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MAY 2, 2019 ISSUE 26.18

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE

TO RECONCILE

Bringing culture home

Lil’wat Nation is one of many Indigenous groups trying to repatriate cultural possessions lost since colonization

16

CHAMBER CELEBRATION

Whistler

honours its top citizens for 2019

21

ALDER HONOURED

CWSAA recognizes

one of skiing’s founding fathers

60

GONE COUNTRY

Musician Kristin

Carter makes her Whistler debut


A HOME TO OUTDOOR ADVENTURE LEADING REAL ESTATE EXPERTS SINCE 1978

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3020 ST. ANTON WAY

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No. 209 is a gorgeous end unit with a wraparound deck plus views of the Valley and mountains.

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3317 PTARMIGAN PLACE, BLUEBERRY Bedrooms:

2

Bathrooms:

2

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Square Feet:

1,197

$1,150,000

ALTA VISTA

Bedrooms:

Lot Size:

Bathrooms:

2

12,965

MARIKA

4299 BLACKCOMB WAY, VILLAGE

KOENIG*

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2

RAY LONGMUIR ray@wrec.com 604-905-8464

Square Feet:

850

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Location, location, location! This newly renovated townhome is just steps from Whistler Village

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2

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4388 NORTHLANDS BLVRD., VILLAGE Bedrooms:

1

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1

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Square Feet:

558

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1450 VINE ROAD, PEMBERTON Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

3

2

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YVONNE NUMAN MIRANDA MARCOS JUSTINE EWART

DORI FAULKNER LESLIE PIPER

ANNUAL SPRING FUNDRAISER Sunday, May 5, 2019, Doors 6pm at The Point Artist-Run Centre TICKETS: thepointartists.com/events

QUE PASA

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300g

Assorted varieties, 420g

$ .49

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Carnival Organic Tortilla Chips

3

Pharmacy & Wellness PRESCRIPTIONS WHILE YOU SHOP

2018

9am to 7pm. 7 days a week.

LOOK IN-STORE FOR EVERYDAY VALUE CARD SAVINGS!

DONATE YOUR POINTS TO YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK

Organic Salsa

3

AOR Advanced Series It is through ethical discipline and evidenced-based science that AOR lead and advance the natural health industry. AOR put pharmaceutical principles into practice to create high-quality products. Pharmaceutical principles are a set of processes that allow us to ensure potency, purity, and traceability from plant to product. It also ensures that our consumers always get the same safe, effective product. Not only do they examine all of the current research, but AOR also make it happen. In their labs, new technologies are continually experimented with, in order to provide our consumers with the most advanced products available.

604.932.3545 604.905.0429

Nesters Market Pharmacy

nestersmarket.com

7019 Nesters Road (Just 1 km north of Whistler Village)

Prices Effective At Whistler Nesters From: Thursday, May 2nd to Wednesday, May 8th, 2019. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sale limited to stock on hand. Some items subject to Tax, plus deposit, recycling fee where applicable.


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

42

60

32 Bringing culture home Lil’wat Nation is one of many Indigenous groups trying to repatriate cultural possessions lost since colonization. - By Alyssa Noel

16

EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Bicycles for

42

SHANDRO ON THE SCENE

Whistler

Humanity’s Pat Montani and Playground Builders’ Keith Reynolds will

summer resident Ethan Shandro earns second-place finish in UCI World

share Citizen of the Year honours in 2019.

Cup downhill junior men’s debut.

26

54

BITE BYLAW

The Village of Pemberton is reviewing

GET CRAFTY

A new workshop series is aiming

its animal control bylaw following an alleged dog attack in the Creekside

to bring indigo dyeing and block printing to crafty locals at venues in

Village development.

Pemberton and Whistler.

28

HUT AMBASSADORS

The Alpine Club of

60

GONE COUNTRY

Vancouver country musician

Canada adapts to the social-media-fuelled popularity of picturesque huts

Kristin Carter is preparing to make her Whistler debut at the Maury Young

by designating ambassadors for the huts and for people.

Arts Centre on May 10.

COVER Pictured are carvings of Thunderbird Killer Whale Chief and Thunderbird Killer Whale Seal on display at the Brackendale Art Gallery back in 1986. Indigenous groups from around the world are currently repatriating cultural belongings lost after colonization. - Photo from the Whistler Question archives 4 MAY 2, 2019


4330 NORTHLANDS BLVD, WHISTLER

achieve a

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7

$ 49/lb

Fresh Family Pack Chicken Wing Drumettes

4 3

DELI 2 $ 29/100g 3 $ 49/100g 1 $ 19/100g

Old Fashioned Ham

NEWMAN’S OWN

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2

$ 99

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each

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415ml

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White Bread Baked Fresh in Store

2 $ 99 each 1 $ 99 each

PRODUCE Bananas Guatemala

8

Bathroom $ Tissue PUREX

Kiwi Fruit Italy

99

Cauliflower California TROPICANA Orange Juice Pulp Free, With Pulp, Lots of Pulp, Some Pulp OLYMPIC

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each

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900ml

4 4 $ 69- 49 3 4 $ 1199 each $ 2 FOR 3 $ 69- 99

ANNIE’S Pasta Dinner Mixes Mild Cheese,Aged Cheddar, White Cheddar

170g

ADAM’S Peanut

500g

$ 99 each

340g

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EL SABROSO

1.66L

650ml

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$ 99

1.65L-1.75L

Yogurt Selected Varieties

SALT SPRING

Classic Ice Cream

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GROCERY

each

15 pack Double Roll, Ultra Double Roll

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MCCAIN Frozen French Fries Crinkle, Shoestring, Hashbrowns

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WE ARE NOW HIRING for ALL POSITIONS

Available to start immediately. Apply in person.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES May 8, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES May 8, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

All Prices Effective THURS. MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Full-service deli, In-store bakery & Floral Department Not valid if combined with PLU 91911

91910

604-938-2850

www.marketplaceiga.com

Not valid if combined with PLU 91910

91911


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns #103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

08 OPENING REMARKS Are you ready to evacuate? This month, we will learn more about how the resort would respond to an emergency that requires all of us to flee our homes.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR We have our First Nations neighbours to thank for the fourpercentage-point increase in protected areas through the Sea-to-Sky Land and Resource Management Plan.

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Is it time to expand Whistler’s food-truck offerings? It’s clear the appetite for food trucks is there, but it is up to the municipality to decide whether to satiate it or not.

94 MAXED OUT The season that was. A tricky year to describe, it was all about weather and

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

mountain operations.

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca

Environment & Adventure

Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

30 ECOLOGIC Lost amidst the miasma of recriminations around the SNC Lavalin affair were two key

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

31 THE OUTSIDER Navigating unfamiliar terrain halfway across the world in the stormy weather would

things Canadians shouldn’t have missed, says columnist Leslie Anthony.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

normally have columnist Vince Shuley retreating into the culinary comfort of a Tyrolean alpine lodge. But not this time.

40 TRAVEL Cruising for Castles on the Danube and Rhine rivers fit the bill for travel writer Karin Leperi, as the cruise took her from Budapest to Amsterdam.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

50 VELOCITY PROJECT While I have this body, I will do the things that only an embodied being can do, writes columnist Lisa Richardson.

52 EPICURIOUS Bearfoot Bistro is the only Whistler restaurant to make Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list. The upscale eatery ranked 59th on annual list voted on by top chefs, food critics and restaurateurs.

56 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW This week, Feet Banks offers a tribute to director John Singleton and looks back on the impact of his decades in the industry.

58 MUSEUM MUSINGS Delve into the history of the Alpine Lodge, one of three lodges that were located around the Garibaldi Townsite in 1914.

62 PIQUECAL The Con Brio music festival descends upon various venues in Whistler with a variety of band and orchestra music from Thursday until Monday.

2 Lots – Pemberton Industrial Park

JUST INGHAM LISTED R E A L

E S T A T E

11 deals to date in 2019. how can I help you?

TIMBERLANE .263 ha  4 residential units allowed  1,200 sq ft office/2 bd suite  15’ x 40’ cover-all bldg.  Fully fenced

NEW Lower Londsdale The Atrium NEW 2 Development Lots 1 bd/2bth 167 E. Esplanade $749.9k Downtown Pemberton $2.5M

STONECUTTER .196 ha  Fully fenced  Power pole w/ panel

JUST SOLD Summer Cottage 2 bd/1 bth Thormanby Isl. $850k

LAND

10 ACRES with Ocean Views Thormanby Isl. Cottage $899.5k

COPPERDOME Pemb. Meadows

156 Acres Birkenhead 969 Blackwater, Pemb. $1.2M

Outdoor Lodge 19 bdrms $1.995M

ESTABLISHED B&B Pemberton Sunshine Coast Beach Cottage Thormanby Isl. 5 bd/4bth $1.599M 1357 Elmwood 9 bd/7 bth $2.599M CONNECTING VANCOUVER, SEA-TO-SKY & PEMBERTON BUYERS & SELLERS

VIEW Ridge Homesite Pemb. NEW W. Van. Beachside Condo 14th & Bellevue...A+ Views $2.195M .65 acres 7508 Pebble Cr. $449k

) 604 ) 230-8167

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F R A N K I N G H A M . C O M 6 MAY 2, 2019

CUSTOM HOME with Lake Views LAND Legacy Ranch in Pemb. Lot 177 Lillooet Lake Estates $495k 387 acres, river frontage $2.65M


R'S TLE E S I WH Y TRU T N L ON ENDE P Y E R D E IN C GRO RE! T S O

LOCAL OWNE LY DA OPERA ND TED

OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS MAY 2-8, 2019

Feeding the Spirit of Whistler Since 1988 AUSTRALIAN

PACKHAM PEARS

1.69/LB

3.73/KG

MEXICAN

GREEN BEANS

1.99/LB

4.39/KG

CALIFORNIA GROWN

ORGANIC BLACK LACINATO KALE

2 FOR $5

BC GROWN

ORGANIC AMBROSIA APPLES

1.99/LB

SILA

SALAMI

7.99

300G

SNOW CAP

ARLA

HAVARTI CHEESE

4.99

200G

Make your favourite Pizza Pie Today

GRIMM'S

BLACK FOREST HAM

1.69

100G

HOMEPRIDE

BREAD

2 FOR $4

570G

NATURE VALLEY

GRANOLA BARS

2 FOR $6

160-210G

KELLOGGS'

FAMILY SIZE CEREALS

4.99

BRAGG'S

ORGANIC APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

7.99

946ML

ANNA'S ORGANIC

BEANS

2 FOR $3

398ML

INDO-MIE

MI-GORENG INSTANT NOODLES

2 FOR $7

5X 85G

SPONGETOWEL

ULTRA PAPER TOWELS

6.99

6 ROLLS

TROPICANA

ORANGE JUICES

6.99

2.63L

DELISSIO

RISING CRUST PIZZAS

5.99

782-888 G

WHITE STRIPE

AUSTRALIAN LAMB RACKS

17.99/LB

KOREAN BBQ BEEF & PORK SAUSAGE

1.69

/100G

SOCKEYE SALMON BURGERS

2.99

/100G

BONELESS SKINLESS CHICKEN THIGHS

6.99/LB

PERUVIAN

RED SEEDLESS GRAPES

3.69/LB

$

8.13/KG

PIZZA DOUGH

1

$ .99

EACH

Original, Fig, Wine or Parmesan

Creamy, Herb & Spice or Jalapeno

Our Best Selling Ham!

White or 60% Wholewheat

Mini Wheats, Raisin Bran or Corn Flakes

CLASSICO

PASTA SAUCES All Flavours

3

$

.99

Black, Red Kidney, Cannellini or Chick Peas

218-650ML

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Whole Racks or Try individual "Lambsicles" for a Great Appy!

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

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7.99/LB

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CREEKSIDE'S OWN ROSSDOWN FARMS

Made Fresh Instore Dailly from Paradise Valley Canadian Pork & Certified Angus AAA Canadian Beef Lemon Dill or Thai Sesame

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39.66/KG

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FRONT END • GROCERY DELI/ BAKERY • MEAT/ SEAFOOD PRODUCE

Locally Made in Mill Bay, Vancouver Island.

Please apply in-store (look for Kent, Don or Joanna), or online at www.creeksidemarket.com

I Put That Sh*t on Everything!

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4.39/KG

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OPENING REMARKS

Are you ready to evacuate? FOR MANY in these days of climate change impacts, the question of a wildfire sweeping into the Whistler valley is not one of “if” but “when.” Over recent summers, we have all suffered through air heavy with smoke, our windows tightly shut against the pollution, our memories of clear skies and lakeside dips and sunbathing just that—memories. Last summer, many began to wonder if this was the new reality, and if it was, what

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

it means for tourism, for our health and our long-term plans to live here. We know from recent research that inhaling smoke from a wildfire can be equal to smoking a couple of packs of cigarettes a day, depending on its thickness. While smoke from wildfire does not seem to have overly affected tourism in 2017 and

look to promote shoulder and off-seasons in the same manner that Whistler successfully has, said Stone. Moreover, he added, the issue underlines the need for municipalities and regions to invest in economic resilience planning. “Most disaster planning is just around emergency planning,” he said. “There’s not a lot of planning on what happens in times of economic disruption.” Whistler, as we know, is a FireSmart community and has budgeted to clear forested areas to help make the resort safer (see story on page 19). The province could do more, and should do more, considering Whistler currently welcomes over 3 million people per year, generates $1.5-million in annual provincial GDP and contributes approximately 25 per cent of B.C.’s total tourism export revenue. Those figures alone make a compelling argument for action on a swift and large scale to save the resort in a wildfire event. But what if … what if that wildfire is raging towards us? This week, the Resort Municipality of

“Most disaster planning is just around emergency planning ... There’s not a lot of planning on what happens in times of economic disruption.” - JEREMY STONE

2018, there is little doubt that repetition of smoky skies will put visitors off coming here. Speaking on a provincial level, Jeremy Stone—a consultant and academic who works on issues concerning economic resilience to natural disaster—said that there is a risk of brand damage when you have significant natural disasters over multiple years. Regions that are most affected should

Whistler is starting the conversation around what that would look like. How would neighbourhoods evacuate? What would visitors do? How would those without transportation get out of town? How would the health care centre be evacuated? We began to hear about the plan, which was done jointly with the District of Squamish, last summer. The $125,000 cost

of the plan was shared between the two local governments who are also in discussions with other regional bodies, Pemberton and local First Nations so that everyone is on the same page if the worst happened. We know that plans are in place for a highfunctioning emergency-operations centre with the hope that response and actions are coordinated, controlled and appropriate. We know that local media, including Pique, will be part of the effort to keep everyone in Whistler informed so that we don’t panic. We also know that evacuating Whistler is not something we can all just sit back and wait for someone else to fully organize. Each one of us needs to have a plan so that when the emergency officials tell us it’s our turn to head to the highway and get out of town, we are ready. Keep your gas tank at least half full, talk to your employer about what their plans are in case of evacuation, talk to the organizations looking after your kids to find out how they plan to notify you on where and when to pick up your children. You need to consider how to manage your pets—do you have proper travelling cases for them? And food and water organized as well? You also need to plan your own sustenance during an evacuation. Have you got your prescriptions organized? What can be done at your residence to mitigate wildfire damage? With national Emergency Preparedness Week running May 5 to 11, it’s a good time to make your own plan and encourage others to do so as well. The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is holding an emergency planning committee meeting on May 2, which is open to the public, with the full plan coming to council later this month. But don’t wait for the RMOW plan. Get your kit together and be ready to go, then relax and get ready for another amazing summer in Whistler. n

55 ACRES OF LAND IN PEMBERTON

7-1350 Cloudburst Drive $1,899,000

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A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019.

ASKING PRICE $498,000

Dave Brown

Personal Real Estate Corporation

davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com www.davesellswhistler.com / www.whistlerrealestateblog.ca Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805

8 MAY 2, 2019

Steve Shuster

t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com www.steveshusterrealestate.com


Discover Sunstone Master Planned: a thoughtfully planned neighbourhood on a sunny, south facing forested hillside.

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appointment, call 604-935-2650 sunstonepemberton.com

The developer reserves the right to make changes and modification to the project design, specifications and features without notice. E&O.E.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Credit where credit is due

The Tenquille Lake area is one that immediately springs to mind. Johnny Mikes // Coast to Cascades field director

Thanks to the Pique for covering AWARE’s recent 30-year anniversary celebration and highlighting the good work AWARE has done over the years and the important role it continues to fill (Pique, April 25). AWARE was integrally involved in the Sea to Sky Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP). It advocated for the creation of over forty Wildland Zones (“partially protected,” no-logging zones, mostly in remnant undeveloped upper reaches of valleys); Floodplain Management Areas along particularly ecologically important portions of the Soo, Green, upper Lillooet, Squamish and Elaho Rivers; measures to benefit wildlife including objectives for the recovery of grizzly bears; and more. But, in the interest of fairness and accuracy, it is our First Nations neighbours that we should thank for the (four-percentage-point) increase in protected areas through the LRMP. At the start of the LRMP process approximately 22 per cent of what is now called the Sea to Sky Natural Resource District (formerly the Squamish TSA) was protected. That figure now sits at approximately 26 per cent (a significant portion of that being rugged, higher elevation “rock and ice”).  To the chagrin of AWARE and other conservation-minded stakeholders back in 2002, the LRMP Planning Forum’s terms

Blueberry Beach Park needs attention

of reference prohibited the creation of new additions to B.C.’s protected area system. This was based on government of the day’s rationale that some parks had been added in this region through the 1990’s Protected Areas Strategy (think Callaghan, Clendinning, Upper Lillooet Provincial Parks as examples of that addition). The additional areas that received full protection were a result of the subsequent government-to-government phase of LRMP discussions between First Nations and B.C. While AWARE and other LRMP table conservationists like the Pemberton Wildlife

Last week, a letter writer mentioned concern about party rafts as a source of pollution for Alta Lake (Pique, April 25). We’d like to mention another significant one. There is a municipal park on Alta Lake at the end of St. Anton Way: Blueberry Beach Park. The beach area has three public docks, and has become very popular during the summer. Parking is allowed on St. Anton Way; vehicles are often bumper-to-bumper out to Archibald Way. This is a dog-friendly park, so dog feces is a problem around the area. Actually, they may share the same problem with their masters, since there are no toilet facilities or refuse containers in this park. As a result, garbage, beer cans, and urinating park users can often be found on St. Anton Way. How can the municipality facilitate such an ill-equipped lakeside park that can only hasten the loss of the quality of Alta Lake? Tish and Jamie Pike // Whistler

Association had certainly identified important areas for protection (Upper Soo, Upper Birkenhead, west side of the Callaghan valley, upper Rogers Creek etc.) and were supportive, the actual credit for achieving additional protection of those areas should rightly go to First Nations. Given pressures like the crush of commercial and non-commercial recreation in Sea to Sky these days, BC Park’s paltry budget notwithstanding, we should ask ourselves if some more protected areas like parks or conservancies (or other lesser designations that can help manage the land base better) ought not be considered again.

Remembering Jane It was heartwarming for me and the rest of the Burrows family to be so well received by my many friends at Whistler on the occasion of Jane’s interment at the cemetery on Friday last (April 26) and at her Celebration of Life on Saturday, April 27.

WHISTLER | PEMBERTON | SQUAMISH Local Expertise with Nationwide Exposure Nordic

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 15 GLENEAGLES A huge thank you is extended to the many long-time friends from both Whistler and the Lower Mainland who showed up to celebrate and socialize. To Pauline, Janice, Erika and Kris who took over for this aging octogenarian and with the help of the fabulous many “church ladies” and their friends who volunteered their time and expertise in getting the whole event set up and organized, I will be eternally thankful. Thanks also to Alison Hunter for her amazing harp playing. To those in attendance who applauded me and the other speakers, even more kudos, and hugs of gratitude. Dear Jane now rests peacefully in the “A” section of the Whistler Cemetery beside the whispering waters of the stream, amongst many of our friends, with a grave-marker to be placed sometime in the summer. On doctor’s orders, I will not be able to attend the Walk for Alzheimer’s on Sunday, May 5, but I will be with you in spirit. May Jane rest in peace. Paul Burrows // Whistler/Salmon Arm

Cultural Centre, Event Rental Works, Calling Mountains Productions, LOM Design, Tara Hare and Louise Frost. You can donate to WCSS online: https:// mywcss.org/get-involved/donations/ Standby for more information on future fundraisers. Blair Kaplan Venables // Pemberton

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Standing up to cancer April is the month that the Canadian Cancer Society picked in the 1950s to run a national fundraising campaign for the fight against cancer. The daffodil was selected to symbolize strength and courage. In 2008, The Ride to Conquer Cancer was created in Toronto as a mega-fundraising event for The Princess Margaret Hospital. A noncompetitive cycling event that sees thousands of riders travel 200 kilometres over two days, it came to British Columbia in 2009. It is the No.1 peerto-peer fundraising event with each participant required to raise a minimum of $2,500.00. In 10 years, the BC Ride to Conquer Cancer has raised over $96 million to support more

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Creating a safe space The Path to Resiliency, a fundraiser held on Wednesday, April 24, started off as just a vision. I wanted to bring together the community to open up a dialogue and to create a safe space. I’ve recently had a few experiences that provided me with valuable lessons, which I felt compelled to share. Life isn’t easy and it can be especially hard when you are living in a community far away from family and friends. Sometimes, life gets really hard but there are people and organizations that you can turn to for support. My goal for this event was to raise both funds and awareness for Whistler Community Services Society (WCSS). One hundred per cent of the proceeds raised are going to their Counselling Assistance program. This program subsidizes financially restricted individuals, couples and families who would like to see a counsellor but could not otherwise afford the cost. Nikki Best and Tara O’Doherty, thank you for being brave, for sharing your stories and for your trust! Kerry Hannah, thank you so much for representing WCSS. A huge thank you goes out to everyone who came to this event, who shared their stories, who asked questions and who offered comfort and words of encouragement. This event would not have been possible without our partners: Squamish Lil’wat

then 47 world-leading research projects under way at BC Cancer Research Centre, advancing care and providing hope to the 77,000 people facing cancer across B.C. Every three minutes someone in Canada hears the words “you have cancer.” One in two Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime. One in four will die of the disease; 60 per cent of those people diagnosed will survive at least five years after diagnosis. In 2017 approximately 206,200 new cases of cancer were diagnosed in Canada, and approximately 80,800 died of the disease. In April of 2018 I signed up to do the Ride to Conquer Cancer, (and just two weeks after this I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer while on stress leave from my career as a nurse). In 2017, an estimated 2,800 women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer and an estimated 1,800 died of the disease. It is the fifth most-common type of cancer for women, but is the most serious as presently there is no reliable screening tests. (I became very ill and had to have surgery and other treatments so was unable to complete the Ride to Conquer caner last year, but) … the coolest thing is that I was able to raise $10,700.00 that went directly to ovarian cancer research. The generosity of friends, loved ones, and strangers was incredible. My mission is to try to raise as much

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.

New to Market | $1,849,000 4375 Northlands Boulevard #28, Valhalla The Valhalla complex offers wonderful amenities including; common area hot tub, beautiful garden areas & secure underground parking. This particular 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom unit has just undergone a beautiful renovation and is like new - ready and waiting for a new owner to come in and enjoy the fresh, lovely space! Sit back and watch the snow fall from inside the unit while warming up by the gas fireplace or on your covered outdoor deck space where you will find your very own private hot tub - a fabulous perk. The central location of the Valhalla complex is great for rental income if you are looking for an investment property. The flexible zoning offered by this property allows owners a great variety of ways in which to maximize use of the unit, which is always a lovely option to have. Call today to make your appointment to view! Welcome to the Best Place on Earth!

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©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

MAY 2, 2019

11


CLASSIC WHISTLER CABIN 8109 Cedar Springs Road $1,998,000 This classic 2 bedroom Whistler cabin occupies almost 1/3 of an acre in Alpine Meadows. A private, flat lot with Meadow Park and the sports centre as our next door neighbour, and Whistler Secondary, Alpine Market, Green Lake and Nicklaus North golf course all within 5 minutes walk.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR awareness and money as I can for ovarian cancer. I know I owe the extra time I have been granted in this life to advances made with research. As a registered nurse who spent 20 years working at Hilltop House in Squamish, then five years at the general hospital, I regularly contemplated the meaning of life, the reality and anxiety that most feel with the prospect of sickness and death. I have always believed in the philosophy of, “Live every day to your fullest as you never know what day will be your last.”

fault. I didn’t bother to read or understand the comprehensive insurance contract. I had made arrangements to have the damage repaired privately, which I later found out was incorrectly diagnosed and not actually possible to be repaired in that manner, however by this time it was a long time after the 30-day deadline. Knowing this, I fabricated a story because I did not want to take on the resulting financial burden and because this felt like the path of least resistance. This is however just shifting the burden from myself to the community rather than

“...I fabricated a story because I did not want to take on the resulting financial burden...” - GW

If you would like to support me for this year’s Ride to Conquer Cancer go to http://www.ridetoconquercancer.ca/goto/ carolinesolonenko2019 Caroline Solonenko // Squamish

Saying sorry I’m writing an apology detailing the reasons for choosing to falsify information regarding a recent (ICBC) claim that I have made. I knowingly made up a story detailing a single vehicle accident to ICBC after being informed of damage to my vehicle. This damage was discovered and shown to me during a routine servicing and maintenance appointment. I do not know who the driver of the vehicle was, or when this damage occurred other than a roughly six-month window. It could have been myself if I did not happen to notice. Accidents must be reported to ICBC within 30 days of the accident taking place. I did not know this at the time, which is my own

being responsible and owning the problem. ICBC expended time, money and other resources during their investigation to determine that I was lying. The effect of this is increasing the cost of insurance for all other drivers and owners of vehicles in British Columbia. This is not fair for anyone else and I apologize to the community. I certainly did not feel good about doing this, and suffered through the stress of telling a lie manifesting itself in various ways. It is not worth it, and I would encourage anyone else considering doing something similar to take the honest path so that you can continue to hold your head high. In writing this I would like to thank ICBC for a second chance and for allowing me to learn a lesson without choosing to take legal action. GW (Editor’s note: ICBC asked us to run this letter, as its publication is part of the restorative justice process for the Crown agency in dealing with this driver. Pique agreed to publish it.) n

FOR THE RECORD In last week’s cover feature on the history of squatting in Whistler, “Ramshackle Soul,” one photo was inaccurately described as the exterior of the Toad Hall’s second incarnation in the Soo Valley. It was in fact an image of the original Toad Hall. Another photo describes Tokum Corners as a popular local squat, when it was, in fact, not a squat but a home that was owned by John Hetherington and George Benjamin.  n

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PIQUE’N YER INTEREST

It’s time to expand Whistler’s food-truck offerings WHEN I FIRST learned, back in 2016, that Whistler would be launching a foodtruck program of its own, I let out a small but audible gasp. That reaction was partly out of sheer excitement and partly out of shock that the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) had finally pulled the trigger on a trend that was already dominating the street-food scene

BY BRANDON BARRETT of myriad other cities around the country. It’s now been three years since that announcement (four since a pilot foodtruck project the muni ran in the summer of 2015), and the program has seen little in the way of growth. According to a spokesperson for the RMOW, that is not likely to change anytime soon. “There have (been) no discussions about expanding the program at this point in time,” the representative wrote in an email. Almost every one of the vendors coming to Whistler’s parks this summer that I spoke to for a story in Pique last month (“Seven vendors slated for Whistler’s summer foodtruck program,” April 19) expressed some degree of hope that the RMOW would loosen up the program’s restrictive regulations.

“I think there’s room for improvement in the program,” said Karin Shard of Squamish-based Greek food truck Carte Diem, who added that she has reduced the number of days she will be in Whistler this summer. “I find that it is a risk for most people participating in the program, (especially if) they are commuting.” Of particular issue for Shard and other vendors is the weather: The RMOW will typically cancel planned vendor days if the morning forecast calls for rain, but if it’s overcast or rain arrives later in the day, sales suffer. Factor in travel and operating costs—Shard estimates it costs her around $1,000 a day just to set up shop in Whistler—plus the $75-a-day fee vendors have to fork over to the muni, and the costbenefit analysis doesn’t always pan out. Shard, for her part, has suggested that the RMOW either lower the cost to participate or institute some sort of profitsharing structure on bad-weather days. “But we’re not there yet,” she noted, adding that she is grateful for the opportunity to be in the Whistler market nonetheless. Of course, the program’s other major barrier is location. Relegated to Rainbow and Lost Lake parks—with Lakeside Park serving as an alternate site when necessary—the program runs on select days over a span of roughly two months. Unsurprisingly, the majority of participating

vendors would like the opportunity to sell their product closer to the village and its constant flow of pedestrian traffic—something that, according to the prevailing word on the street, has long been opposed by Whistler’s bar and restaurant sector. We all know that old adage about competition breeding success, and in a casual food scene that is still ruled by greasy, overpriced pub fare, I don’t think I’m being overly harsh when I say there are plenty of Whistler restaurants that could use a little kick in the butt. Not to mention, food trucks would offer the styles of cuisine that don’t already exist here—how are we still without a dedicated Chinese restaurant?—at an affordable price that our overworked, underpaid worker bees would certainly appreciate. And it’s not like the program would have to run on a daily basis. Allow food trucks to set up at large-scale events—lord knows we have enough of those dotting the schedule—and you have added yet another layer of animation as well as a wider variety of dining options during times when it’s nearimpossible to find a seat in a restaurant. “There’s definitely enough to go around,” said Clare Stenham-Brown, owner-operator of the plant-based Turmeric Trailer, who spoke about the burgeoning food-truck scene in Squamish. “We’re finding that it’s more encouraged because (the District) just wants

the buzz, the people coming in and having lots of options. It doesn’t need to be a sitdown, tip-in kind of environment.” This is all before you consider the potential economic windfall food trucks could bring. In a 2017 report, the Canadian Competition Bureau said that more flexible regulations around food trucks could lead to more jobs, new customers, and improved street vitality in an industry that brings in more than $300 million a year in sales. The industry continues to expand at a healthy clip, too: the Canadian food-truck sector has averaged 2.3-per-cent growth annually since 2013. In Vancouver, for instance, the number of food trucks has skyrocketed from just 17 in 2010 to now more than 100 after the City relaxed its regulations, furthering Vancouver’s reputation as a global food destination. Food trucks have also proven to be an essential stepping-stone for young chefs and restaurateurs who would otherwise not be able to afford commercial space. In a town where locally owned retailers are being priced out at an alarming rate, loosening the muni’s regulatory grip on food trucks would not only create a lower-cost entry point into the restaurant business, but would also help preserve a distinct mom-and-pop character that we are told time and again consumers are looking for. It’s clear the appetite for food trucks is there; it’s up the municipality to decide whether to satiate it or not. n

MAY 2, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION

DID YOU KNOW?

15

Surprise, surprise: This week’s most talkedabout story online detailed how, according to Whistler Blackcomb, closing Blackcomb first this year will lead to a ‘unique’ experience. Among the 68 comments posted, some called into question Whistler Blackcomb’s motives in closing ‘the dark side’ first.

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The amount of time it would take to evacuate all of Whistler in a no-notice emergency on a peak summer day.

“ ” “

16,050

It’s called cutting costs,

wrote one reader.

The maximum capacity of cars per hour on the Sea to Sky Highway.

By having bikes, sightseers and skis/ snowboards on the same side, the operating costs of Blackcomb are zero. Factor in Creekside closing, and those of us on this side of town are forced to commute and pay for parking. This is about money. Not experience.

49,825 The number of people in Whistler on a peak winter day.

$

“ ”

However, even those excited to ski Peak Chair in May lamented the decision to close Creekside Gondola, for both spring skiing and summer sightseeing. “Creekside gondy should be open at least every weekend until closing … and no sightseeing from Creekside this summer means businesses that benefitted from the added attraction last summer are gonna be hooped this summer. Reservations in Creekside are already way down compared to last year for myself and other business owners I talk to,” read one post. Another agreed: “Closing Creekside gondola (with its adjacent free parking & Dusty’s après) along with Whistler’s three highest alpine chairlifts is all part of the new ‘cool package.’ And pay parking or hauling you gear onto a crowded smelly bus sauna to/from the village is definitely ‘best for the guest experience.’”

7.5M

The amount the RMOW will receive in Resort Municipality Initiative funding in 2019, up from the $6.5 million it received in 2018.

Though many were sad to see Blackcomb—and its convenient Base II parking lot—shut for the season, some were excited to ski Whistler in the spring for the first time in a few years. Apparently,

Gaper Day is more fun on Whistler.

hours

THROWBACK THURSDAY

May 5 to 11 this year marks Emergency Preparedness Week. While we all need to take steps to prepare for an emergency, we also need to think about the toll responders face year in and year out as they help others deal with disaster. Pique investigated this topic as the cover feature at this time in 2016. Said Whistler’s then-Fire Rescue Service (WFRS) chief Geoff Playfair in the feature: “When I started in this kind of work, back in ‘81, that’s exactly what we said: Just suck it up. Toughen up. “But those attitudes have changed for all the right reasons and we’re in a different place today for all the better.” n

WSSF success

Corrosive water

p.12

p.28

Anti-Flag at Garf’s p.62

FREE the heroes

OF INTEREST

The Whistler area has hosted three lodges in years past. The first lodge was Garibaldi Lodge built by Tom Nye in 1914 on the east side of the Cheakamus River. Alpine Lodge, further along the Cheakamus River, was built by the Cranes in 1922. A store was added in 1926 with a post office coming later. Lake Lucille Lodge was built by Shorty Knight in 1929 and was very popular for fishing. The lodge was burnt down in 1959 after construction of the dam was completed. 23.17

Changes proposed to help first responders through PTSD

14 MAY 2, 2019

April 28, 2016

|

whistler’s weekly newsmagazine

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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NEWS WHISTLER

Citizen of the Year awarded to Pat Montani and Keith Reynolds CELEBRATING THE RESORT’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST AT THE 2019 WHISTLER EXCELLENCE AWARDS

BY BRANDON BARRETT IN A RARITY for the Whistler Excellence Awards, two individuals will share Citizen of the Year honours in 2019: Pat Montani and Keith Reynolds. The organizations that both men founded share distinct similarities: Montani, who launched Bicycles for Humanity with his wife Brenda, and Reynolds, founder of Playground Builders, both provide a sense of hope to populations that need them most, and both have seen their impact spread around the globe. Bicycles for Humanity now counts 15 chapters worldwide and has collected and transported more than 180,000 bikes to the developing world, while Playground Builders has constructed 240 playgrounds in war-torn countries across the Middle East. But the pair’s connection goes beyond the professional. “Keith and I go way back,” said Montani in his acceptance speech to the assembled crowd of 450 at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler on April 30. “We’ve been friends for a long time and we’ve had countless discussions about being grassroots and plugging along, just trying to make a difference.”

MODEL CITIZENS Playground Builders’ Keith Reynolds stands at the podium accepting his Citizen of the Year Award, alongside fellow winner Pat Montani, to his left, at the 2019 Whistler Excellence Awards.

PHOTO BY KARL PARTINGTON

16 MAY 2, 2019

Reynolds, not one to court the limelight, has mostly kept a low profile as the head of Playground Builders, a concept that was first sparked by his travels as a backpacker through occupied Palestine more than 30 years ago. “I am not really comfortable up here— I’m a lot more comfortable in Kabul or even Baghdad,” Reynolds said in his speech. “We’ve constructed 240 playgrounds in some of the worst areas in the world. We have impacted over a million children in some of the worst places in the world. And we live in this wonderful playground called Whistler. We import play; now we are exporting play.” Although married couples have shared the Citizen of the Year Award in the past, this is the first time Whistler’s longest running award will go to two separate individuals. Dave Clark, founder of the Whistler Half Marathon and dedicated youth sports coach, who has helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars to fight cancer and Crohn’s and colitis, was the other nominee for Citizen of the Year. Pique publisher Sarah Strother, who also serves as president of Whistler Publishing and sits on the board of the Whistler Chamber of Commerce, was named Business Person of the Year. “Aside from reading (G.D. Maxwell’s ‘Maxed Out’) column every week to make sure we don’t get sued, my job as publisher is to ensure the business of Pique runs well,” Strother joked at the ceremony. “Really, what we care about is telling

the news and telling Whistler’s story. It matters to me and it matters to us at Pique as well. This is our home.” In the returning Above & Beyond category, presented to an individual who has made a major contribution to the community, Tourism Whistler president and CEO Barrett Fisher took home the hardware. An emotional Fisher thanked her husband and daughter, her team at Tourism Whistler and the wider community in her acceptance speech. “Our job here is to maintain an incredible balance when we look to how we preserve this beautiful resort,” she said. Pangea Pod Hotel, Canada’s first boutique pod hotel, was handed the Innovative Business of the Year Award. “For us, innovation is all about people,” said hotel owner Russell Kling. The Sustainability in Action Business Award, handed to a business that has demonstrated “considerable positive impact in advancing sustainability,” was given to private composting facility, Sea to Sky Soils. “I’ll dedicate this award to our employees, the boys from Mount Currie who work tirelessly to transform this place into a resource,” said owner-operator Jaye-Jay Berggren. “I can’t thank them enough for that.” The Whistler Champion of Arts & Culture Award went to local theatre producer, educator, and children’s entertainer Ira Pettle. “It’s interesting because I feel like I’m just scratching the surface of what I’m

doing here,” said Pettle. “There’s just a really good scene happening here and I’m excited for what’s coming.” Fairmont Chateau Whistler Executive Chef Isabel Chung took home the Rising Star of the Year Award, given to a business leader 39 and under who has given back to the community and demonstrated success at a young age. Along with leading the Fairmont’s culinary team, Chung spearheaded the ELLEvate TogetHER dinner as a way to bring together female leaders in support of the Canadian Cancer Society and regularly donates her time to the WCSS’s weekly food-bank lunches. “My director of public relations isn’t here tonight,” Chung joked. “I was up against some incredible people, but at the end of the day it’s about our community. Everyone allows you to be successful, our resources, our hotel, my team … and to be able to work with WCSS is one of my passions, to ensure food security.” Forged Axe Throwing took home the honour for Whistler Experience ServiceSmall Business, which is based on secret shopper scores. In the Whistler Experience Service category for large businesses, Mongolie Grill tied with The Beacon Pub & Eatery. It’s the second time Mongolie Grill has won the award, while the Beacon’s sister restaurant, Basalt Wine & Salumeria, won last year. The Whistler Excellence Awards are produced annually by the Whistler Chamber of Commerce. Nominations for the 2020 awards are already open, at whistlerchamber.com. n


NEWS WHISTLER

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Stakeholders eye ‘reinvigorated’ trails group

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NEW MISSION, MORE MEETINGS AND A LONG-TERM PLAN PROPOSED

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WITH THE Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) vision for its Alpine Trails Network largely realized, some stakeholders in the municipality’s Trails Planning Working Group (TPWG) say it’s time to revisit the group’s intent. Dale Mikkelsen, president of the Whistler Off Road Cycling Association (WORCA), raised the issue in a recent letter to mayor and council. “We’re asking for a sort of a revitalization of the sprit of the TPWG, and really what that was was a forward-thinking, goalsetting, multi-year visioning process for trails in Whistler,” Mikkelsen said in an interview, adding that, with the vision of alpine trails (like Lord of the Squirrels and Into the Mystic, which opened in 2017) largely realized, the group has turned into more of a “reporting forum” as of late. “We have felt strongly that we collectively need to put together a three-tofive-year trails master plan for the Whistler area, and the Whistler trails, and that’s only going to happen successfully if it’s led by all the stakeholders,” he said. The WORCA letter calls for: a new mission and mandate for the group; development of a three-to-five year trail plan; that the TPWG be recognized as a

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proper committee of council; increased frequency of meetings (from just two a year to once a month), and; that the chairperson and members be critically reviewed based on their effectiveness to uphold the mission and vision. The TPWG was formed in 2012 to coordinate the planning of hiking and mountain biking trails around Whistler, and includes reps from the Resort Municipality of Whistler, Alpine Club of Canada Whistler, WORCA, 99 Trials Association, Recreation Sites and Trail BC, the Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE), the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, the Cheakamus Community Forest and Whistler Blackcomb. In the case of AWARE—which had to push to become a voting member of the TPWG after originally being told it was a closed group—the changes would be welcomed, for the most part, said executive director Claire Ruddy. “We absolutely agree it should be a long-term planning group. We’ve raised that at meetings previously, and it’s great to see WORCA support that,” Ruddy said. “The recommendation from WORCA is for a three-to-five-year timeline for future trail planning. We would like to see that be even longer, because when we’re looking

SEE PAGE 18

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Whistler

>>

Pique recognized at community newspaper awards “COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS need to take heed about what the Pique is doing in Whistler,” according to judges with the BC and Yukon Community Newspaper Association, who recognized the paper at the annual awards event on April 27 in Richmond. “They are covering all the bases of the community from a civic politics level and then they go above and beyond with thoughtful and interesting pieces relevant to readers.” Reporters Joel Barde and Brandon Barrett won Gold in the Feature Series category for the “On the Mend: Charting the gradual, if uneven, recovery of the region’s grizzly bear population,” cover feature and associated articles. Said the judges: “This series has been given the room and visual support it deserves … This well-researched and organized series serves as an articulate call to action.” Pique took five other Golds: Crank’d (Alison Taylor, Claire Ryan and Karl Partington); “Best of Pemberton” (Andrew Mitchell, Barrett and Jon Parris); Newspaper

promotion—Ode to Ullr (Partington); ad campaign—Sushi Village (Whitney Sobool); and ad design, collaborative, under 25,000— Sidecut for Four Seasons (Lou O’Brien). Pique was awarded Silver in the General Excellence category, with Barde also taking Silver in the columnist category and Partington taking Silver for ad design collaborative for his work for the Audain Art Museum open house. Pique was recognized with five Bronze awards: Historical Writing Category— “Lessons for Whistler’s aspiring councillors,”(Braden Dupuis); Business Writing—“Modular Housing is coming to the Sea to Sky,” (Barde, Barrett and Parris); newspaper promotion—Love in the fast lane (Sobool); special section under 25,000—Exploring Whistler’s ski town archetypes (Ryan, Vince Shuley, Barrett); and special publication under 25,000—FAQ (Taylor, Catherine PowerChartrand, and Partington). -Pique staff n

MAY 2, 2019

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 17 at how we use the landscape, we need to be safeguarding things like connectivity of core habitat for wildlife, and so we have to kind of plan long-term.” While trails affect the local ecology in different ways—whether through users disturbing wildlife or the trails themselves impacting habitat—the various interests of stakeholders at the TPWG are not mutually exclusive, Ruddy said. “We want people to be out enjoying nature, and feeling connected to it, because then we actually will stand up,” she said. “So we want people out on the trails, but we want to make sure that we are putting trails in the least sensitive areas, so that we are maintaining all of the different values on the landscape.” At the April 30 council meeting (held in the Flute Room at municipal hall due to a scheduling conflict at Maury Young Arts Centre), council expressed interest in having representation on the TPWG, though it’s unclear at this time how that might look. “I’m hearing an appetite on council to be more involved in trail-specific direction, so maybe we will (refer this letter to staff) and then as part of that referral begin the conversation about how that can actually happen,” Crompton said. While mountain biking brings big bucks to Whistler—an economic analysis released in 2017 found it generates almost $59 million annually—the continued growth of

TALKING TRAILS Stakeholders in Whistler’s Trails Planning Working Group, which helped deliver the resort’s Alpine Trail Network, say the group needs a refreshed vision. FILE PHOTO COURTESY OF THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

the sport has led to capacity issues around parking and trailheads. The RMOW says it is “exploring options” to manage trailhead issues, including through the development of a “comprehensive strategy document” ($85,000 is budgeted for that project this year, all from Resort Municipality Initiative funds). Also in 2019, the municipality plans to

complete the trail to Beverly Lake, rebuild the south Flank Trail from Northair Mines Forest Service Road to Function Junction, develop rest areas and outhouses and install additional safety and environmental awareness signs ($350,000 budgeted this year, followed by another $300,000 in 2020 and 2021, all from RMI). The RMOW will also increase investment

in the Alpine Trail Ranger Program on Mount Sproatt and Rainbow Mountain with an extra 500 hours between July and October. The rangers will be responsible for monitoring and maintenance, public education, wildfire and wildlife data collection, first aid and more. Find out more at www.whistler.ca/ alpinetrailprogram. n

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Backyard burning prohibited, WFRS reminds residents MULTI-MODAL EVACUATION PLAN CLOSE TO COMPLETION

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE THE 2019 wildfire season has yet to begin in earnest, the Resort Municipality of Whistler and Whistler Fire Rescue Service (WFRS) are taking no chances when it comes to backyard burning. WFRS Chief John McKearney is reminding residents that backyard burning is no longer allowed at any time in Whistler, and campfires are only allowed with a permit. “The problem right now is we’ve had a record dry month of March, and so even though we’re not at high-to-extreme … the real concern is the dry leaves and the light duff,” McKearney said. “And we’ve already experienced smaller fires both to the south and to the north of us.” The WFRS has responded to “a handful” of calls about backyard burning over the last couple of weeks, prompting a press release from the municipality. “We can’t be everywhere, and the possibility of (fire) brands coming off backyard burning and landing in an area that could get away from us is just too great a risk,” McKearney said. Residential yard waste (like branches, twigs and plants) can be dropped off for free at the Nesters Waste Depot and the Function Junction Waste Depot between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. (head to www.whistler.ca/ yardwaste for more info). At this point, WFRS members responding to backyard burning calls are providing education and making sure the fires are out—but fines aren’t out of the question if the problem persists. “We ask the whole community to come together and, where they witness a backyard burning and where they feel comfortable to do so, let their neighbour know that that is not an activity that can go on these days,” McKearney said. “And then, (if necessary), a nonemergency call to the fire department.” Free campfire permit applications can be found at www.whistler.ca/fire. The RMOW’s multi-modal evacuation plan, meanwhile—a joint effort with the District of Squamish—will make its public debut at Whistler’s emergency planning committee on May 2 before coming to council on May 14. The plan includes detailed outlines for evacuating all of Whistler’s neighbourhoods—as well as all tourists— in the event of a natural disaster (such as a wildfire), based on seven different scenarios. With Wildfire Preparedness Day set for Saturday, May 4, the RMOW is also

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FireSmart their properties for Wildfire Preparedness Day on May 4. Community chipper days can be organized through the Resort Municipality of Whistler. FILE PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

reminding homeowners to FireSmart their properties. First appointed in October, McKearney is entering his first wildfire season as WFRS chief. “I’m really quite anxious abut the potential here, but I understand that the residents here, the community, is very acute to any type of smoke, and generally very, very compliant to it, and I certainly see a lot of activity with FireSmart starting to take hold,” he said. “And that’s the best work that we can do right now, in any of our communities, is pull together, and move some of this fire load away from our buildings, so if we do end up with an urban-interface (wildfire) situation, that we have some time to deal with it.” The RMOW’s 2019-to-2023 proposed project list includes $639,540 for wildfire protection in 2019 (plus another $591,000 from provincial grants), and $3,448,900 from 2020 to 2023. Whistler’s wildfire protection program will target three key areas in 2019: wildfire fuel reduction (on Cheakamus Lake Road, near Kadenwood, in the Rainbow interface area and around priority critical infrastructure areas), public education and support for the FireSmart program and improvements to policy and process. FireSmart community chipper days and strata work days are also back this year, as is the adopt-a-trail campaign (which is looking for volunteer groups to help FireSmart sections of the Valley Trail). Anyone interested in either can email FireSmart coordinator Scott Rogers at srogers@whistler.ca. Head to www.whistler.ca/firesmart for more. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Whistler to get $7.5M in RMI this year PROVINCE BOOSTS TOTAL PROGRAM FUNDING TO $13 MILLION

BY BRADEN DUPUIS SOME RECENT CHANGES to the provincial Resort Municipality Initiative (RMI) program mean good news for Whistler—namely, more money to direct towards tourism offerings. The RMOW will get $7.5 million in RMI funding in 2019—a big boost from the approximately $6.5 million the resort received last year. “It’s pretty exciting,” said Mayor Jack Crompton. “Wonderful news. Thank you Province of British Columbia.” RMI money accounts for $13,150,000 in proposed RMOW project funding over the next five years, with $5,986,780 in 2019 alone. Some big RMI projects on the books for this year include $3,052,000 for three public washrooms in the village, $350,000 for the Alpine Trail Program and $310,000 for recreational trailheads. It remains to be seen how the extra $1 million will impact tourism offerings on the ground in the short term, but in general, the RMI funding is “critical to the success of our tourism economy,” Crompton said. “As a community of under 12,000 that

20 MAY 2, 2019

BIG BOOST Provincial Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Lisa Beare, pictured here at an April 29 event, recently announced some changes to the province’s Resort Municipality Initiative program, including an increase of about $1 million for tourism offerings in Whistler in 2019.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

supports a visitor population of 3 million annual visitors, this funding has played a critical role in Whistler’s success,” he said. In other good news, the province announced a big boost to the RMI program

as a whole, increasing the total budget to $13 million (from an average of $10.5 million annually in recent years). The announcement comes on the heels of the provincial government making RMI

a part of the Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture’s core budget earlier this year. The program—intended to assist small, tourism-based municipalities to support and increase visitation—has doled out more than $129 million in funding to 14 communities since 2006. Other changes to the program include a new funding formula that provides a minimum of $100,000 to each of the RMI communities every year, as well as a new, annual, “performance-based” component based on tourism activity. “What we’re most enthusiastic about is the idea that there is performance benefits,” Crompton said. “When we see increased visitation, we have more funds to manage the impact and opportunity.” In 2016, the 14 resort communities that received RMI funding released a report, which found that tourism spending grew by more than 38 per cent from 2011 to 2015 while the rest of the province grew 20 per cent. The accommodation revenues collected in those communities grew 42 per cent (the rest of the province grew 29 per cent). The 14 RMI communities welcome 5.34 million visitors every year—105 visitors for every local resident. n


NEWS WHISTLER

Alder honoured by CWSAA

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ONE OF SKIING’S ‘FOUNDING FATHERS’ RECEIVES JIMMIE SPENCER LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

ACCORDING TO Hugh Smythe, there are a number of different criteria that can be met when the Canada West Ski Areas Association (CWSAA) determines its Jimmie Spencer Lifetime Achievement Award winner. And Peter Alder might just qualify for all of them. The award is given to those who have shown exceptional leadership and lengthy service to the ski industry in the areas of senior management, ownership or consulting. “If that’s the criteria, he’s done it multiple times,” Smythe said of his longtime friend Alder, to whom he presented the award at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler on Thursday, April 25. “There would be nobody else in the province today that has been involved in the industry as long as Peter has.” Considered one of the “founding fathers” of the B.C. ski industry, Alder came to B.C. from Switzerland in 1951 to work as a mechanical engineer. His first contribution to Whistler (what would be the first of many) was overseeing the stringing of power lines through the valley in the ‘50s. After management roles with Red Mountain, Silver Star and Big White, Alder would return to Whistler in 1978 to take on the general manager role at Whistler Mountain.

During his time at Whistler Mountain, Alder initiated the first ski area master plan for the mountain, which included the north-side lifts out of Whistler Village. He also served as chair of the Whistler Advisory Planning Commission, president of the Whistler Chamber of Commerce, and made big contributions to the formation and operation of the Whistler Resort Association, which guided the resort through the turbulent recession of the early ‘80s, Smythe said. “Peter used to say, ‘the last person out, please turn off the lights,’ because that’s when interest rates went to 22 per cent, and it was difficult,” he said. “But Peter was very good at bringing people together, and developing relationships with the province, with the municipality, with the different associations, and with the new player, I call it the new kid on the block, Blackcomb, and myself.” Alder is just the sixth person to be awarded the Jimmie Spencer since it was introduced in 2006 (Smythe himself was given the award in 2009). The honour came as a surprise to the 88-year-old Alder, surrounded by nearly 600 of his ski-industry peers. “I lost my pants,” Alder joked. “An old man, I’m not supposed to cry. It was quite an event. I was really surprised.” With his 89th birthday just around the corner (or “the upper end of middle age,” as he slyly describes it), Alder is still going strong,

“There would be nobody else in the province today that has been involved in the industry as long as Peter has.”

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Smythe was working on the design of Blackcomb Mountain at the time, which was set to open in 1980. “Peter and I became major competitors, so it’s a good thing that we were great friends,” Smythe said with a laugh. Indeed, the pair had a relationship going back to the summer of ’75, when they both took a ski area management course at Selkirk College. Smythe described his longtime friend as “a real character” with a penchant for giving back. “As a person, he’s been really involved, I mean not only all over the province and all over the world consulting … but one thing that Peter’s really known for is mentoring and helping people along,” Smythe said.

recently getting involved with the effort to build a community church in Whistler. “It’s an interesting community. It has some growing pains right now. I think there’s a little bit of an imbalance between rich and poor around here,” Alder said of his longtime home. “But I’m not too worried about it, because every once in awhile we have a downturn and things get back to normal, and there’s still lots of opportunities around here.” As for that long and storied career? “I enjoyed every minute of it,” Alder said. Meanwhile, Danny Cox, also of Whistler, was awarded the 2019 Jim Marshall Leadership Award at the event. For more information, visit www.cwsaa.org. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Nordic Place hostel gets development permit COUNCIL SEEKS ‘CONVERSATION’ AROUND EMPLOYEE HOUSING

BY BRADEN DUPUIS A HOSTEL AT Nordic Place in Creekside is set for redevelopment after receiving council’s approval on April 30. Plans for the property include a new 510-square-metre building to replace the existing building. “In 1970 the existing hostel was built by the (Simon Fraser University) ski club, so it’s been there for quite awhile,” said planner Robert Brennan in a presentation to council. The property was sold in 2018, with the new owner choosing to redevelop it with a new hostel, Brennan said. “It’s quite exciting that they want to do this, because it’s going to have dormitory sleeping accommodations, a semi-private sleeping area … and significant upgrades to the facilities on the site,” he said. The new building will include a twobedroom “caretaker’s suite,” 22 dorm beds and four semi-private units (each allocated four beds), for a total of 40 private beds. But Councillor Ralph Forsyth wondered if they might be used for employees, even if only temporarily.

“I would like a resolution,” he said. “Here’s an opportunity for us to do something, maybe it will work, maybe it fits their plans, maybe they say no, not interested. “If there’s something that we can do to grease the skids, if you will, then I’m all ears for that … there’s 40 beds, let’s see if we can snap it up, even if it’s for a limited time, and then it reverts back to its original hostel status.” Following its approval of the permit,

PERMIT APPROVED Due to a scheduling conflict at the Maury Young Arts Centre, council met in the Flute Room at municipal hall for its April 30 meeting. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

council passed a separate resolution directing staff to enter into a conversation with the owner about using the facility for

employee housing. Council meetings can be viewed online at whistler.ca.n

Spring travel transit levels in effect IF YOU ARE PLANNING on catching public transportation make sure you check the schedule—reduced, spring-service levels are in effect. That means reductions across all Whistler transit routes, as well as the seasonal discontinuation of the 4 Marketplace Shuttle. “Once the snow disappears, and some of the tourist activity starts to dry up, (the 4 Marketplace Shuttle) route really doesn’t see much in terms of ridership,” explained Levi Megenbir, senior transit planner with BC Transit.

Megenbir added that the 10 Valley Express—a new route that runs between the Cheakamus Crossing and Emerald Estates neighbourhoods, stopping at various points along the highway—has seen its schedule cut in half, with a 50-per-cent drop in daily trips. The 10 bus leaves from Cheakamus at 7:20 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. daily. The route was in its pilot phase this summer, and according to Megenbir, it “exceeded our minimum level of performance” targets, which bodes well for its future. BC Transit is currently completing a

review of the 10 Valley Express and will present a detailed report to Whistler council on May 14 (the regular council meeting begins at 5:30 p.m.). BC Transit has also extended later service for 21 Spring Creek, added Megenbir, with the last busses leaving the transit exchange at 8:10 and 9:10 p.m. The best way to check out the changes for individual routes is online, added Megenbir. Visit bctransit.com/whistler for more information. - Joel Barde n

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LASTING LEGACY The Mischa Arnott Legacy Project is a partnership with the Spearhead Huts Society and will see a hut named after the 11-year-old, who passed away last year, as well as a fund for youth education camps.

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Remembering Mischa ONE YEAR ON, THE MISCHA ARNOTT LEGACY PROJECT IS BORN

BY ALISON TAYLOR WHEN 11-YEAR-OLD Mischa Arnott passed away one year ago, the community was at a loss with how to honour and remember her, how to channel the collective grief into something meaningful. How do you pay tribute to the little girl who loved animals and being in the mountains; a talented artist, a rock climber and a skier; a girl who gathered friends close, who loved music; a gentle and wise soul who died too soon? It was a task the Arnott family simply could not face at the time. But now, one year later, though grief is still a daily companion, mom Renata Lewis and dad Doug Arnott have found a way to remember their daughter: The Mischa Arnott Legacy Project. “This is a culmination of Mischa’s own passions,” explained Lewis. “It seemed very fitting.” The legacy project is a two-fold endeavour in partnership with the Spearhead Huts Society: The first part is the Mischa Arnott Alpine Youth Room in the Kees and Claire Spearhead Hut, the first of three huts to be built in the backcountry next to Whistler Blackcomb in the Spearhead Traverse. There are eight bunk beds in the youth room. Each bunk can be sponsored for $2,500. The second part of the project is to raise funds for youth education programs in the mountains, from art and photography camps to naturalists and astronomy camps. The funds will also be used for special respite for children and their families facing illnesses like Mischa’s. Lewis knows all too well how much a gift like that can mean to a family and sick child “to give them the freedom to go off to the mountains and be away from the struggles of living a life of illness.” Lewis remembers those struggles—and she watched Mischa face a lifetime of them in her 11 short years. In the summer of 2017, Mischa, no longer able to walk, stared up at

the mountains from the couch and told Lewis she couldn’t wait to get back up there one day. For Andre Charland, in charge of fundraising for the Spearhead Huts Projects, memorial fundraising like Mischa’s are what’s turning the lofty alpine project into a reality. “That’s what’s made the hut possible,” he said, referring to the various fundraising campaigns and donations honouring mountain lovers who have passed. The first hut will be known as the Kees and Claire Hut, after a more than $900,000 donation from the Kees Brenninkmeyer Foundation in memory of Cornelius (Kees) Brenninkmeyer and Claire Dixon, who perished in a backcountry skiing accident in 2007 when their snow shelter collapsed. Inside the hut, Barbara’s Kitchen will be so named in honour of Barbara McGeough. There are also ongoing fundraising efforts in memory of Brett Carlson and Eduardo Campos. With construction set to resume this week, and the push on for an August opening, the budget for the first hut is now at $2.5 million. One third of that, said Charland, is helicopter costs. There is still another $300,000 to raise to reach that goal. “Mischa is a big part of that,” said Charland. The Kees and Claire Hut, which sits near Russet Lake, will be the most accessible of the three Spearhead Huts once all are complete. In that respect, it meshes perfectly with the Mischa legacy goal to provide youth programs in the mountains. Said Lewis: “Doug and I always try to find the positive in any situation and I think this is something that we can turn to to drive that positive outcome as a grieving family. “It was where she wanted to be—to be back up in the mountains one day.” As the fundraising project kicks off this week, with a goal of raising $40,000, more than $20,000 has already been donated in Mischa’s name. All donations are welcome; no amount is too small. The money will flow through the Community Foundation of Whistler. Go to spearheadhuts.org and click on Dedication to donate to Mischa’s Room. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Bear Smart needs volunteers for its Biking for Bears program NEW BEAR SMART REPRESENTATIVE NAMED TO WHISTLER BEAR ADVISORY COMMITTEE

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE WHISTLER Get Bear Smart Society is calling on local “bike and bear enthusiasts”— which it shouldn’t have much trouble finding in this town—to help patrol areas with potential for human-wildlife conflict. Last fall, Bear Smart launched its Biking for Bears Ambassador program, enlisting half a dozen volunteers to cycle areas typically frequented by both bears and the public. (The society does not identify the exact locations publicly in order to prevent them from becoming hotspots for bear viewing.) The ambassadors work to minimize the potential for conflict by educating the public on safe bear-viewing practices. “We had great success last fall,” said Nicole Fitzgerald, Bear Smart’s outgoing appointee to the Whistler Bear Advisory Committee. “The interactions volunteers had with the public were very positive. The majority of people approached by volunteers were very open and receptive to the information.” Fitzgerald said there were two core

messages volunteers imparted to the public last fall: Maintaining a safe distance of approximately 100 metres from bears; and keeping dogs on leash, mandatory in Whistler except in designated off-leash

the program. Applicants can sign up for as little as one hour and as much as five hours of volunteer work. Volunteers are needed during the first week of May anytime between 2:30 and 8 p.m.

“The interactions volunteers had with the public were very positive.” - NICOILE FITZGERALD

areas at Alpha Lake, Bayly Park, Rainbow Park and Lost Lake Park. (More info can be found at whistler.ca/dogs.) “Some people didn’t understand the impact that an off-leash dog could have on a bear,” Fitzgerald added. “They thought, ‘I feel comfortable with my dog’s safety,’ but didn’t realize that they were actually threatening the safety of the bear. Once that connection was made, dogs were leashed.” Volunteers will have access to a comprehensive education guide and don’t need to be bear experts to participate in

Those interested should contact program coordinator Ivana Minic-Lukac at ivana@bearsmart.com.

NEW APPOINTEE TO MUNICIPAL BEAR COMMITTEE Bear Smart has a new representative on the municipal Whistler Bear Advisory Committee that brings a wealth of experience to the role. Ellie Lamb takes over the position from Fitzgerald, who will remain on as a media

course

consultant for Bear Smart. Lamb has more than 20 years experience as a bear-viewing guide, and currently serves as a director with both the North Shore Black Bear Society and the Grizzly Bear Foundation. She also sits on a municipal bear working group in the North Shore, a role she believes will have some overlap with her new position in Whistler. “I think there will be crossover with some of the agencies that will be represented in Whistler that we’ve been working with in North Van,” she noted. Lamb said she brings “a unique perspective” to the committee, which includes representatives from the RMOW, local police, the Conservation Officer Service, and the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative, as someone who has worked closely with bears in the field. “I’ve spent a lot of time with bears learning their behaviour and language, and there’s no doubt they’re very clear in their messaging. They’re very fair and very peaceful animals,” she said. “The more we know about them and their intentions, the more comfortable we are to apply tools and to hone attitudes that are representative of what we need to do with them in a fair way.” n

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FRIEND TO BIRDERS The Northern Pygmy Owl is worth looking for during a daytime birding expedition in Whistler. PHOTO BY CHRIS DALE

Naturespeak: Northern Pygmy Owl—daytime hooter, friend to birders BY KRISTINA SWERHUN WHY DON’T WE SEE OWLS in Whistler more often? Before you label this a trick question and point out that owls are only active at night, so you wouldn’t see, but rather hear them, what if I told you that one Whistler owl is active during the day all year long? Whistler has 12 species of owl on its bird list: the Spotted Owl has been extirpated after losing its old-growth habitat to logging; neither the Barn, Western Screech, Long-eared, Short-eared or Boreal Owls are very common; September to February you might see Northern Hawk and Snowy Owls; and resident all year are Northern Sawwhet, Barred, Great Horned and Northern Pygmy Owls. The only one of these permanent residents that hunts by day is the Northern Pygmy, and is thus the one you’re most likely to see. But be prepared for something small—it’s an owl the size of a robin, mostly dark brown and white, with a long tail and piercing yellow eyes. Look for them perching on the tops of conifer trees. On top of its diurnal habits, the Northern Pygmy Owl is an amazing little bird. Although tiny, it’s a ferocious hunter with a taste for songbirds and can take down prey up to three times its size. One natural phenomenon associated with it that comes in super handy to birdwatchers is that small birds such as chickadees, warblers and jays will often “mob” Northern Pygmy Owls. A phenomenal behaviour to witness,

mobbing involves prey birds swooping at flying or perched predatory birds to drive them away. Several different species will often join forces to mob a common threat. It’s nice to think of birdies chirping for the love of song, but mobbing birds have survival on their minds and tend to use similar-sounding call notes. This may act to recruit other individuals to form a mobbing flock. Mobbing calls may also tell a predator it has been spotted, causing it to move to another area. The calls can even alert still larger avian predators to go after the target of the mobbing! How does this help a birdwatcher? Knowing that songbirds mob Northern Pygmy Owls, you may be able to find them by following a noisy commotion focused on one spot. But there’s another trick, too. By regularly joining the Whistler Naturalists’ monthly bird walk I’ve learned and seen something new each outing, including local birder Chris Dale imitating a Northern Pygmy Owl call so perfectly that songbirds mob his location! During the monthly bird walk on April 6, I listened and watched as he called in Black-capped Chickadees, Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Song Sparrows, Pine Siskens and Ruby-crowned Kinglets by imitating a Northern Pygmy Owl. So, keep your eyes open for this tiny owl, remember to look and listen for mobbing, use helpful birding resources like the free Merlin Bird ID app, and join a Whistler Naturalists’ monthly bird walk to learn other birdwatching tricks.

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MAY 2, 2019

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NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

VOP reviews animal control bylaw REVIEW FOLLOWS ALLEGED DOG ATTACK IN STRATA DEVELOPMENT

BY JOEL BARDE THE VILLAGE of Pemberton (VOP) is reviewing its animal control bylaw in the wake of an incident at the Creekside Village development in Pemberton. Courtney Marchment said she was about nine metres from her door on Jan. 31 when a dog belonging to a man living in her building allegedly came rushing towards her, attacking her and her Australian Shepherd, Moose. In the ensuing melee, the dog allegedly bit her on the leg, grazed her hand, and injured Moose, so that she required stitches, said Marchment, adding that the alleged attack followed two incidents of “unprovoked aggressive behaviour” from the dog towards Moose. Marchment reported the incident to the VOP but was disappointed with the result. Anne Burt, the VOP’s bylaw enforcement, wrote to Marchment and said: “Both dogs display and have displayed aggressive

CHANGE IS GONNA COME The Village of

Pemberton’s animal control bylaw is under review after advocacy from Courtney Marchment, whose dog was allegedly injured by an off-leash dog in January. PHOTO SUBMITTED

26 MAY 2, 2019

behavior when around each other. “This type of behavior may be a result of the dogs displaying their ‘alpha’ behaviours as they are both female.” The letter from Burt went on to say that given “the Village has been unable to determine to our satisfaction that the bite you sustained was from (the dog), the fact that this incident took place on private

“It didn’t accurately describe the attack, and it didn’t include anything about (the dog) being off leash and Moose being on leash and in control.” According to Marchment, the VOP’s animal control bylaw is unclear and gives too much discretion to bylaw officers. In a recent letter to VOP council, she said it does not make “a clear distinction”

“It’s hard to interpret, understand and enforce, and it appears it is very one-sided in terms of how it is interpreted and enforced.” - COURTNEY MARCHMENT

property and the Village has received no other official complaints respecting (the dog), the Village will not be pursuing an aggressive dog designation at this time.” Said Marchment, “I was very upset to receive that kind of response,” adding that she had forwarded evidence of further alleged aggressive behaviour to the VOP. “I felt like the letter didn’t include any of the previous incidents or evidence leading up to the attack,” said Marchment.

between sections that apply to public and private lands. “It’s hard to interpret, understand and enforce, and it appears it is very one-sided in terms of how it is interpreted and enforced, meaning the bylaw officer has all of the say,” she said. In response, Pemberton council has sent the bylaw to staff for review. “I think it’s always important that if residents or council feel there might be some flaws or holes in a bylaw, we take the time to

review them from time to time,” said VOP Mayor Mike Richman. “We’ve sent it to staff and it will come back to council shortly.“ One of the issues to be reviewed is that—in contrast to places like Whistler and Vancouver—the VOP bylaw has two designations for problem dogs: Aggressive Dog and Dangerous Dog. Richman said that the Dangerous Dog classification was taken directly from the Community Charter, and the Aggressive Dog designation was added to the bylaw to give staff the ability to give a less-severe designation to an animal. “I think the idea back then, when it was put together, was to allow for some restrictions and measures to be put in place that aren’t as … restrictive,” said Richman. Bylaw enforcement on strata properties can be difficult for municipal governments, as stratas have legislative powers, added Richman. “Staff recommended that this (incident) be referred to their strata council for review, and that if they felt that there is a need to take measures on the strata level, they should do so there,” said Richman. Marchment said that while she currently feels unsafe around the dog in question, she would like to see the dog rehabilitated. “The last thing I want to see is a dog put down if it can be trained properly,” she said. Pique was unable to reach the owner of the unnamed dog for comment. n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

ALLAN JENNER Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Thinking of

• Selling your Business • Leasing, buying or selling commercial property in the sea to sky corridor. allanjenner36@gmail.com 604.905.9589 HELICOPTER HARASSMENT A mountain goat seen on Mount Pauline, the site of two recent reports of ‘helicopter harrassment’ of the sensitive wildlife population.

WWW.BLACKTUSKREALTY.COM

604.898.5904

PHOTO BY TREVOR ROSS/ COURTESY OF THE PEMBERTON WILDLIFE ASSOCIATION

‘Helicopter harassment’ of mountain goats has PWA sounding alarm NON-PROFIT HAS RECEIVED REPORTS OF HELICOPTERS DISTURBING GOATS ON MOUNT PAULINE THIS WINTER

BY BRANDON BARRETT RECENT REPORTS OF helicopters flying too close to sensitive mountain goat populations in the Upper Pemberton Valley demonstrate a need for increased enforcement of wildlife regulations, said the head of the Pemberton Wildlife Association. PWA president Allen McEwan said the non-profit has received two reports this past winter, most recently in March, of “helicopter harassment” of goats on Mount Pauline. “It’s well documented by scientists throughout any mountain goat habitat that helicopters within a kilometre of a known mountain goat population is a serious problem, so the Ministry (of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations) has designated mountain goat winter ranges throughout the Sea to Sky corridor and it’s up to the operators to know where they are,” McEwan explained. “This is where we come to the problem, where clearly some of the operators either don’t know where these mountain goat ranges are or they are simply not respecting them.” Both private and charter helicopter flights are governed by federal regulations, although when an operator’s service includes the use of Crown land, provincial authorization is required. As part of that authorization, helicopter operators must provide a detailed management plan to the province. McEwan has lobbied Victoria to consider reviewing management plans every five years to accommodate for changes in wildlife populations and habitat. “We had an incident in the Upper Lillooet a few years ago that I reported and it turned out the management plan was 17 years old and the goat winter range that they were violating may not have been known at the time they submitted the plan,” McEwan recalled. “That just shows the desperate need for more government

staffing here to help supervise and manage these adventure tourism operations.” Under provincial regulations, helicopter flight paths must maintain a 1,500-metre horizontal distance from ungulate winter ranges. Some aircraft that are particularly loud may need further separation. The province is also reportedly considering additional flight path requirements for operators in the Sea to Sky in an effort to improve monitoring. Sgt. Simon Gravel with the Conservation Officer Service (COS) said one of his constables has been looking into the reports of harassment, but without any firm tips to help identify the helicopters spotted this winter near Mount Pauline, he said the COS would be educating local helicopter companies on proper wildlife practices. A provincial ticket for harassing wildlife with a vehicle or device comes with a $345 fine—although in severe cases, legal action can also be taken. Living in some of the most inhospitable terrain in B.C., mountain goats rely on isolated, difficult-to-reach areas in the winter to protect them from predators. At the sight of a helicopter, they can experience severe stress—“scattering like quail,” according to the PWA—and in some cases will even fall to their deaths. The forests ministry has indications that there were seven deaths of collared mountain goats this winter on protected range, but as it has yet to recover any carcasses, it cannot confirm what may have caused the deaths. McEwan said there are roughly 50 mountain goats in and around Mount Pauline, approximately 100 on the Mount Meager side of the Upper Pemberton Valley, and about the same number to the east of the Upper Lillooet River. Anyone who witnesses aircraft flying in close proximity to mountain goats should report the details, including photographic or video evidence, if possible, to the COS RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277. n

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Pitch-In Day

Saturday, April 25th2019 2015 Saturday, May 4th

Non-profit groups will will be be out out clearing clearingup uplitter litterininour ourvalley. valley. Local residents are asked to help by cleaning up LITTER Local residents are asked to help by cleaning up around their neighbourhood. LITTER around their own yard. Individuals Individuals wishing to help to help out are welcome and contact should contact out are welcome and should AWARE: info@awarewhistler.org roads@whistler.ca

www.whistler.ca/pitchinday www.whistler.ca/pitchinday

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/pitchinday

MAY 2, 2019

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DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

The Alpine Club of Canada adapts to the socialmedia-fuelled popularity of picturesque huts DESIGNATED AMBASSADORS ARE ‘MORE OR LESS CUSTODIANS FOR THE HUT—(AND) FOR PEOPLE,’ SAYS ORGANIZATION

BY JOEL BARDE THE POWER of social media to popularize backcountry locations is well known at this point, with many pointing to Joffre Lakes Provincial Park and the many people who have learned of it via Instagram as a prime example. Like some picturesque parks, certain backcountry huts are now grappling with an influx of new visitors—and a host of attendant issues they can cause. The popularity of huts within the Alpine Club of Canada’s (ACC) extensive hut system is now directly related to how often they are “exposed to social media,” said Peter Hoang, communications specialist with the ACC. According to Hoang, the prime example of this phenomenon is the Abbot Pass Hut, a picturesque stone hut that sits high up in the Rocky Mountains, in Banff National Park. Built in 1922, the Abbot hut has traditionally been a refuge for hardcore climbers looking to ascend surrounding mountains. And while it still caters to that crowd, it’s now seen as a prime The famed Abbot Pass Hut has been welcoming new visitiors in recent years—and that’s led to some issues.

POPULAR PLACE

PHOTO BY PAUL ZIZKA

28 MAY 2, 2019

destination for less-experienced hikers who consider it an end-destination. “We have two generations of people going there, and they are both on separate pages,” said Hoang, speaking about the “tension” this has engendered. “Now, we just don’t get climbers up there; we get people who use it as an end-destination and not a base camp.” This, explained Hoang, has led to

which will see designated ACC members assigned the task of teaching etiquette to new visitors. “We have people going up to these huts to tell people, more or less, what the etiquette is,” explained Hoang. “They’re more or less custodians for the hut—(and) for people.” This program, he added, will take the pressure off experienced ACC members

“We have two generations of people going there, and they are both on separate pages. Now, we just don’t get climbers up there; we get people who use it as an end-destination and not a base camp.” - PETER HOANG

problems, as many of the newer visitors don’t fully appreciate the proper etiquette one is expected to follow while visiting the huts. Hoang acknowledged that, in part, the ACC might bear some responsibility for that, having not adequately explained hut etiquette. “Maybe (it) hasn’t been put across (adequately),” said Hoang. “It’s not obvious.” To help address the problem, the ACC recently launched an ambassador program,

who may otherwise feel responsible for intervening. In a separate initiative that recently appeared on the ACC’s blog, Aspects, the organization recently released a noncomprehensive list of written—and unwritten rules—of staying in alpine huts. The project came at the suggestion of ACC members, and drew on over 200 written pieces of correspondence, said

Hoang, who tallied the dominant themes and then released a list of five rules of hut etiquette. The list includes the need to replenish water, share the work, and respect quiet times. “Not everybody is there for the same reasons … so it’s better not to party,” said Hoang, adding that climbers might rise at 2 a.m. to begin their day. The list also reminds people not to leave any food in the huts—a problem that Hoang acknowledged predates the arrival of the Instagram crowd. “It’s usually seen as a favour, for people that come in the future,” said Hoang, of the food issue. “But it just sits there and nobody eats it.” Yet out of all the themes mentioned in the letters, the most popular was heartening, said Hoang. It called on ACC members to “show other users the way” and “be a mentor and withhold judgment” of more inexperienced users. That’s a good thing, as new users develop an appreciation for the environment and hut system and end up helping to protect it, said Hoang. “I think empathy is the basic rope that ties everyone together at huts,” he said. “I think comments like that are super helpful.” To read the ACC blog posts on hut etiquette, visit alpineclubofcanada. ca/blog/2019/1/28/your-voice-on-hutetiquette-pt1. n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net TRUCKEE, CALIF.—Potential for wildfire has become a focal point as officials consider whether to allow the real estate development proposed at the base of Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The proposal would add 1,500 bedrooms and additional retail and resort amenities to the Olympic Valley during the next 25 years. The resort lies between Truckee and Lake Tahoe. Developers have acknowledged that wildfire could burn through the valley faster than people could evacuate. Approvals by Placer County are being challenged in court. Benjamin Spillman of the Associated Press talked with a resident, retired flight attendant Laura Haneveld, who fears being trapped. The fire at Paradise, Calif., which killed 85 people last November, and other fires in California in recent years cause her to worry even more about having too many people trying to flee down a twisting, curvy three-kilometre road to a highway that itself is only two lanes and also curvy. Truckee and Interstate 80 are about 16 kilometres away. Under some circumstances, said Squaw Valley developers and government officials, thousands of people might have to take refuge at the resort. Allen Riley, chief of the Squaw Valley Fire Department, said the acres of bare pavement and village area would be sufficient harbour for people to survive a quick-moving fire, although evacuation would be the first choice. He cited communities in Australia, the Rancho Santa Fe development north of San Diego, and Pepperdine University, between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, as places where shelter-in-place strategies have worked. California state legislators have been considering laws that would toughen the requirements of local governments for approving housing developments in high-risk areas, according to another AP report.

HIGH IN HEALTH RANKINGS JACKSON, Wyo.—Teton County, which is roughly synonymous with Jackson Hole, was ranked No. 6 in the nation for healthy communities in a data analysis conducted by Aetna with U.S. News and World Report. Colorado’s Chaffee County, home to the river towns of Salida and Buena Vista, ranked No. 11 in the same study, while Utah’s Morgan County (just north of Park City) was 12th, and Colorado’s Routt County (Steamboat) was 14th, San Miguel County (Telluride) 17th, and Pitkin County (Aspen) 19 th. Tops in the country was Colorado’s Douglas County, a high-income area just south of Denver. Teton County led rural counties. The magazine’s website noted that “access to

2018

Mountain News: Shelter-inplace one option in case of wildfire at Squaw Valley care and transportation barriers can pose challenges, but residents of rural communities with high-performing economies typically live in healthier natural environments and fare better in terms of housing than their urban counterparts.”

STUDY SEEKS TO DEFINE ROLE OF ARTS ASPEN, Colo.—A study that seeks to measure the economic impact of the arts and culture sector in Aspen will soon begin. “Collectively, to be able to tell a fuller narrative of the importance of arts and culture to our communities is really important,” said Sarah Roy, director of the Red Brick Center for the Arts, which is among the arts organizations pitching in to cover the US$63,000 cost of the study. The Aspen Chamber Resort Association and the City of Aspen are together paying US$53,000. Boulder-based RRC Associates will define many metrics: number of jobs associated with the arts, the secondary impact to local businesses, the attendance at art, music, and other venues. Second-home owners will be surveyed as to how much the arts and cultural scene influenced their decisions to buy in the Aspen-Snowmass area. “Our perspective is that the arts are probably the most undervalued sector in Aspen,” Heidi Zuckerman, director of the Aspen Art Museum, told the city council members. “The economic impact is huge, and I actually think it should be a number that anyone sitting on your side of the table should be able to cite.”

THINKING ABOUT URBAN AVALANCHES CRESTED BUTTE, Colo.—In March, one man died in the Crested Butte area and another nearly perished after being buried under an avalanche of snow from building roofs. That has the Crested Butte Town Council considering regulations intended to forecast such urban avalanches from roofs onto public right-of-ways. The Crested Butte News explained that certain buildings within the town have been known to shed snow during winter, damaging cars when they do. Other roofs haven’t slid but certainly looked like they might after the series of heavy snowfalls this winter. Six buildings have been identified, including the town hall itself. The council leans toward an ordinance that would require owners or tenants to remove the snow once it becomes an obvious danger. It wasn’t clear from the report in the News how town officials intend to define an obvious danger. But not all snow loads seem to pose a similar threat. One roof is said to have shake shingles, hence posting less risk. But another building in the town’s commercial sector slid with what one speaker at the meeting estimated was up to 2.4 metres of snow. No one was walking by. n

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What is Zoning Bylaw Amendment (Housekeeping) Bylaw No. 862, 2019 about?

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How do I provide feedback?

30 MAY 2, 2019

ECOLOGIC

Heating up Part 1: The political climate LOST AMIDST the miasma of recriminations around the SNC Lavalin affair were two key things Canadians shouldn’t have missed. First was the federal budget, where could be found, among other items, several forward-focused initiatives: a reduction in the student loan interest rate and six-month interest-free period after graduation; $5K credit on the purchase of an electric vehicle; 15 per cent credit on a digital news service subscription—something Canadians hesitate to enlist, making it difficult for media outlets to transition as they must.

BY LESLIE ANTHONY Had we the temerity to even briefly wave off the self-immolating protestations and mock opprobrium of Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott that hovered like flies for weeks, we might also have registered this StatsCan tidbit: a buoyant economy and signature child benefit saw the Trudeau government hit its target—set in 2015—of a 20-per-cent reduction in poverty earlier than expected. Twenty. Per cent. I mention these not as a Liberal sycophant (I remain, in fact, infuriated with this government on several fronts) but because as a scientist I’m a trained pragmatist and skeptic, undistracted by schadenfreude from seeing such real, measurable progress as decisive advances in the ecology of a democracy evolving within a current global context. Though we all share some semblance of analytical skill, today’s micro-attentionspan landscape seldom demands we apply this capacity. But lest you think I’m patting my own back or digressing, here’s why it would help to be able to cut through the negative hand-waving around trivialities to understand positive policies. Our much ballyhooed representative democracy is based on a carefully managed ecosystem of different parties, such that regardless of banner waved, when one is in power another forms a “loyal opposition” whose interests follow those of the country’s core values and direction— albeit by different means and with different gewgaws. Not to say radical changes to governance don’t take place, but in Canada’s past, at least, these were debated in rational ways on rational grounds, represented necessary measures and/or benefitted all, and were, once incorporated, woven quickly into the national fabric perpetuated by all parties (e.g., Tommy Douglas’ universal health care). Thus, an incoming conservative government would no more ignore scientists on the issue of acid rain than an NDP government would do so with an invasive forest pest like spruce budworm; these were shared Canadian concerns whose solutions were in the national interest. But things have changed, and

considerations of reality don’t benefit the toxic discourse on which some parties thrive. With the right’s dog-whistled nationalism and focus on trickle-down tax reductions (never shown to have worked), wealth creation for the wealthy (ditto), and de facto corporatocracy (propped up by a theocratic fringe), the rising waters of polarization perpetuated by mainstream media have left little centre ground on which we can all stand. No sooner has the scaffolding for a mutually positive future outcome been erected by a progressive government than it is falsely vilified and a reactionary conservative government is sworn in to begin tearing it down—at great cost to all. Driven by ideological, not practical, considerations, a spiteful, malevolent demolition is carried out in a paradoxically wasteful and ultimately destructive manner, undermining any progress it promises. In order to justify this façade, conservatives have switched from selling stoic, centre-right leadership to attackhappy populist tactics. Starting with the radical Tea Party threat to U.S. NeoCon Republicans, accusations need not be true anymore—just true enough, even when wrapped in absurdities that contravene numerical or fact-based reality. This approach has punched a hole in the ecology of representative democracy that can be seen everywhere—on Fox News, in Donald Trump, the Brexit debacle, and the current stream of vitriol, misinformation, ad hominem attacks and controversymongering by Canada’s conservatives under Doug Ford, Jason Kenney and Andrew Scheer, who simultaneously offer nothing

... accusations need not be true anymore—just true enough ...

for a future we all know is imminent. Our politics are heating up, which brings us to the second thing we might have missed while chugging shots of indignation, bandwagon drunk on the false scandal of SNC Lavalin: Canada’s climate report. Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR) is the first major release of the Canada in a Changing Climate initiative launched in 2017. Though it props up the government’s case for a carbon tax, it is in no way partisan, being based on the same published peer-reviewed literature I have used for a decade of reporting and conference presentations. And, I can assure you, it’s something we shouldn’t have missed—and all need to analyze. Next time Part 2: Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR)—what you need to know and why. n


OUTSIDER

An East Alps sojourn: Part 2 SNOW WHIPS SIDEWAYS as our party crests over the col exiting the Stubaier Gletscher resort. Wind gusts greet our transition point above the Sulztal Glacier, flinging our skins around like some cruel

BY VINCE SHULEY ribbon gymnastics demonstration. My first foray into the wilderness of Austria’s Eastern Alps has a visible range of about six to eight metres. But we’re playing the long game in these mountains, and by “long,” I mean about four to five days. Navigating unfamiliar terrain halfway across the world in the current storm weather would normally have me retreating into the culinary comfort of a Tyrolean alpine lodge. Luckily, though, we have a professional directing our group of Whistler skiers. Jesse de Montigny is the lead guide at Yamnuska Mountain Adventures (based in Canmore, Alta.) and while he’s guided many trips in the

STUNNING SETTING The peak of

Ruderhofspitze (3474m) in Austria’s Stubai Alps. A divine setting. VINCE SHULEY

Tyrol region, it’s also his first time skiing the Stubaital Valley. That’s probably why he was diligently studying the route for hazards the previous evening while the rest of us were busy knocking back bottles of helles lager. After roping up (to guard against crevasse falls) and descending gently for about 10 minutes, we’re out of the worst of the fog and can see further down the valley. Some meadow skipping and a not-so-short skate along the valley floor follow before we arrive at our first backcountry shelter at 2,135 metres, the Amberger Hut. While not luxurious by any means, the Amberger Hut is an oasis among the jagged peaks of the Stubaital. Sleeping about 60 people in beds and bunks with a kitchen to feed twice as many, the stone and wood panelled structure has had multiple renovations and extensions since it was built in 1888, when it slept just eight people. Servers file out of the kitchen at dinner time with enormous plates of Austrian cuisine making sure everyone’s beer glasses are full and schnapps is poured for those inclined. I sleep that night with the fullest belly I’ve ever had in the backcountry. The next day, the weather has softened but the peaks are still shrouded in heavy, vertigo-inducing clouds. After a few hours our group splits in two, half retreating back to Amberger Hut while the rest of us soldier

on up the branching valley. Patience pays off when a brief respite in the storm lets us scramble to the summit of Kuhscheibe (3,189m). Powder turns reward us for the descent, albeit at low speed to counter the flat light and poor visibility. The third day is our transit day to the Franz Senn Hut in the Upper Oberbergtal valley. The storm has cleared, revealing the Stubai Alps in all their glory as we set off from the Amberger. Groups of skiers hailing from a dozen different countries are out to take advantage of the weather window. Our plan was to climb, summit and possibly ski Schrankogel (3,497m) today, but as we round the corner of the Schwarzenberg glacier we notice our intended route would entail crossing an exposed, steep face. Fresh storm snow and solar warming seal the deal and we diligently back away from the objective. Crossing over to the Alpeiner glacier proves a technical task in itself with a steep bootpack requiring us to don crampons and ice axes before rappelling down the other side. Ditching our earlier objective has left us hungry for a high point of the day, so we begin the slow trudge up the glacier as the afternoon wind forms sastrugi under our skis. Gaining the ridge gives our first look back into the Stubaier Gletscher resort, one of our party pointing out what looks like fresh slide in the distance before realizing

it’s actually a groomed run. The panorama of the Eastern Alps reveals countless glaciers, peaks and couloirs of which we must settle for a minute sample this trip. Daylight is in its final hours and clouds on the horizon threaten tomorrow’s ambitions, so a few of us decide that we need a summit to properly appreciate this bluebird day. Two of us fall in behind Jesse as he quickly scrambles to the peak of Ruderhofspitze (3,474m), our high point for the trip. Exhausted but buzzing from the grandeur surrounding us in every direction (or maybe the summit crucifix is encouraging the divinity of the moment), I take as many shots with my camera as I can, leaving a few minutes to just look, breathe and live. The Franz Senn Hut is buzzing with activity when we arrive haggard, sunburned and wind burned. A smattering of different languages pepper the dining hall— everyone seems to have had just as enjoyable a day as we have. I take another generous gulp of weissbier as the peaks outside the window fade into the night. Austria, you’re all right. Vince Shuley set himself a new bar for the backcountry hut experience. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. n

MAY 2, 2019

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FEATURE STORY

Bringing culture home

The Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;wat Nation is one of many Indigenous groups from around the globe that are currently trying to repatriate cultural possessions bought, stolen, found or gifted since colonization 32 MAY 2, 2019


FEATURE STORY

T

By Alyssa Noel

ucked into the corner of a windowsill in Chief Dean Nelson’s Mount Currie office sits a large, grey rock shaped like a vase. “It is beautiful as is, but the strange thing is, it’s not from here,” says Lil’wat Nation political chief Nelson from his office chair, examining the object. “It was brought here from the Powell River area. It’s interesting how things get moved. People take things for their own reasons and values (with) little or no consideration (for their) home. It doesn’t belong here. Its home is with the Sliammon people.” MAY 2, 2019

33


FEATURE STORY A non-Indigenous person reportedly took the stone from Powell River—more specifically the Sliammon First Nation— but when it began to bring hardship and bad luck, they turned it over to the Lil’wat. “They wanted someone to take care of it, at least away from them,” Nelson says. “I have no wishes or bad intentions with the stone figure and it has not affected me negatively. I’ve contacted the leadership of the Sliammon people and only wish for it to be returned to its origin. I feel very strongly about returning things to where they’re supposed to be. It’s a significant piece of someone’s culture that’s been taken from someone. Obviously, their values were never considered.” That concept of repatriating items, art and artifacts has been top of mind for Nelson lately. Earlier this year, he put out a press release calling for anyone with historical Lil’wat possessions—whether they were found, bought or gifted—to return them to the nation. Both individuals and organizations have told the nation of historical possessions in their hands, but because they had been bought or found, they didn’t think too deeply about where those items were from or what they symbolized. Part of Nelson’s challenge now is to convey that meaning to people. “It’s a piece that’s been taken,” he says. “There’s a piece missing. It’s identity, it’s cultural significance, it’s everything. It pertains to our Indigenous values. (The items) are benefitting somebody, but not the people who brought them to life. The real purpose and significance of the recourse for repatriating them. Lil’wat cultural articles are left to interpretation. members have also found traditionally We’re at a loss for someone else’s gain. We weaved baskets in places such as the have identity loss, a cultural loss. We are at Re-Use-It Centre in Whistler and shops a spiritual loss.” in Vancouver. He continues: “The Ucwalmicw are There are also stories floating around putting the cultural pieces back together, of locals—largely in Pemberton—in but presently we’re at a loss because of possession of artifacts. someone else’s value. The values are in “I know of people in the corridor recently people’s homes; they’re on display as a that have followed through with building decorative project. At present, in museums, on (top of) significant cultural sites without people pay to see these exhibitions. They reluctance, without regret,” Nelson says. have a different value there, but we have “Cultural items were dug up and disposed of not had them on display for our people or were kept for personal reasons. Some of to see?” these incidents happened within the last 15 Nelson says he’s heard of Lil’wat years and (they) were never approached for possessions on display in museums as wrongdoing through archaeological laws far away as Philadelphia, New York and or any laws that were supposed to protect Washington, D.C. but they’ve had little historical, sensitive sites or materials.”

(The items) are benefitting somebody, but not the people who brought them to life. The real purpose and significance of the cultural articles are left to interpretation. We’re at a loss for someone else’s gain. We have identity loss, a cultural loss. We are at a spiritual loss.

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

- Chief Dean Nelson

A ‘worldwide’ movement

In his press release, Nelson cites several articles from the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People requiring “states … to enable the access and/ or repatriation of ceremonial objects and human remains in their possession through fair, transparent and effective mechanisms developed in conjunction with Indigenous peoples concerned.” The declaration isn’t legally binding— though signatory countries have committed to upholding it. But a new private members’ bill could help the Lil’wat—and other

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34 MAY 2, 2019


FEATURE STORY

Left and right: Two Lil’wat Nation pieces that are currently housed at the Museum of Vancouver. The centrepiece, from the S7a’ya’nicw clan, is of a half-man, half-fish. Photos submitted.

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FEATURE STORY Indigenous communities in Canada— repatriate cultural property to their territories. Bill Casey, a Liberal Member of Parliament for the Cumberland-Colchester riding in Nova Scotia, first introduced Bill C-391 as a private members’ bill in February 2018 after visiting the Millbrook Cultural and Heritage Centre in Millbrook, N.S. “They have this nice display case with a robe behind glass,” Casey recalls. “I was admiring it one day and the curator, Heather Stevens, said, ‘That’s not the real one. The real one is in Melbourne.’” As it turns out, an Australian museum had been in possession of the Millbrook First Nation ceremonial garment for the last 126 years. That didn’t sit right with Casey. “They had nothing to work with—no tools,” he says. “My idea was to give First Nations like Millbrook a hand, somewhere to turn to. If they identified an artifact that’s available, they could come to this agency and say, ‘This is what we need for transportation’ and get advice and some help.” Casey has since set to work introducing Bill C-391: Indigenous Human Remains and Cultural Property Repatriation Act. He was taken aback by the feedback he quickly received not only from Parliament, but also from leaders, media and institutions from around the world. There was a call from the Commonwealth Museum Association asking to use his bill as a template; there was media coverage in China (though Casey only recognized the image of the Millbrook robe and his name), and even calls from the Netherlands. Clearly, he had tapped into a bigger global issue.

It was the most fascinating learning experience for me to hear what Indigenous people have to say about artifacts. They’re not just artifacts, they represent the spirit of the people who made them and cared for them. I had never been exposed to that perspective.

- Bill Casey

36 MAY 2, 2019

Fifteen artists from Mount Currie displayed quilts, carvings, baskets, drums, and jewelry at the Whistler Fairways in 1993. The exhibit, which included Brian Wallace and Oliver James of the Creekside Dancers, raised more than $200 for the Mount Currie Band. Photo from The Whistler Question archives. “The repatriation of Indigenous artifacts is a movement around the world,” Casey says. “It turned out to be a big deal. We talked to a lot of Indigenous people and museums and leaders from across the country. It was the most fascinating learning experience for me to hear what Indigenous people have to say about artifacts. They’re not just artifacts; they represent the spirit of the people who made them and cared for them. I had never been exposed to that perspective.” The bill seemed to come at the right

time. It passed first and second reading and then went to a committee with voices from both Indigenous and museum representatives. It passed third reading unanimously—a rarity for a private member’s bill—this past February. “I think the timing just happened to be right,” Casey says. “People are ready to do this. We’ve got (the) Truth and Reconciliation (Commission); they all fit together. Certainly artifacts are a big part of reconciliation.” While the bill is still being reviewed in the


20th ANNIVERSARY!


FEATURE STORY Senate, it is expected to pass by the summer. After that, Casey says, the government will have three years to create the framework to carry out repatriation efforts. “I was just really pleased it went the way it did and I’m pleased for the people who will be able to repatriate the artifacts,” he adds. As for the Millbrook First Nations’ robe? Shortly after Casey set the bill in motion, the Australian ambassador to Canada reached out to him: she had talked to museum officials, who were eager to return the item. Now, a member of the Mi’kmaq First Nation band in Millbrook and an Indigenous Australian woman who works at the museum are handling the logistics involved with returning the item to its rightful owner. Meanwhile, the bill that story spurred will create a strategy with five measures planned: To put into place a mechanism for First Nation, Inuit or Metis communities or organizations to acquire—or reacquire— cultural property or human remains; to encourage anyone in possession of remains or property to return them; to recognize the importance of preserving those remains and cultural property; to respect traditional Indigenous knowledge of cultural possessions rather than requiring strict documentary evidence with regards to repatriation; and to help resolve any conflicts that arise with remains or property in a respectful manner. Still, Indigenous communities face a huge challenge trying to determine what, exactly, has been taken and who might be in possession of it. That’s what the Lil’wat Nation is currently grappling with, Nelson says. The first step, he adds, is to make the Sea to Sky corridor aware that based on reconciliation measures and protocol, these cultural items bought, found, and taken should be returned to the First Nations people who created them. “I’m very optimistic,” Nelson says. “I believe in people … That’s all you can do—put your intentions out there and believe people will do the right thing.” Following damaging government policies—from the ban of the potlatch, in which nations were prevented from taking part in the gift-giving feast traditionally practised by Indigenous people across the Pacific Northwest, to residential schools to the myriad

get calls here or emails saying, ‘We have this in our family and we’re thinking about where it should go for the next generation.’” Often, the museum is able to at least narrow down the area from which the items might have originated, she adds. But it can be a complicated issue. She cites the example of First Nations women who would trade clothing for baskets in the late 1800s and early 1900s. “Then that basket is in the settler family. It’s now lived in the settler family for three generations. It has acquired a value to that family,” she says. “They view it as part of their heritage. For them, sometimes, the idea of giving that up is hard. For others, they love being part of that idea—they love reconnecting it with the family or community where the basket originally came from. We’re seeing more of that.” As for museums, they’re slowly beginning to realize they have to balance representation with reconciliation and work with Indigenous communities in order to display their possessions properly. “It’s not solely about repatriation,” Rowley says. “It’s about relationships, reconciliation, and representation.” Nelson’s ultimate goal is to have Lil’wat Nation possessions—from baskets to bowls to stonework and masks—returned and displayed on Lil’wat territory so the nation’s children can identify with them and further embrace their culture. Having worked as a teacher before Mount Currie carver Charlie Wallace meets being elected chief, Nelson returns to the with the eagle he freed from a block of yellow Xetólacw Community School in Mount cedar in 1993. Photo from The Whistler Question archives. Currie about once a week to take part in songs and dances. “The hope is to display the cultural injustices within the Indian Act—that creations together,” he says. “They belong aimed to strip Indigenous people of to the people and the people should know their culture, repatriation of cultural where (the rest) of their cultural heritage is possessions means more than just giving being kept and have access to (it). There are back an item. things that have been returned (by) people “I do want those things for our future,” who have bought things from collectors to Nelson says. “I feel that all of our creations Connecting with individuals in possession give them back to the community and we have to come back here. They’ve been of these items is one issue, but many are very grateful. There was a shift in value away for a long time … This repatriation is museums in Canada have their own policies centuries ago that has never balanced out. just an awakening of this. Understanding around repatriation, says Susan Rowley, a Even today, cultural values are not seen as needs to be emphasized that reconciliation curator at the Museum of Anthropology at equal … The message is anyone who has a is not just a word, but an action to correct the University of British Columbia and chair cultural creation in their possession needs wrongful practices. The history of all … of the museum’s repatriation committee. to return it to the people of origination for incidents and occurrences that have put “I’ve seen a number of wonderful cases proper protocol and spiritual practice.” First Nations’ people on Indian reserves of people stepping forward and saying, If you have any items you think might under the Indian Act system (are) not ‘We’ve found this in our house’ or ‘We’ve be from the Lil’wat Nation and would like fully understood or comprehended by the had this in our home and we’d like to to repatriate them, email info@lilwat.ca or general public.” return it to this nation,’” she says. “We do call 604-894-6115. n

The complications of repatriation

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

BUDA CASTLE AND ROYAL PALACE (HUNGARY)

Cruising for Castles on the Danube and Rhine Rivers STORY AND PHOTOS BY KARIN LEPERI

I

grew up with a healthy dose of Hans Christian Andersen fairytales and Walt Disney adaptations of prince and princess stories with mostly happy endings. However, the parts that intrigued me the most were the castles and stately mansions of yore—vertical aspirations of hopes, dreams and knightly protection. When I heard that many of these stone edifices still exist in Europe—though some with heavy renovations and others but crumbling relics of their former grandeur, I was determined to see and photograph as many castles, and in some cases castle ruins, as I could within two weeks. Viking River Cruises’ “Grand European” itinerary fit the bill for me, with the bonus that I would start in Budapest, Hungary and sail the Danube on an illumination tour showcasing Buda castle and the Royal Palace at night. From Budapest to Amsterdam, the cruise would take me on a journey of the Danube, Main and Rhine Rivers that showcased the legendary castles of these medieval waterways. (The cruise is also offered in reverse.) The castle stretch of this stellar European tour starts with Austria’s Hinterhaus

40 MAY 2, 2019

Castle just south of the town of Spitz on the Danube and ends with the Katz castle in Germany’s Rhineland-Palatinate. The castles were all viewed from the top deck of our ship as we forged the river towards Amsterdam. The amazing part is the sheer number of castles we saw from the comfort of the sundeck in the span of several mornings. There are other castles, estates, palaces and interesting architecture I experienced on this tour but could not photograph from the river. For those reasons, I have not included them in this list. Nevertheless, I mention them as worthy land excursions: Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna, the 900-year-old Benedictine monastery in Melk in Austria’s Wachau Valley, the UNESCO World Heritage Site and medieval town of Regensburg, old town area of Nuremberg, Seehof Palace near Memmelsdorf, Bishops’ Residenz in Wurzburg—one of Germany’s largest and most ornate palaces and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Privileged Access to Schloss Mespelbrunn and Schloss Lowenstein, the Marksburg Castle in Koblenz (the only Rhine fortress never destroyed), the Bruhl UNESCO palaces in Cologne and the antique windmills in Kinderdijik, Netherlands at the end of the tour. Final resting stop was Amsterdam. Castle-surfing doesn’t get any easier. Following are the castles that are situated by the Danube and Rhine rivers that lent themselves for prime viewing from my deck chair. Though I used my Nikon D850 and 80-400mm telephoto lens to photograph most of the castles, shorter lenses will also work.

This is the historical Hungarian castle and palace complex of the Hungarian kings in Budapest. Though the palace was badly damaged at the end of the Second World War, it was rebuilt in the splendid Neo-Baroque style. The expansive buildings and grounds are most photographic when they are illuminated in the dark. Cruising the Danube for a night tour is simply breathtaking. And illuminating.

HINTERHAUS CASTLE RUIN

(AUSTRIA)

Though this castle is in ruins, it has been occupied since Celtic times with a first mention as early as 830 AD. However, the ruins today actually originated in the 12th century, when it was a strategic stronghold for the Wachau Valley. Today it sits high above the Danube river and the market town of Spitz an der Donau in Lower Austria,

SCHONBUHEL CASTLE

(AUSTRIA)

This castle is perched on a high rock overlooking the Danube and the Austrian Wachau Valley—a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Also known as the “Watchman of the Wachau,” the castle has been situated here for more than 1,000 years when it was the property of the Bishops of Passau. Many, including myself, consider this castle one of the most photogenic.

EHRENFELS CASTLE RUIN

(GERMANY)

The Ehrenfels castle was part of a larger defense in the 13th century that protected territory of the archbishopric of Mainz. The castle also served as a toll station, collecting monies for the bishops and the church. It has been used in times of war as a hiding place for the cathedral treasury of Aachen. It was destroyed in 1689. Today, it is not open to visitors.

RHEINSTEIN CASTLE

(GERMANY)

The Rheinstein castle is considered to be one of the most important examples of romantic castle reconstruction. It was built in the beginning of the 14th century as a princely summer residence. In 1975 the opera singer Hermann Hecher bought the castle and has renovated it to become a star attraction in the valley.

SOONECK CASTLE

(GERMANY)

It is estimated that Sooneck castle was built in the 11th century as part of a defense system of the abbey Kornelimünster near Aachen. Unfortunately, defense was expanded to unauthorized toll-taking, which impeded trade severly. As a result, King Rudolf of Habsburg put an end to their practices in 1282 by destroying Sooneck and neighbouring castles. Friedrich Wilhelm IV converted the ruin into a hunting seat in 1842. The castle still retains an impressive local and view of the river.


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

FURSTENBERG CASTLE RUIN

(GERMANY)

Furstenberg castle was built in 1219 by order of the bishop of Cologne. It provided protection and was also used to levy tolls. Destroyed during the Palatinate Succession War, the castle remains in ruins. It is currently privately owned.

STAHLECK CASTLE

(GERMANY)

This castle had a series and succession of owners, first starting in 1135. By 1190 the castle was acquired by emperor Barbarossa, and in 1214 it was acquired by the Bavarian dynasty as an important base for the Wittelsbach rulers. However, the French blew up the castle in 1689. Reconstructed from 1925 to 1927 as well as 1965 to 1967, it was diligently rebuilt. Nowadays the castle is a popular youth hostel.

GUTENFELS CASTLE

PHOTO BY SHUTTERSTOCK

(GERMANY)

Owned by the Falkenstein family since 1257, it is an important example of the Hohenstaufen military and house construction style on the Rhine. Beginning 1277, it was a castle of the Electorate of Palatinate. But it was renamed Gutenfels (solid rock) after an unsuccessful siege in 1504. Rebuilt between 1889 to 1892, it is now a hotel.

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PFALZGRAFENSTEIN CASTLE

(GERMANY)

A toll castle on Pfalz Island near Kaub, it is considered as one of the most picturesque and unique settings on the Rhine. Built in 1327 by Ludwig the Bavarian, the toll station continued operations until 1866.

SCHONBURG CASTLE

(GERMANY)

This castle is located above Oberwesel, a medieval town in the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. In 1149 the castle was temporarily an Empire Castle but was destroyed in 1689. Today, Schönburg castle accommodates a famous hotel.

KATZ CASTLE

(GERMANY)

Located above the town of St. Goarshausen in Rhineland-Palatinate, the castle precipitously stares down at the Rhine river below. First built around 1371, it was bombarded in 1806 by Napoleon, only to be rebuilt later. The castle is now privately owned and accommodates the hotel Katz Castle.

IF YOU GO: Viking River Cruises Tel. 1.800.706.1483

Karin Leperi is an award-winning Albuquerque-based travel writer and photographer who revels in romantic and medieval travel, whether it be seeking dragons, faeries, castles or renaissance revelries. n

MAY 2, 2019

41


SPORTS THE SCORE

Shandro second in World Cup debut CRUZ JUST OFF THE PODIUM IN FOURTH AT SEASON-OPENING RACE IN SLOVENIA

BY DAN FALLOON IN HIS FIRST-EVER UCI World Cup race, Ethan Shandro made a quick impression. Shandro, who lives in Whistler in the summer and is a former Whistler Mountain Ski Club racer, took a second-place finish in the junior men’s category at the seasonopening race in Maribor, Slovenia on April 27. Shandro’s time was just over three seconds back of winner Thibaut Daprela of France, and he was 1.3 seconds ahead of third-place finisher Kye A’hern of Australia. Pemberton’s Lucas Cruz was just off the podium in fourth. “It felt good. It was very shocking at the beginning. It didn’t sink in until the day after, to be honest, so that was cool,” the 17-year-old Shandro said. “I got to the top of my run on World Cup weekend and thought, ‘Let’s just have fun.’ I didn’t take it too seriously and just enjoyed my time at the World Cup and took it all in.” While Slovenia might not necessarily be top of mind when it comes to top mountainbiking destinations, Shandro loved the course while praising the country for its beauty. He also said the kind people and good food made it a memorable part of a milestone event. “It was crazy to do my first World

OVER THE LINE Ethan Shandro crosses the line in his first-ever UCI World Cup junior race.

PHOTO BY MATTHEW DELORME

42 MAY 2, 2019

Cup. There was more of everything. There were a lot more people watching. It was pretty loud and obviously, there’s more pressure, so when you got to the bottom of your run, it was very relieving,” he said. “I definitely take some confidence from it going into the second round. I’m on pace with the guys and I’m looking forward to the season and seeing if I can get on the top step of the podium.” Shandro explained that he and several of

“Definitely, at the beginning of the season, it weighs on me a little bit because I’m proud and don’t want to let anyone down,” he said. “I want to do well for the team and everyone is so supportive, especially my dad. He was the first person I called after my race.” While Shandro left ski racing to focus on mountain biking full time, he still attempts to ski regularly as cross-training for mountain biking. However, his preparation

“I’m on pace with the guys and I’m looking forward to the season and seeing if I can get on the top step of the podium.” - ETHAN SHANDRO

his competitors got a feel for the mountain earlier, as there was a tune-up race the previous weekend. “I got acclimatized to the dirt and I was less jetlagged,” he said. “The dirt, when it rained in Slovenia, definitely got really slick and was almost peanut butter.” Shandro receives a bit of extra attention as his father, Andrew, is an X Games champion and a past winner on the World Cup circuit. While he tries to shrug it off, it’s not always possible to totally avoid his father’s shadow early in his career.

primarily revolved around working in the gym and riding in and around Vancouver as much as possible. Shandro credited the resort immensely for helping him to achieve the levels he’s attained to this point. “Whistler is basically my second home,” he said. “I spend basically half my time up in Whistler. It’s done a lot to help my mountain biking and I spend a lot of time in the bike park riding around.” Two other Canadians raced, with Whistler’s Ian Milley taking 16th and White

Rock’s Elliot Jamieson earning 17th. In the elite men’s division, Mark Wallace was the top Canadian in eighth as France’s Loic Bruni, Great Britain’s Danny Hart and Australia’s Troy Brosnan locked down the top three spots in order. Whistler’s Finn Iles qualified in third, but went down in the race and placed 52nd. No Canadian women competed, however. “After this weekend, we showed that Canadians are out there getting good results and it’s good to represent Canada like that on the world stage,” Shandro said. Cruz, meanwhile, was feeling happy after his fourth-place showing. “My body and my head felt really solid all week and coming away with fourth was a good feeling to be at the same place as last year,” he said. “I actually had a really consistent run and I was feeling really good on my bike and hitting all of my lines, so I wasn’t really surprised with the result.” With the rain in Slovenia, Cruz said the Canadian athletes, himself included, benefitted from riding in familiar conditions. “It was pretty similar to some riding we had in B.C. It rained a whole bunch, so we had an advantage over all the guys who always ride in the dry (conditions),” he said. Joining the SRAM TLD Racing Team this year has given Cruz an extra boost of confidence, as he feels he has extra resources such as a fulltime mechanic and his own pit area. “We’re really treated like celebrities, really,” he said. “It lets us perform the best we can, which is really cool.” n


SPORTS THE SCORE

Kamstra commits to national champions McMaster

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WHISTLER SECONDARY School’s (WSS) Pietra Kamstra was already pumped to have commited to the McMaster Marauders women’s basketball program. She knew she was going to a good school with a strong hoops program. Then, in March, the Marauders won the first championship in the school’s history, defeating the Laval Rouge et Or. “That was really exciting. I had already committed when they won nationals, so we were here in B.C. watching the game. We were on the edge of our seat; it was so exciting,” the 6-1 forward said. As she looked to further her basketball career beyond high school, Kamstra started checking out her options and, realizing that McMaster seemed like a great all-around fit, reached out to them to see if there was mutual interest. “I was doing research on all different types of universities. I began by looking at academics and McMaster has an amazing academic program,” said Kamstra, who will study at the DeGroote School of Business. “Then I started looking at basketball and where I wanted to fit in there, and then I sent an email to them and they responded to me saying that they were very interested.” From there, a McMaster assistant coach came out to see Kamstra play, liked what he saw, then brought Kamstra to Hamilton to check out the campus and to meet the coaching staff and team. “He thought I would really fit with the team. He thought my length and speed would fit well with how they liked to play and then they invited me out for a visit,” she said. McMaster head coach Theresa Burns said the Marauders were interested in Kamstra not only from a basketball perspective, but because of her academic achievements and kind personality. “We were just very impressed with her from a personal standpoint, a character standpoint,” she said. “Those were first and foremost on our list.” Burns added that Kamstra has strong fundamentals from having had strong coaching throughout her upbringing, and feels she’ll fit well into the McMaster system. “She’s got a nice shot, she can shoot the ball. Obviously, at the next level, we’re going to work with it and try to develop her range and her consistency from a deeper range,” she said. “She likes to play a transition game and she likes to get up and defend hard. We like that. That’s the kind of style we play.” While some rookies might find themselves watching more than playing, especially on

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whistlersportsacademy.com HAMMER TIME Pietra Kamstra has committed to McMaster University in Hamilton.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

contending veteran teams, Burns said she believes in a meritocracy and that Kamstra will push for playing time straightaway. “Every first-year needs that time to be able to acclimatize and get used to the university level, but I think she’ll make that jump smoothly,” she said. “I do not have a locked-in philosophy where firstyears don’t really see the floor and we’re just going to work with them. If she’s performing, she’s going to be on the floor. “I think she will grab minutes in her first year. We don’t want to bring her in all the way from Whistler to have her sit.” Playing at the U Sports level from the get-go is an opportunity Kamstra feels prepared to reach out and take. “You have to work to earn what you get. I definitely played that way with my club and on high-school teams,” she said. “If I work hard and put in the time, I will see results.” As she puts a cap on her high-school career with WSS, Kamstra appreciates that she competed at provincials in four of her five years on the team, and that the Storm pushed teams that had greater resources and, on paper, perhaps should have run away with the games. “We definitely put Whistler on the map as a good team,” she said. “We competed with AA and AAA teams who had much bigger schools and many more basketball players there. “It was getting the experience to change people’s perspectives. No one ever thought Whistler could come that far and being able to do that with my team, and my coach Al Kristmanson was amazing.” Kamstra's teammate, Ayden Kristmanson, previously committed to Ryerson University in Toronto. n

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43


SPORTS THE SCORE

Whistlerites embrace para-motoring PAIR OF LOCALS ENJOY ‘FREEDOM’ SPORT PROVIDES

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN WHISTLER’S Don Eagleton first learned about para-motoring, he went all out. In fact, he went all the way to Southeast Asia to get his start. Chatting about his relatively new pastime on a windy day in Bayly Park last week, Eagleton said he had injured himself while skiing and was searching for a new activity. He initially thought of ultra-light airplanes, given both Pemberton and Squamish have airports, but he soon found para-motoring, in which participants wear a roughly 27-kilogram (60-pound) fan-like device on their backs while floating using a parachute, or wing. “The doctors said I needed to get a prosthetic shoulder. I started by thinking, ‘I can’t ski anymore. I can’t dirt bike. I can’t snowmobile. I can’t do any of these things, so I need a low-impact sport,’” recalled Eagleton, who has lived in Whistler for 34 years. “I saw (a video of) a guy in Thailand running towards the water off a beach and I thought, ‘What is this guy doing?’ … It was like he was on a magic carpet floating across the water. Then he went up and over

WINGING IT Para-motorist Don Eagleton shows off his wing on a windy day at Bayly Park on April 26.

PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

the water. “It was killing me, the anticipation to see what he was actually using. Then I thought I want to try this. As it panned out,

WALSH

he was flying a para-motor.” Moments later, Eagleton recalled, his partner walked in and she said they should consider a vacation in Thailand.

“Divine intervention,” Eagleton said. Soon after, he set off to the island of Ko Pha Ngan to track down his guru. “I was like a private investigator. I tracked this guy down through the internet and people who had flown with him,” Eagleton said, noting his Thai instructor trained the military searchand-rescue operators on para-motors, which they used instead of significantly costlier helicopters. Though his instructor had plenty of clout in Thailand, the certification “was (only) worth the piece of paper it was written on” in Canada, and Eagleton could face a $10,000 fine if he flew without a Canadian transport licence. He connected with James Johnson of Armstrong, and with a month of training, earned his papers. In the ensuing five years, Eagleton has had about 60 hours of flight time, split roughly evenly between Squamish, Pemberton and California, taking about 85 flights in that time. Safety is paramount, as Eagleton triplechecks each of his wing’s lines before taking off—one small entanglement could put him off course or otherwise impact his flight. He also checks in with local airports and ensures that they know he’s out there. If he’s itching to go out for a flight,

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Looking Lookingfor forone oneplace place Looking for one place Looking for forone one place place to toLooking ease easethose those aches aches to ease those to toand ease ease those thoseaches aches aches and pains? pains? and pains?

 

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Eagleton said he’ll start planning days in advance and only fly if his body and the weather are cooperative. “I don’t really wake up in the morning and say ‘I’m flying today,’” he said. “I mentally prepare. I’ll get everything ready. “When that morning comes, everything is already ready … It depends on whether or not the weather agrees with me.” Ultimately, it’s about taking calculated risks, which Eagleton said is no different

www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com reserve chute in case his primary fails. www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com 604 962 0555 There are a handful of other pilots in the 604 604962 962 0555 0555 604 604 962 9620555 0555 Lower Mainland, one in Squamish and one other in Whistler. Sergio Leon had a bit of a different introduction, as he first got into paramotoring in his homeland of Spain, where it is significantly more popular, before moving to Whistler. Leon was certified in Spain, bought his equipment and eventually brought it to

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“When the morning comes, everything is already ready ... It depends on whether or not the weather agrees with me.” - DON EAGLETON

than when he was skiing or taking part in any other sport. His best day so far came recently during an hour-long February flight at Green Lake in a rare takeoff from within Whistler, as the only suitable starting and landing points in the resort are frozen lakes in winter. While a full tank of gas would allow flights of three-and-a-half hours, Eagleton said it is uncomfortable taking off with that much fuel and instead leaves with only about an hour’s worth. “I’ll only put an hour, or an hour and a half in there, and then I’ll fly around at about 2,000 feet (600 metres) until I do run out of gas. Then I come down and land with my wing,” he said, adding that he carries a

Whistler. He used to skydive regularly, so he said it’s a step back from that. “It’s not like that adrenaline rush like skydiving,” he said. “It’s more like chilling.” Compared to Spain, the weather can provide more challenges here, he said. “The weather is not always the best,” he said. “You can’t fly almost every day even if you wanted to. It needs to be nice weather. The wind needs to be proper wind. It’s definitely more challenging here, for sure.” However, Leon said “freedom” is appealing to him, and it’s worth the additional hassles Whistler can provide. “You can go wherever you want,” he said, noting he usually takes off from Alta Lake for his 30-to-40-minute flights. “It’s so beautiful.” n

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45


SPORTS THE SCORE

We Run Whistler entering third year RUNNING GROUP MEETS WEEKLY, RAIN OR SHINE, SLEET OR HAIL

BY DAN FALLOON CONSISTENCY IS A VIRTUE when running, and it’s certainly a message that the We Run Whistler group has taken to heart. In its first two years, the group—started by Kristian Manietta and Pique’s own Lou O’Brien—has gained a foothold in Whister in large part due to its willingness to run each and every Tuesday at 5:55 p.m. While the attendance tends to decline in poor weather, it’s not as sheer as one might expect. O’Brien recalled a particularly brutal winter run where temperatures dropped into double digits below zero in blustery conditions. A decent number of people showed up and O’Brien noted that when people aren’t in attendance, it has more to do with their respective availability than whatever is happening outside. “We have made it our mission to never miss a week. No matter what the weather, we’ll always go out, whether it’s just for 6 km because it’s a blizzard or whether it’s 10 km because the conditions are good,” O’Brien said. “People are beginning to realize that it’s a year-round thing that they can do and there are people that they can do it with.”

ON THE RUN We Run Whistler had a strong turnout for its third-season kickoff on April 30. While there were running groups active in Whistler in the past, all experienced their ebbs and flows and none ran through the winter.

PHOTO BY GUY FATTAL

“They tended to be really intimidating to people because people tended to think that they were too hardcore,” O’Brien said, noting groups such as the one run by Helly

Hansen didn’t grow much past 10 or 15 runners before its organizer left town. “We saw a hole in the market there to get something going again.” Led by a strong contingent of locals, the group occasionally sees visitors, such as guests training for a race or, as Manietta noted, an Australian couple that drops in whenever they are in the resort. Though both Manietta and O’Brien are experienced runners, all levels are welcome and encouraged to participate. “Some people, if they’ve never trail run and it’s a bit intimidating to them, they think it’s not for them. But then they come to our run club and they realize that it’s definitely for everyone,” O’Brien said. “We’ve seen a lot of change in people over from just road running to embracing trail (running) and trying something new.” Each week will offer two options, a fulldistance and a half-distance run. Each will have a leader, while a third will run between the two groups. “We run together for the first part of the run and the pace tends to be very conversational,” she said. “We purposely try to keep it slow. As the leaders, we run slow ourselves. “If people choose to run faster, we’ll allow them to if they know where we’re going.”

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SPORTS THE SCORE In its second year of operation, We Run Whistler added après-like socials to some of its runs in order to help “build stickiness and cohesion,” according to Manietta, who recalled going to Toonie Races and Monday Night Rides when he was new in town to create some social connections. He hopes the group does that for a generation of runners, creating a Toonie-like atmosphere that businesses clamour to sponsor every year. “You can go and be competitive or not, and at the end you can have some food and

Pemberton or Squamish. While he accounts for his riding impact, he said runners need to take stock of theirs as well. “We’re using this network of amazing trails, for the most part built by WORCA or maintained by WORCA and the RMOW and Whistler Blackcomb. It’s important for us to look after them,” he said. “It’s important to us and we really want to show that importance to our trail network. We want this healthy relationship between the runners and the mountain bikers.” We Run Whistler is doing a WORCA

“We want this healthy relationship between the runners and the mountain bikers.” - KRISTIAN MANIETTA

a beer and it’s awesome. That social part is, ‘Hey, we sweat and suffer together and it’s kind of nice to chill out at the end of it,’” he said. “There are social parts on the run, but you’re still within your own head.” Heading into 2019, the group is also measuring its own impact on local trails. Manietta is a mountain biker as well as a runner, buys a Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA) pass every year and does trail karma when he rides in

trail night on May 14, working on Yummy Numby, instead of the weekly trail run. Manietta was also excited about a slate of new monthly events alongside Salomon, starting with a running vests demo on June 7. While in the winter, the runs generally start at the Whistler Village location of longtime supporter Lululemon, the summer events have varied beginning points. Check the group’s Facebook page for the most up-to-date information. n

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47


SPORTS THE SCORE

Rec Sites and Trails announces e-bike policy SPORTS BRIEFS: EWS RIDERS TOP PEMBERTON ENDURO; AXEMEN MAKE FINAL; WARM’S OIL KINGS ELIMINATED

BY DAN FALLOON RECREATION SITES and Trails BC released its province-wide e-bike policy on April 24, and it will apply to some trails in the Sea to Sky. The policy will allow for Class 1 e-bikes (where the motor provides assistance only when the rider is pedalling and stops at a speed of 32 km/h) and motor-assisted cycles (similar to a Class 1 in its 32 km/h restriction, but has a power output that does not exceed 500 watts, and the motor must disengage when the rider stops pedalling, releases the accelerator or applies the brake) on established recreational trails for non-motorized use unless e-bikes are specifically prohibited. Class 2 e-bikes (with a motor that can be used to propel the bicycle without pedalling up to 32 km/h) and Class 3 e-bikes (pedalassist up to 45 km/h) are prohibited on non-motorized-use trails, but allowed on any trails that allow for motorized use. Both are considered motor vehicles. The policy applies to several trails in and around Whistler, including Lord of the Squirrels, Lower Sproatt, Comfortably Numb and the Green Lake Loop. Check

NEW POLICY Recreation Sites and Trails BC’s new e-bike policy was announced on April 24. www.sitesandtrailsbc.com for a complete map. With the Resort Municipality of Whistler set to release its own policy sometime in May, Rec Sites and Trails director John Hawkings noted many of the trails in and around the resort are on Crown land and fall

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under its jurisdiction. “In terms of making decisions around trails that are within the jurisdiction of Recreation Sites and Trails, those decisions are going to be made in consultation with the local community, with WORCA,” he said.

The policy leaves open the possibility for a trail to be designated as single-use, e-bike only, reading that no e-bikes are allowed on trails that prohibit bicycles unless the trail has such a designation. Hawkings noted that to his knowledge, no trails currently have such a designation and there are no explicit plans to create trails that are e-bike only unless a community pushes for it. Adaptive mountain bikes are exempt from restrictions provided that the bikes: have three or four wheels; have hand cranks to propel the bike without electric power; have a maximum nominal power wattage of 800 or fewer watts. The bike may have pedal assist or direct throttle power. District recreation officers will enforce the policy, and Hawkings noted that Rec Sites and Trails will monitor the policy’s effectiveness through 2021, at which point the department will reassess it. “We’re going to stay in constant contact with community groups, organizations and stakeholders to determine if the policy is working for them. We’re also going to have to stay in touch with the e-bike sector. Obviously, this is a new activity and the industry itself is emerging,” he said. “As e-bike technology changes and use patterns change, we’re going to have to keep an

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Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Da-na Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for Nesters Nesters Market Nesters Market andMarket and Pharmacy Pharmacy andoffers Pharmacy offers wellness wellness offers talks wellness talks at itsatWhistler talks its Whistler at its location. Whistler location. Join location. Join RHNRHN Join RHN inspirational whole health ideas.

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CHOP CHOP The Axemen Rugby Club will play in the BC Rugby Union finals after downing Chilliwack 57-0.

PHOTO BY LISA-MARIE FEEHAN

eye on that and see if the policy remains effective and meets user needs.” The full policy is available online at tiny.cc/hbd15y.

BARELLI, LANTHIER NADEAU TOPS AT PEMBERTON ENDURO Strong riders came out to represent in the pro categories at the Pemberton Enduro on April 27, but ultimately, Enduro World Series regulars Yoann Barelli and Andreane Lanthier Nadeau came away with the victories. Barelli won all four stages to take the men’s category over Bryan Gregory and Davis English while Lanthier Nadeau won the first two rounds and held on to defeat Laura Battista by 17 seconds. Christina Chappetta, meanwhile, took third. Kate Whitley dominated the open women’s category, finishing well over a minute ahead of challengers Marissa Szajcz and Emilie de Crombrugghe. In the open men’s division, Joshua Paul held off Mahon Lamont and Calum Wilson. As for the masters, Matt Ryan bested Cesar Gairin and Kevin Phelps in the men’s category while Bree Thorlakson was the lone representative in the women’s race. Lastly, in a hotly contested junior race, Emmett Hancock topped Milton McConville and Jonathan Helly. Full results are online at www. spruceracetiming.com.

WARM’S OIL KINGS FALL IN EASTERN CONFERENCE FINAL For the second consecutive year, one of the Warm twins appeared in a Western Hockey League (WHL) conference final, but it was the same story once again. A year after Whistler goaltender Beck Warm helped the Tri-City Americans as far as the Western Conference championship series, brother Will led the Edmonton Oil Kings to the Eastern Conference final. However, Edmonton fell in six games to the Prince Albert Raiders, who won a league-

leading 54 games in the regular season. The loss prevented Warm from playing for a title close to home, as the Vancouver Giants won the Western Conference final over the Spokane Chiefs. Warm received some good news on May 1, as he received the Doug Wickenheiser Memorial Trophy as the WHL’s humanitarian of the year at the league’s with with Chantal Chantal withBarrat, Chantal Barrat, Skin Barrat, Skin carecare specialist Skin specialist care specialist year-end awards ceremony in Red Deer, Alta. He was previously named the Eastern What What make make What s Dr.smake Dr. Hauschka’s Hauschka’s s Dr. Hauschka’s skinskin carecare unique skin unique care and unique and howhow can andcan ithow benefit it benefit can you. it benefit you. Conference’s humanitarian of the year.

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WELSH PLAYING FOR DOYLE CUP Another Whistler puckster, Nolan Welsh, has earned one title this season and is looking for another. Welsh and the Prince George Spruce Kings topped the Jr. ‘A’ British Columbia Hockey League this season, losing just one playoff game in the process. The Spruce Kings defeated Coquitlam in five games in the opening round before sweeping Chilliwack, Victoria and Vernon in the minimum four games. After scoring five goals and 15 assists in 43 regular season contests, Welsh broke out in the playoffs, scoring four goals and 12 assists in 17 playoffs games. Prince George is now representing B.C. in the Doyle Cup series against Alberta Junior Hockey League’s Brooks Bandits, trailing 2-1 in the best-of-seven contest. The Doyle Cup is a formality, however, as both teams have qualified for the RBC Cup national championship tournament given that Brooks is serving as the host.

AXEMEN OFF TO CHAMPIONSHIP GAME The Axemen Rugby Club continued to roll through the BC Rugby Union Division 3 campaign at Howe Sound Secondary School on April 27. The Axemen dominated visiting Chilliwack 57-0 to advance to the championship game against Richmond RFC this Saturday, May 4, at Burnaby Lake Rugby Club. Kickoff is at 11:30 a.m. n

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49


VELOCITY PROJECT

Uncontainable THIS TIME LAST YEAR, I was writing obituaries. I wrote a lot of them. This month, I’ve been grateful for the ability of other people to put some of the grief and loss swirling through our community into words. It’s the thing about loss—it knocks the wind out of you, and with it, all the words, all the insight, all the security. Last summer, there were a couple of times I’d be out riding my bike, and I would think suddenly about the late skier and guide Lisa Korthals. As if she were with me.

BY LISA RICHARDSON At my shoulder, coaxing me on. And then I felt sheepish. Who am I to imagine Lisa would whisper to me? There are so many other people her spirit would attach to, first, right? It wouldn’t have time for me, a looser acquaintance, a less-dear one, amongst all those others with a greater claim. That scarcity mindset sure is hard to kick. After my landlord, Village of Pemberton Councillor Linda Chandler, died, almost 15 years ago, I drove home from her memorial, where a Japanese garden had been planted in Pioneer Park in her honour, emotionally wrung out. I remembered Linda sharing a night she had struggled to come to terms with her cancer, and her imminent obliteration, and literally screamed at the sky. How I had loved her for the ability to put that into words, her everyday vulnerability and ease with sharing that. How I had loved her for her quiet professionalism at the Credit Union where she vouched for people as decent and worthy of a loan, even if their

A CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE What if the breaking of the container doesn’t mean the ending of the contents, but the liberation of them? WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

50 MAY 2, 2019

credit rating wasn’t up to snuff. How many people in this community got their foot in the door because of her quiet advocacy? How far does a person’s influence extend? How can it be traced, once their work is out in the world, spilled beyond their body, their immediate sphere? I read through comments on Dave and Tessa Treadway’s freerange.family instagram account after Dave died, and it struck me that one of his most profound legacies just might be giving so many men, who he had never met, permission to do the riskiest thing of all and love their families, to soften into fatherhood, and treat it as an adventure and an absolute blessing. Not just people in his more direct community, not just people who encountered him, but complete strangers who were drawn

railed against it. My ego, too, chafes, at the complete obliteration of Lisa Richardson. I’m kinda fond of her. It’s hard to imagine the world is able to continue merrily without me, because, I have never known the world, apart from through me, through this vehicle of me, my body, my experiences, this Lisa Richardson-shaped vessel. And yet, it will. And my vessel, this body-container, will dissolve, decompose, back to atoms, back to dust, and what is contained in it, the essence, the essential, the stuff of spirit and life force and animation and the ineffable will be released, and it won’t stay stuck together as one lumpen mass, because there will be no container to hold it together. It will dissipate like dandelion fluff, and yet each dust-bit will be everything, each dust-bit will not be

How far does a person’s influence extend? How can it be traced, once their work is out in the world, spilled beyond their body, their immediate sphere? in by his authenticity and heart. Mapping that impact looks like a sky lit up with constellations, all connected, continuing on far beyond the limits of our vision. That day 15 years ago, as I drove home from Chandler’s memorial, I felt the hollow ache of loss, of never seeing her again, and wondered: where is she now? And, as if inspired by Philip Pullman’s Dark Materials books, I saw it in my mind, a ripple of glitter, a great murmuration of magical dust dissipating into the air, and thought: she was now everywhere. She had dissolved. I understood the moment when Linda Chandler had sensed her own demise and

1/1,000,000,000,000th of me, it will be all of me. And I will be reminded of the truth of abundance because I will be everywhere, in everything, amongst everything, moving with it and through it, and I will able to hover over my son’s shoulder, at my husband’s side, and I will be able to check in on everyone I’ve ever loved or known, and follow the bees in my old garden to the wild hive they take my flowers’ nectar to that I’ve never seen, and I will be able to follow the leaf that my son threw in the creek past where it went out of sight, and then I’ll follow the water droplets and I will be able to chase every single bit of my curiosity all the way to the end and I won’t run out of time or be distracted or

need to choose or focus or pick one or suffer FOMO because I’ll be everywhere, and all the lightness will be me. And so, of course Korthals has been riding at my shoulder, coaxing me on. Of course, I can call her spirit to me, without taking anything away from her son, her husband, her brother, her best friend, and all the other people walking through their days with a great gaping hole in it. That is what was swelling in my heart this week as I drove away from a quick coffee with my friend, who had flown out to speak at Dave’s memorial. Who knows what it means to hold space for the loss. Who expressed something kind, that made me say, “thank you for not waiting until I’m dead to say something like that.” While I have this body, I will do the things that only an embodied being can do: I will hug people fiercely and unashamedly declare my love for them, I will dance with the trees regardless of how crazy it makes me look, and pedal my bike up the hills until my lungs burn. I will do my best to notice the signs of aging with curiosity, instead of indignation, and an immense gratitude for the fact that I am here to experience this. I will do my best to let things land in my body, instead of sweeping them away—the kind word that is easier to duck, the true insight that sends tingles across my scalp, the hilarious joke that makes my head feel full of beer foam—all light and bubbly, the hot coal of rage at injustice that gags in my throat, the gaping loss that sits like a rock on top of my chest. Endings are so hard. And some days, some years, when all you seem to write is obituaries, it feels as if everything is ending, imminently. But I trust in the shimmerdust. There is too much in each of us to be contained forever. The Velocity Project: how to slow the f*&k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


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MON 6

Low Impact *Runner’s Dryland Circuit 7:30-8.30a.m. 7-8a.m.

No Public Skate

Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start. All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

*Spin Bootcamp 5:10-6:10p.m. 6-7p.m.

TRX Mixer 5:10-6:10p.m.

Zumba *Pilates Mat 6:20-7:20p.m. Class 6:45-7:45p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 2

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m.

FRI 3

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 4

SUN 5

MON 6

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 7

WED 8

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 2

FRI 3

SAT 4

SUN 5

MON 6

TUE 7

WED 8

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

Camp Tiny Tyke For ages 3-5 years Every Tuesday and Thursday in July and August 9-12p.m Email kotg@whistler.ca to register now! whistler.ca/summercamp


EPICURIOUS

Bearfoot Bistro only Whistler restaurant on Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list UPSCALE EATERY RANKED 59TH ON ANNUAL LIST VOTED ON BY TOP CHEFS, FOOD CRITICS AND RESTAURATEURS

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE BEARFOOT BISTRO, one of Whistler’s most awarded fine-dining restaurants, has yet another accolade to add to its mantle. The upscale eatery was named to the 2019 Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list this month, as voted on by close to a hundred esteemed chefs, restaurateurs, food critics and diners from across the country. The only Whistler restaurant to appear, it’s the third time Bearfoot has cracked the list, after placing 97th in 2017 and squeaking in at 99th in 2015, the awards’ inaugural year. This year was by far the restaurant’s best showing, coming in at 59th. “It’s great to be involved with such a great group of restaurants across the board. It’s very nice and this is the only one in Whistler,” said renowned Executive Chef Melissa Craig, who is no stranger to industry awards of her own, having been crowned as the country’s top chef at the 2008 Canadian Culinary Championships when she was just 28 years old. Known for her refined take on culinary indulgences from around the world, there’s no denying Craig’s steady hand remains the primary appeal for diners. But, of course, no conversation about the Bearfoot would be complete without highlighting the vibrant atmosphere that restaurant founder Andre Saint-Jacques has helped foster over the years. “I think the Bearfoot is a restaurant about experiences, so that demarks us,” said Saint-Jacques, who often plays the boisterous yin to wife Craig’s reserved yang. “From the nitro martinis and nitro ice cream, to the champagne sabreing and all sorts of things that demark us, it’s about the experience. And, of course, the food. Melissa won best chef in Canada back in 2008, and this solidifies that Melissa’s talent just keeps getting better.” Saint-Jacques also credited the rest of

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BEST (BEAR)FOOT FORWARD The Bearfoot Bistro had its strongest showing yet on the 2019 Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list, coming in at 59th, thanks in large part to the deft hand of renowned Executive Chef Melissa Craig, centre, and her culinary team.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

the Bearfoot staff for continuing to uphold the standards the restaurant is known for. ‘Of course, we’re very excited and very happy but it’s also very exciting for the team, because this restaurant is obviously successful because of our big family,” he said. “Everyone there at the restaurant is

“I think the Bearfoot is a restaurant about experiences, so that demarks us.” - ANDRE SAINT-JACQUES

very proud that we’ve been recognized.” At the time of our interview, Craig and Saint-Jacques were just getting ready to depart for Thailand, Vietnam and Laos, a trip that will be part vacation, part research expedition. “That’s what we do in our spring and fall; we go and see different countries and

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The Bearfoot is also gearing up for its annual lobster promotion, which cuts out the middle man by shipping the crustaceans straight from the Magdalen Islands, a small archipelago in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence known for the quality and flavour of its highly sought after lobster. Lobster should begin arriving at the restaurant by

Thursday, May 9, weather depending. “To me, it’s the best lobster I’ve ever had, without a doubt,” Saint-Jacques added. Western Canada, and British Columbia in particular were well represented on this year’s 100 Best Restaurants list, with Alberta counting 12 restaurants and B.C. 16. The highest-ranking B.C. restaurant on the list was Vancouver’s St. Lawrence, which is at the forefront of the current renaissance of classical French cuisine around the country. Vancouver’s renowned Hawksworth Restaurant— founded by chef David Hawksworth, who has previously partnered with Whistler Blackcomb on a handful of pop-up lunches at the Roundhouse—was the next B.C. establishment on the list, at 11. To view the full list, visit canadas100best.com. To learn more about the Bearfoot Bistro, or make a reservation, visit bearfootbistro.com. n

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from there we get ideas that we then bring back and apply or put into practice at the restaurant,” Saint-Jacques explained. “We may put a twist on what we’ve seen and tried, and I’m sure it keeps new things happening for the patrons that keep coming back.”

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53


ARTS SCENE

Get crafty with new textile art workshops PEMBERTON-BASED ARTISTS HOST BLOCK PRINTING, INDIGO DYEING WORKSHOPS

BY ALYSSA NOEL SIP ‘N’ PAINT nights have been gaining steam across the Sea to Sky corridor over the last few years. But how about Sip ‘n’ Print? Or Sip ‘n’ Dip? Frances Dickinson, a textile artist, and Ulla Clark, a screen printer and freelance designer, recently added those workshops to their jam-packed roster of events happening this spring. The Pemberton-based artists teamed up with The Beer Farmers (who opened a brewery on their 120-year-old family farm on Pemberton Meadows Road last year) to offer a block printing session on May 16 and an indigo dyeing session on May 30. “I spent a lot of time out there crosscountry skiing this winter,” says Clark. “They have this huge barn with all these picnic tables and they’re super open to all these things going on and they’re not worried about their space getting too dirty … A lot of people have been signing up for that.” In addition to brewery workshops, the

GET CRAFTY Hand in Colour is hosting indigo dyeing workshops, alongside block printing, this spring. PHOTO SUBMITTED

54 MAY 2, 2019

pair has several more Pemberton events: an indigo dyeing workshop on May 12, a Block Printing Workshop on June 5, and full-day workshop featuring both on June 9. Then in Whistler, they paired up with 3 Singing Birds studio (where they recently taught employees some of their skills for a team-building night out) to offer a block printing workshop on May 8.

He was super keen to have us.” Working under the name Hand in Colour Workshops, the two artists have enjoyed bringing their laidback, accessible disciplines to corridor residents. The workshops are meant to be relaxing, messy, and unintimidating—plus you walk away with a tangible household item baring your unique design.

“You’re just in the moment doing these weird folds. People enjoy that part of the process.” - ULLA CLARK

Finally, they recently approached Stephen Vogler at The Point Artist-Run Centre to host sessions at the Alta Lake venue on June 22 with indigo dyeing in the morning and block printing in the afternoon (as separate workshops or a fullday event). “We met with Stephen Vogler (at The Point) and our jaws dropped,” Clark says of the Whistler venue. “We both lived in the Kootenays before this and we were like, ‘This is so Kootenays.’ We had goosebumps.

“It’s really informal,” Clark says. “Fran and I are very laidback people. We want a really relaxed atmosphere where people are trying things.” For the uninitiated, indigo dyeing is “a very old process that has had a revival in the last few years all over the world,” Clark says. “Indigo is a plant, so it’s a flower and then they process it to get the vibrant colour.” Dickinson creates a vat of the dye for students (and offers tips on how they can replicate the process at home) before

teaching them shibori—Japanese folding techniques—that creates the pattern on dyed fabric. “We use rocks, strings—there’s so many cool things and it’s neat to see the participants use their imaginations,” Clark says. “You’re just in the moment doing these weird folds. People enjoy that part of the process.” Block printing, meanwhile, can also find beauty in flaws, which helps make it a rewarding experience for beginners. “We carve blocks out of lino and we also use wood foam blocks,” Clark adds. “It’s about easy, user-friendly techniques. I’m a screen printer by trade; that’s a very precise art. If you do little mistakes, there’s big consequences. Even for myself, I’ve found this huge addiction to block printing because I don’t have to be so perfect.” Logistically speaking, workshop participants will receive a tote bag filled with different fabrics as a “sample bag” to practice. Block printers will walk away with a new set of cloth napkins while indigo dyeing participants will make a scarf. “They’re both very fun and addicting,” Clark says. “It’s fun for everyone. We definitely are appealing more to the females, but we want to get a couple guys in there. It’s not just a women’s activity.” For more details on each of the workshops visit handincolour.com. n


ARTS NEWS

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | Printmaking | May 3 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio Sundays | Fabric Portraits | May 5 12 – 4pm presented by

WEEKLY EVENTS Free for members or with purchase of admission

TURN IT UP Miss KosmiK is hosting Intro to DJing Classes for Women on May 2 and 16.

Art After Dark Fridays | Pintmaking | May 3 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making) PHOTO BY CHARLIE ELLIOTT

Learn how to DJ ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: PAINT YOUR PET, CHECK OUT NEW CONSTELLATION FESTIVAL ACTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL MARIE FORTIN —better known as DJ Miss KosmiK—has long noticed a lack of women behind the turntables in Whistler. So, she decided to do something about it. On Thursday, May 2, she’s hosting her first Intro to DJing Class for Women from 5 to 8 p.m. at Moe Joe’s Nightclub. Participants don’t need to have any experience, just “a passion for music and desire to learn,” according to the event description. (They must, however, be women over the age of 19.) The class will cover DJ equipment, song structure, tips for organizing your music and an introduction to beat making. That class limit is 12 and, as a result, Fortin says it’s filling up fast. She’s

white photo of your pet (anything with fur, scales or feathers count). “I gear my workshops to each individual in the class, so no experience is required,” Mueller says in the event description. “Learn how to mix colours yourself, how to apply paint, the importance of light and don’t worry, I make it easy so you will be able to take these skills with you to keep creating.” The cost is $55—including equipment, a drink, and one-on-one instruction. For more information or to sign up visit andrealikesart.com.

Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

CONSTELLATION FESTIVAL RELEASES FULL LINE-UP The Squamish Constellation Festival has unveiled new acts set to perform from July 26 to 28.

“ ... I make it easy so you will be able to take these skills with you to keep creating.”

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also planned a second class for May 16. Registration is $60. Sign up by emailing marie@kosmik.ca. For more information, visit https:// kosmik.ca/blog/may-2-16-intro-djing-classwomen-whistler.

PAINT YOUR PET Sure, you have a million photos of your dog taking up storage space on your phone, but why not take it to the next level and paint your pet? Local artist Andrea Mueller is hosting a workshop on May 7 for you to do just that. From 7 to 9:30 p.m. she’ll lead participants through the process of creating a portrait of their fluffy friend at Café Eightyone in the village. All you have to bring is a black and

Canadian-Colombian singer-songwriter Jessie Reyez, Juno Award-winning rapper Shad and indie rockers Wintersleep are joining the jam-packed roster. “We are so excited to add these incredible artists to our lineup,” says festival co-founder Tamara Stanners in a release. “Jessie’s message of empowerment, Shad and his rap wisdom, and East Coast indierock royalty Wintersleep showcase the diversity of Canada’s music scene and the lineup of our first Squamish Constellation Festival. We can’t wait!” The new performers join Bahamas, Serena Ryder, Half Moon Run and A Tribe Called Red, to name just a few of the already-announced acts. General admission weekend passes are on sale now for $199 or $425 for VIP passes. Get them at constellationfest.ca. n

MONGOLIEGRILL.COM MAY 2, 2019

55


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

A legend lost OFF THE TOP HERE, we need to pour some on the block for writer-directorproducer John Singleton, who passed away earlier this week. Best known for his debut film, 1991’s Boyz n the Hood, Singleton was a unique

BY FEET BANKS and authentic visionary who understood and created films about the power, nuance and influence of African Americans on popular culture. “We make up 20 per cent of this country,” he said in a 1995 video interview, “but we make up 95 per cent of what’s cool and hip about this country.” Singleton was 22 years old and fresh out of USC film school when he enlisted an untested

IN MEMORY John Singleton is being remembered for his important contributions to film. PHOTO BY GEORGE PIMENTAL

gangster rapper named Ice Cube to star in a character-driven film that meshed the cool, badass vibe and aesthetic of the about-toexplode West Coast hip-hop scene with the harsh realities, pain and trauma of living as a black person in Los Angeles in the ‘90s. Boyz n the Hood is a teenage coming-ofage film at heart, but it showed the world that even if they have the aspiration, skills and desire to succeed in America, for many young black men and women, that just isn’t an option. An instant hit (Roger Ebert called it “an American film of enormous importance”), Boyz netted Singleton Best Screenplay and Best Director Oscar nominations (the first black director and youngest person ever nominated for the latter). His next flick, Poetic Justice, tackled the complex relationships and difficulties between young black women and men (while kickstarting Tupac’s fledgling acting career), and then poured all America’s racial tensions into one college drama/ensemble with Higher Learning, released in 1995 (post-Rodney King, pre-O.J. Simpson trial).

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It’s not a subtle film but the Michael Rapaport white supremacy/school shooting scenes are sadly prescient of recent current events and many of the same issues Singleton hits us with are still problems 25 years later. (Bonus points for casting Tyra Banks as a track athlete—John Singleton could recognize screen presence.) Singleton was also one of the first directors to put Snoop Dogg in a major film (Baby Boy, 2001) and his use of music was unparalleled— I’ll always remember my buddy Cortez and I scrolling through the credits of the Boyz in the Hood VHS tape hunting down a track. In the pre-internet days, this was the only way two white kids from Pemberton High could ever discover a song like “O-o-h Child” by the Five Stairsteps (and it’s not like you could find a Five Stairsteps CD in Vancouver either; we didn’t get that track until Spike Lee released in on the Crooklyn soundtrack in 1994. Kids these days have no idea…) Like Spike Lee, John Singleton was a visionary and a revolutionary. The Hollywood/cinematic establishment just recognized Lee with a (long overdue) Oscar

this year, but after his untimely death, it seems John Singleton’s legacy will remain underground, on the streets, with the characters he created and the musicians, artists, filmmakers and fans his honesty and integrity inspired. His work deserves another look, now more than ever, and Boyz n the Hood is available on Netflix. At the Whistler Village 8 this week, it’s still mostly Avengers madness but there is a new flick worth checking out. Long Shot is a nimble odd-couple, fish-out-of-water comedy starring Seth Rogen as a maverick journalist who ends up reconnecting with his childhood babysitter and first crush (Charlize Theron), except now she’s making a run for presidency and needs a savvy speech writer. Directed by Jonathan Levine (The Wackness, The Night Before, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane), this one succeeds on the chemistry of its stars and the mix of crass and class, politics and comedy, romance and Rogen. A refreshing R-rated comedy worth checking out. n

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57


MUSEUM MUSINGS

LODGE LORE Three of the areas best-know lodges, such as Alpine Lodge pictured here in 1980, were located near the Garibaldi Townsite. WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION

Whistler’s local lodges BY ALLYN PRINGLE HEARING

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THE NAME Alpine Lodge, many people may assume it refers to a lodge located in the alpine or in the neighbourhood of Alpine Meadows. Alpine Lodge, however, is one of the three lodges we have information about that were located around the Garibaldi Townsite. The Garibaldi Townsite and several other small communities formed in the Cheakamus Valley near Daisy Lake around the Garibaldi Station of the PGE Railay that opened in 1914. Much of the information the museum has on the area has been provided by Betty Forbes who, along with Ian Barnet, gathered interviews and other documents to start to put together what Betty called “a record of the history for generations to come.” The first lodge, Garibaldi Lodge, was built by Tom Nye in 1914 on the east side of the Cheakamus River. Like Rainbow Lodge, it included a post office and a store. The lodge was operated by Tom Nye and his family until the late 1930s. Garibaldi Lodge was largely inactive during the Second World War until it was reopened by Bill Howard and his father in 1946. According to Bill, one of the more popular trips they offered was up to Black Tusk by horseback. As he recalled, “Very few ever hiked it—very few of our guests anyway. It was a 12-mile (19 kilometres) trail that used to go way out by old Daisy Lake. It took about four hours on horseback to get to the top.” Often these excursions would be camping trips, with pack horses carrying supplies to stay overnight. The Howards operated Garibaldi Lodge for only two years before selling to the Walshes in 1948, who later sold the lodge to Pat Crean and Ian Barnet in 1970. They winterized the lodge to serve the growing number of skiers heading to Whistler Mountain. Alpine Lodge, further along the Cheakamus River, was built by the Cranes in 1922. A store was later added in 1926 and

a post office. Alpine Lodge was operated by members of the Crane family through the 1940s. In 1970 it was bought by Doug and Diane McDonald and, like Garibaldi Lodge, was winterized. Both lodges appear in hotel directories in publications such as Garibaldi’s Whistler News from the 1970s. A third lodge, Lake Lucille Lodge, did not make it to the 1970s. Built by Shorty Knight in 1929 and close to the lake, it was very popular for fishing. The lodge went through various owners before it was bought by BC Electric in 1957 and used as a construction camp during the building of the Daisy Lake Dam. The lodge was burnt down in 1959 after construction of the dam was completed. Both Garibaldi and Alpine Lodges were still operating in 1980 when the provincial government issued an Order-in-Council declaring Garibaldi Townsite unsafe due to the instability of the Barrier—a naturally formed lava dam  retaining the  Garibaldi Lake system. Despite opposition from the residents, the townsite, which had grown considerably by this time, was to be emptied. One of the last community gatherings was held at Alpine Lodge. As Betty Forbes recalled, “The McDonalds at Alpine Lodge opened their whole lobby, kitchen, and dining to the residents of Garibaldi for a pot-luck supper … It was rather like a wake, but it was a happy wake.” Garibaldi Lodge was sold to the government in 1982 and most of the structures were destroyed (one cabin was moved to Pinecrest). Alpine Lodge followed the same fate in 1986. While the museum has transcripts of oral-history interviews and various photos, it is difficult to create a cohesive history of Garibaldi. Recently, however, Victoria Crompton took over the project from Betty Forbes and Ian Barnet, and has now published a book, Garibaldi Townsite: Life & Times, for those interested in learning more. n


PARTIAL RECALL

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1 SKI BOOT SCAVENGERS The Rotary Club of Whistler’s annual Ski Boot Challenge Scavenger Hunt raised $700 for the Whistler Public Library Wonder Lab. Zoo on the Loose and Whistler Mother and Kids, with Isobel MacLaurin as Mother Whistler, won best team costumes, while the Blackcomb Thursday Mountain Host team won the hunt. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 2 EARTH DAY The Howe Sound Women’s Centre Whistler staff team (Allison Gilchrist, Cass Spence and Laurie Hannah) participate in the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s Earth Day tree planting in Cheakamus Crossing on Wednesday, April 24. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 3 NOT BUCKING AROUND A sold-out crowd showed up to Dusty’s on Saturday, April 27 to enjoy tunes from Red Chair, take a spin on the mechanical bull, and, most importantly, support Families Fighting Cancer in the Sea to Sky during their annual Buck Cancer event. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE. 4 WINNING WAYS Pique art director Jon Parris, left, and features editor Brandon Barrett accept the award for Best Special Section, Under 25,000 for Pique’s 2018 Best of Pemberton feature, written by Andrew Mitchell, at the 2019 BC and Yukon Community News Media Awards. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 5 WIZARDS WIN The Ice Wizards celebrate after winning the Whistler Men’s ‘A’ League cup again this season. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 6 FUN RUN More than 40 runners showed up to help celebrate the We Run Whistler Season Kick Off party on Tuesday, April 30. Runners got to check out the new Lululemon 2019 run apparel and take a piece home for free, before taking to the trails for some run therapy and ending with an après party at Fitzsimmons Pub. PHOTO BY GUY FATTAL. 7 PATH TO RESILIENCY Nikki Best, Blair Kaplan Venables and Tara O’Doherty shared their personal stories at The Path to Resiliency fundraiser at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, on April 24. Both funds and awareness were raised for Whistler Community Services Society. PHOTO BY LOM DESIGN. 8 ART ILLUMINATED The Audain Art Museum staff celebrate their hard work during the museum’s annual Illuminate fundraising gala and auction, held at The Westin Resort & Spa on Saturday, April 27, which raised over $450,000. PHOTO BY SCOTT BRAMMER.

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MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Kristin Carter brings songs and stories to Whistler VANCOUVER COUNTRY MUSICIAN PLAYS ARTS WHISTLER LIVE! SERIES ON MAY 10 AT THE MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE

BY ALYSSA NOEL KRISTIN CARTER is proof that something good can emerge from a gruelling commute. After graduating from Dalhousie University with a degree in economics, Carter moved back to her parent’s home in White Rock where she had a three-hour roundtrip commute into Vancouver. But instead of filling time with podcasts or Netflix, she found herself putting pen to paper. “I’d write in a journal on the bus and I started to write music,” she says. “I was encouraged by some family and friends to record demos and start showing them to people.” Her trajectory from economics to music wasn’t quite that random though. From age five all the way through university, Carter sang in a choir. “That was where I got most of my training and experience,” she says.

SONGS AND STORIES Country singer Kristin Carter is set to play in Whistler on May 10.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

60 MAY 2, 2019

“I loved it. Choir is one of the best ways to learn how to sing and connect with people.” In a similarly organic way, she found herself drawn to country music—pulling influence from the ‘90s stars that her mom had listened to when she was growing up. “My mom always tells me she doesn’t

she could and, in 2016, she landed her first professional opening gig. “I’d always been in a choir, but I’d never done solo stuff,” she says. “It feels very vulnerable. You go from 40 people around you to just you.” But she quickly began entering music contests and posting videos on YouTube,

“It’s such an intimate venue. It provides a really awesome platform to explain a little bit more about what your songs are about—and it helps people connect to them on a deeper level.” - KRISTIN CARTER

like country music, which is a total lie,” she adds with a laugh. “Growing up all she’d listen to is Dixie Chicks and Shania Twain and Faith Hill—the golden era of ‘90s country with those awesome female voices. She can’t deny it anymore … I just started writing and singing the music I grew up with.” Carter began to play every open mic

which helped her gain traction. Last year, she was named a semi-finalist in the SiriusXM Top of the Country contest, which is “looking for the next name in country.” She didn’t nab top spot, but she’s back vying for that position this year as well. Voting to choose the top three finalists out of eight is open from now until May 17 at topcountry.siriusxm.ca/artist/kristin-

carter/#VoteNow. “I’m really lucky they picked me to go in twice,” Carter adds. Up next, though, she’s coming to Whistler on May 10 for her first theatre show as part of the Arts Whistler Live! series. Dubbed Kristin Carter: Stories and Songs, she plans to delve into some of the tales behind her music. “I thought it’d be such a great opportunity to do it,” she says. “It’s such an intimate venue. It provides a really awesome platform to explain a little bit more about what your songs are about— and it helps people connect to them on a deeper level.” The show will also feature a six-person band with musicians from Vancouver and the Sea to Sky corridor. “I’m really excited,” she says. “The guys are all super talented. We had a couple rehearsals so far … We’ve been working on the music together and arranging it. I’m really excited to share that with everybody.” Tickets for the show are $15 in advance and $20 the day of the event. Get them at artswhistler.com/event/awl-kristincarter. n


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

LUNCH SPECIAL 11am-3pm mon-thurs $4.99 splitz and lentil burgers

OUT LOUD The Whistler Singers performing at the Christmas Eve Carol Service. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Whistler Sings launches as new, all-ages choir FIVE-WEEK CHOIR KICKS OFF ON MAY 25 AT WHISTLER MUSEUM

BY ALYSSA NOEL ALISON HUNTER was chatting with a member of the Whistler Singers one day when the woman brought up her sister who sings in a choir back home in Bristol. Only the U.K. group had an interesting twist—they were a multi-generational choir. The idea stuck with Hunter, who directs the Whistler Singers and is the former co-director of the Whistler Children’s Chorus. “I started doing some research,” she says. “It’s not happening much in Canada yet, but it’s certainly happening in other parts of the world, including the states.” While the Whistler Singers’ youngest member is 16 and the oldest is in their 90s, she thought it might be fun to gather Whistlerites of all ages and singing abilities together for a morning of music. “It’s not just about music; it’s about community and building community,” Hunter says. “Choirs are community. In so many places in the world, music is such an integral part of their lives. Do I like to think that some people will try this and go, ‘I have to keep singing! And join the Whistler Children’s Chorus or Barbed Choir or the Whistler Singers?’ Yes.” To that end, Hunter and Jeanette Bruce—who took over the Whistler Children’s Chorus, directs Barbed Choir, Whistler’s rock ‘n’ roll choir, and runs Kinderchoir—are launching a five-week multi-generational choir program called Whistler Sings. It will kick off on May 25, running from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m., and take place every Saturday at the Whistler Museum until June 22. No previous experience or music reading ability is required. The only real rule is those under 13 must be accompanied

by an adult. The cost will be $30 per family for the five weeks or $20 per person, to help cover venue costs. Aside from the benefits of singing with others, there’s another perk, Hunter says. “(Whistlerites) don’t have a lot of extended family here. One of our choir members has a new baby … and after choir practice most evenings she couldn’t leave because she couldn’t find her baby. One of the choir members had wandered off with the baby (to help look after it),” she says with a laugh. After the new choir’s five weeks have wrapped up, Hunter and Bruce will assess if there’s enough interest to continue.

“It’s not just about music; it’s about community and building community ... ” - ALISON HUNTER

HAPPY HOUR

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“I think we would extend it,” Hunter says. “My ultimate vision is when we have Remembrance Day, we have every single choir in town singing at it so that it is truly a community event. Same with Christmas; let’s have everybody up there.” For more information or to pre-register, email whistlerchorus@gmail.com. The Kinderchoir—designed to give children in kindergarten a taste of choral music—kicks off on May 7 and runs every Tuesday until June 4 at the Whistler Public Library from 4 to 5 p.m. It’s free to attend, but parents are asked to register at youthservices@whistlerlibrary.ca. n

ON NOW! *AVAILABLE FOR GROUPS OF 14 OR LESS AVAILABLE SUNDAY TO THURSDAY (EXCLUDING HOLIDAY SUNDAYS)

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MAY 2, 2019

61


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

5.2

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of Certified 200 Hour Yoga Instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

SFU WRITER’S STUDIO WRITING CONSULTS

Need an expert opinion on your writing? The SFU Writer’s Studio offers free one-on-one, 45-minute consultations. Register at least one week prior to the consultation time required. Seven pages of poetry or a prose manuscript must be submitted one week prior to your scheduled appointment. Doublespaced with title and your name on each page with the page number on the bottom. For more information and to register, call the library at 604-935-8435. > 2, 3 & 4 pm > Whistler Public Library

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. Eighteen-to-35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

MUSIC

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS!

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with the best beer and service in Whistler! > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT

Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. > 9 pm-2 am > Garfinkel’s

RORY MALKIN

Playing acoustic classics from Smashing Pumpkins, Queens of the Stone Age, Biffy Clyro, Pearl Jam. > 9 pm > Mallard Lounge

KYLER J. PIERCE

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

WHISTLER CON BRIO

Embarking on his solo career after an extensive music career around the Fraser Valley. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to more than 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fi

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS…like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

For 20 consecutive years, Con Brio Whistler has turned Whistler Village into a giant band, orchestra and choral camp culminating in a massed choir of over 500, a massed string ensemble, and massed bands of over 1,800 instrumentalists. The main centres of activity are the Whistler Conference Centre, the Hilton and Westin conference facilities and the Maury Young Arts Centre. For more, visit conbriofestivals.ca/whistler-musicfestival/about/. > Whistler Conference Centre

SEA TO SKY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is

Have you got a spare room? Tamwood International is looking for warm and welcoming homestay families in Whistler to provide a nice room, meals, and positive experiences to our motivated students, aged 16+ from all over the world. Host families are required the whole year round. For more information, please contact homestay@tamwood.com or call 1.866.533.0123

62 MAY 2, 2019


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

YOGA @ THE AUDAIN

Yoga @ the Audain every Friday evening from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. > 6:30-8 pm > Audain Art Museum

MARC CHARRON

FRI

MAY 3 AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

5.3

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Musem

ART AFTER DARK

One-man band on the run, song writer, world traveller and original van lifer. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

TOM FRANCIS

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon-focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

INDOOR PICKLEBALL

Have fun with others playing the fastest-growing sport in North America! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $10. 604-932-1991. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

Squamish-based artist Tom Francis always strives to take your soul for an emotional ride. Writing for the past decade, Tom focused on the blues at first before experimenting with everything from acoustic chill to outlaw country and doing his own takes on some classic crowd pleasers. If you dig eccentric bearded Irish guys that can pluck a string or two, check him out at Cranked. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Art After Dark is every Friday, with artmaking for youth (18 and under) 3:30 to 5:30pm, and adult artmaking 6:30 to 8:30pm. > 3:30-5:30 & 6:30-8:30 pm > Audain Art Museum

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

Award winning Design and Maintenance

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

MUSIC

YOGA @ THE AUDAIN

ONGOING & DAILY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS Let’s send it on and off the mountain this weekend! DJ Dre Morel spinning rock, pop and hip hop all night! For VIP reservations and guest list inquiries, please visit www.tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am

THE MCQUAID TRIO

The McQuaid Trio bring the noise with an eclectic mix of foot stomping and electric instruments, fiddle, bass and guitar. Celtic, bluegrass, pop, folk and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

RACHEL LEWIS

Rachel Lewis and Phil-T-Beats play your favourite Top 40 hits, new and old, as well as Rachel’s catchy, upbeat originals! > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.heikedesigns.com

Tip of the week: Everything is later this year. Have patience and allow Proud member of your garden to wake up first. Roots and seeds need warmth to grow! fertilize only when steady above 7 degrees. Wait a bit with annuals/ veggies. Protect at night if needed. See full series and more information at www.heikedesigns.com

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER MAY 2, 2019

63


PIQUECAL

SPRING COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE MAY 5 CREEKSIDE UNDERGROUND

LIVE @ BLACK’S

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING DJ TYMETAL

Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems...you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

WHISTLER CON BRIO

> Whistler Conference Centre

ART TALKS

Every month, the Whistler Contemporary Gallery will be featuring an artist from their diverse collection of contemporary artists. The gallery invites the public to come and explore the artistic process offering a fascinating insight from conception to completion. > 4 pm > Whistler Contemporary Gallery

COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

> 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MUSIC

SAT

MARC CHARRON

> 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

5.4

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

64 MAY 2, 2019

RACHEL LEWIS

Saturday night live with Rachel Lewis. Lewis plays all your favourite top-40 hits, new and old as well as catchy, upbeat originals. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING DJ TYMETAL

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with TyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS SUPREME SATURDAY > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

LADIES’ NIGHT

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top-40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

ADAM BAILIE

Adam Bailie is a breath of Canadian fresh air. As a contemporary singer-songwriter, Adam stands out as a cross between acoustic reggae and country soul music. His delivery of rhyme and rhythm is genuine and uniquely his own. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Loung

RUCKUS DELUXE

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

SEA TO SKY

PEMBERTON WOMEN’S INSTITUTE PLANT AND BAKE SALE

A wide of bedding plants, vegetables and berry plants, plus the famous Pemberton Seed Potatoes will be available at homegrown prices. You can also buy coffee, tea and homemade goodies. All funds raised are given back to the community. Free. 604-932-7844. > 9-11 am > Pemberton Legion (Pemberton)

SUN

5.5

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum


PIQUECAL COMMUNITY

SPRING COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE

Everyone can buy, everyone can sell! Vendors-First come, first served, $25 (one stall to sell + one stall for your car) Setup 7am-8:30am. All profits yours to keep. Tables not provided. Shop 9am to 2pm. Admission is free. > 9 am-2 pm > Creekside Underground

IG WEALTH MANAGEMENT WALK FOR ALZHEIMER’S

The IG Wealth Management Walk for Alzheimer’s is the Alzheimer Society of B.C.’s flagship fundraiser and is a way British Columbians can celebrate and remember people in their lives who have been affected by dementia, while they raise valuable funds and awareness to create change. Register today! No fees; fundraise and participate in Walk for Alzheimer’s. 604-932-1924. > 10:30 am-noon > Our Lady of the Mountains Catholic Church

FAMILY STUDIO SUNDAY

Family Studio Sunday is every Sunday from 12 – 4pm. > 12-4 pm > Audain Art Museum

MUSIC

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

GYPSY

Sunday session with Gypsy. If you haven’t had a chance to catch this Whistler songbird, you are missing out. Her killer vocals paired with guitar are unforgettable and draw crowds. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

JERRY’S DISCO

Dust off your Gaper Day getup, from backwards helmets to gorby gaps, ‘cos the best Jerry outfit gets a free bottle of prosecco! > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

CORY CURTIS

He has a wide range of contemporary as well as classic songs and a very unique voice; not your average acoustic guitar performer. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

RED CHAIR

Red Chair has become a hometown favourite with their selection of bar favourites, high-energy performances and great musicianship. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL

TyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

CHEAKAMUS CENTRE 50TH ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

Help us celebrate a milestone year at our 50th annual Open House! Join us for a fun, family day of nature exploration and discovery! Activities: Farm animals, salmon hatchery, longhouse, canoeing, archery, river floats, lunch, silent auction, and more! Retro Alert! Dress to Impress with the ‘70s theme. By donation Proceeds support Outdoor School Alumni Society’s Kids Bursary Fund. 604-898-5422. > 10:30 am-3:30 pm > Cheakamus Centre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

OPEN MIC

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

MON

5.6

COMMUNITY

MUSIC & WORDS

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab - new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix, mend and create. $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

40% OFF ALL FOOD VALID WITH A DRINK PURCHASE LIMITATIONS APPLY EXCLUDES ADD-ONS

Two of Whistler’s best patios with one smokin’ deal Valid: April 23-Mid June, 2019

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

MAY 2, 2019

65


PIQUECAL SPORTS

SEA TO SKY

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

> 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

MUSIC

OPEN MIC

INTRODUCES...

Open Mic night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Jenna Mae. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place for new artists to try performing in front of a small supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. They’re always looking for new musicians to join them. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MONDAY NIGHT LIVE WITH WHAT A RACKET!

CARAMBA FEATURE TAPAS MENU! SUNDAY TO THURSDAY | BEGINNING MAY 5TH TAPAS MENU AVAILABLE FROM 5PM TO CLOSE!

ENJOY MORE CARAMBA FEATURE NIGHTS 20” TUESDAYS ARE BACK! $15 20” PIZZAS WINE WEDNESDAYS 50% OFF SELECTED WINES! COCKTAIL SPECIALS EVERY NIGHT! Follow us: @carambawhistler

carambarestaurant.com | 604-938-1879

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana Swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

MARTINI MONDAY > 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

GREG NEUFELD

Armed with a guitar, stompbox, and one of the best, soulful voices you will ever hear. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

5 DAYS

MONDAY MADNESS Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

Choice of one plate

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad

Marinated chicken thigh, low fat yogurt dressing, capered focaccia croutons, Grana Padano crisp

2 Baja fish Taco

House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

Beef Burger

Ground chuck, fried onions, lettuce, tomato

Mac and Cheese

Macaroni, 4 cheese sauce, light panko crust +garlic toast

Plus one craft beer

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

FVCK MONDAYS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

TUE

5.7

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-9358436 or email youthservice@whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

BEST PICTURE SERIES: BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

Didn’t see all the Best Picture nominees on the big screen? The library will be screening a nominated film on the 1st and 2nd Tuesday of each month this summer! Next up is Bohemian Rhapsody, a footstomping celebration of Queen. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

OUR TOWN: A PLAY IN TWO ACTS

Whistler Secondary School’s annual school play is sure to amaze. $10 for adults, $6 for students and children. > 7 pm > Whistler Secondary School

COMMUNITY

WE RUN WHISTLER: SALOMON DEMO PACKS NIGHT

Join us to for a special night in collaboration with Salomon Whistler. Demo their latest running packs while we run some of Whistler best trails. Two distance options (approx, 6 and 10km). #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

SPORTS

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership. > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

MUSIC

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

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PIQUECAL ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

TOMMY TUESDAYS

Tommys Tuesday with resident DJ Dre Morel and guests bringing you all the best of the best every Tuesday evening! Visit tommyswhistler.com. > 8 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

GREG NEUFELD

> 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

CHAD OLIVER

Ruckus Deluxe frontman and former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver sings Celtic, rock, pop and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

KARAOKE NIGHT

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

SPORTS

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB WEDNESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for emerging road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free for club members. > 5:15-7 pm > Whistler Village Sports

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

5.8

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

OUR TOWN: A PLAY IN TWO ACTS See Tuesday’s listing for more info. > 7 pm > Whistler Secondary School

COMMUNITY

EAT LOCAL!

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

MUSIC

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

WED

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Join the library for this brand new series and learn how to eat local! For more information, visit whistlerlibrary. ca/events/eat-local. > 7-8:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

SCOTT PERRIE

A vibrant performer and multi-instrumentalist, he plays the guitar, harmonica, piano, trumpet, kazoo and percussion. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

MIKE BELANGER > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAIN

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

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67


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF MAY 2 BY ROB BREZSNY

Stories and Songs

From choir girl to country troubadour

FRIDAY MAY 10

MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE DOORS 7PM | SHOW 8PM | 19+

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “How prompt we are to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our bodies,” wrote Henry David Thoreau. “How slow to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our souls!” Your first assignment in the coming days, Aries, is to devote yourself to quenching the hunger and thirst of your soul with the same relentless passion that you normally spend on giving your body the food and drink it craves. This could be challenging. You may be less knowledgeable about what your soul thrives on than what your body loves. So your second assignment is to do extensive research to determine what your soul needs to thrive. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I invite you to explore the frontiers of what’s possible for you to experience and accomplish. One exercise that might help: visualize specific future adventures that excite you. Examples? Picture yourself parasailing over the Mediterranean Sea near Barcelona, or working to help endangered sea turtles in Costa Rica, or giving a speech to a crowded auditorium on a subject you will someday be an expert in. The more specific your fantasies, the better. Your homework is to generate at least five of these visions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We must choose between the pain of having to transcend oppressive circumstances, or the pain of perpetual unfulfillment within those oppressive circumstances,” writes mental health strategist Paul John Moscatello. We must opt for “the pain of growth or the pain of decay,” he continues. We must either “embrace the tribulations of realizing our potential, or consent to the slow suicide in complacency.” That’s a bit melodramatic, in my opinion. Most of us do both; we may be successful for a while in transcending oppressive circumstances, but then temporarily lapse back into the pain of unfulfillment. However, there are times when it makes sense to think melodramatically. And I believe now is one of those times for you. In the coming weeks, I hope you will set in motion plans to transcend at least 30 per cent of your oppressive circumstances. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You Cancerians can benefit from always having a fertility symbol somewhere in your environment: an icon or image that reminds you to continually refresh your relationship with your own abundant creativity; an inspiring talisman or toy that keeps you alert to the key role your fecund imagination can and should play in nourishing your quest to live a meaningful life; a provocative work of art that spurs you to always ask for more help and guidance from the primal source code that drives you to reinvent yourself. So if you don’t have such a fertility symbol, I invite you to get one. If you do, enhance it with a new accessory. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In my horoscopes, I often speak to you about your personal struggle for liberation and your efforts to express your soul’s code with ever-more ingenuity and completeness. It’s less common that I address your sacred obligation to give back to life for all that life has given to you. I only infrequently discuss how you might engage in activities to help your community or work for the benefit of those less fortunate than you. But now is one of those times when I feel moved to speak of these matters. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when it’s crucial to perform specific work on behalf of a greater good. Why crucial? Because your personal well-being in the immediate future depends in part on your efforts to intensify your practical compassion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We are whiplashed between an arrogant overestimation of ourselves and a servile underestimation of ourselves,” writes educator Parker Palmer. That’s the bad news, Virgo. The good news is that you are in prime position to escape from the whiplash. Cosmic forces are conspiring with your eternal soul to coalesce a well-balanced vision of your true value that’s free of both vain misapprehensions and self-deprecating delusions. Congrats! You’re empowered to understand yourself with a tender objectivity that could at least partially

heal lingering wounds. See yourself truly!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The country of Poland awards

medals to couples that have stayed married for 50 years. It also gives out medals to members of the armed forces who have served for at least 30 years. But the marriage medal is of higher rank, and is more prestigious. In that spirit, I’d love for you to get a shiny badge or prize to acknowledge your devoted commitment to a sacred task—whether that commitment is to an intimate alliance, a noble quest, or a promise to yourself. It’s time to reward yourself for how hard you’ve worked and how much you’ve given. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio poet Sylvia Plath wrote, “I admit I desire / Occasionally, some backtalk / From the mute sky.” You’ll be wise to borrow the spirit of that mischievous declaration. Now is a good time to solicit input from the sky, as well as from your allies and friends and favourite animals, and from every other source that might provide you with interesting feedback. I invite you to regard the whole world as your mirror, your counsellor, your informant. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In January 1493, the notorious pirate and kidnapper Christopher Columbus was sailing his ship near the land we now call the Dominican Republic. He spotted three creatures he assumed were mermaids. Later he wrote in his log that they were “not half as beautiful as they are painted (by artists).” We know now that the “mermaids” were actually manatees, aquatic mammals with flippers and paddle-shaped tails. They are in fact quite beautiful in their own way, and would only be judged as homely by a person comparing them to mythical enchantresses. I trust you won’t make a similar mistake, Sagittarius. Evaluate everything and everyone on their own merits, without comparing them to something they’re not. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I want what we all want,” writes novelist Jonathan Lethem. “To move certain parts of the interior of myself into the exterior world, to see if they can be embraced.” Even if you haven’t passionately wanted that lately, Capricorn, I’m guessing you will soon. That’s a good thing, because life will be conspiring with you to accomplish it. Your ability to express yourself in ways that are meaningful to you and interesting to other people will be at a peak. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Using algorithms to analyze 300 million facts, a British scientist concluded that April 11, 1954 was the most boring day in history. A Turkish man who would later become a noteworthy engineer was born that day, and Belgium staged a national election. But that’s all. With this non-eventful day as your inspiration, I encourage you to have fun reminiscing about the most boring times in your own past. I think you need a prolonged respite from the stimulating frenzy of your daily rhythm. It’s time to rest and relax in the sweet luxury of nothingness and emptiness. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The Blue Room is a famous Picasso painting from 1901. Saturated with blue hues, it depicts a naked woman taking a bath. More than a century after its creation, scientists used X-rays to discover that there was an earlier painting beneath The Blue Room and obscured by it. It shows a man leaning his head against his right hand. Piscean poet Jane Hirshfield says that there are some people who are “like a painting hidden beneath another painting.” More of you Pisceans fit that description than any other sign of the zodiac. You may even be like a painting beneath a painting beneath a painting—to a depth of five or more paintings. Is that a problem? Not necessarily. But it is important to be fully aware of the existence of all the layers. Now is a good time to have a check-in. Homework: What are the five conditions you’d need in your world in order to feel you were living in utopia? Write FreeWillAstrology.com

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

Winter edition out now 68 MAY 2, 2019

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com


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Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

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WhistlerProperty.com UNSPECIFIED LOCATION Executive Townhome Available In Tantalus, 1/2 duplex, immaculate, open concept, high ceilings, backs onto green space. 2 bedrooms plus den, 2.5 baths, double garage. $2850. rglminv@gmail.com

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Professional Family looking for a property to rent long term for 18 to 24 months while we build our house on Treetop Lane. Three bedroom as a minimum. Willing to do any property maintenance. Rent $5000 for the right temporary home for us. No rental management fees. 604-905-9105 shauna@shaunaocallaghan.com

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VIOLINISTS WANTED Do you want to play the violin? Are you excited about the idea of playing with a fun group of amateur string players with a passion for music? Sea to Sky String Orchestra is looking for violinists to join us. We require a playing level of Suzuki Method book 6,7 or RCM 7 or equivalent. If you'd like to know more please contact Yuko by email; dreamthedream15@ gmail.com

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N’QUATQUA 21 Lakeshore Dr. P.O. Box 88, D’Arcy, BC V0N 1L0 Phone (604) 452-3221 Fax (604) 452-3295

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Community

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ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

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Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

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Pemberton Farmers' Market season is just around the corner! Members are welcome to join us for our AGM on Tuesday May 7th from 7-9pm at the Pemberton Community Centre. For more info, contact us at info@pembertonfarmersmarket.com

• Preparing financial reports and submissions to relevant government entities; • Arranging financial audits and reviews as required; • Banking money and cheques received and issuing receipts as requested or needed;

IS SEEKING TWO LEADERS TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

Banquet Manager & Team Driver For a complete job description please visit SLCC.ca/Careers. We thank you for your interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

• Maintaining and transferring money between bank accounts as required; • Payment of invoices and fees as required or otherwise instructed; • Recommend and maintain a system of policies and procedures that impose an adequate level of control over Finance Department activities • Bi-weekly Payroll and weekly Accounts Payable, Reconciliation of Accounts Receivable. DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS: • Bachelor’s degree in finance or accounting plus 3+ years of progressively responsible finance. • Must maintain confidentiality and discretion in all aspects and be comfortable with flexible working schedule to meet the needs of the Company and its executives Application Procedure: Please send resume & cover letter to Lucinda.phillips@nquatqua.ca by May 10th, 2019.

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Blackcomb Peaks Accommodations seeks a

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MAINTENANCE PERSON

ASSISTANT MANAGER

for a Full-Time position. The successful candidate will need to be able to shift between duties rapidly, be very organized, and lift 25+ lbs. Tools are provided. Good time

MEETING PLACE

LINE COOKS

3 months; benefits will be offered. Competitive

DISHWASHERS

starting wage provided to the successful candidate.

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

Please contact admin@blackcombpeaks.com

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

management skills are very important, and after

with your resume to apply.

The Annual General Meeting for the Pemberton Museum society will be held Wed May 08, 2019 at 7pm at the museum. 604-894-5504 www.pembertonmuseum.org

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler.com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604-892-3125.

EDUCATION FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL Is hiring for the role of:

Nature Educator Are you passionate about spending time outside in nature, with skills and experience in working with children? Join our team today and help shape and inspire the next generation of nature lovers! We are hiring for both full-time and part-time seasonal Nature Educators to help with our programs at the One Mile Lake Nature Centre. Please send your resume and cover letter to stewardshippemberton@gmail.com and join our team of inspired, passionate people! The full job posting can be found at stewardshippemberton.com/who-we-are under ‘Join our Team’.

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for: LINE/ PREP COOKS (FULL-TIME & PART-TIME) HEAD CHEF DISHWASHERS Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Must be able to create rich sushi menu including maki, nigiri and sashimi with various ingredients such as raw fish, fresh fruits & vegetables. Minimum one year as a sushi chef experience required. Wage: $14.50 per hour, FT, to work at Kaze Sushi in Westin Whistler. Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards

Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS

WILDERNESS FIRST AID TRAINING SPRING 2019 Wilderness First Responder May 18-25 80-hr program for outdoor professionals and backcountry guides. Required course for many outdoor companies. Nationally Recognized Certification meets requirements of WMS, ACMG, BC River Outfitters Association, Sea Kayak Guides Alliance of BC, Outward Bound, NOLS

Advanced Wilderness First Aid May 14-17 This 40-hr program has become a minimum standard for outdoor professionals, guides and instructors. Also re-certifies Wilderness First Responder course.

New Mountain Bike Advanced Wilderness First Aid Training May 1-4 In Squamish. MBIA Specialized MTB course. WFR recertification accepted

SIRIUS WILDERNESS MEDICINE

Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available.

REGISTER ONLINE AT: www.siriusmed.com Toll Free (877) 982-0066

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE

REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

72 MAY 2, 2019

Canadian Leader in Wilderness Medical Training

Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION


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THE BEST KIDS STORE EVER

NOW HIRING GOOD PEOPLE

RETAIL SALES HOST

GREAT PERKS & BENEFITS APPLY NOW: LAURA@ thecirclewhistler.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Whistler Singers - Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter season. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/whistlersing ers/

DRIVE

SELL

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452- 0123 or visit www.pembertonartscouncil.com

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604- 892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

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Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus.net

WORK

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE

RENT

We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities)

Facilities Maintenance Associate

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877-892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature CentreConnecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton.com Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

EXCLUSIVE LUXURY LAND ROVER EXCURSIONS FULL TIME / PART TIME

NATURE TOUR GUIDE Guide Income ranges from $20 to $35+ per hour

* If you are passionate about wildlife & nature, we can train you!

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts.

Please forward resumes to info@whistlerdiscoverytours.com

info@rolandswhistler.com

QUALIFICATIONS: • Must have BC Class 5 drivers license • Wildlife Tour Guiding & Outdoor photography skills are a bonus

Apply in person or email resume to

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/ Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multirotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net

Canstar Restorations helps people by restoring buildings and possessions that have been damaged by fire or water. We are seeking Carpenter Helpers, Contents & Restoration Technicians No experience necessary- we provide training! • Competitive salary • RRSP matching, health and dental, 4% vacation, sick days • Work in a variety of homes and businesses along the Sea-to-Sky • Amazing team and incredible culture • Opportunities for advancement and over-time

Email resume to careers@canstarrestorations.com

is currently hiring for the following position:

EXCAVATOR OPERATOR 3 yrs experience required Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

MAY 2, 2019

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive.com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Whistler Vacation Club and Elevate Real Estate Management is currently hiring for a range of positions!

Front Desk Agents, Housekeeping and Houseperson:

Experience is preferred but not necessary, full training will be provided

What do we offer for all positions?

• $18 per hour starting wage • Pay review after 3 months based on performance • Retention bonus - details upon application • Staff accommodation - details upon application • Eligibility for medical benefits • No reduction in hours during ‘dead season’ • Friendly working environment

What do we need from you?

• Must have good attention to detail • Be able to use initiative • Be comfortable working as part of a team and an individual • Must be reliable and punctual • BC driving license an asset • Preferably looking for long-term candidates Positions available starting immediately for the right candidates. Please visit us in person at the Twin Peaks resort or email your resume to: hskp@thewhistlervacationclub.com

Roland’s Pub is looking for an Assistant Manager.

Serving & bartending experience required, must have Serving It Right Certification. Salary negotiable and based on experience. Benefits will include Extended Medical & Dental, tips, staff meals, staff discounts, ski pass, and gas allowance. This is a full-time, year-round position. Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Dropin for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962- 8711

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal - Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com

The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company. We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team. Required are:

Labourers Equipment Operators Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

www.whistlerexcavations.com

DOUG BUSH

to join our growing team. RDC specializes in High Performance Custom Homes and Renovations. WE OFFER: Positive work environment Work on innovative energy efficient projects – new homes and renovations Leadership training Extended health benefits Tool purchase support

Please send your resume to: info@rdcfinehomes.com

With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@ gmail.com or find us on facebook. Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org

KP SURVEY SERVICES LTD.

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN

74 MAY 2, 2019

High-Performing Experienced Carpenters

Last modified by:

is looking for a

Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

RDC Fine Homes is looking for positive and reliable

Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www. whistleryouthcentre.com or call 604-935-8187.

www.whistlerwag.com

Dogs and pick-up trucks don’t mix! Dogs who are riding in the backs of pickup trucks may look like they’re having fun, but they are not safe. When you transport your dog in the open bed of your pickup, you endanger both your dog and other motorists. Even with a restraint your dog may be seriously injured or killed riding in the back of a pickup. Why risk your dog’s life? Put him in the cab with you in a travel crate, or if you have an extended cab, have your pet ride in the back portion of the cab where he will be away from the front windshield.

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler.toastmastersclubs.org Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894- 6580 Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium - Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782 Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@bookbuffet.com


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Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend.

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday's-Sunday's per week. 10am5p.m..

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management rm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benets Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment

PORCA is hiring! The Pemberton Off-Road Cycling Association (PORCA) is seeking a self-motivated and community minded individual who is passionate about mountain biking to fill the position of Executive Director.

Current Career Opportunities:

GUEST SERVICES AGENT • JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

Whistler Museum & Archives Society - Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am- 5pm, 4333 Main St. www.whistlermuseum.org or 604-932- 2019

To read the job posting and apply please go to the PORCA website:

porcabikes.com Closing date for applications is May 10th.

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:458:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca Whistler Chamber of Commerce Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www. whistlerchamber.com Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring for:

FULL & PART TIME GRILL CHEFS Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www. whistlermac.org or view our schedule on Facebook - Whistler Mature Action Community Group page. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

ASSISTANT RESTAURANT MANAGER Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help inspire, develop, oversee and manage our front-of-house team. The Assistant Manager will help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality. Qualifications • Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group. We offer year-round full hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY!

careers@araxi.com

Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full & Part Time Housekeepers Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com

WIDE OPEN WELDING IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITION:

FABRICATOR/ERECTOR Please forward your resume to contactus@wideopenwelding.com

MAY 2, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS FOR SENIORS Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/ youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Earls is starting to build our team for Spring and Summer Servers, Cooks, Hosts, Expeditors, Bartenders & Shift Managers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604-576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

We are currently interviewing:

Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www.healthylivingwhistler. com Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss. org, rebuildit@mywss.org Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@mywcss.org.

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

is hiring for full time positions in our maintenance and construction departments. We are also looking for individuals to fill both part time and full time positions in our garden centre located in Whistler. Pease send your resume to highcountrylandscape@telus.net

76 MAY 2, 2019

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities · Senior Bylaw Officer · Student Program Leader - Canada Summer Jobs · Labourer I - Village Maintenance · Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 2 · Human Resources Coordinator - Benefits

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) - Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org The Mountain Village Social Gathering - Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @ themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-932-3202 Camp Fund - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail. com, visit our Facebook Page or website www.familiesfightingcancer.ca


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KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org. Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org. Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am- 12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library.

HI CANADA

We’re Hiring! Join Our Diverse & Fun Team at Nita

Hotel & front office positions including management All culinary kitchen & service positions including management Competitive wages Flexible working hours Great perks & benefi ts Discounts on F&B + Spa services Staff housing available

Pemberton Strong Start Family DropIn- A play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm3pm. Call 604-894- 6101 / 604-966- 8857

FAMILY RESOURCES Whistler Public Library - Open MonThurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

Check out www.nitalakelodge.com/careers to learn more

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

CAFÉ SUPERVISOR We are looking for a dynamic and eager person to join our fun loving team at our Whistler hostel in Cheakamus Crossing. A great opportunity to grow your career! Offsite affordable subsidized housing available and a great compensation package, including benefits and discounts on food and activities. Visit our website for details or give us a call – apply today! hihostels.ca/careers careers.pm@hihostels.ca 604-962-0025

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www.mywcss.org. Counselling Assistance Available WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604-932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@ welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistler’s busiest spots!

The Listel Hotel Whistler is now hiring for the year-round leadership position of

At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer.

FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

We are currently looking for

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4

• Responsible for leading a dynamic front office team and daily operations • Competitive Salary and incentives provided • Extended Management Health and Wellness Benefits available For more information and application, please send resume and cover letter to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as- sistance. www. mywcss.org, food- bank@mywcss.org Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101 Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

We are Bike techs • Sales staff • Full and Part time Apply info@fanatykco More info www.Fanatykco.com/Employment

We are currently hiring Full Time Sales Representatives with personality! Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina.

Staff Accommodation Available (4154 Village Green)

MAY 2, 2019

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OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following position:

Dishwashers We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full Time Night House Person ($19.31 per hour, 10:00 pm – 8:00 am, 4 days per week) Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com

DIVERSE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WITH

Residential/Commercial projects ACROSS THE SEA TO SKY CORRIDOR

Dubh Linn Gate is hiring:

BAR MANAGER Dubh Linn Gate is seeking an experienced bar manager. Areas of expertise include ordering and inventory, menu design and costing, managing an experienced bar team, providing exceptional leadership and delivering good craic. A minimum of 2 years’ management experience in a high volume bar or pub, and a minimum of 3 years’ bartending experience are required. We offer a competitive salary, tips, a ski pass, housing if required, a flexible schedule and a great working environment. Drop by the pub to speak with Diane or Louise between 9:30am and 3pm Monday to Saturday.

78 MAY 2, 2019

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. TO APPLY: CALL 604.935.2683 or EMAIL DCOTE@COASTCONSTRUCTION.CA

COMMUNITY LISTINGS SOCIAL SERVICES North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334 Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org. Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877- 890-5711 or 604-892-5711 RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101 Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler Community Services Society - Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www.whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-698-6455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm-7:00pm. Confidentiality assured. Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www. hswc.ca or call (604)962- 8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890- 5711 Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free onestop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600


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Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org. SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con- cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www.jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781 Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-798-3861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905-BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

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Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and non-judgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

WORK

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: TEACHER ON-CALL GENERAL HAND - $15.25/hr Part -Time and Full-Time Whistler Brewing Co. is looking for a motivated and energetic General Hand to fulfill duties in production and distribution departments, such as but not limited to: • Assisting on Packaging Lines • Assisting in Cellar Duties • Cleaning and Sanitation – indoors and outdoors, including some snow maintenance • Assisting with keg deliveries as required REQUIREMENTS: • Technical Aptitude • Capable work in wet working environment, plus outdoors in all weather conditions • Capable work with Corrosive Chemicals • Able to move 60kg • Willing to learn to operate a Fork lift • Quick learner • Team Player • Punctual • Must own safety boots

Tap House Bar and Server Whistler Brewery Tap House employee is a brand ambassador for the Whistler Brewing Co and is responsible for taking care of our visitors, conducting brewery tours, and supporting the retail operation. Requirements: • Able to work independently and on a team • Able to complete task in a timely manner unsupervised • Excellent communication skills • Has complete Serving It Right • Has completed FoodSafe Level 1 – an asset • Age of majority • Experience in a high volume environment • Love beer Join an awesome, fun, small hardworking team. Good hours & beer perks! Apply within!

Position Type: Location: Status: Reporting to: Salary: Closing Date:

Teacher On-Call Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Full-time Education Director Commensurate with Experience Posted Until Position filled

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation School situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, B.C. in the Mount Currie Community. The school is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • The ability to teach various high school subjects • Member of the Teacher Regulation Branch • In possession of a degree in Education • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture • Ability to work within a Cooperative Discipline framework • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Background in relationship-based, learning and discursive practices • Adventurous, versatile and a nature lover • Must complete a criminal record check. Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter and resume including references. Contact Information:

Verna Stager, Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717 Email: glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties.

The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service.

HOUSEMAN

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

MAY 2, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Local construction company looking for motivated labourers for summer time construction work. Great wages available contact scott@scottybsolutions.com

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

In-House Marketing Concierge Full Time & Part Time Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Tara.Ryan@diamondresorts.com

www.whistlerwag.com

Lost and Found? If you spot a stray animal or have lost an animal, call WAG at 604-935-8364. WAG operates a lost and found service to help reunite lost pets with their families.

Great Retail Opportunity. Snowflake in Fairmont Chateau Whistler is looking for a manager. We specialize in Canadian made or designed outerwear and accessories, and have been in Whistler for almost 30 years. Good base salary; commissions on every sale, incentives, bonuses, staff discount, underground parking nearby, on the job training, and access to Health Club at the Chateau.

Check list… Retail experience. Love to sell. Team leader and team player. Organized. Energetic. Enthusiastic. Good time management. Able to motivate others. Fluent in both written and spoken English.  Flexible regarding shifts worked.         

Please email resume to megan@snowflakecanada.com

MountainView Accommodation Room Attendent This is a full or part-time, year-round position. Excellent pay, benefit packages for full-time employees. No previous experience is required as we do offer full training. Staff housing is available. Job description includes cleaning rooms, linen stocking, common area cleaning, and seasonal projects. christina@mvawhistler.com

Whistler Personnel Solutions Find your perfect fit today! talent@whistler-jobs.com All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experienced bartender, mainly day shifts, full time preferred. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca

CNC Machinist Whistler CNC shop requires Machinist / Operator for the manufacture of bicycle products. Metal working experience minimum requirement for applicants. FT permanent position. 40hrs per week, day or afternoon shifts available. Email resume to

sales@northshorebillet.com

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

Maintenance Owner Relations Seeking Room Attendants, Dishwashers and In Room Dining Overnight Servers!

***$500 Signing Bonus Offered*** Our Benefits Include: Health Benefits | Colleague Housing | Leisure Package Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Great Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

Guest Service Agent Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

80 MAY 2, 2019

 THINGS.  TO DO.


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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER At the heart of the village Position Type:

HIRING FAIR LISTEL HOTEL WHISTLER

Wednesday, May 8 from 11:00am-2:00pm

Housekeeping and Guest Agents positions. Wages start at $17.50 per hour. Bring your resume! Commissions as well as benefits for full time employees. Fun work environment! + Signing bonus of $300.00!

The Listel Hotel Whistler | The Listel Hotel Vancouver | Cheakamus Centre | Timber Restaurant | Forage Restaurant | Bearfoot Bistro

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE.

Tourism Whistler is a member based sales and marketing organization that actively promotes Whistler’s unique position as a world-class all season resort destination. We are currently hiring for the following positions: • Associate, Conference Sales • Coordinator, Research • Executive Assistant • Summer Surveyors • Travel Consultant • Visitor Centre Agent To review the job descriptions and to apply, visit whistler.com/careers.

Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

High School Career and Planning/English Teacher 1.0 FT High School Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 24, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach Career Education 8, 9, 10, Career Life Education 11/12, and English First Peoples 10 • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Administration Coordinator, Principal and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Prepare and prep students for English 10 Provincial Assessment • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including references, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

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We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SIX TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Six Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 6 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Jump Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

82 MAY 2, 2019

We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

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7 6 8 Join our Adventure Service Team 2 at the Whistler9Village Inn8 and Suites! WE OFFER • A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy HARD (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts • Medical and Dental for full time employees • Some staff discounts on local activities • Staff housing based on availability • Increments to pay scale based for longevity • Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

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9 7(Commission based incentives) 1 9Wage • FT 3 Night Auditor -7Premium

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(Commission based incentives)# 25 • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) 5 7 can be 2 Resumes submitted to karen@wvis.ca 3

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Experienced 4 6 Journeyman and NOW HIRING: 1 2 8 9 Apprentace’s needed. ATV & BUGGY GUIDES Commercial and residential. 6 8 CANOE GUIDES Projects in Whistler, Squamish, Pemberton. 8 6 1 High JEEP GUIDES attention to detail,

E-BIKE GUIDES HARD SHUTTLE DRIVERS MECHANIC

ability to work unsupervised # 27 and run projects/crews.

$25-35 per hr. Resumes kanegray@baseelectric.ca

We offer a fun, outdoor work environment with a great team of like-minded individuals. An always changing, always challenging work day with the opportunity to connect with people from all over the world. Flexible schedules and amazing staff parties are definite perks of the job. PERKS INCLUDE: FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE – FRIENDS # 25 3& FAMILY 4 2 9 DISCOUNTS 1 6 5 7 8– EPIC STAFF PARTIES - FREE ACTIVITIES 7 1 9 5 FOR 3 8STAFF 6 2 4 6 8 5 2 7 4 3 9 Full job descriptions at: 1 7 3 6 2 9 8 4 www.canadianwilderness.com/employment/ 9 5 4 7 8 3 1 6 8 2 6 4 5 1 9 3 If you are interested in joining our team, 2 3 1 8 9 7 4 5 please submit your resume to 4 9 7 1 6 5 2 8 employment@canadian01.com 5 6 8 3 4 2 7 1

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: MILE 33 BUS DRIVER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Mile 33 Bus Driver Bussing Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Supervisor of Facilities and Services As per the Bussing Salary Grid April 4, 2019 Posted until position is filled Immediately

Details: Under the supervision of the Head Bus Driver and the Supervisor of Facilities and Services the Bus Driver will drive the Mile 33 Bus Route. (Lower Lake Band Area). Key Deliverables: • Pre-trip inspection of bus and proper warm up • Mile 33 to Xet’olacw Community School and Signal Hill Elementary and Pemberton Secondary School • Arrive at School for drop-off • Other bus runs as requested • Clean and fuel up if required • Routes are subject to change by the Supervisor of Facilities and Services if required. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Must have minimum Class 2 • Driver’s Abstract • Criminal Record Check • Ensure all busses are inspected for SAFETY required • Make sure insurance for bus is up to date • Ensure log books are kept up, including mopping and washing seats once a week • Review fuel bills when requested • Other duties as required • This route is on Forestry Road. Driver needs to be capable and confident on unpaved road. Driver needs to be strong and in good health

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

Whistler in e f li d o o g A =

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted.

HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, and driver’s abstract and criminal record check by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Premium Rentals is looking for experienced, enthusiastic and outgoing bike mechanics to join our team to service Premium’s rental fleet as well as customer maintenance and repairs. Superior Wage | Bike Servicing Commission Structure Bike Park Pass | In Store Discounts

Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings: www.glaciermedia.ca/careers R001408475

BIKE MECHANIC

FULL & PART TIME SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE

To apply, please email: peter@premiummountain.ca

MAY 2, 2019

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE ONE TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade One Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Experienced Dining Room Server Server Assistant Bar Back

BACK-OF-HOUSE

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12.

Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes First Nations School Association coaching that improves student and teacher performance.

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package

This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Experience with Read Well, DIBELS and Six Minute Solution an asset/willingness to attend professional development • Ability to work collaboratively. Must be cooperative in strategies with Professional Learning Communities under direction of First Nations School Association • Experience with Saxon Math an asset/ willingness to attend professional development • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Can use data to drive classroom/school wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communications with students and their families about academic progress • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commitment to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference call and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. • Implement strong classroom management strategies Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

84 MAY 2, 2019

WE’RE HIRING

DISHWASHERS On-the-job offered APPLY TODAY!

We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca


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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER Pan Pacific Whistler is currently hiring for: HR Coordinator Reservations & Revenue Supervisor Guest Services Agent Night Auditor Preventative Maintenance Technician Maintenance Associate Room Attendant Overnight Houseperson Breakfast Cook Breakfast Dishwasher

PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Discover new opportunities to embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler, located at Whistler’s best address. We offer competitive wages, ski pass, and staff accommodation. Detailed job postings can be viewed by selecting “View all jobs” and “Pan Pacific Whistler Mountainside” on our Careers page at www.panpacific.com/en/careers.html To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

52 ISSUES $76.70/YEAR

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

$136.60/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

$605.80/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN USA

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201 Delish Cafe in Function Junction is expanding! We are currently hiring both part time & full time positions:

Barista/Cafe Servers Apprentice Bakers No experience necessary, we are happy to train great people on the job!

Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee housing available for the right candidates. Send your resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com

HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Seven Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 3, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 7 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a SchoolWide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery/Corrective Reading Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

MAY 2, 2019

85


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SHARE WHAT MOVES YOU.

THE WHISTLER CHILDREN’S CENTRE IS HIRING A MANAGER OF HUMAN RESOURCE & ADMINISTRATION

SUMMER SURVEYORS

Part Time, Contract (starting mid-May) Surveyors play a key role in gathering information about the guest experience in Whistler. The surveyors collect information from guests in a non-biased manner over the summer season, throughout the village. Surveyors conduct face-to-face, intercept surveying on iPads. Our ideal candidates are mature, outgoing, knowledgeable locals who enjoy talking to people.

The Manager of Human Resource & Administration maintains the Business Administration and HR functions of the Whistler Children’s Centre. The Manager works to support the Executive Director and the Teachers within the non-profit child care centre.

KEY RESPONSIBILITES

• Complete 6 hour surveying shift between 9am – 6pm (3 days per week). • Conduct surveys in the Whistler village (outdoor pedestrian areas). • Conduct surveys in all weather conditions.

This position performs in accordance with the goals and philosophies of the Whistler Children’s Centre Society.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES

• Excellent interpersonal skills, with particular emphasis on superior customer service. • Comfortable approaching people, with excellent knowledge of Whistler, and surrounding areas. • Ability to work independently with limited supervision.

This position offers a flexible schedule with a competitive wage and other fun benefits. To apply please send your cover letter and resume to Meredith Kunza: mkunza@tourismwhistler.com

Requirements:

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY

Working knowledge of the BC Employment Standards Act

Experience in Human Resources; scheduling, payroll, recruitment

Excellent interpersonal and communication skills

Ability to lead, supervise, and manage staff

Background in Business Operations; managing accounts, deposits, reconciling

Computer knowledge

Strong organizational and time management skills and the ability to work without supervision

Knowledge of the BC Child Care Licensing Regulations

No criminal record

We offer the following:

Sales Coordinator Pique Newsmagazine is looking to fill a focal role of sales coordinator in our advertising sales department. The chosen candidate will possess uncompromising customer service and work well under pressure while thriving in a fast-paced deadline driven news media environment. The ideal applicant will have previous experience working with a print/digital media sales team. Strong administrative and communication skills are essential in this role, and attention to detail is a must. You will be highly organized and able to act as a liaison between departments, as well as possess a high level of professionalism when dealing with clients. We offer an excellent remuneration package as well as a benefits plan. Located in the mountain resort town of Whistler, British Columbia, Pique Newsmagazine is the unequivocal leader in reporting, interpreting and understanding the culture of the Coast Mountains and what it means to those who live, work and play in Whistler. Established in 1994, Pique’s success is derived from hard work, quality design, insightful editorial and an impressive list of regular advertisers. Our readers are informed, enlightened and entertained, and our advertisers receive the exposure and the results they expect. It is part of Glacier Media, one of Western Canada’s leading community media publishers, with more than 75 weekly, bi-weekly and daily community newspapers. Pique has been chosen by both the BCYCNA and News Media Canada as the top newspaper in its circulation category in 2017. Interested candidates should forward their resume and a cover letter to: Susan Hutchinson at shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Deadline: May 10th, 2019

WHISTLER PUBLISHING Limited Partnership

86 MAY 2, 2019

Dynamic and supportive work environment

Flexible 4 day work week

BC Medical Services Plan Coverage and Extended Health & Dental for single or family

Wellness Benefit

Paid days off to attend to physical and mental well-being

Employees with children attending the Centre receive a child care discount

Day off with pay on your birthday, Christmas Eve and Boxing Day

Professional development opportunities

If you are a Human Resource professional looking to work in the non-profit sector APPLY TODAY! Email cover letter and resume to Kari Gaudet, Executive Director at director@whistlerchildren.com. Closing date Friday, May 10th. For more information about the Whistler Children’s Centre, please see our website: www.whistlerchildren.com


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WHISTLER BLACKCOMB Demi Chef de Partie Overnight Steward Front Desk Agent

Love what you do! Because that’s what we’re all about. Whether you’re looking for a seasonal job or wanting to build an exciting career, we’ve got you covered.

Overnight Front Office Supervisor

We are hiring for a variety of full time, part time and volunteer opportunities.

The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately.

FEATURED ROLES:

Steward

$500 signing bonus available for all hires

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

MARKETING – BRAND EQUITY SENIOR SPECIALIST – YEAR-ROUND IT – IT PC TECHNICIAN – TEMPORARY UNTIL AUGUST 2019 LODGING OVATIONS – NIGHT AUDIT – YEAR-ROUND RETAIL - MOUNTAIN TOP STORE MANAGER – YEAR ROUND FOOD & BEVERAGE – MERLIN’S BAR & GRILL SOUS CHEF – YEAR-ROUND HR – FRONT DESK ASSOCIATE – YEAR-ROUND

Please visit whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs to find out more and apply!

/

/

/

/

BDO Canada LLP ASSURANCE & ACCOUNTING BDO is looking for a

JUNIOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT for its Whistler Office located in Function Junction. This position is a full-time, salaried position.

Job duties include, but are not limited to: • • • • • • •

backup reception coverage collating & paper/e-filing income tax and GST returns processing incoming tax information and assessments setting up and maintenance of client files and data base coordinating client mail outs assisting with the preparation of various tax filings and elections providing administrative support to partners, managers, staff as required

Required qualifications and competencies include: • • • • • •

administrative experience in an office environment proficiency in MS Windows/PC ability to work under pressure and adhere to strict policies and guidelines excellent interpersonal and customer service skills proven ability to work within a confidential environment willing to take on additional responsibilities and duties over time

O&R Restaurants seeking full-time

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF, LINE COOK, BAKER, DISHWASHER, SERVER, BARTENDER We offer competitive pay, a social work environment, seasonal bonuses*, food discounts when not working, meals with every shift*, and a variety of F&B establishments to work. We’re looking forward to you joining our family!

Our ideal candidate is a naturally warm and friendly individual with an always positive attitude and a strong work ethic. If you are enthusiastic and team-oriented and meet the above qualifications we invite you to submit your resume and cover letter to Amy Rathgen at arathgen@bdo.ca We thank all candidates who apply. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. BDO is an equal opportunity employer.

*for kitchen staff only

Please send resume to aaron@labocca.com MAY 2, 2019

87


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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

This could be your office Spa Experience Supervisor Call Centre Supervisor Guest Experience Team Lead Spa Experience Team Lead Café Team Lead Staff Housing Caretaker WE OFFER:

WE ARE LOOKING FOR:

• • • • • •

• • • •

Growth opportunities Subsidized housing Free yoga classes Ski pass or wellness package Free massage after 3 month probation Bath membership for you and a friend

Above and beyond attitude Leadership experience Commitment to your role Passion for the hospitality and tourism industries

Apply now: www.scandinave.com/en/careers/location/whistler/

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

Summer Programs Opera�ons Team Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Cra� Facilitator

Is looking for a

SALES ASSOCIATE Snowflake, a Canadian retailer specializing in Great Canadian Design is looking for a sales associate to join our team.

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler

Great wage + incentives (including fitness pass)

Summer Marke�ng & Communica�ons Assistant

Opportunity for advancement

Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Summer Program & Events Assistant

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Community Promo�ons Assistant Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Sales experience and asset but not required. Please send your resume to kathleen@snowflakecanada.com

APPLY TODAY!

Snowflake, Fairmont Chateau Whistler 4599 Chateau Blvd (Upper Village)

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

SNOWFLAKECANADA.COM

artswhistler.com/careers

88 MAY 2, 2019

Must be enthusiastic, fluent in both written and verbal English and able to work days/evenings/weekends.


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District of Squamish Career Opportunities Technology Transformation Program Project Manager We are looking for a superior Project Manager who can also consecutively manage individual technology projects that comprise the multi-year program. The ideal candidate will demonstrate extraordinary leadership, have proven experience leading finance system and ERP implementation, a background in Finance (preferably municipal finance), as well as a background in IT.

IT Application Specialist This position will maintain, support, and build, on the District's growing array of business applications. Successful candidates must have the ability to manage complex systems and applications in a busy, open environment, while also providing friendly support to end-users.

Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more!

Housekeepers Needed

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound!

BUSSER MAINTENANCE ENGINEER ROOM ATTENDANT

OVERNIGHT SECURITY AGENT DISHWASHER ACCOUNTING MANAGER

PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Hospitality

Integrity

Leadership

Teamwork

Ownership

Now

COOKS CHEF DE PARTIE STEWARD ROOM ATTENDANT HOUSE ATTENDANT BELL TEAM ~ AWESOME PEOPLE WORK HERE ~ Apply online on hr@hiltonwhistler.com or in person Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm We thank all interested applicants, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted

MAY 2, 2019

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Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Server Assistant Expeditor BACK-OF-HOUSE Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered

APPLY TODAY!

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Assistant Bar Manager

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Executive Housekeeper

- Housekeeping Room Attendant

- Front Desk Manager

- Houseperson/Public Area Attendant

- Bellperson

Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

• A strong knowledge of spirits and cocktails • Previous experience in a premium food and beverage operation is an asset • A professionally recognized wine certificate is an asset (WSET or equivalent) Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily. We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

We are looking for

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

SALES ASSOCIATES

Guest Services Agents Room Attendants Maintenance Helper

FULL-TIME & PART-TIME POSITIONS Be part of a FUN TEAM that offers Staff Housing Available Competitive Wage Benefit plan that suits you best Staff Discounts Work schedule that complements your availability

CARLBERGS GIFT SHOP

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

90 MAY 2, 2019

111B-4333 Sunrise Alley Whistler, BC, Canada V8E 1M7

info@carlbergsgiftshop.com

If you are a team player, have good customer service skills, willing to learn and want to progress in a fun and fair work environment, we invite you to drop off your resume or fill in an application form online!

www.carlbergsgiftshop.com


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NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks Bakery Clerks Juice Bar Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545 PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and fast-paced dining room. The Bearfoot Bistro, considered one of Canada’s top restaurants, featuring an inventive and sophisticated fine dining menu and one of the country’s most complete wine lists looks for people like you to offer that unique experience to our guests.

We are hiring for the following positions:

Catering Chef Sommelier Pastry Sous-Chef Catering Chef qualifications:

5+ years experience in a hotel or restaurant kitchen or a catering operation

Sommelier qualifications: Previous experience as a sommelier ISG or WSET certification or equivalent an asset

Pastry Sous-Chef qualifications: 5+ years experience in pastry

We are looking for candidates with the following skills: Ability to focus attention on guests needs Excellent communication skills Strong interpersonal skills Highly responsible and reliable Ability to work well under pressure Ability to work without supervision

The Bearfoot Bistro offers year-round employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more…

If you with anyany of those positions, pleaseplease submitsubmit your resume If you are areinterested interested with of those positions, your and cover letter to Colin Schira at colin@bearfootbistro.com resume and cover letter to Colin Schira at colin@bearfootbistro.com

I 4121 Villaeg Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 I bearfootbistro.com 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com 4121 Village Green

Adjacent to Listel Hotel

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS

TOWN

WITHOUT IT MAY 2, 2019

91


CALL THE EXPERTS

Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

BLINDS ETC.

FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

WINDOW COVERINGS

BLACK BEAR CARPET CLEANING LTD.

David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• • • •

Wood blinds Sunscreens Shades Motorization

www.summersnow.ca

Summer Snow Finishings Limited

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS ETC. Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

• BLINDS • SHADES

• CARPETS • UPHOLSTERY

Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

604.698.8406

CARPET CLEANING

• TILES • CAR INTERIORS

100% ECO FRIENDLY CERTIFIED www.blackbearcarpetcleaning.ca • 604 698 6610

PROUDLY SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER 25 YEARS

CHIMNEY

GLASS

BLACKCOMB CHIMNEY PATROL LTD.

TIRED OF THOSE OLD CONDENSATED, MOLDY WINDOWS AND DOORS?

Serving Whistler since 1986

Specialized in cleaning

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

Chimneys, Furnace & Airducts, Dryer vents.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

GLASS

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

WANT TO ADVERTISE

your service here?

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors.

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

MORTGAGES

PAINT

604.932.1132 whistlerglass.com

MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS · Frameless Shower Enclosures · Complete Window/Door Packages · Custom Railing Glass Systems · Fogged/Failed Window Replacements

mountainglass.ca | info@mountainglass.ca

604-932-7288

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

SURVEYING

SURVEYING

BUNBURY & ASSOCIA

Surveys Surveys

▪ ▪ ▪

Surveys Plans

Surveys

www.bunbury-surveys.com

Phone: 604-932-3770

92 MAY 2, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

604-894-6240 7426 Prospect St, Pemberton

SURVEYING DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 ▪ ▪ ▪

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

BC LAND SURVEYORS North Vancouver to Lillooet

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


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Taken -- (startled) Repair a tire Greek marketplace Knack Type in again Backpack contents Efficient Sheltered Debussy subject Be sorry for Funny Charlotte --

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: HARD

8 7

9

4 1 8

6 3 7

1 3 2 1 7 6 5 9 1 3

5 9 3

2

8

4

HARD Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 26

ANSWERS ON PAGE 82

MAY 2, 2019

93


MAXED OUT

The season that was … COLD AND DRY. That’s the way it started. Cold and dry. We rolled past Halloween with gardens still, well, if not in bloom, at least still largely green. We watched the jet stream drive storms south of us. Watched Washington state get blanketed in snow while we waited ... waited ... impatiently. American Thanksgiving came and went in its usual, bountiful excess and with some small fraction of the mountains open to slide, cheek-to-jowl, on man-made snow. C’est la vie. It shall come. Newbies were jumping out of their skin. Some were mining the shavings

BY G.D. MAXWELL behind the ice rink at Meadow Park and hauling it to wherever they could to make features they could slide on. Jaded oldtimers just shrugged their shoulders and marked the passage of time, trying to get used to toking without concern, now that pot was finally legal. People far and wide make plans for their Christmas ski holidays. Epic Pass holders, Eprechauns—I was going to dub them Eppers, rhymes with lepers, but my former Pique editor, Bob Barnett, had, as usual, a better idea—couldn’t wait any longer and since the old country, Colorado, finally had early season snow, gave Whistler a pass. Their loss; our gain, since the snow finally came, and came, and came in early December, after they’d booked their flights and hotels, giving us a number of days of relatively peaceful sliding between Christmas and New Year’s. When the snow came, the hills came alive ... with the sound of joyous abandon. Since Vail Resorts had an absence of groomers—self-inflicted wound—we had the heretofore unknown experience of skiing the now abandoned Springboard in snow above our knees. Alright, it wasn’t a completely unknown experience, but you had to tap into the collective memory and recall the earliest years of Blackcomb to remember a time Springboard, the mountain’s premier intermediate run, experienced that much snow without a grooming machine whipping it into submission. That Springboard was empty was due, largely, to the fact that skiing it is a pain in the keester without the Solar Coaster lift to ride back up. If you kept a keen eye out, you could cut across to the new Catskinner

UNLUCKY Spotting an “Eprechaun” amid the skiers and snowboarders who hiked up to the Excalibur Gondola after the Blackcomb Gondola opening was delayed on March 12.

PHOTO BY RICHARD KINAR

94 MAY 2, 2019

chair about two-thirds of the way down and if you hadn’t noticed the Breakdown Gondola wasn’t yet in operation, you could head down and grow older waiting at its midstation, something any number of people did even after it opened. Yes, it was an, uh, interesting year. And it’s become even more interesting now that Blackcomb is shut down for the season and, like days gone by, we’re able to ski Whistler’s north-facing slopes in the spring. And, of course, we excitedly look forward to what Whistler Blackcomb’s (WB) communications director refers to

While I’m not certain it’s actually unique, I can understand how WB sees this as an asset ... while others may see it as a pain in the asset. All of this palaver is, of course, by way of introduction to the perennial question: What kind of season was it? It was, and this is unique, three kinds of seasons. Yes, for the first time ever, I find it impossible to give a highly subjective, totally meaningless, single number from one to 10 to rank this season. The first element, and crucial it is, to understanding this season is the weather. It

Operations was, at times, so shaky it led me to research whether there had ever been a scoring system that allowed negative numbers! as a “unique” package as spring springs forward and mountain bikers begin plunging downhill. Once the bike park opens on May 17, we’ll be able to load the same lifts as them. And sightseers. Yes, WB is graciously recreating that old Coke commercial where we all hold hands and live in peaceful harmony—bikers, skiers, snowboarders, sightseers, the whole world’s welcome.

was cold. For the most part relentlessly cold. I wore my heaviest ski jacket more days this year than I have in the decade or so I’ve owned it. Heck, I even broke down a few days and wore a muffler to keep my lower face from falling off. The upside of cold, coupled with the mean jet stream tricks, was we only experienced a smattering of those juicy, Hawaiian days of liquid snow to the top.

While my clothing barely kept me warm, it kept me warmer than my rain gear keeps me dry and that is a huge benefit of cold. So let’s call this aspect of weather an 8.7. Cold good; wet bad. The second element was, just to make things more confusing, also weather, specifically, snow. There wasn’t much of it. Fortunately, it always seemed to come in the nick of time, that time being about the time I was beginning to think positive thoughts about a warm-weather holiday, something I find almost as appealing as planning a dinner party for a group of lactose-intolerant, gluten-free, veganish teetotallers. While the moguls grew larger and more precipitous, off-piste became more challenging, and I had to keep reminding myself of the grammatical difference between the phrases, “Skiing is good” and “The skiing is good.” Skiing was good, just to make things more confusing. This may have had something to do with almost breaking my foot off at the ankle before the season started and being relegated to mostly groomed runs until some time in January, but it was fun to get reacquainted with carving skis and tight turns. So while last season won’t be remembered for its snow, it wasn’t bad, not bad at all. Call it a solid 7 with hope for something better next season. The final element that made this season’s scoring uniquely more complex was operations. Operations was, at times, so shaky it led me to research whether there had ever been a scoring system that allowed negative numbers! From the inauspicious start—and stop—of the new gondola, to the inability to get even lifts that worked running within a reasonable time after opening, to grooming that was, at times, more like a game of hide and seek, operations seemed singularly challenging this season. I don’t know why and, really, it’s not important since I’m certain even Vail Resorts’ centralized management would prefer operations to be better than they were. The highly touted new lifts seemed to have something to offend everyone. There were comical, spontaneous cracks about the centre-pole foot rest (sic) on the new Emerald Express Chair, especially from snowboarders, several of whom required orthopaedic intervention after a couple of rides trying to find a way to use them comfortably. There was at least one gentleman who dubbed the approach to the new Catskinner Chair as the Death Crossing for Children, due no doubt to the confluence of family-zone beginners, park rats and people who could ski the bumps of Upper Catskinner. So, with optimism for the future, let’s call ops a 3 ... ironically, Vail Resorts’ comfortable ranking among North American skiers. Hmmm.... n


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BLUEBERRY HILL

NORDIC – THE LOOKOUT

BLUEBERRY HILL

WHITE GOLD

Spacious & renovated 2 storey Blueberry townhome. Features an open living room and dining room with large gourmet kitchen. In suite laundry, large boot room and additional storage completes the list of ‘must haves‘. Nightly rentals allowed. $1,299,000

COMING SOON! Ski or bike in/out from Creekside trails. Beautifully upgraded 3br, 2.5ba, 2027sq‘ townhome. Soak up views of Whistler Peak from SW facing decks. Fully furnished and turnkey ready to move in or rent nightly. $2,999,000

Located in the exclusive Blueberry Hill neighbourhood, this stunning property offers the opportunity to build your dream home on a large 20,904 sqft. lot. Amazing views of Whistler/ Blackcomb. $2,959,000

Fitzsimmons Walk means superior quality and outstanding location! With Wolf, Sub Zero and Asko appliances, two fireplaces, and double garage, this 4 bedroom town home, centrally located also has outstanding views. $2,995,000

Nick Swinburne *prec

Rob Boyd

Brigitta Fuess

Laura Wetaski

3106 St. Moritz Cresent

6-2500 Taluswood Place

604-932-8899

3430 Blueberry Drive

604-935-9172

5-7124 Nancy Greene Drive

604-932-0751

604 938 3798

BLUEBERRY

CREEKSIDE

ALPINE MEADOWS

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

Offering breathtaking views of both Whistler and Blackcomb, this spacious 4.5 bedrooms, 3 bathroom is fully furnished and turn key ready to be your perfect mountain getaway! Flexible zoning allows for nightly rentals. $1,899,000

1 bdrm ¼ share ownership in Evolution; located at the base of Creekside Gondola. Some features: in-suite laundry, double-sided gas fireplace, heated outdoor pool & 2 hot tubs, eucalyptus steam room, fitness centre, games room, media room, etc. $113,900

Outstanding value, solid build and design. 5 bedrooms, 5.5 bathrooms + revenue suite. Spacious floor plan, 2 car level entry garage, hot tub! Radiant in floor heat, fireplace, decks, mt. views! $2,995,000

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David Wiebe *prec

Bob Daniels

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204-3212 Blueberry Drive

114C-2020 London Lane

604-907-2074

8228 Valley Drive

604-966-8874

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604-932-7997

604-966-1364

ALTA VISTA

WHISTLER CREEK

EDGEWATER SECHELT

SQUAMISH

Meticulously kept, spacious 2 bedroom plus large loft, 3 bathrooms in Alta Vista Pointe. Tastefully renovated with granite counter-tops, SS appliances, wood doors, and heated tile floors in baths and foyer. You won’t want ot miss this one! $1,379,000

Enjoy this beautiful, fully renovated, turn-key unit and relish in the highest cap rate of any nightly rental property currently available on the market. Amenitites include pool, hot tub, sauna, garden space. $1,050,000

BEACHSIDE TOWNHOME in Omni’s beautiful Edgewater development. This 3 bedroom home includes over height ceilings, gourmet kitchen appliances, electric fireplace and both a patio and balcony to enjoy during the summer. $499,000

The perfect family home awaits! ‘Rivers Walk’ Townhouse in Brackendale. Modern 3.5 Bed/ 3 Bath/ 2,350sf. Open concept living featuring 2 living areas. Dbl garage, patio, hot tub & outdoor dining. Greenspace & mountain views. $799,000

Jenna Franze

Rachel Edwards

1503-3050 Hillcrest Drive

Jody Wright

604-935-4680

302 A/B – 2129 Lake Placid Road

Jeremy Fairley

604-935-9150

5984 Beachgate Lane

48-40632 Government Road

604-345-5415

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

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Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-4200


5503 - 4299 Blackcomb Way

$479,000

Spectacular view from this luxurious 1 bedroom in the heart of the Village. Minutes away from the Whistler Blackcomb lifts, restaurants and all the beauty that Whistler has to offer. Suites feature full kitchen, fireplace, balcony, Aveda bath amenities, soaker tub and floor-to-ceiling windows utilizing the mountain views.

Ursula Morel*

1

604.932.8629

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

9096 Corduroy Run Court

$2,999,950

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with a stunning main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen with ample sunshine. Easy to show.

Ann Chiasson

604.932.7651

9483 Emerald Drive

4

$2,695,000

#114D - 2020 London Lane

$122,500

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mountain at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Evolution offers custom finishings, contemporary design & comes fully equipped. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, steam room, games room, exercise room & media room.

Bob Cameron*

1

604.935.2214

#307 - 2222 Castle Drive

$1,175,000

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dustyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Looking for a special property? Now offered for sale, is this solid log post and beam Artisan quality chalet set on a private view lot! Large living spaces include four bedrooms, an office, 4.5 baths, media room with Bose surround sound, family room, as well as a piano area. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/9483emerald

Here you will find a quiet and comfortable 2 bedroom 2 bathroom townhome PLUS Garage! This meticulously cared for home has soaring vaulted ceilings bringing in lots of natural light and views of Sproatt, Rainbow and Brandywine Mountains. Cozy up to the wood burning fireplace and enjoy 2 balconies and a bonus landscaped private back patio and garden.

Bruce Watt

Chris Wetaski

Dana Friesen Smith

5

604.905.0737

8109 Cedar Springs Road

$1,998,000

604.938.2499

Anderson Lake

4

$399,000

Classic Whistler cabin on almost 1/3 of an acre in Alpine Meadows. A private, peaceful lot - an awesome location to call home with Meadow Park as our next door neighbor and 200 meters to the sports center. Centrally located with Whistler Secondary school, Alpine market, Green Lake and Nicklaus North golf course all within 5 minutes walk.

Featuring 100 feet of lakefront, on .68 of an acre, this property is situated on the east shore of pristine Anderson Lake, so it catches all the afternoon sun. Accessible by boat, the cabin was completely renovated in 2015, with about 936 sq ft of total living space. It boasts spectacular views up and down the lake and of the Bendor Mountain Range to the west.

Dave Beattie*

Dave Halliwell*

2

604.905.8855

9376 Emerald Drive

$1,350,000

604.932.7727

8556 Drifter Way

3

$2,599,000

2

604.902.3878

#6 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

$197,000

Adjacent to the Fairmont Chateau golf course, this rarely available, 1/5th interest in an immaculate 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhome boasts a spacious open layout , heated slate floors in bathroom. A cozy wood burning fireplace, large master bedroom with sitting area, and plenty of secure parking are among the many amenities.

Dave Sharpe

2

604.902.2779

8333 Mountain View Drive

$2,299,000

The only renovated, fairly priced, move-in ready 1,500 sf Whistler home with 2 beds, 2 baths + a 3 bedroom suite. Upstairs there is new hardwood flooring throughout, new thermal windows, ample matching built-in cupboards everywhere including linen closet and pantry. Matterport3D Showcase: bit.ly/9376EmeraldB

This property is the king of views and privacy in Alpine. Sit on top of the world of Whistler, enjoying your hot tub on a cliff edge overlooking just about everything, Blackcomb & Whistler Mountain, Green Lake, Armchair, Wedge. Need a mortgage helper? Monthly revenues of $5,500.00 to help

Spacious split level home with 5 bdrms, 5 baths and a 2 bdrm revenue suite earning $5000/mo.revenue! Fantastic southern facing view lot over 12500sf with dbl garage. Tons of potential with the home or great revenue while you make plans to build your dream home.

Denise Brown*

Doug Treleaven

James Collingridge

604.935.2013

2

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Pique Newsmagazine 2618  

Pique Newsmagazine for May 2, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2618  

Pique Newsmagazine for May 2, 2019

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