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FR EE

Vol. 18 / No.43/ July 19-26, 2017

National Day of the Cowboy takes over Anthony, Texas Page 12 ..................................... ................................... The ghosts of “Hell Paso” Page 5 ..................................... ................................... A deeper look into El Paso’s cowboy past Page 13 ..................................... ................................... Finance 101: The 411 on 401(k)s

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VICTORIA G. MOLINAR comment: @whatsupweekly Sometimes, the things that give you the most confidence are those moments when you fearlessly put yourself out there – especially as a performer. I attended the annual Arabesque belly dance show at the historic Scottish Rite Temple this past Saturday. I first learned about the event’s organizer, Snake Charmer & the Belly Dancer in 2012 when I wrote a story about them for the Fort Bliss Bugle. A mother-and-daughter duo, what prompted the two to venture into the art of belly dance was the need to find a skill that boosted confidence and aptitude. At a time when Seneé Barraza was struggling in elementary school, her mom Sonia Flores got her into belly dancing, which she said led to Seneé’s academic improvement. What started off as a fun exercise flourished into a lifelong career for Seneé and Sonia. The two have been teaching belly dance and hosting Arabesque and the 1920s/’30s-themed show, The Cat’s Meow, for the past several years, giving audience members and performers an opportunity to appreciate dance and body types of all kinds.

The age range is also what’s really impressive. I’ve seen belly dancers in their 60s and 70s, dressed to the nines with a sense of confidence that younger generations often struggle to find. While some performers might have washboard abs, the whole point of belly dance isn’t to showcase one body type.

You’ll often find thicker figures making moves that will leave you mesmerized. Ultimately, the point is to showcase a skill that takes much study and practice and to promote diversity, femininity, and historically speaking, fertility. It’s no wonder that such an art form would instill confidence in performers.

“Belly dance has been the way my soul writes love letters to my body,” said belly dancer Darlina Marie, who performed at Arabesque. “It gives me liberation and allows me to be brave in my own skin. It is my hustle, my passion, my exercise, my therapy and my connection to so many other beautiful souls. It’s the breathing for my sanity.”

FUNDRAISER FOR ALBERTO HALPERN

SAVE THE DATE!

Photo by Angela Saavedra

Don’t forget to check out Adult Coloring Book Night on Thursday, July 27 at DeadBeach Brewery on 406 Durango St. The fun starts at 5 p.m. We’ll feature the work of local artist Carlos Alejandro Lopez as part of the Last Thursdays art walk. Our new sponsor has a scrumptious line of beer you can sip as you color. This month’s featured summer seasonal is the Heartbreaker, a Berliner Weisse kettle sour infused with passion fruit and mango.

A fundraiser for Alberto Halpern, senior administrative assistant to El Paso County Commissioner David Stout, will be held this Friday, July 21 from 4 p.m. until midnight at the Tin Man craft beer growler filling station on 5001 N Mesa St. The fundraiser will include a silent auction with fine art pieces donated by friends of Halpern, food trucks, a live DJ set and a giveaway for a weekend getaway at El Cosmico hotel in Marfa. During a celebratory road trip after marrying newly elected District 2 city Rep. Alexsandra Annello in June, Halpern and Annello were in a head-on collision near Marfa. Halpern remains in intensive care with injuries that include a ruptured spleen, punctured lung, broken pelvis and legs and a possible loss of vision. Proceeds from the fundraiser will go towards rehabilitation and caregiver services along with other medical expenses. Can’t make it to Friday’s event? You can also make a donation at gofundme.com/BetoHalpern.

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JULY 19-26, 2017

5

GHOST HUNTERS DISCUSS PHANTOMS OF EL PASO’S HISTORIC PAST Paso Del Norte Paranormal Society/Ghosts915 president and treasurer Bonnie Juarez stands inside the basement of her organization’s headquarters. Earlier this summer, two workers cleaning out the basement left and refused to come back after seeing a couple dressed in “turn-of-the-century garb” by the stairs. Photo by Jorge Salgado

By Dylan Taylor-Lehman comment: @whatsupweekly

El Paso used to be such a fearsome place that it was referred to as “Hell Paso.” Outlaws, gunslingers, and generally dangerous individuals made their home here, and many of these people were apparently so tough that they opted to stick around long after they’ve left this mortal coil. In other words, El Paso is the home to many ghosts. According to local ghost hunters, the most notorious era of El Paso’s history has given rise to a proportional number of phantasms. People died in gunfights almost constantly, including more than a few near the building now owned by Bonnie Juarez, president and treasurer of the Paso Del Norte Paranormal Society/ Ghosts915, and her partner Peter Stone. The building, which serves as the headquarters for the group, was built in 1912, but it stands right next to the former Wigwam Saloon and brothel. Not far from the Wigwam was the infamous “four dead in five seconds” shoot-out in which marshal Dallas Stoudenmire killed three outlaws and a civilian in 1881. The Wigwam eventually burned down, but a dark energy apparently still lingers. There are unknown footsteps and mysterious clattering in the building, Juarez said, and earlier this summer, two workers cleaning out the basement left and refused to come back after seeing a couple dressed in “turn-of-the-century garb” by the basement stairs. Leon Baker, owner of El Paso Ghost Tours, said that a presence dressed in classic cowboy garb is known to wander the streets and alleys near the building. The entity looks real enough to seem like just another passerby, he said, but then he’ll turn

a corner and disappear. Apparitions are also consistently reported at the nearby DeSoto Hotel. In fact, ghosts seem to gravitate toward it, Baker said. “[The hotel] is very haunted,” he said. “You can see it and feel it. You’ll be standing there next to your girlfriend and you’ll feel someone go right between you.” Also contributing to the otherworldly presence is the fact that historic Downtown El Paso used to be home to a lot of cemeteries. But the cemeteries were bulldozed or built over as the city grew. The stadium, the Masonic Temple building, and the public library are all built on what used to be cemeteries, said Grim Ghost Tours co-founder Angelique Patino, turning on its head the notion that the dead will rest in peace. “Builders were very careless with cemeteries. Who knows how much of it was built over?” Patino said.

An early, undated photo of Downtown El Paso taken from the former Hotel Pierson. Many ghost huntPhoto provided by El Paso County Historical Society ers consider Downtown a hotbed for ghosts of the Old West.

Perhaps it is no surprise, then, that ghostly activity has been reported in the library. A woman in a dress and big hat and an old soldier have been sighted in the basement stacks, a child likes to sit in a red chair in the children’s section, and flying books, papers,and desks have been

reported all over the building. Having your final resting place overturned is understandably cause to be upset, Juarez said, but some ghosts seem to like hanging around and harassing people for the fun of it because that’s what Continued on 6


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JULY 19-26, 2017

Old ticket stubs found inside the Paso Del Norte Paranormal Society/Ghosts915 headquarters. The building stands right next to the site of the former Wigwam Saloon and brothel, where dark energy apparently still lingers. Photo by Jorge Salgado

GHOSTS

Continued from 5

they liked doing in their former lives. They don’t seem to have any mission other than to make people uncomfortable. “Some people are just nasty,” Juarez said. “They were individuals in life, and they’re individuals in death.” But it is not just the ghosts of gunslingers that haunt the city. According to enthusiasts, there are ghosts from many eras and many walks of life. Kathryne Greaves Lopez writes in “A Chance of a Ghost” that El Paso High School is haunted by the ghost of a cheerleader (perhaps connected to a rash of real-life student deaths that happened in the 1930s), and that an exhausted-looking doctor haunts a part of Fort Bliss

that used to be a hospital and overflow morgue. An old friar is said to appear on Trans-Mountain Road, and Patino noted that early movers and shakers like the Trost brothers and Octavia Magoffin are said to haunt their respective homes. Baker said he recently communicated with “James,” an entity that says he lived on the Downtown streets and died only last year. (And this isn’t even touching on the Chinese, Native American and Buffalo Soldiers who made their home here – groups that almost certainly have their own cache of ghosts.) Fortunately for those of us who are still alive, not all ghosts appear to be malicious. Some have unfinished business, some are trapped unwillingly and some may not even know they’re dead, Juarez said. To that end, Baker cited his communi-

El Paso Ghost Tours owner Leon Baker says ghosts seem to gravitate toward Downtown’s DeSoto Hotel. Photo by Jorge Salgado

cation with James Pickett, a doctor who verifiably worked in El Paso in the 1930s. The communication started at Leo’s, next to DeSoto, and continued in the restaurant next door. The buildings historically shared a basement, which was Dr. Pickett’s office. Pickett apparently died before he could complete a complicated surgery, Baker said, and was distraught that the patient didn’t get the necessary care. However, Baker did some research and found that Pickett’s partners finished the surgery successfully. He communicated this to Pickett, and the communications stopped. It seemed like he found the peace he was looking for, Baker said. But no matter the provenance of the

ghosts or the reasons they choose to stick around, encountering something from the next realm is a powerful experience, hinting that there’s something beyond the reality we know. We won’t know whether it’s fun, terrifying, or lonely until we get there, but Baker said he’s not worried about it. “Some people obviously do transition to the next place,” Baker said. “You’re going to go where you’re supposed to go.” Some of these people were evidently destined to stay in El Paso for a while. If the circumstances are right, then perhaps you’ll get the chance to meet some of the luminaries from the city’s past. It might be enlightening or it might be scary – and it will almost certainly be when you least expect it.


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KAPPY’S CORNER By Steve Kaplowitz / Comment: @whatsupweekly

Remember when UTEP and New Mexico played each other twice each season as members of the Western Athletic Conference? If you were born after 1998, you probably heard the stories from your parents or grandparents. Miner fans can relive some of those memories on Saturday, December 2 when Paul Weir brings his Lobos to the Don Haskins Center. In addition, the Washington State Huskies will play in El Paso as part of the non-conference season which also includes a trip to Puerto Rico. The field includes Appalachian State, Boise State (NIT last season), Illinois State (NIT last season), Iowa State (NCAA last season), South Carolina (NCAA last season), Tulsa and Western Michigan. Those match-ups have not yet been announced. The Miners will also play NMSU twice in a five-day span in December, as part of their 2017-18 men’s basketball schedule, which was released last week.

JULY 19-26, 2017

“Our home schedule has been upgraded with Washington State and the Lobos, who have been our biggest rivals for nearly 90 years,” UTEP coach Tim Floyd said in a press release. “The series makes sense, and I applaud the administration at New Mexico for recognizing that. We like the multi-team event in Puerto Rico because of the quality of the opponents, including a potential matchup with 2017 Final Four participant South Carolina. The WestStar Bank Don Haskins Sun Bowl Invitational has an NCAA Tournament team from a year ago in North Carolina Wilmington. We always try to schedule teams that will prepare us well for a strong conference slate.” It is important that UTEP is prepared for C-USA action, since they will play their toughest league opponents on the road next season. Middle Tennessee, UAB and Old Dominion host the Miners, who do not get a return home game at the Don. The good news is that UTEP will play homeand-home series with Rice and Louisiana Tech, a pair of 20-win teams from last season. They will also host Marshall for their lone meeting with the Thundering Herd.

___ I ran into a varsity high school boys basketball coach recently and he told me that Texas was seriously considering adding a shot clock for high school basketball. My first reaction was “Wow, Texas still does not play with a shot clock?” I was more surprised to find out that only eight states use a shot clock for high school hoops. Here is the current list:

STATE

BOYS

GIRLS

California

35 seconds

30 seconds

Maryland

none

30 seconds

Massachusetts 30 seconds

30 seconds

New York

35 seconds

30 seconds

North Dakota

35 seconds

30 seconds

Rhode Island

35 seconds

30 seconds

South Dakota

35 seconds

30 seconds

Washington

35 seconds

30 seconds

According to the Dallas Morning News, cost is a big reason why Texas has said no in the past to a shot clock. The average price to wire a shot clock to an existing gym could be around $2,000. Even if Texas only installs them in 5-A and 6-A schools, there are roughly 513 gymnasiums. The total cost would exceed a million dollars. Another reason the state has resisted the shot clock movement is because some coaches would rather play a slower tempo game or they prefer holding onto the ball late in a game with a slim lead rather than shoot it. Personally, I prefer watching a high school game with the same set of rules like college basketball. ___ Since 1997, Steve Kaplowitz has hosted “Sportstalk” weekday afternoons 4-7 p.m. on 600 ESPN El Paso. Over the last 17 years, he has also worked for UTEP and NMSU as a play-by-play broadcaster, for UTEP telecasts on Time Warner Cable and for KDBC-TV and KTSM-TV as a sports anchor/reporter. You can contact Steve by emailing him at skaplowitz@krod.com.


JULY 19-26, 2017

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FINANCE 101

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THE 411 ON GETTING A 401(K)

By Dylan Taylor-Lehman comment: @whatsupweekly

Understanding retirement options and taking advantage of them can be a daunting, frustrating task. The terminology and complicated rules can make you want to keep your money in a tin under your mattress. However, even if you don’t plan on ever getting old, it behooves you to think about saving for retirement and educate yourself on how to make the most of your savings. Fortunately, one of the most common ways of saving for retirement – the 401(k) plan – is a fairly straightforward plan to sign up for. Many companies match employees’ contributions with cash or stock, which is effectively free money for your retirement. Be sure to talk with financial professionals about what opportunities make the most sense to you and how to go about saving and investing responsibly. While it might be a ways off, the goal is to retire someday and comfortably enjoy the years when you are finally, gloriously free of having to work for a living.

What exactly is a 401(k)?

A reference to section 401, paragraph K of the Internal Revenue Code that established it, 401(k)s are retirement plans offered to employees by private businesses. The idea is that you’ll put money aside to invest in some of these options, which will presumably grow and sustain you through your retirement. The 401(k) is administered by a third party, such as Vanguard or Charles Schwaab, but you

decide what percentage of your paycheck goes into the plan each pay period, and the employer puts it in the account on their behalf. There are a few major benefits to having a 401(k). Many employers will match a percentage of the funds contributed by an employee, or will offer stocks or other incentives to participate. Also, the money you put into a 401(k) is taken out of your paycheck before taxes are, meaning that not only do you not pay taxes on the money you invest, but that you pay less taxes overall since you are only taxed on the part of the paycheck that is left after your 401(k) percentage is taken out. The money you contribute to the 401(k) is not taxed until you withdraw money from the account when you retire, and, according to 401khelpcenter.com, any investment gains and earnings are likewise not taxed until the money is withdrawn. Moreover, because a 401(k) is administered by a third party, your retirement savings are not tied to the success of your employer. In fact, it is illegal for an employer to physically hold the assets of its employee’s 401(k).

Who sets up a 401(k) and how is it done?

To establish a 401(k), your employer consults with a broker or investment manager to create a number of different investment options for employees. Typically, these include a variety of high to low risk options like stocks, bonds, mutual funds and money market accounts. Your employer is obligated to provide you with a summary plan description, giving you a comprehensive overview of the different options and how they work. The downside is that the options your employer picks are the only options you have to choose

from. However, these options can be numerous. According to CNN, the average plan has around 19 options, but Billy DeFrance, a certified public accountant at El Paso’s Lauterback Financial Advisors, said that he’s seen plans with more than 100 investment options. While this variety is good, the sheer amount of choices can be confusing for people who aren’t familiar with the obscure world of finance, so feel free to consult a trusted advisor when deciding where to invest. He also noted that some 401(k) options include built-in commissions and fees charged by the brokers that ultimately mean less money for you. “The key is to understand who benefits from your investments,” he said.

Contributing to a 401(k)

Once you have your 401(k) set up, it is pretty easy to contribute. You choose how much you want to contribute per pay period and your employer automatically takes it out of your paycheck and puts it into your 401(k) account. There are limits to the amount you can contribute to your 401(k) each year. If you are under 50 years old, you can contribute up to $18,000 per year, while employees 50 and older can contribute an additional $6,000 per year, or up to $24,000. Employers will often match contributions, or a percentage of them, while some employers offer what are called “safe harbor” contributions, which is a set amount regardless of how much an employee contributes to her account. The money an employer contributes is subject to taxes. However, the money your employer contributes isn’t automatically yours. The funds are “vested” – you have to remain employed with your company for a set number of years before the money they’ve contributed is fully yours. After this time, however, you get to keep the money even if you take a different job. Employers do have some latitude to restrict who can participate in the 401(k) program. According to 401khelpcenter.com, “individuals with a less than one-year service, union members, non U.S. citizens, part-time workers, etc.” may be ineligible for the plan.

Withdrawing your funds or rolling them over

Almost all plans require you to keep your money in the 401(k) until you are 59-and-a-halfyears old. (After you turn 70-and-a-half, you are obligated to make minimum withdrawals from your 401(k).) According to CNN, “withdraw any of it before then and you’ll be hit with a bruising

10 percent early withdrawal penalty, on top of the regular income tax that is due on withdrawals” from 401(k) plans. DeFrance said that in some cases, these fees and taxes could wipe out as much as 40 percent of the amount you are trying to withdraw. After you are 59-and-a-half, however, you can use the money as you’d like, though you of course still have to pay taxes on it. However, if an emergency occurs, you can access the funds in your account without paying a penalty; you can borrow money against yourself by taking a loan out from your 401(k). You must pay the loan back within a set amount of time, or you’ll be charged all of the fees and taxes that you would an early withdrawal. (And you can only take out a loan using funds you’ve contributed, not those of your employer.) But almost every single advisor cautions against treating your 401(k) like a savings account or an emergency fund because of how easily your 401(k) funds can diminish if you take them out or don’t pay back the loan. Withdrawing from a 401(k) is difficult on purpose, and the hefty fees are an inducement for you to leave the funds alone until you retire. Fortunately, if you change jobs and sign on for your new employer’s 401(k) plan, you can transfer your old 401(k) savings to the new account without paying the taxes and penalties. Though, if you like your previous employer’s plan and are happy with the investments, you aren’t obligated to transfer the funds, DeFrance said. But in most cases, he said, you have to have at least $5,000 of vested funds in order to stay in your old account.

Two other things to consider

- There is another kind of 401(k) you might have heard about called a Roth 401(k). It functions as a sort of inverse to the traditional kind of 401(k) discussed above: in a Roth 401(k), you are taxed on the money you contribute from your paycheck, but aren’t taxed when you withdraw it when you retire. Speak with your advisor about the plusses and minuses of opening a Roth 401(k). - Matching funds given by many employers sometimes come in the form of company stock. The CNN article notes that “experts recommend keeping no more than 5% to 10% of your total assets in the stock of your company.” One has to only recall the Enron debacle to understand why this is good advice. - All in all, investing in a 401(k) is a really smart thing to do, DeFrance said, and the numbers speak for themselves. “If a 25 year old invests $1,000 per year in a 401(k) at a 7.2 percent return, in 40 years, that $1,000 would be worth $16,000,” he said. “Smaller amounts invested early have the best chance of return and security in your retirement.”


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THE SECRET TO A GREAT POTLUCK? IT’S NOT THE FOOD By Melissa Clark (The New York Times) comment: @whatsupweekly

The most elaborate potluck I ever went to was my own wedding, to which each guest brought a dish in lieu of gifts. We feasted on truffled pea soup and caviar tea sandwiches. At the other end of the potluck spectrum was my daughter’s second-grade graduation breakfast, a festive hodgepodge of child-made scones, store-bought red velvet doughnuts and boxes of hot coffee. Both parties were total successes, with a perfect mix of dishes appropriate to the occasion. That’s because they had the most important potluck ingredient in common: a strong organizer. The secret of a great potluck isn’t good cooking. It’s careful planning. A potluck host is like a choreographer whose role is to create a dance rather than a mosh pit, distributing the burden of the cooking so no one has to work too hard and giving guests a chance to shine by allowing them to show off their very best dishes. The host is also in charge of the flow of the meal, keeping track of what everyone is bringing to make sure there’s an interesting selection without any duplicated dishes. “As a potluck organizer, I’ve learned that it works out better if I’m a little dic-

tatorial about assigning dishes,” said Amy Thielen, the author of the 2013 cookbook “The New Midwestern Table.” Thielen grew up in northern Minnesota, where potlucks were pretty much the only parties people gave. Her strategy is to make the central meat dish, then assign the rest of the meal according to people’s strengths, asking her friend with the clay oven to bring his homemade bread, the friend with the vegetable garden to bring pickled asparagus. “I’ve learned the hard way that a hands-off approach can result in four kinds of cucumber salad,” she said. Kristin Donnelly, who wrote the 2016 cookbook “Modern Potluck,” prefers to be slightly more relaxed. She suggests setting up an online sign-up sheet (she uses Google Docs) that everyone can view, but with broad categories — dips, salads, desserts — so that guests can help shape the party and bring dishes they’re excited to make. “As a host you do want to do some planning, but you don’t want to give in to your inner control freak,” she said. “When your guests can see what everyone else is bringing, they’ll self-edit and you won’t get six platters of deviled eggs — at least you probably won’t.” One thing hosts do not have to worry about is facilitating conversation among strangers. The very nature of the format

gives guests an easy icebreaker: the food itself, who made what and how you got it there. Deviled eggs always have a backstory. As for being a good potluck guest? Donnelly recommends that you think about logistics before signing up for your dish. Will you go to the party from home, where you can pull a warm casserole from the oven? Or will you be at work, and need to make your dish the night before? If that’s the case, a grain salad or cheesecake bars hold up well when made in advance. I usually volunteer to bring a fluffy salad made with hardy greens (baby kale, mature spinach, radicchio) that can hold up well for a few hours, and I dress it right before serving. It’s colorful, light and goes with almost everything. It’s also one of the less glamorous things you could make, so it often gets overlooked by cooks seeking a more stunning presentation. But it’s always gone when the party is over. No matter what you bring, it’s best to garnish your offering in situ, especially those grain or potato salads, which can get a little dull sitting in the fridge. “A squeeze of lemon, some olive oil and some fresh herbs right before serving really takes things up a notch,” Donnelly said. As for the casserole, that nearly indispensable classic of the potluck table, both she and Thielen are big fans of the 9- by 13-inch baking pan, which you can use for

anything from vegetable tians to peach cobblers and is easy to carry, wrapped in foil and nestled in a cardboard box to keep it warm. The photographer and food blogger Leela Cyd loves 4- to 6-ounce glass canning jars, which make transporting individual servings of chilled soup or chocolate pudding easy and eliminates the need for plates. Her favorite? “Greek salad in a Weck jar,” she said. “You layer the heavier things first: the feta, olives, cucumbers, tomatoes and dressing. Then you put the lettuce on top and people shake it just before they open the jar.” I like the 2-quart Ball jars for carrying watermelon lemonade or iced tea to a party, since you can seal the tops, then use a small ladle to serve. If all goes smoothly, guests get to linger over a varied and delicious spread, and hosts are left to enjoy the fact that they are giving a party and did not have to cook everything themselves. Cyd advises hosts to reinvest all that saved prep time in the other details that make a party memorable. For her, that means picking flowers for the table. For me, I might actually get a chance to take a shower before guests arrive. Always take a moment for yourself, she said: “It will make you happy.” Continued on 11


JULY 19-26, 2017

POTLUCK

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Continued from 10

Photos by Andrew Scrivani (The New York Times)

Pickled Deviled Eggs Yield: 12 servings Time: 30 minutes, plus overnight pickling - 12 large eggs - 1 1/2 cups rice vinegar - 6 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled - 2 1/2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar - 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt, more as needed - 1 teaspoon black peppercorns - 1 large red onion, halved and very thinly sliced - 1 cup mayonnaise - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard - 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper Flaky sea salt, for serving

1. Put eggs in a large pot of cold water and bring to a boil. Turn off the heat, cover and let sit for 10 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to immediately transfer to a bowl filled with ice and water. Let cool, then peel. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, combine vinegar, garlic, sugar, kosher salt, peppercorns and 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil, then turn off the heat and stir in onions. 3. Spoon half of the onion mixture into a 2-quart jar or heatproof container. Add eggs and pour remaining onions and brine over the top. Let cool. Cover and refrigerate overnight or up to 3 days. 4. Remove eggs from onion mixture and cut in half lengthwise. Scoop yolks into a minifood processor or blender. Add 1 tablespoon of the pickling liquid, mayonnaise, mustard, pepper and a large pinch of kosher salt. Process until smooth. Spoon into egg halves, sprinkle with flaky sea salt, top with some of the pickled onion and serve.

Tomato and Zucchini Casserole With Crisp Cheddar Topping Yield: 8 servings Time: 1 hour - 5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed, more for buttering casserole dish - 1 1/2 cups whole milk ricotta - 1/2 cup fresh basil or mint leaves - 2 garlic cloves, finely grated or minced -2 1/2 pounds tomatoes, cut into 1 1/2-inch wedges - 1 pound slim zucchini, thinly sliced - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt, more as needed

- 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh chopped oregano or marjoram - 3/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest - Pinch cayenne pepper - Extra-virgin olive oil, as needed 1. Heat oven to 400 degrees and butter a 9by 13-inch casserole dish or 2-quart gratin dish. 2. In a food processor or blender, purée the ricotta, basil and garlic. 3. Toss tomatoes, zucchini and 1 teaspoon salt in casserole to combine, then spread into an even layer. Dollop with ricotta mixture and scatter olives evenly across the top.

- 1/2 cup high-quality pitted black olives, roughly chopped - 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

4. In a medium bowl, combine flour, oats, cheese, oregano or marjoram, lemon zest, cayenne and a large pinch of salt. Use your fingertips to work in the 5 tablespoons butter; you should end up with small clumps. Scatter clumps over vegetables, then drizzle liberally with olive oil.

- 1/2 cup rolled oats - 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

5. Bake until golden and bubbly, 35 to 45 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

DID YOU KNOW? The City of El Paso’s Curbside Recycling Program accepts cardboard. • This includes cardboard egg cartons, cereal boxes (without the plastic liner), gift boxes (without the paper tissue), cardboard rolls that hold your toilet paper and paper towels • Don’t forget to fold your cardboard to make more room in your blue recycling bin

Citizens may call 311 (915-212-6000) or visit www.recyclerightEP.com for more information


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JULY 19-26, 2017

NATIONAL DAY OF THE COWBOY HIGHLIGHTS EL PASO’S HISTORY By Miguel De Santiago comment: @whatsupweekly

The Old West won’t be a thing of the past this Saturday, July 22, thanks to the National Day of the Cowboy. An all-day festival will take over Anthony, Texas, paying homage to the American icon. “They’re pretty much a folk hero to our area and I think the more that we can keep that memory alive, the more people and tourists will experience and find out what it was to be a cowboy,” said Benjamin Romero, mayor pro tem of Anthony, Texas. This will be the free family-friendly celebration’s third year in Anthony and overall sixth year. Its humble beginning was at Cleveland Square Park, in front of the El Paso Museum of History “We wanted to put it on a grander scale and bring out more residents and people to come and visit this event so not only can they find out a little bit more about cowboy history, but find out what an important role they were in regards to our culture and our heritage,” Romero said. This year’s festival headliners are Lubbock-based Dalton Domino, who Rolling Stone magazine listed as one of “10 New Country Artists You Need to Know” and Bruce Robison, a country music star from Austin whose songs have been covered by Tim McGraw and Dixie Chicks. Attendees can enjoy exhibits of El Paso’s Old West past and take cowboy-style pictures via Miss Purdy’s Old Time Photos, an LA-based photo booth that provides an entire western scene backdrop and props. A mechanical bull for adults and a kids’ area with a water slide will amp up the entertainment. There will

A petting zoo, pony rides, water slide and plenty of other activities will add to the festival’s kid-friendly fun.

Photo courtesy of Benjamin Romero

also be food and craft vendors, a petting zoo and pony rides. Going beyond festivities, Saturday’s event aims to boost locals’ excitement about their hometown’s history. “Knowing the heritage of El Paso and West Texas, as well as how much this could mean to heritage and cultural tourism in the area, I, along with many others were convinced that honoring the genre of the cowboy, cowgirl and vaqueros would be a great fun way to perpetuate a lifestyle that was so important to our place,” said local history enthusiast Bernie Sargent. He’s one of the founders of the event and the local Old West reenactment group Six Guns and Shady Ladies.

National Day of the Cowboy has been observed by 11 states since 2005, and its organization of the same name spearheads efforts in growing the number of states that recognize the day. “A lot of people think that cowboy culture has died, but we still have it,” Romero said. “It’s alive and well. We have ranch hands, we have people that still have cattle out here in the area, we have individuals that ride horses – this event fits perfectly with our region.” Sargent helped spearhead Texas’ recognition of the National Day of the Cowboy in 2003 with help from state representative Joe Pickett. Their efforts paid off in 2005 when the resolution for the day

passed in the state legislature. “There had already been eight other states that had enacted it legally and officially on a statewide level,” Sargent said. “We were hoping to get support from the senate, but it took us two sessions before we finally found a senator that would walk it through the senate and make it a state-wide function every year – the fourth Saturday of July.” Sargent became enamored with the Old West aesthetic as a kid growing up in Pennsylvania, watching kids shows like “Hopalong Cassidy” and “The Roy Rogers Show.” Naturally, the borderland also intrigued Sargent, making Anthony a perfect spot to host an event that recognizes its role in history. “It’s right on the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the old stage coach route, the Pony Express rail – there’s so much history that went through those parts of our county,” Sargent said. “The mayor and mayor pro tem have embraced this so much. We’re pleased that we’ve been able to help them and in turn they’re excited about this thing going forward and becoming a permanent calendar event for the town of Anthony.” As for reenactments, Six Guns and Shady Ladies will act out the final days of outlaw John Wesley Hardin, who was shot to death in an El Paso saloon, as well as events caused by infamous brothel madam Alice Abbott. “It’s not only performing, but it’s actually educating,” Sargent said. “We call it edutainment, and we’re actually helping people of all ages learn more about one of the many cultures that make up the southwest.”

WHAT’S UP

National Day of the Cowboy celebration Anthony Municipal Park 100 Richard White Dr., Anthony, Texas. Saturday, July 22, 4 p.m.-midnight Free admission More info at facebook.com/ DayoftheCowboyinAnthonyTX, 915497-1769

Local Old West reenacment group Six Guns and Shady Ladies will be a part of the National Day of the Cowboy celebration.

Photo provided by Six Guns and Shady Ladies


JULY 19-26, 2017

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By Maggie Asfahani comment: @whatsupweekly

Cowboys and their ways have always held a firm grip on the collective imagination. The stereotype of a gruff, virile man traversing the lonesome landscape on his trusty steed has been the basis of countless books and movies, and has become a worldwide symbol of America at its most authentic. But local history experts say it’s crucial to keep context in check, particularly when it comes to the cowboy’s place in El Paso history. “I think it is important to understand who these men were and how they lived,” said Robert Diaz, first vice president of the El Paso County Historical Society. “El Paso in 1881 was a sleepy, dry village with a population of 700 individuals. In May of that year, the railroads arrived in El Paso and changed the region forever. “By 1891, 10,000 people lived in El Paso,” he continued. “That said, El Paso’s borders were contained within what is now Downtown. Many people immigrated to El Paso looking for opportunity. Some became venture capitalists. Some saloon owners. Others were cowboys and ranchers.” One of the biggest misconceptions about cowboys is that they were all gunslingers, Diaz said.

“If anything, they were the ultimate common folk, getting by as best as they could and establishing, unbeknownst to them, a culture revered throughout the world,” he said. “Cowboys were businessmen and ranchers,” he continued. “They tended cattle and raised animals, sowed, and developed ranches for business’ sake. Many of these individuals were veterans of the Civil War and sought to create a new and quiet life for themselves following the turmoil.” Although not all cowboys settled their scores with violence, the Old West was a tumultuous, colorful time, and not everyone played by the rules, said Jackson Polk, a local historian who hosts “The El Paso History Radio Show,” on News Talk 690 KTSM. “The gunfighter business was huge in El Paso,” Polk said. “They worked on a ranch, then they’d come into town with their guns get drunk and shoot people.” Polk said the problem was exacerbated when the railroad came to the city because it was easier for the unsavory elements to find their way in. Only after the hiring of Dallas Stoudenmire as marshal did El Paso find some semblance of law and order. Although popular media tends to

lump them together, Diaz is firm. “Yes, gunslingers lived here. And yes, Stoudenmire was a force to be reckoned with. And yes, (outlaw) John Wesley Hardin set up a law practice across the street from what later became Hotel Paso Del Norte (Camino Real) on S. El Paso. But none of these men were cowboys.” Not all of El Paso’s Wild West history had to do with ne’er-do-wells and hard working ranchers, however. “We also had a world famous female rodeo rider in the early 1900s from El Paso,” said Bernie Sargent, a historian and co-founder of the Old West reenactment group Six Guns and Shady Ladies. “The first gal that competed here in El Paso was Lucille Mulvil. She actually won $1,000, and the cowboys couldn’t believe it was a woman doing it. And then there was a gal from El

Paso named Rose Smith. She got caught up in the fervor of women competing in the rodeo. She did quite well.” Although ranching and rodeos may no longer be a linchpin of El Paso culture, it is still an important part of our heritage, according to Polk. “The cowboy way in El Paso is real, it should be remembered,” Polk said. “It’s a major part of our history. Don’t let it die.” Sargent echoes the sentiment. “When we lose our history, we lose our basis. Our soul,” he said. “We really have to remember all aspects of it.” El Paso County Historical Society’s Robert Diaz described cowboys of Old West El Paso as the ultimate common folk, working as businessmen and ranchers. They were often veterans of the Civil War. Photo courtesy of the El Paso County Historical Society


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CALENDAR

WED. JULY 19

El Paso Ghost Tours Paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ Nolita Corner Bistro, 420 E San Antonio Ave, 8-10:30 p.m., $20, discount on Facebook, 915-4906769, elpasoghosttours.com. Make Your Own Doughnut Kids and bigger people make custom doughnuts. Hillside Coffee & Doughnuts, 4935 N. Mesa St., Ste. 1B, 2-4 p.m., free, 915-474-3453. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Journey, Asia Rock music performance. Don Haskins Center, 151 Glory Rd., 7 p.m., $42-$344, ticketmaster.com. ‘Wine, Camera, Action: Landscape and Astrophotography with Wayne Suggs’ The workshop teaches long exposure, panning and landscapes. Photography Enthusiasts of El Paso hosts a Wednesday workshop every month. Wine Attitude, 6633 N. Mesa St., 6-9 p.m., $35 w/two glasses of wine, $20 no wine, peepfocalpoint@ gmail.com, peepclub.org. Wacky Wednesday: Comedy Open Mic Open to all jesters. Age 21+ 5 Points Bistro, 3019 Montana Ave, 9 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomedy. State Line Music Series: Valerie Ponzio Pop music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, countyline.com/StateLineMusic. html. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 5:30 p.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org. Improvisation Workshop Lessons on improv. Five spots available. Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 7-10 p.m.

Coding with Brew: Web Development Booze and learning. Coding class for adults. Lessons are: create a web page using HTML elements, apply CSS, program interactive JavaScript in a web page. No prior experience needed. Event runs July 12-Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. Wed.-Thurs. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., Ste. 2, 6-8 p.m., $250, 915-209-2656, fablabelpaso. org/calendar.

JULY 19-26, 2017

JULY 2017 F r i d a y, J u l y 2 1 - S u n d a y, A u g u s t 1 3

CALENDAR GIRLS

April Ticket Acoustic duo performs. Mesa Street Grill, 3800 N. Mesa St., 8-11 p.m., free, 915-532-1881, aprilticket.com. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. The Hub of Human Innovation, 500 West Overland, Suite 230, 9 a.m.-10 a.m., free, 915-321-3123, 1millioncups.com/elpaso. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 2729. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt.

THURS. JULY 20 Fronteriza Food, Cuisine Cooking Class Seasonal cooking class offered every Thursday. Today’s lesson is tamales, rajas, rojo y pollo and chile verde. Cafe Mayapan, 2000 Texas Ave., 6 p.m., $35, 915-217-1126, eventbrite.com. April Ticket Acoustic duo performs. Coco Miel, 1515 Lee Trevino Dr., 7:30-10:30 p.m., 915-595-7170. Cool Canyon Nights Weekly, free outdoor music performance by local bands. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 6-9 p.m., free, $10 VIP, elpasolive.com/coolcanyonnights.

Text/photo provided by El Paso Playhouse

T

he El Paso Playhouse opens its 54th season with Tim Firth’s British comedy-drama based on the 2003 film of the same name. After Annie Clarke’s husband dies of leukemia, she and her best friend Chris Harper resolve to raise money for the local hospital by creating and selling a calendar. They manage to persuade four other friends and fellow Women’s Institute members to pose nude for a pinup

calendar featuring middle aged women. The calendar turns out to be a major success, but Chris and Annie’s friendship is tested with the resulting media circus and their newfound fame. “Calendar Girls” is based on a true story of 11 WI members who posed nude to raise money for the Leukemia Research Fund. Opening night of the production will include free finger food and drinks. Ticket are $12

for senior citizens (62+), students and military members and $15 for general admission. Friday and Saturday performances are at 8 p.m. while Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. El Paso Playhouse is located at 2501 Montana Ave. Find more info at 915-532-1317, theelpasoplayhouse@gmail.com, ElPasoPlayhouse.com and facebook.com/elpaso.playhouse.

Tonight - July 19

VALERIE PONZIO July 26

SORRY ABOUT YOUR SISTER You Must Be 21 Or Accompanied By A Parent To Enter All Shows

Join us from 3-7:30 for $2 drink specials and FREE Live Music from 8-10 Please help support the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank by donating at the show.

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank

The State Line Bar-b-q 1222 Sunland Park Dr. (915) 581-3371 Schedule At countyline.com


CALENDAR JULY 19-26, 2017

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM

El Paso Ghost Tours Paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ Nolita Corner Bistro, 420 E San Antonio Ave, 8-10:30 p.m., $20, discount on Facebook, 915-4906769, elpasoghosttours.com.

“Funny F*ckin Fridays” Comedy Open Mic Music spun by DJ Kasual. Doors open at 9 p.m. Age 21+ Dr. Bombay’s Nice Dreams Hookah Lounge, 9828 Montana Ave., Ste. F, 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomed.

Live Jazz Locals perform music. The Tap Bar & Restaurant, 408 E. San Antonio Ave., 10 p.m., 915-532-1848, facebook.com/TheTapBarEP.

#DeloDrives America Tour feat. Lisa Kelly In celebration of the 120th anniversary of the invention of the diesel engine. Chat with Lisa Kelly (History Channel’s “Ice Road Truckers”) over some fun games, great prizes, and free heavy duty motor oil. Love’s Travel Stop, 1300 Horizon Blvd, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., free, 650787-3328, deloperformance.com/ gamechangers.

Fake Tides, Bad Kids Garage punk from San Diego, CA. Local opener is Kat Suicide. Love Buzz, 3011 Pershing Dr., 9 p.m., 915-257-3118, facebook.com/faketides. So Loud Thursdays: What So Not DJ plays electronic music. Age 21+ Born and Raised, 2106 N. Zaragoza Rd., 9 p.m., $15-$25, 915-996-1066, jandkpresent.com. Life Drawing Session Art workshop with Gummi Thordarson. Bring your own supplies. Crossland Art Gallery, 500 W. Paisano, 5:30-8 p.m., $10, crosslandatgallery.com. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 10 a.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org. Coding with Brew: Web Development Booze and learning. Coding class for adults. Lessons are: create a web page using HTML elements, apply CSS, program interactive JavaScript in a web page. No prior experience needed. Event runs July 12-Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. Wed.-Thurs. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., Ste. 2, 6-8 p.m., $250, 915-209-2656, fablabelpaso. org/calendar. Teen Hangout Activities for teenagers. All El Paso Libraries, 4 p.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrarys.org. Improvisation Workshop Lessons on improv. Five spots available. Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 7-10 p.m. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 2729. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt.

FRI. JULY 21 Copywrite Rap music performance with local opener Space Captains Collective. Age 18+ Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango St., 9 p.m., 915-307-7736, facebook.com/ clubhereiloveyou. El Paso Ghost Tours Paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ Nolita Corner Bistro, 420 E San Antonio Ave, 8-10:30 p.m., $20, discount on Facebook, 915-4906769, elpasoghosttours.com. Alfresco Fridays: Soul Sacrifice Weekly outdoor concert series. This week is a Santana cover band. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 6 p.m., free, alfrescofridays.com. David Blaine Magician performs. Plaza Theater, 125 Pioneer Plaza, 8 p.m., ticketmaster.com.

Micro Championship Wrestling Little people get down in the squared circle. There will be a meet & greet at 7 p.m. All ages. Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, 122 S. Old Pueblo Rd., 8:15 p.m., free. ‘Danny and the Deep Blue Sea’ A drama about Danny and Roberta, two lost souls that meet in a rundown Bronx bar. Event runs July 14 through 22, 6:30 p.m. on July 14 and 22, 7:30 p.m. on July 15 and 21, 2:30 p.m. on July 16 Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 7:30 p.m., $7-$12. ‘Danny and the Deep Blue Sea’ A drama about Danny and Roberta, two lost souls that meet in a rundown Bronx bar. Event runs July 14 through 22, 6:30 p.m. on July 14 and 22, 7:30 p.m. on July 15 and 21, 2:30 p.m. on July 16 Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 6:30 p.m., $7-$12. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Omaha Storm Chasers. Event runs July 21-24, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat. and Mon., 6:05 p.m. Sun. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/epchihuahuas. Paralysis, Xenophile Thrash-metal music with openers Arson Kill and The Car Bombs. All ages. Paulina’s Badlands, 7792 Franklin Dr., 8 p.m., $5, 915-771-0997. Music Workshop All age music workshop featuring locals Mariachi Los Arrieros. La Fe Culture and Technology Center, 1314 E. Yandell, 12 p.m., free, 915-545-7190, lafe-ep. org. ‘Calendar Girls’ A comedy set in Yorkshire, England, a group of middle-aged women pose nude for a pinup calendar to raise money for the local hospital and become a media sensation. Event runs July 21-Aug. 3, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. El Paso Playhouse, 2501 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $15, 915-532-1317, elpasoplayhouse.com. ‘Yeomen of the Guard’ An English opera from the late 19th century. Colonel Fairfax has been sentenced to be beheaded. To avoid leaving his estate to his accuser, Fairfax secretly marries a strolling singer. Black Box Theater, 430 N. Main St., 7:30 p.m., $15, $12 senior/student, 575-5231223. Lucha Frontera Weekly wrestling show featuring N.E.W. brawlers. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 6-10 p.m., $5-$10, 915356-5113, https://facebook.com/ neweraep.

Movies on the Lawn: ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Jerk turns into a monster and then meets a pretty girl that could take away his curse. Centennial Plaza, 500 W. University Ave., 8:30 p.m., free, news.utep.edu. ‘Into the Woods’ A childless couple journey to break a witch’s curse. Features a live orchestra. Event runs July 14-30, 7:30 p.m. Fri., 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Sun City Musical Theatre, 3733 Shell St., 7:30 p.m., $15, $12 student/ senior/military, $10 ages under 12, suncitymusicaltheatre.com. Hide Industrial/goth music performance with opener L.U.T.O. and Faciem. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 11 p.m., free. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 2729. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt. Viva El Paso Musical that celebrates the four major cultures that have influenced El Paso. Event runs June 16-July 29, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8 p.m., $9, vivaelpaso.org.

SAT. JULY 22 Sunset Film Society: ‘The Bee Gees’ Outdoor documentary screening. Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, 1 Ardovino Dr., 9 p.m., free, 915-5436747, sunsetfilmsociety.org. Archery and Atl-atl Demonstration Demos held every Saturday. Equipment provided. Marshals present. Archers welcome to bring own recurve or longbow. El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Rd., 11 a.m.-2 p.m., free, 915-7554332., archaeology.elpasotexas. gov. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Let Freedom Sing: Naughty by Nature, Killah Priest Hip-hop music performance with local opener DJ One Man Jazz Freedom Crossing, 1611 Haan Rd., 7 p.m., free, freedomcrossingatfortbliss.com/ events. Health and Wellness Fair Vendors and demos and more health related activities. Cielo Vista Mall, 8401 Gateway Blvd West, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., free, 925-546-6411. Music on the Lawn: If We Were Turtles Local pop-rock band performs. Openers are Fallex and Old Kids. Fountains at Farrah, 8889 Gateway Blvd. West, 7:30-10:30 p.m., free, fountainsatfarah.com/eventcalendar. Benefit Concert The Hard Road Trio performs to benefit KRWG Public Media. Rio Grande Theatre, 211 N. Main St., 7 p.m., 575-523-6403, riograndetheatre.com.

El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Omaha Storm Chasers. Event runs July 21-24, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat. and Mon., 6:05 p.m. Sun. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/epchihuahuas. NightDrive: San Ligre, Dirty Circuits Synth-pop music performance. Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango Ave., 9 p.m.-2 a.m., 915-307-7736, https:// facebook.com/clubhereiloveyou. El Paso Public Library Bookfair Join the El Paso Public Library from10 a.m. - 5 p.m.at Barnes & Noble Sunland Park for hands-on demonstrations of some of the technology available in their makerspace. A percent of each sale made in support of the bookfair will be donated back to the library. Come out and support your local community! Barnes & Noble Sunland Park, 705 Sunland Park Dr., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-581-5353, facebook.com/ BNSunlandPark. Las Cruces Tequila, Taco and Cerveza Fest The third annual gourd stuffing. Mariachis, lucha libre, chihuahua races. Fill your eyes with spectacle, make the belt Thanksgiving loose, tell your body shut up, it’s time to taco down. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 5 p.m.-11 p.m., $20 adv., $25 door, ttcfest.com. Kaos Metal music performance. The Rockhouse, 9828 Montana Ave., 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., free, 915-591-7625.

15 Sun City Splash and Dash Swimrun event for ages 7-15 years old. Ascarate Park, 6900 Delta Dr., 7 a.m.10 a.m., $2 spectator, $25 runner, raceelpaso.com/splash-dash. Border Metal Massacre Local black and death metal music performances by Genocide ov Buccon, Tlabkal, Asphyxiation and Abaddon. Paulina’s Bar & Grill, 7792 Franklin Dr., 8 p.m., 915-771-0997. Italoboyz House/techno duo DJ. Local support: Mago, Skillz, Jose Alberto. Outdoor/block party event. Age 18+ Prickly Elder, 916 N. Mesa St., 9 p.m., $15, defaultlogic.eventbrite.com. Funko Pop! Swap #2 Buy, sell and trade Funk Pop toys with collectors. Mayhem Toyz and Comics, 2200 N. Lee Trevino Dr., 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m., 915-595-6762. Album Benefit Concert Local souljazz band Kikimora performs. Tickets at All That Music and Headstand. Virtual tickets at brownpapertickets.com. Star City Studios, 120 W. Castellano, 8 p.m.-11 p.m., $15 (show,drinks,food). Ancestral Health Fair A gathering of culture, harvest and dance. Grocery bags and raffles. Kid’s corrido class. Family games and fandango. Dance and exercise classes. Plant classes. Cooking classes. Menopause class. Cafe Mayapan, 2000 Texas Ave., 9 a.m.-2 p.m., free, https://facebook. com/mujerobrera.

Andrew McMahon Singer-songwriter performs. Former vocalist/pianist/ lyricist for Something Corporate. Songwriter for Jack’s Mannequin. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets at 7th Layer, All That Music and Eloise. Online tickets at ticketfly.com. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St., 7:30 p.m., $28.50 adv., $31.50 door, 915-3519909, trickyfalls.com. Sunset Film Society: ‘Tangled’ A wanted bandit meets Rapunzel while on the run. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 2 p.m., free, sunsetfilmsociety.org. ‘Calendar Girls’ A comedy set in Yorkshire, England, a group of middle-aged women pose nude for a pinup calendar to raise money for the local hospital and become a media sensation. Event runs July 21-Aug. 3, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. El Paso Playhouse, 2501 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $15, 915-532-1317, elpasoplayhouse.com. ‘Yeomen of the Guard’ An English opera from the late 19th century. Colonel Fairfax has been sentenced to be beheaded. To avoid leaving his estate to his accuser, Fairfax secretly marries a strolling singer. Black Box Theater, 430 N. Main St., 7:30 p.m., $15, $12 senior/student, 575-5231223. Gregor Tresher DJ technos. Age 18+ 301, 301 S. Ochoa St., 10 p.m., $5 w/RSVP for 21+, $10 gen. admish, smgevents.com.


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‘Into the Woods’ A childless couple journey to break a witch’s curse. Features a live orchestra. Event runs July 14-30, 7:30 p.m. Fri., 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Sun City Musical Theatre, 3733 Shell St., 7:30 p.m., $15, $12 student/ senior/military, $10 ages under 12, suncitymusicaltheatre.com.

Music Under the Stars: Mariachi Los Arrieros Mariachi music performance. Chamizal National Memorial, 800 S. San Marcial St., 7:30 p.m., free, 915-534-0600, elpasolive.com/ musicunderthestars.

Elks Lodge Blood Drive Blood taking for a blood bank for saving lives. Free ice cream and t-shirt for donors. El Paso Elks Lodge #187, 2278 Trawood Dr., 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 915532-4441, elpasoelks187.org.

KISS-FM ‘Summer of Love’ Brunch Series Wine, brunch and a movie screening. Today’s movie: “Best Little Whore House in Texas.” Alamo Drafthouse, 250 E. Montecillo Blvd., 11 a.m., drafthouse.com.

UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 2729. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt.

Mariachi Sunday A big ‘ol dose of that classical Mexican folk. Happens every Sunday. Age 18+ Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, 122 S. Old Pueblo Rd., 12 p.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-860-7777, speakingrockentertainment.com.

Eureka O’Hara Drag show featuring a contestant from season nine of RuPaul’s Drag Race. Touch Bar & Nightclub, 11395 James Watt Dr., 9 p.m., $5 age 21+, $10 age 18+, eventbrite.com. Fudge the World Writing Workshop Local writer leads a writing workshop Memorial Park Public Library, 3200 Copper Ave., 12:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m., free, 915-328-5484, https:// facebook.com/tumblewords. Viva El Paso Musical that celebrates the four major cultures that have influenced El Paso. Event runs June 16-July 29, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8 p.m., $9, vivaelpaso.org.

Sun City Roller Girls Banked track roller derby double header. Sexecutioners vs. Las Diablas. Las Catrinas vs. Las Viudas Negras. Halftime music by Viva Las Vegas. Half time raffle benefits Borderland Rainbow Center. Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets at Golden Goose, Label Exchange, The Pershing Inn and Zombie Skate Shop. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 6 p.m., $7 adv., $10 door, $7 military, free age 10 and under, suncityrollergirls.com. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Omaha Storm Chasers. Event runs July 21-24, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat. and Mon., 6:05 p.m. Sun. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 6:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, https://facebook. com/epchihuahuas.

‘Calendar Girls’ A comedy set in Yorkshire, England, a group of middle-aged women pose nude for a pinup calendar to raise money for the local hospital and become a media sensation. Event runs July 21-Aug. 3, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. El Paso Playhouse, 2501 Montana Ave., 2 p.m., $15, 915-532-1317, elpasoplayhouse.com. ‘Yeomen of the Guard’ An English opera from the late 19th century. Colonel Fairfax has been sentenced to be beheaded. To avoid leaving his estate to his accuser, Fairfax secretly marries a strolling singer. Black Box Theater, 430 N. Main St., 3 p.m., $15, $12 senior/student, 575-523-1223. ‘Into the Woods’ A childless couple journey to break a witch’s curse. Features a live orchestra. Event runs July 14-30, 7:30 p.m. Fri., 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Sun City Musical Theatre, 3733 Shell St., 2:30 p.m., $15, $12 student/ senior/military, $10 ages under 12, suncitymusicaltheatre.com. Summer Dance Social A spot to dance in. Shundo Ballroom Dance Studio, 120 Paragon Lane, 2 p.m.-5 p.m., $10, $7 military/members, $5 student. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 2729. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt.

The Morning After Champagne Brunch Dance party with food and champagne. Born and Raised, 2106 N. Zaragoza Rd., 11 a.m., jandkpresent.com.

in Mexico. Is that correct?? - August in Austin

By Gustavo Arellano comment: @whatsupweekly

Q.

I’m not searching for relationship advice, Mexican; just wondering why there is no love between Honduras and Mexico. - La Gordita Dear Chubby Catracha: Mexicans might despise Salvadorans and have no use for Guatemalans, but Hondurans? We play “Sopa de Caracol” at all our parties, don’t we?

Q.

My understanding, lo these many years, is that Mexicans cannot give up their Mexican citizenship. I understand that under Mexican law, a natural-born Mexican is never legally allowed to claim exclusive other citizenship, and that Mexico will not recognize U.S. embassy legal process in Mexico on behalf of a Mexican naturalized as a U.S. citizen who is present

Dear Gabacho: You’re listening to too much Alex Jones. The Mexican Constitution says native-born Mexicans can never lose their nationality, which is just a fancy way for Mexico to claim more people subject to its authority—an important point we’ll use before the New World Order tribunal in a couple of years to reestablish Aztlán.

Q.

In 1990, some of my Mexican friends told me it cost $500 to come from Mexico with a coyote. Recently, a friend from Tamazunchale told me it now costs $2,500. How much of this money, paid to the coyotes, go to Border Patrol Employees? - El Pollo Loco Dear Gabacho: $2,500? Try $5,000 to start, all thanks to Trump’s immigration policies. And Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly had the gall to take credit for the jacked-up prices. That’s like a big-game hunter saying that the antelope over his fireplace worked extra-hard to get there. ___ Ask the Mexican at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram @gustavo_arellano!

MON. JULY 24 El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Omaha Storm Chasers. Event runs July 21-24, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat. and Mon., 6:05 p.m. Sun. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, https://facebook. com/epchihuahuas.

TUES. JULY 25 Board Game Night Board and tabletop games. Bring your own. There are board games onsite, too. Game Vault, 9828 Montana Ave., 6 p.m.-10 p.m., free, https://gamevaultelpaso.com. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Taking Back Sunday, Every Time I Die Opener: Modern Chemistry. Real tickets at 7th Layer, All That Music, Bowie Feathers and Eloise. 6:30 p.m. doors. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 7:30 p.m., $28.50 adv., $30 door, ticketfly.com. Citizenship Classes Information to pass the United States citizen test. All El Paso Libraries, 5 p.m., free, 915212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Comedy Open Mic Doors open at 9 p.m. Age 21+ Coconuts Bar & Grill, 816 N. Piedras St., 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/epucomedy.

JULY 19-26, 2017 El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Iowa Cubs. Event runs July 2528, 7:05 p.m. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook. com/epchihuahuas.

WED. JULY 26 El Paso Ghost Tours Paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ Nolita Corner Bistro, 420 E San Antonio Ave, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m., $20, discount on Facebook, 915-490-6769, elpasoghosttours. com. Make Your Own Doughnut Kids and bigger people make custom doughnuts. Hillside Coffee & Doughnuts, 4935 N. Mesa St., Ste. 1B, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., free, 915-474-3453. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Wacky Wednesday: Comedy Open Mic Open to all jesters. Age 21+ 5 Points Bistro, 3019 Montana Ave, 9 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomedy. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 5:30 p.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org.

Coding with Brew: Web Development Booze and learning. Coding class for adults. Lessons are: create a web page using HTML elements, apply CSS, program interactive JavaScript in a web page. No prior experience needed. Event runs July 12-Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. Wed.-Thurs. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., Ste. 2, 6-8 p.m., $250, 915-209-2656, fablabelpaso. org/calendar. Meditation on Twin Hearts Cost: free Meditation to open the heart and crown chakra. Boom, chakra, chakra. Unity Church, 1420 Alabama St., United States of America, 7 p.m., facebook.com/lightelpaso. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors, and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. The Hub of Human Innovation, 500 West Overland, Suite 230, 9-10 a.m., free, 915-321-3123, 1millioncups. com/elpaso. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Iowa Cubs. Event runs July 2528, 7:05 p.m. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, https:// facebook.com/epchihuahuas. State Line Music Series: Whitney Rose Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, countyline.com/ StateLineMusic.html.


CALENDAR JULY 19-26, 2017

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ANDREW MCMAHON TA L K S G R AT I F I C AT I O N , PERSEVERANCE

By Alan Sculley comment: @whatsupweekly

T

his Friday, singer-songwriter Andrew McMahon will bring his Zombies Summer Tour to Tricky Falls. His 2014 self-titled first solo album under the name Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness gave him the biggest success of his 15-year music career when the song “Cecilia and the Satellite” went top 10 on four different alternative and rock singles charts. It might seem like a long wait for a break-

WHAT’S UP

Andrew McMahon – Zombies Summer Tour

through to mainstream radio, but McMahon, in a sense, is happy he didn’t have that sort of success any earlier in his career. “I think why there’s a sense of gratification of when it came to me is [because] it was the first time I was ready for it,” said McMahon, reflecting on his hit single during a recent phone interview. After Mahon’s first band (Something Corporate) decided to take a break in 2004, he wanted to explore a more classic pop direction with his songwriting and decided to make a solo album under the band name Jack’s Mannequin. That album, “Everything in Transit,” was ready for release when in May 2005, McMahon was diagnosed with cancer of the white blood sells, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia as it was officially known. On Aug. 23, 2005, the day “Everything in Transit” was released, he received a stem cell transplant from his sister, Katie.

With Arizona, The Greeting Committee Saturday, July 22 Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St. Doors open 6:30 p.m. All ages, $21-$25 Tickets available at Bowie Feathers, 7th Layer, All that Music, Eloise and TicketFly.com More info at TrickyFalls.com UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-30. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22 and 27-29. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16, 23 and 30. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-7476060, utep.edu/udt.

EXHIBITS Reel Authentico Contest El Paso’s Downtown Management District seeks videos by local filmmakers capturing the spirit of Downtown El Paso. Deadine is July 26, downtownelpaso. com/dmd. Ends 7/26/17. 2017 Annual Juried UTEP Student Art Exhibition Art and design by UTEP undergrads. All media taught in the department represented. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-7476151, rubin.utep.edu. Ends 7/28/17. International Eye of the Camera Juried photography exhibit. Crossland Gallery, 500 W. Paisano Dr., 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 915-534-7377, crosslandartgallery.com. Ends 7/29/17. Art of the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro Group art exhibit featuring 10 local artists. Golden Eagle Gallery, 1501 Main St., 12-4 p.m., 915-851-0093, sanelizariohistoricdistrict. org. Ends 7/30/17. New Acquisitions Presenting new additions to the permanent collection including Joshua Shane Flores, Felice House, Wendy Red Star, Jim Waid and more. NMSU Art Gallery, 1390 E. University Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, 575-6462545, https://uag.nmsu.edu. Ends 8/18/17.

Spirit Lines: Helen Hardin Etchings Twentythree copper-plate etchings produced in the early 1980s by a Native American artist. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 12-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300, elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 10/8/17.

‘Nature’ The New Mexico Watercolor Society’s Southern Chapter’s new exhibit. Southwest Environmental Center’s Cottonwood Gallery, 275 N. Main St., 9 a.m.-6 p.m., free, 575-5225552. Ends 8/31/17.

‘American Plains Artists’ The 32nd annual juried exhibit and sale features 104 two-and three-dimensional realistic and representational artworks in traditional media that depicts the American Great Plains region. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 12-5 p.m., nmfarmandranchmuseum.org. Ends 11/5/17.

Mesilla Valley Fine Arts August Exhibit Dual exhibit. Photographs by Bob Zolto. Paintings by Frank Peacock. Mesilla Valley Fine Arts Gallery, 2470-A Calle de Guadalupe, 10 a.m.5 p.m., 575-522-2933, mesillavalleyfinearts. com. Ends 8/31/17. An American Animator, Don Bluth Celebration of the 10th annual Plaza Classic Film Festival. An El Paso native animator known for “Anastasia” and “All Dogs Go To Heaven.” Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-2120300, elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 9/7/17. Suzi Davidoff: Simplified World Explores human-wrought changes in the ecosystem. Drawings on found maps and globes with accompanying hand-drawn animation. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-7476151, rubin.utep.edu. Ends 12/15/17.

“I think there’s a lot that I’ve learned on this road of making music and living and surviving some pretty strange twists and turns,” McMahon said. “But I don’t know that in any other scenario, I would have felt one, as prepared, and two, as ready to sort of keep moving in the right direction.” His most recent album “Zombies on Broadway,” was released in February and will always hold a special place for him, he said. He began working on the album in New York City before “Cecilia” started to catch on, so some songs reflect the fear that the “Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness” album would falter and the thrill McMahon then felt as “Cecilia” became a hit and took his career to a new level. McMahon is excited to tour with the new album and bring out a show that includes some visual bells and whistles. “Obviously, the tour will be largely dedicated to bringing these new songs to life and have people hear the songs off of ‘Zombies on Broadway,’” McMahon said. “In that process, this is really the first time in awhile that I’ve been able to take a full headlining production out, so we’re excited to stretch out and bring out some cool toys that we don’t always get to play with.”

Photo courtesy of Andrew McMahon

The Red That Colored the World This art exhibit explores the use of the cochineal bug, used to create a red pigment, throughout history and places and art styles. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 12-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300, elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 8/20/17.

‘The Life of J’ New paintings from local Jorge Alfonso Polanco Aguirre. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-543-6747, internationalmuseumofart.net. Ends 8/31/17.

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AUDITIONS ‘Jewel Box Series’ Applications he Jewel Box Series is designed to foster and showcase community talent in the Philanthropy Theatre. Deadline is July 28, 2017. epcf.org/jewelbox. 7/28/17. Dia De Los Muertos 2017 Call for Artists The Calavera Coalition seeks original art for its official t-shirt and poster design for the “Dia de los Muertos on the Mesilla Plaza” event. The winner receives one free booth space for the event, valued at $175. All art must: reflect spirit of Dia de los Muertos, be in black and white format, pen and ink line art, easily converted to screen printing. Entries should be submitted on a CD or through e-mail as JPEG or PDF files. Deadline is Aug. 1, 12 a.m.-11:59 p.m., calaveracoalition@gmail.com. 8/1/17. Calling All Musicians and Vendors Need peeps for a two day craft beer and wine fest at Ft. Bliss. facebook.com/BlissTapandCork. 8/1/17.

Minerpalooza Volunteers Wanted Familyfriendly music festival needs some people to do things. minerpalooza.com/volunteer. Ends 8/1/17. El Paso Symphony Youth Orchestra Auditions Local musicians needed., 12 a.m.11:59 p.m., free, 915-525-5975, epsyos.org. 8/19/17.

MUSEUMS Aa Studios Various amounts of local art. 2645 Doña Ana Rd., Las Cruces, NM, 575-520-8752 or wysiwyg@zianet.com.

200 S. Santa Fe St., 915-342-6357 or DCCDreamChasersClub.com. El Paso Holocaust Museum and Study Center The museum was established to help educate the public about the Nazi Holocaust during WWII. 715 N. Oregon, Tues.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. and Sun. 1-5 p.m., and by appointment, 915-351-0048. El Paso Museum of Archaeology Dioramas and displays of ancient times. 4301 Transmountain Rd, Tue.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun. and Mon., 915-755-4332.

Al Borrego Studio & Gallery Original works, prints and gifts by Al Borrego. 1501C Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915-8510093, alborrego.com.

El Paso Museum of Art Permanent collections, special exhibits, art classes, film series, lectures, concerts, storytelling sessions and educational programs. 1 Arts Festival Plz, Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m-5 p.m.; Thur., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun., 12 p.m.-5 p.m, free, 915-532-1707 or elpasoartmuseum.org.

Bert Saldana Art Gallery Original Southwestern oil paintings and prints by Bert Saldana. 1501 Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.-Fri. 10 a.m.2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915-479-2926, bert_saldana@yahoo.com or bertsaldanafineart.com.

El Paso Museum of History The past displayed in permanent and temporary exhibitions. 510 N. Santa Fe Street, Tues-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 12-5 p.m., Thurs. 9 a.m.-9 p.m, closed Mondays and holidays, 915-351-3588, or elpasotexas.gov/history.

Centro Municipal de las Artes Museum offers poetry readings, art exhibitions, dance performances and art classes. 16 de Septiembre, Mariscal 105, Cd. Juarez, MX, free, every Sunday 11 a.m.-1 p.m., for more info (01152656) 617-2828.

Escamilla’s Fine Art Gallery & Studio Original impressionist paintings, prints and numerous gift items with Escamilla images. 1445 Main St., Ste. B1-2, San Elizario 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 12:30-4:30 p.m. Sun., 915-8510742 or 915-474-1800. albertoescamilla.com.

Crossland Gallery & Art Junction Home of the El Paso Art Association. 500 W. Paisano, Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free, 915-534-7377 or elpasoartassociation. com.

FOR MORE, SEE WHATSUPPUB. COM

Dream Chasers Club Local art exhibits.


18

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JULY 19-26, 2017

TAKING BACK SUNDAY’S ADAM LAZZARA EMBRACES CHANGES Tuesday, July 25, 6:30 p.m.

S

ince the reuniting of the original lineup of Taking Back Sunday, which stops at Tricky Falls on Tuesday, July 25, the band members have shown a new willingness to push themselves creatively. That is especially true of the group’s current album, “Tidal Wave,” which moves Taking Back Sunday well beyond the emo-rock sound many have associated with the band, introducing, in particular, a punkier edge to some of the songs. Frontman Adam Lazzara said part of what is allowing the group to branch out is realizing that this classic lineup of Taking Back Sunday – which also includes guitarists Ed Reyes and John Nolan, drummer Mark O’Connell and bassist Shaun Cooper – has a distinct musical identity. “I think there’s something we realized also through the process is most anything we do that’s the five of us, it’s always going to sound like Taking Back Sunday,” Lazzara said in a recent phone interview. Lazzara views the song “Tidal Wave” – and the album as a whole – as a sign that the band members are more willing than ever to let musical influences they have picked up over the years show up

By Alan Sculley / comment: @whatsupweekly

in their songwriting. “I’ve found with myself, the more I grow, the more open I am to listening to different (things) or just listening to things I maybe never would have given a chance when I was younger,” the singer said. “I think it’s the first time that we’ve worn a lot of our influences just right on our sleeves.” Taking Back Sunday is including songs from “Tidal Wave” as part of a career-spanning set on the summer tour. Being able to play the new songs is special for Lazzara. “There’s something about [‘Tidal Wave’] that I think it is holding a real special place in all of our hearts and minds right now,” Lazzara said. “Not that other records haven’t, but there’s just something about this album that feels a certain kind of special that I have a hard time putting into words.”

Photo by Ryan Russell

WHAT’S UP

Taking Back Sunday

With Every Time I Die, Modern Chemistry Tuesday, July 25 Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St. Doors open 6:30 p.m. All ages, $28.50 - $30 Tickets available at Bowie Feathers, 7th Layer, All that Music, Eloise and TicketFly.com More info at TrickyFalls.com


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