr, Philomath, OR 97370

6. Cardwell Hill Cellars (2E)

265 S 5th St, Monroe, OR 97456

5. Broadley Vineyards (3H)

25059 Larson Rd, Monroe, OR 97456

4. Bluebird Hill Cellars (2H)

23924 Territorial Rd, Monroe, OR 97456

3. Benton Lane Winery (2H)

2565 Riverside Dr S, Salem, OR 97306

2. Ankeny Vineyard & Winery (4B)

15305 Dunn Forest Rd, Monmouth, OR 97361

1. Airlie Winery (3C)

Wineries

1

Dallas

Kings Valley

May is Oregon Wine Month, 31 223 days dedicated to tasting, learning and supporting Oregon wine. On January 18, 2012 Oregon's Governor John Kitzhaber signed a proclamation designating May as Oregon Wine Month, reviving a tradition that had been dormant for more than two decades.

May

223

3

4

1

7

Lewisburg

19

99W

Monmouth

10

20

13

22

16

Albany

2

5

Jefferson

5

Salem

Valley Winery Guide

2

21

D

C

B

A


Alsea

20 8

34

9

6

12

• 52% of Oregon wine is made from estate-grown fruit.

• 1% of the wine produced in the U.S. is from Oregon

• 70% of Oregon wineries produce fewer than 5,000 cases per year.

• There are 19 approved winegrowing regions in the state of Oregon, stretching from the Columbia River Gorge to the Willamette Valley.

• The Willamette Valley’s fertility is the product of multiple ice-age floods.

• Oregon’s biggest wine growing region is found in the Willamette Valley. This region yields two-thirds of the state’s wine production.

• Because of Oregon’s cooler climate, the state’s signature grape is Pinot Noir.

• Today, there are 725 Oregon wineries, and more than 1,000 vineyards growing 72 varieties of grapes.

• As a result of prohibition, the Oregon wind industry in the 1960s was almost non-existent – with just a few small family wineries in operation.

15

Philomath

• In the 1840s, the first vines were planted by the settlers arriving on the Oregon Trail wagons.

Fun Facts!

8800 Enchanted Way SE, Turner, OR 97392

4

14

18

11

5

99W

3

Monroe

20

20

Corvallis 34

Halsey

99E

99E

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You’ve prepared for a rewarding retirement. We can help you make the most of it. Your vision of retirement is unique, and your financial plan should be too. As an Ameriprise private wealth advisory practice, we have the qualifications and knowledge to help you grow and preserve your wealth. Whether it’s investment management, tax strategies or legacy planning, we’ll work with you to find the right financial solutions for your individual needs. And we’re backed by the strength and stability of one of America’s leading retirement planning companies.

Call us today and discover the personal service you deserve. PacWest Wealth Partners A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial services, Inc. Albany - 541.926.4116 Bend - 541.382.2354 Corvallis - 541.757.3000 Salem - 503.399.9498 www.PacWestWealthPartners.com

The compass is a trademark of Ameriprise Financial, Inc.

Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. (03/19)


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