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37th Annual Home Show Community Aquatic Center 100 Park Avenue

March 29 - 31


Home Show March 28, 2019 - 1

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What’s inside 2

STAY COOL

Weather-proof your home for the summer

3

IN THE POOL

Read about these droughtresistant pool trends.

5

UPGRADES

Try these four home upgrades to make you feel good about being a homeowner.

SAVE AN EXTRA

7

HIRING OUT?

When should you tackle the project yourself, and when is it best to hire help?

10

MAKE A SPLASH

There are fountains for every home budget.

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PALM PROBLEMS

5 issues to watch out for when it comes to fan palms.

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2 - March 28, 2019

Home Show

Weather-proof your home for summer By SARAH DIXON

SPECIAL TO TODAY’S NEWS HERALD

Temperatures are rising in Havasu which means electricity bills will follow. Luckily, there are things you can do to keep a hole from burning in your pocket. During the spring months especially since it cools down at night, it’s important to utilize the windows as a way to gain cool air and keep out the heat. The Department of Energy suggests, “Turn off your cooling system and open your windows while sleeping. When you wake up in the morning, shut the windows and blinds to capture the cool air.” The cool air that comes through the windows at night will last longer during the day if you close your windows first thing in the morning. During the day, while the windows are closed, use window coverings to keep the sun from shining through the windows

and heating the interior of your home. According to the DOE, “About 76 percent of sunlight that falls on standard doublepane windows enters to become heat.” Window coverings include shades, blinds, draperies, shutters, tints, and UV blockers. You can also utilize an awning to cover the sunniest side of your house. Of course, you don’t have to keep your windows closed and covered all day. If you want to get some natural light into your home, open the coverings that don’t get direct sunlight. That’ll allow light in while keeping the heat out as much as possible. One of the easiest ways to save on your electricity bill during hotter months is to regulate your thermostat and use it efficiently. Experts believe setting the thermostat to a similar degree to the outside temperature will lower the cost. Obviously, you don’t want it to be 90 degrees in your house but setting the

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thermostat as high as comfortably possible will maximize your energy savings. It is also important to change the settings while you’re outside of your home. It doesn’t make sense to cool your house while you’re not in it. The DOE also mentions, “Avoid setting your thermostat at a colder setting than normal when you turn on your air conditioner. It will not cool your home any faster and could result in excessive cooling and unnecessary expense.” Besides your thermostat, there are other machines and appliances that can affect the temperature in your home. The oven, dishwasher, dryer, bath, curling iron, and computer have the potential to raise the temperatures. Avoid cooking in the oven on hot days, use the microwave or an outdoor grill instead. “Wash only full loads of dishes and

clothes. Consider air drying both dishes and clothing. Take short showers instead of baths. Minimize activities that generate a lot of heat, such as running a computer and using hot devices such as curling irons or hair dryers,” advises the DOE. It’s not only what’s inside your home but your home itself. Be sure to seal any cracks or openings with caulk or weatherstripping. You can adjust your thermostat all you want but if the hot air is leaking through, it’ll be completely pointless. Lastly, perform routine maintenance on your cooling and heating system. Experts suggest vacuuming vents to prevent dust build up in between services. These tips are simple and inexpensive. It will cost little to nothing to try a few in order to reduce your spring and summer time electricity bills.

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Home Show March 28, 2019 - 3

Business Directory Listing A&E Construction 1880 Commander Drive, Unit A 928-680-2891

Drought-resistant pool trends By SARAH DIXON

of the pool, and there are three types that can add appeal during a drought.

Almost everyone in Havasu has a pool. It’s pretty much a necessity during the hot summer months when the beaches by the lake and the lake itself become too crowded. Although pools are fun in the sun, they are a luxury item and somewhat expensive to maintain. During a drought, pools can become quite the irritant with water levels evaporating and nosey neighbors upset with your water usage. Here are a few tips and trends to follow to keep your cool and enjoy your pool.

CANTILEVERED COPING This type of coping funnels the water back into the pool. It looks as though there is a slit in between the water’s edge and the bottom of the coping which allows the water to seep through instead of running over the edge and all over your patio or grass.

SPECIAL TO TODAY’S NEWS HERALD

CHECK FOR LEAKS During warmer months, the water in your pool will evaporate. Experts say the normal level of evaporation should be one inch per week. Anything more than that should be checked. Take a look at your equipment, such as the backwash valve, filter band clamps, and other fittings that “can cause the pool to lose water,” says Aqua Magazine’s Kevin and Terri Arnett. SCHEDULE ROUTINE MAINTENANCE It is important to maintain the pool once a week. This will allow you to become familiar with your water levels, color, and temperature. Skim the leaves, brush the sides and bottom, vacuum, and check the water circulation as well as its filter. Besides maintaining your pool, changing its aesthetic can also help during a drought. According to the experts at Texas Stone Sealers, “Pool coping can help you maintain your pool’s water levels, while also providing an appealing aesthetic.” Pool coping is the material used on the outside of the pool, like a shelf on the edge

LIGHT-REFLECTIVE COPING Dark colors tend to suck the light in causing your pool to become hotter and the water to evaporate. By using lighter stones like Travertine, the light will be reflected and the water levels should stay intact. EXTRA-WIDE POOL COPING This type of coping is good in shallow pools and will help keep water from splashing out of the pool. When installing coping, the constructors will level it at an angle so the water runs back into the pool. Another way to upgrade your pool while preparing for a drought is to install an outdoor umbrella. You can either set it poolside or directly in the pool. The umbrella will provide a bit of shade and create the look of a tropical paradise right in your backyard. • Cantilever Umbrella: Made with UV resistant material and a steel frame, this umbrella can withstand windy weather and is able to rotate 360 degrees. Experts believe the cantilever umbrella is the best type to use because it is versatile and provides extensive shade. • In-Pool Umbrella: Just like the cantilever style, this umbrella is made of UV resistant material and a steel frame; however, instead of next to the pool, it is installed right inside, usually on a platform or island.

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Havasu Community Credit Union 55 S. Lake Havasu Ave 800-894-1200 lafinancial.org Havasu Home Services Home Check, Landscape, Maintenenace Services 928-486-2945 aplushomecheck@yahoo.com Havasu Powersports 1040 N. Lake Havasu Ave 928-453-1610 havasupowersports.com Mohave Solar 1849 W. Acoma Blvd #110 928-680-0040 mohavesolar.com

Sabre Building Corporation 2935 Maricopa Ave 928-505-4522 sabrebuilding.com Shelf Genie 928-291-2171 shelfgenie.com Showplace Fashion Furniture 175 N. Lake Havasu Ave 928-855-1212 showplacefashionfurniture.net Tri-County Property Services, LLC 928-230-8531 thepropertyimprover@yahoo.com Tri-Source Heating Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 928-208-9751

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4 - March 28, 2019

Inside vendors

Outside vendors

Home Show

BOOTH.......................VENDOR 18 ................................... Riverfront Industries Assoc. 19 ................................... CTS Global Products 20 ................................... CTS Global Products 21 ................................... MDS Enterprises 22 ................................... Havasu Audio Video LLC 23 ................................... Air Control Air Conditioning Inc. 24 ................................... Air Control Air Conditioning Inc. 25 ................................... Desert Cat LLC/Old West Soaps 26 ................................... Lifesource Water Systems 27 ................................... Sleep Research 28 ................................... Sleep Research 29 ................................... DL Kettle Corn 30 ................................... Mohave Solar 31 ................................... Mohave Solar 32 ................................... Dynamite Roofing LLC 33 ................................... Havasu Garage Screens 34 ................................... Havasu Garage Screens 35 ................................... Kitchen Tune-Up 36 ................................... AleaMari Co 37 ................................... Kitchencraft 38 ................................... Kitchencraft 39 ................................... Advantage Windshield 40 ................................... Ace Glass Tinting of Havasu 41 ................................... Ace Glass Tinting of Havasu 42 ................................... BHT Marketing 43 ................................... Mohave State Bank 44 ................................... Parker & Desert Pest Control 45 ................................... Dreamstyle Remodeling 45 ................................... Dreamstyle Remodeling 46 ................................... Cowboy Princess 47 ................................... Sinclair 49 ................................... Living Well Products Direct 50 ................................... Sabre Building Corp. 51 ................................... Budget Blinds 52 ................................... Budget Blinds 53 ................................... City Maytag 54 ................................... Quick N Brite 55 ................................... Havasu Solar 56 ................................... Sinclair 57 ................................... Cutco 58 ................................... Castle Rock Doors 59 ................................... Ben Franklin Plumbing 60 ................................... Pitzers One Hour Heating & Air 61 ................................... Michael Alan Furnishings 62 ................................... Michael Alan Furnishings 63 ................................... Michael Alan Furnishings 64 ................................... Summer Accent Umbrellas 65 ................................... Summer Accent Umbrellas 66 ................................... Colorado River Home Watch 99 ................................... Eagle Creations 100 ................................. First Class Bambo 101 ................................. Tuff Spas 102 ................................. Tuff Spas 103 ................................. ServPro 104 ................................. Catching Air LLC 105 ................................. Catching Air LLC 106 ................................. River Paint & Supply 107 ................................. Swim Solutions AZ 108 ................................. Indigo Jewelry 109 ................................. Havasu Cabinets 110 ................................. T-Mobile 111 112 ................................. Tri-State Equipment Rentals 113 ................................. Five Star Culinary Connection Inc. 114 ................................. Five Star Culinary Connection Inc. 115 ................................. Alpaca Store 116 ................................. Alpaca Store 117 ................................. Alpaca Store Food #1 ........................... Marnie’s Food Catering Cart Food #2 ........................... Sweeties Cheesecake in a Cone 118 ................................. Unisource


Home Show March 28, 2019 - 5

BOOTH.......................VENDOR 119 ................................. Unisource 104 ................................. Catching Air LLC 105 ................................. Catching Air LLC 106 ................................. River Paint & Supply 107 ................................. Swim Solutions AZ 108 ................................. Indigo Jewelry 109 ................................. Havasu Cabinets 110 ................................. T-Mobile 111 112 ................................. Tri-State Equipment Rentals 113 ................................. Five Star Culinary Connection Inc. 114 ................................. Five Star Culinary Connection Inc. 115 ................................. Alpaca Store 116 ................................. Alpaca Store 117 ................................. Alpaca Store Food #1 ........................... Marnie’s Food Catering Cart Food #2 ........................... Sweeties Cheesecake in a Cone 118 ................................. Unisource 119 ................................. Unisource 137 ................................. Evergreen Softub Inc. 138 140 ................................. Tuff Shed/Arizona Building Creations 141 ................................. ARC Coatings 142 143 ................................. Farmers Insurance Cassie Sotelo Agency 144 ................................. LHC Water Department 145 146 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 147 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 148 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 150 151 152 153 156 200 ................................. Sogno Toscano Olive Oil Boutique 137 ................................. Evergreen Softub Inc. 138 140 ................................. Tuff Shed/Arizona Building Creations 141 ................................. ARC Coatings 142 143 ................................. Farmers Insurance Cassie Sotelo Agency 144 ................................. LHC Water Department 145 146 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 147 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 148 ................................. Havasu Can Cleaning 150 151 152 153 156 200 ................................. Sogno Toscano Olive Oil Boutique

Home upgrades to make you feel lucky By JENNA SCHUSTER HOMEADVISOR

There are also plenty of home upgrades you can make to create your own luck all year long. QUIET CABINETS AND DOORS Accidentally slamming a cabinet door and waking the whole household can feel like the worst stroke of luck. But if you have old-fashioned cabinets, this situation can be hard to avoid. To help your family sleep more soundly, have a pro install softclosing cabinet and door hinges in your home. These hinges stop your swinging door right before it smacks the edge of the frame, so they’re virtually noiseless! Another benefit? You’ll never slam your fingers in the door again. STAIN-REPELLING FURNITURE If you’ve had the misfortune of spilling a drink on your furniture, you know how badly it can stain. Avoid this, and watch spills roll right off the fabric, by spraying your furniture with stain repellent. Simply spray couches, upholstered chairs, rugs and any other fabric that might easily stain, and let it dry for about a day. Next time you drop a drink, your furniture should repel the liquid. Sounds lucky to us! Just remember to spot test it first — and check manufacturer recommendations. PERFECTLY-TIMED COFFEE Getting up on a Monday morning can feel anything but lucky. But investing in helpful appliances can make it a little better. Consider get-

ting a coffee maker with a timer so you can wake up to a fresh cup of Joe instead of having to wait for it to brew. All you need to do is load the coffee and set the timer the night before, and the machine will do the rest. If you’re ever running late for work, having coffee ready for you as you race out the door will feel like kismet. HANDS-FREE SINKS If you’re the chef at home, you know first-hand how messy cooking can be. And if you frequently cook

How can I save water around the house? By PAUL F. P. POGUE ANGIE’S LIST

Water is one of the most important utilities in the home, and one of the easiest to overuse. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates the average home loses 10,000 gallons per year to leaks. Follow these tips to conserve water around the house and save money while doing your part to use water wisely. Update your appliances: Older appliances are some of the biggest water-wast-

ers around the house. Newer toilets use as little as 1.28 gallons per flush. Older ones, especially those dating before 1992, can waste several gallons with every flush! Inefficient faucets and showerheads account for as much as 3,000 gallons of loss a year. And older appliances use quite a bit more water than new ones. Look for water-based appliances marked with the Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense label or Energy Star designation.

Fix leaky pipes and toilets: Pipes losing water behind the wall can be tricky to detect unless there’s obvious damage. Pay close attention to your water bill. A jump in water usage from one moth to another may indicate a leaky pipe. If you suspect a leak, check your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak. Call a plumber for assistance. Even a small leak in your toilet tank can lose significant amounts of water, and

with raw meat or eggs, you also have to worry about proper sanitation. Avoid contaminating your faucet with germs by installing a touch-sensor kitchen faucet. With this faucet, all you need is a simple bump of the wrist, elbow — or even nose — and it will turn on the tap. For food lovers, this is your lucky break. A plumber or skilled handyman should be able to install this device quickly. Once installed, the faucet should be easy to maintain, only requiring battery changes as needed.

you’ll never detect it if you don’t know what you’re looking for. Put a few drops of food coloring in the tank and let it sit for 10 minutes. If the coloring bleeds into the bowl, you know water is leaking from tank into the bowl. Quite frequently, the culprit is a worn-out rubber flapper that decayed over time. It’s a quick and easy fix to replace them with parts from your local hardware store. Update your lifestyle: You can waste a lot of water without even realizing it. Turn off the faucet while you brush your teeth or shave, and plug up the sink if you do dishes by hand. Thaw food in the refrigerator overnight rather than use a running tap of hot water.


6 - March 28, 2019

Home Show


Home Show March 28, 2019 - 7

Spring cleaning: Hire it out or DIY? By Dan DiClerico HOMEADVISOR

If you’re like most homeowners, your home maintenance to-do list is longest during the spring. Over the course of a few short weeks, you need to clean house, get organized and tend to any essential maintenance issues that resulted from winter’s harsh weather. Chances are, you can’t get to everything on the list yourself, which is where the pros come in. But which projects should you hire out and which should you tackle yourself? HomeAdvisor’s Spring Cleaning Checklist provides guidance by dividing the projects into those that are complex or time-consuming enough to require a professional, versus those that are DIYfriendly. Plus, we’ve included the average cost to hire a pro as reported by real homeowners in HomeAdvisor’s True Cost Guide. HIRE IT OUT DEEP CLEAN CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY: Regular vacuuming is important, but once a year it’s worth hiring a professional cleaning surface to come in with the heavy-duty equipment. Most companies use hot water extraction to remove deep-seeded dust, dirt and allergens, and their spot cleaning treatments will take up stubborn stains, maybe left over from the holidays. Furniture cleaning average cost: $162 Carpet cleaning average cost: $176 RESEAL BATHROOM GROUT: Grimy grout not only looks gnarly, it can harbor microbes and mold, which can quickly spread to other parts of the bathroom. The longer you let it go, the worse it gets. Over-the-counter cleaners aren’t nearly as effective as pros, who will come armed with steam equipment and specialized cleaning solutions. Grout sealing average cost: $449 TREAT THE DECK: All decks benefit from a spring power washing to blast away grime and mildew. The equipment can be dangerous, so it’s best left to the pros. Wooden decks must also be sealed every few years — or more often if you choose a transparent stain, which shows the wood grain but doesn’t provide as much protection as solid or semi-trans-

parent stains. Power washing average cost: $250 Deck sealing average cost: $840 CLEAN GUTTERS: Clogged gutters can lead to a litany of problems, including leaky roofs and cracked foundation walls. Given the hazards of climbing ladders, especially on two and three-story homes, this is another project that you should probably let the pros handle. Gutter cleaning average cost: $152 SERVICE COOLING EQUIPMENT: An annual tune-up, ideally ahead of the cooling season, will keep your central air system running at optimal efficiency and minimize the risk of a mid-summer conk out. Heating and cooling contractors get busy once the weather warms, so schedule your appointment as early as possible. AC service average cost: $80-$100 DIY-FRIENDLY CLEAR YARD DEBRIS: Start by raking up fallen leaves and dead foliage from foundation beds; left unchecked, this debris can choke off plants and foster disease. If you don’t have a compost pile or bin, consider starting one with the collected leaves and foliage. ORGANIZE CLOSETS: First separate items into “keep,” “toss” and “donate” piles. If you haven’t worn a garment in the last year, it’s ready to go. Remember to vacuum the empty closet. When restocking, group like items together and store them by frequency of use. CLEAN MATTRESSES: Remove sheets and covers and machine wash in hot water. Vacuum mattresses using your vacuum’s upholstery attachment. Then deodorize the mattress by sprinkling baking soda over the surface and leaving it on for several hours.

Finding the perfect lamp is easy By KATIE LAUGHRIDGE TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Lighting has such a large impact on a space, it might be surprising to find out it can easily be overlooked when designing a room. It has the ability to impact our mood, and of course, enhance the design of a room. From task lighting to creating general ambiance, lamps are inherently functional, but we’re here to say you don’t have to sacrifice form for function. I always strive to create layers of light within a room by using multiple light sources of varied types. I like to think about how the light will play in a room. The goal is a bright center, which is more typically achieved with overhead lighting, and pockets of light around the perimeter that highlight important elements. This is where lamps come into play. It’s clear from what we are seeing that designers are having a fun moment with creative lighting. Everyone has their own rules when it comes to choosing lighting for their spaces. For me, this is an area where I just like to have fun. I have picked up some tips and advice that hopefully can help you in choosing the perfect lamps for you. I like to think about the following prompts to get me started, because as we all know, rules (unlike lamps) are made to be broken. Incorporate color and personality. Lamps don’t have to be taken so seriously. Add whimsy to a space with an animal-shaped base perfect for a child’s room. Or, add a pop of an eye-catching hue to add some brightness to a darker tabletop. Feeling adventurous? Switch up your classic white shade for one in black or another exciting color to stand out. You might be surprised by how many compliments start coming your way. Add a new traditional touch and shop

Large lamps are a great addition to any vignette that needs height and light to stand out in the room. for double! Symmetrical lamps flanking a table are a key design element in new traditional design. Using statement lamps can double the interest and the impact. This tip can be applied to any room or design aesthetic. Symmetry never goes out of style. Let your lamp lead the design charge. Use your lamp to tie in your accent color, incorporate pattern and texture to a room, or show your wild side. I like to suggest you pick a lamp that really makes an impact and draws your eye. To borrow from Marie Kondo, choose a lamp that really sparks joy every time you turn it on. Treat your lamp as art and invest in it. I treat lamps as investment pieces. They are one of my favorite places to splurge in a room, because a good lamp truly makes such an impact on design. Some of my favorite lamps right now are lovely hand-painted pieces from designer Dana Gibson. The way she incorporates wild pops of color to traditional shapes and forms is brilliant. Don’t be afraid to mix and match. Using lighting to create balance doesn’t mean you have to create uniformity. Mixing and matching different lamps throughout a room is what gives your room character and highlights your style.

Celebrating 24 Years of Building!

WASH WINDOWS: It’s worth investing in a good-quality rubber squeegee, which our pros say delivers the best lintand streak-free cleaning. WIPE DOWN HARD-TO-REACH SURFACES: Counters and floors get cleaned throughout the year. Spring is the time to wipe down out-of-the-way surfaces. Try this homemade cleaning solution: one part ammonia to eight parts water, plus a few drops of dish detergent.

We have many floor plans to choose from... or we can design and complete your custom floor plan with our in-house draftsman. Many of our standard features are upgrades in other models. Realtor, GRI, WCR www.ParadiseHomesofHavasu.com

Karen Erwin

928-486-6701


8 - March 28, 2019

Home Show

AIR CONDITIONING

HEATING

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PLUMBING

Home Show

INSULATION

March 28, 2019 - 9

DUCT TESTING

th

March 29-31st at the Aquatic Center Fri 3pm-7pm | Sat 9am-5pm | Sun 9am-3pm

Stop by and Come Talk to Us About… Utility Rebates Available

The Benefits of Adding a Second Return Air in Your Home The Varying Air Conditioner Efficiency Ratings and their Importance How to Detect Leaky Ducts and What to do About Them What’s the Best Way to Heat & Cool my Garage? How to Know if the Water Pressure in your Home Falls Within Normal Range

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10 - March 28, 2019

Home Show

California fuschias should be included in every dry garden

Fountains make a splash

By MAUREEN GILMER

Fountains have been around since Roman times. In the ancient world, they were purely functional, employing springs or aqueducts to provide water for drinking, bathing and cleaning to even the smallest villages. Modest, centrally located and fed by gravity, public fountains were the focus of a simple communal existence. Fountains went upscale when modern plumbing and pumping systems became widespread in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Removed from their utilitarian origins, those burbling pools, jets and waterfalls became status symbols and, in the public sphere, objects of civic pride. Cities from Rome to Kansas City, Mo., are admired and defined by their many public fountains, and the Sunset Strip in Las Vegas was transformed by the Bellagio hotel-casino’s spectacular display of rocketing, tumbling water. Perhaps because of that perceptual shift, one of the biggest misconceptions about fountains is that they’re pricey, says Michele Hoolihan, owner of Fantasy Fountains Inc., a 60-year-old business in Newport Beach, Calif. “A lot of people think they can’t afford a fountain, but there are models for every budget and every type of home,” Hoolihan said. Another incorrect assumption about fountains is that they’re water hogs. Hoolihan countered that it just isn’t so. “A lot of the time we can tap into an existing irrigation system to do a water feature.” Electricity consumption can be minuscule, too. “You might need just a small pump, and most of the lighting we use is low voltage.” All that cascading water is recirculated, Hoolihan pointed out, so you’re not wasting that precious resource. Evaporation is usually not much of an issue, either, she added. “With many water features, you’re dropping water into the ground and recirculating it, so you’re not giving it a lot of exposure to the sun.” Those who want to keep their carbon footprint small can shop for a solar-powered fountain. They’re convenient, too: You don’t have to worry about placing your fountain near a power source. Solar power is also an excellent way of turning a birdbath into a fountain, which eliminates a potential source for mosquitoes. “If you have a birdbath, then you already know that the water gets stagnant

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Among the many species that make perfect candidates for droughty gardens, there is one that is not given the attention it deserves. California fuchsia, formerly known as Zauschneria californica, is now classified in a new genus as Epilobium canum, but you may find them listed both ways. This perennial taught me much about growing natives in unsuitable soils and how to get around the problem for a beautiful dry color garden. The goal was to elevate the roots of the perennials just enough to keep them above the dense ground, a technique suited to virtually any garden. Irregular curbs of field stone I gathered off the property were created to hold no more than a foot of soil. I collected sandygravelly “road base” from a drainage ditch and mixed it with equal parts local topsoil so that water applied moved through too fast to pool. California fuch-

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sia proved quite well adapted to such lean ground with porosity preferred over fertility. Virtually every native I added to that soil mix thrived. The fuchsias literally took off. Their small grayish fuzzy leaves on brittle stems rose to about 18 inches, proving quite capable of withstanding the hot afternoons in that west facing ridge. Here they bloomed heavily at first, then spotty flowers appeared throughout the warm months. A big male rufous hummingbird discovered them and drove off all other competitors. I left it all winter only to discover by spring that the fuchsia hadn’t died at all. Rains stimulated its growth, spreading over a much larger area than the original plant because all the buried parts of the stems had rooted! What made this happen was the road base. If it had been clay soil mounded up, it would have quickly rotted. This easy rooting demonstrates why fuchsia can become invasive where soils are right for rooting and seed germination.

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By PAUL HODGINS

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

and is a breeding ground for mosquitoes,” says online fountain retailer Soothing Walls. “Constant flowing water will invite birds but is unattractive to insects.” The biggest threat to a residential fountain’s well-being, according to Hoolihan, is overzealous maintenance by its owner. Well-intentioned but wrongheaded efforts can lead to disaster. “Some people like to put bleach in the water, thinking that will kill things. The problem is that it corrodes the components, the pumps and jets and nozzles. They can break down quite quickly.” Popular do-it-yourself website eHow suggests algicides as a better alternative to bleach: “Many algicides are available at pond and pool supply stores that are safe for both the fountain and any animals that may drink from the fountain. These products are as easy to use as bleach products, but they are safer and will not void any warranties.” PLEASING TO THE EAR AS WELL AS THE EYE When Hoolihan begins a consultation for a project, she first scouts the location. “I look at it from the overall design perspective. I look at the style of the home. Is it a natural setting? Is the house done in Tuscan style?” Choosing a site is important. You don’t want your fountain to be tucked away in a corner but in a place of pride. In Europe, fountains are often the focal point of intersecting sightlines. You might want to consider feng shui when placing your fountain; water is an ancient feng shui symbol of wealth and prosperity. According to feng shui’s ancient rules, the best places on your property for a fountain are its eastern portion (the health and family area), southeast (the wealth and money area) and north (the career and life path area). If you’re not a feng shui adherent, here’s a more tangible benefit that can be derived from fountains: They’re an excellent source of negative ions. The health effects of negative ions are well-known. A Columbia University study of people affected by seasonal and chronic depression found that negative ion generators were as effective as antidepressants. When negative ions enter the bloodstream, they produce biochemical reactions that increase levels of the mood chemical serotonin, which can help suppress depression and boost energy.


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12 - March 28, 2019

Outdoor fire elements By ANTONIE BOESSENKOOL TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

When Rhonda and Jose Castro began the three-year makeover of their home, Rhonda had a pretty good idea of what she wanted: fresh and modern, but also warm. That’s the approach she takes to the investment properties she and Jose redesign and sell. “When we came to this house, I just knew I wanted to do a very bright, crisp, modern, but homey, style,” Rhonda said of her house. It would be modern, yes, but not museum-cold. “I still knew I wanted to have a warmth to it, for it to be cozy.” Three fire features, inside and outside, help create that ambiance. Before renovation, the first floor was divided up with walls, and the spectacular view out of the back of the house was overlooked. The couple opened up the space and added lots of windows. Now the focal point in the comfortable, modern living room is the fireplace. The limestone facing is complemented by a custom concrete

slab intersecting it to create an attractive off-centeredness. On the second floor, another fireplace divides the master bedroom and bathroom with a partial wall. It’s wonderful for staying warm while starting the day on cool mornings, Rhonda said. Rather than flat, plain stone, they picked a material with embedded glass for this fireplace. “It gives it a sparkle, but keeps it kind of spa.” Rhonda said they’ve added warmth to the modern, neutral palette of the house with other touches too. She loves chandeliers for adding glamour, and she’s picked some beauties, like the traditional one in the entryway that’s contemporized with silver spherical framework. She also likes distressed wood floors, not too shiny, more worn-in. But the fire elements aren’t limited to the indoors. Jose designed the backyard and patio, including an L-shaped fire pit made from white concrete and filled with round, gray stones. It’s another focal point, not just aesthetically, but also for its physical warmth.

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DESIGNING FIRES FOR GARDENS Landscape designer Molly Wood said fire elements are a big part of the gardens she creates for her clients, who are focused on entertaining outdoors. “All of my gardens are going to have a look that I call California gardens,” Wood said. “A lot have to do with outdoor living, and that is the chief component of fire elements.” Fireplaces indoors are a mainstay, but gathered around a fireplace, your back is often to the beautiful views outside. What’s more, space is often a limiting factor when trying to seat a large group. But take that fire element outside, and you open up possibilities with more space. It’s better suited to a large group or a party, where friends and family can enjoy the candlelight-like glow. Wood had a blank slate when she was tasked with designing an entertainment-oriented back patio and yard for a bachelor in Newport Beach. But she already had an impressive element to work with: a dramatic view from the backyard over Newport Harbor and a perfect vantage point for sunsets. To take advantage of the scene, she created a fire feature that combines fire and water. A long, rectangular pool stretches across the space, and in it, a smaller, square pool creates an eye-pleasing geometry. Edging the pools and intersecting with the outer rectangle is another rectangle, this one the fire element. Fire-proof ceramic balls of different sizes rest in a bed of sand. “With fire and water, you know that all your needs will be met,” Wood said.

“I really think that water noises and a fire feature connect in a visceral way.” Along with two hot tubs and two TVs, the fire and water elements add up to a swanky place to entertain. Though Wood designed the space with a masculine color scheme and overall feel, she included ingredients to soften the look. The angular geometry of the pools and fire feature is balanced with plantings, such as the greenery that’s a little unruly growing between pavers around the pool. And the sleek and clean surface of the porcelain pavers is complemented by wood decking in raised areas. Wood said the fire features she incorporates into her designs are square or rectangular, perhaps with a wide lip to use as a seat or a place to rest a drink. She loves to use the ceramic spheres, as in the Newport Beach bachelor’s pad. With them, the fire feature looks attractive even without the flame. Both the spheres and the lava rock used in some fire features conduct heat, lending additional warmth. Outdoor fire elements don’t have to be limited to fire pits, however. For another house, Wood brought the traditional indoor fireplace outside. With a white-walled structure, light-colored wood outdoor furniture with big white cushions, and glass lanterns accenting the fireplace, it’s a much more feminine space than the one she created for the Newport Beach homeowner. This one she designed for a single woman. As such a beautiful, enticing spot, “It’s a great invitation from the inside looking out,” Wood said. “It pulls you out into the space.”


Home Show March 28, 2019 - 13

5 fan palm behavior problems By MAUREEN GILMER TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

The first Spanish explorers never saw our native palms, but desert tribes knew them well. These huge fat-trunk, slowgrowing natives are survivors of much earlier forests that died out eons ago due to climate change. All that remain are isolated groves at desert springs where there is still enough water to maintain the survivors. From these isolated stands come our entire fan palm population. Here in the Mojave Desert, Washingtonia robusta became vital to the survival of Native Americans due to limited desert resources. They harvested the fruits and fronds and wood of the trees for food and building materials. The palms were as essential to desert people as buffalo were to plains tribes. Despite our affinity for these great natives and their skinny brothers the very tall Mexican fan palm, there are important caveats. As the trees grow older, their unexpected behaviors should be known to everyone who owns or wants to own one. 1. Palm reproduction makes litter. Every year, a mature palm produces with long sprays of thousands of tiny white flowers that explode out of the foliage head. Once pollinated, petals are blown away in a snowstorm that litters the ground and the pool. The fruit is borne on long stems maturing into pea-sized black seed that rains down all around the tree. Seeds on paving are a hazard to foot traffic like ball bearings. Where they fall on soil, they ger-

minate into a lawn of thin green blades. It’s a maintenance nightmare to pull them all out of flower beds. 2. Palms are dangerous in high winds. Palms retain their dead fronds, the “skirt,” which accumulates beneath the green living head of the palm. The native California palms hold their fronds indefinitely, well illustrated by those in the wild. However, occasionally they have been known to drop a full skirt in extreme wind events. Even a single wickedly-thorned stem can damage people, buildings, cars and landscaping, causing significant liability. 3. Palm skirts are alive with pests. In the wild, native palm skirts contain a whole ecosystem for wildlife, particularly rodents and birds. Over time, the skirt can become so large that whole colonies of animals reside there together. This isn’t a problem away from homes, but in town, skirts will make neighbors very unhappy. Pigeons love to nest there, splattering the trunk and ground with

white excrement. Rats nesting in the skirts are safe from coyotes. If the palm is close to the house, rats use it to access your roof and eventually get inside. Snakes even climb the palms to feed on baby birds and rats. Moreover, bats, potential carriers of rabies, roost in skirts, littering the ground with potentially toxic feces. After recent wildfires, palm skirts proved an important fuel for fast moving flames in urban areas. 4. Palms need access for trimmers. We love to plant around palm trees, but space should be reserved for tree trimmers and their ladders. When they cut fronds, they fall freely, crushing the plants around the trunk. 5. Palms damage hardscape. A small fan palm today is a monster tomorrow because Washingtonias grow so fast. Damage to masonry is not so much the roots, but the rapid

growth and expanding diameter. They are usually volunteers from seeds that fall into slots against wall foundations. These create so much pressure the wall may be cracked or pushed over. There is nothing more elegant than a well lighted California fan palm specimen in the night garden. Growing them in small spaces, however, is a big responsibility. More than one gardener has quit and neighbors have become sworn enemies when big palms put people, their homes and cars in peril.


14 - March 28, 2019

Home Show

How to plan the perfect outdoor kitchen Whether you’re lounging around the pool or telling stories around the fire pit, you love entertaining outdoors. So why wait to design and build the outdoor kitchen you’ve been dreaming about? There’s no time like the present. And these tips will help you down the path to success. PICK THE RIGHT SPOT Location is everything when it comes to planning your outdoor kitchen. Not only will placing it in the wrong spot be inconvenient and uncomfortable, but it could also be dangerous. Start by locating any utility lines, underground and overhead, and design with those in mind. You don’t want to cut into buried lines during the building process, nor do you want to build directly under an overhead power line that poses a risk every time you raise an umbrella. Next, consider the weather. You’ll have

more fun in your outdoor kitchen if you locate it away from windy or overly sunny areas. Plan to build your space within natural windscreens and shade from your landscaping. Then install elements to protect your kitchen from the elements that pose a challenge for comfort and cooking. Traffic flow and the proximity to your indoor kitchen are also worth considering. Plan a spot that places the two kitchens conveniently close. But be sure that the proximity and placement of the outdoor appliances are oriented to prevent smoke from drifting indoors. CHOOSE FUNCTION OVER FORM Grill, rotisserie, oven, stovetop, brick oven, blender, wine cooler — there are so many choices. But if you aren’t using them regularly, they’re needlessly taking up counter and cabinet space. Before going overboard on the appliances, ask

yourself what you’re going to be cooking and what you’ll actually use. Generally, you’ll need a refrigerator and a grill or other cooking source, as well as some storage and prep space. Embellished wood cabinetry makes a bold statement in an indoor kitchen, but exposure to the elements makes wood cabinets impractical for the outdoors. Instead, opt for stone, concrete, or steel countertops and cabinets. Not only do they give your kitchen a modern appearance, but they’re also durable and easy to clean. Investing in practical kitchen elements from the start will render savings in upkeep down the road. KEEP IT SOCIAL It’s said that the kitchen is the heart of the home; when you’re entertaining, guests often congregate in or near the kitchen to visit with the cook and each other. Arrange your outdoor kitchen to

allow for that as well. Site your dining and lounging areas near enough that you can chat with guests while preparing the meal. (This also makes it easier to get food to the table). Set the ambience with good lighting. Add brighter lights to pathways, cooking areas and activity areas, then go for adjustable lighting in the dining or lounging areas. Colored bulbs help to set the mood, but save them for areas in which illumination isn’t necessary to keep everyone safe and sound. A large television designed for outdoor use is a great addition for some gatherings; turn your kitchen and lounge area into an outdoor movie theater or mini sports arena. Add a sound system for background music or for amplifying the television’s sound. Add a large table, a fireplace or fire pit, an overhead fan or two, and some comfortable seating, and you’re ready to entertain.


Home Show March 28, 2019 - 15

Your official spring home walkthrough By LAUREN WHITE HOMEADVISOR

With the change of seasons, it’s time to open your windows and let that fresh spring breeze flow through your home. But it’s also time to inspect your property for damage, maintenance issues and potential improvements. If you conduct a thorough home walkthrough, your spring tests and inspections will fly by — and you’ll be on to enjoying the weather in no time. Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors to make sure they’re working properly, and swap out old batteries for fresh ones. Check your plumbing for leaks, and hire a plumber if you find any. Test for toilet leaks by dropping food dye in the tank to see if it seeps into the bowl. Assess your fireplace and hire a chimney sweep if you didn’t do so before the winter season. Afterwards, give your fireplace surround a thorough scrubbing. Inspect your HVAC system and replace your filters. Hire a pro if you’re due for your annual service or an air duct cleaning. Flush your water heater, or hire a pro to perform the work for you. Experts recommend flushing annually. Test your sump pump by slowly pouring water into the sump pit. The pump should activate and the water should drain. Inspect caulking and insulation. You may be able to fix caulking on your own, but for insulation issues it’s best to call a pro. Flip the switches on your ceiling fans to move the fan blades counter-

clockwise and send air downward. Clean your floors and check for stains and damage. You may need minor repairs, a steam cleaning, or more significant work like subfloor repairs and hardwood refinishing. Identify and address dirt and scuffs on your walls. And consider whether or not it’s time for a new coat of paint — and a fresh new color! Inspect and clean your doors, windows and screens — inside and out. This might be the year to upgrade to high-efficiency windows or install new screens. Assess your home exterior — your foundation, siding and roof — for damage and potential maintenance demands. If you can’t assess your roof from the ground, call for a roof inspection. Check other surfaces on your property — your driveway, walkways, patios or decks — for damage. Call a pressure washer for grimy concrete. Inspect wooden features like decks and fences to see if they need to be resealed or stained, and hire a deck pro to fix loose railings and boards. Assess your landscaping. Mark problem areas like bald patches and dead trees, branches and shrubs. And note areas where you’d like new landscape features. If you have a lawn service contract, make sure it’s valid for the coming months. Test your irrigation system and inspect it for damage before the watering season. Look for pools of water on your property. If you find any, hire an expert to find the cause and ensure proper drainage.


16 - March 28, 2019

Home Show

How to stick to your budget during a remodeling project By DAN DICLERICO

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

It’s one of the unwritten rules of remodeling that a project will always cost more and take longer than expected. But just because this is the norm, you don’t have to take it as a given. With the right combination of planning, discipline and smart shopping, your renovation can end on budget and ahead of schedule. Here’s how to get there: Build a cushion. Hidden surprises, including structural damage behind walls and outdated electrical, are the biggest remodeling budget busters. Building a 10 to 15 percent cushion into your initial budget will help cover these unforeseens. Involving your contractor early in the process also helps set a realistic budget. While they can’t see through walls, they might be able to do a pre-inspection of the house to spot potential problem areas. A spongy bathroom floor, for example, is a sure sign of water damage. Getting your contractor on board early will also stop you from falling in love with a design that’s way beyond your budget. Negotiate upfront. Most contractors are willing to haggle over the price of the job. That’s especially true if they know you’ll turn into a repeat customer, so if you have additional projects in mind, be sure to share that information upfront. Getting bids from multiple contractors will increase your bargaining power. You should also check HomeAdvisor’s True Cost Guide to get a handle on the current market rate for a given project. As with any deal-making, the more information you have, the stronger your position will be.

Stick to the plan. It’s often said that the four most expensive words in home remodeling are “while we’re at it.” If you’re intent on sticking to the budget, you must resist the urge to change the design plan after the work is underway. The more detailed the design, the easier this will be. Avoid a lot of “allowances” in the written contract, basically blank spaces that your contractor will fill out later, say for light fixtures or flooring materials. It’s easy to underestimate how much these items will cost. Do some of the work yourself. DIY can help control project costs. Just be sure to make it part of the initial negotiations with your contractor. Low-impact prep work is ideal, say tearing up carpets or taking away old cabinets. Unless you’re an experienced DIYer, think twice about taking a sledgehammer to walls. The work is messy and backbreaking, plus you run the risk of damaging load-bearing walls or buried plumbing and electrical lines. At the back end of the project, finish painting is a great project to tackle yourself. Doing so could shave a few percentage points off the total budget. Go bargain hunting. Salvage yards and secondhand stores can be great sources for inexpensive remodeling wares, from fireplace surrounds to bathroom vanities. There are even retailers that sell entire kitchen sets (cabinets, countertops, appliances and more) that have been carefully removed from high-end residences. On a major project, like a gut kitchen renovation, the measure could save you tens of thousands of dollars. But making used materials fit your space will present design and installation challenges, so it’s important to work with an architect and contractor with the right skill set and experience.

When should you splurge for the best materials? By PAUL F.P. POGUE ANGIE’S LIST

You get what you pay for, as the saying goes, and there are some areas where you shouldn’t skimp on quality — building materials and contractor services, for example. When you cut corners in important areas, you’ll typically end up paying a lot more in the long run. You might have higher operating costs, have to pay extra to fix the mistakes made the first time around or replace something years before you should have to. Insulation. Properly insulating your home improves comfort, increases energy efficiency and reduces heating and cooling costs. According to the Energy Star program, 9 out of 10 American homes are under-insulated, so this is an easy way to boost efficiency. Aim for the highest R value achievable within your budget. Caulk. Less expensive caulking materials aren’t as flexible as higher-quality options, and they typically won’t adhere to surfaces for as long. For a lasting result, use the best possible caulk for the job. The higher quality makes a big difference; premium caulk can last 10 times longer than cheaper options. Windows. Windows are expensive and labor-intensive. You also don’t tend to replace them for many years after you install them. So, this is a job you definitely want to get done right the first time. Choose the most efficient windows you can afford specific to your climate. You can cut heating and cooling costs by as much as 33 percent by paying extra for low-e storm windows. Paint. Not all paints are created equal. Lower-quality paint tends to fade faster and require more volume for coverage than higherquality options, particularly in highly saturated colors. This is one area in which the benefit is immediately obvious. Economy-grade paint may require 2 to 3 additional coats to achieve the same effect. Roof replacement. Roofing is one of the biggest and most expensive jobs you’ll do on your house, and the consequences of a poor roofing job can be catastrophic. So, hire a reputable roofing contractor to install the best quality product you can afford. Also, higher quality materials generally have longer warranties, sometimes 50 years or more, so you’ll likely only have to pay for this project once. Kitchen appliances. You’ll be putting appliances through heavy use for years, especially the bigger ones like a refrigerator or oven. Higher-end models are likely to last much longer, and you’ll get a longer warranty. Space matters, too. You might save a few bucks by reducing the storage space of a fridge or the usable area of an oven, but over the years you might regret the small savings at the cost of convenience.

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