Willamette Living Home & Garden 2020

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2020/21

Willamette

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Home isolation? In this kitchen? Yes please! Local Residents are Busy Bees in the Garden Window Coverings, Think Before You Shop Preserving the Fruits of Your Labor


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We are so excited we wet our plants! Nursery & Garden Center Winner: Garland Nursery & Landscaper: Lee Powell, Garland Nursery

Special thanks to our amazing staff and customers! We couldn’t do it without you!

5470 NE Highway 20 • Corvallis, OR 97330 • 541-753-6601


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Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. (03/19)


Welcome

Home & Garden Willamette Living's

2020/2021

Welcome to the 2020/2021 edition of Willamette Living's Home & Garden! What a year! Normally we advocate for spending some time at home, but this is really pushing it. On the other hand though, I've got a pretty good garden going. We're at the point now where we have a zucchini ready to pick every 20 minutes, or so it seems. I've replaced a window, cleaned up our deck. installed new downspouts in the front of the house and I have a few more little maintainence items on my list. We've also spent some time thinking about some bigger remodeling plans, now that our last little bundle of joy has left the nest. We're wandering around in here wondering what to do with all the extra space! We're lucky in our area in that we have some outstanding trade professionals. People who can work wonders where if I were to attempt myself, let's just say our property value would suffer -- greatly. People like Heidi at Powell Construction. Heidi submitted an article for this year's issue of some kitchens her and her crew have transformed, like the one on the cover. So cool. Or take a look at the article about maximizing your space submitted by Cressa at WL Construction. Cressa and her husband Lars work wonders with the unused space in your home. You can go from unused basement, or cobweb filled attic, to completely awesome man cave in no time!

Perhaps you've just moved to the valley and want to take advantage or our optimum growing conditions? Take a gander at the year's article about "edible gardening." That article was submitted by Brenda Powell (no relation to Heidi, I think). Brenda is one of the family owners of Garland Nursery, an institution here in the mid-valley. They're closing in on a hundred years in business! Or maybe you want to go all in on the rural lifestyle and get a chicken or two. Urban Ag Supply in Albany can point you in the right direction. Basically anything you'd like to do to upgrade your home is close at-hand here in the valley. Or, maybe you're tired of working on your house? Legend Homes, one of Oregon's top home builders offers brand spankin' new homes in our area that are hard to beat. Definitely take a look if new is the plan. Everything works, nothing leaks, no pests, clean & efficient, sounds pretty nice, right? As always, thanks for reading and we'll get to work on next year's line up! Happy Home Improving,

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Willamette Living Magazine Home & Garden 2020

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Scott Alexander, Publisher Willamette Life Media

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Scott & Gayanne Alexander

Willamette Living Home & Garden is published annually by Willamette Life Media LLC

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Willamette Living 922 NW Circle Blvd Suite 160 - 179 Corvallis, OR 97330

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HOME & GARDEN

Edible Gardening in the Willamette Valley By Brenda Powell Growing your own fruits and vegetables has grown in popularity the last few years, but interest exploded in 2020. In the Willamette Valley, we are fortunate to be able to grow and plant almost year-round. There are a few things to know about our area. Western Oregon receives most of its rainfall from OctoberMarch. We tend to receive very little moisture July-September. Also, we can get very warm in those 3 months. This makes it more difficult to establish plants in our hot, dry summers. Fall planting once the rains start reduces the amount of water needed and makes it easier for the plant to get established. However, not all plants are available to purchase in the fall. Our average last frost date is April 20th. Average means that on April 20th there is still a 50% chance of frost. On May 11th, there is a 10% chance. Our average first frost date is October

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27th, with October 4th having a 10% chance of frost. In general, our completely frost-free days are May 23-Sept 30th. This gives a good guideline for when it is safe to put out tender plants (ones that would be killed by a frost) without needing to protect them. It is possible to plant out some things earlier if they can be covered in the event of a frost. Soil temperature plays an important part in when to plant warm season vegetables. So even if we are pretty sure we will not have another frost, the soil temperature may be too cool for something like beans or cucumbers to really start growing. Although things are changing slowly, the nursery industry is still geared to a seasonal approach to plant availability. Here is a brief guide of when to plant and when to find the best selection.


Late January-February: Bareroot fruit trees, fruiting vines and berries. A good portion of apples, cherries, pears, plums, blackberries, grapes, raspberries, strawberries, and others are grown by nurseries in fields. They are dug in the winter and shipped without soil, hence the term bareroot. They need to be immediately covered with sawdust or soil to keep the roots moist until they are planted into the ground. Bareroot plants are usually less expensive but are only available for a short time. Not everything is available bareroot and not all garden centers choose to carry bareroot items. February-May: Container grown fruits including all of the above listed fruits plus blueberries, elderberries, figs, kiwi and more. February-April: Cool season vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, greens and mustard, kale, peas, spinach, Swiss chard and more can be planted outside beginning in mid-February through April. Many vegetables can be planted from seed directly into the ground or started indoors to transplant at the appropriate time. Also, bareroot vegetable starts like asparagus, horseradish, rhubarb.

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March-May: Lettuce, celery, potatoes, leeks, onion sets, root vegetables, cilantro and hardy herbs. Although you can buy starts for almost any vegetable, the root vegetables (beets, carrots, parsnips, radishes, turnips) are best started outside from seeds. Many warm season vegetables may be started from seed 4-6 weeks before they are ready to be planted outside. April: You may be able to plant tomatoes provided you are able to protect them if necessary and the soil temperature is warm enough. Corn in the second part of the month. May-June: Basil, beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, melons, peppers, squash, tomatoes, peppers. Make sure the soil

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temperature is warm enough before planting the cucumbers and melons. You can plant beans through July. July-mid-September: Fall and winter vegetables such as arugula, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, kale, lettuce, mustard and more. Some varieties are harvested in late summer and fall and some are harvested in late winter. Root vegetables can be planted again during this time. Parsnips in June/ July, beets June-Aug, carrots and turnips July-Aug, radishes Aug-Sept. Mid-September-October: Garlic, shallots, and bunching and overwintering onions. Citrus: Lemons, limes, and oranges are not hardy outside here. They can grow outside from May-September but must

Make sure the soil temperature is warm enough before planting the cucumbers and melons. You can plant beans through July.


be brought into a greenhouse or very bright light area in your house. Citrus plants are available through much of the year but give thought to whether you have enough bright indoor light before purchasing in the late fall/winter. This is a simplified list but hopefully helpful to those that are new to the area or new to gardening. Certainly, there will be other, experienced gardeners that may disagree with something. Every year and every garden are just a little bit different. There are good resources to give more detail and cover varieties of vegetables not mentioned here: OSU Extension monthly garden calendars, OSU Extension “Growing Your Own� online publication, and Territorial Seed Company fall growing guide. Hopefully, the increased interest in edible gardening will continue well into the future. After all, you what can be fresher than produce harvested from your own back yard.

HOMEOWNERS CONTRACTORS DESIGNERS You can enjoy the peace of mind knowing your installers from Mid-Valley Tile are all certified tile installers. The Certified Tile Installer Program provides consumers with a mechanism for identifying the level of proficiency of prospective tile installers and, It encourages them to use only the bestqualified installers, ensuring that their tile project is installed correctly from the beginning, and looks beautiful for years to come.

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Save Your Work!

Keep Summer Alive - in February Dinners

SO, YOU’VE SPENT YOUR SUMMER DIGGING, FERTILIZING, PLANTING, WEEDING, WATERING AND NOW YOU’VE GOT A BUMPER CROP OF DELICIOUS SUMMER VEGGIES -- NOW WHAT? Perhaps you’d like to save some of that delicious summer goodness for a wonderful dinner in the midst of the winter doldrums? Canning might be your answer, although the process involves jars... I guess “jarring” just doesn’t work. Canning foods is a practice that dates back to 1809. Nicolas Appert, a French brewer collected a sizable reward of 12,000 francs for devising his method of preserving food for the French military. Appert had observed food cooked in glass jars didn’t seem to spoil as long as the seal remained unbroken. No one know why it worked, they just knew it worked. It would be another 50 years before another Frenchman, Louis Pasteur, got to the bottom of the food spoilage problem and identified the culprits - microbes. There are several obvious benefits to home canning. Not counting your labor, canning can save you as much as half the cost of buying commercially canned food. Many vegetables begin to lose nutrients as soon as they are picked. In fact, some may lose nearly half their vitamins within just a few days unless they are canned or cooled. If vegetables are preserved properly, they can actually be more nutritious than fresh produce sold in stores. The canning process can be boiled down to just a few basic pointers: Your food to be canned should be of the highest quality possible canning food of questionable freshness, not a good plan Food should be washed, peeled, “hot-packed” or be high in acids to discourage the growth of microbes, bacteria, yeasts and molds. You want to remove as much air as possible, and store your properly preserved foods between 50 to 70 degrees. Remember, the process of preserving food is just that -- to preserve it. That means it must be done right. Canning done

improperly can result at the least in spoiled food, and in the extreme it can result in deadly botulism toxin - a very serious form of food poisoning which can result in death. Don’t be alarmed however, food properly preserved will be free of spoilage, and is nutritious and delicious. The process hinges on the acidity of your food to be preserved. High acid foods, such as pickles, most fruits, and tomato sauces (note: some tomatoes need to have a shot of lemon juice or citric acid added to meet acidity requirements for low-temp canning) can be canned using a “boiling-water” canner. A boiling water canner is simple a boiling water bath to lower your prepared jars into. On the other hand, foods such as red meats, seafood, poultry, and all fresh vegetables need to be canned at higher temperatures. Reaching these higher temperatures involves a pressure cooker, or hours in a boiling water canner. The process of canning has gone on for years, we all have a mother, aunt, or grandma who has done some canning at some point. It’s a tradition, a ritual that some are very proud of, and with good reason, a fantastic jar of raspberry jam, or great pickles is a treat the whole family will appreciate. Keep in mind that if you have very young family members, you can make some very nutritious and delicious baby foods for the wee ones. There is a great series of canning guides available for free from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. They explain everything you need to know, even stuff you didn't know you need to know. See the link below. Of course you’ll also need jars, and possibly a water bath canner or a pressure canner. Here in the Willamette Valley, good deals may be had at Bi Mart, or online at www.canningpantry.com. and for the highest quality cookware, pots & knives that will last for generations, visit The Inkwell Home Store on 3rd St. in Downtown Corvallis. Happy canning!

USDA CANNING GUIDE: https://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html

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Decorating Tips & Trends: Affordable Stylish Ideas for a Fresh Look

"When windows are ignored, they make a room feel dull and uninviting."

"The era of throwing a room together with cheap, disposable furniture is over and for obvious reasons."

by Kimberly Blaker ARE YOU TIRED OF YOUR DATED, DULL, OR WELL-WORN INTERIOR? If so, you may want to consider an update. With the following tips, you can create a fresh look by combining some of your existing furnishings with a few new or new-used pieces to achieve the atmosphere you desire.

medium, and small pattern to bring them together without conflict. Also, use patterns in odd numbers. For example, rather than 2 or 4 different patterns, use 3 or 5. Be sure to balance the patterns throughout the room rather than cramming them all in one area.

Painted furniture. This trend has come and gone and come around again. That’s excellent news for creating a whole new look without the expense of all new furniture. Several styles of painted furniture are currently popular, so there’s something to fit every personality. Painted styles include the worn look, matte finishes, and ceruse style. Colors range from the newly-popular earth tones and muted hues to bright and bold color paints

Earthy is in. Warm, earthy tones are back in this year, and cool is out. For a larger room, you could paint it in a darker earthy shade. For smaller rooms, choose lighter warm shades of paint. White window casings and doors are also out. So consider stained wood, a color that complements the walls, or the same color as the walls.

Toss the vertical blinds. These lack appeal and have gone to the wayside. The trend is for windows to add to the beauty of a room. When windows are ignored, they make a room feel dull and uninviting. Look for elegant fabrics in solids or prints that compliment the colors and styles in your room. Another popular choice is bamboo shades, which add texture. Mix patterns. At one time, this was a strict no-no, but it’s become increasingly popular. There are several tricks to make it work, though. First, use patterns of various sizes. Use a large,

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Mix & match furniture. Nothing says boring more than a living room full of matched seating and ottomans. Create contrast with complementary colors and patterns. If your sofa is solid beige, try adding a chair with a red, beige, and brown pattern. Combine styles. Gone are the days when everything in a room had to be of a singular style. Today, people are combining two or three of their favorite styles to create character and uniqueness. It’s merely a matter of choosing the right pieces from different styles that complement each other.


"When choosing artwork, it should be proportional to the size of the wall. Large pieces go on large wall spaces, and small go in small areas."

"Don’t forget to bring in elements of nature with a couple of real plants or a stack of logs near the fireplace."

Minimal is more. The decor is essential to any room. It adds personality and creates intrigue. But overdone can feel overwhelming and makes it difficult to notice anything. A few scattered pieces to create focal points is better.

Avoid monochromatic color. Rooms with monochromatic color schemes are out, whether the colors are pale, earthy, or bold. Choose a primary color, and then accent colors that are not in the same color family as the primary.

Avoid ‘fast furniture.’ The era of throwing a room together with cheap, disposable furniture is over and for obvious reasons. Opt instead for quality pieces that will last and add value to a room. If the cost of new quality furniture isn’t in your budget, watch Craigslist and estatesales.net for like-new quality pieces at a fraction of the cost.

Mix tableware. This is a great way to save money while adding interest to your table. One option is to choose one pattern for dinner plates, another for salad plates, and another for bowls that compliment each other. Alternatively, select several different place settings, each in different colors or patterns. These can be had for practically nothing at thrift stores, estate sales, or on clearance.

Mix metallics. People commonly use only gold or only silver tones in a room. But the two combined can be very attractive. Add plenty of texture. Modern and contemporary is the inthing. But too much of it makes for a dull, sterile look. This problem is easy to solve by adding texture, which creates dimension and makes a room more interesting. Add tufted or fur pillows to a sofa. Also, add a few objects with a rough finish and a shag rug to a hardwood floor. Don’t forget to bring in elements of nature with a couple of real plants or a stack of logs near the fireplace.

The right size art for your wall. When choosing artwork, it should be proportional to the size of the wall. Large pieces go on large wall spaces, and small go in small areas. Also, hang art at the right height. An average height person’s head should come to the center of the art piece. Add height. There are several ways to make a ceiling appear higher. First, choose a ceiling color that’s light and at least a shade or two lighter than the walls. Use short furniture to make a room look taller. Finally, order extra long drapes so you can raise the curtain rod 5” to 7” above the window casing. www.willametteliving.com

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Tips Compliments of Local Roofing Pro Jason Schaefer of Orezona Building & Roofing Co.

What to check • Look for signs of leakage. Get up in your attic with a flashlight and look for not only active leaks, but for signs of previous leaks (water staining.) • Animals. If you are looking into your attic and see eyes looking back at you, that’s a bad sign. Go outside, look for birds working on nests, or trails of bugs marching to their new home, under your shingles. • Debris. Limbs, leaves, cones, etc, causing standing water, cracks, holes or other damage to vents and other protrusions.

Your Roof, First Line of Defense Against the Elements YOUR ROOF IS ARGUABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT MAINTENANCE AREA OF YOU HOME – IT STANDS BETWEEN THE ELEMENTS AND EVERYTHING UNDER IT! If it never rained, there would be no problem. But the Willamette Valley is hardly a desert. Moisture is not your home’s friend. The introduction of water, where it’s not supposed to be, can lead to mold and wood rot that may end up costing you thousands of dollars to repair. It’s best to make sure the integrity of your roof is not compromised. A well-constructed roof is designed to last for decades, but things can go south sooner -- for several reasons. It’s easy to ignore roof issues because you don’t see up there without trying. A leaky faucet is obvious, a split in some old caulking around a roof vent… not so much. But it’s worth your effort to get up there, or get someone up there, to take a look around once in a while! Poorly executed repairs: failure to properly lap shingles or apply sealants around newly installed or replaced venting or other roof penetrations can result in leaks. Tree damage: falling limbs, piles of leaves, or things tossed down by birds and squirrels, can all lead to big trouble. Bigger debris can puncture and crack roofing, and

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leaves can cause water to pool – both lead to moisture introduction. Expansion and contraction: over time, heat and cold can cause roofing materials to move around, leading to failure of sealants, nails, or the roofing materials themselves. Particularly with some membrane roofs. Wind: high winds can cause shingles to lift and become unstable, or in some cases, leave the roof altogether! Plain old wear and tear: for example, roofing materials with granulated surfaces can lose granules over time which lessens their resistance to UV rays, which will lead to materials breaking down, cracking, and leaking. The animal kingdom: birds and insects want to be under a roof when it rains too – yours! Keep an eye out for unwanted house guests who can make holes, then bigger holes, then invite their friends! And the number one cause of major roof repairs: lack of maintenance. It’s worth your while to check things out now and then. It only takes a few minutes, and it could save you a ton of money down the road.

• Dried, shrunken or cracked sealants around flashing, vents, or joints. • Inside the house, if you have stains appearing on finished drywall or wood ceilings, they’re most likely coming from roof leaks. • And last but absolutely not least, check your gutter and downspouts for proper drainage. Leaves clogging gutters and downspouts, can lead to standing water on your roof’s edge, leading to rotten facia, soffits, and roof decking – none of which are an easy fix! Sure, sometimes it’s a hassle cleaning out your roof’s drainage system, but in the long run, you’ll thank yourself for all the money you’ve saved. You can use that money, to take a vacation, to someplace where it’s not raining!

Pro-Tip: Never pressure wash your roof! You can blow shingles right off, and at the very least, you'll seriously degrade your stone granule surfacing which is key to the life of your roof.


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Call Orezona Building & Roofing Co. Today at 541-981-2190

Over 25 Years

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SERVING THE MID-VALLEY • COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL • ENERGY STAR AND LEED APPROVED PRODUCTS • METAL ROOFING • PVC & TPO MEMBRANE • ARCHITECTURAL ASPHALT COMPOSITION SHINGLES OREZONA BUILDING AND ROOFING CO. IS FULLY LICENSED, BONDED & INSURED. CCB NUMBER: 201381 “Orezona Did a great job on our roof. Arrived about 8 am, ďŹ nished and cleaned up by 5 pm. Jason was very helpful and the entire crew was respectful - even stacked the bricks from the

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old chimney. We are very pleased. Thank you Orezona!� - Rita Margin (5 star Google review)


In the Kitchen

Kitchens to Consider by Heidi Powell

Throughout our years of home remodeling, we have seen a lot of trends come and go. Our constant challenge is to make choices with homeowners that are up-to-date and unique while still feeling timeless and classic. With every style of kitchen comes new ideas and new ways of achieving this. These three unique projects highlight the different ways in which homeowners can showcase their tastes and remain true to classic looks.

Earthy Contemporary Some people might be worried that a more modern style isn’t going to fit into their older home. The homeowners for this earthy contemporary project asked for a unique style that utilized local products and recycled

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elements. A potential concern was the transition from elsewhere in the home into the kitchen space – the home was built in the 1960s and contained lots of brick and dark wood. Our design team chose to lean into the more traditional warm wood tone to avoid that problem. Though the cabinets are in a modern slab style, the natural stain on both them and the floor brings the whole design down to earth. The counter tops are a quartz style that mimics the texture of concrete. This element was a great way to add a modern industrial touch and still portray a very easy feel. The white backsplash looks clean and natural at first glance but is made more modern by using tile in trapezoid shapes. Our design team works with many clients who want to update their space but not change the overall style of the home. In this case, modernizing the shapes while keeping the colors in line with the traditional home was the key. For more info on this project, check out the “Locally Grown Kitchen� on our website. www.willametteliving.com

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In the Kitchen

Chic Farmhouse Our clients in this chic farmhouse kitchen remodel craved the farmhouse look for their home and knew the style was for them, but rather than go with the whites and grays that have become so typical of the style they had a different vision. We helped them choose a cream-colored cabinet with a glaze to highlight the cabinet detail. To add a bigger twist, the island was painted a muted mint green, and the tile backsplash is a mix of ceramic, metal, and glass tile. The rustic feel of the pewter colored cabinet hardware and the butcher block island countertop finishes off the farmhouse look. With the farmhouse look as popular as it is right now, our designers are always looking for ways to personalize the look, as well as to make timeless selections people will enjoy for years to come. Two tone cabinetry and the pop of color on the walls make the kitchen warm, cozy, and relaxing; with the selections balancing the old and new and giving it a personality all its own. For more info on this project, check out the “Chic Farmhouse Kitchen� on our website.

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Vibrant Blue

The homeowners of this crisp blue kitchen knew they didn’t want a classic neutral look. They wanted to have their home finally reflect their style and the way they live. These gorgeous cabinets provide a stunning splash of color. By keeping everything else neutral – the white counters and backsplash, the stainless-steel appliances, and natural wood flooring – we achieved a look that feels clean and comfortable while also being vibrant and exciting. The bright blue brings out the best in every other aspect of the kitchen and makes a beautiful design statement. When working with a bold color palette, our designers advise choosing the colors for the main focal point first – usually cabinets and countertops in a kitchen – and building the other choices around those things. In this gorgeous kitchen, vibrant cabinet colors steal the show, and it’s all possible due to moderation in the other selections. For more info on this project, check out the “Vibrant Blue Kitchen” on our website.

www.powellconstruction.com In the end, our goal is to provide every single homeowner we work with the kitchen of their dreams, utilizing their own unique style and incorporating it into a cohesive design. We work with every new client to make sure we are giving them a look that they will be happy with for years to come – without sacrificing any of their aesthetics in the here and now.

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Window Coverings

Creative Window Covering Solutions by Teri Wilkinson, Benson's Interiors

Windows are an important feature in any home. Usually, the natural light let into a room through a window is a beautiful thing. However, sometimes natural light can create uncomfortable temperatures or glare in a room. Modern features in today’s window coverings allow precise light control. There may be times that you want to bathe the room in full sunlight, other times you would prefer virtual darkness or maybe somewhere in between. Before you begin shopping for window coverings determine your specific needs for light control, privacy, and identifying your personal decorating style. Now you are ready to explore the window covering options!

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Before you begin shopping for window coverings determine your specific needs for light control, privacy, and identifying your personal decorating style


Light control and privacy: Slatted blinds have been available for many years. They are a great option for customizing the light flow into a room. Horizontal or vertical slats are made of rigid materials. Options include traditional aluminum in a wide range of colors, naturally beautiful wood slats or vinyl with smooth or textured finishes. Many people choose slatted blinds due to the ease of adjusting the slats as needed through the day. Fabric shades were introduced in the 80’s and gave a softer look at the windows. However, they did not allow flexibility for privacy or light control. Roller shades had the same drawback. These types of shades were either open for full exposure or completely closed. Contemporary fabric shades have been designed with amazing features to better control light and privacy. Top down shades offer the benefits of eye level privacy, while allowing light to enter at the top of the window. This type of operation is available on cellular shades, roman shades, grass and modern woven woods. With many tasteful fabric options, top down shades are complimentary to any décor. Banded shades feature alternating sheer and solid fabrics within one shade to allow view through and light control. An array of band sizes, textures and light filtering fabrics make the banded shade a great option in almost any room.

S vane window shades are an innovative design made to achieve desired privacy and UV protection. Light controlling soft vanes coexist with sheer fabrics panels; to rotate as the users directs light and view through to the desired setting. These shades can be oriented in a horizontal or vertical manner, which allows for any size window to be covered with this very functional and attractive type of shade.

Your own decorating style: Selecting home décor in the right materials, color and functionality enhances the comfort of a home. Keep in mind that design is not “one size fits all”. The most comfortable homes reflect the home owner’s individual style.

To define your style, think of some key fashion terms like formal, tailored, casual or exotic, just to name a few. These terms will help determine if you prefer clean lines or soft folds, vibrant colors over subdued tones, or if metal or fabric embellishments may be a characteristic that you would like to consider when selecting your window coverings. Today’s versatile window dressings have many innovative functions, superior light management, privacy control, plus visual appeal beyond expectations. Discussing your needs and desires with a window covering specialist is the most focused approach to finding the perfect solution for your windows.

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Home Tips - That Won't Break the Bank

Save a Little Money Easy Updates You Can Do Yourself Most for Under $100! by Kimberly Blaker So you've been dreaming of updating your home, but the cost of new flooring or a kitchen remodel doesn't fit your budget? Don't despair.

ceiling fans look decrepit? The blades often deteriorate faster than the fixtures. So buy new blades to make your fans look new again.

There are lots of ways to revitalize and update your home without breaking the bank. Check out these simple updates and fixes that'll give your home a fresh new look, inside and out. Just a few inexpensive fixes, and you'll be eager to show off your beautiful abode.

Liven it up with paint. Fresh paint goes a long way toward updating and freshening a room. With hundreds of shades to choose from, there's lots of room for creativity to achieve the designer look you want. Pick up paint brochures at your hardware store for color scheme ideas, and notice how unexpected colors are paired together to create fabulous designer looks. Then play around with different colors against the color of your room's flooring and furnishings. You might be pleasantly surprised to discover an unexpected color pairing creates a beautiful new look.

Replace your front door. This is the first thing guests see when they walk up to your home. So it's a great place to begin your updating. A higher-end wooden door will add beauty to your entrance. But even a new steel door painted in an inviting color will add a lot of curbside appeal to your home. Repair window screens. Torn window screens detract from curb appeal. Fortunately, they're inexpensive and easy to fix. Buy a package of replacement screen and a screen rolling tool to do-it-yourself. If you're not up to the task, hardware stores often do screen replacement at a reasonable cost. Just drop off your damaged screen, and they'll have it ready for you in a couple of days. Cure dirty or crumbling grout. The wonderful thing about tile is not only its luxurious look but also its longevity. But filthy or broken down grout can spoil the look. Make your tile floor or shower look new again by freshening the grout. If it's just dirty, you can clean it. For instructions, visit www.bobvilla.com. If the grout is broken down and needs to be replaced, find grout removal instructions at www.thespruce.com. Update switch plates & outlet covers. This is a super-easy way to update a room, and there are so many choices for every decorating style. If you like the look of metal switch plates but don't want the expense, buy some metallic spray paint in bronze, brushed nickel, or silver. Just remove the covers, spray them, and in an hour they'll be ready to put back on. Replace ceiling fan blades. Do your

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Pick up paint brochures at your hardware store for color scheme ideas, and notice how unexpected colors are paired together to create fabulous designer looks.

Freshen trim & doors. Paint the trim and doors throughout your home in a single color. Not only will this freshen your home, but it'll also give your home a cohesive look. If your home is small, then white or light grey paint will keep your home bright and make it feel more spacious. If you have a larger home, you can go bold with a medium or dark color. This will add richness to your living space. Medium grays and tans or dark charcoal and coffee colors are good choices. But before you get your paint mixed, pick up plenty of sample cards with various undertones. Hold them against the walls (or new paint colors) in each room to find a color that blends well with every color scheme in your home. Wallpaper a small room. Wallpaper is in again and can transform a small room, such as your bathroom or foyer. Choose from the latest patterns, textures, and colors for a great new look. Replace vent covers. Over time, banged up and painted-over vent covers become an eyesore. So new vent covers will go a long way toward making your home feel like new. Freshen bathroom caulk. Old stained and deteriorating caulk can make a

Willamette Living Magazine Home & Garden 2020

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bathroom unsightly. It can be removed and replaced relatively easily with a little patience. Visit www.houselogic.com to find simple removal instructions and the correct way to apply fresh caulk. Clean hard water stains off of your toilet & tub. If you have hard water, your toilet bowl and bathtub may be hideous. Luckily, there are several options to remove hard water stains. CLR calcium, lime, and rust remover does wonders on porcelain. If your bathtub is vinyl or acrylic, CLR must be diluted and can remain on the fixture for only a couple of minutes. So read instructions carefully. For more hardened buildup on porcelain, buy a handled pumice stone and sand off the accumulation. But don't use pumice stones on vinyl and acrylic because pumice is too abrasive and will leave scratches. Update cabinet hardware. New cabinet knobs and pulls can give your bathroom or kitchen a facelift, and there are tons of styles from which to choose. Revitalize or paint cabinets. If your solidwood bathroom or kitchen cabinets look worn, you can revitalize them by rubbing them down with Old English. Painting them is a good alternative since white or gray cabinets are the trend. You can also get creative, and choose a bold color to liven up your kitchen or bathroom. Install a kitchen backsplash. A tile backsplash will add richness to your kitchen. Find do-it-yourself instructions at www.diynetwork.com. If that's more work than you want to invest, choose from a wide selection of faux tile backsplash panels to add dimension and character to your kitchen. Update doorknobs. Do your doorknobs look shabby or dated? This is another easy fix. Brushed nickel is the latest trend in hardware. Doorknobs come complete with instructions and are easy to change with just a screwdriver. Also, consider replacing the hinges to match the doorknobs.


Get More Out of Your Home

How to Maximize the Usable Space in Your Home

by Cressa Campos, W.L. Construction We take pride in transforming your home, and we look for new ways to utilize your old spaces. Recently, we accepted the challenge of turning our clients unused storage space into an office/man cave. We turned the room into a relaxing new space to work, and hangout, while still leaving plenty of storage space. We added amazing new features including a bar, a television, shelves with sports memorabilia, and a desk? There are so many ways for you to get creative without changing the entire look or purpose of your room.

Photos: "Before and During" Please turn the page for "After"

Here are some of our favorite ways to add value to your unused spaces to help give you some inspiration.

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Turn Your Attic into a Private Getaway Although transforming an unfinished attic may seem daunting or impossible, you’d be surprised at how beautifully it can be converted into a finished bedroom. With the right planning and considerations, your attic could be converted into a decorative private getaway for your guests. This is just one of the many ways for you to get creative without changing the entire look of your home with an addition.

Creating a Cozy Basement

With a little imagination and the right professional team, your basement can be transformed into your dream space. Hang a television on the wall and plop a comfy reclining couch with cozy throw pillows and blankets to create a relaxing entertainment center. Then, add pops of color in your carpeting, accents, and art pieces to tie the room together. If you really want to get fancy, you can even add a small wine cellar or minibar to store drinks and treats.

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Willamette Living Magazine Home & Garden 2020


Creating Your Dream Workspace Having a private area to read, study, or finish up some work is always a nice option to have in your home. Maximize your living space by clearing out unneeded floor space and add an L-shaped desk in the corner of your room. This is a great option to save space, plus you can add your own personal touch with decorative shelves and picture frames. There are plenty of ways to turn preexisting space into a more useful space for you and your family. If you want to redecorate your home without breaking the bank, contact the professionals at WL Construction. Contact us at 541-7382602 for your free consultation!

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Lifelong Skills

Gardening with Kids: Playing in Dirt isn't Just Fun – It's Healthy, Too! by Kimberly Blaker There's no question, playing in the dirt tops the list of fun for kids, particularly young children, despite the protests of many well-intended parents. If you happen to be one of those worried parents, you can put your fears aside. As it turns out, dirt is actually beneficial to the long-term health of kids, according to a Northwestern University article by Clare Milliken, "Germs at four, less inflammation at forty." Studies have found that early exposure to certain germs, like those found in dirt, actually helps kids' immune systems learn to regulate inflammation better. In turn, this exposure reduces kids' risk for many diseases throughout their lives. For that reason, a family garden is a perfect opportunity to build your kids' immune systems. Better still, gardening offers lots of other benefits to kids and families. Through gardening, kids learn to be responsible by caring for their own plants. It's also a great way to help kids learn about and develop an appreciation for science. Another health benefit is that gardening encourages healthier eating. Not to mention, it's an excellent activity for family bonding. So gather up your kids and gardening supplies, head outdoors, and get ready for some dirt-filled fun.

put a daily gardening task list on the refrigerator. Also, to help your child maintain enthusiasm, suggest keeping a garden log. Kids can have fun recording the date of plantings, each day's gardening activities, when each plant sprouts, the amount of growth of the plants, and the harvesting. Finally, after harvesting, have your child help you prepare the vegetables. Try different ways of preparing or cooking them to help your kid develop a life-long love for fresh, healthy veggies.

Books on gardening with kids To get your family's gardening project off on the right foot, consider an age-appropriate book. This will also help build your child's enthusiasm. To help make your family garden a success.

The Little Gardener by Jan Gerardi (ages 3-4) The Little Gardener by Emily Hughes (ages 3-7) Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner (ages 5-8) Roots, Shoots, Buckets & Boots: Gardening Together with Children by Sharon Lovejoy (ages 4-10)

Getting started First, decide where to plant your garden. Then allow a small space for your child to have his or her own garden, too. This will help build your child's enthusiasm for the garden and encourage him or her to take ownership and responsibility for it. Having their own garden can be exciting and rewarding for kids because they know that they, alone (or with minimal help), grew those little seeds into a marvelous plant. Next, decide what to plant. For young children, consider fastgrowing plants they are familiar with. Little kids also love plants that are colorful or have strong scents. If your kids are older, let them choose what they want to grow. But keep in mind your child's personality. If he tends to be impatient, suggest plants that are easy to care for and grow quickly.

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When you begin planting, show your child how to plant the seeds and how to space them apart correctly. Then have your child water the seeds as directed.

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Planting your garden

We feature organic growing materials, houseplants, hand tools, and garden themed gifts in Historic Downtown Albany

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When you go shopping for the supplies, take your kids along and let them pick out their own seeds and gardening tools. For the safety of young children, look for kids' gardening tools made of durable plastic.

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As you proceed in planning and preparation, include your child in it as much as possible. Remember, this stage is as much fun for kids as it is for parents and helps build kids' enthusiasm. Also, let your kids help you draw up the garden plan. If they're old enough, they can also create their own shopping list.


Rediscovery

A Happy and Hopeful Harvest Sara Miller Chonaiew, Urban Ag Supply Harvest season is nearly perpetual for us in the Willamette Valley. The climate makes it possible to always be growing and harvesting something. Harvest is our reward for perseverance, payment for our patience and salve for our garden failures. This year, I am excited for all the new gardeners who are experiencing harvest for the first time, their inaugural awards ceremony. Like others in our industry, we were quite occupied with would-be gardeners this Spring. They came for seeds and soil. They came to ask questions about organic growing methods and eco sensitive products. Some came for books, others for tools. We visited with customers who had gardened in the past but had steered away from it in recent years. We heard stories of the amazing tomatoes grandma grew or the sweet apples from trees at the family farm. “My mom always had a huge garden” one customer said, “I just never had time to get into it until now.” As the season progressed, we began hearing about the sheer thrill of watching seeds turn into seedlings. Honestly though, that is a feeling that never dulls, even for experienced growers. Seeing those cotyledons emerge, the first sign of growth, is an

unmatched treat. We are reminded each time how nature is just awesome. My conversations with new gardeners now focus on the fruits of the labor. One neophyte told me “I can’t believe I grew string beans! I can’t believe how good they taste.” Like the little seeds they planted, newbie gardeners developed into mature dirt lovers, bearing fruit of their own. They talk about spending time with their families in the garden. They tell me their children love hunting for slugs and snails. They are finding new ways to commune with neighbors, even if only to share tomatoes from a single plant on a small patio. Harvest brings many rewards. I am truly hopeful we are seeing a shift within our food system. I hope newfound affinity for fresh food not only continues to motivate new growers but also serves as recognition of the arduous work of farmers. I hope it inspires new support for our local farm families too. I am hopeful we are on the garden path toward expanded access to fresh food. We are grateful and duly honored to be part of new or rekindled passion for growing food. Happy harvest to all of you gardeners and farmers! May your rewards be plentiful.

My conversations with new gardeners now focus on the fruits of the labor. One neophyte told me “I can’t believe I grew string beans! I can’t believe how good they taste.” Like the little seeds they planted, newbie gardeners developed into mature dirt lovers, bearing fruit of their own

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Willamette Living Magazine Home & Garden 2020


EARTHSMART FEATURE Builder Comparison

Legend Homes

Local Builder X

LONGEVITY OF STRUCTURE House tightening & air sealing Professionally installed windows Behind-the-siding photo documentation Third party certifications Including EPS, Dry-Out Certificate & MORE ENERGY EFFICIENCY High performance windows R-23 polar blanket wall insulation (code R-21) 96% efficient furnace & ductwork, located within conditioned Space Tankless water heater 100% LED lighting One year Energy Bill Guarantee INNOVATIVE SUSTAINABILITY Hardwired video doorbell Water saving fixtures and systems Composite engineered wood materials Local vendors and suppliers Final stair treads & risers installed by finish carpenter after drywall is completed HEALTH AND SAFETY Whole home fresh air ventilation system MERV 11 filter Heating system protection during construction Low VOC paints, carpeting & other surfaces

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in Corvallis, Oregon

Dare to Compare

Compare Legend Homes with Other Local Builders Legend’s EarthSmart energy efficient homes are sustainably built, affordably priced and engineered to help pay for themselves! They deliver long-term cost savings in the form of lower energy bills. Legend’s EarthSmart homes pass rigorous tests and exceed building code compliance. How do other home builders stack up when it comes to building the best energyefficient, green home? Here is a short list of the many features Legend Homes offers: • One year Energy Bill Guarantee

• Behind-the-siding photo documentation

• House tightening & air sealing

• Water saving fixtures/ systems

• R-23 polar blanket wall insulation (code R-21)

• Composite engineered wood materials

• 95% efficient furnace, in conditioned space

• Local vendors and suppliers

• Tankless water heater

• Whole home fresh air ventilation system

• +90% LED lighting

• And So Much More!

Legend Homes offers top-notch energy efficiency and green home features. For a longer, comprehensive list, visit legendhomes.com/earthsmart to learn about the Legend Homes EarthSmart difference!

Introducing the Fairhaven! Fairhaven Modern Bungalow

Fairhaven Modern Prairie

MLS#765287

A Brand New Single-Level Home Plan, priced from $487,900 Lee Eckroth can be reached at 541-760-4742 or RussellGardens@LegendHomes.com Model Home Open Sat & Sun 11am - 3pm or by Appointment at 1930 SW Stanford St, Corvallis

LegendHomes.com/Russell Built by Legend Homes. CCB# 55151 See sales representative for details. All details including prices, amenities and availability are subject to change without notice. Room sizes, square footage and ceiling details vary from one elevation to another. Stated distances are an approximation.

455 NW Tyler Avenue, Corvallis • 541-757-1781