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AUGUST 22, 2019 ISSUE 26.34

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE BUILDING BLOCKS

BUILDING

?

BOON

MUNICIPALITY NOT IMMUNE TO THE PERILS OF A HOT CONSTRUCTION MARKET

16

VAN LIFERS

Young people face

barriers in Whistler

22

CHILDCARE

Competition for placement

has people camping overnight to register

60

MUSIC LEGEND

Buffy Sainte-Marie

reflects on her remarkable career


NATURE IS AT YOUR DOORSTEP

Photo Credit: Tourism Whistler

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MALLORY JENSEN LUCY LIVING TREVOR CAMP

NADIJA VEACH MAYUMI ONISHI

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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

40

60

32 Building boon? Municipality not immune to the perils of a hot construction market. - By Alison Taylor

16

VAN LIFERS

Young people face barriers when trying

40

JOY FOR JOHANSSON

After a trying two

to “survive and thrive” in Whistler, prompting one van-dweller to voice her

years, Sweden’s Emil Johansson revels in victory at Red Bull Joyride after

concerns in a letter to council.

edging Canada’s Brett Rheeder.

26

NO DUMPING

The Pemberton Wildlife Association

54

GONE SOLO

Whistler artist Jenny Judge moved away

is calling on the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District to follow through on

from glass to explore plaster in her new solo show—and it earned her a

the development of an illegal dumping strategy.

spot as a finalist for a national art prize, too.

28

60 MUSIC LEGEND

SNOW SAFETY

While helicopter skiing may have

Singer-songwriter Buffy

had a reputation of being a bit sketchy back in the 1970s, a new report

Sainte-Marie talks about her long and storied career ahead of her

shows safety has improved dramatically since then.

first show in Whistler.

COVER I am very thankful and appreciative of the groundbreaking work the Whistler Housing Association (WHA) has done over the past few decades. Happy to see that while not perfect and certainly challenging, the WHA is still doing its best to address our never-ending housing crisis. - By Jon Parris 4 AUGUST 22, 2019


OP EN

CONSTRUCTION

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4330 Northlands Blvd Whistler, BC V8E 1C2

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Thank you Whistler for your patience as our renovation continues. We will begin replacing the roof, which is scheduled to be completed the end of October. During this time the store access will be redirected with a clear alternative path. Please note that we may look closed but we are still open with regular hours. We’re building an exciting new place to shop, to explore and to discover. More than that, we are creating a community-gathering place. Come discover what’s amazing and delicious in a place where everyone’s invited to experience great fresh foods. FRESH ST. MARKET STORE LEADER,

Mark Ball


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns #103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

08 OPENING REMARKS With the election landscape a real challenge heading into October’s federal election, it is more important than ever for voters to get informed.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letter writers this week weigh in on fiscal responsibility, how generous Nesters is to local charities, and changes Vail Resorts has made to its $400-for-$500 gift card.

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Growing up in Kamloops, writer Joel Barde was obsessed with mountain biking. During Crankworx, he rekindled his love affair with two wheels.

94 MAXED OUT Max, who was a victim of the Telus webmail meltdown this week, takes some time to

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

answer his mail.

Sales Coordinator JO JANCZAK - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca

Environment & Adventure

Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

30 ECOLOGIC Leslie Anthony is staggered by the number of hair elastics he finds in the environment. It’s

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

31 THE OUTSIDER Writer Vince Shuley comments on the shocking suspected sabotage of the Sea to

like two invisible armies had a hair-tie war all around us. The war is over, but the spent ammo remains.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

Sky Gondola on Aug. 10.

38 TRAVEL Len Rutledge takes on an amazing tour of some of the U.S.’s national parks in the West, a trip he found awe-inspiring.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

50 VELOCITY PROJECT Lisa Richardson meets up with adaptive climber Craig DeMartino and learns that adaptation is the skill set most needed for the approaching future.

52 EPICURIOUS The seventh annual Whistler Village Beer Festival will feature twice as many events as last year when it returns to the resort from Sept. 9 to 15.

56 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW This week, our columnist Feet Banks reveals how you can have your taco and eat it too. Plus, he weighs in on Ready or Not, the new thriller opening on Friday.

58 MUSEUM MUSINGS Though built as a fishing lodge, Rainbow Lodge was a destination for more than eager fishermen in the 1950s, as it was a popular resort for honeymooners.

62 PIQUECAL This Monday, head down to Creekside to catch an outdoor screening of family favourite E.T. as part of the Whistler Film Festival’s Summer Cinema Series.

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OPENING REMARKS

Canada’s peril WE ARE TWO MONTHS out from a federal election and locally, we don’t yet have candidates from the Liberal or NDP parties. For the Green Party we have Dana Taylor; there’s Gabrielle Loren for the Conservatives; and Robert (Doug) Bebb for the People’s Party of Canada. Sigh. Canada is not perfect—there is much we can improve as we head into another election. But honestly, I am the only one feeling this election is like being Sisyphus?

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

On our national agenda, we still have the ongoing development of the Alberta tarsands and the pipeline expansions that seem to go with it (Hello! Climate change— isn’t it time for political parties to stop

that Canada’s Prime Minter Justin Trudeau violated the Conflict of Interest Act by improperly pressuring former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to halt the criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin, to feel heavy hearted as a voter. This stinging finding is clearly damaging to the Liberals as we head toward the Oct. 21 election. It is, after all, the second time Trudeau has run afoul of conflict of interest. In 2017, Mary Dawson, the former ethics commissioner, found Trudeau had contravened four sections of the Conflict of Interest Act when he and his family went on vacation to a private island in the Bahamas owned by the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of Ismaili Muslims. Trudeau apologized then, but not now. This time, he said he was protecting Canadian jobs—and while that is a powerful election message for any politician, it’s not going to be enough heading into this election. The Liberals were elected, after all, on a platform of promising to do things

As I see it, the only thing that might make the electorate swallow its distaste and vote Liberal is the lack of options for where to place votes. Maybe this will be the Green Party of Canada’s opportunity?

kowtowing to big business?), the logging of old-growth forests (more kowtowing), broken promises on electoral reform, continued deficits ($19.8 billion in this fiscal year) and the many questionable positions of those leading our political parties at the federal level to contend with. One only has to consider the SNCLavalin affair, especially in light of last week’s finding by Canada’s ethics watchdog

1 BEDROOM WHISTLER VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE 44-4388 Northlands Blvd Upgraded 1 bedroom townhome in the popular Glaciers Reach complex in Whistler Village. Walk to ski lifts, restaurants and shops. This two level home features open concept kitchen and living room area, gas fireplace and 2 private decks to relax on after a day on the slopes. The complex features pool, hot tub, exercise room and underground parking. Unlimited owner use permitted with nightly rental option.

differently. Canada was sick of a Stephen Harper Conservative government that centralized power with a leader, and had little room for Parliament. Trudeau’s actions in SNC-Lavalin, which exceeded the parameters of his office in trying to influence a decision that melded politics and business, are damning. As I see it, the only thing that might make the electorate swallow its distaste and

vote Liberal is the lack of options for where to place votes. Maybe this will be the Green Party of Canada’s opportunity? For this reason, and a few others, this election is unlikely to be a run-of-the-mill affair. It is possible that it will be an election focused on issues rather than leaders. Thanks to the credibility-defying scandals that have come out of the White House since President Donald Trump’s election, voters seem to be able to partition scandals and their choice of leaders. Are we becoming desensitized to immoral and perhaps even unlawful behaviour in our leaders? There are always constants in the issuesledger on Election Day—jobs, healthcare, security. But this election, I believe, sees climate change near the top. Let’s not forget the Liberals bought a pipeline for $4.5 billion in 2015, a decision that seems to make a mockery of Canada’s climate change goals. However, Trudeau’s Liberals continue to say they believe global warming poses a direct threat to Canada and to the planet. And they are demanding that the provinces put a price on carbon emissions, or Ottawa will do it for them. Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives, on the other hand, believe that taxing carbon is a burden on consumers and business. Canada’s contribution to global warming is minuscule, he said, arguing that there are better, less-fiscally damaging ways to reduce emissions. This election is likely to also offer up a good dose of negative advertising across all mediums. And why not? It appeals to voters’ emotions as opposed to rational thought— and that may be a safer ploy that asking us to consider who to vote for on a rational basis (few good choices there). Our federal electoral landscape is a challenge, and that means now more than ever that voters need to get informed and cast a ballot. n

en Op m ite -4p u y S pm pla un 1 Dis & S t Sa

A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Fiscal responsibility at municipal hall

new role ends in early 2021. Also, though South Base is listed as one of several possible areas for development in Whistler Blackcomb’s Master Development Agreement, there are no plans to expand there at this time, and if plans were put in place, public consultation would take place, according to Whistler Blackcomb.]

Has this term become an “oxymoron” of sorts? In October of 2018, the majority of candidates running for election spoke of fiscal responsibility and “transparency” in government decisions at municipal hall. Is it only me who is shocked to see that current Chief Administrative Officer Mike Furey has been appointed into a newly created role as Chief of Strategic Policy and Partnerships? You might have missed that in the July 25, 2019 announcement if you were away on summer vacation. I would like to know what the criteria is for “creating” this new position, and more importantly, what justifies the salary, which I understand is going to be more than $250,000. There are five newly appointed and very capable individuals on the newly created Strategic Planning Committee at the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW). Do they really require a “Chief?” Mayor Crompton stated: “Council, as we consider the large work plan that we have in front of us and the tremendous amount of the high number of strategic and important projects that we have to take on, thought this was a great way to get that important work

Big thanks to Nesters Big kudos and thanks to Bruce Stewart from Nesters Market for his faithful devotion to funding local charities through the points program. After more than 10 years of receiving points and dollars from Nesters Market through local points donations, we also wish to thank the hundreds of locals who donated their Nesters points to facilitate the construction of playgrounds for children in war-torn areas of the world. There are thousands of children playing and having fun thanks to our local grocery shoppers! We have the ultimate playground here in Whistler, and the generosity of locals and Nesters enabled us to export some of our play to kids around the world. Keith Reynolds // Founder, Playground Builders Foundation

to come with the expansion of municipal boundaries at the “South Base” during the Official Community Plan open house/ community engagement sessions? Those who attended asked questions about future growth in our community and concerns about future development. I didn’t hear one word about the “South Base” ... did you? Dawn Titus // Whistler

done, and to provide a strong transition at CAO (see “Whistler’s top staffer Mike Furey to take new role with RMOW,” Pique, Aug. 1). That leaves residents to understand that mayor and council—who all stated that “fiscal responsibility” and transparency at municipal hall were major issues they would address— made this decision in unison. Am I the only one who would like to hear some definitive explanation for the need for this new position at the RMOW? Speaking of transparency: did anyone else hear anything about the major developments

Function(al) Junction On behalf of the Whistler Chamber of Commerce, we’d like to thank [mayor, council and staff] for the work completed on the pedestrian pathways in Function Junction.

[Editor’s Notes: Furey will continue on the same terms as his current contract, which amounts to $246,042 in total remuneration, until his

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10 AUGUST 22, 2019

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LOCAL AGENTS

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ph: 604-935-3380

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 318 G2 HORSTMAN HOUSE We appreciate the RMOW’s willingness to consult with the Function Junction stakeholders and the Chamber to see the completion of Phase 1 and 2 at the beginning of the summer. The Alpha Lake Road reduced speed, at-grade pedestrian pathway, the relocation of the two bus stops, new flashing light crosswalks and traffic-calming curbs are all significant

Relations to purchase the $400-for-$500 gift card. This passholder perk had been removed by Vail Resorts in 2017 and was re-instated in 2018. I believe that the return of this benefit may have been the result of customer pushback. In years past, the $400-for-$500 [card] could be used towards the purchase of seasonlong programs, i.e. Max Four, etc. This is no

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improvements to the safety and functionality of travel in the Function Junction area. We look forward to consulting with the RMOW to develop Phase 3 plans to bring additional creative improvements and continue the good work that has been done. Melissa Pace // CEO Whistler Chamber

Vail giveth and Vail taketh away Recently, I called Whistler Blackcomb Guest

longer the case, effectively increasing the price of these programs by 20 per cent. Guest Relations suggested that I contact Guest Communications via email to inquire about this change in policy, which I did. As a caveat, I was told that I was not the only one voicing concern with the change. Guest Communications responded with the following: “I’m very sorry to hear you are affected by the new rule change with the pass holder gift

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card and thank you for taking the time to send me your feedback. Hearing from our guests helps us assess what improvements we can make to achieve our goal of consistently providing an unmatched experience for our guests.” Since the purchase of Whistler Blackcomb by Vail Resorts, there has been a consistent erosion of passholder perks. The Parent Pass, while re-instated, has been grandfathered, available only to past holders of the pass; the Buddy Passes now are purchased at 50 per cent, etc. As stated previously, Vail Resorts speaks to “making improvements to achieve our goal of consistently providing an unmatched experience for our guests.” May I suggest: “A thousand words will not leave so deep an impression as one deed,” as Henrik Ibsen said. Nancy Forrest // Whistler

Dust blows, but it’ll be worth it As a resident of Downtown Pemberton, my condo facing the community barn has been affected by the dust during the construction. I empathize with Mark Mendonca about the cleaning (see “Pemberton businesses deal with a dusty summer,” Pique, Aug. 16). I have decided to close my windows more than I’d like to in order to keep the dust at bay. While it is inconvenient, I have actually been impressed by the contractor (Hazelwood’s) diligence with dust-mitigation efforts by watering the streets regularly. It can’t be an easy job, but it’ll be worth it

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in the end and I believe the inconveniences will be forgotten in time. Go Pemberton! Jay Cyr // Pemberton

Grateful for wonderful medical services Many thanks to the amazing paramedics and all the doctors, nurses and staff of the Whistler Health Care Centre and the Lions Gate Hospital who attended to me [following

“It can’t be an easy job, but it’ll be worth it in the end and I believe the inconveniences will be forgotten in time. Go Pemberton!” - JAY CYR

a bike accident near Hydro Hill on Aug. 8]. Your kindness and efficiency were most appreciated. Also, thanks to the Wangs of Vancouver for contacting the ambulance and to Liz and her husband from Cincinnati for waiting with me until the arrival of the ambulance. Whistlerites are very fortunate to have such wonderful medical services. Ian Johnson // Whistler n

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Cheakamus Community Forest (CCF) – Forest Manager position The CCF is seeking an individual or qualified firm to act as the Community Forest Manager on a contract basis. This involves taking a lead role on community relations, harvesting planning, operations, reporting, working with various stakeholders on the CCF’s Carbon Project and managing fuel thinning within the CCF’s boundaries. We are specifically seeking someone with the following skills and qualifications: • • • • •

Significant knowledge of the Whistler, Squamish and Lil’wat communities. Significant knowledge of the land base, uses and tenure holders within the CCF boundaries Ability to work with a broad variety of stakeholders. Understanding of fuel reduction practices. Registered Professional Forester or Registered Forest Technician preferred.

The CCF is a partnership between the Resort Municipality of Whistler, Lil’wat Nation and Squamish Nation operating a community forest tenure on 33,000 hectares with a 21,000m3 AAC near Whistler, BC. The forest manager reports to the Board of Directors and is assisted by an administrator. www.cheakamuscommunityforest.com Send a cover letter and resume to hberesford@whistler.ca by 4:30 p.m., September 9, 2019. Thanks to all who apply, only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Cheakamus Community Forest 4325 Blackcomb Way Whistler BC V8E 0X5 Attn: Heather Beresford – Environmental Manager hberesford@whistler.ca

12 AUGUST 22, 2019


PIQUE’N YER INTEREST

How mountain biking has changed in the past 15 years GROWING UP in Kamloops, I was obsessed with mountain biking. Along with a handful of close friends, I took full advantage of the freedom the sport

BY JOEL BARDE jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com

gave me, building dirt jumps and spending countless hours exploring seemingly endless singletrack. At the time, it felt like Kamloops was at the epicentre of the nascent freeride movement, with homegrown pros like Wade Simmons and eye-catching coverage in Bike and the Kranked series. But in Grade 11, I moved to West Vancouver, where I stopped riding altogether. I didn’t take to the trails, with their elevated, janky bridges and wet, treacherous rock sections. Without my pals to push me, I lost interest altogether. At the invitation of CamelBak, I recently spent two days riding—a day on the Lost Lake trails and one in the bike park—getting reacquainted with the sport.

A few things, it turns out, have changed over the past few years. And at the risk of stating some all-tooobvious conclusions, here’s what sticks out: • New bikes are fun to ride uphill. To my surprise, Lost Lake has some phenomenal trails, and I was surprised at how well the new enduro bikes climb. The bike I was on, a 2018 Norco Range, was incredibly efficient

Enduro bikes are built well and sturdy enough to take on serious terrain. • The media landscape has been turned on its head. From what I recall of my teenage years biking, the majority of magazine coverage seemed about five years behind what people were into, full of spandex-clad cross-country riders riding rocks in Moab. Pinkbike was new

At the time, it felt like Kamloops was at the epicentre of the nascent freeride movement, with homegrown pros like Wade Simmons and eye-catching coverage in Bike and the Kranked series.

going over rocks and roots—and dropper seat posts are a revelation. • Freeriding won out. There was always a gulf between cross-country riders (“uphillers”) and downhillers. Technical advancement has shrunk it, allowing cross-country riders to take on lines that would have previously been inconceivable.

and cool. But the idea that there would be something as progressive and interesting as Freehub Magazine—an elegantly designed publication that combines mountain biking, art, and beer—was implausible. • Mountain biking is cool—or at least cooler. As much as I loved riding, I was

resigned to the fact that it didn’t have the cachet of skateboarding, snowboarding or even hockey. It was niche, slightly nerdy, and the clothes were, well, kind of weird. (Roach shorts, anyone?). • There are way, way more female riders. I can’t think of any girls in my age group who rode back in the day. Now women are ripping, with filmmakers Anne Cleary and Lacy Kemp making an excellent debut into the Dirt Diaries that put it on display. • Trails are gnarlier. I remember riding Dirt Merchant and A-Line. There is now no way—in hell—that you would catch me on either. The jumps are HUGE. • The riding has progressed by leaps and bounds. I can vividly recall seeing a local sponsored rider throw a 360 over a dirt jump in Sun Peaks. At the time, it was the sickest trick that any of us had seen. At Joyride, I watched a contingent of riders pull tricks that would have seemed unimaginable. Simply bonkers. Getting back on a bike, after so long, was a great feeling. And it seemed like everyone I spoke to said something similar, remarking, “You live in Whistler, and you don’t have a mountain bike?” I didn’t have a good answer. But with any luck, next year they won’t be asking. n

AUGUST 22, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE driver to downside tailwhip into a 450 step-through and a 360 tailwhip.

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION

FOOD BANK

Beginning in September the Food Bank will have a new open day. Wednesdays from 10:00 am to noon.

(Monday will no longer be open food bank day)

At its Aug. 13 meeting, Whistler council received yet another letter from a visitor urging the municipality to change the name of Squaw Valley Crescent. Though the Creekside street, like many other local roads, is named after a past Olympic host city, the concerned letter writer pointed out that the term “squaw” is an ethnic and sexual slur historically used for Indigenous women. So what did our followers have to say when asked whether they thought the street should be renamed? Though many replied, no, they think the street should keep its current name, one argues, “Yes, for all kinds of good reasons.” Other responses stated:

“Are local First Nations people offended by it? If so, then bring them into the conversation to change it. If not, it’s yet another case of white people stepping in when they’re not needed.”

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“I am a local member within Lil’wat—I am NOT offended but... yes, I think some of our elders and community members will be. In the 70’s & 80’s, we have (or I have) heard this word used to me at school. So at one point I hated the word, but now I’m over it because I know who I am. Some, yes, will still be offended by it.”

“I have done research. I feel like it should be changed. I live on the street. Often when I have to say the name of my street to people, they repeat back to me: Squaw (in an I-can’t-believe-that tone)? It’s embarrassing!” “The things that people choose to be offended by and then the things people ignorantly put up with. It’s truly unfortunate.”

OF INTEREST

10

31 The percentage of teens in Sea to Sky, 15 years and up, who have vaped in the last 30 days. The provincial average is 21 per cent.

DID YOU KNOW?

Though built as a fishing lodge, Rainbow Lodge was a destination for more than eager fishermen. With its location on Alta Lake relatively easy to access, though still feeling remote in the 1950s, it was a popular resort for honeymooners looking to escape life in the city. The newlyweds were met at Rainbow Lodge by Alec and Audrey Greenwood, who had bought the lodge from the Philips in 1948. Some were assigned to Cabin 11 for their stay, and time was spent boating on Alta Lake and hiking.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

In this issue from five years ago, writer Cathryn Atkinson investigates the reclamation of Squamish Nation culture through their relationship with their traditional canoes. In the feature, Atkinson learns about the Tribal Journey that year, which saw a Qatuwas or “People Gathering Together Festival” from July 13 to 18. The response was great with dozens of canoes eventually arriving in Bella Bella with over 1,000 “pullers” (as the canoeists are called), while about 5,000 other visitors reached the village overland. Some participants travelled on their own paddle power for weeks to get there. n WOMAD

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NEWS WHISTLER

Young people face barriers when looking for ways to ‘survive and thrive’ in Whistler VAN DWELLER WRITES LETTER TO COUNCIL ASKING FOR CHANGE

BY BRADEN DUPUIS AS AN AVID CLIMBER and outdoor enthusiast, it made sense to Alexa Caswell to “downsize” her life and live minimally in her customized, off-grid RV. Since January, Caswell and her partner have been travelling North America in search of adventure—but it wasn’t until they arrived in Whistler in May that they started running afoul of parking bylaws. “We’ve travelled a lot over the last eight or nine months, and this is the only place that we’ve had this kind of difficulty parking,” Caswell said. “We’ve met so many other people living in RVs, living in vans, that can’t afford housing, or just don’t want that lifestyle, which is our situation, but there’s no reasonable place to do it permanently.” Instead, Whistler’s resident van-lifers spend their time lot-hopping, or parking outside of town and driving in to work, which to Caswell seems unnecessary. “There’s a lot of unused space in Whistler that could be home to these people, but instead we spend our lives basically running from bylaw,” she said. “So to me the solution is to find a spot where we’re out of the public eye—the wealthy people that vacation here don’t Alexa Caswell and her partner have been living in their customized, off-grid RV since January, but never had much trouble with parking bylaws until they arrived in Whistler.

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16 AUGUST 22, 2019

have to look at us, but we can still live and live affordably … and have time off.” Overnight parking is allowed in Day Lots 1 to 5 from April 1 to October 31 (for a maximum of 24 hours), but camping in vehicles is prohibited. The fine for “illegal camping” is $100 a night. The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) issued 451 tickets for camping or living in a vehicle in 2016, 314 in 2017, 904 in 2018, and 335 to date in 2019. The RMOW said the bylaw helps to reduce wildlife attractants in the lots, and the increase in recent years is due to “additional enforcement resources” being allocated due to the threat of wildfire and wildlife. “Wildlife attractants are the municipality’s chief concern with illegal camping, and Bylaw Services has zero tolerance for wildlife attractants,” an RMOW spokesperson said in an email. “The public is welcome to camp in designated areas such as Riverside Resort, Whistler RV Park and Campground, Cal-check Recreation Site and Nairn Falls.” To Caswell, that reasoning doesn’t hold up. “If the issue is food, then why is overnight parking legal, but overnight camping is illegal?” she said. “That has nothing to do with bears, that has everything to do with you not wanting people to set up camp permanently, because it looks bad, right? “I’d rather [they] just be honest and say, ‘we’re trying to uphold an image here, and you don’t fit well into that,’ because I understand that. But don’t [do it] under this guise of, ‘oh you attract bears.’”

The two campgrounds closest to Whistler charge monthly rates that are almost equal to what one would pay in rent, she added, and the others (which they do make use of from time to time) are not near any bus routes. In a letter to council on June 15, Caswell called the parking bylaws “unjust and discriminatory” towards van-dwellers, who are often young members of the working class. Caswell and her partner work three jobs between the two of them, and while they could afford housing in Whistler if they could find it, they would have no money left over. “We would have no other money left, just like everybody else in Whistler. You’re not here to make money, right? … But not everybody who’s living this way can,” she said. “So I think there’s a lot of barriers for people to live in Whistler—financially mainly—and so when you make sleeping in your vehicle illegal, you’re saying it’s illegal to live in poverty or low income, which is discriminatory.” There are a lot of factors at play when talking about barriers for young people in Whistler, said Jackie Dickinson, executive director of the Whistler Community Services Society (WCSS). “I think, in any community, it’s important for us to realize that young people that are entering the workforce and visiting our community are coming with some higher levels of school debt and financial debt due to high costs of education, and so they’re looking for ways to thrive and

survive in communities,” she said. “I think that people may choose [the van-life] over living in conditions that sometimes prove to be unsafe, unhealthy or unaffordable.” A landlord/tenant relationship is a business, she added, “and it’s important to understand that, but what cost does that relationship have on the wellbeing and health of our community if we are charging people beyond what they can responsibly and logically afford?” she said. “So if it’s more than 30 to 35 per cent of their income a month, we’re going to see this community struggle, and then we’re going to see more barriers to us as a whole community thriving.” Those who are struggling financially see knock-on effects in other areas of their lives, most notably in their mental health—a conversation happening with more frequency at WCSS. “We’re hearing from employers [about] higher rates of mental health issues, and even mental health emergencies, as our housing challenges have become more difficult in the community,” Dickinson said. ‘We’re having a lot of employers reach out to us and say, ‘how can I help my employees?’” Many employers are now going “above and beyond” what they’ve traditionally done to retain and support their staff, “but there’s definitely barriers,” she said. Dickinson said she was encouraged to hear Mayor Jack Crompton tell a crowd of recent arrivals during welcome week last

SEE PAGE 17

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BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE THE RESORT Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) remains focused on lowering its emissions, the technology isn’t quite there to facilitate a wholesale change in the municipal vehicle fleet. Of 250 total pieces of equipment in the RMOW fleet, only 10 run on alternative fuels, while a further 32 per cent of the fleet could be switched to electric today. “If we were to replace everything tomorrow, that we could, with electric or hybrid vehicles, we could replace up to 31 total,” said central services supervisor Paul Klein, in a presentation to the Committee of the Whole on Aug. 13. The RMOW needs to be sure of the reliability of new technology as it sources new vehicles—which has been a challenge in the past for many municipalities, including Whistler, Klein said. “We’ve brought in equipment at the front of industry … all excited that we’ve got this great piece of electric equipment, and then found out that it doesn’t do the job, we don’t have the infrastructure. It’s a challenge,” he said. “So we’ve learned from those, and look to do a lot more investigation before we make that purchase.” The RMOW’s 2019 fleet replacement budget is $3.26 million, bolstered by the purchase of a new fire engine and replacement of three five-ton plow trucks (the 2020 budget is currently set at $1.45 million, followed by $880,000 in 2021).

The vehicle replacement planning process starts in August, and includes a detailed review of all “replacement candidates,” Klein said. “We’re looking for that optimum economic point of replacement,” he said. “So just before that vehicle starts costing us too much, but at the same time holding some of that residual value, so when we do auction it we’re getting something back.” The RMOW has three options for vehicles nearing the end of their lifespan: defer, replace or repurpose (like in the case of a 2011 F150 crew cab, which was repurposed last year to be used by Whistler’s FireSmart crew). “We thought this was a great idea to try and just put this off for another year, and let (FireSmart) have it,” Klein said. “So it deferred FireSmart from having to purchase a brand new vehicle, and it also provided them something to get around town in, and it’s been completely reliable so far this year.” Diesel fuel consumption was up last year (195,041 litres from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 compared to 183,271 from July 2017 to June 2018) but down from the 206,000 litres burned over the same period in 2016-17. “Our major consumption is done in the winter, so it really is dependent on our climate how much we burn,” Klein said. “We’ve had a couple of pretty good winters, so I think we’ve done a good job of mandating that we reduce how much we’re idling vehicles, where we’re using

SEE PAGE 20

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BARRIERS FROM PAGE 16 year that, the day they arrive in Whistler, they should consider themselves locals. “I think those messages are really powerful and they need to continue, because I think people instantly need to feel a sense of belonging,” she said. “If they don’t … they’re going to feel that the place they live in is not a good place to live, and then they might confront challenges within their workplace, or be viewed as just someone who arrives here and leaves here—almost like a form of currency, in a way.” That conviction is one Crompton said he holds deeply. “Because you’ve lived here for 30 years doesn’t give you any special or unique access to community. Whistler is a place that welcomes people regardless of how long your tenure is,” he said. “I agree that affordability is critical for an effective community. It’s something that we’re attuned to, and focused on addressing.”

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5638 ALTA LAKE ROAD That said, creating a designated spot for van-dwellers isn’t something the RMOW is considering, he added. “I would say Whistler has just completed an extremely thorough public engagement while reviewing our [Official Community Plan],” he said. “Our community broadly supports focusing our attention on delivering permanent, safe housing for Whistlerites.” For Caswell, the goal with writing her letter to council was simply to start a discussion. “Right now, it’s this counter culture— we’re just doing it anyway, and finding ways around it, but no one’s really doing anything about it … I honestly think a lot of the goals are common, but if nobody from the two parties talk then nothing’s ever going to change,” she said. “And we’re not going to be here forever— no one is … that’s just not Whistler, but I would love to be part of starting a change so that it’s easier for other people.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 17 them, how we’re using them … so I think efficiencies are being gained as well.” Unleaded gasoline use was also up year over year: from 162,951 litres to 173,442. “The more that we bring on these alternative fuel vehicles, we start to see those numbers get affected, but it’s going to take some time with numbers that big, and the pieces of equipment that we’re able to change,” Klein said. “Fleet management is one of the largest costs to any organization, so a fiscal responsibility, training, planning, and an eye on advancing technology paves the way to success for this program.”

CROSS CONNECTION CONTROL BYLAW GETS FIRST THREE READINGS A bylaw aiming to further prevent backflow from private water systems into the RMOW’s potable water supply system received first three readings on Aug. 13. The cross connection control bylaw, as it’s called, builds on a municipal program of the same name first introduced in 2013. A cross connection refers to any potential water connection between the potable water supply system and a potential source of non-potable water contamination or pollution. Through its cross connection control program, the RMOW has achieved 90 per

cent compliance from the community, said engineering technologist Luke O’BeirneKelly, in a presentation to council. “It’s highly unlikely we’ll get to that 100-per-cent level unless we have a bylaw in place that provides additional incentive for consumers to put in the forward planning and budgeting required to get these more complex instalments put in place,” O’Beirne-Kelly said. The bylaw prohibits anyone from creating a cross connection that could contaminate the water system; requires the consumer to control every cross connection on a premises or facility; and requires approved backflow prevention assemblies to be inspected and tested at least once every 12 months. “Essentially it allows us to enforce our cross connection control program,” O’Beirne-Kelly said, adding that the bylaw will be implemented in a phased approach to address high-risk hazards first. “The bylaw has clear timelines that dictate the expectation of when to have their backflow preventer installed and when to have them tested,” he said. “It also gives us the ability to work with consumers who are facing forward planning and budgeting constraints to make an agreed timeline for when they can have this installed.” While the bylaw only concerns industrial, commercial and institutional facilities, residential properties may be considered down the line.

Central services supervisor Paul Klein provides an update on the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s vehicle fleet at the Aug. 13 Committee of the Whole meeting.

FLEET MANAGEMENT

PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

DVP APPROVED FOR ELECTRONIC SIGNS AT WHISTLER BLACKCOMB Council approved Development Variance Permits for electronic signs at three Whistler Blackcomb (WB) locations at its Aug. 13 meeting: one each at Skier’s Plaza, in the Upper Village and at Creekside. “The proposed sign design is essentially three sections of LED display that would be combined and housed in a black steel framework,” said planning analyst Tracy Napier in a presentation to council. “The total dimensions are about 2.8

metres wide by 32 centimetres high, which means a total screen area of less than one square metre.” Electronic projection signs, defined as those projected from an electronically modulated optical device such as a liquid crystal projector onto any surface in view of the general public, are prohibited in Whistler. The WB signs will operate from 6:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and will display information about weather conditions and lift status to guests. “We didn’t find that there would be any negative impacts from the proposed signs, as they will only operate in the daytime, they will only display static text information, the information would be only related to safety and advisories related to on-hill conditions, and they’ll have no advertisements or moving imagery of any kind,” Napier said. Ski areas are probably the “most dynamic tourism entity” to operate, said Councillor Arthur De Jong, who is also WB’s mountain planning and environmental resource manager. “In WB’s case, we’re moving 20,000 people a day through three different climactic zones, massive alpine zones frequently pounded by pacific storms changing the operating parameters— sometimes by the minute,” he said. “So to have the capacity to communicate to our guests to the minute on what is happening is very helpful and appreciated.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Childcare concerns need to go higher up, stakeholders say FRUSTRATION ABOUNDS FOR WHISTLER PARENTS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE SOME Whistler parents remain frustrated with childcare options and a perceived lack of urgency at municipal hall, the issue expands far beyond Whistler, say local stakeholders. “It’s got to go bigger picture,” said Kari Gaudet, executive director at the Whistler Children’s Centre. “It’s definitely got to go bigger picture, and it’s the provincial government, it’s the federal government.” The lack of childcare options is exacerbated by staffing, housing, a lack of people going into the Early Childhood Educator (ECE) field, and licensing requirements, Gaudet said. “When it comes to the licensing requirements and people going into the field, those are provincial problems,” she said. “This isn’t a Whistler problem, this is a provincial problem, and essentially it’s a

federal problem as well, but it’s nothing to do with Whistler.” In more than two decades working in childcare, Gaudet said she’s seen different council members try to take the issue on. “They want to come and talk to me and learn about what could be done, and then they try a couple of things and they realize how quickly you hit a brick wall,” she said. “I think we just need to be talking to the higher ups.” The most recent bout of frustration stems from the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) Kids on the Go after-school program registration, which once again saw dozens of parents camping out overnight in the rain to get their kids a spot in the program. Lesley Clements said she lined up at Meadow Park Sports Centre at 1 a.m. on Aug. 10—the earliest she’s ever been there—and still ended up with No. 46, which secured her “about two thirds” of the spaces she needed. “My biggest beef is [that] this has been the third year in a row that I’ve had to stay up all night to register my kids for a fundamental

TENT CITY Dozens of parents lined up overnight in the rain on Aug. 10 to ensure their kids’ spots in Whistler’s Kids on the Go after-school care program—with varying levels of success.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

after-school program,” Clements said. “It just seems so archaic … The first person out there, he was there at like 2 o’ clock in the afternoon.” While she recognizes the challenges with finding ECEs (and housing them locally), Clements feels the issue deserves more focus. “More time and energy and money, definitely,” she said. “They put out a survey this summer to maybe implement things like, this coming year, where it’s like, this should have been done years ago, realizing that the community is growing at this specific age group, and we

need to provide for our long-term citizens that have been here for many years.” The RMOW said it undertook “several actions” in response to last year’s feedback, including moving the registration time from 9 a.m. to 6 a.m., working with other agencies and organizations to coordinate the release of after-school schedules (in advance of Kids on the Go registration), and to create two new after school programs through the Whistler Tennis Academy and Whistler Sport Legacies. Pay for program leaders was also

SEE PAGE 23

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NEWS WHISTLER

Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation fundraiser returning to Whistler after multi-year hiatus ‘WE’RE BACK FOR MENTAL HEALTH’ ON SEPT. 12 WILL FEATURE LIVE MUSIC, DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION

BY BRANDON BARRETT TWO OF B.C.’S biggest advocates for youth mental health are reviving a fundraiser for the Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation after a years-long hiatus from Whistler. Whistlerites Kerry and Ginny Dennehy, who launched the non-profit in 2001 following the suicide of their 17-year-old son, Kelty, are hosting “We’re Back for Mental Health” next month, the first major foundation fundraiser held in the resort in more than a decade. “We haven’t done anything since our last golf tournament in 2008, and we thought it was time to muster up some energy for another fundraiser. The idea was to do something a little different,” said Kerry. A supper-club concept that will include dancing and live music by Fabulous George and the Zodiacs and Juno Award-winning singer-songwriter Barney Bentall, the event will raise money for several ongoing programs at the foundation. The Dennehys have raised millions of dollars for youth mental health in the nearly two decades since the loss of their son, and in

2007, the Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre opened as part of Vancouver’s BC Children’s Hospital. Last fall, the centre also revamped its website—keltymentalhealth.ca—to be more user-friendly and features updated resources for youth, parents, caregivers, health professionals and school personnel, as well as information on mental health and substance use challenges that has been reviewed by clinical experts at BC Children’s Hospital.

Kerry also highlighted a new online therapy program being developed called Kelty’s Keys, which will connect youth to one of 38 trained psychologists. “First of all, it takes away the stigma by dealing with a psychologist online. You don’t have to go to the bricks and mortar of a psychologist’s office,” he said. “Young people are much more comfortable dealing online and it’s much more efficient, too,

because a psychologist can deal with four times as many people through these online programs as they can sitting in their office.” Online support programs are being developed for depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, post-partum depression and eating disorders, Kerry said. “I think you’re going to see [Vancouver

SEE PAGE 24

>>

CHILDCARE CONCERNS FROM PAGE 22 increased to $23.43 an hour, plus 12 per cent in lieu of benefits. There are currently 115 kids registered for Kids on the Go for the 2019-20 school year. While last year had 180 registered, the comparison isn’t “apples to apples,” a spokesperson said, as kids can join anytime throughout the year. Whistler Councillor Jen Ford—whose husband lined up at 10 p.m. to ensure spots for their five-year-old—noted that the provincial government has made some investments in childcare, but local officials need to “keep the pressure on.”

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With the annual Union of BC Municipalities convention set for Sept. 23 to 27 in Vancouver, the issue will likely be a hot topic. “I think there is a heightened awareness, because every community is feeling it,” said Ford, who oversees Whistler’s social services and regional cooperation portfolio. “We have strength in numbers when all of the communities are kind of singing the same tune, and saying we need to continue to commit to better care, better education, more available education for ECE teachers, so that we can get more and more people into the line of work, because

that’s certainly where it all stems from, is the availability of qualified staff.” With a federal election on Oct. 21, Ford said it’s important to keep the conversation going. And as for addressing the frustrations of local parents, it’s something the RMOW is always working on, she added “It was a tough registration. I know there were a lot of people out there all night long, and I know that it’s frustrating for families,” she said. “It is a really, really tough situation, and we continue to work on it, and we continue to make it better—hopefully.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Whistler women’s group relies on simple yet effective fundraising approach EACH MEMBER OF 100 WOMEN WHO CARE DONATES $100 QUARTERLY TO A DIFFERENT LOCAL CHARITY

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE NEWLY FORMED Whistler chapter of 100 Women Who Care met for the first time on May 29 at 7 p.m. in a ballroom of the Fairmont Chateau hotel. By 8 p.m., the group had already handed over a cheque for more than $11,000 to local charity Zero Ceiling. Founded by local Ashlie Girvan, 100 Women Whistler relies on a fundraising approach that is as simple as it is efficient: Every quarter, each of the group’s members—which now counts 117 local women—nominate a Sea to Sky charity they feel is worth donating to. Three organizations are randomly selected from that list and then asked to give a fiveminute presentation to the group. The women then vote for the charity they feel is most deserving, with each donating $100 to the cause. “It’s a one-hour commitment of your time, and $100 every quarter. It’s the simplicity of it,” Girvan said. Girvan got the idea for a Whistler chapter after learning of the 100 Who Care Alliance

from a friend in Vancouver. Started in 2006 by a Michigan woman who was looking for a quick and efficient way to raise money for local charities, 100 Women Who Care now counts more than 850 chapters worldwide, including offshoots such as 100 People Who Care, 100 Men Who Care and 100 Kids Who Care. There is also a 100 Women Squamish chapter. “We’re really lucky where we live that we are surrounded by so many strong and smart women,” Girvan said. “It’s not only a fundraising event but a networking event where strong women can come and be in a

room with likeminded women.” Zero Ceiling, a charity dedicated to reducing youth homelessness, was honoured to be 100 Women Whistler’s first fundraising recipient, said program and development officer Lizi McLoughlin. “[A hundred dollars] is not an outrageous ask of any one individual but it makes a really big impact,” she said. The $11,300 Zero Ceiling received is enough to support one of its Work 2 Live program participants for more than six months. The program houses up to eight

youth at a time, who spend a year in Whistler as a way to build a self-supported life. The local chapter now has its sights set on launching 100 Kids Whistler, with its first meeting set for Sept. 26. The concept is identical, except kids are asked to donate $10 every quarter, instead of $100. Those interested in joining either the kids’ or women’s chapter of the 100 Who Care Alliance can register at 100womenwhistler.com or by emailing Girvan at info@100womenwhistler.com. The next meeting is Aug. 28. n

YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH FROM PAGE 23 General Hospital] with the funding restrictions being so tight these days, that they need a more efficient way to deal with people—and many more people as well—so this is one area where the online therapy can be very effective,” he added. Whistler has long been a major booster of the Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation, and the organization has responded in turn by helping establish a range of supports for youth in resort schools.

“I think it was a big shot to the high school when Kelty took his life because he was so well known,” Kerry said. “It really focussed on the need to establish resources and programs for youth at a very young age. That’s why we’ve sent so many counsellors and therapists into the schools to train the teachers, the school counsellors and the principals and everything about how important it is to talk to everyone and spread the word that peer support is very important.

“To engrain this in the youth and the culture in every community, especially what we’ve tried to do in Whistler, it’s got to be ongoing. It’s crucial to recovery and the erasing of the stigma of it so people can talk openly.” We’re Back for Mental Health is set for Thursday, Sept. 12 at Buffalo Bills and includes a discussion about mental health, a silent auction and “other surprises,” Kerry said. Tickets are $50 and include dinner, available at thekeltyfoundation.org. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Naturespeak: Is that oil on the beach? BY KRISTINA SWERHUN WHILE THE WESTERN toad migration was on during the last month or so at Lost Lake, the nature interpretation team from the Whistler Museum had many questions about this amazing natural event. Countless people came to witness the tadpoles as they were emerging on the beach as tiny toads or “toadlets.” Keenly observant people were also asking about shallow water or small puddles with a rainbow sheen on them thinking they were harmful for the toads. Maybe you’ve also seen this rainbow sheen and thought it was a pollution problem, perhaps from sunscreen or some kind of motor oil. It may surprise you to hear that what you’re seeing is most likely harmless bacteria just doing what they naturally do. Iron bacteria, the most common bacteria contributing to this phenomenon, are common in iron-rich freshwater wetlands like those at Lost Lake. Every living thing needs energy to live and these microscopic bacteria use chemosynthesis (chemical reactions) instead of photosynthesis like

plants do. The bacteria oxidize dissolved iron and manganese for energy. The bacteria then secrete proteins and carbohydrates that form a biofilm—the proteins and carbohydrates are lined up end-to-end within sheathes and are stuck together side-by-side in rows on top of the water and refract sunlight. In other words, the bacteria eat iron and poop out a rainbow. Just when you think you’re beginning to understand nature, you discover species so odd, so unexpected that you’d never dream them up and yet they’re thriving in the most ordinary of places. What’s also amazing is that this organism has been around for perhaps billions of years—hundreds of millions of years before plants or animals evolved. How’s that for staying power? To compare, dinosaurs were around for about 165 million years and modern humans have been around for only about 200,000 years. These are not bad bacteria; in fact, they are beneficial because they process metals in water. Once the bacteria feed on the iron, it turns to rust, and that rust can grab onto other stuff floating by—like arsenic, other harmful metals, and even viruses. In other words, these bacteria can actually help filter

EXTRAORDINARY NATURE Bacteria that leave a rainbow sheen are part of a healthy environment and “shatter”

when disturbed.

PHOTO BY KRISTINA SWERHUN

water, a key ecosystem service and but one important reason that preserving wetlands is so important. There is a quick way you can tell if the oily sheen you see on water is caused by natural bacteria or harmful pollutants. If you disturb the bacteria, the biofilm will “shatter” like glass and won’t immediately flow back together due to the way the molecules are aligned and sticking to the surface. Petroleum-based oil sheens will

initially separate when disturbed but then quickly flow back together. Petroleum sheens often also have a gasoline-like odour. You can report any water quality issues like petroleum-based oil sheens to the RMOW Stewardship Department at stewardship@whistler.ca. Other water quality issues to report include a sudden growth or increases in growth of algae, or a sudden change in the colour or clarity of water. n

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NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Pemberton Wildlife Association calls for illegal dumping strategy FREEZER FULL OF MEAT RECENTLY FOUND AT ILLEGAL DUMPING SITE

BY JOEL BARDE THE PEMBERTON Wildlife Association (PWA) is calling on the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) to develop an illegal dumping strategy, saying that the body has already committed to doing so and must follow through. “They have already committed to doing that plan, but due to staff workload and turnover they haven’t been able to complete it,” said PWA president Allen McEwan. Last spring, the PWA sent along a report, prepared by former Whistler Councillor Sue Maxwell, to the SLRD laying out the case for a policy. It noted that the PWA cleaned up a specific problem site along the Green River back in April 2018, removing six large bins of garbage that included approximately 3,175 kilograms of metal (including roofing, construction materials, and car frames), as well as a dozen mattresses.

KEEPING IT GREEN Volunteers, led by the Pemberton Wildlife Association, picked up people’s junk from several illegal dumping sites along the Green River Forest Service Road in April 2018. PHOTO SUBMITTED

26 AUGUST 22, 2019

And while the Green River site remains in relatively good shape (thanks to the PWA clean-up), the report said that yard waste has once again begun to appear and that could be a harbinger of things to come. “It [is] felt that the last pattern of activity started with the dumping of yard waste

McEwan said it’s incumbent on the SLRD to develop a plan to make it easy for residents to dispose of their waste, saying that the current arrangement, in which residents must drive to the Sea to Sky Soils facility near Rutherford Creek and pay a tipping fee, isn’t practical.

“The other day I got a call from a Good Samaritan that someone had dumped a freezer out there full of rotting meat or something.” - ALLEN MCEWAN

and progressed to other materials once it appeared that this was a dumping site, so this fresh material is of concern,” read the report. Moreover, McEwan recently learned that a freezer—full of rotting meat—had been left at the site. “The other day I got a call from a Good Samaritan that someone had dumped a freezer out there full of rotting meat or something,” said McEwan. “They probably had a disaster at home where the freezer failed when they were on holiday.”

“We believe that it’s a local government’s responsibility to find an economic and convenient place to take yard waste so they don’t start another unofficial dump in the woods,” said McEwan. “Certainly, convenience and affordability are the issues we want to work on.” The report also listed a host of suggestions used in other jurisdictions to mitigate illegal dumping. These include free yard-waste disposal, supporting organizations to

clean up sites immediately, and improving communications with the public regarding where to dispose of materials. When asked for an interview or more information about illegal dumping in the regional district, the SLRD declined to provide either. In an email correspondence, SLRD Chief Administrative Officer Lynda Flynn said the SLRD board passed a resolution to review “the illegal dumping strategy as noted in the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Solid Waste and Resource Management Plan” on June 26, and staff will bring a report on the issue at a forthcoming meeting. “The spokesperson is [Director of Electoral Area D] Tony Rainbow, and he would need this information from staff, which is what is being developed at this time,” wrote Flynn. With fall on its way, McEwan is hoping that a strategy is put in place, and the SLRD addresses the issue of illegal dumping in the regional district. “In our view [illegal dumping] shows a lack of respect for the land, and it leads to problems with wildlife and invasive species,” said McEwan. “It’s poor stewardship, and we think that every resident of the Pemberton Valley should be accountable for their own waste and they should take it to the appropriate place.” n


20th ANNIVERSARY!


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

New report shows ‘dramatic’ improvements in safety records at Canada’s helicopter- and snowcat-skiing operations LANDMARK REPORT SAYS SINGLE-LOCATION REPORTING SYSTEM STILL NEEDED

BY JOEL BARDE IT’S WIDELY ACCEPTED that over the years technological advancements have improved safety at Canada’s helicopter- and snowcat-skiing operations. But until now, there hasn’t been a definitive study that documents industrywide safety records over time. A new report from Simon Fraser University (SFU) expert Pascal Haegeli and two other academics, Matthias Walcher and Sven Fuchs, does just that. “The report found that the risk of dying in avalanches has come down dramatically,” said Haegeli. As there is no single-location reporting system in place for the industry (the report calls for one), the researchers gathered the data set from a number of different sources, including HeliCat Canada (the trade organization for the helicopterand snowcat-skiing industry), individual operations, the Canadian avalanche accident database, the BC Coroners Service and WorkSafe BC.

SAFETY FIRST A new report compiles information from a host of sources, illustrating a significant decease in the risk of injury or death at Canadian helicopter- and snowcat-skiing operations.

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28 AUGUST 22, 2019

The study draws on 713 incidents that resulted in injuries or fatalities among guests or guides during a total of 3,258,000 skier days from the 1970 to 2016 winter season. While the risk of death from avalanches decreased over the study period, the study found that avalanches remain the largest contributor to overall risk of death (77 per cent), followed by tree wells and other nonavalanche-related snow immersions. Extrapolating from the data, the authors found that while there were about

provides a good sense of risk values associated with the mechanized skiing industry and how they have changed as the industry evolves. “In this case, because [we had] records of guest skier days going back to the very start of the industry, it allows us to calculate risk values. That’s very rare,” said Haegeli. There was an “expected difference” when it comes to accessing backcountry via helicopter versus snowcat, said Haegeli. Helicopter skiing, over the duration of

“We simply know how to better predict avalanches.” - PASCAL HAEGELI

85 fatalities per million skier days in the 1970s, that figure has decreased to about 10 per million skier days from 2010 to 2016. The decrease, explained Haegeli, owes to improved risk-management procedures among operators, better rescue technology, and improved “avalanche awareness.” “We simply know how to better predict avalanches,” he said. Given the nature of the backcountry (there’s no one counting how many people enter an area at a given time), the study

the study, was found to be slightly more dangerous, with 19.4 deaths per million skier days compared to 16.2 with cat skiing. “For heli-skiing, 85 per cent of that was related to avalanche fatalities, whereas in snowcat skiing, only 50 per cent of the risk was associated with avalanches,” he said. Snowcat skiing has a higher risk of “immersion of non-avalanche related issues” such as people falling over in deep snow or suffocating in tree wells than helicopter skiing, explained the study.

As a way to improve the industry, the authors recommend the creation of an industry-wide incident and near-miss reporting system. “One of the observations we made is that there are differences in terms of how operations take care of these incidents,” said Haegeli. “And in order to help the industry as a whole, it would be useful to have a common standard and potentially a single database where the entire industry could enter their incidents. “This would allow us to do real-time analyses, so we could have a clear sense of where we are at and identify trends.” Ross Cloutier, executive director of HeliCat Canada, said the organization is currently working on one in coordination with SFU’s Avalanche Research Program. “We’re hoping that by this fall, that we will have a single-source, single-location reporting software system,” said Cloutier. The goal is to get some members on it this year, and then have the rest of the industry follow, he said. Cloutier added that the ongoing collaboration between HeliCat and the SFU research centre has been very productive, and that he’s thrilled to have the new report in hand. “It’s really excellent to say, “Here is an entity that can do this, and here is what the stats look like,’” said Cloutier. n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net ASPEN, COLO. —The Aspen Skiing Co. last year boosted its minimum wage from US$12 per hour to US$13.50 per hour (all figures in U.S. dollars). This year, it’s increasing the minimum again, to US$15 per hour. Caleb Sample, the company’s director of talent acquisition, told The Aspen Times that he hoped the wage boost will make Aspen more appealing as it sets out to fill its 1,000 to 1,500 seasonal openings. The obvious comparison is against Vail Resorts, which last year boosted its hourly minimum to $12.25 per hour. Vail Resorts has not announced a new minimum for this coming ski season. Colorado’s minimum wage is $11.10 per hour. However, a new law gives municipalities and counties the authority to set their own minimum wages beginning in 2021.

REGION STANDS OUT IN THE DEEP RED OF GLOBAL WARMING OURAY, Colo.—Climbers gather each January in the canyon shadows of the San Juan Mountains to test their skills on giant columns of ice. The towers in the Ouray Ice Park are created by feeding water to the canyon walls, but the cold is natural. It’s not as cold in Ouray County as it used to be, though. A data set assembled by The Washington Post showed Ouray as one of the places with the most rapid rise in temperatures in the lower 48 states since the late 19th century. Average temperatures have increased 2.3 degrees Celsius. Other counties in western Colorado and eastern Utah have warmed significantly. Utah’s Grand County, where Moab is located, increased 2.5 degrees C. Colorado’s San Miguel County, home to Telluride—a short distance from Ouray—had a 2.2-degree C rise. The Washington Post drew on statistics from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Division Database between the years 1895 and 1918. It found uneven warming across the United States, with some areas of the South actually cooling a bit. Rhode Island and New Jersey stand out for their heating, as did Los Angeles. The biggest blob of red and burgundy on the Washington Post’s map was in the mountains and deserts of western Colorado and eastern Utah. The newspaper noted that the area altogether has exceeded the 2-degree C threshold that policy makers, based on the advice of scientists, have identified as critical threshold for global warming. The newspaper’s work echoes that of a

2014 report, “Climate Change in Colorado,” which also called out spiked warming in western Colorado through 2012. Every year since then, with the exception of 2013, has been much warmer than the 20th-century average. Russ Schumacher, Colorado’s state climatologist, said he’s not sure why that portion of Colorado has been warming disproportionately. “We could definitely quibble about some of the details on their maps, but the overall picture is nicely represented,” he said. The cause of rising temperatures globally has long been understood: the sharp increase in greenhouse gases, which traps heat near the Earth’s surface. The regional variations sometimes remain puzzling. “This ‘forcing’ is quite well understood; the physics of it have been known for over a century. How it plays out in, say, Telluride can be trickier. It involves local factors— land-use changes and the terrain in general,” Schumaker told the Telluride Daily Planet. Directly linking greenhouse gases and changes in a mountain valley remains complicated. “Certainly a substantial fraction is connected to global warming, but in complex terrain areas, and with changes in land use over the last century, those factors can also be important,” he told Mountain Town News. Broadly speaking, the higher latitudes will warm (and are warming) more than the Tropics. Alaska has had an outsized warming streak, but Costa Rica, not so much. “But elevation effects are still an area of active research, in part because we don’t have a lot of reliable data at high elevations (say, above 3,000 metres) nor do models represent the terrain of Colorado particularly well.” Several teams of scientists in recent years have issued studies that identified rising temperatures as playing a large role in declining flows of the Colorado River. About 92 per cent of the river’s flows originate upstream of the Grand Canyon, much of it in western Colorado. Flows since 2000 have declined 19 per cent from the 20th century average. Brad Udall, a scientist with the Colorado Water Institute, told a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee in February that 2018 was the hottest and driest year in the Four Corners region since records were first kept in 1895. Udall said that a study that he and two other researchers published in 2018 found 50 per cent of flow reductions in the first 14 years of the century were due to higher temperatures. The other half were due to shifting precipitation patterns. “It is clear the Colorado River, and the entire Southwest, has shifted to a new hotter and drier climate, and, equally important, will continue to shift to a hotter and drier climate for several decades after we stop emitting greenhouse gases,” he said. n

2018

Mountain News: Aspen Skiing raises minimum pay this winter to US$15/hr

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29


ECOLOGIC

Ties that don’t bind IN AN OBSESSIVE drive to rid Creekside

Patrick George Archer, born March 12, 1951 in North Vancouver, passed peacefully and loved in the arms of family August 8, 2019 following a stroke.

of the scourge of invasive burdock (I’ll write about this in another column), I’ve spent much time mucking along the sides of the Valley Trail, the verge of ditches, the margins of peoples’ yards, and the edges of gardens, sidewalks, parking lots, and roadways in general. As I cut and hack and shovel up the offending greenery, much is revealed about the habits of humans who frequent such areas. As you can imagine, it isn’t pretty. To start, it’s truly impressive the efforts people will make to hide garbage they know should be placed in a trash or recycling bin— fast-food collateral, beer and cooler cans galore, and, of course, that badge of true

A Celebration of Life will be held at 1:00 pm on Sunday, September 1 at Big Sky Golf Club.

BY LESLIE ANTHONY

Pat loved his family, friends and colleagues. He enjoyed a daily competition with best friend Chuck to be first up in the morning. Pat also loved being on the water, spending many years as a tugboat captain at the helm of the Glengarry. More recently, he worked closer to home in Pemberton as the maintenance man at Big Sky Golf Club. The family wishes to thank the staff at Big Sky for their swift action the day he fell ill. Pat was active in the community, having served as President of the Pemberton Stock Car Association and Pemberton Slo Pitch and as member of the SLRD Pemberton Recreation Advisory Committee. He was a lifelong athlete, sneaking in as many golf games as possible. His favourite expressions were “No rules on Sunday,” “Keep your eye on the ball.” and “Timing is everything.” In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be given to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of your choice.

BACK TO SCHOOL Tuesday, September 3, 2019 For detailed information on school opening times, registration, and school bus routes, visit our school district website, www.sd48seatosky.org or call your child’s school board office. Be sure to check the bus schedules as bus stops and/or departure times may have changed. A full back-to-school information package is available at the school board office, the Pemberton Bus Garage and will also be available at the schools during the last week of August. Community access terminals to the internet are located at your local Public Library.

For additional information, please call

604.892.5228 30 AUGUST 22, 2019

laziness and general uncaring, the dog-shit bag. The irony of someone burrowing deep into the undergrowth to stash this stuff is that it would take equal or less effort to dispose of it properly. But I’m not here to talk about the general unconsciousness of humanity (again, another column). Instead, what I want to discuss—because it’s both startling and intriguing—is the most common item encountered in my burgeoning new career as a burdock-basher. It’s heartening, at least, to note this isn’t the expected gum wads or cigarette butts. But it’s a little strange to state that the object most commonly lost, misplaced, dropped, discarded, spontaneously generated, pooped out by birds, or rained down upon the Earth from the cosmos is this: the hair tie.

camouflage nor disposability can account for their sheer number. There is, however, this fascinating phenomenon: if you watch someone wearing a hair tie, you’ll note the regularity with which it is taken on and off, on and off, on … and off, as if flaunting the odds the universe has set for losing one. My own home is no exception. When my partner enters our dwelling, the first thing she does—before misplacing keys, phone or sunglasses—is march into the kitchen and deposit a hair tie on the counter. I find one every day, placing it in one of several baskets set around the house for their collection. These baskets, however, are forever empty, the contents evaporated into the ether. When I find hair ties in the car, I place them on the stickshift, where I think they will be handy. These also evaporate. This explains why hair ties precipitate out of the atmosphere. And yet… hair ties must constantly— and inexplicably—be purchased. No less a sarcasm-slinger than thebeaverton.com published this noteworthy article: “Quantum scientists discover that the more hair elastics you buy, the fewer you have access to.” I recently saw an 18-pack (which left me wondering over other consumer products with 18 as a standard count) on which was printed “choking hazard.” On any other product this would cause concern over their disposition, yet hair ties magically elude such scrutiny. Perhaps because keeping them in an obvious place—like your wrist— can also be dangerous: “A hair  tie may cause a cut or an abrasion after chronically rubbing on your  wrist,” says a health blog (for real). “If the cut is deep enough, it can allow bacteria that normally live on the skin, or potentially dangerous pathogens

“Quantum scientists discover that the more hair elastics you buy, the fewer you have access to.” - THE BEAVERTON

Indeed, these ubiquitous circular elastics are everywhere, accumulating in the corners of our lives, ground under heel into gravel or asphalt, infiltrating the pedosphere wherever you care to look— and, most importantly, places you don’t care to look. It’s like two invisible armies had a hair-tie war all around us. The war is over, but the spent ammo remains. While it’s hard to understand such profligacy, a few obvious clues suggest how hair ties escape control: they are small, imminently disposable, come in mostly neutral colours, and constantly break— despite being made of synthetics that will never disappear. This makes them a de facto pollutant. And if you want to add a social element, almost none are fairtrade.  And yet, neither size, low-quality,

such as MRSA or E. coli, to penetrate to deeper layers where they do not belong.” The extensive literature (not joking) on the subject universally urges a shocking first line of defense against this scourge: don’t lose them in the first place. But since we now know that might not possible, perhaps we just need better-behaving, more sustainable hair ties. If you’re wondering about zero-waste hair ties and alternatives, you’ll be heartened to know these exist (start here: https://bit.ly/2ZlhpK4). This column may be mostly tongue in cheek, but like all comedy, a laugh at our own expense is often illuminating. Leslie Anthony is a science/environment writer and author who holds a doctorate in connecting the dots. n


OUTSIDER

Attempting to understand actions without clear reason HUMANS ARE CAPABLE of doing some nasty things. One just needs to listen to a world-news report a couple of times a week to hear what violent and senseless acts are taking place in all parts of the world.

BY VINCE SHULEY Thankfully very few of those senseless acts take place in Canada, one of the reasons we’re all lucky to live here. Last week, however, news broke that the Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish was damaged during the night. The North Shore and Sea to Sky region has dozens of rope-line lifts and we’ve all heard about unexpected accident scenarios around the world when the lifts aren’t operating. Highwind gusts, rockslides, ice expansion, even low-altitude flying aircraft collisions have downed rope-line lifts. As Sea to Sky Gondola general manager Kirby Brown said in front of the multitude of TV news cameras last week: “Honestly, in this business, while what we’re trying to do is create opportunities for people to have great experiences, really the job is around risk management.” After the RCMP had a chance to survey the scene, news soon surfaced that a

DISTURBING EVENT The suspected sabotage of

Squamish’s Sea to Sky Gondola has Pique columnist Vince Shuley searching for answers. PHOTO BY VINCE SHULEY

perpetrator(s) had appeared to intentionally cut the 52-millimetre (about the diametre of a beer can) haul cable, causing many of the 30 gondola cars to come crashing down onto rock faces, cliffs, and the forest floor. I had trouble believing it at first. As someone who was (many years ago) involved in a gondola failure incident, I couldn’t fathom how someone could cause this to happen intentionally. Thankfully, no one was hurt as the ropeline snapped in the early hours of the morning when the gondola was closed. Could this quiet time slot have been chosen to facilitate the alleged vandals’ (terrorists?) own escape under the cover of darkness? There were also

partially cut. In early December, 2018 a partially cut cable was found on the Ferrari lift at Passo Rolle resort in Italy. No one was charged, nor has anyone claimed responsibility for either of these acts of vandalism. While costly, the repairs to these separate (and presumed unrelated) incidents didn’t have anywhere near the consequences to that of the Sea to Sky Gondola incident. Closer to home but going back 18 years in Heavenly, Calif., there was an attempt to interfere with safety sensors and dislocate the cable from the wheels on the lift tower. This time, the perpetrator(s) left a call sign spelled in black cable ties: the acronym

“Honestly, in this business, while what we’re trying to do is create opportunities for people to have great experiences, really the job is around risk management.” - KIRBY BROWN

night shift security personnel on site when it all went down, so you can throw that gallant victimless-crime theory out the window. Still confused and—like everyone else— looking for answers to such a very rare occurrence, I did some digging to see if this has happened before. It has. The most notable was at Pal-Arinsal ski resort in Andorra in November 2018. A few weeks before the resort was due to open for winter operations, staff found cables on three different rope-line lifts had been

“ELF.” The local authorities believed that ELF stood for Earth Liberation Front, an international underground movement that claims to “vandalize in an effort to halt the destruction of the environment while maintaining a nonviolent philosophy.” ELF also claimed responsibility in 1998 for a middle-of-the-night arson attack on Vail Resorts’ Two Elk Lodge (along with Ski Patrol headquarters and three ski-lift buildings). Work was scheduled to begin the next day on Vail Resorts’ controversial

Category III expansion of 243 hectares into what is now known as Blue Sky Basin. It’s too early to say what motivated the alleged brazen act against the Sea to Sky Gondola. Eco-terrorism? Extreme localism? Tinfoil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorists? Nothing is being ruled out by the RCMP at this point. What we do know is that the alleged perpetrator(s) had a specialized skills set and tools to get through 52 mm of steel cable and probably didn’t understand the risk to him or her self. While no one was physically hurt, Squamish will be feeling the hit of losing its flagship tourist attraction for several months as it looks like it won’t be re-opening until the spring of 2020. The tourism flow that bolstered Squamish’s reputation as Canada’s outdoor recreation capital will be stymied. People are out of work. The one silver lining out of all of this is that Squamish residents appear to be rallying around the Sea to Sky Gondola and look forward to Kirby throwing a big party once the shiny new cable and and cabins are installed. The best thing we can do in the Sea to Sky is to continue to ride gondolas—just like we always have. I wouldn’t stake locals at being fearful of future sabotage, but we don’t want the mainstream visiting public to get the idea that rope-line lifts are any less safe now than before the Sea to Sky Gondola was allegedly sabotaged. Vince Shuley looks forward to riding the Sea to Sky Gondola again next year. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. ■

AUGUST 22, 2019

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FEATURE STORY

32 AUGUST 22, 2019


FEATURE STORY

Municipality not immune to the perils of a hot construction market // by Alison Taylor he rather ordinary building at 1020 Legacy Way looks like any other compact four-storey apartment complex, buzzing with activity in the push to have renters in place this fall. From the outside looking in, there’s nothing to indicate that this building will set a standard as the most expensive employee housing project on Whistler’s books, coming in at close to $10 million for 24 units of affordable rental housing. This equates to $411 per square foot to build. Of course, to the layman, the windows at Legacy Way are simply windows, not triple-paned glass; the exterior walls look like any other, not prefabricated panels that were specially insulated offsite, constructed in a controlled environment; and you can’t see the energy-efficient HVAC system from the outside looking in. All these components, and much more, make this building the Whistler Housing Authority’s (WHA) first Passive House apartment block, a showpiece building highlighting the “unique marriage of Passive Housing building and affordable housing,” says WHA general manager Marla Zucht. But building to Passive House standards isn’t cheap.

AUGUST 22, 2019

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FEATURE STORY Add to that the fact that Legacy Way was built in a red-hot construction market, with labour hard to source, and the everincreasing price of materials and costs begin to mount. There is also the Whistler premium at play, that somewhat elusive figure that comes with building in the top ski resort in North America, inflated for things like Whistler’s prescriptive design guidelines and snow-load requirements. “[The Legacy Way building is] well in excess of market housing in Vancouver,” says quantity surveyor Jody Pamplin, an associate with Butterfield Development Consultants, which was in charge of the project. Pamplin says higher-end market apartment units in Burnaby and Coquitlam typically fall in the $300/sq. ft. range. The last three years have marked an unprecedented time for the construction industry in a resort known for its highend ski chalets, tony hotels and affordable employee housing program. Whistler is not alone in this building boom. In times like these, however, all eyes are trained on the public purse and the headline-grabbing municipal projects: a confounding $7-million Gateway Loop project completed last year, a $3-million village washroom project on the books, and a $1-million-plus expansion to the Meadow Park Sports Centre that attracted just one qualified bid, which also came in over the projected budget. What does this construction climate mean when it comes to the annual multimillion-dollar public works program on the backs of Whistler taxpayers? It’s big business paving new roads, installing new water pipes, upgrading aging infrastructure, building affordable employee housing and keeping Whistler’s tourism face fresh. And what does it mean when the Whistler Housing Authority (WHA) is in the throes of a $35-million flurry of building, with three new projects and the bulk of the construction debt to be paid back in rental income over several decades? “It’s a good news story in that there’s a lot of economic activity,” says Councillor John Grills. “The hard part is trying to build affordable employee housing… and it’s hard right now.”

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Building in a boom Mateo Durfeld always has two major worries when it comes to running his longstanding construction business: Not having enough work to keep his staff busy, and having too much work that his staff can’t keep up. Durfeld Constructors have long been associated with high-end log homes, and now with its Passive House builds, is managing the construction of two employee housing projects for the WHA. His aim now is to remain good and

scales at a staggering $120 million plus in 2018, a record high (see related graph). To put that number in perspective, take the post-Olympic lull year of 2011. There were 132 residential permits issued that year (compared to 212 last year). The total dollar value of those permits was under $20 million. In the last two decades, construction costs have dramatically increased, over and above the expected bump for Olympic inflation. In fact, there has been a roughly 1.7 increase in the cost-to-build index. In 1999, that cost index was at 90; flash forward to today and the index sits at 170… with no signs of levelling off.

A sign of the times?

“It’s a good news story in that there’s a lot of economic activity. The hard part is trying to build affordable employee housing… and it’s hard right now.” steady, even when the work is plentiful; you never know when it might dry up again, particularly in a Whistler market that tends not to follow the norms of the industry. “The goal is to really keep our core staff busy,” says Durfeld. “The trick is to keep them full and gainfully employed.” It’s a familiar refrain, this work-lifebalance conundrum, as builders looked to hire both skilled and unskilled labourers in a market where staff is hard to come by. Municipal stats paint part of the picture. Building permits reached a 10-year high last year, the second busiest in the last two decades. Meanwhile, the total value of residential building permits tipped the

money,” says Chris Bozman, president of the local chapter of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association. “We could definitely employ more people,” admits Bozman with Kindred Construction. Because of that, he adds, many homebuilders are picking and choosing their projects carefully. “Most homebuilders are being selective on which projects they’re looking to take on,” Bozman notes. That’s not a bad problem to have— when you’re the builder. But when you’re on the flipside of that equation, looking for multiple bids in order to get the best bang for your buck, it can be a challenge.

And despite the resort workforce being bigger than ever before, with 16,399 full-time-equivalent employees in 2018, more than 40 per cent of local businesses reported being short staffed, with more than 900 unfilled positions that year. Construction, compared to other sectors such as tourism and hospitality, has always had the advantage of paying well. It is not immune, however, to the same staffing challenges affecting other sectors: namely, finding, housing and retaining skilled labour. “It’s not uncommon to hear of staff going to work across the road [on another job site] because someone offered them a little more

Earlier this summer, the municipality found itself in a challenging spot when just one qualified bid was submitted for the $1-million-plus renovation project at Meadow Park Sports Centre. It was unusual, to say the least; municipal projects typically attract multiple bidders. Grills was not in favour of handing out the $1.4-million contract when it came to a vote at the council table in early June. Among his concerns over the project, which will see the expansion of the cardio room and stretching area by enclosing the building’s west rooftop patio, was the fact the sole bid on the project, from TM Builders, came in at almost a quarter of a million dollars over the original estimated cost, provided by outside consultants just six months prior. Grills was not alone in his concerns. Coun. Jen Ford also voted against awarding the contact but the duo was ultimately defeated 4-2 at the council table. This prompted Grills to call for a review of the municipal tender process. More than two months later, his concerns have been assuaged to some extent. Grills explains that the single bid could have been due to a timing issue—the bid was put out later in the construction season when contractors may have already filled up their schedule. In the meantime, TM Builders, a local company, has also been working with the municipality to find ways to bring costs down.

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FEATURE STORY

Residential Building Permits 300

$140,000,000

$120,000,000

192

184

194

$80,000,000

158

149

140

132

164

124

$100,000,000

$60,000,000

105

100

109

165

168

186 123

150

173

171

185 170

173

192

201

200

212

258

250

$40,000,000

50 $20,000,000

Total number of residential building permits Total value of residential building permits

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2018

2017

2016

2015

Data source: Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW)

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2014

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FEATURE STORY

“I’m a little surprised they only got one bid,” says Durfeld, who wasn’t aware of the bid opportunity. “We were in the thick of doing the apartment block for the municipality,” he adds, referring to the new employee housing building in Cheakamus. “At some point you’re just limited in how much you can take on.” It takes time and money to bid on complex projects like the Meadow Park expansion. In this climate, builders aren’t waiting around for jobs they might get; rather, they’re more inclined to pursue confirmed work. Bidding mid-season takes much-needed resources from other projects on the go. Though Grills called for a delay to the project in order to get a more competitive bidding process, that too ran into

story altogether. Take the $7-million Gateway Loop, the redevelopment of the bus loop at Whistler’s arrival point in the village. “Gateway Loop is your poster child for community concern about budget,” admits Coun. Duane Jackson. Council has heard those concerns. Gateway Loop was a project with a unique design, complex engineering and a broad scope of work that relied on many different subcontractors. And yet, initial cost estimates in 2014 pegged the project at just $3.1 million. “Involving a greater number of subcontractors introduces a higher level of uncertainty in the bid process,” states an email from the municipal communications department.

That original estimate was “during a different construction climate, before a detailed design and based on a simpler concept ... ” roadblocks, with municipal staff warning that there was no guarantee the project cost would come down at a later date. It could have also jeopardized a $400,000 anonymous donation to the expansion, facilitated through the Community Foundation of Whistler. “There’s no indication that pricing and materials are going to change,” adds Grills.

Predictability vs. Uniqueness HOUSING LEGACY Whistler Housing Authority GM Marla Zucht discussing Ottawa’s $7.3-million investment in WHA’s Passive House-certified rental unit at 1020 Legacy Way. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

36 AUGUST 22, 2019

Not all municipal projects miss the estimated budget. Take the waterproofing of Whistler’s leaky village parkades that has been ongoing for several years. The pricing on those multimillion-dollar upgrades all came in close to estimates and the schedules have stayed on track. So, too, did a project involving laying pipe for aging water mains and paving the municipal road systems. These types of projects are fairly predictable in terms of costs, given the record of historical pricing and the limited variables to the job. There is $2.3 million in the budget to finish off the last parkade this year. Likewise, another $3.1 million in the budget for water main replacement; $1.1 million to upgrade roads; and $3.6 million for sewer mains, with similar expected costs in the ensuing five years for that work. This is the predictable municipal work. Unique, one-off projects, are a different

That original estimate was “during a different construction climate, before a detailed design and based on a simpler concept,” a municipal spokesperson told Pique in 2018. It can be difficult, however, to reconcile the two numbers in the minds of the public. The same can be said of the $3-million price tag for three sets of municipal washrooms planned for this year. The project was part of the 2019 municipal budget funded fully from $7.5 million in provincial Resort Municipality Initiative funding. In April, council gave third reading to the polarizing project that will see the construction of three sets of public washrooms—at Gateway Loop, Lost Lake Park, and Whistler Olympic Plaza. When pushing the project forward, council recognized the community concerns over cost. “To have a few projects that are out in the media… I guess that’s going to happen when you’re doing as many projects as we are,” says Grills.

Affordable Housing In the midst of Whistler’s year-long housing shortage, the projects on everyone’s minds remain employee housing opportunities. The WHA, which is a subsidiary of the municipality, has three projects on the go at various stages. Combined, these projects


FEATURE STORY

CONSTRUCTION CHALLENGES With difficulty finding and housing labourers, construction challenges remain ongoing at Bear Paw Trail, the $8-million seniors housing complex with 20 units in Rainbow.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER HOUSING AUTHORITY

will cost in the range of $35 million: $10 million for Legacy Way, $8 million for the seniors housing project at Rainbow, and an estimated $17 million for the largest rental project on Cloudburst Drive, also in Cheakamus. The WHA has not been immune to the construction challenges. “The shortage of labour has been really tough on us,” admits WHA general manager Zucht, highlighting the challenges at Legacy Way. It proved difficult, for instance, to find a siding company locally; labourers came from the Lower Mainland to do the work. “We had to pay for accommodation for those trades,” she says. The same is often true for engineering firms, whether civil, structural or mechanical. “All of those pieces add up,” Zucht says. Key to this project remaining affordable is a $7.3-million boost from the federal government. That comes in the form of preferential financing rates of 1.5 per cent. And that means rent can stay “affordable.” Seventeen units in the building, for example, will have rental rates below 30 per cent of the area’s median household incomes. Zucht told Pique last month the

rental rates are expected to range between $1,250 and $1,950 a month, depending on unit size. The mortgage on the building is at a 50-year amortization. “The rationale for why the [Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation] makes this financing tool available to established low-risk housing providers is because it requires less operating income to service the debt,” Zucht explains. “This in turn allows for lower rent levels to be charged, which increases rental affordability.” The construction challenges, however, remain ongoing at Bear Paw Trail—the $8-million seniors housing complex with 20 units in Rainbow. That project got a helping hand in the form of $2.5 million in grant funding from senior levels of government, which goes a long way to ease some of the strain of the current construction climate. The biggest building, a 45-unit rental building on Cloudburst Way in Cheakamus Crossing, has just gone out to tender. “That will be a telltale sign,” says Zucht of how the industry will shake out out in the coming years. Estimates put the cost of that building around $17 million, with an expected $4

million in grants, but Zucht says they will have a better understanding of costs once the bids come in. It will not be Passive House certified but it will incorporate the lessons learned from the Legacy Way build. “It costs a bit more [to build to Passive House standards] but it will make a dramatic difference,” says Durfeld, who also has a stake in BC Passive House, a prefabrication company based in Pemberton that specializes in panelized building systems. “It makes a huge difference to quality of living and the impact on the environment,” he adds. Indeed, it is a game changer when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions, 40 to 50 per cent of which come from our buildings. “If you want to make an impact, then you focus on housing, and it’s not complicated,” adds Durfeld. Zucht echoes the sentiment. “As the building owners and long-term operators, that makes sense for us,” says Zucht of the Passive House standards. She points to the mid-construction air tightness testing at Legacy Way at the end of May, part of Passive House certification requirements.

“The results of this May test revealed that the building had attained an impressive air tightness result of 0.1 air changes per hour (ACH), which is one of the highest results the Passive House building scientists have seen, and is well on track to meet the Passive House Certification requirement of 0.6 ACH,” she adds. As the WHA readies to welcome renters to Legacy Way, the board remains hard at work. Jackson, one of council’s appointees to the WHA board, says they are spending a lot of time and oversight on the $17-million Cloudburst project in these early design stages, adding the board has a fiduciary duty to optimize budgets and get as much value as possible out of each project. What are the energy savings? How does that compare to additional costs? How do you measure the environmental impact? What is the return on the community investment? All questions that are top of mind at the board level. He adds: “At the moment, we’re doing everything we can to be diligent.” And it remains to be seen how the construction industry in Whistler will shake out in the years to come. ■

AUGUST 22, 2019

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

The wonderful

national parks of the western U.S.A By Len Rutledge ::

Photos by Phrensi Rutledge

T

he concept of National Parks was developed in the United States, so it is no surprise to discover that some of the best parks in the world are here. I recently toured through a number of western parks and was amazed by the beauty and diversity I saw. The great thing is they are easily accessible from British Columbia. A good way to visit is to fly from Vancouver to Salt Lake City and rent a car from there. Depending how much time you have, travel south through the Utah parks and then go north to Yellowstone. It is quite a bit of driving but you will be rewarded with wonderful experiences quite different from anything in Canada. These are places I really enjoyed.

Zion National Park This is almost 500 kilometres south of Salt Lake City and is best known for its steep and jagged red rock cliffs and its arid landscape. From hiking trails to rock climbing, from mountain biking to bouldering, there is a heap of fun to be had in Utah’s favourite national park. It is a canyon of soaring towers and massive monoliths excellent for photographing and you can see many of the great sights from the road.

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38 AUGUST 22, 2019

Bryce Canyon National Park It’s only 1.5 hours driving from Zion to Bryce. If time is short, you can do both of these parks in the one day but this would be a pity because they both have great interest and are quite different. At 2,500 metres above sea level, Bryce Canyon is a series of natural amphitheatres sunk into pink cliffs and filled with delicate red rock structures called “hoodoos.” Take the 60-km scenic loop drive for incredible vistas and hike the twokilometre Navajo Loop Trail, which wanders down into the rock formations. You will be stunned.


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

Antelope Canyon This famous Instagram site is 240 kms south of Bryce National Park, just across the border in Arizona. Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon on Navajo Indian land. It has two separate, scenic sections; Upper Antelope Canyon and Lower Antelope Canyon. The two canyons are distinct but are within a 10-minute drive of each other. You can choose to do both in one day and each will take roughly two hours. But it’s not as easy as that because you need to book ahead and tours are often running late. Because I was on a very tight schedule, I could only visit the lower canyon where two operators provide tours. As far as I can tell they operate almost identical tours at a similar cost. To a large extent the success of the tour depends on the guide. Our guide was very helpful in taking photos and told us stories surrounding the rock formations. The colours and shapes are quite amazing.

Monument Valley Although it is directly east of Antelope Canyon, it is a 200-km trip because there are few roads in this area. The main features are clusters of vast sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 300 m above the valley floor. Access to the Tribal Park is from US163 and you need to pay an entrance fee. This gives you access to the Visitor Centre and the View Hotel and also allows you to drive Valley Drive. You can access this unpaved road in your own vehicle or take a tour with a Navajo guide. The drive is 27 kms long and typical times for the full trip are two-to-four hours. The road can become very busy during summer days, with queues at the major overlooks. I recommend early morning at this time of the year as the light is better for photography and there are far fewer people than later in the day. Organized tours, which you pay extra for, provide access to other parts of the park.

Arches National Park Arches National Park is located in southeast Utah, eight kilometres north of Moab on US 191. The park has more than

2,000 natural stone arches, in addition to hundreds of soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. This is the largest concentration of arches in the world. Our first impression of the park was of a windless, sun-warped sprawl of red spires and orange buttes rising and falling to the horizon like a city of stone. Plan on spending at least a few hours in the park, exploring the scenic drive and several of the viewpoints and short trails. Many of Arches’ famous rock formations are easily seen from the single road that goes through the park. If time permits, longer hikes lead to many spectacular rock formations.

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Yellowstone National Park You need to return to Salt Lake City then go another 500 kms north to reach here. With geysers, grizzlies, a grand canyon, and great mud pools, Yellowstone National Park is dramatic, imposing and at times overwhelming. The world’s first national park, established in 1872, is a wonderful blend of land, water, forest, grassland, wildlife and geothermal features. It challenges your senses and stirs your soul. Yellowstone is in Wyoming with small parts spilling over into Montana and Idaho. Heat and volcanic activity from the depths of Earth power this dramatic landscape which is visited by four million people each year. In 1978, Yellowstone was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Rather than a single focus, Yellowstone has several hubs so travelling around is essential. Don’t miss these three highlights. Old Faithful Geyser erupts about 17 times per day to an average height of 40 metres. Wait on the wooden boardwalk built around the geyser and watch it erupt with your camera in hand. Yellowstone’s largest hot spring is in the Midway Geyser Basin and is accessible by boardwalk. It is a large turquoise pool ringed with orange and yellow with steam coming off the surface. Yellowstone’s grand canyon is an immense multicoloured trench that stretches 38 kms and rises as much as 360 m above the Yellowstone River. Trails lead to outstanding viewpoints like Artist’s Point for great views of the 100-metrehigh Lower Yellowstone Falls.

Accommodation There is accommodation in many of the National Parks and Indian areas, and in nearby towns. Camping is also permitted in the National Parks within designated camp areas. www.LenRutledge.com ■

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AUGUST 22, 2019

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Johansson hangs on for first Joyride win RHEEDER NARROWLY MISSES TRIPLE CROWN OF SLOPESTYLE

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN EMIL JOHANSSON placed second at Red Bull Joyride in 2017, the question wasn’t if but when he would win the event one day. It’s only been two years since then, but it’s been a long road for the 20-year-old Swede. In the intervening years, he was diagnosed not only with a congenital back defect that hampered his riding, but also with an autoimmune disease that ground his recovery to a crawl. But on Aug. 17, nothing could stop Johansson as he posted an eye-popping 95.75 in his first run to claim his first-ever Joyride victory. “I’m pretty speechless. I don’t really know how to explain this moment, but obviously, it’s a childhood dream coming true,” he said. “I’ve had a lot of struggles in the past that I don’t know if this day ever would have come. “Getting the win today feels fucking awesome, to be honest.” Johansson recalled sitting on top waiting for each rider to complete his second run. Only Canadian Brett Rheeder, with a chance to claim the Triple Crown of Slopestyle, came close, putting up a 94.50 to place second. Third-place finisher Dawid Godziek of Poland, the last rider to drop before Johansson’s

ELITE EMIL Emil Johansson during his winning Red Bull Joyride run on Aug. 17.

PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

40 AUGUST 22, 2019

victory lap, ceded the win to the Swede, coming down the course but not pulling off any risky tricks that might unseat him. “I was crying on top. I was like, ‘Dude, you’ve got to hold it together. You can’t crash. That would be so bad,’” he said. “Watching all the runs, I was worried that the run I did wouldn’t have enough and I wouldn’t come through. “That would be really hard, but I was ready for it. I had my headphones in. I didn’t really celebrate anything until I got down.”

other,” he said. “I really try to make sure that if I do something regular, I try to do the opposite.” That sense of action and reaction has been something Johansson has had to deal with for ill as well, as his progress since his diagnoses has been far from linear. He explained it’s been difficult to feel fully healthy again, even after a fourth-place finish at the 2018 Joyride in his only Crankworx contest of the campaign. “It’s been coming on and off. Usually, I would get back to being good and then I

“I’ve had a lot of struggles in the past that I don’t know if this day ever would have come.” - EMIL JOHANSSON

Johansson’s winning run looked smooth as butter as he pulled off tricks such as a cork 720 off a hip, a double truck driver to downside tailwhip into a 450 stepthrough on the next feature, and the piece de resistance, a 360 tailwhip to inward table off the whale tail to cap his attempt. Johansson said he couldn’t pinpoint a trick or two that put him over the top, explaining that he meticulously plans his runs with each trick playing a major role in his success. “I’m not really a one-trick-or-two rider. I usually try to look at the whole picture and make sure that things make sense off each

would be off my bike for quite some time, or something would happen, if a sickness would come up, it would make me feel worse,” he said. “It felt like, ‘Oh, you feel too good. Let’s put you back a step again.’ It was two steps forward, one step back, all the time.” Rheeder, meanwhile, was mostly pleased to place second and to claim the Crankworx World Tour championship. The last time Rheeder had the chance to claim the Triple Crown, in 2015, things fell apart in Whistler as he placed a distant 16th. While admittedly bummed to miss out on his second chance to claim it, Rheeder

took the narrow defeat in stride. “I know that if I expect to win it and I don’t, I’m going to get into that dark area that I was in last time,” he said. “I spent the whole year [trying for it] and whatever, but it’s OK. It’s all good. There’s more to life than having that trophy on my shelf.” Rheeder acknowledged he almost went with a more conservative run before deciding to take no prisoners in his second attempt as he tried to claim the Triple Crown. “I was going to do far less of a run than what I tried on Run 1. There were elements to it that I wasn’t going to do, but then I changed my mind five minutes before I dropped in,” he said. “I have the Triple Crown here. If there’s any time to do it, it’s now. Everyone was sending it, doing their runs and landing. “I decided I was going to some tricks I didn’t practice this week, which is scary, because you want to make sure you can do them before the contest.” Among the tricks he added were a flip double barspin off the top log, a double whip, and a backflip off the whale tail. The silver result capped off a stunning two-season run for Rheeder, as he’s finished no lower than second in any of his past seven Crankworx slopestyle events. However, he said he’s considering taking a step back from competitions. While Whistler can expect to see him at the 2020 Joyride, it’s up in the air as to where else he’ll compete next year. “I’ve been so contest-driven for probably 14 or 15 years now and I’m looking for something else, I think,” Rheeder said. “We’ll see what happens.” n


SPORTS THE SCORE

Ropelato, Verbeeck crowned as royalty

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BROSNAN, HANNAH REPEAT AS CANADIAN OPEN DH CHAMPS

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN IT CAME TO the journeys of the eventual King and Queen of Crankworx, the two winners’ journeys couldn’t have been more different. On the women’s side, Canadian Vaea Verbeeck entered the Whistler festival with a healthy lead over American Kialani Hines and Anneke Beerten of the Netherlands in the overall standings and that order remained the same when the dust settled on Aug. 18. After coming out like gangbusters at the Rotorua and Innsbruck stops, the Whistler week was relatively quiet for Verbeeck as her lone two medals were bronze. Still, it was more than enough to hold on for her $20,000 prize. “It feels unreal. It was obviously looking good with the good advantage coming in for me this week,” she said of her initial 94-point advantage on Hines that ballooned to 130 points by the end. “It always blows my mind that I won the overall at Crankworx. I’m definitely super happy.” Verbeeck acknowledged feeling disappointed after crashing in the Air DH, as she’d set her sights on gold there, but everything still worked out. Verbeeck’s win was confirmed at the Rock Shox Ultimate Pump Track Challenge on Thursday, meaning she raced the Canadian Open DH on Aug. 18 with a clear mind. “I actually got sick the day after I knew because the stress was gone,” she said. “It’s nice to end it on a fun note racing DH for fun.” As for the men, American Mitch Ropelato was seventh and a full 150 points back of leader Tomas Lemoine of France when the week began. When it ended, he had catapulted himself up the standings ahead of Frenchmen Adrien Loron and Lemoine, who took second and third, respectively. It was a stunning week for Ropelato, who won the Garbanzo DH, the 100% Dual Slalom and the CLIF Speed & Style while also placing second in the Air DH. “I’m stoked it all worked out. It’s one of those things where you’re not sure until you get going. About halfway through, I was like, ‘Oh, this might be possible,’ and I made it happen,” he said. Ropelato acknowledged that once he moved into the lead and was the prey, not the predator, that he started to feel some pressure. The Speed & Style, especially, was “super stressful,” though it didn’t show as he blazed past trickster Lemoine for the win. “It was pretty stressful towards the end. I was starting to put a lot of pressure on myself. It started out to just have fun, then it was like, ‘We can do this,’ and then it’s, ‘No, we’re going to do this,’” he said. In Sunday’s action on course, Tracey Hannah rolled to her fourth consecutive Canadian Open DH win. It also continued another streak for Hannah, as she won

the cornerstone downhill races at all three Crankworx stops, entitling her to a $5,000 bonus on top of her $5,000 race prize. Hannah also captured the world tour title. “I love racing Crankworx. That’s the main thing,” she said. “This track is not too long, not too pedally. It’s a really fun track.” Hannah has enjoyed a several-seconds gap between herself and the field in the past, but the chasm closed this year as Austrian junior Valentina Holl was 0.6 seconds back and France’s Myriam Nicole was 0.63 seconds off the pace. “I knew it was going to be close,” she said. “Everyone was going to push.” On the men’s side, one-time Whistler resident Troy Brosnan, also of Australia, brought home his fifth victory in a row in this event, besting American Bruce Klein by 1.52 seconds and Canadian Kirk McDowall by 2.78 seconds. “It feels amazing. It was one thing to go three in a row, and then even four, but five is just next level,” he said. “I was feeling good all week on the track. It’s a good race to win right before World Championships coming up [in Mont-Ste-Anne, Que.] in a couple weeks.” McDowall, whose parents own property on Blackcomb Mountain benchlands, said he was overjoyed to hit the podium for the first time in his summer backyard. “I spend a lot of time here in the summer, of course, and do a lot of training on that course,” he said. “I’ve been doing this race for a long time and for the first time, I’m finally getting on that podium.” McDowall added that he changed his strategy to practice less this year as the little bit of reverse psychology seemed to work. Meanwhile, New Zealand’s Brook MacDonald claimed the world tour championship after winning the downhills in both Rotorua and Innsbruck. The Whistler stop didn’t go as planned as he rolled to an eighth-place finish, but MacDonald was still pleased to claim his prize. “It would have been nice to either win today or be on the podium, but it’s pretty tough coming here and racing Troy and those boys,” he said. In the amateur categories, winners were: Austin Jewett of the United States (junior male 17-to-18); Gracey Hemstreet of Canada (junior female 13-to-18); Pemberton’s Lucas Cruz (junior male expert); Norway’s Mille Johnset (junior female expert); Brazil’s Wallace Miranda (master amateur male 30-to-39); Great Britain’s James Thompson (senior amateur male 20-to-29); Canada’s Robert Venables (veteran amateur male 40-plus); Pemberton’s Tegan Cruz (youth male 13-to-14); and Tristan Lemire of Canada (youth male 15-to-16). Locals who hit the podium were: Max Grayston (third in senior amateur male 20-to-29); Ryan Griffith (second in youth male 13-to-14); and Jackson Goldstone and Jakob Jewett of Squamish (second and third, respectively, in youth male 15-to-16). Visit www.crankworx.com for more. n

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Zula, Kintner win in pump track JEWETT NARROWLY MISSES MEDAL IN FIRST PRO CONTEST

BY DAN FALLOON IT’S BEEN A LONG TIME since any pro rider was as excited as Tommy Zula was to win a Crankworx Whistler event. The American, who bested France’s Adrien Loron in the Rock Shox Ultimate Pump Track Challenge final in the Boneyard on Aug. 15, eagerly looked up at a screen broadcasting the race to determine whether his two-run combined time was enough to knock off the four-time Crankworx World Tour champion, and upon receiving that confirmation, jumped into Loron’s arms. And, naturally, he chugged a whole beer in the finish corral. “I wanted this race so bad for the past few years, so I’m so stoked to walk away with it,” said Zula, who has only raced the Whistler pump track and is now eager to test the other World Tour stops. “This year, winning qualifying definitely helped and made me a little bit more confident coming into tonight. I knew I had the speed.” Zula had to take out a trio of big names to win, defeating Kyle Strait and Austin “Bubba” Warren before facing Loron in the final. Several of the Round of 16 matchups wouldn’t have surprised Zula as a showdown for the gold medal, so he felt honoured to win it all. “I was really nervous against Kyle Strait because he’s always helping me and giving me pointers and he’s such a big name,” he said. “Austin Warren, too, he was going fast.” “I started feeling really good about halfway through the day today,” he said. “I stiffened up my fork a little bit. In between the rollers, there was a janky, harsh feeling, so I added some tokens on my fork ... I got the bike working good and that was it.” Loron, meanwhile, held the world tour title three consecutive years before ceding it to countryman Chaney Guennet in 2018, and he’s thrilled to have it back. “It’s amazing to get this title back,” he said. “I lost it last year, and I was thinking about doing something about it. I’m super happy to have it.” In the small final, a local’s Cinderella story came tantalizingly close to a medal as junior Jakob Jewett fell to Warren by just

ROUNDING INTO FORM American Tommy Zula won the men’s event at the Rock Shox Ultimate Pump Track Challenge on Aug. 15. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

four hundredths of a second. Jewett knocked off big names such as Ropelato and Guennet on his journey to the final four, eventually succumbing to Loron and Warren. It capped a full day for the 16-year-old Jewett, who was up at the track for practice at 7 a.m., qualified, headed to the Crabapple Hits to compete in the Official Whip-Off World Championships, then returned to compete in the evening’s main event. “Thursday was a pretty crazy day,” he said. “It didn’t really feel real. It felt like a dream because usually I watch these events and see all these guys competing. It’s crazy to think I’m there with them.” What makes Jewett’s accomplishment even more special was that he defeated the eventual King of Crankworx, Mitch Ropelato, in the Round of 32 at a time when the American was on an absolute tear, finishing

the week with three golds and a silver. “Once I saw the brackets and saw I was against Mitch, I was like, ‘Aww, I’m out. There was no way,’” recalled Jewett, who nabbed two golds and a bronze in junior Crankworx action during the week. “Definitely, taking out Mitch was a confidence booster.” On the women’s side, American Jill Kintner grabbed the crown for a seventh time, toppling fellow Yankee Jordy Scott in the final. Kintner has been feeling ill all week, but considering her closest battle was a 0.76-second combined gap over another American in Kialani Hines, it’s hard not to wonder how significant the chasms could have been were she entirely healthy. “They’re short events, so you find the strength and it’s really fun,” she said. “I love the pressure.” After taking much of the year to focus on

the Enduro World Series, Kintner returned to Crankworx for its final festival of the season here in Whistler. That’s in large part because of the unique and challenging tracks riders face here as opposed to other spots on tour. “My favourite part about Whistler is that the course always has something different,” she said. “[The pump track] was challenging in the shark-fin area. It was loose and technical. “BMX tracks where you don’t have to brake or think, I can’t stand those.” Hines, who won the first two pumptrack races of the season, came away with the world tour crown after defeating Joey Gough for bronze. “I’m bummed out right now because I didn’t ride how I wanted to here. But I can’t complain with coming home with the overall because it proves I rode good all year,” she said. n

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Scott wins first-ever women’s Speed and Style ROPELATO TOPS MEN’S EVENT

BY DAN FALLOON JORDY SCOTT MADE Crankworx history on Aug. 16, winning the inaugural women’s event at the CLIF Speed and Style up at Blackcomb Base II. Scott almost didn’t make it up the mountain, however, a day after taking silver in the Rock Shox Ultimate Pump Track Challenge. With some encouragement, though, she entered and eked out a win over Canadian Casey Brown. “I’m really stoked on that,” Scott said. “I was feeling really rough [from pump track] this morning and almost pulled out. I just decided to go for it and my team manager said, ‘I think you could do it, rolling down the course and maybe get a podium or something.’ “I started riding and feeling a little bit better. I’m really happy that I went for it.” Scott and the eight other women who entered were challenged by windy conditions that delayed the event’s start time. However, the 18-year-old Scott tamed the course and held on to win. “It freaks me out more if I wait up there and wait for the wind to end,” she said. “I just have to trust myself, know that I’ve ridden in the wind before and that I can get it done.

“I took it a little easy in the berms. They were a little bit wet and some people were sliding out, so I’m glad I did that because I didn’t lose any time,” she added. “I love the big jumps and was having a great time out there.” Scott grew up doing BMX, but in her downtime, would go to Pennsylvania’s Camp Woodward and ride dirt jumps and skate parks and get more bike experience, which she says has helped her with every discipline. She hopes to do more freestyle events in the future after also competing in the Big White Invitational earlier this summer. “It’s always been a side thing, but I’ve been happy to compete in it this year,” she said. “I’ve been really liking the downhill racing but I’d like to come to a few of the Crankworx events and compete in anything I can.” Veteran rider Brown, meanwhile, was thrilled to see high participation numbers the first time out, especially given the conditions. “It was awesome to see so many girls signed up for the event and turned out for it,” she said. “I’m just so glad these girls can ride in the wind, man. It’s super windy out here and they threw down. It was super sick.” Brown, who completed tricks such as a one-foot turndown, said the course was full of fun corners and challenging grass turns. She added that the best way, at least for her, to go up against the wind was to try to trick

HISTORY MAKER Jordy Scott won the first-ever women’s CLIF Speed & Style event on Aug. 16. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

into the gusts. “I feel like if you don’t do a dead sailor, you’re going to be better off if you just scrub it a little bit, have a little bit more control over your bike and make it do something in the air other than just hanging out and waiting for the wind to catch you,” she said. The women’s event was in a different format than the men’s, as each competitor dropped individually as opposed to the

traditional head-to-head matchup. In the men’s event in the evening, Mitch Ropelato of the United States knocked off Tomas Lemoine of France in the final as speed won out over style. Lemoine cased the first jump of his second run and essentially ceded the win to Ropelato. Ropelato primarily earned style points through his 360s, and blasted down the course to take a major time advantage over his competitors. However, 2018 champion Lemoine was finding a perfect balance between the two until the finals, making the first-time finalist Ropelato sweat a bit in the start gate. “I was nervous. He was putting faster times than me down,” he said. “I was just stoked to be in that final.” In the small final, Sweden’s Martin Soderstrom defeated Great Britain’s Daryl Brown to claim the overall World Tour crown. “It’s unreal. I had a really good year with only podium places, so I stayed very consistent and that’s why I won the overall,” he said. Soderstrom said the course, moved to Base II from its traditional grounds in the Boneyard, was a challenge. “We’re used to tracks that are 25 seconds and this was 36,” he said. “It’s way longer, so it was tiring, but it feels even better to end it.” n

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Ropelato, Kintner top dual slalom CANADIAN VERBEECK CLAIMS OVERALL TITLE

BY DAN FALLOON MITCH ROPELATO RODE perfectly for much of the 100% Dual Slalom at Blackcomb Base II on Aug. 14. And he was flowing so well that even when he wasn’t flawless, it was still good enough to win. In the second half of his semifinal against Czechia’s Tomas Slavik, Ropelato slipped a pedal and bobbled early in the race, but recovered and crossed the line first. In his next heat, the first round of the final against fellow American and good friend Austin “Bubba” Warren, Ropelato had a slightly more serious slip—though Warren did as well moments afterward. “[The slip against Slavik] didn’t seem that bad. The one against Bubba was terrible. I thought I was going down for sure. That was sketchy,” he said. “You just forget about it and keep going. “I learned that in enduro racing. You make so many mistakes that you get it out of the brain real quick.” Warren, who was the runner-up for

the second consecutive year after Kyle Strait bested him in the final in 2018, said Ropelato was a worthy adversary for gold. “What a final,” he said. “We’ve been together for so long, just riding, and it’s always a pleasure to go up against one of my best buds racing. “We came into one of the first corners up there and I heard him push. It didn’t scare me at all. And I just came into the next corner and just pushed the front end through some rocks.” With a 0.2-second difference at the midpoint, Warren knew it was going to be close and victory was within reach, but Ropelato emerged. Slavik bested American Matthew Sterling in the small final to take third. On the women’s side, American Jill Kintner picked up her second victory in as many days after claiming the Air DH crown on Tuesday. The reigning Queen of Crankworx reclaimed the crown after losing it to Australia’s Danielle Beecroft in 2018. Kintner had won this race every year from 2013 to 2017. Battling sickness throughout the week, Kintner thought about skipping the race, but was glad she decided to come out, besting fellow American Clare Hamilton in the final.

KILLER KINTNER American Jill Kintner (right) defeats France’s Morgane Charre in a semifinal during the 100% Dual Slalom on Aug. 14.

PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

“I definitely had to step it up there in the finals. It was loose and hard to push. It’s not the easiest course we’ve ever had, and it’s nice to have a challenge,” Kintner said. “I prefer this to the light, easy ones that are over in 13 seconds.” Kintner noted Hamilton could push a little harder as she was using her trail bike, but Kintner was flying down the course en route to defeating the racer with the top qualifying time. However, with Kintner missing the first two Crankworx festivals in Rotorua and Innsbruck, the door was wide open for Canadian Vaea Verbeeck, who won the dual slalom at both and claimed the overall crown with a third-place finish, topping France’s Morgane Charre in the small final. “I had no expectations going in even though it was looking promising,” Verbeeck said. “I did great and I’m super happy.”

The dual slalom course moved to Base II after being located in the Boneyard for several years beforehand. The course was different, but a welcome new challenge, riders said. “It was a little sandier and a little more gritty … Growing up riding moto, too, it was nice. You could just dive into these ruts and just go for it,” Warren said. “Usually, coming into Whistler, it’s pretty long and very built up and pretty technical,” Verbeeck said. “This one was kind of half-and-half, built and grass corners.” Said Ropelato: “The course was so sick. They did such an amazing job. It was a little short, but they need to keep doing slalom like this. It was just insane.” In the amateur categories, winners were: Lucas Cruz; Andrew Brooks; Jakob Hartman; Rachid Moumou; Bodhi Kuhn; Jacob Jewett; Cassie Voysey; and Annelie Marquardt. n

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Parry captures PGA of BC Championship FAIRMONT CHATEAU’S O’ROURKE DROPS OFF AFTER HOT START

BY DAN FALLOON AS A THREE-TIME CHAMPION, it should be no surprise that Bryn Parry walked away with the 2019 TaylorMade and adidas Golf PGA of BC Championship once again. But the margin of victory surprised even Parry himself as he finished seven-underpar for the two-day tournament at Whistler Golf Club. The Seymour Creek Golf Centre pro shot the low score on both days, besting Victoria’s Lindsay Bernakevitch and Cheam Mountain’s Kevin Stinson by six strokes. “This course is really difficult. I think I played a whale of a round today,” he said. “I was really proud of [my score]. When you shoot a score like that, you’re going to separate a little bit.” Things were close after Round 1, with Parry carrying just a two-stroke advantage over a handful of competitors, including Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s Padraic O’Rourke. Parry, however, came out blazing in Round 2, birdieing his first three holes to extend his advantage en route to shooting 66 on the day. “I made a really good putt on the first

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hole for birdie, hit a good shot on two and made birdie, and the third hole was a parfive. I hit it to about five feet and made that,” he said. “I jumped ahead early and sometimes when you start like that, you get your confidence to a high, and you can play and have some fun with it. “It went my way today.” When the tournament was last held at the local course in 2010, Parry placed second, and though it’s challenging, he tends to find a way to score well. “I love coming up here to play,” he said. “The golf course was absolutely perfect. I know it’s been windy up here, so they put exactly the right amount of water down and just got it dialled in for us. It was a treat to play.” O’Rourke, meanwhile, slipped from a tie for second at the midpoint to a tie for 12th after struggling on the first five holes, finishing at three-over-par for the event. To start the tournament, O’Rourke had an early tee time and managed to avoid the wind early on. “[On Day 1], I played very solid for about 10 holes. My putter was pretty good yesterday without ball-striking being amazing,” he said. “It was probably a round, even, where

WELL DONE Seymour Creek’s Bryn Parry (left) receives congratulations from PGA of BC executive director Donald Miyazaki after winning the organization’s championship on Aug. 20. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

I left a couple of shots out there.” Though he hasn’t been playing much this summer, O’Rourke felt confident heading into the second and final round before things slowly fell apart. “I felt pretty comfortable, actually,” he said. “I just got off to a rocky start. The first five holes were a bit of a shock. I was fourover after five and was really struggling. “I shot a 74 (three-over). It was not what I was hoping for, but it could have been a whole lot worse.” Other locals were: Nicklaus North’s Mike Nedoszytko (54th); Whistler Golf Club’s Alan Kristmanson (71st); and Fairmont Chateau’s Matthew Hillhouse (96th). Nedoszytko was appreciative of the opportunity to compete close to home. “To have this championship in Whistler,

it’s pretty special,” he said. “The golf course is in phenomenal shape and it goes to show how good the golf in Whistler is.” However, with the course having narrower fairways than his home course, Nedoszytko had some struggles and acknowledged his first-ever Championship was a learning experience. Meanwhile, Kristmanson had his plate full as a competitor and host. “I struggled personally but I had two great pairings both days. We had a lot of fun and the course played really tough,” he said. “It’s been hot and windy, which dries the golf course out and makes conditions really challenging. “The good players can handle it and the ones that are struggling don’t.” For full results, visit www.pgabc.org. n

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45


SPORTS THE SCORE

Armstrong, Edwards claim their first Crankworx Whistler Whip-Off wins NEW ZEALAND’S VINNY ARMSTRONG EDGES OUT CASEY BROWN, ENDING SIX-YEAR WINNING STREAK

BY MEGAN LALONDE THERE WERE A PAIR of new faces atop Crankworx’s Official Whip-Off World Championships podium this year. In a close, jam-style contest where judges claimed they could have chosen “15 different riders” as the winner, two athletes in particular owned the Crabapple Hits on Thursday afternoon, Aug. 15 to claim their very first Whip-Off World Champs wins. New Zealander Vinny Armstrong took home the women’s championship belt— and the $2,000 cheque—putting an end to second-place finisher Casey Brown’s sixyear winning streak in the process. So what tactics did Armstrong (who previously edged out Brown at the Official

European Whip-Off Championships in Les Gets, France in 2018) use to finally wrestle away the title of “sovereign of style” from Crankworx Whistler’s long-reigning Whip-Off queen? “Just sending it, I guess,” said Armstrong following the event. “It’s such a hard push up [back to the start], you get so tired but I just think the stoke is so high— real big crowd—it just amps you up to like keep going, running up the hill, and trying to get as sideways as possible.” More than 3,000 people showed up to the Whistler Mountain Bike Park’s Fitzsimmons Zone this year to watch some of the world’s best fly high above the dirt jumps and whip their bikes well past 90 degrees before turning their wheels straight down the fall line—then head back uphill to do it all again. Armstrong may have competed in

SENDING IT Kade Edwards during the Official Whip-Off World Championships on Aug. 15. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

Whistler’s Whip-Off event for the past few years, but thanks to her win, she said the 2019 edition was, “Definitely one of the best I’ve had—so sick.” Pemberton’s Jaime Hill rounded out the podium in third, a repeat of her 2018 performance. Nineteen-year-old Kade Edwards of the United Kingdom took the men’s win, rising one step up the podium from his second-place finish at the 2019 Official European Whip-Off Championships at Crankworx Innsbruck in June.

When asked whether he had any strategies heading into the event, the reigning downhill Junior World Champion replied, “Not really, just give no fucks and send it.” Clearly, the strategy, or lack thereof, worked. “I rode [the course] last year for the first time, and then [to win] this year, I’m stoked,” he said. “[There were] so many good whips, I wasn’t expecting anything.” New Zealand’s Billy Meaclem, also 19, finished in second, with American Ryan Howard following in third. n

September 9 - October 18: • Accounting for the Manager • Organizational Behaviour/ Workplace Management • Project Management Essentials

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Harper, Chang win BC Juvenile Championships NICKLAUS NORTH’S WALKER TAKES 12TH

BY DAN FALLOON BURNABY MOUNTAIN Golf Course’s Leo Harper pulled off a come-frombehind victory in the boys’ event at the BC Juvenile Championships at The Meadows at Pemberton on Aug. 15. Trailing Victoria’s William Bishop by two strokes heading into the third and final round, Harper blazed to a five-under-par front nine at the same time Bishop posted a three-over to stake out his advantage. In the end, Harper put up a 54-hole score of six-under to best Victoria’s Daniel Bennett by four strokes and Bishop by six strokes. “I knew if I played well, [Bishop] would also have to play well,” the 16-year-old said of his approach to the final round. The big shot for Harper was hitting an eagle (two-under-par) on No. 7 from roughly 70 yards out before nearly acing the No. 8 and also birdieing No. 9. At the midpoint, Harper went into protection mode. “I just thought I’d play it safe, make some putts if I can. I didn’t really want to take out a driver. I don’t think I hit one driver on the back,” said Harper, who finished just one shot back in last year’s tournament. Harper heated up over the course of the

GREAT GOLF Leo Harper (centre) with William Bishop (left) and Daniel Bennett (right) after the BC Juvenile Championships. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

tournament’s three days, slashing his score by a steady two strokes each time out. He credited feeling more confident with his putting for the improvement. “I just knew that if I could keep relying on tee shots that the putts would fall,” he said. Harper said with some narrow fairways, it was especially important to hit tee shots straight, adding that it was difficult to putt from outside 10 feet. While that style of play doesn’t mesh well with his approach, Harper made the adjustments necessary to win. The lone local player in the tournament, Nicklaus North Golf Course’s Stewart Walker, placed 12th. Walker put up scores of six-over and seven-over in the first two rounds of play to find himself off the winning pace, but the

14-year-old rallied in Round 3, with a fourunder 68 to tie Harper and Burnaby’s Andy Luo for the best single round of the week. “I was 13-over, so I didn’t really have much to lose, so I just went for every shot,” he said. “On the first two days … I wanted to play it safe because I’m still in it on the first couple of days. “After I made the cut, I knew I wasn’t going to win, so I just played as hard as I could.” Walker said the slower greens and choppiness of the fairway in some parts of the course made play difficult. At 14, Walker was one of the younger golfers taking part, and with this event on his calendar in the future, he hopes to find himself higher up the leaderboard as he continues to progress with coach Graham Kehoe.

“It would be nice to shoot the same round as I did today and, getting older, I’ll be hitting it longer and playing better, so that should be good,” he said. In the girls’ event, Alyssa Chang of Meadow Gardens Golf Club won with a 54-hole score result of one-over-par, besting clubmate Martina Yu by three strokes. Richmond’s Sherri Yang was seven strokes back. Chang led the whole way, putting up a one-over 73 on Day 1 before posting backto-back even-par 72s. With the opportunity coming into the final round to hang on for the win, the 16-year-old made a point of trying to stay calm to lock it down. While Yu closed the gap to just one stroke on No. 12, Chang kept an even keel to secure the win. “Golf is such a mental sport, so I knew after my first two rounds that I played well,” she said. “I had to stay calm and not let my nerves get to me.” Chang said her putting was key to the win, especially with a new putter in her hands. “I was trying to get used to that ... and so that really helped my game out. My hitting wasn’t that great, so my short game was definitely what was good,” she said. Chang added that she sometimes experiences slow greens at her home course, so it helped her adjust in the tournament. n

AUGUST 22, 2019

47


SPORTS THE SCORE

Sherlock captures firstever World Cup win SQUAMISH RACER TOPS JUNIOR MEN’S FIELD IN LENZERHEIDE

BY DAN FALLOON SQUAMISH’S SETH Sherlock showed no fear en route to earning his first-ever Mercedes-Benz UCI World Cup downhill in Switzerland earlier this month. Competing in the junior men’s division in Lenzerheide on Aug. 9, Sherlock bested Switzerland’s Janosch Klaus by 0.46 seconds and New Zealand’s Tuhoto-Ariki Pene by 1.25 seconds. Sherlock credited his success to attacking a wet, potentially slick track as though it was dry and dusty, which ended up paying off. “I felt pretty solid on the track. It got kind of rainy right before my run, but I thought that it was actually pretty dry, so I just went as fast as I would have in the dry [conditions] and it worked out,” he said. “I didn’t notice it being that slippery, but it seems like a lot of people held up because they thought it would be a little slipperier than it was.” Sherlock qualified third and as such, dropped near the end of the race.

As a result, being on top with two riders left, he had assured himself at least a podium finish. He remained in the hot seat at race’s end. “It was crazy. I’ve never been more stoked. It was awesome,” he recalled. However, Sherlock acknowledged that his expectations were far from lofty entering the race, as the course setup didn’t seem to align well with his approach to riding. “It was one of the courses that I expected to be the worst for my riding style,” he said. “There were more jumps, more berms and it was less technical than some of the other World Cup courses. It was still pretty technical, but one of the least.” Given that, Sherlock feels more confident moving forward as he’s gained a sense that he can conquer anything the World Cup circuit might throw at him. Sherlock is a regular in Whistler as his grandparents own a house in Nordic Estates. He trains plenty at the Whistler Mountain Bike Park, and combined with riding in his hometown, feels well prepared to take on international trails. “I find more value out of riding   in

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CELEBRATION TIME Seth Sherlock (centre) gets sprayed by Janosch Klaus (left) and Tuhoto-Ariki Pene (right) after winning his first-ever UCI World Cup junior men’s win earlier this month. PHOTO BY ANDY VATHIS/COURTESY OF SETH SHERLOCK

Squamish than Whistler. It’s still really good to be able to ride trails like In Deep [in the bike park],” he said. “You get really comfortable riding some really technical stuff. “With the bike park stuff up here, it’s a more flowy kind of riding style, and then in Squamish, it’s pretty rugged, pretty raw.” In his first World Cup season, Sherlock entered hoping to qualify for most races, get some top-15 finishes and perhaps a top-10 placement. While qualifying hasn’t been a

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sure thing for Sherlock quite yet, when he does, he’s made the most of it, taking finishes of 10th, sixth, third, another sixth and now, first. “It’s been a pretty good progression,” he said. Also in Lenzerheide, fellow Canadian Elliot Jamieson was fourth while Pemberton’s Lucas Cruz took 13th. In elite men, Mark Wallace was the top Canadian in 14th while Whistler’s Finn Iles finished toward the back of the pack in 58th. For complete results, visit www.uci.org. n

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48 AUGUST 22, 2019

SUMMER ’19 19 ISSUE ON STANDS AND IN ALL GOOD BIKE SHOPS NOW


SPORTS THE SCORE

ON THE WATER The 2019 BC Circuit Regatta is coming to Alta Lake on Aug. 24 and 25. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER SAILING ASSOCIATION

Whistler Sailing regatta coming to Alta Lake BRIEFS: WHISTLER RUNNERS COMPLETE 50/50 IN SQUAMISH

BY DAN FALLOON KEEP AN EYE on the waters of Alta Lake this weekend. The 2019 BC Circuit Regatta is returning on Aug. 24 and 25 and will have more local content than ever. Whistler Sailing Association (WSA) head coach Francois Hebert said as of Aug. 20, there were 60 participants registered to participate. Of those, 10 are local youth, with a potential for two to three more as well. “It’s looking really good. There are lots

at 11 a.m. on Aug. 25. Hebert said vantage points for spectators include The Point, Rainbow Park and Blueberry Hill. As well, the club is in need of a few additional volunteers to help make the weekend a success. Those interested can reach out to info@whistlersailing.com.

WHISTLER PAIR COMPLETES 50/50 Two Whistler runners completed back-toback massive days at the Squamish 50 on Aug. 17 and 18. Wolfgang Sterr and Louise Oliver finished the 50/50 contest, with a 50-mile

“It’s looking really good. There are lots of up-and-coming kids.” - FRANCOIS HEBERT

of up-and-coming kids,” he said. “They’re sailing the smallest type of boat, called an Optimist. Lots of them are between 10 and 13. “It’s such a great opportunity for them and it shows how well our program is doing as our kids are able to go through the different levels.” Hebert noted that since WSA is a developmental team, this is the sailors’ lone opportunity to race this year, though they are encouraged to join a travelling team if they’d like to pursue the sport further. Hebert added that racers are coming from all over the province, as well as from the Seattle and Bellingham areas of Washington state. He expects this to be a fantastic weekend for racing. “Things are shaping up well. Preparations are well underway and we’re pretty much ready to roll here as far as the logistics of it all,” he said. Racing begins at noon on Aug. 24 and

(or 80-kilometre) race on Day 1 followed by a 50-km leg on Day 2. Sterr took fourth in the men’s 50-to-59 division and 37th overall with a combined time of 21 hours, 35 minutes and 29 seconds (21:35:29) while Oliver was fifth in the women’s 40-to-49 event and 48th overall, finishing in 22:29:07. Other Whistlerites in the 50-miler were: Maxime Brassard (21st overall); Sharon Carney (75th overall); and Louise Stevens (121st overall). In the 50-km race, Guy Fattal (41st overall); Nina Wills (72nd overall); Linsey Stevenson (87th overall); Cindy Bonnell (91st overall); and Alex Hay (130th overall) all crossed the finish line. Also on offer was a 23-km race in which Maude Cyr (22nd overall), Jen Glavas (74th overall), Eileen Craig (158th overall), Julie Zoney (179th overall), and Maridee Fitch (238th overall) all finished. For complete results, check out squamish50.com. n

the beach whistler L e t ’s h e l p c el e b r a te th e

“ G o To p l es s M ar ch ” i n W h i s t l er th i s Su nd a y. S i n c e eve r yo ne wi l l b e To p l ess we d e c i d e d to h ave a S A L E! 25% off on all Swimwear for Sunday, August 25th! A percentage of sales will be donated to “Breast Cancer Research”, so come out and shop on Sunday to help support this worthy cause. To all participants of the “Go Topless March” we will offer 40% off all Swimwear on Sunday, August 25th.

Located near the Olympic Rings on the Village Stroll. Follow us on Instagram @thebeachwhistler

604-932-7505 AUGUST 22, 2019

49


VELOCITY PROJECT

Imperfect, but adapting to it IT’S AN UGLY TRUTH. When I first encountered climber Craig DeMartino, I felt a little bit sorry for him. He was inspiring, for sure. Remarkable in his resilience, absolutely. But, with his right leg amputated below the knee, I saw the absence more than his remarkable presence.

BY LISA RICHARDSON DeMartino was a professional climber and one of the session guides brought to Squamish by Arc’teryx for last summer’s Climbing Academy. (He returns with the Squamish Climbing Academy this weekend, Aug. 22 to 25.) If I articulated a thought at all as he walked past, fit and strong and with barely a hitch to his gait, my eyes sliding sideways to avoid staring as I wanted to, the thought would have been, “Isn’t that so inclusive of Arc’teryx?” Me and my “able body” and my less-than way of thinking, so deeply patronizing. A few months later, I had the chance to talk with DeMartino for a project we were both engaged on for Arc’teryx. As we backand-forthed about empathy, design, climbing prosthetics, goats, navigating airport security, he became fully fleshed out, a human, not a caricature, and my less-than thinking whooshed away. I don’t climb the grades he climbs at, but as DeMartino said, “The beauty of climbing is that you can be a 5.6 climber and get the same thing somebody climbing

RISE N’ CLIMB Adaptation is the skillset most

needed for the approaching future. Who better to guide that needed perspective shift than an adaptive climber? PHOTO BY ANGELA PERCIVAL/ARC’TERYX

50 AUGUST 22, 2019

5.14 does. It’s the same, the mechanism is the same.” We shared a common language. Last week, I squared up to a rough granodiorite wall, feeling out of shape, rusty, confronted by a season of low activity. I studied the rock, thinking about my first few moves, how to shift from the horizontal world to the vertical one as smoothly as possible. And DeMartino’s words came back to me: “Climbing is about working with imperfections in the rock.” Rock is a medium I love to interact with—the cool smell of it on my fingers, its textures, its variability. Over aeons, water, and other factors, have worn and shaped and created features in rock walls. You can’t interact with polished flawless granite. (You

imperfection.” The imperfection in the rock is what we seek out. But his gracious way of looking at the imperfections in ourselves, physically, let me settle, finally, into the wonder of my own imperfect physical form. At 54, DeMartino is in incredible shape. He’s led the first all-disabled ascent of Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan, and is the first amputee to climb El Cap in under 34 hours. He returned to climbing after surviving a near-fatal ground-fall in 2002, knowing he was a different person, physically and mentally, than he had been before the accident, willing to explore what that might look like. He had to learn to navigate the changes in his body and mind, and out of that hard-won learning,

[H]is gracious way of looking at the imperfections in ourselves, physically, let me settle, finally, into the wonder of my own imperfect physical form. get smashed by it, as anyone who has ever slammed their favourite coffee cup down too hard on their unforgiving countertop well knows.) But where there are fissures and flakes and scars and pieces that have fallen away over the years, you have the chance of a meaningful encounter. I have easily oppressed myself with the idea that there is an Ur-Climber physique, a body as impervious as granite that lends itself to the power, grace, and strength the sport requires, a perfection I smash my self-esteem up against quite regularly. I’d be a better climber if I had a more perfect climber-body, I thought. Until DeMartino said, “Climbing is really about working with

he developed the empathy and skillset with which to offer adaptive climbing clinics to help people recover from trauma, to ask themselves, how can I work with this imperfection? How can I adapt? How can I turn this to my advantage? “Climbing is what helped me,” said DeMartino, “so now I introduce people who have gone through heavy trauma to climbing. They’re trying to figure out what their new body is doing or what it will do. I try to help uncover that. I’m guiding them not really as a climbing guide. It’s more, ‘Hey, your life is totally different now, but that doesn’t mean it’s bad. It just means it’s totally different. So what does that look like

on a daily basis?’” What can climbing do? Climbing teaches anyone who steps up to the vertical wall how to try hard. How to take your time. How to be efficient. How to be present. “It’s easy when you’ve gone through trauma to get caught up in this circle of ‘it hurts, and nobody understands, and nobody lets me do anything,’” reflects DeMartino. That’s where he intervenes, because the same traits that make you successful climbing, can make you successful after heavy trauma. (Or mild trauma. Or garden-variety, selfesteem wobbles.) You practice adapting to imperfection, and every now and then, everything flows and the rush of that carries you through a hundred more shitty days. “Because I’ve been in it for so long and understand my injuries, I can tell them, ‘Yeah, it is sucky today, but tomorrow is going be totally different.” Because that’s what climbing is like. That’s what trauma is like. That’s what life is like. Out of shape, post-surgery, post-baby, torqued or tweaked or tired out, our bodies are not fixed in time. We are constantly adapting to imperfections. DeMartino gifted me with a way of looking that was far more generous and gracious than I had ever had, and I’ll never feel sorry for him again. Nor for myself. Pity feeds on the presumption there is a perfect way. There is no perfect way. There’s just accepting the invitation to participate with the bodies and minds that we have. Adaptation is the skillset we most need for the now-future. How lucky when we find a teacher willing to show us the way. The Velocity Project: how to slow the f*&k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 22

FRI 23

SAT 24

SUN 25

MON 26

TUE 27

WED 28

We are diving into a change at the Meadow Park Sports Centre pool this fall.

CLOSED

To further support local youth swim, public swim times will change.

RE-OPENING SEPT 3

Check the new schedule before you go: whistler.ca/swim

whistler.ca/swim | 604-935-PLAY (7529)  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler FLEXIBLE REGISTRATION FITNESS CLASSES ‘Flex-reg’ classes have a separate fee and allow you to register for classes on the days that fit your schedule. REGISTERED FITNESS CLASSES Registered fitness classes have a seperate fee and a defined start and end date. Pre-registration is required for the entire set of classes.

All other classes are included in the price of admission. See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at: whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 22

FRI 23

SAT 24

SUN 25

MON 26

TUE 27

WED 28

TUE 27

WED 28

CLOSED

RE-OPENING SEPT 3 POOL SCHEDULE THU 22

FRI 23

SAT 24

SUN 25

MON 26

CLOSED - RE-OPENING SEPT 24

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler


EPICURIOUS

It takes a village WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL RETURNS SEPT. 9 TO 15 WITH EXPANDED LINEUP OF EVENTS

BY BRANDON BARRETT LIAM PEYTON has experienced the Whistler Village Beer Festival (WVBF) in almost every conceivable way. The former Gibbons Whistler staffer not only co-founded and ran the festival in its first three years alongside Harrison Stoker, he has also attended as a beer lover, a bottler for Whistler Brewing Company, and, this year, as a brewer: Slackwater Brewing, the Pentictonbased microbrewery and taproom he opened with his wife just a few short months ago, is taking part in the festival for the first time. “This will be the complete full circle,” Peyton said. “Getting to go back with my own brewery, it’s kind of like the home run of all four ways of enjoying that festival.” Entering its seventh year, the WVBF will expand from six to seven days and will feature double the number of events compared to 2018. It runs from Sept. 9 to 15. Brittia Thompson, marketing manager for event producer Gibbons Whistler, said the emphasis this year was to bring in more venue partners under the festival umbrella. “What we found was that the breweries themselves were doing pop-up activations and partnering with different venues in town to do tap takeovers [during the event],” she explained. “It’s not the Whistler Gibbons Beer Festival, it’s the Whistler Village Beer Festival, so if these guys want to do something, we’re really happy to promote it. We really just want the whole community to come together in celebration of craft beer and everyone really benefitting from the boom that is happening in B.C.” That inclusive approach has led to perhaps the most diverse lineup of events yet, with a mix of WVBF staples, such as the always-popular Master Crafters on Sept. 13, and unique concepts like Craft Cultures on Sept. 9, a night of brews, bites, music and entertainment at the Audain Art Museum. If that doesn’t wet your whistle, there will also be beer and yoga, a Function Junction block party called Axes & Ales, beer trivia and bingo at Pangea Pod Hotel, and a

VILLAGE PEOPLE The seventh annual Whistler Village Beer Festival will feature twice the number of events as last year when it returns to the resort from Sept. 9 to 15. PHOTO BY JESSIE BYRNE

number of tap takeovers throughout town. The event culminates with the Main Event on Sept. 14 and 15, featuring more than 70 breweries pouring 140 varieties of craft beer and cider in Olympic Plaza.

draft lines up for grabs. The winner of the People’s Choice Award gets to feature the winning beer at Stonesedge for a year, while the three runners-up also land their brews at a Gibbons establishment. The winner of

“I think what differentiates us is a lot of festivals just give trophies, but we give draft lines or places in fridges.” - BRITTIA THOMPSON

“We’re really working a lot with different partners to come up with cool activations on the site, so it’s more focused on the customer’s experience within the Main Event as well as all the beers,” Thompson said of the festival’s final two days. “We always have a few tricks up our sleeves.” Always a popular event with brewers, a major part of WVBF’s appeal is the five

Master Crafters, a blind taste test that will focus on hazy beers this year, will secure a draft line at the FireRock. “This one is a must-hit festival on the circuit. Ever year, just the interest alone from the breweries keeps rising,” Thompson said. “I think what differentiates us is a lot of festivals just give trophies, but we give draft lines or places in fridges.”

The WVBF has come a long way since its original incarnation, when it attracted roughly 2,000 beer lovers. Since then, the WVBF has more than doubled its attendance, expanded its schedule, and even spawned an offshoot festival in the Okanagan. For Peyton, who still remembers the “almighty pep talk” his then-boss and now event producer Katrina Frew gave him in the early hours of the inaugural festival’s first day back in 2013, seeing its evolution has been a personal point of pride. “I’m extremely proud of seeing how far this festival has come,” he said. “We had such a grand vision at the start and then to see Kat and the team … and everyone’s contributions and seeing that festival grow is awesome. It’s such a fucking beautifully well-run festival. It’s super special. I still hope to remain connected to that festival for quite some time.” Tickets for the seventh annual Whistler Village Beer Festival are available at showpass.com/wvbf2019. n

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52 AUGUST 22, 2019

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ARTS SCENE

Jenny Judge finds Wonderments WHISTLER ARTIST FEATURED IN VANCOUVER SOLO EXHIBIT; NAMED FINALIST IN SALT SPRING NATIONAL ART PRIZE

BY ALYSSA NOEL IT WAS A BIG ASK. Around three years ago, the Craft Council of B.C. had given Whistler artist Jenny Judge a solo show—only, they had expected she would turn in glass pieces for her exhibit, as that was the medium she was working in at the time. “Mountain Object Makers [the co-op studio space she co-ran in Function Junction] folded, I had nowhere to fire and I was really tired of working in glass,” Judge says from her Alpine home. “I said to them, ‘Will you just trust me? I’m not going to give you a glass exhibition. I’ll probably do an installation.’” Only, when they agreed, “I panicked,” she says. “I didn’t know what I was going to do.” But, as has been the case in Judge’s 30-year career, an idea formed organically, with inspiration gleaned from both her surroundings, and myriad art experience. “I decided I was going to work in plaster because, as a kiln caster in glass, I used plaster all the time, but not as a material unto itself. I thought, ‘I’m going to explore

TAKING SHAPE Jenny Judge poses with her piece, Moonscape, currently on the wall of her Whistler home.

PHOTO BY ALYSSA NOEL

54 AUGUST 22, 2019

plaster,’ and that’s what I did,” she says. “I would have never envisioned the work to be this when I started. I went with the flow, and it kind of came out the way it did.” With the help of her 3D printer, Judge designed various shapes gleaned from nature, printed them, and then used vacuum-formed moulds to pour plaster into.

how to take it all in,” she says. Each installation features several smaller plaster pieces that, collectively, make up a circle. One, currently on display at her home, is called Moonscape. With a range of shapes inspired by the natural world, each piece is positioned in a carefully chosen spot—and mapped out down to the nail hole on paper spread out in

“With this body of work, I didn’t let anybody in, I didn’t take any criticism. I didn’t talk to anybody [about it]. I just put my head down and made it. - JENNY JUDGE

“I gave to a Kickstarter campaign for this home-based vacuum former years ago and completely forgot about it,” she says. “I was in the middle of thinking, ‘How am I going to get this show together?’ and this arrives at my doorstep. It was like synchronicity.” What resulted was Wonderments and Materiality: A craft-based installation, her solo show at the Craft Council of B.C. that starts on Sept. 5 and runs until Oct. 10. Made up of four pieces, the overall aim is to capture a fleeting moment of awe. “The easiest way to understand it is the summer night sky. You’re looking up at the stars and it’s so much bigger than us. You don’t know

Judge’s studio space. One side of each piece is painted black and the other is white, so depending on which side of it you stand, you see a completely different hue. “I was really working with organic shapes,” she says. “The craft space is very embracing—it’s different than the white modernist cube art gallery. They told me I could do whatever I wanted. That’s where I came up with the wall being embraced. I thought, ‘If I have organic shapes, that will work.’” The other pieces include similar shapes with wildly varying techniques applied to them. There’s Alchemy, which plays with

chemical reactions to metal; Carnival and Cotton Candy, a whimsical offering in delicious-looking hues; and White Sky, which features neutral tones in order to play with shadows. That last piece earned her a spot as a Salt Spring National Art Prize finalist. Judge was one of 52 artists from across the country—chosen from around 1,200 submissions by a jury—selected to show her work on Salt Spring Island from Sept. 21 to Oct. 19. From those finalists, one will receive a $20,000 Salt Spring Prize. “Getting into the show is a prize unto itself,” Judge says. “You get these amazing emerging artists. I’m excited just to see all the other works.” On top of that, as part of her solo show at the Craft Council, she will also be delivering a talk on Oct. 2 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. about her series, blending technology and art, and her approach to her work. One small tip she’ll share that can be interpreted as solid life advice, too: when you find a path that feels right, stay on it. “With this body of work, I didn’t let anybody in,” she says. “I didn’t take any criticism. I didn’t talk to anybody [about it]. I just put my head down and made it. I think it’s really hard being an artist because you’re always trying to please other people and I think sometimes that gets in the way of the creative process.” n


ARTS SCENE

Credit: Jimmy Dow

audainartmuseum.com TALENTED TRIO The Ninety Nine Collective pose for a photo in their Granville Island pop-up shop. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Whistler artists pop up on Granville Island CATCH THE NINETY NINE COLLECTIVE IN VANCOUVER UNTIL SEPT. 2

BY ALYSSA NOEL THREE WHISTLER ARTISTS are set to take over a space on Granville Island for a two-week pop-up shop. The Ninety Nine Collective, made up of painter Allison van Gruen, artist and surface pattern designer Julie Hamilton, and jewelry maker Sarah Sladen, will have their work on display—and host a few workshops as well—until Sept. 2. “I think I can say for all of us, we’re just excited about new opportunities and meeting new people,” van Gruen says. “Those two girls in particular are real chatty Cathys and it’s going to be a very fun place to hang out. I hope a lot of our Whistler community might want to escape to the city and check out what we’re up to.” Last November, van Gruen ran into an artist she knew through a women’s creative mastermind group—focused on helping female artists gain greater gallery representation—who had a pop-up in the same spot on Granville Island. “She was very helpful and said she’d give me the information to do my own popup there,” van Gruen says. She learned the space was subsidized and, therefore, not prohibitively expensive to rent, so she approached long-time friends Hamilton and Sladen about joining her. “They immediately said yes,” she adds. “I really wanted to try and branch out some more and have a wider audience and it seemed like a great opportunity to do that.” By chance, the person who runs the space worked in Whistler for many years and was intrigued by the prospect of hosting

a trio of Sea to Sky artists. “We ended up getting our first choices of dates,” van Gruen says, adding they start on Wednesday, Aug. 21 and wrap up on Sept. 2. As part of the pop-up, Hamilton and Sladen will also host workshops. “Julie is going to be offering a workshop in collage and paper cutting … the work she’s featuring at this pop-up is the work from her 100-day project she did on Instagram [featuring 100 days of making painted paper collage],” van Gruen says. “She has a really great eye for colour and different abstract botanicals and landscapes.” Sladen, meanwhile, will offer a peek into how she makes her popular sami bracelets, sewn with intricate silver thread. “I’m the painter,” van Gruen adds. “Right now my work is focused on animals. I find I’m being inspired from my travels and my backyard, actually. I don’t typically draw a whole animal; I’m drawn to facial expressions. I love dogs, sheep, roosters, and owls. That’s been my focus right now.” While the collective—which derives its name from Highway 99 winding through Whistler—is still in the early stages, the trio plans to keep it going after the pop-up wraps up. “We work well together,” van Gruen says. “We’re friends, we have fun … For now, we’re just three friends being creative, having fun.” The Ninety Nine Collective Pop In & Shop runs daily on Granville Island (#4 – 1494 Old Bridge St.) from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. until Sept. 2. If you’re interested in one of the workshops, email van Gruen at allivg@ me.com for more information. n

Discover the unexpected and explore an outstanding collection of Canadian Art • Kids 18 & under are always FREE • Open late Friday until 9pm with Yoga & Adult Art Drop-ins • Family Studio Sundays 12-4pm

Credit: Darby Magill

Admission $18 Adults & Seniors | FREE Ages 18 & Under Location 4350 Blackcomb Way – between Day Lots 3 & 4 Hours Open 10am – 5pm Daily, 10am – 9pm Friday, Closed Tuesday

AUGUST 22, 2019

55


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

Taco time IT’S DIFFERENT FOR everybody I suppose, but for me the best thing about being an adult is the ability to have tacos pretty much anytime I want. OK, maybe not the best thing, but top three. Because tacos feed all, regardless of age, gender or class. But growing up in a (much smaller back then) Canadian

BY FEET BANKS ski town in the ‘90s meant my only real access to tacos was my mom. And tacos took a lot of preparation; both my parents worked and we had to drive to Squamish once a week to buy groceries (and even then, cheese was a luxury). So taco night was a rare and celebrated event. (It goes without saying we weren’t eating out a lot and even if we did my folks were choosing

ON THE HUNT Ready or Not hits theatres

this week.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

Sushi Village over Gators or The Cactus Grill—which were the only taco games in town.) But now that I’m an adult, I have my own taco recipe kinda dialed, the local taco scene is infinitely better, and any one of us can have tacos almost anytime we want. And I always want them, especially since I discovered Taco Chronicles, a six-episode, Spanish-language, culinary tour de force recently available on Netflix. It’s an intelligent, kick-ass show, beautifully shot, but most important is that every episode starts with a different type of taco narrating at you in first person. It literally starts with tacos waxing poetic about their own lives…brilliant. And it gets better from there, each 30-minute episode focuses on a different type of traditional taco (carne asada, tacos de canasta, carnitas, barbacoa, guisados and al pastor) and explains the history of the dish, what region of Mexico it hails from, as well as what makes it unique, tasty and culturally relevant. Tacos are incredibly nuanced, with complexities and flavours that can only be passed down through generations, but

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they must also be affordable. For whatever reason, people will pay 30 bucks for pasta (which is just flour and water and sauce) but not for tacos, which can require hours of prep to get the meat/sauce/toppings/ fresh tortillas just right. Needless to say, my personal taco recipes have gone out the window and I can’t wait to dig a pit in my yard and cook a sheep in there overnight. Taco Chronicles is the download of the week! At the Whistler Village 8, the big new flick this week is almost as good as a Sunday morning barbacoa taco with a cup of broth on the side—Ready or Not stars Aussie actress Samara Weaving (The Babysitter) as a young bride who has hitched herself to a nice young man with an ultrarich (and ultra fucked up) immediate family who insist all new family members undergo a macabre initiation ritual right after the wedding. Without giving too much away, our unsuspecting heroine finds herself in a game of hide and seek that’s a lot more like hunt and destroy—think Clue meets Get Out meets the final reel of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre but supported with the dark comedy instincts of Heathers.

Ready or Not is only the second feature from filmmaking collective Radio Silence (Matt Bettinelli-Olpin, Tyler Gillett and Chad Villella) but the trio delivers a cult classic in the making—smart, fun, funny, blood soaked and more than capably led by Weaving, (who we knew would be a star after The Babysitter, and who will also appear in the new Bill & Ted sequel. Bonus!) Speaking of sequels, the Wachowski sisters have announced a fourth instalment of The Matrix, with at least Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss returning, and Netflix is apparently making a He-Man animated series titled Masters of the Universe: Revelation that will pick up right where the original cartoon ended. Notorious comic geek/weed smoker Kevin Smith (Clerks, Dogma, Jay & Silent Bob) will act as showrunner and executive producer. Which reminds me of one of my other favourite things about being an adult: watching cartoons high. But the best things have to be the ability to drive myself to the movie theatres, afford cheese, and of course sex—which is really just another kind of taco. ¡VIVA LOS TACOS! n

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ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: SQUAMISH ARTWALK PLANNED; MUSIC AND A MOVIE AT THE POINT

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BY ALYSSA NOEL DAMIEN VERGEZ held on to first place at Dirt Diaries again this year. The France-based director and producer earned the top spot—and a $5,000 cheque—for his short film Men in Bikes, which screened at the event in Whistler Olympic Plaza last Wednesday, Aug. 14. “To me Dirt Diaries isn’t just about having an idea or knowing how to focus pull,” Vergez says in a release. “It’s about being able to create something that resonates with an audience. It’s about being able to tell a story in a powerful way.” The story he told this year starred mountain biker Brett Tippie in a Men in Black homage. After buying a special device from a mad scientist, Tippie travels around the Whistler Mountain Bike Park stealing skills from pro-riders—and delivering some bad jokes in the process. The annual Crankworx contest features short films from six filmmakers who begin production on June 1. The resulting clips have to feature the Whistler Valley and the Whistler Mountain Bike Park in a quarter of their films, but then have free rein on any other aspect. Max Sauerbrey, a 19-year-old filmmaker from Colorado, earned second place this year with his film Step by Step, while third place went to Anne Cleary and Lacy Kemp, for their video Trail’s Alive!, which featured a female crew of riders.

MUSIC AND A MOVIE AT THE POINT The Point Artist-Run Centre is hosting a unique double-header evening of film and music on Wednesday, Aug. 28. First up, Whistler musician Aude Ray is celebrating the launch of her new album Dreamcatcher. She will perform alongside

her band, made up of Sea to Sky musicians, including Marcus Ramsay on guitar, Radim Koppitz on violin, Rajan Das on bass and Andrew Crome on drums. After that, filmmaker tobias c. van Veen will screen his new short film Lost Alien. Shot in Whistler using documentary techniques with “surrealist and silent filmmaking,” the film follows a photosensitive black alien that’s stranded on a sunlit planet and attempting to return to her dark dimension. The evening runs from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets are $15 at thepointartists.com/ events.html.

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“It’s about being able to create something that resonates with an audience.” - DAMIEN VERGEZ

SQUAMISH ARTWALK Arts Whistler recently announced the myriad events happening as part of its Fall for Arts season in September, but it turns out our neighbours to the south have some creative autumn offerings in store too. From Sept. 1 to 28, the Squamish ArtWalk will pair various shops and galleries from Brackendale to Britannia Beach with artists from the Sea to Sky Corridor to display their work. A kickoff party for the month-long event is set for Saturday, Sept. 7 from 7 to 9 p.m. That will include an Anonymous Art Show fundraiser in which all art will be displayed anonymously until it’s purchased. The pieces will be $50 with half going back to the artists. For more details visit squamishartscouncil.com. n

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AUGUST 22, 2019

57


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THOUGH BUILT as a fishing lodge, Rainbow Lodge was a destination for more than eager fishermen. With its location on Alta Lake relatively easy to access, though still feeling remote in the 1950s, it was a popular resort for honeymooners looking to escape life in the city. Les and Marge Stevens came to Rainbow Lodge on their honeymoon in September 1953. They later recounted their stay while revisiting Alta Lake and staying with Claude and Dorothy Hoodspith, the publisher of the Squamish Citizen, in 1981. Les Stevens, an advertising manager for Wosk’s in Vancouver, first visited Alta Lake with his family in the summer of 1944. His parents had booked a cabin at Jordan’s Lodge for two weeks and Les and his sister spent what he called a “typical holiday” swimming and fishing. Later, when planning his and Marge’s honeymoon, Les thought of his earlier holiday at Alta Lake and suggested Rainbow Lodge. The couple enquired with the lodge, looked over their brochure, and made a reservation for the day following their wedding. The Stevenses made the journey to Rainbow Lodge in the same fashion guests had decades earlier. They caught the Union Steamship from Vancouver to Squamish and then rode the PGE to the station at the lodge. According to Les, “The coaches in those days were like old street cars with the wooden slat seats with the flip over backs so you could face either way and for heat they had a potbelly stove at one end.” The newlyweds were met at Rainbow Lodge by Alec and Audrey Greenwood, who had bought the lodge from the Philips in 1948. They were assigned Cabin 11 for their stay. For the next week the Stevenses spent their time boating on Alta Lake and hiking. They took one day to hike up to Rainbow Falls. On their way they found a

deserted log cabin and spent part of their hike speculating on who had built it. The Stevenses had always planned to return to Rainbow Lodge for a second honeymoon, perhaps inspired by a couple they met during their stay who had come back to celebrate their 10th anniversary. Unfortunately, by the time they had made it back, much of Rainbow Lodge had been destroyed by a fire. The Stevenses visited the remaining cabins and even took a photo outside of Cabin 11. Les claimed that the visit was “like going back in time, because coincidentally the weekend we were there was the weekend of the ‘50s dance and everyone was dressed for the period.” Rainbow Lodge was not the only part of the valley that had changed drastically by 1981. Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains were both open, the Resort Municipality of Whistler had been formed, and construction was well underway on the new town centre. According to the Stevenses, not being skiers, they were amazed by all the development. They claimed that, “looking back it doesn’t seem so long and it’s hard to believe it’s the same spot that 28 years ago seemed so remote.” Despite their surprise, the Stevenses were not entirely unconnected to the development in the area. This story was found while doing a keyword search of our research files for “Wosk” after reading about a proposed development in the Summer 1969 edition of Garibaldi’s Whistler News. Benjamin Wosk, who had built the Wosk department store chain with his brother Morris, proposed to develop a hotel, shopping centre, condominiums, swimming pool, and youth hostels on 40 acres in today’s Creekside. These plans, however, were never realised. The area, known as the Wosk lot, was used on and off as a parking lot for the lifts into the 1980s. As an advertising manager for Wosk’s, Les Stevens’ employers played their own part in the development of the Stevens’ remote honeymoon destination. n


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1 JOYRIDE TO THE WORLD A group of the world’s top mountain bikers took to the Boneyard on Whistler Mountain—or, rather, the air high above it—to show off their most impressive tricks during the 2019 Red Bull Joyride on Saturday, Aug. 17. 2 PADDLE PALS Spinal Cord Injury BC Camp participants took to Alta Lake over the weekend, Aug. 17 and 18. PHOTO COURTESY SCIBC STAFF. 3 SUPER FANS Mountain bike fans showed up to the Crabapple Hits on Thursday, Aug. 15 to cheer on B.C. rider Casey Brown in the Official Whip-Off World Championships. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE. 4 FUTURE FIREFIGHTERS Darcie Sibbald gives a hall tour to the “Mountain Kids” at a Whistler fire hall—complete with the opportunity to aim a real fire hose. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 5 ABBEY ROAD L-R: Dave Williamson, Brent Harley, Steve Bayly , Roxy the dog, and Tammy Shore—all strong advocates for safe pedestrian pathways in Function Junction—came together for an Abbey Road photo shoot in appreciation of the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW}) work done to date in Function Junction, as detailed in a letter to the editor from the Whistler Chamber of Commerce’s CEO Melissa Pace (see letters p. 10) to mayor, council and staff. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER CHAMBER. 6 SQUAMISH 50 Maude Cyr crossing the finish line to the waiting race director Gary Robbins. Maude placed fourth in the women’s category of the Squamish 50 23km distance on Sunday. PHOTO COURTESY OF SQUAMISH 50. PHOTO BY EMILIO BOLOGNA.

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59


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Buffy SainteMarie reflects on dynamic music career MUSICIAN AND ACTIVIST SET TO PERFORM IN WHISTLER FOR THE FIRST TIME ON SATURDAY, AUG. 24

BY ALYSSA NOEL TO SAY BUFFY Sainte-Marie has had a remarkable career would be an understatement. Now well into her 70s, the legendary musician and activist has won myriad industry awards—as well as receiving a mindboggling number of honourary degrees; spent five years working on Sesame Street; was blacklisted by American radio, as well as both the Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon administrations for her antiVietnam and pro-Indigenous rights efforts; and she even toted around a then-unknown Joni Mitchell’s demo tape in the ‘60s, trying to get industry reps to listen to her. Pique caught up with the CanadianAmerican Cree singer-songwriter by both phone and email to hear more about her career, activism, and the advice she has for young artists. There is a laundry list of ways you’ve been courageous through your music and work. What is your advice for young people today who want to use their art to say something meaningful? BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE: Just do it. Don’t wait for a stamp of approval from some bozo. Practice. Get good at the show part of show business; that’s your job! Learn more than those four chords that brought your first applause. Build your own fanbase. But also smarten up about the business part of show business, which is not about you, your art, or your convictions: it’s only some product they’re selling. But because the courage part is up to

MUSIC LEGEND Buffy Sainte-Marie is making her Whistler debut on Saturday, Aug. 24.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

60 AUGUST 22, 2019

you, don’t expect somebody else to captain that boat. Just put on your big girl pants and practice and get super good; and don’t burn out. You were the first woman to breastfeed on national television. I watched the clip on Sesame  Street and it was so lovely, but I was struck by the feeling that this would never happen today. How did that moment go over back then? Did it feel important?   I know. It’s on YouTube; then somebody takes it down, back and forth. But at the time we did it, it was no big deal. I don’t think we received any complaints, but we did (and I still do) get lots of positive feedback. I’m still very proud of having worked with Sesame Street for over five years, not only regarding breast feeding but also sibling rivalry, diversity, self-esteem stuff, lots of issues. They were genuinely child-centred and we reached 72 countries of the world three times a day. I wanted to ask about when you were blacklisted. When did you figure it out? I didn’t figure it out. Twenty years after the fact, a radio broadcaster started an interview by apologizing to me for having gone along with statements on White House stationery thanking him for supressing my music, which deserved to be supressed. Only two other people were blacklisted at the time: Taj Mahal and Eartha Kitt. The rest of your career is smiling; in Australia, Scandinavia and Europe. I was playing concerts in Hong Kong and Stockholm. I figured singers come and go. I had no idea. I didn’t find out until 20 years after the fact. Then it was much too late to resuscitate a career I thought had died in the U.S.

It’s sad to think you thought your career had fizzled, but really you had been blacklisted. It really is. In a way, I felt sorry for poor Buffy who got drowned, but it wasn’t just poor Buffy. It was all the people I thought I could reach. I had a particular point of view. I didn’t come from where Judy Collins or Bob Dylan came from. Indigenous people in the world, we’re not connected. We don’t have the Rolodex. There is no Indigenous music industry … We don’t have the protection or support or development opportunities that other people will have. As a music fan—not someone necessarily in the industry—it seems like more and more Indigenous musicians of all genres are getting more mainstream attention. What was it like for you first starting out? My songs were coming from my own head and my own experiences, including in Indian Country most Americans didn’t visit. Once “folk music” started bringing in big money, the heavy-hitter businessmen and lawyers created management stables. I can’t tell you much about that because I wasn’t included. I didn’t drink, so I didn’t go out to bars after the show, where the social and business networks got together. Peter, Paul & Mary, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and the Laurel Canyon crowd were all handled by experienced showbiz professionals who pretty much ran the show and placed their artists where the photo ops were. The rest of us had a lot of

fun too but it was with much less support from pros, including the record companies. So for me it was different and I was kinda in it for the airplane tickets. I didn’t expect to last long or be part of that crowd. Instead I loved going to a city and then to a nearby reservation or Native community where activism was building and my songs were part of it. In Australia, I did concerts in the major cities but my private times were concerned with Aboriginal issues (where Aboriginal people weren’t even considered human! They were listed as part of the flora and fauna.) In Norway, Sweden and Finland, I did concerts in the cities but spent my down time with Indigenous Saami people. Showbiz professionals thought I was making a mistake but I thought they were missing out. I’m stressing that it was very white in reference to your question about Indigenous presence in music now. With such a huge discography, how do you build a setlist today? What can we expect to hear in Whistler? It’ll be a big mix of songs, and maybe some video if logistics allow. My band will be with me so we’ll do rockin’ things like “You Got to Run,” “Carry It On” and “Starwalker,” but also some solo songs like “Universal Soldier,” and maybe some songs that’ll be new to people like “The War Racket.” Catch Buffy Sainte-Marie at Whistler Olympic Plaza as part of the Whistler Presents free summer concert series on Saturday, Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. n


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Around the world with Conor Fitzpatrick IRISH SINGER-SONGWRITER QUICKLY FINDS HIS WAY IN WHISTLER’S MUSIC SCENE

BY ALYSSA NOEL CONOR FITZPATRICK spent his 20s travelling around the world to wildly varying countries, but he made sure to have one item at each stop: his guitar. “There are Irish bars everywhere in the world,” says Fitzpatrick, who’s originally from Belfast, but now calls Whistler home. “I’m quite lucky. If you walk in with a guitar and an Irish accent, they give you a gig.” He’s being modest, of course. Since arriving in Whistler nine months ago, his unique acoustic spins on everything from Van Morrison to Thin Lizzy and Taylor Swift—not to mention his booming voice— have earned him a weekly Wednesday residency at Cranked Espresso Bar as well as an increasing number of gigs at bars around town. “I like to do things people don’t expect to hear on an acoustic guitar,” he says. “People will be like, ‘Oh, I’ve heard that song before. What is it? It sounds completely different.’ I put my own little spin on it.” Fitzpatrick first started playing music for an audience as a busker in Belfast. It didn’t take long before he got noticed. “[Bar bookers] would ask me to come and play in their establishments in Belfast and, from there, I just played more and more,” he recalls. On top of that, he was chosen as Belfast Busker of the Year, which earned one of his original tracks a spot on radio, as well as a slot at a major music festival, playing alongside Irish artist Mundy. Despite the fact that he was building buzz in his home city, Fitzpatrick decided he wanted to travel. “When I went to Liverpool, it was difficult to get it kicked off and start again. It was something I knew I’d have to get used to if I was travelling, so I was OK to do that,” he says.

MAKING MUSIC Conor Fitzpatrick has a weekly gig

at Cranked Espresso Bar. Catch him every Wednesday. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Here in Whistler he teaches biking to young kids through the Whistler Sports Academy, which leaves him plenty of time in the evenings to pursue that second job. The two worlds have even occasionally collided. “Cranked [gigs are] so early, so parents bring their kids because they know I’m playing,” he says. “The kids are just mesmerized. That’s a really cool thing to see.” With so much experience busking and playing in bars around the world, Fitzpatrick has a unique vantage point to

“I like to do things people don’t expect to hear on an acoustic guitar ... ” - CONOR FITZPATRICK

From Australia to Vietnam, New Zealand to South America, everywhere he went he made sure to have his guitar in tow. “I’ve been travelling quite a lot,” he says. “I really couldn’t do it if I didn’t have music. I’ve been teaching kids [as a high school teacher] but if I didn’t have the music I wouldn’t be able to save the money as quickly and see different places. It’s like a second job … I love it, it’s like a hobby. It’s perfect for me.”

assess Whistler’s music scene. His verdict? “Everybody is super supportive,” he says. “In other places, they can be quite standoffish with each other and competitive maybe … Because it’s a small community, you know everybody.” Catch Conor Fitzpatrick at Cranked every Wednesday from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. He’s also playing around the village as part of Arts Whistler’s street animation on Aug. 30 and Sept. 28. n

AUGUST 22, 2019

61


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

8.22

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. 604-962-0413. > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. Register by emailing melissa@ betterbrainhealth.info. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > Whistler Chamber Boardroom

SUMMER WHISTLER NATURE CAMP

Whistler Nature Camp’s summer session offers a unique opportunity for kids ages six-to-10 to connect with Whistler’s natural backyard! Imagine a place where their natural sense of wonder can ignite at the centre of their fun and learning and helps to inform the direction each day will take. > 8:30 am-3:30 pm > Spruce Grove Field House

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of Certified 200 Hour Yoga Instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9-10 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

THROWBACK THURSDAYS

DISCOTECH

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

BAND CAMP

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

MUSIC

Come lounge out, dance and listen to all the throwback hits one could need. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old-school vibes, remixes, mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. 604-962-0601. > 9 pm-midnight > Three Below

Band Camp is a local talent development night at Black’s Pub. This is where new talent to Whistler debuts and artists who have been honing their skills at Jam Nights make their debut. This week it is Nicole and Alex a.k.a. Hot Licks on guitar and vocals from 9 pm. Free. 604-932-6408. > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

With a high-energy performance, heartfelt songwriting, and a dynamic collective of musicians behind him Evan Kinsella is capturing audiences everywhere he goes. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Live Music every Tuesday and Thursday. > 8 pm > Brickworks Public House

FRI

8.23

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT

Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. 604-932-2323. > 9 pm-2 am > Garfinkel’s

THE WHISKEYDICKS LIVE MUSIC AT BRICKWORKS

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS … like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME EVAN KINSELLA

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

Join us for a night of funk, house, disco and retro remix with DJ Mary Merlin and friends. For guest list and group perks, email guestlist@moejoes.com. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

The WhiskeyDicks are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as one hell of a good time. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

> 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its special exhibition. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. > 5:30 pm > Audain Art Museum

A MULTI-SENSORY LIVE-ACTION EXPERIENCE THAT BRINGS THE MILL TO LIFE! AT B R I TA N N I A M I N E M U S E U M 62 AUGUST 22, 2019


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun playing the fastest-growing sport in North America. All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. For more, call 604-932-1991. $10. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

MUSIC

COLIN BULLOCK

Colin Bullock melds folk, alt-country, blues and pop into a signature sound that is uniquely his own. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

JEFF HEINTZMAN SUMMER WHISTLER NATURE CAMP AUG 23 SPRUCE GROVE FIELD HOUSE

COMMUNITY

SUMMER WHISTLER NATURE CAMP

> 8:30 am-3:30 pm > Spruce Grove Field House

Friday night weekend kickoff party with Jeff Heintzman. This local legend brings out a good old Cranked party with his mix of all your favourite acoustic classics and his own originals. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

ONGOING & DAILY

release is De la Gente. Free. > 7:30-10 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FIRE IT UP FRIDAY

Come down to Tommy’s Whistler and set the bar high for the weekend. DJ Dre Morel spinning pop, rock and hip hop beats all night long. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. Let us know if you are celebrating for a gift from us to you! > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

ROBCAT

> 9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

THE WHISKEYDICKS

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE LADIES’ NIGHT WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

JUMMAH SALAH (FRIDAY PRAYER)

There will be a weekly “Jummah Salah” (Friday Prayer) held at the Maury Young Arts Centre Multi-Purpose Hall. It is open to all and everyone is welcome. There is no cost for this event. Organized by the BC Muslim Association. > 1:30 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dance floor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

BLUE PHOENIX @ ALPINE CAFE

Join us this Friday for another awesome night of ballads and bluesy tunes by Blue Phoenix, a.k.a. the talented local legend Don. Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems ... you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

SPORTS

PEMBERTON FARMERS’ MARKET WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

WHISTLER PRESENTS OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES: QUINTA KALAVERA

Originating from Guadalajara, Quinta Kalavera delivers reggae, ska, gozadera and Mexican Latin fusion with urban sounds. The band merges genres such as rock, urban music, Latin rhythms, reggae and dubstep, with unique brushstrokes from other influences. Their latest

Award winning Design and Maintenance

Pemberton Farmers’ Market brings together Pemberton area producers and consumers creating a marketplace for vibrant collections of fresh produce, delicious food, unique art and more. Free. 604-966-4422. > 3-6:30 pm > Pemberton Downtown Community Barn

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

SAT

8.24

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.heikedesigns.com

TIP of the week:

Looking for a Low Maintenance Garden? - part 2:

Learn about Right plant - right place! Combine plants that benefit eachother Work with clean surfaces and materials

Proud member of

See full series and more information at www.heikedesigns.com

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER AUGUST 22, 2019

63


PIQUECAL PHOTO SUBMITTED

BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION

THE WHISKEYDICKS

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

> 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

LIVE @ BLACK’S WHITNESS @ COAST MOUNTAIN AUG 24 COAST MOUNTAIN BREWING

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

BIRTHDAY MOVIE SCREENING IN FLORENCE PETERSEN PARK!

Come celebrate Whistler Public Library’s 33rd birthday with our fifth-annual outdoor film screening! This year, catch Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. > 8-10 pm > Whistler Public Library

LADIES’ NIGHT

COMMUNITY

KOSTAMAN @ ALPINE CAFE

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

> 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Good vibes only with Kostaman this Saturday! Come down and join the party. Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER FARMERS’ MARKET

The market hosts an average of 90 local vendors showcasing fresh fruit, produce, artisan crafts and food products. > 11 am-4 pm > Upper Village

WHITNESS @ COAST MOUNTAIN

SPORTS

WHISTLER PARKRUN

Whistler parkrun is a free 5 km community fun run or walk held every Saturday over spring and summer. All levels and abilities welcome, walkers, runners, kids, strollers and dogs. Join us every Saturday at 9 a.m. at Lost Lake Passivehaus. Free. > 9-10 am > Lost Lake Passive Haus

MUSIC

FACE PAINTING

Cranked in Rainbow is hosting a Lucia Gelato and kids face-painting party. Escape the busy village for this family-friendly event. > 2-6 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MIKE WETERINGS

He fronts both his own all-originals group with a distinct African slant to their trippy pop/rock sounds, and performs solo across Western Canada for the past seven years. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

Beats, beers and babes. Bear witness to the sweet beats of DJ Whitness. > 7-10 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

WHISTLER PRESENTS OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES: BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE

Buffy Sainte-Marie is touring constantly, and coming off her critically acclaimed, Polaris Music Prize-winning album Power in the Blood. The Cree singer-songwriter has been a trailblazer and a tireless advocate, an innovative artist, and a disruptor of the status quo. Free. > 7:30-10 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza

Saturday night live music with David Storey. Storey features effortless boot stomping sing along energy. Cranked is proud to host this award winning artist featuring Canadiana folk rock. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with tyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

These free sessions educate local and visiting youth about all things environmental through fun and interactive activities. Open to all, but mainly intended for kids ages five to 11. All kids must be accompanied by a parent. Free. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

SUPREME SATURDAY

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

Whistler’s newest nightclub and lounge turns it up every Saturday night with VIP Tables and a party not to miss out on. DJ Dre Morel spinning pop, rock and hip-hop beats all night long. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. Let us know if you are celebrating for a gift from us to you! > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

Kal Mollison, frontman of acclaimed Canadian indie band Sandcastle Theory, builds on-the-fly vocal and instrumental arrangements; mixing solo acoustic renditions of classic pub and college rock tunes with live loops and beats. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SUN

SUMMER FUN WITH CODING

Encourage your kids to learn new skills by creating a simple, fun computer program using Scratch. Learning coding helps kids improve their creative, logical, and troubleshooting reasoning. STEM is the future—all kids should be familiar with it! This program is designed for kids aged eight to 12. Registration is required for all sessions, so please email the library at youthservices@ whistlerlibrary.ca or call 604-935-8436 to sign up. > 2-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

8.25

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

LIBRARY BIRTHDAY PARTY WITH PETER PUFFIN’S WHALE TALES

STEPH & SHANE

Live music from noon onwards. Free. > 12 pm > Stonesedge

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MUSIC

We’re celebrating the library’s 33rd birthday with Peter Puffin’s Whale Tales! > 12-2 pm > Whistler Public Library

TAKE THE MOUNTAINS HOME WITH YOU

64 AUGUST 22, 2019

AWARE KIDS NATURE CLUB

WEEKEND GETAWAYS

KAL MOLLISON DAVID STOREY

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB

NANCY J. WILHELM-MORDEN 3827 Race&CoNancy 3x3.2.indd 1

R A C E A N D C O M PA N Y. C O M 14-07-03 3:20 PM


PIQUECAL LIVE MUSIC SUNDAYS

Join us on our patio every Sunday afternoon for live music featuring Whistler musicians. Great tunes and great vibes all summer long! Free. > 3-5 pm > Merlin’s Bar & Grill

MON

8.26

COMMUNITY

MUSIC & WORDS JACOB DRYDEN

Mixes cutting-edge modern pop with old-school rock. Served up with a modern twist. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic, UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

RED CHAIR

A proper four-piece rock band playing all your radio favourites and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

LIVE MUSIC - EVAN KINSELLA

Evan Kinsella is a soul-drenched folk, hip-hop artist based out of Squamish, B.C. Inspired by the healing power of music, travel, and love, his music is written from the heart. > 9-11:55 pm > Three Below

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

TENANCY RIGHTS LEGAL ADVICE

Peter Kebengele, Poverty Law Advocate at Sea to Sky Community Services (SSCS), will be hosting informal drop-ins at both the Whistler Public Library and Pemberton & District Public Library at various dates until November. Kebengele heads SSCS’s new Poverty Law Advocacy Program, which offers free legal advocacy support and assistance to financially restricted individuals and families in Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton. For more information, go to sscs.ca/programs/poverty-law-advocacy/. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

The Whistler Film Festival, in association with Creekside Village, presents the WFF Summer Cinema Series featuring four, free, outdoor movies every Monday night from Aug. 12 to Sept. 2. Movies start at dusk (after 8pm) and will be held in the plaza at the base of Whistler Mountain in Creekside. Chairs available by donation. Dusty’s Bar & BBQ invites guests and families to enjoy dinner and a movie on all movie dates, and ‘Kids Eat Free’ from 5pm to 8pm. This week’s film is the ‘80s classic, E.T. > 8 pm > Whistler Creekside

> 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

Sport and beer—what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous meat raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership. > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

Whistler BMX races every Tuesday at the track in Cheakamus Crossing. All bikes, all ages, all levels welcome! Registration on site at 5:30 p.m. and racing starts shortly after 6pm. Volunteers always needed! $3-$7. > 5:30-7 pm > Whistler BMX Track

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

MONDAY MIX MADNESS

He’s top of the food chain and he’ll sweep away the Monday pains. He’ll shock your brain, the one and only DJ Gainz. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

WE RUN WHISTLER: LOST LAKE + SPLITZ GRILL

Join us for a cruisy group run (two distance options) on the glorious single track of Lost Lake followed by a sweet apres at Splitz Grill. Visit werunwhistler.com for more details. #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm > Splitz Grill

MUSIC

OLIN BRIX

Olin Brix is a one-man band. Through layers of looped beats, vocals and guitar, he creates a fresh vibe that is certain to keep the crowds wanting more. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

LIVE MUSIC AT BRICKWORKS

> 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

TUE

> 8 pm > Brickworks Public House

8.27

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

JACOB DRYDEN

> 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY

Open mic night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Jenna Mae. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

� Vista Place LIVE, WORK, PLAY

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WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

RUCKUS DELUXE

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

ITS YOUR TIME TO SHINE OPEN MIC & PATIO JAM

SPORTS

WHISTLER BMX WEEKLY RACES

MEATY MONDAY

SPORTS

MUSIC

tyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

MARTINI MONDAY

TRIVIA NIGHT

WFF SUMMER CINEMA SERIES: E.T.

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

for new artists to try performing in front of a small supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

info@vistaplacebc.com

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

NOW ACCEPTING Lease Applications

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com AUGUST 22, 2019

65


PIQUECAL > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

TOMMY TUESDAYS

DJ Dre Morel and weekly guests turning it up every Tuesday night all summer long. Pop, rock and hip hop to crank up your Tuesday night. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

ALEX MAHER

This Vancouver music-scene veteran first surfaced in Flannel Jimmy in the late ’90s, later forming hip-hop fusionists DNA6 in the ’00s. Now performing as a oneman band, he brings down the house performing live over loops and beats, with guitar and saxophone. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

KARAOKE NIGHT > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

TUESDAY TURNTABLISM WITH DJ PRAIZ

Hip hop, drum and bass and jazz mixes that transcend eras, beats that burn hard and sooth like aloe vera. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

WED

MOTHER GOOSE AT WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

Mother Goose is a free group experience for children newborn to 18 months and their families. Registration is required, and spaces are limited. Register today! For more information and to register, email grace. chadsey@sscs.ca or call 604-698-6935. > Florence Petersen Park

COMMUNITY

MAC (MATURE ACTION COMMUNITY) COFFEE/ BRUNCH & CONNECT.

This is for the 55-plus community to get together and chat, enjoy coffee/tee and snacks, play cards and board games and we’ll also have occasional guest speakers. Cranked offers any MAC member a 20-per-cent discount on any food or beverage item they order during this event. Feel free to view the “Whistler Mature Action Community” Facebook page or contact Kathy White at chair@whistlermac.org for more details. > 10 am-1 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT NEW HOUSING OPTIONS IN WHISTLER?

Join us at our local social gathering the last Wednesday of every month at Hunter Gather. Find out more on our Facebook page and at themountainvillage.ca. > 5:30-7:30 pm > Hunter Gather

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

SPORTS

Join the library each week for a little natural history, a story, and a craft, presented in partnership with Whistler Museum. > 11 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

Come learn more about a new approach for sustainable housing here in Whistler. Sea to Sky Housing Information Sessions’ free event. > 12:30-1 pm > Camp Lifestyle and Coffee Co

WHISTLER FARMERS’ MARKET > 2-7 pm > Upper Village

MUSIC AND A MOVIE

Aug. 28 will mark an exciting double-header evening of entertainment at The Point Artist-Run Centre with the Whistler release of Aude Ray’s new album Dreamcatcher and the premiere of Whistler-made short film Lost Alien, directed by tobias c. van Veen. Tickets are $15 at thepointartists.com/events.html. > 7:30-9 pm > The Point

BOARDS, BEER AND BINGO

Pow Bingo Night with DJ Foxy Moron. $2 per sheet, prizes for winners. All proceeds go to the Downtown Women’s Centre, who provide homeless women with amenities, food and a safe place to go. > 8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 9:30-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

ALEX MAHER

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

WEDNESDAY NIGHT RACING, SAILING

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Join the Whistler Sailing Association for our weekly Wednesday Night Race Night and social. Members will participate in a fun and competitive sailing race, followed by a social evening. Please visit whistlersailing. com/races-family-club-sail/ for prices, prerequisites & registration. Rig at 5:30 pm, first horn at 6:15 pm. > 5:30 pm > Whistler Sailing Club

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community. Mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium, the club includes students who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm

Brush up on your general knowledge for quiz night every Wednesday with Whistler legend, Quizmaster Stache. > 9-11:55 pm > Three Below

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All levels are welcome to join in the locals’ night. Clinics for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced players. Free racket rental, snacks, and beverage included! $20. > 6-8 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB

Join Whistler Public Library and Armchair Books on the fourth Wednesday of every month for this community book club. Free and open to all. Pick up the book at the library or mention the book club to buy it for 15-percent off at Armchair Books. Free. > 7 pm > Whistler Public Library

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

CRAFTS IN THE PARK

WANT TO MAKE WHISTLER YOUR PERMANENT NEW HOME?

8.28

INDUSTRY NIGHT

MUSIC

CONOR FITZPATRICK

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see Conor Fitzpatrick play. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer days, he will be playing outside on our sunny patio. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

JENNAMAE

JennaMae, originally from the Calgary/Banff area, moved to Whistler as a snow chaser. Bringing her soulful sultry voice and strums on her guitar, sharing her stories and remixed covers to the mics around Whistler. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAINZ

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

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ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF AUGUST 22 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s not cost-efficient

to recycle plastic. Sorting and processing the used materials to make them available for fresh stuff is at least as expensive as creating new plastic items from scratch. On the other hand, sending used plastic to a recycling centre makes it far less likely that it will end up in the oceans and waterways, harming living creatures. So in this case, the short-term financial argument in favour of recycling is insubstantial, whereas the moral argument is strong. I invite you to apply a similar perspective to your upcoming decisions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): African-American slaves suffered many horrendous deprivations. For example, it was illegal for them to learn to read. Their oppressors feared that educated slaves would be better equipped to agitate for freedom, and took extreme measures to keep them illiterate. Frederick Douglass was one slave who managed to beat the ban. As he secretly mastered the art of reading and writing, he came upon literature that ultimately emboldened him to escape his “owners” and flee to safety. He became one of the 19th century’s most powerful abolitionists, producing reams of influential writing and speeches. I propose that we make Douglass your inspiring role model for the coming months. I think you’re ready to break the hold of a certain curse—and go on to achieve a gritty success that the curse had prevented you from accomplishing. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For 25 years, businessman Don Thompson worked for the McDonald’s fast food company, including three years as its CEO. During that time, he oversaw the sale and consumption of millions of hamburgers. But in 2015, he left McDonald’s and became part of Beyond Meat, a company that sells vegan alternatives to meat. I could see you undergoing an equally dramatic shift in the coming months, Gemini: a transition into a new role that resembles but is also very different from a role you’ve been playing. I urge you to step up your fantasies about what that change might entail. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot,” wrote author Audre Lorde. As an astrologer, I would add this nuance: although what Lourde says is true, some phases of your life are more favourable than others to seek deep and rapid education. For example, the coming weeks will bring you especially rich teachings if you incite the learning process now. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The American idiom “stay in your lane” has come to mean “mind your own business,” and usually has a pejorative sense. But I’d like to expand it and soften it for your use in the coming weeks. Let’s define it as meaning “stick to what you’re good at and know about” or “don’t try to operate outside your area of expertise” or “express yourself in ways that you have earned the right to do.” Author Zadie Smith says that this is good advice for writers. “You have to work out what it is you can’t do, obscure it, and focus on what works,” she attests. Apply that counsel to your own sphere or field, Leo. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Yisrael Kristal was a Polish Jew born under the sign of Virgo in 1903. His father was a scholar of the Torah, and he began studying Judaism and learning Hebrew at age three. He lived a long life and had many adventures, working as a candle-maker and a candy-maker. When the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1945, Kristal emerged as one of the survivors. He went on to live to the age of 113. Because of the chaos of the First World War, he hadn’t been able to do his bar mitzvah when he’d turned 13. So he did it much later, in his old age. I foresee a comparable event coming up soon in your life, Virgo. You will claim a reward or observe a milestone or collect a blessing you weren’t able to enjoy earlier. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sailors have used compasses to navigate since the 11th century. But that tool wasn’t enough to guide them. A thorough knowledge of the

night sky’s stars was a crucial aid. Skill at reading the ever-changing ocean currents always proved valuable. Another helpful trick was to take birds on the ships as collaborators. While at sea, if the birds flew off and returned, the sailors knew there was no land close by. If the birds didn’t return, chances were good that land was near. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because I think it’s an excellent time to gather a number of different navigational tools for your upcoming quest. One won’t be enough. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What do you want from the allies who aren’t your lovers? What feelings do you most enjoy while you’re in the company of your interesting, non-romantic companions? For instance, maybe you like to be respected and appreciated. Or perhaps what’s most important to you is to experience the fun of being challenged and stimulated. Maybe your favourite feeling is the spirit of collaboration and comradeship. Or maybe all of the above. In any case, Scorpio, I urge you to get clear about what you want—and then make it your priority to foster it. In the coming weeks, you’ll have the power to generate an abundance of your favourite kind of non-sexual togetherness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As the CEO of the clothes company Zappos, Sagittarius entrepreneur Tony Hsieh is worth almost a billion dollars. If he chose, he could live in a mansion by the sea. Yet his home is a 200-square-foot, $48,000 trailer in Las Vegas, where he also keeps his pet alpaca. To be clear, he owns the entire trailer park, which consists of 30 other trailers, all of which are immaculate hotbeds of high-tech media technology where interesting people live. He loves the community he has created, which is more important to him than status and privilege. “For me, experiences are more meaningful than stuff,” he says. “I have way more experiences here.” I’d love to see you reaffirm your commitment to priorities like his in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It’ll be a favourable time to do so. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Medical researcher Jonas Salk developed a successful polio vaccine, so he had a strong rational mind. Here’s how he described his relationship with his non-rational way of knowing. He said, “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” I bring this up, Capricorn, because the coming weeks will be a favourable time to celebrate and cultivate your own intuition. You may generate amazing results as you learn to trust it more and figure out how to deepen your relationship with it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey once formulated a concise list of his requirements for living well. “One must be reasonable in one’s demands on life,” he wrote. “For myself, all that I ask is: 1. accurate information; 2. coherent knowledge; 3. deep understanding; 4. infinite loving wisdom; 5. no more kidney stones, please.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to create your own tally of the Five Crucial Provisions. Be bold and precise as you inform life about your needs. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We may be surprised at whom God sends to answer our prayers,” wrote author Janette Oke. I suspect that observation will apply to you in the coming weeks. If you’re an atheist or agnostic, I’ll rephrase her formulation for you: “We may be surprised at whom Life sends to answer our entreaties.” There’s only one important thing you have to do to cooperate with this experience: set aside your expectations about how help and blessings might appear.

Celebrate the Library's Celebrate the Library's at Whistler Public Library at Whistler Public Library

12 p.m. Birthday Cake 12 p.m. Birthday Cake 1 to 2 p.m. Peter Puffin's Whale Tales 1 to 2 p.m. Peter Puffin's Whale Tales 8 to 1010 p.m. andthe theLast Last Crusade 8 to p.m.Indiana Indiana Jones Jones and Crusade for full fulldetails! details!

Poet Muriel Rukeyser said, “The world is made of stories, not atoms.” I’d add, “You are made of stories, too.” What’s your favourite story that you’re made of? FreeWillAstrology.com

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

AUGUST 22, 2019

67


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CHALET: 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Modern, stylish renovation, furn, huge deck, private, large corner lot, hot tub, w/b f/p. UP-Mstr-Queen bed, 2ndDouble with small sleeping loft. MNDouble & single. 604-889-2525 blakelilly@hotmail.com

Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

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68 AUGUST 22, 2019

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Moving/Garage Sale Saturday, August 24th from 9 am to 1 pm. Some furniture and misc. garage sale items. #1-1530 Tynebridge Lane in the Glades. 604-966-4121 lee.bennett.86@gmail.com

GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES WE ARE MOVING tons of baby / kids clothes. Brand name shoes, toys, books, puzzles, sports gear , dress up costumes and much more. Sat Aug 24 and Sun Aug 25 from 10 am to 4 pm - rain or shine 4 - 1530 Tynebridge Lane

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The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler, a unique boutique style property, is seeking for Maintenance Shift Person, who will provide perform routine, extensive preventive maintenance and repair procedures on the Hotel building to ensure guest satisfaction.

Maintenance Shift Person:

full time 8:30am to 4:30pm Competitive wages and benefits Start immediately Description of Duties • Report to the Hotel Housekeeping Manager for day-to-day duties • Perform minor and major repair of all buildings and equipment • Repair doors, door locks and closets • Complete daily, weekly and monthly checklists on building equipment maintenance procedures and maintain records of scheduled maintenance procedures • Respond to emergency maintenance requests as required • Perform outside custodial duties such as snow removal as required • Respond to guest maintenance requests efficiently and with immediacy • Perform other duties as required Job Requirements • High school diploma or general education degree (GED) • 1 Year of responsible experience in building and mechanical equipment maintenance and repair; or an acceptable equivalent combination of education and experience • Good skill in the use of hand and power tools • Self motivated, responsible, organized and task oriented • Fluent in English and good communication skills • Able to take and follow instruction with regard to repair work done Wage 19.00 to 25.00 with competitive benefits

Reply to parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

RDC Fine Homes is looking for positive and reliable

High-Performing Experienced Carpenters and a Site Foreman

PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

to join our growing team. RDC specializes in High Performance Custom Homes and Renovations. WE OFFER: Positive work environment Work on innovative energy efficient projects – new homes and renovations Leadership training Extended health benefits Tool purchase support

Please send your resume to: info@rdcfinehomes.com

Management training Opportunity Ruby Tuesday is looking for the right Salesperson to join our team today This is a full time key holder position with management training - management role to begin end of October to cover maternity leave. Apply in person at Ruby Tuesday located in the Town Plaza

604-905-6290 70 AUGUST 22, 2019

SUBSCRIPTIONS

NOW HIRING!

Opportunity for Full-Time and Part-Time employment in All DEPARTMENTS. Our Team enjoys: ü Air conditioning ü Awesome colleagues ü Flexible schedules ü Training and experience ü Employee perks and benefits ü Prime location in Pemberton ü Short commute = less time, more $$$

Apply within, visit our website or email us today! www.pembertonsupermarket.com jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com

52 ISSUES $76.70/YEAR

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

$136.60/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

$605.80/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN USA

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX www.whistlerwag.com

Don’t forget to scoop the poop! It’s not fun to step in, or to see around town. Help keep Whistler clean and pick up after your dog.

TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201


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ARTS & CULTURE

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION Whistler Singers Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ whistlersingers/

DIVERSE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WITH

Residential/Commercial projects Is hiring (FULL TIME / PART TIME) LINE/PREP COOKS DISHWASHER (FULL TIME) HOST STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to or contact Samantha at skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

ACROSS THE SEA TO SKY CORRIDOR

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING

Site Supervisors Carpenters Carpenters Apprentice Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. TO APPLY: CALL 604.935.2683 or EMAIL DCOTE@COASTCONSTRUCTION.CA

NOW HIRING:

MECHANIC Looking for construction

landscapers/ small excavator operator,

airbrake license an asset, experience w/paving stones, masonry skills, skid steer, small excavator & other landscaping or construction experience. Wage negotiable.

cmac.cont@gmail.com

PERKS INCLUDE: FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE – FRIENDS & FAMILY DISCOUNTS – EPIC STAFF PARTIES - FREE ACTIVITIES FOR STAFF Fullll job Fu j desc escriptionss at: at ww ww ww w.canadia w. anwilderness derness.com m/e /employment oyment/ oyment

If you are interested in joining our team, please submit your resume to e m ployment@canadian yment@canadian01 1.com

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

OUT NOW!

FULL TIME: LINE COOKS PART TIME / FULL TIME: BUSSERS HOSTS

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

* ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE FOR ALL POSITIONS * Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

Refreshingly Unique & Affordable

ASSISTANT MANAGER & SALES ASSOCIATE We are looking for a reliable, self-motivated individual who loves to work with people. Shifts would vary including alternating weekends once fully trained. Previous retail and merchandising experience preferred. What we offer: Awesome work environment, Competitive salary, bonuses & the opportunity to work where you live, while saving time and money ($2 p/h) on your commute! If you want to work with an amazing team email your resume to: smallpotatoesbazaar@telus.net 104-7445 FRONTIER STREET, PEMBERTON, BC 604-894-6002 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

AUGUST 22, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

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CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up.

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Tour Receptionist & Transport Coordinator (Full Time)

is now

hiring

for

Guest Service Agent/Night Audit

– Part-time

These roles include the following Perks and Benefits:

• Staff discounts and incentives

Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Extended Benefits

• Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental.

• Central Location

• Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort.

• A fun team, and fantastic staff events

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment.

Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org

• A dedicated and supportive management team • Wages starting from $18 per hour Please reply with a cover letter and resume to

*eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

hr@listelhotel.com

Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm.

Coast Mountain Veterinary Services is looking for, Full-Time Receptionist Veterinary Technician/Assistant at our hospital in Creekside. Candidates for Vet Tech or Nurse/Assistant position must have experience monitoring hospitalized patients (administering fluids, medications, recording vitals, etc) taking radiographs, assisting with venipuncture, processing laboratory samples etc. Equally as important is a great attitude and someone that works well with a team to deliver exceptional service to our clients and the highest level of medical care to our patients. Please forward your resume and cover letter if you are interested in this position to Jonathan Kirby, jonathan@coastvet.com

Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:00-10:00, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

We are hiring for the following positions:

BARTENDER / MIXOLOGIST Send cover letter and resume to jobs@altabistro.com Or drop off resume at Alta Bistro (in the Pinnacle Hotel on Main Street) Monday to Friday, 3pm-5pm

72 AUGUST 22, 2019

THINGS TO DO THINGS TO DO YOUTH ACTIVITIES

1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050.

THINGS TO DO the insiders’ guide to whistler

Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com


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Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

We’re looking for great people to join our team! If you are passionate about food and creating great culinary experiences, we may have the perfect fit for you. We have the following roles available:

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook. Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org

PM Server Assistant In Room Dining Server Steward Front Desk Agent Concierge Security Officer Commis2 Commis3 Pastry Commis2

Chef de Partie Bell Attendant Guestroom Attendant Purchasing Receiver Private Residence Receptionist Private Residence Door Attendant Shuttle Driver Spa Attendant

· Dishwasher · Line Cook · Prep Cook · Food Expeditor · Salad Tender ·

The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately.

We hire great people, train them well and provide plenty of opportunities to learn and grow. It’s part of the reason we’ve been named among the Top 50 Employers in Canada since 2003. If you are hardworking and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment, apply today at The Keg Steakhouse + Bar in Whistler Village.

Details:

Applicants may apply in person daily between 3pm and 5pm and/or email their resume to whistler@kegrestaurants.com

$500 signing bonus available for all hires

Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782 Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY COORDINATOR: • 3 years construction experience & site/field safety role • Experienced in developing health & safety resources Also Recruiting: • Heavy Duty Mechanics • Dump Truck Drivers • Pipelayers & Labourers

Email resume to careers@coastalmountain.ca

CARPENTERS / FRAMERS WANTED • 4 on 3 off or 5 on 2 off a week depending on your preference. • Medical and Dental Benefits. • Good potential for future growth within the company. • Competitive wages. • Looking for journeymen, lead hands and assistants. • Currently hiring carpenters for framing and concrete forming projects - high end estate home/commercial and residential mix between Whistler/Pemberton.

FIND YOUR CAREER

Please send resume to admin@thorworksconstruction.com Or call Brandon: (604) 902-8467 Or both.

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

We are currently hiring Full Time Sales Representatives with personality! Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina.

WIDE OPEN WELDING IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITION:

Staff Accommodation Available

FABRICATOR/ERECTOR

(4154 Village Green)

Please forward your resume to contactus@wideopenwelding.com

AUGUST 22, 2019

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OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team

Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following positions: Pastry Chef Server Food Runner Host Dishwasher We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Staff housing is available for kitchen positions Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3:30pm to 5:30pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

COMMUNITY LISTINGS MUSEUMS Pemberton and District Museum and Archives Society - Located at 7455 Prospect St. Open: May to Nov annually from 10am-5pm. Guided tours and activities for all ages. Join us for "Tea & Tales" every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August. Some seasonal closures. Closed on holidays. www.pembertonmuseum.org

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m..

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING Whistler Breakfast Club Meets monthly at 6:45-8:30am at Whistler Chamber office. Offering a chance for business owners to meet and "speed network" with other business owners to build their circle of contacts and collaborators in the Sea 2 Sky Corridor. Learn more at facebook.com/ whistlerbreakfastclub

Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FUNDRAISING AND COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

PEAK Peak Performance PERFORMANCE Physiotherapy & Massage Therapy PHYSIOTHERAPY AND MASSAGE 11-4154 Village Green (in the Crystal Lodge) Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4

Seeking a Part-Time or Full-Time

Front Desk Agent

Please send your resume to peakp@telus.net or drop off at reception to the attn: Erica.

74 AUGUST 22, 2019

The Squamish Hospice Society is a non-profit organization that provides support and programs for Sea to Sky residents and their loved ones dealing with life limiting illness. The demand for our services is growing and we are eagerly seeking a part time Fundraising and Communications Coordinator to join our team. The ideal candidate will have: • Proven leadership in a public sector or non-profit environment including the ability to guide, support, motivate and delegate • Excellent interpersonal skills and be able to maintain successful working relationships with the Board of Directors, staff, donors, our committees, community leaders and other charitable organizations • Planning, organizational and management skills • Education or experience in communications, fundraising and event planning • Demonstrated competency with a wide range of computer and social media platforms If you are an enthusiastic individual interested in working for a growing non-profit please see the full job description online at www.squamishhospice.com. Please submit expressions of interest to info@seatoskycommunityhospice.com by 5pm September 6, 2019

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page.

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities · Chief Administrative Officer · Program Leader · Administrative Assistant - Legislative Services · Lifeguard/Swim Instructor

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.


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Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com

District of Squamish

START YOUR HOSPITALITY ADVENTURE TODAY!

Career Opportunities Manager of Sustainability and Climate Change Regular Full Time

We are currently recruiting for the following positions:

This brand new position will lead the Sustainability Program at the District of Squamish. It will be strategically focused and play a critical role in leading climate change work and influencing policy to achieve District-wide sustainability and climate change goals.

Room Attendant Housekeeping Houseperson

Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org.

Dishwasher Night Cleaner, Stewarding

Records Management Coordinator Regular Full Time

$500 SIGNING BONUS FOR ALL HIRES

This key role is responsible for implementing, maintaining, and improving the District’s corporate records management system. Experience working in Records Management in a local government environment or other public organization is required.

STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE | SKI PASS DISCOUNT WELLNESS ALLOWANCE | GLOBAL HOTEL STAY DISCOUNTS COMPETITIVE WAGES | EXTENDED MEDICAL BENEFITS GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT FOR FULL DETAILS AND TO APPLY, PLEASE VISIT:

www.fairmontcareers.com

squamish.ca/careers

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

EXCLUSIVE LUXURY LAND ROVER EXCURSIONS The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202 Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca

Now Hiring for the Following Position: EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPERS – CASUAL • Competitive Wages - $25/HR • Discounted Food • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

FULL TIME / PART TIME

NATURE TOUR GUIDE Guide Income ranges from $18 to $35+ per hour

QUALIFICATIONS •

Must have BC Class 5 drivers license

Knowledge of BC bears, other wildlife, local flora, fauna and natural history is valuable

Guiding & Off-road driving experience plus photography skills are a bonus * If you are passionate about wildlife & nature, we can train you!

Please forward resumes to info@whistlerdiscoverytours.com

SOLID CONTRACTING is currently looking for

CARPENTERS We offer full-time/flex-time positons in a positive, safe work environment. Salary based on experience. Send us your resume or call Solidcontracting@gmail.com 604-966-7062

solid-homes.com

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Service Electrician and Apprentices email resumes to: office@westelectric.ca AUGUST 22, 2019

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FAMILY RESOURCES KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

FOOD & BEVERAGE OPPORTUNITIES Host / Hostess Banquet Server Banquet Houseperson In-Room-Dining Server

We think that you’ll LOVE working at Nita Lake Lodge!

Junior Server—Wildflower, Mallard Lounge

• Enjoy working with a great team,

Bartender, Portobello

• Discounts at our Spa and Restaurants, • Season End Bonus, • Work away from the village in beautiful Creekside! Current positions include: Host, Server Assistant, Banquet Server, Pastry Assistant, Spa Receptionist, Maintenance Associate.oday

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

Deli Attendant / Barista, Portobello Pastry Cook 1, 2, 3 Chef de Partie Cook 1, 2, 3 STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE | SKI PASS DISCOUNT WELLNESS ALLOWANCE | GLOBAL HOTEL STAY DISCOUNTS COMPETITIVE WAGES | EXTENDED MEDICAL BENEFITS OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT FOR FULL DETAILS AND TO APPLY, PLEASE VISIT:

www.fairmontcareers.com

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org. Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE.

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org.

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

· Night Audit

PROJECT LEAD, RESEARCH Full Time, 1 Year Contract

The Project Lead is responsible for the coordination and execution of a large scale research and data communication plan to be executed throughout the length of the contract. The project will involve research reporting, building interactive data visualizations, coordination and facilitation of training sessions, and communication with both internal and external stakeholders. The ideal candidate is knowledgeable about tourism in Whistler and Whistler’s visitors, up-to-date on current market research trends, and preferably has experience analyzing data and writing research reports.

· Maintenance · Room Attendants Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more.

• Travel Consultant

To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to:

• Database Analyst

beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com

Tourism Whistler Is Also Recruiting For:

For a complete job description and to apply, visit us online at whistler.com/careers.

SUMMER EDITION OUt NOW! 76 AUGUST 22, 2019

We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101 Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101


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Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management firm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benefits Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment Current Career Opportunities:

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org

• NIGHT AUDIT • GUEST SERVICES AGENT • GUEST SERVICES SUPERVISOR • APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1

We’re Hiring

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. APPLY TODAY!

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hardworking candidates are invited to apply.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Experienced Server Food Expeditor / Trainee Server Host / Hostess Server Assistant Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily.

We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com

Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for qualified Whistler employees . Visit www. whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455

Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full & Part Time Housekeepers & House Persons $19.00 per hour Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

The Sweetest Job In Town! We’re Hiring! For the right candidate we offer a Ski Pass and Competitive Wages.

Full time & part time positions available. Work in a fun environment and with a great team! Apply in person with resume at our store in Whistler’s Marketplace. Staff accommodation in village available for select staff. GreatGlassElevatorCandyShop.com

AUGUST 22, 2019

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SOCIAL SERVICES

SCANDINAVE SPA WHISTLER

1 2Spa is3recruiting 8 Scandinave for 2 the following positions: 3 4 Reservation 6 Supervisor 9 7 Building 1 Caretaker 4 6 Spa Assistant Director

Epic Food. Epic History. Epic Parties. Sushi Village is looking for their next Rockstar Restaurant Manager! A great opportunity for a hands-on, on the floor manager, with tons of personality and the customer focus at the heart of it. Responsibilities: • Ensure daily operations function as efficiently as possible to maximize a positive dining experience • Lead by example! Offer hands on management style with strong leadership skills • Personality! Shine bright and look after our extensive return clientele • Additional responsibilities will include any of the following; Staff Development, Bar Management, Event & Group Bookings

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• Commitment and Dedication • Your own unique experience • Teamwork and interpersonal skills • Effective leadership and management skills

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Education/Qualification: • University or College designation in Hospitality or Culinary Management an asset • Minimum 4 - 5 years’ experience leading teams in a restaurant or retail environment

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Full Job Description available on Indeed.com If you think you've got the passion, desire and experience we're looking for, please send us your CV with a little about you! All applicants must speak fluent English, be eligible to work in Canada, and provide two work references.

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: HOUSEKEEPERS **$500 Signing Bonus** plus: • Competitive Wages • Wellness Allowance • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Complimentary Associate Stays • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts

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Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

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Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

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Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

3 5 2 1 4 6 7 9 1 7 1 6 2 9 8 4 1 JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! 8 hiring 4 full 2 time 5 & part 3time: We are 2GRILL 3 COOKS HOSTS (PART TIME & FULL TIME) 1

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Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

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Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org.

Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced # 31 work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

HARD

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

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Don’t miss out. Apply now at https://www.scandinave.com/en/careers/location/whistler/

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Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for HARD more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

WHAT WE ARE OFFERING

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SUPPORT GROUPS

• Bath access anytime for you and a friend # 29 • HARD Free yoga classes • Extended health benefits • Free massage after 3 months probation • Subsidized staff accommodation • Great work environment focused on work life balance

Working Conditions: • Must be available to work evenings, holidays and weekends as business dictates • Long periods of standing, walking and talking

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

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SMART Recovery Whistler (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. HARD Drop-in: Registration is not necessary. Wednesdays 5:30-7:00pm Whistler Health Centre (2nd floor-group room)

RELIGION

Employment Opportunities:

Guest Services Manager # 29

7 9 1 2 5 3 8 4 6 2 6 8 4 7 9 5 1 3 4 3 5 8 6 1 2 7 9 5 7 3 1 2 4 9 6 8 6 2 4 9 8 7 1 3 5 1 8 9 5 3 6 4 2 7 3 5 2 7 1 8 6 9 4 9 1 7 6 4 5 3 8 2 Competitive wages, health benefi 8 4 ts, 6 casual 3 9 2environment 7 5 1

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com 78 AUGUST 22, 2019

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Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com

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4 7 9 2 5 8 3 1 6 8 6 1 9 7 3 5 4 2 Roman Catholic Church3 2 5 1 4 Come 6 7 celebrate 8 9 mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler 2 3 6 8 9 4 1 7 5 on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5 1 7 6 3 Thursday/Friday 2 8 9 4 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, 9 Francis 8 4 5of Assisi, 1 7 Pemberton 2 6 3 5:45pm. St. on Sunday1 12:30pm 9 8 4and2 Friday 5 6 9am. 3 7St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 7 4 2 3 6 1 9 5 8 604-905-4781 6 5 3 7 8 9 4 2 1

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Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SIX TEACHER Position Type: Categories: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Start Date: Posting Date: Closing Date:

Grade Six Teacher Elementary 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grids August 26, 2019 July 30, 2019 Until Position Is Filled

Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lí wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12.

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 6 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Jump Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally

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Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information: Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’ólacw Community School PO Box 604, Mount Currie, BC, V0N 2K0 Tel: 604-894-6131 Fax: 604- 894-5717

We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

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Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

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Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

RENT

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant Handyperson

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Head Coach, Skeleton

Whistler Olympic Park Heavy Duty Mechanic Groomer Operator Equipment Operator Sport Coach Manager, Marketing

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

Serving BC for over 30 years

Busy Structural Steel Fabrication business in Pemberton is seeking to fill multiple positions within the company.

• Part Time Office Assistant • Full Time Experienced Steel Fabricator • Full Time Labourer Interested candidates to send Resume and CV to info@wwswelding.ca.

SUMMER EDITION

OUt NOW! AUGUST 22, 2019

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Title: Location: Status: Reporting to: Wage/Salary: Start Date: Closing Date:

Child and Youth Therapist Master’s Degree in Counselling Psychology or Equivalent Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. .8FTE to 1.0 Full Time (4 days per week or 5 days per week) – Part Time Negotiable School Principal Commensurate with Experience August 27, 2019 Post until position is filled

Summary: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Xet’olacw Community School is looking to hire a full time child and youth therapist for their school. The child and youth therapist will work with students aged 4-19 within a school based setting. In addition to being trauma informed, flexible and having experience working with Indigenous students, preferred therapeutic modalities include narrative therapy, expressive arts, and CBT. The successful candidate will demonstrate clear boundaries, strong ethics and a firm understanding of informed consent. The successful candidate will be able to both understand and honour the impact of the history of colonialism on Indigenous communities in their work with the students, their families, the staff and the community. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • A Master’s Degree in Counselling Psychology or equivalent • Excellent communication skills; confidence to role model these skills and engage in them • Be registered with the BCACC, CCPA (certified member) and/or the BCTF • Ability to liaise (or learn to liaise) between Indigenous and nonindigenous culture, work within a team, on various teams and independently • Flexibility and collaborative team player • Engages in consistent and healthy self-care practices • Open to Learning Key Deliverables: • Provide therapy to children and youth aged 4-18 and carry a caseload of individual clients, co-facilitate group therapy and maintain appropriate records. • Participate in school based teams, inter-agency teams and develop mental health resources when needed • Liaise and attend meetings with other health care professionals and service providers when requested by clients (to best support a circle of care and mental health) and with appropriate informed consent. Key Responsibilities: • Arrive each school day by 8:30 a.m. Be available after hours and on holidays under extenuating circumstances for at risk students and their families. • Create a schedule that outlines your therapeutic caseload and that honours the scheduling needs of the school (and individual classrooms). • Co-facilitate or facilitate teaching classes, group therapy and super courses. • Provide therapy and classroom psychoeducation that is culturally competent, has a clear beginning, middle and end and that is tailored to the needs of the individual or group. • Be available for debriefing and support for staff regarding mental health in the classroom and to support the mental health of the students on your caseload. • Participate in peer supervision and personal supervision as needed or requested. • Be open to participating in culturally oriented activities (including but not limited to; stein Valley hiking, Outdoor-based super courses, learning Ucwalmicwts words and phrases). Send cover letter and resume including references.

Rare opportunity to join our team! Immediately hiring a strong, reliable server. Part-time, flexible hours. Fun, busy work environment. Make a great income, enjoy a free meal, employee discounts and staff outings! 604-9350055 whistlersamuraibowl@gmail.com

We are the Spa for you

The Pony Restaurant-All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experience necessary, part time position. Server: must have experience in similar fast paced role. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca

If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting:

Executive Chef & Outside Operations Manager Northern Escape Heli-Skiing is looking for an Executive Chef and an Outside Operations Manager to join our team for the upcoming winter season, and hopefully beyond. We operate 3 lodges in Terrace BC and provide a dynamic work environment with great benefits. If you think you are the right person for the job, tell us why in your cover letter and send us your resume to chad@neheliskiing.com Job descriptons can be found at : https://www.neheliskiing.com/jobopportunities

REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST (signing bonus applicable) SPA PRACTITIONER • SPA CLEANER ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.

PUT YOUR CAREER ON A NEW PATH Photo credit Justa Jeskova

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: CHILD AND YOUTH THERAPIST

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

DATABASE ANALYST Full Time, Year Round

The Web Development and Information Technology team offers responsive, friendly support to ensure that everything works so employees can get to the job at hand; improving overall effectiveness and productivity. As an IT team member, The Database Analyst’s role is to build, maintain, repair, and upgrade the various Tourism Whistler and Whistler.com databases. The Analyst is responsible for querying data, providing reporting on all databases, and providing business analysis and 2nd level support to Tourism Whistler’s Finance System and CRM tools. The ideal candidate will have strong technical, analytical and communication skills, and an excellent working knowledge of Microsoft programs such as: SQL Server, SSRS, Dynamics 365 and GP.

Gordon J. wiber & Associates Inc. Accounting Technician Well-established, CPA firm located in Whistler, BC. The firm offers a good work / life balance environment and a flexible schedule for the candidate to enjoy the outdoor lifestyle that Whistler offers We are looking for a full-time staff accounting technician. The successful candidate must have previous experience in a public accounting firm and should require very little training and be able to work independently in our small office. Bilingual office, knowledge of French is beneficial. valerie@whistlerca.com

TEMP WORK/ FULL-TIME JOBS - Whistler Personnel Solutions find your perfect Side Hustle! www.whistler-jobs.com

Tourism Whistler Is Also Recruiting For: •Project Lead, Research (1 Year Contract) •Travel Consultant For a complete job description and to apply, visit online at whistler.com/careers.

Upon receiving your information an applicant’s Declaration and Agreement will be sent to be signed. Contact Information:

Verna Stager, Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Phone: 604 894-6131 / Fax: 604 894-5717 glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca

We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

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EXECUTIVE

THE INN AT WHISTLER VILLAGE & MOUNTAIN SIDE HOTEL

POSITIONS AVAILABLE: FULL TIME/ PART TIME HOUSEKEEPING MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATE HOUSEPERSON Competitive Wages *Housing Available* Great Summer and Winter Incentives Submit resumes to: gm.whistler@executivehotels.net

WHISTLER’S PREMIER VISITOR MAGAZINE ON STANDS NOW!

Are you a seasoned restaurant veteran looking to work in a smaller and more personalized environment? Or are you new to the service industry and looking to expand your skills with other like minded individuals? We welcome both and have the following positions currently available:

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE FOR FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS HOSTS/ EXPEDITORS With competitive wages and great gratuities, Basalt also offers MSP/Extended Health Benefits after the first 90 days of full-time employment, along with a Spirit Pass program for those employed full time. If you enjoy and excel while working within a small team, we would love to meet you!

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Whistler Chamber of Commerce Excellence Award Winner 2018 Whistler Waldorf School Inspiring a Genuine Love of Learning Currently Seeking for the 2019-2020 School Year Elementary Grades Teacher (full time) Elementary Grades Teachers (part time and on-call) High School Drama, PE, Fine Arts, French, Science, Math Teachers (part time and on-call) Administrative Assistant / Registrar (full time, excluding school holidays)

Pick up our Summer 2019 issue now Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

BC Teaching Certificate or eligibility required. Waldorf Teaching Certificate or commitment to Waldorf teacher training required. For more information and to apply visit our website. whistlerwaldorf.com

FULL TIME and PART TIME POSITIONS WITH A COMMERCIAL CLEANING COMPANY • Starting wage of $20.00 per hour. • Flexible working hours • Must have a valid Driver’s License Send resume to: teamcwhistler@telus.net Or call: 604 935 8715 AUGUST 22, 2019

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: Food & Beverage / Catering Manager A multi functional role overseeing operations in the Breakfast Bistro and Catering & Event Execution

Here’s to the Journey

• Competitive Wages

At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound!

• Wellness Allowance

HOUSEKEEPING COORDINATOR ASSISTANT BANQUET MANAGER PEOPLE & CULTURE GENERALIST SOUS CHEF SALES MANAGER

KITCHEN RECEIVER/ COORDINATOR RESERVATIONS AGENT

• Flexible Schedule • Discounted Food

BELL ATTENDANT

• Extended Medical Benefits

BANQUET SERVER

• Spa Discounts

PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• Associate Housing

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers. careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Housekeepers Needed

Sharing your passion for the corridor?

Signing Bonus & Great Benefits! Both Full Time & Part Time available! The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom

. Looking for mature, year round, committed team players for our Whistler locations and our new Squamish location. . Full time position (option for 4 or 5 day work week). MUST be available weekends. Evenings required in peak season. . Customer Service skills a top priority. Luxury sales experience helpful, retail experience preferred plus the ability to have fun! . Second language will be a huge asset (Mandarin, Spanish, Japanese etc.) . Competitive wages based on experience . Competitive sales commissions, excellent perks inc. Extended medical/dental, health and wellness bonus, birthday bonus credit after 3 months.

Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

Resumes to be dropped off at either Whistler location or emailed to tina@Keirfinejewellery.com Please indicate which location you are applying for (Whistler or Squamish)

Details:

Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com 82 AUGUST 22, 2019


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

CURRENT LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE:

Banquet Manager Assistant Restaurant Manager, Mallard Assistant Restaurant Manager, Wildflower Executive Chief Steward STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE | SKI PASS DISCOUNT WELLNESS ALLOWANCE | GLOBAL HOTEL STAY DISCOUNTS COMPETITIVE WAGES | EXTENDED MEDICAL BENEFITS

FOR FULL DETAILS AND TO APPLY, PLEASE VISIT:

www.fairmontcareers.com

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WE’RE HIRING THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS! • Full-time and Part-time Sales Associates • Full-time Door Pre-Hanger

WE OFFER: • • • • • • •

One time Signing Bonus of $500 Wellness Allowance or Ski Pass (equivalent value) Vehicle gas allowance for Pemberton and Squamish residents Discounted Merchandise Extended Health Bene�its Competitive Wages A great work environment

JOIN OUR TEAM!

Please send all resumes to Ken Ross at kross@windsorplywood.com or apply within. Unit #107 – 1055 Millar Creek Rd., Whistler (Function Junction), BC V8E 0K7

SERVICE TECHNICIAN Great opportunity for a super motivated/organized person to excel in the field of hardware installation and lock technician services. Compensation starting at $24-$30 depending on skill level. Includes: Health Benefits, Mobile Phone Plan, Ski Pass The successful individual will have experience in carpentry and/or building maintenance. Any experience in low voltage electrical and/or hotel card access systems will prove very beneficial. Good communication and customer service skills as well as a strong work ethic are essential to this position. Please reply to alpinelock@telus.net with a resume and cover letter outlining your suitability and qualifications for the position. No drop-ins or phone calls please, apply only by email.

JINX HAIR Our Sylvie will be leaving Jinx on August 15th. We thank her for her wonderful work and we will miss her. This is an excellent opportunity for someone to rent a chair. If you are interested please mail your qualifications and references to: Jinx Hair 101-7331 Arbutus St. Pemberton, B.C. V0N 2L1

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Room Attendants Guest Services Agents Maintenance

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment AUGUST 22, 2019

83


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Now Hiring for the Following Positions:

Flexibility to Suit Your Lifestyle At Westin, we believe that a great work-life balance is the foundation of wellness. Join our dynamic banquets team and have the flexibility to live your best life in Whistler!

BANQUET SERVERS - CASUAL

EARN $19 PER HOUR IN A FUN & ENERGETIC ENVIRONMENT JOB REQUIREMENTS

PERKS & BENEFITS

• ‘SERVING IT RIGHT’ CERTIFICATION • MINIMUM OF 2 SHIFTS PER MONTH

• FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES • COMPETITIVE WAGE

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

HOUSEPERSON – OVERNIGHT BREAKFAST COOK BIKE VALET HOUSEPERSON VALET BANQUET SERVERS – CASUAL BREAKFAST DISHWASHER BREAKFAST / BISTRO ASSOCIATE (Seasonal Bonus) GUEST SERVICE AGENT (Commission Incentives) GUEST EXPERIENCE MANAGER

• • • • • • •

Competitive Wages Associate Housing Wellness Allowance Flexible Schedule Discounted Food Extended Medical Benefits Spa Discounts

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Join Our Team Employment Opportunity

We are currently interviewing:

Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

VillageOfPemberton 84 AUGUST 22, 2019

www.pemberton.ca

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Do you want to share in something special? If challenge & fun at work is what you desire, come see us today!

Servers Cooks Hosts Expeditors Barbacks Setters Shift Managers Visit us anytime or email us at apply.whistler@earls.ca

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

E R ’ E W

hiring

LOCATED IN WHISTLER MARKETPLACE VILLAGE NORTH

Join our Team Let’s fall in love with food together

WE’RE HIRING

· MEAT LEADER · BAKERY LEADER · · HR GENERALIST · DAIRY LEADER · CASHIERS · · PRODUCE EXPERTS · GROCERY EXPERTS ·

TO APPLY, SEND RESUME TO careers@freshstmarket.com

ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT HUMAN RESOURCES CAREER OPPORTUNITY School District No. 48 (Sea to Sky) is seeking a high performing professional with seasoned Human Resource skills and administration background. This position is an excluded staff position and offers a competitive rate of pay and benefits package. We ask that applications be made on-line through the Make A Future website by no later than Monday, August 26, 2019 at 4:00 pm. http://www.makeafuture.ca/regions-districts/ bc-public-school-districts/metro/sea-to-sky/

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Guest Service Agent - Relief Duty Manager - Room Attendant (Housekeeper) - Houseperson / Public Area Attendant - Bellperson

- Part-time External Maintenance Associate (work outside taking care of the exterior of the Hotel) - Property Maintenance Associate

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

AUGUST 22, 2019

85


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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

WE’RE HIRING

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. Apply today!

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

We are a boutique group events and lodging venue, located 15 minutes south of Whistler. Our exclusive property has 35 guest rooms, unparalleled meeting spaces and vast gardens, spanning over 20 forested acres. Chef De Partie We are well known for our food quality, sustainability and creative culinary experience. Using the freshest ingredients from our geodesic dome greenhouse and gardens, our food travels just minutes to our tables. You will have a unique opportunity to experience all aspects of the kitchen and truly develop your skills. Housekeepers (Casual) Work a little or a lot - you decide. We are seeking positive self starters to keep our spaces sparkling. No dark hallways and housekeeping carts here. We spend lots of our time outside through the forest and over creeks to get the job done. Catering Servers (Casual) Create your own schedule! A perfect match for warm, fun and service oriented individuals to host groups in our historical main lodge dining room. Be a part of our guest's most special events and memories.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Server Assistants Hosts / Hostesses

BACK-OF-HOUSE Line Cooks (1-2 years experience)

We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Apply to careers@thebrewcreekcentre.com

Staff housing available We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT

Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests! Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

86 AUGUST 22, 2019

Your next big adventure starts here.

Certified Dental Assistant for busy family dental clinic

Located 20 minutes north of whistler in the beautiful pemberton valley. Also seeking

Part-time Dental Hygienist Hours negotiable with competitive wage. Email “info@pembertonvalleydental.ca” or fax to 604-894-6934


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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SCANDINAVE SPA WHISTLER

JOB FAIR SEPTEMBER 5TH Scandinave Spa is hosting it’s annual winter job fair on September 5th from 8:30am until 12pm All applicants invited to the Job Fair will get FREE access to our baths afterwards!!!

The Blackcomb Lodge join our team

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR • Baristas – Passion for coffee • Guest Experience Agents – Attentiveness and Above & Beyond Attitude • Reservation Agents – Patience and Interpersonal Skills • Spa Experience Attendants – Team Spirit • Day Cleaners – Attention to Detail • Night Cleaners – Night Owl • Spa Experience Team Lead – Nature lover with Leadership Skills • Guest Experience Team Lead – Empathetic and Supportive

We offer competitive wage, flexible We offer competitive wage, flexible work work, schedules, a benefi variety of benefits schedules, a variety of ts including including employee discounts, training employee discounts, training & development, & development, career advancement career advancement opportunities and more! opportunities and more!

WHAT WE ARE OFFERING

• Free bath access anytime for you and a friend • Free yoga classes • Free Ski Pass or Wellness package (equivalent value) • Free massage after 3 months probation • Extended health benefits • Subsidized staff accommodation • Great work environment focused on work life balance

Front Desk Agent (FT)

•• Front Desk Agent (FT) Room Attendant (FT)

questions? let’s chat questions? let’s chat 604.932.4155 604.932.4155 hr@blackcomblodgeltd.com hr@coasthotels.com 4220 Gateway Drive

apply online now coastcareers.ca

•• Room Attendant (FT)(FT) Laundry Attendant •• Laundry Attendant Houseperson (FT) (FT) •• Houseperson (FT) (FT) Night Supervisor •• Night Auditor (FT) Maintenance Ambassador (FT/PT)

Don’t miss out. Apply now at https://www.scandinave.com/en/careers/location/whistler/

Let us take care of you! • • • • Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Whistler = A good life in

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted. AUGUST 22, 2019

87


CALL THE EXPERTS

Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

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SURVEYING

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SURVEYING

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88 AUGUST 22, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

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Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


PUZZLES ACROSS

1 Cooking spice 6 Goad 10 Intelligent 15 Command 20 Flavorful seed 21 Cache 22 Loosen 23 Handy’s “-- Street Blues” 24 Pillow covers 25 Kind of lily 26 Tuned in 27 Lazes about 28 Intention 29 Sleep noisily 31 H.H. Munro 33 Fingerprint, maybe 35 Skilled person 36 Meat turner 38 -- out (withdraws) 39 Poet’s tributes 40 Rattlesnake kin 41 Brad of “Fight Club” 42 See eye-to-eye 44 Nabbed 46 Gamble 48 Moola 51 Changes skirt length 53 Let go 58 Tempe inst. 59 Bark 61 Install a lawn 62 Do over 63 Superman foe -- Luthor 65 Index 67 Dogie stopper 69 Most uncouth 71 Novelist -- Grey

72 Wisconsin farm 74 Actor’s prompt 75 Kitchen appliances 76 Mild protest (hyph.) 77 Cursory inspection (hyph.) 79 Fair-haired ones 80 Movies 81 Naturalist John - 82 Satisfied 83 Sounded the bell 84 On solid ground 87 Glossier 88 Went off the track 92 Anchors 93 Took the risk 94 Quick turn 95 Foolish plus 96 Diligent insects 97 Bulbous 98 John Lennon tune 100 Main idea 101 Step on it 102 Flat-topped hills 103 Knows how 104 Rights movement word 106 Paris street 107 Most tidy 109 Farthest point 112 Ad come-on 114 Crowlike bird 115 Placid 117 Energy 119 Prefers charges 122 Set a price 125 Citadel 126 Italian wine city 127 Make fun of 131 Shout

132 133 134 136 137 139 141 143 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152

Injection Get steamed up Catchers’ gloves Pesky insect Nimble Indian rulers Pasture entrance Cookout locale Ms. Zellweger Carroll heroine Pedro’s honorific Actor’s need Sharpened Like circus lions Familiar auth. Exotic fruit

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21

Hombres’ homes Square Orange Bowl city Suffix for hero Monster-hunter’s loch Race official Fishing gear Web addr. Figured out Pennsylvania settlers Imprudent Give -- -- whirl Roughly Ship bottoms Emmy relative Rainbow band -- Lama Vote in Turn back the clock Rifle attachment

30 Routine 32 Arkin or Bede 34 Cheerful 37 Knock gently 41 Qt. parts 43 Chap 44 Drive away 45 Coated with flour 47 Chow down 48 Emerson’s middle name 49 From Bangkok 50 College major 52 To be, to Brutus 54 Fencing needs 55 Subtraction word 56 Make happy 57 Tough fabric 60 Indiana hoopster 62 Ship or plane part 64 Warrior princess 66 Small earthquakes 68 California’s Big - 69 Imitated Kermit 70 Got the soap out 71 Hurling barbs at 73 Not his or hers 75 Raw wool 76 Neighbor of Oman 78 Go for the gold 79 Mixtures 80 Kind of pool 82 Venus and Mars 83 Queenlike 84 Bombay nanny 85 Pertaining to sound 86 Traveler’s stop 87 Draws the latch 88 Lose brightness

89 Hideouts 90 Follow 91 Prevent from proceeding 93 Dove’s shelter 94 Region 97 Takeoff site 98 Make war 99 Blockhead 102 Ewe’s plaint 103 Italian noblewoman 105 Winged insect 108 McBain and Sullivan 109 Stirred up 110 Hair treatment 111 Frat letter 113 Body part

116 118 119 120 121 123 124 126 128 129 130 132 135 138 140 142 144

Blot out Aquatic mammal False alarm Implored Gazing at Herring Eucalyptus muncher Part of PABA Over and over Hang on to Temple city of Japan Pay attention Electronic junk mail Peggy or Brenda Lehrer or Carrey Twice five Muslim honorific

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: HARD

9

4

7 8 7

7 2 5 9 6 2 8 4 6 5 9 5 7 4 2 8

6 2 7 8

1

HARD Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 30

ANSWERS ON PAGE 78

AUGUST 22, 2019

89


MAXED OUT

On getting it wrong… AS CHALLENGING AS THIS last week has been for almost anyone with a Telus email address—and particularly for me—it seems it’s time to purge and do a semi-regular Tales From the Inbox column. Up front I have to warn correspondents that I’m working from memory and, therefore, must out of necessity paraphrase the emails you’ve sent me. That’s because the 100 or so emails that were in my inbox last Wednesday disappeared, lost in the ozone, perhaps never to be returned. When my email became semi-functional again this Tuesday morning, they were gone, along with all the various folders in which I kept what I previously thought of as important emails on a variety of subjects. I hope the

BY G.D. MAXWELL Canadian Revenue Agency, my insurance broker and others will understand. If they do, they’re miles ahead of Telus, which seems not to understand at all. Along with the vanquished emails were the email addresses of, well, everyone I’ve ever corresponded with. You know who you are. I’d love to hear from you again, if for no other reason than to rebuild my address folder in the event Telus can’t. Please contact me at gd.maxwell@shaw.ca or the email address at the top of this column. On with the show. Dear Max, I am not a liar. None of my colleagues who sell real estate in Whistler are liars. You have slandered us in your last column. We (collectively) await your apology. P.O’ed Realtor Dear POR, I apologize. No, I don’t mean I apologize the same way, say, Justin Trudeau means it about his little ethics breach. I mean I sincerely apologize. Just to be clear, Whistler realtors do not lie. Sometimes, in writing 1,100 or so words, one or two slip in that shouldn’t. In last week’s column those were “lie,” as in the sentence, “They lie, prevaricate, dance around the truth and use words in ways not yet documented by etymologists.” The other was “lying” when used later in a sentence beginning, “And bless their lying souls....” In my defence—and by no means am I trying to blunt my sincere apology—I thought it was clear, from the paragraph preceding the one in which those words slipped past my self-editing radar, that I was referring to your brethren and sistren who flog recreational property in, “... Cariboo’s cottage country.” Having purchased the oft-referred to Smilin’ Dog Manor in the southern Cariboo some 18 years ago, I had the opportunity to work with several local realtors and have since become friendly with some others.

90 AUGUST 22, 2019

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

And were I to write those sentences over again this week, I’d leave those words out entirely—they sting too much. Prevaricate, be economical with the truth and other such euphemisms would, I freely admit, have been less hurtful while still getting to the heart of the matter in cottage country. But like I said, a single word, or words, among so many can apparently be like a bullet to the heart. When shopping for a cottage in said locale, I personally experienced each and every one of the, I thought, humourous examples I gave to illustrate the casual association with facts exhibited by realtors in that part of the province, as opposed to here in Tiny Town. It got so bad at one point that I threatened physical violence— swatting with a rolled-up newspaper to be

it was abundantly clear that definition of recreational real estate was a galaxy removed from the very posh, very recent, very luxurious recreational real estate available in Whistler. At any rate, I can assure you it will never happen again. Please accept my apology. It was my fault alone; not the editor’s. Please feel free to berate me personally should I ever offend you in the future. Humbly, Max Hi GD, Woo-wee, how about that report by the ethics commissioner? Looking forward to your rebuttal. Or will you just admit you got it wrong? A Fan

I have bottomless experience admitting I get things wrong. After all, I’ve been married most of my life. precise—if the realtor showed me one more “fixer-upper” prefaced by the phrase, “Just bring in a bulldozer and have at ‘er.” Given the examples I used, e.g., “... bring(ing) in a platoon of machete-wielding day labourers...” to reach your “cozy,” e.g., “... both you and a friend cannot be inside at the same time...” cabin, I thought

Dear Fan, Admit I got it wrong? I have bottomless experience admitting I get things wrong. After all, I’ve been married most of my life. And writing an opinion column now for almost 24 years, if I had, say, $100 dollars for every time I’ve been wrong, I wouldn’t qualify for WHA rentals under the new asset guidelines!

But I’m not sure how wrong I was in this case. Actually, I can’t really remember what I wrote about it and I’m too lazy to look it up. I’m pretty sure Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion and I disagree about some things though. He determined no one, including the Prime Minister and anyone on his staff, other ministers and, quite possibly, the little voice inside Jody Wilson-Raybould’s head, should have even talked to her about her decision to not intervene in the SNC Lavalin prosecution. This seems a bit over the top to me. While I have no doubt the attorney general has the last word in things judicial in the executive branch, I don’t believe she or he should live in a vacuum. I don’t know about you but in my experience I’ve generally found a spirited debate among colleagues yields better decisions than those made solely by one person without any input from anyone else. So I’m struggling a bit with that part of Mr. Dion’s decision. At any rate, JT was wrong. I was wrong. JW-R was wrong. Andrew Scheer is wrong. The Leaders’ Debate Commission is wrong in denying Maxine Bernier a place at the debates and Elections Canada is wrong in muzzling any group that wants to speak out about climate change just because Maxine is too dumb to believe the science behind it. Depending on who they get to run in this riding, I’m likely voting Green. That’ll probably be wrong too but like I said, I’ve had a lot of experience at being wrong. Cheers, Max n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NICKLAUS NORTH

EMERALD ESTATES

NICKLAUS NORTH / GREEN LAKE ESTATES

PEMBERTON

This opulent, brand new, custom built home is situated on the 5th hole of Nicklaus North Golf Course. Featuring 4 bedroom plus a 1 bedroom suite all are exclusive with stunning ensuites. Nightly rentals allowed! $6,490,000

Inspiring views, sun and exceptional privacy from this craftsman style post and beam 4 bdrm, 4.5 bath chalet. Features media room, den, hot tub, decks, garage and easy care gardens. OPEN HOUSE Sat. Aug 24, 2 - 5 pm. $2,595,000

This 3.5 bed townhome in the Englewood Green development is a blank canvas awaiting your personal touches. The convenience of the Green Lake float plane dock, Nicklaus North Golf course and Valley trail are all a short walk from your door. $1,799,000

Custom post & beam home, 4.5 bed/4.5 bath & 1 bed rev. Suite on 10 acres. 5 Stall barn, tack room & gust studio, fenced paddocks. Ideal for horse boarding, B&B, hobby or micro farm and only 5 min to Village. $2,242,000

Carleigh Hofman

Laura Wetaski

Nick Swinburne *prec

Brigitta Fuess

8044 Cypress Place,

9483 Emerald Drive

604-805-5358

9-8030 Nicklaus North Blvd

604 938 3798

604-932-8899

7334 Clover Road

604-932-0751

WHISTLER CREEK

CREEKSIDE

EVA LAKE VILLAGE, NORDIC ESTATES

TYAUGHTON LAKE

Whistler Resort 1/4 share spacious two bed / two bath condominium residence. Future owner can use their weeks for a relaxing stay or rental pool. Nearby Creekside + Village shops / retaurants / ski lift access to enjoy! $264,900 + GST

Spacious 1 bedroom, quartershare property at the base of the Creekside Gondola. One week per month can be used for personal enjoyment/rental revenue. Hotel features; hot tubs, pool, lounge, movie theatre, games room & much more! $110,950

Eva Lake Village is a conveniently located complex within the Nordic Estates neighbourhood that is occupied by employees or retirees of Whistler and as a result offers a wonderful feeling of community. $499,000

Two acres, 450‘ of waterfront, cabin, dock and more! Explore the renowned Chilcotin trails from your door then relax with family on the terraced lawns, firepit, decks and fantastic views. Only 2hrs from Whistler. $449,000

Kathy White

Kerry Batt

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Rob Boyd

302 Week D – 2020 London Lane

604-616-6933

206D-2036 London Lane

31-2230 Eva Lake Road

604-902-5422

604-905-8199

7050 Tyaughton Lake Road

604-935-9172

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS

BRACKENDALE, SQUAMISH

GARIBALDI HIGHLANDS

11 year old vacation building at Whistler Creekside. Steps to Creekside ski gondola. 1008 sqft.,2 bedroom and 2 bathroom, modern interior finishing with a full open kitchen. 1/4 ownership, easy to manage and with great rental revenue. $245,000

This beautiful and perfect family home checks all the boxes. The home’s flexible layout can provide the option of a 4 bedroom home with a 1 bedroom suite or a 3 bedroom home with a 2 bedroom suite. Call today for your private showing! $2,899,000

On apx. 1/4 acre on Dryden Creek you’ll find this 3,150 sf ‘Timber Kings’ home. Outside: lush gardens, basalt columns, sauna cabin, whirlpool spa & workshop. Inside: 3 beds, family room/4th bedroom + office, 3 baths & 2-car garage. $1,099,000

HIGHLANDS PERFECT HOME! Located on a culde-sac next to Jura Park. 2500 sq.ft. with 4 bed & 3 bath, high efficiency heating & a/c. Detached studio/ office. Close to the Elementary school & parks $1,099,000

Ruby Jiang *prec

Caronne Marino *prec 604-905-8324

Katherine Currall

Angie Vazquez *prec

306B-2020 London Lane

6207 Eagle Drive

778-834-2002

41496 Meadow Ave

2548 Jura Crescent

604-966-1364

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

778-318-5900


3800 Sunridge Place

$8,450,000

Stunning property designed by Stuart Silk Architects - nestled beside a creek for privacy with gorgeous mountain views, 5 bedrooms, theatre, office, gym, sauna and steam and a bright inviting family room. Boys and girls en-suited bunk bedrooms. Constructed to last with concrete and Corten steel and a copper roof.

Ann Chiasson

5

604.932.7651

9483 Emerald Drive

$2,598,000

#114D - 2020 London Lane

$115,900

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mountain at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Evolution offers custom finishings, contemporary design & comes fully equipped. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, steam room, games room, exercise room & media room.

Bob Cameron*

604.935.2214

6344 Easy Street

1

$2,749,000

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Bruce Watt

5

604.905.0737

Anderson Lake

$399,000

Discover the peace and tranquility of Emerald Estates. This home is blessed with spectacular views and exceptional privacy. Unique log post and beam construction of the highest quality. Sold furnished, immaculately maintained four bedroom four and a half bath layout easily converts to create a one bedroom suite if desired. 3D Showcase: rem.ax\9483ed

This home features 5 bedrooms, three bathrooms, a den and a broad open main floor plan through the kitchen, dining and living rooms. A revenue suite could easily be added for a nanny, rental of guest separation. With plenty of covered deck space and a huge double car garage, this large lot on the upper side of Whistler Cay is not to be missed.

Featuring 100 feet of lakefront, on .68 of an acre, this property is situated on the east shore of pristine Anderson Lake, so it catches all the afternoon sun. Accessible by boat, the cabin was completely renovated in 2015, with about 936 sq ft of total living space. It boasts spectacular views up and down the lake and of the Bendor Mountain Range to the west.

Chris Wetaski

Dave Beattie*

Dave Halliwell*

4

604.938.2499

604.905.8855

5

3

604.932.7727

Price Reduced

11388 Gun Lake Road West

$875,000

#673 - 4090 Whistler Way

$372,900

WATERFRONT on beautiful GUN LAKE! This well finished large 4 bedroom family home is perfectly situated on over 300’ of lake front. Gun lake is a paradise like no other and just 2 hours north of Whistler via the Hurley Forest Service Rd. 5 km’s long and up to 350 ft deep, Gun lake has some of the cleanest and most clear waters in BC.

An unforgettable stay & a smart investment awaits you as a new owner of a .5 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 425 sf suite at The Westin, Resort & Spa,Whistler, a mountainside resort brimming with thoughtful amenities. All suites underwent a comprehensive luxury renovation in 2018 and the common areas are scheduled this year. 3D Showcase: rem.ax\673westin

Dave Sharpe

Denise Brown*

7

604.902.2779

8409 Matterhorn Drive

$1,475,000

604.935.2013

#2 - 2101 Whistler Road

.5

$599,000

3277 Arbutus Drive

$2,139,000

Outside you have incredible privacy to enjoy your new 19 foot swim spa/hot tub all year long. Gorgeous gardens of flowers and vegetables on the sunniest property in Brio. Step inside and you will be impressed with all the room. Huge loft that could be easily converted into another large bedroom to give this property 5 bedrooms!

Doug Treleaven

604.905.8626

Black Tusk

4

$648,000

Now priced below assessed value! Opportunity knocks! Amazing RI1 lot ( infill zoned ) allows for duplex and/or secondary dwelling. Easy build site with all day sunshine and mountain views. This Whistler classic ‘A’ frame has been extensively upgraded over the years and is very cute, cozy and livable while you make plans to redevelop or simply enjoy as is.

Freshly renovated 1.5 bedroom townhome! This stunning property is turn key and move in ready. Good times await as you are only a 5 minute walk to the Creekside Gondola and all amenities. Featuring new floors, new carpets, updated bathroom, new kitchen, new appliances, and fresh paint throughout, this property checks all the boxes!

Just in time for building season - this 7535 flat vacant lot in Black Tusk is ready for your client. 15 minutes south from Whistler Creekside you arrive at the gated community of Black Tusk Village. This private community offers single family housing at an attractive price point.

James Collingridge

Josh Crane

Laura Barkman

604.902.0132

2

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

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Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.902.6106

1.5

604.905.8777

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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