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CAMPUS | COMMUNITY | CONNECTIONS

CAMPUS | COMMUNITY | CONNECTIONS

• Summer 2011

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Grandmaster defeats 30 challengers in simultaneous chess demonstration

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When election season rolls around, Laurier’s LISPOP is there to read the political tea leaves

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VOL. 1 | NO. 1 | APRIL 7,2008 “Baby beluga grads” head out into the big wide world

Province invests $72.6 million in Laurier Funding for Global Innovation Exchange is largest capital investment in university’s history By Lori Chalmers Morrison

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remaining $30 million. | CONNECTIONS CAMPUS | COMMUNITY

“This major investment in He may not have tied it up in Laurier is an investment in the ribbons and bows, but when prosperity of the region and the the Hon. John Milloy revealed province and the tremendous the provincial investment that potential of our students,” said he jokingly called “Laurier’s Max Blouw, the university’s 100th anniversary present” president and vice-chancellor. on June 20, it was met with “Government support during the kind of surprised enthuLaurier’s centennial year recogsiasm one might express upon nizes our history of academic opening a gift they’d never excellence and innovation and dreamed possible. fosters our purposeful growth Milloy, Ontario Minister into Laurier’s next century.” of Training, Colleges and Housing |SBE and Mathe| CAMPUS CONNECTIONS COMMUNITY Universities, committed matics together in the GIE will $72.6 million to the Global enhance the synergies between Innovation Exchange (GIE) Laurier’s business and applied Photo: Tomasz Adamski facility at Wilfrid Laurier and financial math programs University’s Waterloo campus. and serve as an iconic repreThe announcement representation of the leadership sents the largest single capital role Laurier plays in Canadian investment in the university’s business and Waterloo’s history. technology industry. “Laurier produces a steady “This new facility, and the stream of graduates key to our people and programs within local and provincial economies,” it, will enable the university Top: from left, Laurier Board of Governors Chair John Ormston, Laurier President Max Blouw, Ontario MInister of Training, ColMilloy told a large crowd of to meet the growing demand leges and Universities John Milloy, and MPP Leeanna Pendergast. Bottom: artist’s conceptions of the new University Ave. facility. Laurier community members for enrolment in Laurier’s and supporters in the Senate dedicated to developing young and Hickory Streets, and The total project cost, which business and math programs & Board Chamber. “This minds.” will become home to includes renovations to the and support Canada’s future announcement builds on the The signature GIE building Laurier’s School of Business Peters Building, is $103 million. business leaders,” said Deb excellence that Laurier has built will be located on University and Economics (SBE) and Laurier has accelerated its for 100 years. This facility is Avenue between Hemlock Department of Mathematics. fundraising efforts to raise the GIE FUNDING see page 3

Months of behind-the-scenes planning yield Max Blouw appointed to 2nd term spectacular centennial convocation For many students, convocation boils down to a single moment when their name is called and they are hooded on stage in front of their friends and family. Although the moment may be a small one, ensuring that moment is special for every graduating student is a process that takes months. Planning for Laurier’s spring convocation ceremonies on the Waterloo campus begins the moment fall convocation is over, says Sondra Schwartz, Laurier’s manager of Ceremonies and Events. “At that point we’re already confirming room bookings, communicating information with key people and planning the venue logistics so that everything will work in the allowed space,” she said. This year, nine ceremonies were held on the Waterloo

Photo: Tomasz Adamski

By Mallory O’Brien

Honorary degree recipient Raffi calls grads on the banana phone during spring convocation. Each convocation ceremony requires months of planning and preparation.

campus from June 6 to 10, as almost 2,500 students graduated in the Athletic Complex (AC). About 800 to 1,500 people attended each ceremony. On June 21 and 22, 300 students graduated from Laurier Brantford during three ceremonies held in the Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts, a refurbished 1919 vaudeville theatre.

“The Sanderson centre is an elegant space and we’re lucky to have it close to campus,” said Kevin Klein, external relations coordinator for Laurier Brantford. For the first time at Laurier Brantford, a bagpiper led graduating students through the downtown area as they CONVOCATION see page 6

Laurier’s Board of Governors has appointed Max Blouw to a second five-year term as president and vice-chancellor of the university. His current term began Sept. 1, 2007 and runs until Aug. 31, 2012; his second term will run from Sept. 1, 2012 to Aug. 31, 2017. “Max Blouw has provided true vision and an exceptional level of strategic leadership during an important period in the university’s history,” said John Ormston, chair of the Board of Governors. “As Laurier celebrates its centennial, we are pleased and fortunate that Dr. Blouw will remain as president and vicechancellor for another term to lead the university forward into its next century.” Blouw joined Laurier as president and vice-chancellor on Sept. 1, 2007 after a distinguished career at the University of Northern British Columbia, and at St. Francis Xavier University. A biologist with a keen interest

in research, Blouw is active in national and provincial academic affairs. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada and its Standing Advisory Committee on University Research. He is also on the Executive Committee of the Council of Ontario Universities and serves as co-chair of the College-University Consortium Council. Since joining Laurier, Blouw has championed a number of strategic initiatives aimed at assessing the university’s values and strengths and establishing a vision to guide its future development. These initiatives include Envisioning Laurier, a new Academic Plan, the President’s Task Force on Multi-Campus Governance, and campus master plans for Laurier’s Waterloo and Brantford campuses. During his first term, the BLOUW REAPPOINTED see page 2

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Summer 2011

president’s message

The word “transformational” is often thrown around these days — a little too freely, perhaps — to describe a sizeable project. I try to reserve my own use of the word for those rare initiatives that truly have the potential to change the course of an organization or propel it to new heights of achievement. It is with confidence, therefore, that I describe the Ontario government’s $72.6million investment in Laurier’s Global Innovation Exchange as a transformational gift. Not only is this the largest single capital investment in Laurier’s history, it is also a remarkable investment in the future of our university. This wonderful announcement was made June 20 by John Milloy, Ontario’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities. Before a standing-room-only crowd in the Senate and Board Chamber, Minister Milloy described the Global Innovation Exchange as a “first-class proposal” that aligns with the government’s

commitment to “put students first.” As The Waterloo Region Record said in an editorial the following day, the province’s support for the Global Innovation Exchange “is, at once, a meaningful recognition both of what Wilfrid Laurier has achieved and what it can accomplish in the years ahead.” I couldn’t agree more. The Global Innovation Exchange is both a physical building and an innovative concept that will benefit the university, the surrounding community and the entire province. It will house Laurier’s School of Business and Economics and the university’s mathematics programs in a stateof-the-art education facility. The building, to be located on the site of the current St. Michael’s school property on the Waterloo campus, will be designed to environmentally sensitive LEED standards and will provide Laurier with an impressive signature building on University

Avenue. The Global Innovation Exchange will enable Laurier to stay on the leading-edge of business education by supporting our ongoing efforts to further integrate the academic and experiential aspects of learning. It will also allow Laurier to accommodate an additional 2,000 students while enhancing our ability to continue improving our overall student experience. The benefits that will accrue to the School of Business and Economics and the Department of Mathematics are obvious. But this new facility will also benefit the Faculties of Arts, Science and Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies through increased space in the Arts, Schlegel and Peters buildings. It should also be noted that the Global Innovation Exchange is a key element in Laurier’s Campus Master Plan, which recommends linkages with exciting new facilities elsewhere on the Waterloo campus in the years to come.

Jim Butler appointed to another term as vp: finance and administration had its share of challenges over Laurier’s Board of Governors has the past decade. Throughout it all, appointed Jim Butler to a third Jim Butler has provided Laurier five-year term as vice-president: with exceptional leadership in finance and administration. Butler’s current term runs from the area of finance and administration,” said John Ormston, chair Sept. 1, 2007 to Aug. 31, 2012; his of Laurier’s Board of Governors. next term runs from Sept. 1, 2012 “We are delighted to appoint him to Aug. 31, 2017. to another term.” During his current term, Butler Butler was recently elected successfully managed the univerpresident of the Canadian Associsity’s finances during ongoing fluctuations in provincial funding ation of University Business Officers (CAUBO). He was also and a serious market downturn awarded the association’s most in 2008-09. He has also played a prestigious award, the 2011 Ken lead role at the provincial level Clements Distinguished Adminin addressing university pension istrator Award, for his many challenges, heading a Council years of leadership in university of Ontario Universities (COU) finance. working group tasked with Butler is a past chair and ensuring that proposed solutions current member of the COU’s regarding pension solvency Council of Senior Administrative legislation were brought forward Officers, and continues to play a to the Expert Commission on lead role in addressing university Pensions in Ontario. pension challenges at the “Ontario’s university sector has

Jim Butler

provincial level. Butler joined Laurier in August 2002 after a 14-year career in university administration at the University of Windsor. He has taught courses in humanresources management, compensation management, pension management, and business policy and strategy for the Faculty of Business Administration at Windsor.

InsideLaurier is published by Communications, Public Affairs & Marketing (CPAM) Wilfrid Laurier University 75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5

InsideLaurier Volume 5, Number 2, Summer 2011 Editor: Nicholas Dinka Assistant Editor: Lori Chalmers Morrison Design: Erin Steed Contributors: Sandra Muir, Mallory O’Brien, Lori Chalmers Morrison, Kevin Crowley, Erin Klassen, Sara Lawrence, Samantha Dzikewicz

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Photo: Tomasz Adamski

Province makes ‘transformational’ investment in Laurier

Laurier President Max Blouw speaks with Ontario Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities John Milloy prior to the Global Innovation Exchange announcement.

This has been a tremendous year for Laurier. Not only are we celebrating the university’s centennial, we have had exciting developments on both the Waterloo and Brantford campuses, as well ongoing events and achievements at our Faculty of Social Work in Kitchener and our Toronto and Chongqing offices. At the heart of it all is a

BLOUW REAPPOINTED continued

university also added important new buildings to its Brantford campus, including the Research and Academic Centre. It also announced plans to build a Global Innovation Exchange on the Waterloo campus — a state-of-the-art education facility that recently received Ontario government funding of $72.6 million, the largest single capital investment in the university’s history.

university community that is innovative, inspiring and purpose-driven. We have much to be proud of, and much to look forward to.

Dr. Max Blouw, President and Vice-Chancellor

“Laurier has an extremely bright future ahead of it, thanks in large part to its vibrant sense of community and the many talented faculty, staff and students who work so hard to make this university one of the best in Canada,” Blouw said. “It is a privilege to serve as president and vice-chancellor, and I welcome the opportunity to help the Laurier community move forward into its second century.”

Send us your news, events & stories

Email: insidelaurier@wlu.ca Deadline for submissions: August 10 All submissions are appreciated, however not all submissions will be published. We reserve the right to edit all copy for accuracy, content and length.

InsideLaurier welcomes your comments and suggestions for stories. Tel: (519) 884-0710 ext. 3341 | Fax: (519) 884-8848 Email: insidelaurier@wlu.ca InsideLaurier (circ. 2,100) is published eight times a year by CPAM. Opinions expressed in InsideLaurier do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or the university’s administration. Available online at www.wlu.ca/publicaffairs. Printed on recycled paper

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September 2011 CAMPUS | COMMUNITY | CONNECTIONS

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NEWS

Laurier creates new Chair in Brand communication Laurier has created Canada’s first Chair in Brand Communication with an investment of $1.9 million by 45 leading Canadian brands and brand marketing professionals to establish Laurier as a national centre for brand education. National branding, advertising, marketing communiBrad Davis cations and marketing research expert Dr. Brad Davis has been appointed as the inaugural chair. As part of the role of chair, Davis will continue to build upon the university’s relationships with the brand communication industry and other leading academic partners in an effort to raise the quality and profile of brand communication education across Canada. “In the era of social networking, it is more important than ever that organizations have a deep rooted and organic understanding of their brand to be able to sustain genuine and authentic conversations with consumers,” Davis said.

Farouk Ahamed named chair of Board of Governors Farouk Ahamed has been named chair of Laurier’s Board of

Summer 2011

What’s new and notable at Laurier

Governors for a two-year term. Ahamed is president of ADF Invescap Inc. and a former partner at Ernst & Young with over 30 years of financial experience. A Laurier graduate (BBA ’80), Ahamed is serving his second term on the Board of Governors and is also a member of the Dean’s Advisory Committee for the School of Business and Economics. He takes over as chair of the Board of Governors from John Ormston, who remains on the board as immediate past chair.

Laurier staff member helps judge major journalism award Kevin Crowley, director of Communications and Public Affairs, was one of five judges selected from across Canada to serve on the selection committee for the 2010 Michener Award. The award recognizes and promotes excellence in Canadian public service journalism. The winner of this year’s award was CBC’s the fifth estate for its reporting on the incarceration and death of Ashley Smith, a seriously troubled teenager who spent the last four years of her life behind bars for a minor offence. “The Michener Award honours journalism that has a significant impact on the public good,”

Crowley said. “The fifth estate stories led to an Ontario Court of Appeal ruling that allows greater public access to exhibits filed in court proceedings. It was an important ruling that improves the transparency of the province’s judicial system.” Crowley is a former business editor of the Waterloo Region Record, which won the Michener Award in 2001 for uncovering serious misuse of public funds in municipal lease financing. Crowley was the lead reporter on the investigation.

Brantford campus to get varsity soccer and basketball Effect May 1, 2011, Laurier Brantford has joined the Ontario Colleges Athletics Association (OCAA ). The Brantford campus will begin competing in the 2014-15 season in men’s and women’s soccer, followed the next season by men’s and women’s basketball. “Joining the OCAA provides the opportunity to develop strong varsity athletic programming for Laurier Brantford students,” said Greg Stewart, manager of athletics and recreation in Brantford. Laurier Brantford will join 30 OCAA member institutions, including Algoma University College, Nipissing University, Redeemer University College, and Trent University.

The OCAA oversees 15 varsity sports, nine league sports and six tournament sports. In nine of these sports, the provincial champions go on to compete in national championships.

Laurier presents the 2011 Awards of Teaching Excellence Peer and student praise abounded for this year’s award recipients for teaching excellence. These awards recognize teachers who provide a rewarding academic experience for students and display concern for both students and faculty success. This year’s winners were: • Assistant Chemistry Professor Steve MacNeil in the full-time faculty category • Global Studies Instructor Edmund Pries in the part-time contract academic staff category • Biology Teaching Assistant Emily Macdonald, teaching assistant award in the graduate category Steve MacNeil, assistant professor and undergraduate advisor for Chemistry, was also recognized for his in-depth knowledge of organic chemistry and his efforts to use innovative ways to share this knowledge with his students. Also this spring, Biology Professor Lucy Lee has been named Univerity Research Professor.

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GIE FUNDING continued

MacLatchy, vice-president: academic. “The GIE will expand Laurier’s ability to deliver integrated and engaged learning opportunities across our campuses to students at the local and global levels.” Laurier’s Faculties of Arts, Science and Graduate Studies will also benefit directly from the GIE, as the new facility will create opportunities through the increased available space in the Arts, Bricker Academic, Schlegel and Peters buildings. In his remarks at the announcement event, Blouw said the GIE will allow Laurier to show a new, forward-looking face in Waterloo, with a bold presence on University Avenue, and also nationally and globally through Laurier’s programs and partnerships. “If it is possible for a building to represent a philosophy and a culture, then the Global Innovation Exchange does that. The partnerships that created it, and the future partnerships it will foster, truly inspire lives of leadership and purpose,” said Blouw. For detailed information about the GIE facility, including frequently asked questions, artist’s renderings and media coverage, please visit the GIE website: www.wlu.ca/GIE

Centennial

Photos: Mallory O’Brien

Multitasking grandmaster takes Laurier to chess school

Mark Bluvshtein defeated 32 opponents at a Laurier chess “simul” event held as part of the university’s centennial celebrations. At left: Bluvshtein (back) is introduced by event organizer Hasan Shodiev.

By Nicholas Dinka For the average chess player, each and every game is an occasion of intense stress and borderline desperation – of striving to see just one more move ahead while avoiding head-slapping mistakes. Mark Bluvshtein is not the average chess player. The 22-year-old international grandmaster recently played – and defeated – 32 opponents simultaneously at a Laurier demonstration event held in celebration of the university’s centennial. “This is fun because it’s more relaxing than a tournament,” Bluvshtein said while sizing up the competition before the contest, which took place in the Science Building Atrium. “Everyone looks feisty,” he added, seeming pleased. The event was organized by Hasan Shodiev, a lab coordinator in Laurier’s Department of Physics and Computer Science and a passionate advocate for the

game. “Regular chess training develops skills related to critical thinking and also complex reasoning and communication,” he said. “We don’t need robots, we need creative people for today’s society. It’s exactly what we’re trying to teach at the university.” As the contest got underway, it was clear that Bluvshtein does not adhere to the Bobby Fisher stereotype of the nerdy, antisocial chess prodigy. Dressed in a rakish summer suit, he strode calmly from board to board, pausing now and then to chat with players and spectators along the way. Not that he wasn’t also brutally efficient. As he moved a piece on one board, usually within a few seconds of arriving, his head was often already turned to study the position on the next board. Cameron Davidson-Pilon, a fourth-year math major, had set himself the goal of getting the

grandmaster into check at least once, but he was soon withering under his opponent’s attacks. “I could take hours at this game to make one move, and it would seem redundant after his next move,” he said. Forty minutes or so into his game, Davidson-Pilon succumbed. Did he achieve his goal of putting the grandmaster in check? “That was not accomplished, unfortunately.” As play progressed into the mid- and end-games, Bluvshtein sometimes lingered to study a position in detail before acting. “He’s stalled here a bit longer than some other games, so it means he had a decision to make,” said Hazel Smith, a Laurier business student and vice-president of the chess club, as the grandmaster stepped back to contemplate a move. “In simuls you really have to allocate your time to the key moves and dangerous players.”

Smith is herself an accomplished master of the game. A former member of Canada’s Chess Olympics team, she is one of the five or so best female players in the country, by Bluvshtein’s estimation. Several of the challengers managed to put up strong fights, he said. Foremost among those was one Laurier undergraduate who was able to put him in a dangerous position during their endgame. The grandmaster fought his way back, however, eventually bedeviling his opponent with a show of false weakness that lured him into overextending himself. “I spent a lot more time in that game than other games, because I knew it would take a lot more energy,” Bluvshtein said. “That was the game with the most concern.” After about two hours, chemistry Professor Vladimir Katiev was the last player still at his board. He played a “position game,” focusing on building

a strong, mutually protective structure of pieces on the board as the grandmaster pummelled him with attacks. When Katiev resigned, Bluvshtein had two bishops to the former’s bishop and knight, a slightly inferior combination that spelled doom at the hands of a high-calibre player. “It just flew by,” the grandmaster said, after the event’s conclusion. “I was so zoned in that I didn’t notice it was coming to an end. Suddenly there were only two players left.” He said he had enjoyed himself, and that the event was a nice break from the rigors of tournament play, where the smallest mistake can be fatal and where single games sometimes drag on for hours. “I had a game in Moscow that went almost seven hours,” he said. “It was a draw, but at least I didn’t lose. Playing for seven hours and losing – there’s not a lot of worse things than that in chess.” 3

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Summer 2011

By Sandra Muir

Photo: Mallory O’Brien

they are coming from makes life It’s hard to imagine the kind easier.” of development sessions that Following the keynote would have inspired staff a address, participants spread century ago. But as Wilfrid out into individual sessions Laurier University celebrates its such as project management 100th anniversary, it’s clear that best practices, event planning employees at Laurier’s Waterloo and Brantford campuses were eager to learn about project management, writing, event planning and a number of other topics at the first-ever Staff Development Day. “Staff development is a key element for anyone who thrives for success,” Max Blouw, president and viceRegistrar Ray Darling led a light-hearted Staff chancellor of Laurier, told staff in his opening address. Development Day session on juggling. 101, and the multi-campus “Companies and organizations are only as good as their people.” environment. “There are a variety of topics, More than 300 staff members but there are some common registered for the May 4 event, trends,” said Beth Noble, a which kicked off with a keynote development officer on the lecture on generational diversity Waterloo campus who attended by consultant Nora Spinks. the writing, event planning Spinks spoke about why each and multi-campus workshops. generation communicates and “Some of them are outside of my works in its own unique way. role, but they do relate to what “Each generation brings their I do.” uniqueness to work,” said Noble added that the day Spinks. “Understanding where

was a nice break from the usual routine. “Today is also a chance to meet people from other departments and learn from other departments.” The event was organized by a committee led by Jennifer Porritt, manager of Learning and Organizational Development, and Kate Konopka, manager of Employee Relations. Porritt and Konopka had heard of this type of event being held at other institutions and thought it would be a good addition to centennial celebrations at Laurier. “We really wanted to do something fun for staff,” said Porritt. She said they were pleasantly surprised by the number of people who came forward with ideas for sessions. Volunteers from various departments and campuses helped to keep the day running smoothly, including a barbeque lunch in the quad. “There were a lot of people who helped and participated in the day,” said Konopka. “It’s really indicative of the community here at Laurier.”

Abby Goodrum named vice-president: research Laurier has appointed media scholar Abby Goodrum to the role of vice-president: research, effective July 1. Goodrum held the Velma Rogers Graham Research Chair in News, Media and Technology at Ryerson University, where she also served as associate dean for Research in the Faculty of Communication & Design. Goodrum is also the director for Social Science and Humanities Research in the nationwide network of centres of excellence in Graphics, Animation and New Media (GRAND), and is a senior research fellow at the Knowledge Media Design Institute based at the University of Toronto. As vice-president: research, Goodrum will lead Laurier’s Office of Research Services, providing vision, strategy and support for Laurier’s overall

Abby Goodrum

research endeavours. “We are delighted to welcome Dr. Goodrum to Wilfrid Laurier University,” said Max Blouw, president and vice-chancellor. “She brings a valuable interdisciplinary research experience as well as great personal energy and proven leadership skills at a time when the breadth and depth of research being conducted at Laurier is growing

significantly.” Goodrum holds degrees in Radio, TV and Film, and Library and Information Science from the University of Texas, and a PhD in Information Science from the University of North Texas. The author of numerous publications, including a book and many book chapters, journal articles and conference papers, Goodrum brings a strong background in scholarly research and grant-funded activity to Laurier, and has been instrumental in obtaining grants totaling more than $30 million over the past six years. Goodrum succeeds Dr. Paul Maxim, who has chosen to return to an academic career after a successful five-year term in administering and leading Laurier’s Office of Research Services.

Deans appointed for Social Work and Grad & Postdoc Studies Laurier has named Nick Coady as dean of the Faculty of Social Work and reappointed Joan Norris to a second term as dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (FGPS). “Dr. Norris is a strong advocate for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and graduate programs at Laurier,” said Deborah MacLatchy, vicepresident: academic & provost. “She is well positioned to take on the challenges and to develop the opportunities to further support graduate program development at Laurier during her second term.” Norris will begin her second term in January 2012 following 4

a research sabbatical. Tamas Dobozy, associate professor of English and Film Studies and associate dean of Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, will serve as acting dean until the end of December. Coady will take over the role of dean of the Faculty of Social Work from Susan Cadell on July 1. Cadell, who has served as acting dean since January 2010, will be taking a sabbatical to focus on research and graduate student supervision. Coady joined Laurier in 1994 as an associate professor after working at the University of Calgary. His social work practice

background includes individual and family work with multiproblem adolescents and their families and group work with abusive men. He has served two terms as the associate dean of the Master of Social Work program and two terms as the associate dean in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. “Dr. Coady has been an active and engaged professor in the Faculty of Social Work,” said MacLatchy. “His leadership over the next five years will help guide the faculty as it undertakes exciting new opportunities regionally as well as nationally and internationally.”

What are you reading

?

On June 1, staff took a lunch-hour stroll with the Golden Hawk, kicking off the Canadian Commuter Challenge. The Hawk kept its cool through the lunchtime event, despite sweltering heat and a mobbing by adoring middle-schoolers along the way.

What are you listening to? Name: Nancy Forde Job Title: Intermediate Administrative Assistant, Global Studies CD Title: To the North Artist: Matthew and the Atlas

What are you eating?

I admit an obsession with the indie music scene, not just in Canada, but also globally. And since I work in Global Studies, it seems only natural I’d love a band called Matthew and the Atlas. I stumbled across their video for the second track on the EP To the North, titled “Within the Rose,” and instantly fell under the spell of front-man Matthew Hegarty’s lilting, husky voice. Think Tom Waits meets Justin Vernon.

What are you reading

?

Name: Chris Dodd Job Title: Director, Residence Book Title: Living on the Black Author: John Feinstein

What are you listening to?

I am currently reading a book by one of my favorite authors, John Feinstein. Living on the Black is about the final baseball season for two iconic Cy Young award-winning pitchers, Mike Mussina (New York Yankees) and Tom Glavine (New York Mets). Feinstein has an interesting perspective because he gets unprecedented access to the players and the teams. The book also has much to say about what it means to be a “professional” in pro sports today.

Photo: Mallory O’Brien

Staff Development Day draws over 300 Hawk gives walk the talons up

Summer 2011

By Sandra Muir

With provincial plans for significant increases in student numbers in coming years, growth remains top of mind – something that Blouw noted in his speech to staff and faculty at the event. He said it’s healthy to have debate about the issue, and encouraged everyone to participate. “The growth and size of the university has also engendered some complexity,” he said. “As we end our first century of operation, we need to think of the implications of growth. “As long-serving employees… you are people others will look up to,” he said. “I believe our future is extraordinarily positive.” Langford, who has no plans to retire anytime soon, agrees that debate is good for an organization. “If there isn’t a little bit of back and forth, then an organization is stagnant,” he said.

Photos: Sandra Muir and Tomasz Adamski

When Carl Langford started at Laurier 35 years ago in Information Technology Services, computers looked and worked quite a bit differently than they do now. There was one big mainframe, card decks and magnetic tapes, and disc drives the size of washing machines. Langford, manager of network operations, has watched technology – and the university – evolve over more than three decades. So have the dozens of other faculty and staff members who gathered April 27 for a Long Service Recognition event in the Turret, marking 10, 15, 20, 25 and 35 years of service as of 2010. “This is a community that once people join, they find very fulfilling,” said Laurier President Max Blouw. “And I think they stay because it is wonderful to work here.”

Susan Weigel, a senior medical secretary in the Health Services Department, says she’s enjoyed every minute of her 10 years at Laurier. She’s also seen many changes, including a renovation in 2003 designed to give students more privacy at the campus medical clinic while they wait for their appointments. In addition, all the files are now electronic, and there are many more staff members than when she started. “When I look back, the years have gone so quickly,” she said. Weigel was one of 63 employees marking a 10th anniversary. That’s a slightly higher number than in recent years because 2000 was a big hiring year. Since 1997, the university has steadily increased the student population, said Mary Jo DaSilva, an HR and pension administrator at Laurier. “This has in turn meant more faculty and staff hires,” she said.

Staff and faculty gathered at the Turret on April 27 to honour longserving staff members.

people at Laurier

New Appointments Ann Brandt associate director, Development & Alumni Relations, Brantford campus Andrew Parda junior technical support specialist, ITS Kandice Baptiste Aboriginal student recruitment and retention officer, Aboriginal Initiatives Sarah Wiley academic program assistant, Dean’s Office, Brantford campus Nikola Vukovic special constable, Brantford campus

Max Blouw congratulates Carl Langford on 35 years of service to the university.

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Got a question? Send it to ndinka@wlu.ca

Photo: Laurier Archives

Long-service employees honoured

campus decoder

CAMPUS | COMMUNITY | CONNECTIONS

A: Today’s concourse is a highly functional, open-concept space featuring a Starbucks and plenty of seating, but once upon a time it was a different sort of space more suited to an age of letterman jackets and poodle skirts. Fitted out with a dinerstyle food counter, where the computer lab is now situated, it was a place where students could enjoy a cup of coffee or a sundae (price: 20 cents) while chatting with friends. It was also briefly the site of controversy: in the 1960s, the “Christ or coffee scandal” erupted when the university’s administration locked up the Torque Room during chapel hours to encourage more students to pay

their holy respects. First opened in the 1950s, the Torque Room was originally located on the bottom floor of the Arts Building, but was later relocated to the site of today’s concourse. In the cafeteria’s heyday, The Cord published “TorqueRoom Tallies” and “Torque Talk” gossip columns, written in a conversational style, as if transcribed from conversations overheard in the space. In the summer of 2000, the computer lab was put in and the concourse took on its present form, more or less, with separate lounge and study areas and an upscale coffee bar (the forerunner of the Starbucks). Today’s concourse is a lively and popular spot for students to study and catch up between classes, but it’s hard not to feel a little nostalgia for the old-fashioned charm of the Torque Room of yore.

Jessica Bell receptionist/ admissions assistant, Admissions

Ann Kaufman switchboard operator

Q: I’ve heard that the concourse area on the Waterloo campus (some people call it the Torque Room), was once the location of a fifties-style diner. What’s the story?

For a complete list of appointments visit www.wlu.ca/hr

services assistant, Leaf Program, Brantford campus Anna Barichello instructional design specialist, Teaching Support Services Janine Castanier residence life area co-ordinator, Residential Services Shawn Jefferson third-class operating engineer, Physical Resources Jeff Johnston third-class operating engineer, Physical Resources Aeron Lawrence recruitment officer, Student Recruitment Holly Patton event coordinator, SBE

Jamie Howieson coordinator: communications (athletics), Athletics and Recreation

Crystal Shadwell recruitment officer, Student Recruitment

Indranie Jagmohan director, financial reporting and systems, Finance

David Siegers third-class operating engineer, Physical Resources

Azhar Rauf systems analyst III, Enterprise Solutions

Debbie Brittain reporting analyst, Registrar’s Office

Heather Smith coordinator, residence facility operation, Residential Services

Changes in staff appointments Hilary Potts administration assistant (associate dean), Faculty of Science

Olga Stukalov technology transfer officer, Office of Research Services

Colin Reiner network support technician, ITS

Abby Goodrum vice-president: Research

Peter Thompson project coordinator, Physical Resources

Alicia Wilkinson LEAF student

Michael Welk project

coordinator, Physical Resources Paula Peplinski switchboard operator, ITS Stephanie D’Lima national recruitment coordinator, Student Recruitment Andrew Moase network engineer, ITS Melissa Huszczo, associate registrar, Brantford campus Bridget Parris admission assistant – OSS applications, office of the registrar Leanne Hagarty, BBA project research assistant, School of Business & Economics Sheldon Pereira congress 2010 project coordinator, Student Services Lucy Carreiro, senior administration assistant IV, Psychology Sue Dawson manager, Parking Services Ellen Menage office and services administrator, WLUGSA Bridget Parris admissions assistant – OSS applications, Office of the Registrar Cara Pulkics information specialist, Registrar’s Office

Vanessa Parks publications coordinator, Communication, Public Affairs & Marketing Cameron Terry area manager, custodial, Physical Resources Christine Hauk information specialist, Registrar’s Office Valerie Kilgour Coordinator, LEAF undergraduate program, Brantford campus Stephanie Kuntz manager ICT Service Desk, ITS Jessica Berrigan health and safety administrator, EOHS Mary Mason senior administration assistant, Department of Sociology Yolanta DiFelice leadhandcustodian, Physical Resources Tanya Diriye OneCard systems assistant, OneCard Jody MacDonald custodian, Physical Resources Paul Schell mechanic/ groundsperson, Physical Resources Peggy Freymond program assistant (Graduate Programs), Faculty of Education

Reitrements

Florence Nadrofsky Food Services Ira Ashcroft Faculty of Arts: Language & Literature Mark Baetz, professor of business (policy); associate director, Faculty Relations James (Jim) McCutcheon, Faculty of Business & Economic Michael Moore Faculty of Arts: English F.H. Rolf Seringhaus Faculty of Business & Economics Christopher Simpson Faculty of Arts: Archaeology Brooke Skelton librarian Paul Tiessen Faculty of Arts: Film Studies Anne Westhues Faculty of Scoial Work Lynne Doyle Faculty of Arts: senior administrative assistant

Grace Gao reporting analyst, Advancement 5

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Summer 2011

coffee with a co-worker Name: Rhoda Howard-Hassmann Title: Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights and Professor, Department of Global Studies and the Balsillie School of International Affairs Where you can find her: On the fourth floor of the Dr. Alvin Woods Building

How long have you been at Laurier? Since July 1, 2003. What do you teach? I work on some very heavy topics – mainly human rights and genocide. Right now I’m working on state-induced famine. In human rights literature, there is a lot of work about international markets in food and how that affects people’s access to food. But there is very little about how governments will deprive their citizens of food. It intersects with both genocide studies and human rights studies.

Heard on Twitter Check out what the Laurier community has been tweeting about at twitter.com/lauriernews. Laurier also has official sites on Facebook at www.facebook. com/LaurierNow and YouTube at www.youtube.com/LaurierVideo.

@LaurierNews The Globe and Mail: Laurier wins big in Ontario funding announcement http://bit.ly/jQAOJT #Laurier June 21, 2011 @LaurierFootball Former @WLUAthletics Golden Hawk @grapanaro makes a great tackle in @CFL action last night for his @Wpg_BlueBombers bit.ly/ l7L8Sd June 17, 2011 @LaurierTO RT @LaurierNews: #Laurier alumnus & Juno award-winning rapper Shad sits down with @nationalpost for Q&A: natpo.st/kgknOI June 17, 2011 @LaurierMBA #Laurier School of Business and Economics introduces Canada’s first chair in Brand Communication Management. http://bit.ly/myeRvK #MBA #wlu June 16, 2011 @WLUPress A serendipitous discovery last night in Toronto. A street in honour of the late Barbara Godard, WLUP author http://yfrog.com/h4o2hujj June 15, 2011

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Photo: Sandra Muir

Drink of choice: I drink coffee in the morning and herbal tea the rest of the day. My husband and I buy coffee beans and mix them up together. Right now we are on French mocha and Columbian.

In her spare time, Rhoda Howard-Hassmann finds joy in both poetry writing and pumping iron.

What is your typical day at the office like? I have meetings or classes most of the day. I usually eat lunch at my desk or in the faculty lounge with people from the History department. I conduct my research and write at home. What do you like to do in your spare time? In my private life I write poetry and I publish it in local places in Hamilton, where I live. I’ve been publishing as a poet since the late 1970s. From poetry workshops I’ve learned a lot about writing. The first thing I learned is that I can’t rhyme so I don’t try. I learned

CONVOCATION continued

moved in a procession from the Brantford Research and Academic Centre to the theatre. “It made it a celebration for not only the students and their accomplishments, but also the city of Brantford,” said Klein. Throughout the year, both in Brantford and Waterloo, hundreds of tasks must be completed to prepare for each ceremony, including: working with the convocation planning committee, organizing the chancellor’s luncheons, scheduling the orchestra and soloists, training volunteers, publishing programs and liaising with each of this year’s nine honorary degree recipients. In Waterloo, the set up for the ceremonies is a full-day job that happens just the day before. The gym floor goes down and the stage goes up. The red carpet is rolled out and the chairs are placed. The set up also involves coordinating with a number of external vendors, including the furniture rental service, sound technicians and photographers. This year, in celebration of Laurier’s 100th anniversary, a screen projected the university’s historical timeline and photos, “for those parents who showed up early to get good seats,” said Schwartz. Special efforts were also made to bring high-profile honorary degree recipients. The final list included Raffi Cavoukian, Dr. Neil Arya, Arthur J. Carty, Louise Arbour, Roméo Dallaire,

to be very precise and specific in the words I use. You have to use words that have meaning, and you have to be able to portray or convey a picture or feeling in words. How else do you unwind after a long day? Because I deal with such heavy topics in my work, I like to watch British murder mysteries in the evening. And while I sit in front of the TV, I crochet baby blankets. It’s very easy, you just go back and forth. Around here, there are so many people having babies. It’s a young faculty, so there is practically always a candidate for a blanket when

Craig and Marc Kielburger, Linda Hasenfratz, Bishop Michael Pryse, and Fisk Johnson. The last piece of the puzzle is setting the stage. “Once the thrones are in place we know we’re good to go. It’s like, ‘OK, now we can go to sleep.’” In Waterloo on the day of a ceremony, the excitement begins in the Bricker Academic Building, where students rent gowns and line up in alphabetical order. “A whole other production is going on there while parents filter into the AC,” said Schwartz. “Alumni Relations and Career Services collect information from graduates, Student Publications distributes yearbooks and class composites. Then after graduates have picked up their gowns they proceed to the Science Building to line up.” In Brantford, setting up the ceremonies also includes working very closely with Nipissing University on a joint ceremony. Believed to be the first of its kind when it began in 2006, Brantford’s joint ceremony is actually two ceremonies: one for Laurier and one for Nipissing, with a shared stage party, procession and recession. This year, Brantford students made their way to the new Research and Academic Centre, where they had an opportunity to connect with Career Services and Alumni Relations before heading off to the Stedman Community Bookstore to get their gown and hood. Then they joined the student procession.

Film Studies.

I finish one. Sometimes I’m rushing. Do you have a favourite book or author? No. But I read fiction constantly and belong to two book clubs. I nicknamed one the “Respectable Older Ladies Bookclub,” organized by a friend of mine who is retired from teaching in the Catholic school system. The other one I nicknamed the “Serious Literary Group.” We’ve had professors from Laurier come and speak at the group, including professors Tamas Dobozy, Maria DiCenzo, and Lynn Shakinovsky in the Department of English and

While there have never been any major problems the day of a ceremony, students showing up late is always a big challenge. “It happens almost every ceremony,” said Schwartz. “Our marshals have to seat them elsewhere and then remember to slot them back into line when it’s time for them to go up on stage.” Despite minor hiccups, everything always runs smoothly, in part thanks to a regular crew of volunteers who know how to make the quick fix when needed. There are about 30-45 volunteers needed per ceremony, in addition to the more than 50 staff and faculty who take part.

What is something that people would be surprised to learn about you? I like to pump iron. I’ve always been a swimmer, but I just started going to the gym about a year-and-a-half ago and I really like it. My ambition is to lift a fifth of what my 30-year-old son can lift. He can do a 75-pound weight. I can do 12.5 pounds, and would like to move up to a 15-pound weight. I just thought, I’ll get my courage in my hands and try this.

By Sandra Muir

While the Office of the VicePresident/Principal coordinates Brantford’s ceremonies, Klein says the day is truly a campuswide event. “The staff and faculty at Brantford play a huge role in convocation, and many are integral through all the stages of planning,” said Klein. The same goes for convocation on the Waterloo campus. “I don’t think there is one department or faculty not involved with convocation – it takes a whole campus,” said Schwartz. “It’s really great to see an entire university come together to celebrate this important occasion.”

In the media “The evidence suggests that individuals are less likely to engage in risky or reckless behaviour during recessions and are more likely to engage in health-improving behaviours.”

Ariizumi

Schirle

– Hideki Ariizumi and Tammy Schirle, Faculty of Economics From “Out of Work? You may Live a Little Longer,” published in The Globe and Mail on March 21, 2011. The article reviews recent studies showing that increased jobless rates are associated with a drop in mortality. Laurier community members are frequently featured in the local and national media. To see more coverage, visit www.wlu.ca/Laurierin thenews, and find out about our Experts at Laurier program, visit www. wlu.ca/experts.

Summer 2011

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RESEARCH FILE

Reading the political tea leaves with an expert’s cool eye Laurier’s LISPOP researchers provide authoritative analyses of big elections and hot-button issues Politics. As the saying goes, along with religion, it’s a topic to avoid in casual conversation. Few things get people more riled up. Two supporters of different parties could argue for hours. But taking a cool-headed approach to politics is what the associates of the Laurier Institute for the Study of Public Opinion and Policy (LISPOP) do best. Founded in 2000, LISPOP studies issues pertaining to the creation, use and representation of public opinion in the policy process. “We not only monitor the practices and claims of the public-opinion and interestgroup industries, but also serve as an educational resource to Laurier and the larger community on questions and issues pertaining to those claims and practices,” says Andrea Perrella, director of LISPOP. Associates of LISPOP also use polling data to figure out seat counts for Canada’s federal and provincial elections. Laurier LISPOP researchers (L-R) Andrea Perrella, Jason Roy and Barry Kay. The institute provided real-time results to Global Television’s Decision Desk during the recent federal election. Professor Barry Kay has used his “regional swing model” data to answer questions such as system and what they think algorithm to chart more than 30 “How have Canadian attitudes they are getting) and whether or years of Canadian elections. about the environment differed not there are explanations to be “The seat projection model is over time?” and “Are women or discovered across the provinces, LISPOP has completed extensive research on minority not about predicting the future men more likely to vote Consersuch as why some provinces voters in Canada. Here are some facts about minority – it’s only as good as the polls vative?” have “less of a deficit” than groups and how they vote. it’s based on,” says Kay. “As a One current LISPOP research others and why some provinces result, its true test is when using project is trying to discover local have higher voter turnout and Green Party voters election-day results. Since 1963 attitudes toward fluoridation greater satisfaction. Green Party voters are disproportionately young compared to – that’s 15 elections – it’s been and immunization by working “What’s great about this partisans of other parties. The environment is, obviously, a key accurate within four seats per on a survey with the University research group is not only do we focus for the party, but Kay has found that people who give party per election.” of Waterloo. “We want to find have regional expertise, but we priority to the environment are just as likely to vote NDP. Since the 2004 federal election, out why people have seemingly also have individuals who focus “So it’s not just about ‘tree hugging,’” he says. “When you Kay has worked with Global TV contradictory attitudes about on specific things, like LISPOP’s probe further, there are a lot of people who are unhappy with to give them real-time results public health matters,” says survey development,” says everyone so they vote Green. I refer to them frequently as during election night. For the Perrella. “People are lining up to Roy. “Another colleague works ‘none of the above’ voters.” recent May 2 election, a dozen get their flu shot, but saying, ‘get on media content analysis and current and former Laurier the fluoride out of my water!’” will be looking at newspapers Gay and lesbian voters LISPOP uses polling data in the provinces, and another “Over the last 10 years we have donated by research firm Perrella currently has an article in press for the Canadian focuses on elite interviews that Journal of Political Science about gay and lesbian voters. Ipsos Reid, which tracks the get information from a different seen new agencies popping According to data from the 2006 federal election, the same sex opinions of tens of thousands angle,” says Roy. up and giving us almost daily marriage issue was very important. Not surprisingly, gay and of Canadians. Because the Ipsos Roy’s personal research looks lesbian voters don’t tend to vote Conservative, but they aren’t Reid data sample is typically at society’s growing dependence numbers, and one of the necessarily voting NDP, either. much larger than other opinion on opinion polls and whether or questions has been: What is the polls in the country, LISPOP can not those polls have any impact “Gay and lesbian voters are not overwhelmingly NDP, and the NDP is the party that is more supportive of civil rights on voters. impact of these numbers on the study the social and political issues in the gay and lesbian community,” said Perrella. “In opinions of many minority He is planning to track what voters?” 2006, the Liberals were more ambiguous about those issues, groups, such as Green voters, individuals are doing when but they were a more viable party, so perhaps you have -LISPOP researcher Jason Roy gay and lesbian voters, and even they’re faced with bits of polling people voting strategically in order to ‘stop’ the Conservatives.” gun owners (see sidebar for information, the frequency with In general, women are more likely to vote NDP than men students helped Kay staff Global more details). which they receive the inforare. This is especially true in the gay and lesbian communities: TV’s Decision Desk, identifying In an unusual coincimation, and whether or not they lesbians are even more likely to vote NDP than gay men. which of Canada’s 308 constitudence, at least four provinces can recall the information, to get encies they thought were ready (Newfoundland, Manitoba, a better understanding of the Christian voters to call. Ontario and Saskatchewan) will impact the polls may be having LISPOP has also studied minorities within religious minorities, LISPOP also uses Kay’s model be going to the polls later this on how people decide their vote. and found distinct differences between sub-groups. For to populate an election tracker year for provincial elections. “Over the last 10 years we example, the East Asian Christian minority is vastly different map, which can be found on When that happens, Perrella have seen new agencies popping from the Latin American Christian minority – the latter is much their website (www.wlu.ca/ and Professor Jason Roy will be up and giving us almost daily less likely to vote Conservative than the former. lispop). During the election, the collaborators on a project led by numbers, and one of the There is also a distinction between Catholics and Protesmap directly fed two national Jared Wesley of the University questions has been: What is tants, which historically was thought to be one of the key media chains: Global News and of Manitoba that will look at the impact of these numbers religious distinctions in Canadian voting. Now, mainstream Postmedia Network, responcross-province differences and on the voters? Or do they have Protestants don’t vote all that differently from Catholics, but sible for papers such as the comparisons to the federal any impact?” says Roy. “Some Evangelical and small-denomination Protestants do. National Post, Ottawa Citizen and election. say that the campaign doesn’t “The main difference among Christians is mainstream Vancouver Sun. Perrella and Roy, who will be matter, that the horse race vs. Evangelical Protestant,” said Kay. “We also found that Although LISPOP receives a covering the Ontario election, coverage doesn’t matter, but non-Christians are less likely to vote Conservative (and vote lot of press during elections, its will look at democratic deficit others would say those who either Liberal or NDP) and non-believers are strongly NDP.” researchers are busy in between (the difference between what don’t know better could be them as well, analyzing polling people expect from a democratic misled by the polls.”

Voting minorites

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Photo: Mallory O’Brien

By Mallory O’Brien

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Summer 2011

“Baby beluga grads” head out into the world Honorary degree recipients at spring convocation include Dallaire, Arbour – and Raffi!

Photos: Tomasz Adamski and Sandra Muir

This year’s spring convocation ceremonies took place on the Waterloo campus June 6 to 10 and Brantford campus June 21-22. Approximately 2,172 undergrad degrees and 277 graduate degrees were granted, with about 80 per cent attending their convocation ceremonies. “Celebrating the academic success of our students is a moment of great pride for our whole community,” said University Registrar Ray Darling. “Many of our students will treasure the milestone of convocation for years to come, especially because they are graduating in Laurier’s centennial year.”

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Honorary degree recipients included Dr. Neil Arya, Arthur J. Carty, Louise Arbour, Lieutenant General, the Right Honourable Roméo Dallaire, Craig and Marc Kielburger, Linda Hasenfratz, Bishop Michael Pryse, Fisk Johnson and musician Raffi Cavoukian, who affectionately referred to his graduating group as “baby beluga grads.” Video of both events was livestreamed and can be viewed at www.ustream.tv/ channel/wlu-convocation-2011. Additional photos are available on Laurier’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/LaurierNow.


Summer 2011 - insideLaurier