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Vol. 18 / No.31/ APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

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APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

YOUDECIDE:WHOSHOULDFILLTHEMAYOR’SSEAT?

Early voting is now in full swing until Tuesday, May 2, while Election Day is on Saturday, May 6. With eight candidates in the El Paso mayoral race, some might have their heads spinning. But that’s where we step in! Recently, Progress 321 – an organization of young professionals focused on improving the region’s quality of life – held a mayoral panel at the El Paso Club. Candidates Emma Acosta, Dee Margo, Elisa Morales, Jaime O. Perez, David Saucedo answered Progress 321 members’ questions regarding quality of life, handling disagreements and Juarez. To make deciding a bit easier, we’ve included some answers from the panel discussion for your purview. Missing from the discussion were candidates Jorge Artalejo, Willie Cager and Charles Stapler. We sent them the same questions and only received thorough e-mailed answers from Stapler before press time. Want to learn more about the candidates’ stances on different topics? Consider checking out these next two events: Talk El Paso and News Radio 690 AM Live Mayoral Forum: Sunday, April 30, 5-7 p.m. at Hope and Anchor, 4012 N Mesa St. UTEP Town Hall: Monday, May 1, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Tomas Rivera Conference Center in UTEP’s Union East Building, 500 W. University Ave.

Emma Acosta: Was the Jorge Artalejo: Substitute first woman to serve as the Dis- teacher, perennial political cantrict 3 city Rep. in 2008 and was didate. re-elected in 2009 and 2013, retired head of city department.

Willie Cager: YISD coach, Cager Foundation founder, member of Texas Western College team that won the 1966 NCAA basketball championship.

Elisa Morales: Work history Jaime O. Perez: Teacher, includes being a program coordi- chief of staff to former El Paso nator for the Hispanic Scholarship County Judge Anthony Cobos. fund, a researcher at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and a community liaison for the El Paso Behavioral Health System.

David Saucedo: AccounCharles Stapler: Retired tant, owner of Saucedo Lock Co., postal worker, former member member of Texas State Board of of the El Paso County Historical Nursing, former El Paso Boys & Commission. Girls Club board president.

QUESTIONS FOR CANDIDATES: Q. Apart from the quality of life bond projects that are underway – including the multipurpose center, zoo improvements, children’s museum and community parks – what specific quality of life projects are important to you and how will you dedicate yourself to seeing them to fruition well past your tenure as mayor? Saucedo: The biggest elephant in the room is the arena. That’s the biggest ticketed item and we need to get that done, once and for all. I’ve been against the current location. I’m for the arena, however ... we are not 120 PORFIRIO DIAZ El Paso, TX 79902 ph: (915) 534-4422 fax: (915) 534-7919 www.whatsuppub.com facebook.com/whatsupweekly Twitter: @whatsupweekly PUBLISHER Secret F. Wherrett (x114) • secret@whatsuppub.com EDITOR Victoria G. Molinar (x140) • editor@whatsuppub.com

championing our history and our heritage. We are trying to keep comparing ourselves to San Antonio, to Oklahoma City, to Nashville – we are from the world famous west Texas town of El Paso. We are descendants of pioneers and trailblazers. Our identity is stronger than any of those other communities, but yet, we’re willing to bulldoze one of the first neighborhoods in El Paso to put in an arena. We need to start looking at this very carefully because we’re going to be on the hook for a lot of money. Acosta: I do want to talk about streets because that’s something that’s number one in many people’s minds. We’ve been

doing a piece meal job of fixing one street here and one street there. I want to start a policy where we go in and fix that entire neighborhood. I want to make sure that you get involved in government. I think it’s very important that you, the community, let us know what it is you want. The other thing that I have championed and I will continue to champion is supporting local businesses and helping local businesses grow, because when you grow, that money stays here in El Paso. Of course, I’m always championing veteran’s issues and the disabled community. Margo: The first quality of life bond election we ever passed in this community, ever in its history, was in 2000 – I was fortunate enough to chair that – which contributed to the African exhibit at the Zoo,

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Edgar B. Gonzalez (x130) graphics3@elpasoinc.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Angela Saavedra • asaavedra@elpasoinc.com

PROOFREADER Miguel De Santiago

GRAPHIC ARTIST Xanthe Miller xmiller@elpasoinc.com

CONTRIBUTORS Denise Nelson-Prieto, Steve Kaplowitz, Steve Escajeda, Eric Acosta, Isabel A. Walters, John del Rosario, Austin Savage, Luis Gonzalez, Alan Sculley, Lisa Martinez, Lisa Amaya, Khayla Golucke, Bethany Blundell, Xcelzin Pena

PHOTOGRAPHER (x138) photos@elpasoinc.com

Evan A. Rivera erivera@elpasoinc.com EVENT SALES AND MARKETING Erin Pfirman (x133) • erin@elpasoinc.com SOCIAL MEDIA PROMOTIONS Deborah Grado dgrado@elpasoinc.com (x104)

CALENDAR Eric M. Acosta calendar@whatsuppub.com *Deadline Monday, noon

Dee Margo: Businessman, former Texas state representative, president of the appointed EPISD Board of Managers during its two-year existence.

the History Museum Downtown, etcetera. The legacy I was happy to leave is that we completed the projects on time and on budget. I’m not thinking far beyond some grandiose project for the future. I think we need to complete what we’ve got here. We don’t need another San Jacinto Plaza taking another four or five years and no restrooms. Let’s move on. Let’s do it correctly. It sounds like you’re asking, ‘What do you want to do as mayor, specifically?’ In my position, I’m going to listen to what the people want to do. I think the biggest thing we can do, which would be a surprise to a lot of people, would be completing everything on time and on budget. Morales: A competitive advantage is Continued on 5

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CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Martha Fernandez (x109) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Debra Fraire (x113) • ads@elpasoinc.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Hector Ramirez (x111) • Judy Ramirez (x110) • Christian Pistella (x134) • Deborah Grado (x104)

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APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

5

MAYORAL RACE

Continued from 4

something that you have that others don’t – a differentiator, right? We are not investing in our natural spaces. Hueco Tanks is outside of the city, but we can collaborate with them and we have started to. This is a world-class destination for rock climbers. The Franklin Mountains – those are the things that we need to be investing in – our differentiators. But also things like our seniors. Our senior citizen centers are closing. They’re starting to consolidate. We’re hurting a huge part of our community. We don’t have the capacity to address veteran homelessness. Those things aren’t addressed in the quality of life bonds, but these are our communities. Perez: In the last eight years, we have not even achieved three percent of [economic] growth annually. We cannot afford to continue expanding. Not only that, we’re going to have to figure out how to contract. So any conversation about programs in the future or bond programs in the future are simply not realistic conversations. Our conversation has to be, “What are we going to do? How are we going to handle economic contraction?” Stapler: Even though the multipurpose center (arena) is a good idea, it should be placed in an area that would give us a viable venue, not just to tear down a neighborhood so a few people can get a big payout. Just recently, UTEP has offered the city a deal in which to build a larger venue to house 18,000 seats. Too many people in this town ignored this deal. Q. You have now been elected mayor and are sitting at a council meeting. Two representatives get imbued in a personal argument during the meeting. How do you resolve this issue in real time and what work will do you do behind the scenes to resolve overall divisiveness? Morales: As the Mayor, it’s not my responsibility to be a baby sitter. There are things that we can do to create a momentum, which is starting with issues we

agree on and move forward. I’m a citizen that is electing my representative. I want them to be very tenacious in advocating for me. Perez: We don’t need to be enforcing anything. If a representative gets into it with another representative, that’s up to their districts and their districts need to re-elect them or not. It is not the role of the mayor. We don’t have to enforce professionalism. We don’t have to enforce anything. If someone comes to the podium and is upset about something and they are a little out of hand in terms of their words, so be it. They’re responsible for themselves. I don’t believe in telling people how they should live and what they should do and how they should do anything. Gloves are off. The accountability mechanism is elections. Saucedo: I would take an immediate recess, go to the back and tell them to cut it out. This is the attitude that’s been happening at city council, and it’s just an embarrassment. We’re not talking about the things that are important. I’ve been a part of community groups that have gone to try and advocate for things in city council, and there’s bickering. We’re hiding cellphones. This is embarrassing. We are elected officials. We need to act accordingly and always put the interest of the people first instead of our personal interest. We need to all come together. Acosta: I’m not one of those combative city representatives. I don’t bring emotion. I bring solutions and I bring facts. As the mayor, it is your responsibility to make sure that the business of the city continues without having disruption in the council. The first thing I would say, “Is there something that you need to tell the rest of the community that we don’t know about?” Number one. Number two: we have a charter provision that allows the City Council to remove a disruptive City Representative, and I would entertain that motion. I would say if they’re being so disruptive, then perhaps they need to be removed. And that would be the last time that they do that. Margo: I’m not in favor of unvarnished, released energy on a public setting. I’m going to come with the premise that everybody wants what’s best for this

community and that’s how we’re aligned. And then we’ll work through whatever relationship issues there are, but they will not be exposed at the council. We have accountability responsibilities and we have policy setting responsibilities. You hold the city manager accountable, and the city manager holds his department heads accountable for their performance. You should set the tone. We’ve got to be adults. Stapler: I was in City Hall during one of those sessions. Unfortunately, the presiding officer did not have the finesse to quiet down the combatants. I would try and find out the personal weaknesses and strengths of each councilperson in order to get an even flow between all of the councilpersons. There will always be disagreements between people, but we must learn do disagree without being disagreeable. Q. How will you protect our mountains from development and encourage ecotourism? Do you have any ideas for increasing sustainability in El Paso? Morales: This is something that’s really important to me. This is our competitive advantage. Not many cities have a state park nestled within their city. It’s really important to protect that. There’s also been development that’s planned. There was some money in the quality of life bonds that could maybe be used. There are many eco and advocacy groups here. This is very, very important to me – protecting our competitive advantage, protecting our natural spaces. Saucedo: I’ve been talking about space preservation since September. I’ve gone to the Green Party and everyone here in town has been talking about it. It’s one of our strongest assets. It’s beautiful here in El Paso. This is where the Rocky Mountains end, right here in El Paso. I think that’s one of our strengths. Acosta: We do need to protect our mountains. Sustainability: We have a desalination plant, the largest in-land desalination plant in the entire world, and I encourage everyone to go to a tour. I encourage you to taste the water before it goes into the desalination plant and afterwards. It’s a really interesting tour to take. Margo: When I was in the legislature,

they wanted to shut down the tramway. We were able to keep it open. Those are the kinds of things that we need to make sure to do. We need to have relationships with our state Parks and Wildlife folks in Austin to maintain what we have here. And we need to avoid the scarring from the development standpoint on the mountain, as I’ve listened to my spouse say to me for many, many years. Perez: I’ve been an environmentalist my whole life, and I was one of the people that fought that Sierra [Blanca] nuclear dump. The public service board has an enormous amount of land. Some land swaps could possibly help in terms of preserving some of the mountain. Stapler: I was appointed to the Open Space Advisory Board by Mayor Leaser last year and have been on record in supporting using funds from the storm water funds in order to buy and preserve lands along Franklin Mountain. I am also on record as a supporter of keeping Castner Range in public hands. Q. When was the last time you went to Juarez? What are very simple actions you would take to work closer with Juarez? Saucedo: I went about a month ago with Ms. Cecilia Levine. I went to a trade show. We need to have respect. El Paso has been dictating to Juarez how it should be and we’re not at the table as peers. I will come to the table with Juarez as peers. This is something I’m taking very seriously because very soon, if we don’t take Juarez seriously, Juarez is going to move on and do something amazing and we’re going to be stuck here with our pants down looking around like, ‘Oh what happened? Where did we lose our opportunity?’ I’m in Juarez all the time. Perez: Last time I went to Juarez was a month ago and I no longer go because I got a phone call trying to lure me to the Mexican airport. I imagine that’s because of the notoriety of the mayor’s campaign. Juarez is becoming more and more violent as we speak. Deaths are up and I think it is a very dangerous place to go. That said – the problem with the government is that their government only goes Continued on 6


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WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM Continued from 5

on six-year cycles and they don’t have the continuity that we do in our system. That’s the reason we have to work more collaboratively with Juarez. Morales: I did go a month ago. I go every month to visit family and friends, and we go and eat. I did a medical mission trip to Oaxaca in September. One of the things that is very interesting – I’ve been meeting with some people from Jaurez and they are developing health tourism that will benefit El Paso. Talking with these other stakeholders, not just in a professional or governmental sense, allows us to know the commerce that they’re doing and how we can benefit. Margo: We’re really one metropolitan area. It’s been said. We have been for over 400 years, whether the recognition is there or not. I don’t go over as often as my spouse, Adair, does. She’s one of the founders of the FEMAP foundation. She goes over almost weekly. We both have our passes to go back and forth. It’s critical. We also need to include Southern New Mexico as part of the whole process. Acosta: I went about two months ago to Juarez to an economic development forum at the Tec de Monterey. A lot of the issues that Juarez has are the issues that El Paso has. They talk about workforce. They talk about education. It is the same kind of things that we are facing. This is the reason that we need make sure that we engage Juarez, that we talk to their officials over there, that we talk to the associations in Juarez. The maquilla industry is very important to this community. For every six jobs, we have one in El Paso and we need to make sure that we continue to work together. Stapler: I have a doctor’s prescription for a medication that I get from a drug store, usually on a Monday, about every couple of months. I usually visit the plaza area and have a meal while I am there. I have not had the occasion to meet the new mayor, but look forward to that moment.

APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

IF YOU WANT YOUR VOICE TO BE HEARD, VOTE GUEST COLUMN:

___ Editor’s Note: During the 8th annual Women’s History Month conference at UTEP, Women’s Intercultural Center executive director Mary Carter helped lead a lecture called “Women, Power and Politics: Enhancing Learning Outcomes through Information Literacy and Community Engagement.” Throughout Mary Carter, executive director of her profession, she required the Women’s Intercultural Center exceptional skills in working with city officials and advocating for the rights of underserved communities. Carter’s lecture left a strong message that young community members must be active in their city government in order to create the changes they want to see. Because of this, we invited her to be our guest columnist for this week’s issue to talk about the importance of voting in elections such as the one that’s approaching on May 6. ___

The ugly fact about the state of Texas is that a great number of people young and old do not exercise their right to vote, particularly when it comes to mayoral races. According to a study conducted by Portland State University in January 2017, we lack a healthy democracy: “The results show that in most cities, few people vote in mayoral elections, and those who do vote tend to be older and more affluent than the population at large and

less likely to be people of color. This raises important questions about social justice and public policy related to local elections.” In the most recent mayoral election in the city of El Paso 11.6 percent of individuals age 59 voted, turnout for young adults ages 18 to 35 was 4 percent while 30.6 percent were adults ages 65 and up. Each voter speaks for themselves and 25 other members of their community which include family members under the age of 18 and friends who are residents or are undocumented. Not casting a vote not only affects you, it affects those 25 people that count on you to be their voice. Why are they silenced? Because in politics, people who don’t vote don’t count as much as those who do. “I didn’t vote because it won’t make a difference,” is what a large number of the Millennials I encounter through my work at the Women’s Intercultural Center tell me. Yet, in not voting, they are ceding decisions for their future on the older more affluent population. Every day, local elected officials in the City of El Paso make important and influential decisions about core services like police and fire, drinking water, economic development and roads and public transportation. When voter turnout is low, a small percentage of residents influence policy choices that can have a positive or negative impact in the life of the city’s residents. That means YOU! Voting is the most powerful tool a U.S. and Naturalized Citizen is granted. Don’t squander it. Look at the areas throughout the city and notice the differences. The side of town with good schools, paved and clean roads are places that have high voter turnout. The places that have bad schools and broken down roads are most likely areas where people don’t vote. Voting makes your voice heard and gives you the power to help transform and improve your community. Make a difference, become a person of influence. Vote in your upcoming mayoral election.

DID YOU KNOW? You can place CLEAN plastic food containers into the blue curbside recycling bins! • When you place any type of item with food residue into the blue recycling bin, it contaminates the other clean products, which results in dirty recyclable items. • Remember, CLEAN plastic food containers are accepted.

Citizens may call 311 (915-212-6000) or visit www.recyclerightEP.com for more information


APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

7

SUN CITY CRAFT BEER FEST RETURNS WITH NEW PARTNERSHIPS

Returning to the festival this year is the human foosball setup, along with many other games sponsored by Dave & Buster’s.

By Victoria G. Molinar comment: @whatsupweekly

Back for its fourth year, the Sun City Craft Beer Festival is going bigger than ever thanks to El Paso Live teaming up with festival founder Nahum Avila for the second time. “We had about 3,000 attendees last year, and this year we’re expecting about 5 to 6,000 and a big part of that was because of the success we had last year,” said Ryan Lympus, assistant general manager for El Paso Live. “I think people were very happy to see the variety of beer that we had and just the overall atmosphere of the festival.” Although Avila sold the festival to El Paso Live, he is still the main organizer behind the event, networking with breweries and coordinating the countless details it takes to organize a festival of this magnitude. “It all started when I had a beer tasting – I used to host about 100 people – and one of my friends told me I should start a beer fest,” Avila said. So in 2013, he gave it a shot and held his first festival at Cleveland Square Park. “I didn’t know a lot of people would go,” Avila said. “I started getting all this support – from sponsors to people around the city. Ticket sales went crazy. That’s when I knew I’d have to make it bigger and close the streets.” With over 50 breweries coming to the fest, more than 150 local and regional craft beers will be on site for attendees to sip. “Of those, we have 20 brewers actually coming to the festival,” Lympus said. “They’ll be there at their tents talking to people, really giving them information about the different brews. People will be able to talk to them about the different flavors and notes and why that beer is special.”

Photos courtesy of Nahum Avila

El Paso’s four local breweries – Deadbeach Brewery, El Paso Brewing Company, Ode Brewing Company and Sun Brewing Company – will also be at the event to offer beer that’s exclusive to the festival. Staff from El Paso Home Brewing Equipment and Supplies will offer beer 101 demonstrations throughout the fest. “You’ll be able to smell all the aromas and learn the basics – the types of beer there are, what gives it its color and how to create the flavors,” Avila said. For the first time, VIP ticket holders will get to enter the festival an hour early and enjoy exclusive beer made by local brew masters and complimentary meals. Expanding the festival’s footprint this year, organizers added food trucks and live art down the pedestrian pathway reaching the Durango Bridge. They also added more indoor space to allow beer-lovers to escape the heat and enjoy more seating, vendors and a liquor garden. “With twice as many people expected, we kind of wanted to spread it out a bit more and double the number of staff pouring the beer so that we could keep the lines down and keep people moving,” Lympus said. Also new to the festival are several partnerships. Part of why organizers are expecting a spike in attendance is because they teamed up with radio giant iHeartMedia. Now that Whole Foods Market and Dave & Buster’s is open, the two successful chains have also partnered with El Paso Live for this year’s festival. Whole Foods is the sponsor of the festival mug, and after the festival attendees can take their mug to Thunderbird Taproom at Whole Foods to get $1 off a draft beer of their choice for the rest of the year. Dave & Buster’s will be in charge of the game zone, which will include arcade

FESTIVAL BREWERY LIST

Nahum Avila, founder of the Sun City Craft Beer Festival.

games, human foosball, corn hole, trash can pong and a giant Jenga. The “Make a Wish” game, an old-school arcade console with Pac-Man, Galaga and other classic games, will also be at the event. The console takes cash, and proceeds from it will go towards the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Other games will be free to play. Live music will return to the festival, this time featuring Garden Grove, Austin Freeman and The Other Half at the KHEY stage and a Power 102.1 DJ at the Power stage. With countless beer options, brewers to pick the brains of and non-stop entertainment, being bored at an event of this magnitude seems almost impossible. “This festival feels like a dream come

LOCAL BREWERIES:

DEADBEACH BREWERY EL PASO BREWING COMPANY ODE BREWING COMPANY SUN BREWING COMPANY ACE CIDER (CALIFORNIA) ALAMO BEER COMPANY (TEXAS) AUDACITY BREW HOUSE (TEXAS) AVERY (COLORADO) BISHOP CIDER COMPANY (TEXAS) COMMUNITY BREWING COMPANY (TEXAS) DEEP ELLUM BREWING COMPANY (TEXAS) DESCHUTES BREWING (OREGON) DOGFISH HEAD BREWERY (DELAWARE) FOUNDERS BREWING (MICHIGAN) GREEN FLASH BREWING COMPANY (CALIFORNIA) LAGUNITAS BREWING (CALIFORNIA )

true,” Avila said. “I just want to thank everybody for going. This year is going to be amazing. I hope everybody has a good time and drinks responsibly.”

WHAT’S UP

Sun City Craft Beer Festival

Saturday, April 29, 1-8 p.m. El Paso Convention Center Plaza, 1 Civic Center Plaza $30 general admission, $80 VIP (prices will increase closer to the festival) Tickets at SunCityCraftBeerFest.com and the Plaza Theatre box office. More info at ElPasoLive.com or 915231-1100 NEW BELGIUM BREWING (COLORADO) OASIS TEXAS BREWING COMPANY (TEXAS) ODELL BREWING COMPANY (COLORADO) STONE BREWING (CALIFORNIA) SWEETWATER BREWING COMPANY (GEORGIA) ALASKAN BREWING COMPANY (ALASKA) AYINGER BREWERY (GERMANY) LINDEMAN’S (BELGIUM) SAMUEL SMITH BREWERY (ENGLAND) BROOKLYN BREWERY (NEW YORK) OSKAR BLUES (COLORADO) MARTIN HOUSE BREWING COMPANY (TEXAS) ALESMITH BREWING COMPANY (CALIFORNIA) AUSTIN EAST CIDERS (TEXAS) ABITA BREWING (LOUISIANA) ROGUE BREWING (OREGON) FIRESTONE WALKER (CALIFORNIA) ...AND MANY MORE

With the Sun City Craft Beer Fest app, attendees can view the festival map and keep track of the beers they’ve tried.


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KAPPY’S CORNER By Steve Kaplowitz comment: @whatsupweekly

The search is finally over for UTEP’s next women’s basketball head coach. On Monday, Kevin Baker was named head coach of the Miners. Baker had spent the previous two seasons with Angelo State University and was with UT Tyler prior to his time with the Belles. Despite having no Division 1 experience, Baker has been successful at both Division 2 and Division 3, guiding both Angelo State and UT Tyler to the NCAA Tournament. He also has ten years of high school coaching experience in East Texas, and has just one losing record in 15 seasons as a head coach. I sat down with Baker to discuss his coaching career, getting his big break at UTEP and what Miners fans should expect from his teams. What has the last 48 hours been like for you? It’s been a good 48 hours. I’ve met tons of people on campus the last couple of days and taken a great tour of the city, and people don’t know this, but this is the very first time that I’ve been in El Paso in

my life. I am thrilled to death to be here. You mentioned at your press conference that you are familiar with Keitha Adams and her coaching job at UTEP. You know her success here all these years doesn’t go unnoticed in the women’s basketball world. It’s kind of like if you go to a high school and ask around, they’ll tell you who the best teachers are. We all know who the best coaches are and Keitha’s name would always come up. She doesn’t know me at all, but I’ve heard her name the last 16 years with the quality job that she has done. I wasn’t surprised to see her get the Wichita State job, but I was surprised to see her leave (UTEP). How big is your hiring at UTEP for Division 2 and Division 3 coaches in college basketball? I’m so lucky that Bob Stull and the committee took a hard look at my resume and ignored the number by the D. If they don’t do that, I’m probably not here. There’s a lot of good (coaches) out there that if you just give them an opportunity, they are going to do well. I’ve noticed this hiring cycle that a lot of D2 coaches are getting Division 1 jobs and I think it’s great. What did you learn as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at West Texas A&M? I cut my teeth in recruiting at WT. That was the place where I learned how to recruit, I learned about what we call “the grind” of recruiting, and I hung around

the men’s coaches a lot, I hung around the football coaches a lot, and they really taught me the ins and outs of how to go the extra mile. After 10 years as a high school coach, it still took you another five years before you received your first big break as a college basketball head coach with UT Tyler. And a break it was! Even the five years I was at WT, I applied for so many head coaching jobs and nobody was taking me for interviews or anything like that. With every rejection, it seemed like it fired me up more to get to this level. I always said that somebody was going to take a chance on me. I don’t know who it’s going to be, but someone is going to take a chance and Howard Patterson called and offered me the job at UT Tyler and the rest is history. What are your teams known for? I would love to say that our teams are known for how they defend. For the most part, the way we defend has been the hallmark for what we do, but this last year at Angelo State we were one of the top scoring teams in the country, and we didn’t defend very well. So, the answer to that question is we are known for just winning. How will you handle the comparisons between your program at UTEP and your predecessor, Keitha Adams? This is a very cliché answer but as a coach, I can’t afford to look at it that way.

APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

Baker comes to El Paso from Angelo State University, where he posted a combined record of 50-14 in two seasons (2015-17). Photo by J.R. Hernandez (UTEP Communications)

I have to be the best Kevin Baker I can be. If I start looking at my successes versus somebody else’s, I would think that I would be down a lot. A friend of mine told me that if you get into coaching for the wins, you’ll never win enough. If you get into coaching for the money, you’ll never make enough. So, those are the things that I try to think about. Since 1997, Steve Kaplowitz has hosted “Sportstalk” weekday afternoons 4-7 p.m. on 600 ESPN El Paso. Over the last 17 years, he has also worked for UTEP and NMSU as a play-by-play broadcaster, for UTEP telecasts on Time Warner Cable and for KDBC-TV and KTSM-TV as a sports anchor/reporter. You can contact Steve by emailing him at skaplowitz@krod.com.


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LOCAL INITIATIVES, EVENTS PUSH FOR AN ECO-FRIENDLY REGION By Denise Nelson-Prieto comment: @whatsupweekly

As Earth Month comes to a close, educators and activists in El Paso and Las Cruces aim to send out the message that Earth Day is truly every day. To teach the community about sustainable practices and raise awareness about environmental issues, the Fountains at Farah will host an all-day Earth Month celebration while the Southwest Environmental Center will lead a People’s Climate March in Las Cruces on Saturday, April 29. Called GRO – which stands for growth, resilience and opportunity – the Fountains’ free event will include yoga, live music and speakers and exhibitors who will discuss simple ways to go green. The all-day celebration is a collaborative effort between the city’s Office of Resiliency and Sustainability, the Humane Society, the El Paso Zoo and other local groups. “We’re trying to make our community a better place and educate people more on things they can do to help,” said Eleni Ogas, marketing and events coordinator for the Fountains at Farah. “We wanted to celebrate Earth Day and decided to do it the following weekend so we wouldn’t be competing with too many other events and give people a chance to come out.” One of the groups presenting will be the Center for Environmental Resource

Management (CERM) from the University of Texas at El Paso. “Apart from the bee keepers, master gardeners and yoga going on at the event, I’ll be presenting information on sustainability and having giveaways,” said Luis Perez, the group’s sustainability coordinator. “Sustainability is kind of like safety and health; it affects everybody and we can make a difference if we do our part.” Apart from their presence at GRO, CERM has ongoing sustainability projects at UTEP including an eco science fair, a planting party and plans to implement a comprehensive recycling program on campus with the help of university group Engineers Without Borders, “We’re working with a recycling company that’s going to help us augment the program to assist us in doing a better job with recycling,” Perez said.

A march for a change

change is one of the major drivers.” Marchers are encouraged to wear blue T-shirts to “evoke a big flowing river.” A slew of presenters will discuss various environmental topics after the march. New Mexico State University climatologist David DuBois, state senators and local activists make up the diverse group of speakers who will talk about key environmental issues. “Part of the big message of the People’s Climate March comes down to keeping fossil fuels in the ground and identifying the disproportionate effects that burning them has on the poor, women, immigrants and people of color,” Sloan said. Sloan said that while an individual’s actions might make a small impact, grassroots-level efforts can go a long way in getting federal, state and local

governments to implement changes that will address the needs of the earth and its inhabitants. WHAT’S UP

GRO–EARTH MONTH CELEBRATION

Saturday, April 29, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Fountains at Farah, 8889 Gateway West Blvd. Includes live music, yoga and presentations Free, all ages More info: facebook.com/ElPasoSustainability, 915-212-0115

PEOPLE’S CLIMATE MARCH Saturday, April 29, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Albert Johnson Park (off Picacho Avenue and Main Street; march down Water Street) Las Cruces, New Mexico More info: facebook.com/Southwest. Environmental.Center, 575-522-5552

The People’s Climate March is a national event organized by U.S.-based group 350.org. More than 30 sister marches will take place on Saturday, including one at Albert Johnson Park in Las Cruces. “One of our big missions is to slow down the trend of mass extinction, especially as it plays out here in the Southwest region,” said the center’s field organizer, Peter Sloan. “Climate

EPCON COSPLAYERS GO ALL OUT Photos by Victoria G. Molina

The Convention Center was packed with countless familiar faces this past weekend during the El Paso Comic Convention, a three-day extravaganza of all things pop culture. Attendees dressed up as their favorite characters from video games, comic books, movies and TV shows. Along with cosplay (aka costume play) contests, convention goers got to enjoy tabletop tournaments, live music by online sensation Harp Twins, workshops on top-

ics such as miniature airbrushing and panel discussions with celebrity guests. This year’s EPCON was graced by the presence of famous actor and El Paso native Alan Tudyk (“Star Wars: Rogue One”), Ninja Turtles co-creator Kevin Eastman, “Saw” franchise actress Dina Meyer, “Pirates of the Caribbean” actor Martin Klebba and many others. To keep up with EPCON and see what organizers are up to next, visit facebook. com/ElPasoComicCon.

Jonathan Pini as Big Daddy from ‘BioShock’

Stefani Hinojos and Rhiley Alexandra as characters from ‘Overwatch’

Andrea Sandoval and Pablo Velarde as Aqua and Terra from ‘Kingdom Hearts’

Ursula Ofsow and Scharlotte Ofsow as an Ewok and Princess Leia from ‘Star Wars’

Jesus Abraham Coronado as Wing Zero from ‘Gundam Wing: Endless Waltz’


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CALENDAR

WED. APRIL 26

The State Line Music Series: Austin Freeman Band Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371 or countyline.com/StateLineMusic. html. Beer 101 Class focused on brewing basics, beer profiles and styles. Deadbeach Brewery, 406 Durango St., 6-9 p.m., free, 855-915-2337, deadbeach.com. Twin Peaks Rock music performance with opener Chrome Pony and Post Animal. Doors pop at 8 p.m. All ages. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9 p.m., $14 adv., $16 door, lowbrowpalace.com. UTEP Symphonic Winds Wind and percussion get down, get down. Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall, 500 W. University Ave., 7:30-9 p.m., $5 adult, $3 student/military, free UTEP faculty/student/staff, utep.music. edu. A Lot Like Birds, Hearts Like Lions Post-hardcore music performance. All ages.Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7 p.m., $13, holdmyticket.com. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘The Red Turtle’ 2016 animated film, co-produced by Wild Bunch and Studio Ghibli, tells the story of a man shipwrecked on a deserted island who meets a giant red turtle.¬†Event runs April 21-27, 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Wed., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Sun., 1:30 p.m. April 27. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m., $7, $6 matinee/seniors/military/ student, $5 Wed., 575-524-8287, mesillavalleyfilm.org. Chris Tomlin Christian music. Openers: Big Daddy Weave, Phil Wickham, Zach Williams, Mosaic MSC and Jason Barton. Don Haskins Center, 151 Glory Rd., 5 p.m.-11 p.m., eventbrite.com.

Yoga Humans pretzel to nirvana. Happens every Wed. 150 Sunset, 150 E. Sunset Rd., 6:30 p.m., 915-5851150, 150sunset.com. Adult Coloring Book Night vol. 5 People color in line drawings. Featuring the art of Gino Madrid. Tonight is a popup ramen and beer dinner. TradeCraft, 3737 N. Mesa St., 7 p.m.-2 a.m., free, facebook.com/TradeCraftep. ‘Anything Goes’ Cole Porter musical about the people aboard the S.S. American. Event runs April 21-May 7, 7 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 1:30 p.m. April 23, 2:30 p.m. no dinner matinee April 30 and May 7. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $27.50$46.50, 915-747-5234, ticketmaster. com. 16th Annual Southwest Administrative Professionals Conference Business owners from across the region network. Event runs April 26-27. Headstart Multipurpose Center, 11670 Chito Samaniego, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-838-1000, apcsouthwest.com. Sadiki Fuller Standup comedy. Event runs April 26-30, 7:30 p.m. Two late shows at 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Ages 17+ El Paso Comic Strip, 1201 Airway Blvd., 7:30 p.m., $6-$12, 915-7795233, laff2nite.com. Business Blend Mixer Music, food and networking. RSVP required. International, 114A Mills Ave., 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m., $30 nonmembers, $20 members, 915-566-4066. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors, and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. The Hub of Human Innovation, 500 West Overland, Suite 230, 9-10 a.m., free, 915-321-3123, 1millioncups. com/elpaso.

THURS. APRIL 27 ‘Anything Goes’ Cole Porter musical about the people aboard the S.S. American. For details see Wed., April 26.

CALENDAR APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

APRIL-MAY 2017 APRIL 28-MAY 7

‘MEDEA’ BRINGS GREEK TRAGEDY TO UTEP

By Bethany Blundell comment: @whatsupweekly n a tale of vengeance and the pursuit of love, the Department of Theatre and Dance at UTEP will bring Euripides’ “Medea” to life starting this Friday, April 28. “It’s a Greek tragedy written almost 3,000 years ago, and most people think that sounds boring, but it’s not,” director Jay Stratton said. “It is exciting, it is scary, there’s violence, there’s bloodshed, there’s angry couples fighting. It’s good, good stuff. It’s one of the greatest revenge stories of scorned love ever written.” The 80-minute play revolves around Medea, who met and instantly fell in love with Jason on the Isle of Colchis. Upon realizing she wanted nothing more than to be with him, she went through great lengths to win his love, including moving to a foreign city and enduring the taunts of the local townspeople. When Jason finds a beautiful young princess to pursue, Medea’s heart is shattered. With a broken heart, MeWHAT’S UP dea becomes desperate and commits an unthinkable act of vengeance. The play ends with what Stratton Friday-Sunday, April 28-30 calls “a shocking surprise.” Stratton Thursday-Sunday, May 4-7 said he wasn’t involved in the initial 7:30 p.m. Fridays/Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays process to choose which play would be performed, but he is thrilled he Wise Family Theatre (2nd Floor, Fox Fine Arts building) was able to direct it. University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W University Ave. UTEP students began preparTickets: $14 general admission; $12 non-UTEP ing for their performances in early students, military, groups 10+, UTEP staff/alumni, $9 March, and have practiced rigorously UTEP students since. More info: 915-747-5118, Stratton said the show consists of utep.edu/liberalarts/theatre-dance many tricky technical effects and he is looking forward to seeing them come to life during the actual performance. “I genuinely think that people who come to this play will not be disappointed,” Stratton said.

I

‘Medea’


12 Last Thursdays Gallery Crawl and Art Market Art galleries, restaurants and bars host one-time only exhibits. Art market. Live music. Food trucks, too. Downtown El Paso, 6-9 p.m., facebook.com/LastThursdaysEP. Purchasing Power Lunch Learn more about EPISD’s $668 million bond and how to do business with EPISD. Wyndham El Paso Airport Hotel, 2027 Airway Blvd., 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., $70 non-member, $35 member, 915629-6700, elpaso.org. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘The Red Turtle’ 2016 animated film, co-produced by Wild Bunch and Studio Ghibli, tells the story of a man shipwrecked on a deserted island who meets a giant red turtle. For details see Wed., April 26. Cowboy Draft Party in the Desert Watch sports teams purchase humans with Kevin Smith(1992 Cowboys 1st round pick) and Jaylon Smith(2016 Cowboys 2nd round pick). Oh, and yeah, duh, Rod Smith and David Buehler are also going to be kickin it hot sauce, too. Doors open at 4 p.m. Gringo Theory Patio Bar, 11410 Montana Ave., 6 p.m.-10 p.m., $30 (includes 1 autograph, like so tubular!), 915-303-5521. Stargazing Hueco Tanks staff leads stargazing, stories and planetary viewing. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site, 6900 Hueco Tanks Rd., 7 p.m., $7, free age 12 and under, 915-849-6684, tpwd.texas.gov. 16th Annual Southwest Administrative Professionals Conference Business owners from across the region network. For details see Wed., April 26. The United States Honor Flag Fundraiser Banquet A dinner to honor the sacrifice of police, EMS, fire and military members. Venue Event Center, 5585 S. Main St., 6-9 p.m., $25, $250 table, 575-522-1232, ushonorflag.org. Dining Out for Life Fifteen eateries in the El Paso area donate 25% of their diners’ food bill to Border AIDS Partnership. Participating restaurants: 5 Points Bistro, Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, Cuartito Azul (east), Hillside Coffee, Independent Burger, L&J Cafe, Magic Pan Bistro, Malolam, Mesa Stret Bar & Grill, Ode, Pot Au Feu, Rib Hut, Salt Box and Tratoria Bella Sera, All day, diningoutforlife.com. Sadiki Fuller Standup comedy. For details see Wed., April 26. For King & Country Pop music performance. Inn of the Mountain Gods, 287 Carrizo Canyon Rd., 8 p.m., $22-$55, innofthemountaingods. com. Take Back the Night & Candlelight Vigil College campuses across the nation unite to combat sexual violence, bring awareness to the plight of victim’s of abuse and sex violence. Featuring keynote speaker: Staceyann Chin. UTEP Tomas Rivera Conference Center, 500 W. University Ave., Union East, Rm. 308, 7-9 p.m., free. Frazier Shows Spring Carnival Food, rides and games. Event runs April 2730, 6-9 p.m. Thurs., 6 p.m.-12 a.m. Fri., 3 p.m.-12 a.m. Sat., 3-10 p.m. Sun. Pan American Center, 1810 E. University Ave., 6-9 p.m., free admisison.

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM 24th Ann. Women’s Luncheon Food and business professionals in a network empowerment. Featured guest is author of “The Freedom Writers Diary” Erin Gruwell. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 11:30 a.m., $100, elpasolive.com/calendar. UTEP Symphony Band Winds and percussion blow the place apart. Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall, 500 W. University Ave., 7:30-9 p.m., $5 adult, $3 student/military, free UTEP faculty/student/staff, utep.music. edu.

FRI. APRIL 28 Las Cruces Country Music Festival Headliners: Travis Tritt, Kacy Musgraves, The Eli Young Band, Tanya Tucker, the Marshall Tucker Band and Bri Bagwell. Rodeo, fashion show, too. Event runs April 28-30, 5 p.m. 211 N. Water Street, 5 p.m., $30-$150, lascrucescountrymusic.com. Café y Pan Dulce Networking with coffee and pastries. RSVP required. Anejo Steakhouse, 16000 Ashford, 7:30 a.m., $25 nonmembers, free members, 915-566-4066. Kaos Metal band performs. CJ’s, 7026 Alameda Ave., 9 p.m., free, 915-2617317. 2017 Juried Student Art Show Opening Reception Work by undergraduate and grad students from New Mexico State University. NMSU Art Gallery, 1390 E. University Ave., 5-7 p.m., free, 575-646-2545, uag. nmsu.edu. Rotating Sets: The Genders Local punk rock band performs with movement performers and while being recorded. Event runs April 28-29, 8-10 p.m. Fri., 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Sat., BYOB. Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 8-10 p.m., $10, facebook.com/RotatingSets.

CALENDAR APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

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TURKISH FESTIVAL CELEBRATES CULTURE, FOOD By Lisa Amaya comment: @whatsupweekly

T

he community is in for a unique and special treat on Saturday, April 29 when the Turkish Food & Craft Festival takes over the Raindrop Turkish House in East El Paso. Like the title suggests, there will be lots of food, live entertainment, arts and crafts and children’s activities. Arts and crafts include an ebru (paper marbling) demonstration by Feyyaz Cheman, ceramic art, children’s face painting and henna tattoos. Along with food, vendors will sell jewelry and crafts. Local musician Dan Lambert, folk dancers and guest speakers will provide entertainment. Sabri Agachan, director of El Paso’s Raindrop Turkish House said the reason the non-profit organization hosts the annual festival is to make the community aware of Turkish values, culture and traditions. The festival began 10 years ago and continues to grow every year, Agachan said. The national Raindrop Foundation currently operates in eight states. A non-profit, it was founded by Turkish-Americans in 2000 in Houston. El Paso’s office is one of 11 in Texas. Between 100-200 Turkish residents currently live in El Paso, Agachan said, adding that the organization aims to promote tolerance amongst other cultures. “There is no need to change each other. It is best to love one another just the way they are,” Agachan said. “People are sometimes ignorant towards one another. If one doesn’t know something, there can be fear. We need to have some balance and we have to eliminate prejudice.”

Agachan said the Turkish try to treat guests with warmth and respect by serving them food and tea. Food sold at the festival will include gyros, kebabs, Turkish pastries and salads. “People really like the food. The baklava is a popular dessert at the festival,” said Hatice Solak, a chef from the Raindrop who helps organize the festival. Solak helps cook meals during the organization’s weekly meetings on Fridays. She also participates in coffee nights, monthly gatherings geared towards discussing women’s issues. She recently helped organize a book club event on Saturdays. Agachan said Turkish and Hispanic values are similar in some ways. “The Turkish have strong family values,” he said. “They try their best to love each other and connect with their families on a regular basis.” No matter what your cultural background is, festival organizers aim to make attendees feel right at home. WHAT’S UP

Turkish Food & Craft Festival

Saturday April 29, 11a.m.-7 p.m. Raindrop Turkish House 10767 Gateway Blvd. West, Suite 610 Free admission and parking Food and drink tickets ($1-$8) will be available for purchase at the festival. More info: facebook.com/RainDropElPaso, RainDropTurkishHouse.org, 915-328-0098

‘Anything Goes’ Cole Porter musical about the people aboard the S.S. American. For details see Wed., April 26. King Octopus Local cover band rocks out their insides. Hidrant, 3112 Forney Ln., 9 p.m., free, witter.com/ kingoctopusband. Sadiki Fuller Standup comedy. For details see Wed., April 26. MK DJ thumps Detroit techno-househip-hop music. 18+, dress code enforced 301, 301 S. Ochoa St., 10 p.m., free w/RSVP prior 10 p.m., $10 gen. admish, 915-307-5514, eventbrite.com. Art Build for “People’s Climate march” Making decorative signs adorned with catchy phrases to protest the end of the world as we know it. Sign-making materials and art supplies provided, but y’all can bring your own, too. Southwest Environmental Center, 276 N. Main St., 4 p.m.-8 p.m., free, 575-522-5552, wildmesquite. org. Paloma y DiBlasio Argentine pianist performs with a Spanish singer. Plaza Theater, 125 Pioneer Plaza, 8:30 p.m., $79-$150, 915-231-1100, ticketmaster.com.

‘Fragmentos’ Contemporary ballet performance inspired by movements of people across borders. Event runs April 28-30, 7:30 p.m. Chamizal National Memorial, 800 S. San Marcial St., 7:30 p.m., $12, $10 children, elpasoballettheatre.com. La Feria: Noche Española NMSU flamenco, OME narrated concert and poet Carlos Otero. Food by Sabores de España which is Chefs Irasema Ontiveros and Alejandro Dimakis. Adobe Horseshoe Theatre, 1500 Main St., 7 p.m., $75, RSVP req., sanelizariohistoricdistrict.com.

COURI Symposium Undergraduate researchers, scholars and artists present and discuss their research. Event runs April 28-29, 1:30 p.m.4 p.m. UTEP UGLC Building, 500 W. University Ave., 1:30-4 p.m., free, 915-747-5058, facebook.com/ utepcouri. ‘Medea’ Medea falls for Jason, who then falls for a Princess, which makes Medea mad, and she gets her revenge. Event runs April 28-May 7, 7:30 p.m. Thurs.-Fri., 2:30 p.m. Sun. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7:30 p.m., $9-$14, 915-7475118, academics.utep.edu/udt.

SAT. APRIL 29 Turkish Food and Craft Festival A day of cultural and gastro gorging. Whole day family event. The Eats: doner, kebap, Turkish tea ad coffee, baklava, pilav and more. Folk dances, henna non-permanent tattoos, live music, handcrafts, as well as Turkish Ebru art, ceramics and jewelry. There’s face painting and a bounce house, too. Raindrop Turkish House, 10767 Gateway Blvd. West, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., free, 915-328-0098, raindropturkishhouse.org.

Sun City Craft Beer Festival Over 150 local and craft beers with which to wage war against your body and sobriety. Two stages of music. Beer tutorials, food trucks, gigantic Jenga and beer pong, human foosball. Attendees get commemorative mug. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 1-8 p.m., $10 designated driver, $25 gen admish, $90 VIP, 915-534-0609, suncitybeerfest.com. Archery and Atl-atl Demonstration Demos held every Saturday. Equipment provided. Marshals present. Archers welcome to bring own recurve or longbow. El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Rd., 11 a.m.-2 p.m., free, 915-7554332., archaeology.elpasotexas.gov.


APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

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APRIL 28-29

ROTATING SETS BRINGS ECLECTIC PERFORMANCES TO GLASBOX

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By Austin Savage comment: @whatsupweekly

espite the massive amounts of time and effort that goes into perfecting a song or album in the studio, there’s something about a live performance that enthralls listeners and induces goose pimples. Knowing this, two-time Grammy-winning sound engineer Justin Leeah captures that essence with his Rotating Sets music series at the Glasbox on 210 Poplar St. The two-night monthly event – which will showcase rock group The Genders this Friday and Saturday, April 28-29 – features performances that Leeah records and engineers for a live-album release. “This was something I always wanted to do for years,” said Leeah in between running sound cables, “Capturing the essence of a band in a setting that’s comfortable and acclimated to them.” Past acts include Omar Cuellar, Dusty Low and MATTOX. Each performance also contains a unique visual aesthetic for each band that comprises visual art, performance theater and dance. The eclectic acts fit perfectly with the aesthetic that Leeah had in mind when conceiving his idea. A hub for artists, the Glasbox studio

FloraFEST 2017 Native and desertadapted plant sale. Largest sale of its kind in the area. Master gardeners and plant experts on hand for information. Centennial Museum and Chihuahuan Desert Gardens, 500 W. University Ave., 9 a.m.-4 p.m., free, museum.utep.edu. El Paso NORML Discussion on marijuana laws, politics and outreach. Memorial Park Library, 3200 Copper Ave., 3-5 p.m., free, eventbrite.com. Layali Al-Sham Spring Concert Middle Eastern music. Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall, 500 W. University Ave., 7:30 p.m., $3.50, ticketmaster.com. Hot Chip DJ Set Bumpin electronic dance. Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., $25, eventbrite.com. Square Peg Youth Empowerment Open Mic and Project Kick-Off Youth empowerment with emphasis on children with disabilities and special needs. Dancing, poetry, how many cats fit in a pair of jeans counting experience, lifting waits while reading Moby Dick, sit and stare at the audience, anything goes. The Pizza Joint, 500 N. Stanton St., 4-7 p.m., facebook.com/in.a.round.hole. El Fantasma Duranguense performance with openers Voz de Mando, Kanales and Banda Jerezana. Buchanan’s Event Center, 11540 Pellicano Dr, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., $40, eventbrite.com. Sadiki Fuller Standup comedy. For details see Wed., April 26.

also provides a backdrop that heightens the uniqueness of Rotating Sets. “It’s just a really cool deal,” said Ross Fleming, a UTEP set designer and who collaborates with Leeah for the monthy series. “It’s just a nice atmosphere for people to come and hear good music in an environment outside of the typical bar scene.”

The Genders will be featured at this weekend’s Rotating Sets series.

Photo by Papa Joe Photography

WHAT’S UP

Rotating Sets presents: The Genders

Dusty Low performed for Rotating Sets in February.

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Burton

Foam Wonderland Featuring DJ TJR. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 8 p.m., $15-$40, ticketfly.com.

Whole Hog BBQ Live music, vendors, barbecue and vegetarian options. Keepa’s Park, 5199 Grove East, 3 p.m., $100, 915-219-4973, dscep.org.

Sunset Film Society: ‘Serpico’ Frank Serpico is an idealistic New York cop who refuses to take bribes, unlike many of his fellow officers. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 2 p.m., free, 915-5436747, internationalmuseumofart.net.

9th Annual El Paso Run/Walk for Autism Awareness 5K run, 5K walk and 1 mile fun walk. Gates open at 7am race starts promptly at 8am. Funds benefit the Autism Society of El Paso. $2 parking fee. Ascarate Park, 6900 Delta Ave., 7 a.m.-1 p.m., 915-525-1133, autism-society.org/ chapter554.

Arts in the Parks Workshop: Watercolor Painting Art knowledge. What to bring: Brushes 1 size 000 1 size 2 1 size 1/2 inch Wyler Aerial Tramway State Park, 1700 McKinley Ave., 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., free, tpwd.texas.gov. ‘Sunset at the North Hacienda’ 35th annual soiree. Classical music performance., 12 p.m., $125, 915-8339400, elpasopromusica.org. El Paso Artists Studio Tour Thirtyeight artists, eighteen locations. A look at local artists’ studios. Event runs April 22-23 and 29-30, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sat., 12-5 p.m. Sun. Various Locations, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, pleinairpaintersofelpaso.com. Las Cruces Country Music Festival Headliners: Travis Tritt, Kacy Musgraves, The Eli Young Band, Tanya Tucker, the Marshall Tucker Band and Bri Bagwell. Rodeo, fashion show, too. For details see Fri., April 28. King Octopus Cover band performs. The House of Rock, 931 N. Resler Dr., 9:30 p.m., free, twitter.com/ kingoctopusband.

An Open Book: An Evening with Justin Furstenfeld of Blue October Doors at 7 p.m. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 8 p.m., $29, ticketfly.com. 13th Annual Empty Bowls Sampling of soups and mac-n-cheese from 15+ local grubberies. Live auction. Silent auction. Handcrafted bowl. Music performance. EPCC Administrative Services Center, 9050 Viscount Blvd, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., $25, eventbrite. com. San Fermin Indie rock music performance with Low Roar. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9 p.m., $12, $66 meet&greet, ticketfly.com. British Car Days Show British Motorcar Club of Southern New Mexico’s celebrates its silver anniversary. 100 British cars and motorcycles. Mesilla Plaza, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., free spectators, 575-680-8333, bmc-snm.org.

With recording by Justin J Leeah, videography by Yennifer Lucero and Jaz Meza and choreography and production design by Jennifer Burton Friday and Saturday, April 28-29, 8-10 p.m. Friday, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Saturday Glasbox, 210 Poplar St. $10 Tickets at the door and Eventzilla.net ‘Hueco Tanks – The Escontrias Family Legacy’ Information on the Escontrias, influential members of the El Paso Community and owner/ ranchers of the Hueco Tanks property before it was Hueco Tanks. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site, 6900 Hueco Tanks Rd., 10 a.m., $9 age 13+, $2 age 7-12, 915-857-1135 ext. 0, tpwd.texas.gov. Rotating Sets: The Genders Local punk rock band performs with movement performers and while being recorded. For details see Fri., April 28. The Slackers Ska punk with openers Vibes Arise and The Pinsetters. 18+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7 p.m., $12 adv., $15 door. Cafe Tacvba Tribute Ska rock tribute band. Ages 18+ Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, 122 S. Old Pueblo Rd., 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m., free, speakingrockentertainment.com. ‘Growth, Resilience, Opportunity’ Celebration Yoga, live music, bicycle education. Presentations by local bee keepers the Zoo with live reptiles, the El Paso master Gardeneers, Humane Society adoptions, and “I Painted That” workshops. Love the Earth before it burns. Fountains at Farah, 8889 Gateway Blvd. West, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., free, 915-212-0115, elpasotexas.gov/ ORS. COURI Symposium Undergraduate researchers, scholars and artists present and discuss their research. For details see Fri., April 28.

People’s Climate March Protesters march and be aggravated across the country in order to help -- slow? prevent? -- to express their agitation at the destruction of ecosystems and animal species and atmosphere and the government bodies who are watching the Earth become uninhabitable to humans. Protesters are asked to wear blue to symbolize water. (or Al Gore’s tears) Albert Johnson Park, N. Main St., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 21st Annual ‘Día de Los Niños, Día de los Libros’ A festival in celebration of literacy and books. Food booths, free books, crafts and more. Washington Park, Washington St., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, 915-543-5468, elpasolibrary. org. Code Breakers: Youth Coding 8-week Program Week 1: Introduction to coding, Week 2: Drawing and colors, Week 3: Variables and animation basics, Week 4: Interactive programming, Week 5: Creating websites, Week 6: Adding CSS and JavaScript to websites, Week 7: Mobile applications/sneak peek to virtual reality, Week 8: The computer. Software provided, bring laptop with WiFi, Ages 10+ Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., 4-6 p.m., $200, 915209-2656, FabLabElPaso.org. ‘Fragmentos’ Contemporary ballet performance inspired by movements of people across borders. For details see Fri., April 28. ‘Medea’ Medea falls for Jason, who then falls for a Princess, which makes Medea mad, and she gets her revenge. For details see Fri., April 28.

SUN. APRIL 30 FloraFEST 2017 Native and desertadapted plant sale. Largest sale of its kind in the area. Master gardeners and plant experts on hand for information. Event runs April 29-30, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. For details see Sat., April 29. The GOSPEL Mix Open mic-style Gospel event. Hilton Garden Inn Airport, 6650 Gateway Blvd. East, 3-7 p.m., $15 or $10 plus 3 canned goods, 915-626-7757, facebook. com/events/1643948395901263. Everyone Dies in Utah Hardcore with openers Divisions, Beneath the Waves and Deliah Blue. Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7:30 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door, holdmyticket. com. El Paso Artists Studio Tour Thirtyeight artists, eighteen locations. A look at local artists’ studios. For details see Sat., April 29. UTEP Horn Choir Richard Lambrecht and the UTEP horn choir performs horn choir music. Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall, 500 W. University Ave., 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m., $5 adult, $3 studet/ military, free UTEP faculty/student/ staff, utep.music.edu. Las Cruces Country Music Festival Headliners: Travis Tritt, Kacy Musgraves, The Eli Young Band, Tanya Tucker, the Marshall Tucker Band and Bri Bagwell. Rodeo, fashion show, too. For details see Fri., April 28.


14

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Jiménez song), which is derived from the Zenata, the Berber confederation that served as cavalry of the Moors and were respected by the Spanish for their talent—conquistador game respects conquistador game, you know?

By Gustavo Arellano comment: @whatsupweekly

Q.

Dear Mexican: In Jared Diamond’s DVD for Guns, Germs, and Steel he mentions the classical Spanish form of horsemanship, jimeta. I have not been able to find this word used anywhere else. Can you help? - Bronco Babobos Dear Gabacho: While Diamond’s book of the same name is a classic, he got his word wrong—it’s jineta, per the Real Academia Española. The word is descended from jinete (horseman, and “El Jinete” is a GREAT José Alfredo

El Paso Sings Locals compete for aural superiority. Also jumping balloons, vendors, food, music, giveaways. Terra Nova Ballroom, 3500 Rene Dr., 12-6 p.m., $5-$150, eventbrite.com. Art en Vivo: SPAIK Live screen printing. Food and music. BYOB Proper Printshop, 800 Montana Ave., 7-9 p.m., free, 915-887-8351, properprintshop.com. Retro Game Night & Dart Tournament Dart tournament, Jenga, beer pong, and “Connect 4.” Atari, NES and Sega gaming as well. Darts at 8:30 p.m., gaming at 7 p.m. The District Pub & Kitchen, 601 N. Piedras St., 7 p.m., free, 915-564-0707. Sadiki Fuller Standup comedy. For details see Wed., April 26. Dr Lucy Scarbrough Spring Solo Concert Classical music. USASMA Memorial Chapel, 11275 Biggs St., 6 p.m. ‘Fragmentos’ Contemporary ballet performance inspired by movements of people across borders. For details see Fri., April 28. ‘Medea’ Medea falls for Jason, who then falls for a Princess, which makes Medea mad, and she gets her revenge. Event runs April 28-May 7, 7:30 p.m. Thurs.-Fri., 2:30 p.m. Sun. For details see Fri., April 28.

MON. MAY 1 This Day in History: 1941 - “Citizen Kane,” directed and starring Orson Welles, premiered in New York. 1971 1948 - The People’s Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was proclaimed.

TUES. MAY 2 Board Game Night Board and tabletop games. Bring your own. There are board games onsite, too. Game Vault, 9828 Montana Ave., 6-10 p.m., free, gamevaultelpaso.com.

¡ASK A MEXICAN! INFLUENCES POLITICS!:Last week, a scandal broke out in the Los Angeles City Council District 1 race between incumbent Gil Cedillo and challenger Joseph Bray-Ali. After the BrayAli campaign attacked Cedillo for not denouncing some p*nd*j* spewing racist remarks during a debate, One Bill Gil’s people told the Los Angeles Times about a years-old video of Bray-Ali asking your humble Mexican a YouTube question about why Mexicans like to use their car horns as doorbells (short answer: because we’re LOUD. And also because most barrios rarely have any open parking spaces). Bray-Ali subsequently apologized for the nine-year-old question, even as he de-

El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas charge the Albuquerque Isotopes. Event runs May 2-5, 6:35 p.m. Tues.Thurs., 7:05 p.m. Fri. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 6:35 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/epchihuahuas.

WED. MAY 3 The State Line Music Series: Radio La Chusma Reggae-cumbia-rock music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371 or countyline.com/StateLineMusic. html. ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ 2 and 7:30 p.m. May 4, 8 p.m. Fri., 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., 1 and 6:30 p.m. May 7, 7:30 p.m. Tues.-Thurs., 1 p.m. May 14., 7:30 p.m., $47-$118. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas charge the Albuquerque Isotopes. For details see Tues., May 2. Yoga Humans pretzel to nirvana. Happens every Wed. For details see Wed., April 26. ‘Anything Goes’ Cole Porter musical about the people aboard the S.S. American. For details see Wed., April 26. Bo Dacious Standup comedy. Event runs may 3-7, 7:30 p.m., additional late shows 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. El Paso Comic Strip, 1201 Airway Blvd., 7:30 p.m., $6-$12, 915-779-5233(LAFF), laff2nite.com. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors, and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. For details see Wed., April 26.

EXHIBITS El Paso Sketchers 4th Art Show Group of ladies from different backgrounds present art in various mediums. Event runs April 1-30, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 1-6 p.m. Fri., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat. El Paso Public Library West, 125 Belvidere, 10 a.m.7 p.m., 915-472-7109. Ends 4/29/17. Lizzie Ochoa Pop Art Exhibit Colorful art. Main Library, 501 N. Oregon, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-212-3230, elpasolibrary.org. Ends 4/30/17. Metamorphosis – Trash to Treasure Recycled material art. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 1-5 p.m., free internationalmuseumofart.net. Ends 5/6/17. 2017 Juried Student Art Show Work by undergraduate and grad students from New Mexico State University. NMSU Art Gallery, 1390 E. University Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, uag.nmsu. edu. Ends 5/13/17. ‘Life As It Is’ MFA thesis exhibit by Yolanda Cooper. Features portraits. NMSU Art Gallery, 1390 E. University Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, uag.nmsu. edu. Ends 5/13/17. April Foolishness Rokoko Art Gallery, 4901 Chippewa Trail, 12-5 p.m., 575-522-5553, facebook.com/ Rokokoart/. 5/13/17. Southwest Land & Skyscapes Day and night images by local photographer Wayne Suggs. Rokoko Art Gallery, 4901 Chippewa Trail, 12-5 p.m., 575522-5553. Ends 6/10/17. Cartography – Mapping Contemporary Art at the Border A gander at the landscape of institutions and independent projects that shape contemporary art practices in El Paso, Juarez and Las Cruces. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-747-6151, rubin.utep.edu. Ends 6/16/17.

clared himself a “fanboy” of this column. Wow, where to begin...how about f*ck everyone involved? F*ck the Times for not doing their research and realizing that Bray-Ali’s question was directed at me—that dramatically changes the dynamics of the story. F*ck Cedillo’s team for responding to a racial taunt by one of his supporters by sending reporters the question to turn the tables on BrayAli (Cedillo, for his part, denounced the nastiness, although one of his fans is now leaving anti-Indian comments on my clip). F*ck Cedillo’s supporters for not allowing Bray-Ali to ask a legitimate question about Mexicans to a column set up for that. F*ck any Cedillo supporters who think the very act of engaging with ¡Ask a Mexican! is racist—Gil sure didn’t think so when he was a member of the Latino Legislative Caucus in 2008 when they awarded me with a Latino Spirit Award for what they said was my “exceptional vision, creativity, and work ethic.”

CALENDAR APRIL 26-MAY 3, 2017

F*ck Bray-Ali’s supporters for trying to drag in former state senator Martha Escutia into the “Go back to India!” debacle. F*ck Bray-Ali’s brother for sending me a Facebook message that got sent to that filtered folder b*llsh*t—my email’s pretty easy to find, bruh. F*ck Bray-Ali for apologizing and taking back his question—implies what you did was wrong, which it wasn’t. With fans like you, who needs enemies? Man, where’s a tamborazo version of “Hit ‘Em Up,” when I need it? Everyone involved: don’t use my column for your pathetic needs. Take a deep breath, and concentrate on issues that matter in District 1, like housing affordability and the fact that gentrified Highland Park is overrated. Ask the Mexican at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram @gustavo_arellano!


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