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Vol. 18 / No.47 / August 16-23, 2017

Overcoming common college pitfalls

Page 5 ............................................................................

UTEP’s new Center for Arts Entreprenuership Page 6 .........................................................................................

Finance 101:...................................................................... How to eat well on the cheap Page 7

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College resources you shouldn’t take for granted Page 8 .................................................................................. The symphony takes on The Beatles Page 12

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FROM THE EDITOR: VICTORIA G. MOLINAR comment: @whatsupweekly Photos by Victoria G. Molinar

WHAT GUEST STAR WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE AT THE NEXT PLAZA CLASSIC FILM FEST? AMARIS SANCHEZ:

BERLINDA CABAZOS:

IVAN TORRES:

GITZEL MONCIVAIS:

ROBERT BABBITT:

LAWRENCE WELSH:

Quentin Tarantino because his movies like “Kill Bill” are so exciting and they have a cooler, older vibe to them.

I’d bring Christopher Nolan because his movies can be very inspiring. He’s able to unravel the stories in a way that isn’t predictable and there’s amazing soundtracks that come out on his movies.

I would bring any of the MGM film musical stars who are still alive. I think Jane Powell is. I was actually friends with Cyd Charisse for the last few years of her life, and she would have loved the festival. I’m sure the MGM stars would have a lot of great stories to tell. Another person to consider is Timothy Bottoms from “The Last Picture Show” and a really good idea would be to bring in Peter Fonda from “Easy Rider.”

Eduardo Verástegui – he came out in “Bella.” He was also a producer in the movie. I like the film because the cinematography was great, the story was also really great and the actors did a great job at portraying the characters. They were very sincere.

I’m between Quentin Tarantino and Christopher Nolan. I feel like Tarantino would be a better guest, though, just because he likes to talk a lot. I’d like to hear the story behind his films. If you watch his interviews, he’s just so eager to talk and so knowledgeable.

Mickey Rourke because he’s one of the great American actors, and certainly one of the great Irish-American actors that’s kind of been forgotten a bit, but he’s in the lineage of James Dean. We could bring him in for “Rumble Fish” and “The Pope of Greenwich Village” and a bunch of his other movies.

I’m sure that a lot of readers can relate, but the older I get – and I’m turning 29 this fall – the more I feel like there’s so much I don’t know about the world around me. It’s a very humbling feeling, and when it comes to learning about things like wildlife and new music, it can evoke a fun sense of wonder. But this past Saturday, I simply felt dumbfounded. I wasn’t shocked that the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia would lead to a riot and countless injured. And by now, I’m not surprised to hear hateful remarks and to see any form of political upheaval. But was has me baffled is the fact that no matter how far we’ve advanced in other areas of human existence, we can’t seem to genuinely coexist. If I had children, I wonder if I’d find the “right” words to say to them, because even as an adult, I’ve had this naïve idea that the future wouldn’t pan out this way. I feel the responsibility to be a good example and stick to tolerance and discussion, but I know that those factors aren’t enough to maintain and promote peace on a larger scale. The morning of Saturday’s riot, I was enjoying the markets in both El Paso and Juarez – a stark juxtaposition next to what was happening in Charlottesville. My view that morning was a practically cloudless sky, beautiful old buildings, vibrantly colored aguas frescas and smiling faces from all walks of life. Right now, I don’t have answers or solutions. But while I try to figure things out, I can count my blessings and be grateful for the tolerant and kind people that surround me every day. While it’s important to stay informed and think critically, it’s equally important to a ck n o w l e d g e the lotus in the mud.

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AUGUST 16-23, 2017

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OVERCOMING COMMON COLLEGE

PITFALLS

Not sure if the major you’re studying is the right one for you after all? Don’t stress over it too much. You’re not alone; the National Center for Education Statistics revealed that 80 percent of American college students change majors at least once.

By Denise Nelson-Prieto comment: @whatsupweekly

For those getting ready to enter college for the first time or return to school, there are few things to remember, including dispelling the myth that you work better under pressure. That definitely doesn’t work for everyone, and the stress can add up. Also, caffeine is not a food group and should be used sparingly. Calendars actually serve a purpose. They have these neat little things called dates where you can input important information that will be useful at a future time. Michelle Blumenfeld, who holds a master’s in social work and is known as El Paso’s life coach, touts the benefits of time management and being organized as two fireproof ways to have a successful college career. “You have to be prepared,” she said. “You want to make sure you put everything in your calendar, know where all of your classes are and give yourself time to get to class.” She advises all incoming freshmen to map out where each of their classes is on campus, grab some friends and hit the pavement. “It’s a fun way to meet people and not be late on the first day,” she said. For those who are always chasing time, Blumenfeld recommends setting an alarm a half hour before class starts to ensure prompt arrival. Blumenfeld added that feeling overwhelmed when attending college is pretty much inevitable, but it doesn’t have to cause a melt-

down. By scheduling everything, down to exercising and alone time, you’re empowering yourself. “It’s important kids remember they have to have social engagement time, exercise time and time for solitude if they need it,” she advised. She recognized the frenzy of college and how the fact that you’re almost never by yourself can be overwhelming. “It’s an important skill to cultivate – to know when to be alone,” Blumenfeld said. Of course, all the advice in the world won’t stop you from making mistakes here and there. After all, mistakes are a part of the learning process, too! Below, we’ve put together a short list of ways to deal with common pitfalls.

Switching gears

The National Center for Education Statistics revealed that a whopping 80 percent of American college students change majors at least once. In fact, a 2013 New York Times article stated that less than 30 percent of college graduates actually have jobs related to their degrees. Switching gears mid-semester does not have to be a crisis. For Blumenfeld, she sees the undergrad years as a time to get the most of your education, no matter what your major, and changing disciplines can be a natural extension of that. “Anything you study – music, biology or tap dancing – that’s really the time in your life to do it,” she said. “At no other time will you be able to take classes for the sake of learning.” Catie McCorry-Andalis, associate vice president for Student

Life and dean of students at UTEP, touts the benefits of the university’s academic clubs, civic engagement opportunities, research opportunities and sports as a way to offset anxiety about choosing a field of study. “It’s not uncommon for a student to change their major, but the best way to understand that is by being engaged in clubs and many of the opportunities we have on campus, where you have an opportunity to refine and discover what you’re most interested in,” she said.

Money management

When you get that student loan or grant and find yourself with extra paper, it might not be the best idea to blow it on shoes and a new tattoo. Part of the growing pains of college includes learning how to budget your money. “It’s important to get things down on paper,” Blumenfeld suggested. “Make a budget. What it takes to be fiscally responsible is being able to differentiate what you want and what you need.” So bust out that pen and paper and figure out how much you need to live, and hopefully you’ll still have some spending cash. Of course, save money where you can by buying used books, considering car pooling to school and making coffee at home rather than dropping 4 to 5 bucks on a latte. In a 2014 analysis, the United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service reported that millennials spend $2,921 annually on dining out. Think of how much you could

save by preparing your own food! We offer advice on how to eat like a king on a pauper’s budget on page 7.

Roomates – a game of trial and error

For many, college is also a time to strike out on your own and get an apartment or dorm room. A common mistake is believing your roommate is going to be your BFF. In the case of dorms and on-campus apartments, resident assistants often get complaints that touch on issues ranging from theft to noisy roommates. The roommate effect can have long lasting consequence. A New York Times article titled “The Science of Roommates,” looked at how roommates’ behaviors influence one another. Things such as weight gain/ loss, study habits and even binge drinking were found to be some of the influ-

encing factors for first-year roommates. If you find yourself saddled with the roommate from hell, don’t fret. For campus living, McCorry-Andalis said arrangements can be made if two people absolutely cannot get along. However, she had some tips on ways to prevent killing each other. “Not everything’s going to be perfect, so our goal is to try to get them a roommate who’s going to work well for them,” she said. “We want to help make sure the relationship gets off to a healthy start by helping them understand and communicate.” In some instances, Blumenfeld suggested that roommates consider whether the source of their dilemma is their own behavior or attitude. “Maybe it’s not your roommate,” she said. “Maybe they’re giving off a vibe and you’re the one putting up your dukes.”


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AUGUST 16-23, 2017

UTEP’S CENTER FOR ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP KICKS OFF THIS FALL By Denise Nelson-Prieto comment: @whatsupweekly

El Paso Pro-Musica and the University of Texas at El Paso have joined forces to create the Center for Arts Entrepreneurship, which launches this fall on campus. The aim of the program is to expose music students to world-class performers and arm them with the practical skills necessary to pursue a career in classical music. “We’re really excited about it,” said the university’s music department head, Dr. Steve Wilson. “We’re bringing in some amazing guest artists to work with our students, play in ensemble with them and really interact with them on a level that’s unprecedented.” The official launch of the center was celebrated recently with a concert featuring Pro-Musica artistic director and world-class

cellist Zuill Bailey and other renowned performers. Bailey, who also teaches at UTEP, will head up the CAE. Lauded as an innovator and visionary in the realm of classical music, Bailey also became a Grammy award winner earlier this year. His out-of-the-box thinking has landed him in various venues that are not limited to concert halls. It’s not uncommon for him to play his cello in places like coffee shops, libraries and hospitals, increasing the accessibility of live classical music. “The successful people out there are engaging new audiences, different kinds of venues, coming up with innovative programming and incorporating different technologies into the program,” Wilson said. “No one does that better than Zuill Bailey.” For Bailey, the mark of great leaders and innovators in the field of classical mu-

El Paso Pro-Musica and UTEP celebrated the new Center for Arts Entrepreneurship with a concert this past Saturday, Aug. 12. Pictured here is Grammy-award winning cellist and Pro-Musica artistic director Zuill Bailey and acclaimed concert pianist Awadagin Pratt. Photo by Jorge Salgado

sic does not solely hinge on their ability to play their instruments. Instead, these people possess a great number of diverse skills and abilities that have propelled them to the top of their game. He pointed out some of the performers he brought in for the kick-off concert – including renowned musicians Martin Sher and Awadagin Pratt – as prime examples of these accomplished leaders and as a glimpse into the caliber of players he’s bringing into the center this fall. “Every musician that’s brought in is at the top of their field as a musician, but they’re also incredibly multi-faceted in other things they do, and equally successful,” Bailey said. Students will engage with the performers in a series of week-long, intensive classes at the center. Along with Wilson, Pro-Musica executive director Felipa Solis has established relationships with accomplished musicians to bring them to the center to talk to students about resume development, creating a digital portfolio, cultivating career opportunities and how to engage different audiences. The center will focus largely on instilling real-world skills in students and developing tools to interact with and engage the community. “The whole idea is El Paso Pro Musica and UTEP are combining forces to create a scenario of bigger, greater thought – no boundaries,” Bailey said. “[We’re] creating a multi-faceted existence for the students at the university through music and through all the inspired arts.” Wilson said while all students are invited to participate at the center, this year, the programming is specifically geared to music majors. During subsequent years, the scope will expand to include students studying all artistic mediums. The team is already working on future plans to develop an elective curriculum for music majors. Although the details haven’t been ironed out, classes on topics like principles of economics and marketing are on the table. “We want to train for life in the 21st century as an artist,” Wilson said.


AUGUST 16-23, 2017

7

FINANCE 101 By Dylan Taylor-Lehman comment: @whatsupweekly

Presented by evolve.fcu.org

EATING HEALTHY FOR CHEAP

For many of us, eating is one of the best activities of the day. Breakfast, lunch, lunch two, dinner, post-dinner, or a multitude of snacks – nothing is quite as satisfying as a good meal or five. However, whether you’re eating recreationally or for the basic three meals per day, it can be disheartening to see how even a routine trip to the grocery store can take a big bite out of your bank account. Conventional wisdom seems to hold that healthy foods are more expensive, but you can be handy in the kitchen and fill your bags at the grocery store without gobbling up a ton of hard-earned cash. We’ve rounded up a few pointers to help you eat like a king on a pauper’s budget. Grocery shopping A few strategies might help you save money before you even set foot in the grocery store. Planning out your meals, making the most of ingredients on hand, and making a list of what you need can help you avoid impulse buys and buying a bunch of random stuff that looks good, but may not yield filling, well-rounded dinners. • Visit the bulk bins: Buying food in bulk not only cuts down on unnecessary packaging, but yields cheaper prices and gives you the opportunity to buy ingredients in the quantities that you need. If you want to experiment with a new grain or legume or want to put together your own nut mix, a visit to the bulk bins will allow you to do this in a way that makes sense for your budget. Bring your own bag to add some eco-friendliness to your shop-

ping routine. • Rethink your protein: This might come off as annoying to those who shudder at the term vegetarian, but consider eating less meat. Meat is typically the most expensive part of a meal, but with a little research and experimentation, you can make an infinite amount of hearty, meatless recipes spanning many flavor palettes. Lentils, garbanzos, split peas, nuts, couscous, black beans, brown rice – all are inexpensive and filling staples that can be used in a multitude of recipes, and can conveniently be found side-byside in most bulk sections. Moreover, these items are dense in nutrients, vitamins, and fiber, and if stored in an airtight container,

will be good for a long time. • Explore your produce options: Consider buying produce from places other than grocery stores. Farmers markets, produce stands, and corner stores are often stocked with bountiful arrays of fruits and vegetables, often at better prices than supermarkets. (Five oranges for $1, for example, means a whole lot of freshsqueezed orange juice in my household.) Produce that is in season tends to be much cheaper, so pay attention to what’s currently growing and what is being flown in from the other side of the world. Another tip is to buy frozen fruits and vegetables, which are typically inexpensive (and are often on 10 for $10-type sales) and can be used in a ton of different ways. • Buy generic: Of course, make sure you are getting the quality ingredients you want, but for basic staples, there is often little difference in brand-name and generic items aside from price. Check the priceper-ounce notation on the price tag (and not just the price), as packaging can be deceptive. • Sales: Take advantage of sales on items you love, but also be aware that just because something happens to be on sale doesn’t mean it is something you need. You’re not saving $3 by buying a $10 item on sale for $7; you’re spending $7 you didn’t plan on spending in the first place! • Cooking Going out to eat is great – no muss, no fuss, and you get to eat stuff you might not know how to cook. For those on a budget, however, a $10$20 check each time you go out to eat can add up very quickly. But you’ve been so good about saving money by shopping responsibly at the grocery store, so let’s take it one step further by cooking more meals at home. One strategy that can help you

save time and money on meals is to cook enough food so that you have leftovers. That way, you’ll have lunch ready to go for the next day (or days). When you’re putting away dinner, simply portion out food for tomorrow so you can throw your containers in your bag as you head out the door. Not having to think about what you’re going to eat affords significant peace of mind, especially if you know your lunch is going to be tasty since you made it yourself. And if the food is amenable to freezing (lasagna – yes; salad – no way!), you can freeze whole meals or separate ingredients to make new meals when you are so deeply engaged in studying Kafka or some esoteric calculus formula you can barely pull yourself away from your desk to eat, let alone cook. You can also repurpose leftover odds and ends into new meals. Potatoes getting stiff in the fridge? Rice starting to dry out? Consider using them as ingredients in soup. Jason Lucero, a sous chef at Tabla and Ode, suggests buying a rotisserie chicken for its versatility and abundant meat. You can easily whip up flautas, tacos and tostadas with chicken and tortillas, which can be cheaply topped with vegetables and beans. While not necessarily the cheapest item, avocados can be added not only for the flavor, but for their spectacular nutritional content. Lucero also suggests making big salads, which can be topped with the aforementioned chicken, tuna or garbanzo beans. You can also add quinoa and other grains, he says, or experiment with flavors by adding fruit, such as watermelon or cantaloupe, to salads. Salads are relatively quick to prepare and the ingredients can be cobbled together without undue expense. And although essentially devoid of nutrients and anything of value to your body, that classic college staple, ramen noodles, can easily be jazzed up with chopped vegetables, peanuts, sprouts, thin strips of meat or a fried egg. You’ll be surprised with what you can do with a 20 cent bag of noodles!


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MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR COLLEGE EXPERIENCE

R&B duo Nina Sky performed at last year’s Minerpalooza pep rally. Tuition fees cover events like Minerpalooza, music shows and guest speakers, said Catie McCorry-Andalis, dean of students and associate vice president for Student Life at UTEP. Photo courtesy of UTEP Communications By Luis Carlos Lopez comment: @whatsupweekly

It’s inching towards that time of year when school starts and the I-10 at West El Paso challenges Los Angeles and Interstate 405 for the title of world’s biggest parking lot. But even as back-to-schoolers begrudge the stop-and-go traffic, it is also the time of year when dreams, aspirations and ambi-

tions are re-sharpened. If you’re in college, you might be counting the calories of that morning latte and your hard-earned pennies as you try to figure out what is included in tuition, what is covered through financial aid and what is coming out of your own pocket – or uh, your parent’s debit card. Ah, yes. Upward mobility comes at a cost of one credit hour at a time.

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Tuition and university fees might finally be coming down by some estimates, but their costs are no chump change. According to a recent NPR article, tuition grew at more than double the rate of inflation from 1990 through 2016. So as college students embark on a costly journey, doesn’t it make sense to take advantage of all the things covered by fees and tuition?

AUGUST 16-23, 2017

In the case of fees and tuition at the University of Texas at El Paso, Catie McCorry-Andalis, dean of students and associate vice president for Student Life, said the university offers plenty of resources for all students. “At our campus, we take quite seriously that your education is not only what happens in the classroom; it’s what happens outside of it,” McCorry-Andalis said. “It’s also about our students’ ability to access opportunities that are not available anywhere else.” McCorry-Andalis said tuition fees cover events such as the Minerpalooza pep rally, music shows and guest speakers. The dean of students also lauded UTEP’s efforts to offer tuition services to all –freshmen, graduate, undergraduate and returning students. While rates fluctuate depending on a major, UTEP students pay approximately $376.11 per credit hour. The fees are separate from tuition. Those cover things like a library fee, recreation fee and health care fee. Best Value Schools ranked UTEP number 8 out of 100 most affordable universities in America. The university drew praise for its affordability and commitment of $100 million every year to support advanced research and independent studies. “I paid for my first year out of pocket, so I made sure to know what I was paying for,” said former UTEP miner Nicole Chavez. Now working at CNN in Atlanta, Chavez said part of the challenges of taking advanContinued on 9


AUGUST 16-23, 2017

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tage of these services is that UTEP is a commuter school. “I felt like not a lot of students spent time at the campus, especially after 4 p.m.” Chavez said. “I feel like if I had lived on campus, I would have taken full advantage of the services.” Danya Perez-Hernandez agreed that commuting to and from UTEP made it difficult to enjoy all that the school had to offer, but added that having health benefits and internship opportunities at the campus allowed her to quit her job during her last year of school to focus on finding internships related to her major. Perez-Hernandez works for The Monitor in McAllen. “I had to quit my job and rely on my work through UTEP,” she said. “At that point, I was aware of the services that were provided. It felt good to know that I could count on the extra support from the university.” El Paso Community College is also not far behind when it comes to offering resources, said associate vice president of Instruction and Student Success, Dr. Julie Penley. Part of the tuition fees at EPCC include things such as tutoring, offering office hours and the Pretesting Retesting Educational Program (PREP), which helps improve students’ placement scores. Penley added that one of the things students need to improve on is getting over the fear of using resources available at places such as EPCC and UTEP. She said these resources are often taboo because students are often afraid or ashamed to ask for help. “Nobody wants to appear vulnerable,” Penley said. “They are looking around and they may feel like they are the only ones who don’t get it. They are hesitant to ask questions in class, let alone to go outside of class, be proactive and seek services. Maybe this is something faculty can do in their classes, letting students know that there’s no such thing as a silly question. You are smart to ask questions and reach out for help.”

UPWARD BOUND: BREAKING BARRIERS AND TRADITIONS When it comes to college, there seems to be a disconnect between college readiness and college eligibility. In his 2005 book, “College Knowledge: What it Really Takes for Students to Succeed and What We Can Do to Get Them Ready,” David Conley pointed out that in the U.S. education system, high schools make students college-eligible, not college ready. The Upward Bound program is doing something about it. College admissions advisor Mark Jurado said the program is not only making students college-eligible, but giving them the right tools to succeed. “Our model is called, ‘resiliency in the face of adversity or against the odds,’” he said. “We serve first-generation, low-income students. We try to instill that learning is not only about aptitude, but also about increasing our capacity for learning through hard work and effort.” Offered through the University of Texas at El Paso, Upward Bound supports high school students in their preparation for post-secondary studies. According to the program’s website, it serves low-income students and students whose parents don’t have a bachelor’s degree. The program’s goal is to increase the rates at which participants enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education. Students must be at least 13-years-old and no older than 19, and they must be entering the 9th and 10th grades. While the program is selective, Jurado said programs such as Upward Bound are critical in helping students break barriers and get ahead in life. He added schools, teachers and counseling at UTEP, El

Paso Community College and other campuses can offer help, but at the end of the day, it’s up to the student. “You can lead the horse to the water, but you can’t make the horse drink,” Jurado said. “Many students are exposed to resources during, let’s say, student orientation – whether it’s here at UTEP or at EPCC or Berkeley or Arizona State. Ultimately, it’s up to the student to take advantage of all these wonderful resources that universities have to provide.” This, Jurado said, is what creates a chasm between families with resources and first-generation college students and students of color. “That is an issue among Latinos,” Jurado said. “Maybe it’s meekness, maybe it’s shyness or just simply tradition or custom to not ask for help. We have to break through that barrier. That’s something we teach students: to learn how to knock on doors and ask for help.” Valedictorian and Parkland High School outgoing senior, Sharie Campbell, 18, was part of the Upward Bound program. She received scholarships that will cover the entire cost of attending Texas A&M, which she will be attending this fall. She plans to go into the medical field. Campbell said the program gave her motivation to succeed. “People try to set a standard for you saying that you won’t succeed,” she said. “ T h a t gave me more motivation, if anything, to show that people from my background can succeed despite where they grew up.”


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SPOTLIGHT ON DANCE: LESSONS LEARNED AT THE DANCE CONFERENCE By Jennifer Burton comment: @whatsupweekly

El Paso has found itself transformed into a nursery for the performing arts. Several new dance companies have been christened over the course of the last three years. Across the city, dance events are being held on a nearly weekly basis. Spotlight on Dance focuses on these new companies, individual artists, their local productions and touring events. In July, dance instructors, dance scientists, choreographers and performers from around the world converged at New Mexico State University to gather for the Bill Evans Teachers and Dancers Institute and the International Dance Science and Pedagogy Conference. Hosted by NMSU’s Department of kinesiology and dance and modern dance pioneer William “Bill” Evans, the twopart workshop and conference included intensive instruction and presentations in Evans’ technique, Laban-Bartenieff-based movement fundamentals (LMA/BF), somatics and pedagogy. Instructors and keynote speakers included LMA/BF practitioner and theorist Peggy Hackney, dance scientist Karen Clippinger, ballet instructor and dance scientist Kitty Daniels, Feldenkrais practitioner Suzie Lundgren, pedagogist Melissa Hauschild-Mork and technician Heather Acomb. Choreographers, including Evans, presented their work as part of the Desert Dance Festival, which ran at the same time as the conference. The workshop and conference offered two tracks: one focused on pre-professional dancers (BEDI) and one for instructors (BETI). As an NMSU graduate student, I attended the BETI classes. The BETI classes included instruction in Evans’ “Etudes,” exercises meant to engage the full-range of the body, step-by-step – a class devoted to LMA/BF taught by the effervescent and energetic Hackney – and in-depth classes in dance science. Each day began with the fundamentals of BETI pedagogy, a system of teaching Evans’ technique and technique in general. Taught by Hauschild-Mork, each lesson was guided by one of Evans’

five principles: embracing change, honoring personal uniqueness, unifying body, mind, and spirit, clarity and cultivating community. Execution of these principles is meant to provide a backdrop for how we approach our students and teaching dance, as well as the big take-away: how we approach life.

Embracing change

Guess what? Nothing is static. Life isn’t like the movie “Groundhog Day” (thank goodness!). But, that means that you need to accept and be prepared for change. Live in this moment. This is today. What are you going to do with what you have today? In the words of Evans, “We cannot erase, but we can replace.”

some kind of synchronicity. Evans says it is a communal event, where dancers are, “moving together for a shared purpose.” How do we build communal relationships and trust? How does it change your self-image when you feel that you are part of a communal group? I barely scratched the surface of the information I learned at this conference. Due to space, I was not able to include some of

the amazing interviews I had with dance pioneers Bill Evans, Peggy Hackney and Kitty Daniels, but I want to thank them for their generosity and time. I hope that I was able to share with you – dancers and non-dancers alike – something valuable for your daily lives.

Honoring personal uniqueness

You do not have the same body or same abilities as the person next to you. You have a lived experience that is totally different from everyone else around you. It’s not productive to compare yourself with any one else and get bummed-out by these comparisons. What is it about you that you can share with others?

Renowned choreographer and teacher Bill Evans came down to NMSU to lead workshops and present his work during the Desert Dance Festival in July. Photo by Jennifer Burton

Unifying body, mind and spirit

Everything in your life is interconnected. The way that you feel on the inside can determine how you feel on the outside, or the other way around. Do you feel disconnected right now, like those three ingredients are separate of each other? How can you integrate the three? How can you use that knowledge?

D O W N T O W N A R T & FA R M E R S M A R K E T P R E S E N T S : 1st & 3rd Saturday

Clarity

Be clear. Be specific. What is your intention? In the words of Daniels, “Intention and purpose are different.” Intention is what you’re trying to do, and purpose is where you’re trying to go. The unifying concept is “how”.

Cultivating community

You are not alone on an island. In the context of a technique class, even if you are doing an exercise “alone” you are doing it with a large group of people, in

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KAPPY’S CORNER By Steve Kaplowitz / Comment: @whatsupweekly

This past weekend marked the return of former El Paso Chihuahuas fan favorite Cody Decker to Southwest University Park. The man who had a Chihuahuas bobblehead issued in his likeness last season is now a member of the Las Vegas 51s, the Triple-A affiliate of the New York Mets. The 51s were in town for a fourgame series against the Chihuahuas. Decker knew that timing is everything and he released his newest video on his Antihero YouTube channel last Friday. It spoofed the last two years of his professional baseball career as well as the popular 1980s hit NBC show T h e A-Team. Decker’s parody version is fittingly titled The 4A Team, referring to a player who is good enough

to play in Triple-A but not necessarily in the big leagues. Truth is, Decker has never had a chance to prove that he belongs in the majors. His lone Major League opportunity came in 2015 when he was called up to the Padres after the Chihuahuas playoff run ended. He received a total of 11 at-bats and 12 plate appearances in eight games, and Decker had not registered a big league hit. He does have an RBI to his credit from a sacrifice fly. The 4A Team features Decker at his best, spoofing George Peppard and also bringing back his Brad Ausmus cutout as well as the larger than life Mensch mascot that he made popular during Israel’s run in the World Baseball Classic. Those two also appeared in another short video that he released last week. He did keep Mr. T in his original role. As for his fourgame series with the Chihua-

huas, Decker did not disappoint at the plate. He started every game at first base and finished the series with six hits, including a home run and a pair of doubles. The Chihuahuas series is the first time since he was called back up that Decker has been playing every day at Triple-A. If he can continue to hit like he has at Southwest University Park, there is a chance that Decker could return to the big leagues next month when the PCL regular season ends and MLB teams expand their rosters. Good luck to one of the best people in professional baseball. The El Paso Coyotes are preparing for their second season in Major Arena Soccer League (MASL) and the team is already excited about all of the changes that they are making to their roster. Players like defensive midfielder Christian Gutierrez and defenseman Manuel Rojo, both from Tijuana, Mexico are new to the roster for 2017-18. Gutierrez was a key player for the

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Mexican National Team, one of the top 3 scorers of the previous MASL season, and he scored 51 goals in 20 games, becoming the top Mexican scorer in history. Meanwhile, the 20-year old Rojo was named MASL rookie of the year in his first professional season. They also added veteran goalkeeper Jesus Molina, who was MVP of the MASL playoffs last season and he brings over 20 years of experience to the net for the Coyotes. “I am very excited about this season,” team president and co-owner Gil Cantu said. “This year, we are growing and are making changes that will only make us better. We are all very excited about the future.” The Coyotes’ first home game is set for Saturday, Oct. 28. The team also will be offering a new Coyote Club Card season pass for $149, offering fans prime seating, a jersey, and other exclusive opportunities. For more information, call 915-400-7585 or visit ElPasoCoyotes.com.

Photo provided by Pablo Saavedra


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CALENDAR

CALENDAR AUGUST 16-23, 2017

AUGUST 2017

S a t u r d a y, A u g . 1 9 , 8 p.m.

Classical Mystery Tour revives Beatles classics with live symphony By Victoria Guadalupe Molinar / comment: @whatsupweekly

While generations of Beatles fans can’t say they’ve seen the Fab Four in the flesh, this Saturday, Aug. 19, will give them a chance to enjoy their hits to the backdrop of a live symphony orchestra at the Plaza Theatre. Dubbed the Classical Mystery Tour, the concert is a collaboration between the El Paso Symphony Orchestra and four musicians who sound and look like members of The Beatles. Audience members will have the chance to hear songs like “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” with a live horns section and “Eleanor Rigby” with strings. The show was founded by Jim Owen, who was introduced to classical music as a kid. Growing up in Huntington Beach, California, he began to play the piano at age 6 and started performing Beatles songs 10 years later. By age 18, he toured in the Beatlemania show internationally, portraying “the quiet Beatle,” George Harrison. “As a tribute band, we could do very limited songs; The Beatles had so many songs with orchestration,” said Owen, who now plays John Lennon. By the mid-’90s Owen had a grand idea. “Finally, it occurred to me; why don’t we just do this with a real orchestra?” Owen said. Thus, The Classical Mystery Tour premiered at what’s now called Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Orange County in 1996. LA composer Martin Herman

WED. AUG. 16 Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Lost in Paris (Paris Pieds Nus)’ While searching Paris for her 93-year-old missing aunt, a librarian meets a tramp. Event runs Aug. 11-17, 7:30 p.m. Additional screenings: 1:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m.- $7, $6 matinee/ senior/military/student, $5 Wed., mesillavalleyfilm.org. Vivamos Mexico Mexican independence day celebration with music and presentation of “Alcaranes Musical.” Chamizal National Memorial, 800 S. San Marcial St., 4:30-9:30 p.m., free, eventbrite.com. State Line Music Series: Fungi Mungle Disco covers music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, CountyLine.com/StateLineMusic. html. ‘77 Minutes’ In 1984, a man walks into a McDonalds in San Diego and shoots forty people, killing 21 in the worst mass shooting in USA history at the time. Explores the tragedy and why it took police 77 minutes to take down the shooter. Filmmaker Charlie Minn will answer questions on opening weekend. Event runs Aug. 11-18 at 1,3,5 and 7 p.m. Montwood Movies 7, 2200 N. Yarbrough Dr. 77minutesfilm.com.

El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Albuquerque Isotopes. Event runs Aug. 15-18. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/ epchihuahuas.

THURS. AUG. 17 Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Lost in Paris (Paris Pieds Nus)’ While searching Paris for her 93-year-old missing aunt, a librarian meets a tramp. For details see Wed., Aug. 16. Demonhammer Metal music with openers Obeisance and Terrorist. Age 18+ 501 Bar & Bistro, 501 Texas Ave., 8 p.m., $5, 915-351-6023. Rifftrax: ‘Doctor Who: The Five Doctors’ Stars of “Mystery Science Theater 3000,” Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett riff on the 1983 Doctor Who film “The Five Doctors.” Screens Aug. 17 and 24 at Tinseltown, Cinemark Montana and Cielo Vista Mall. 7 p.m., FathomEvents.com. ‘77 Minutes’ In 1984, a man walks into a McDonalds in San Diego and shoots forty people, killing 21 in the worst mass shooting in USA history at the time. Explores the tragedy and why it took police 77 minutes to take down the shooter. Filmmaker Charlie Minn will answer questions on opening weekend. For details see Wed., Aug. 16.

transcribed the musical scores from the Beatles recordings note for note. “Our first show, I’ll never forget,” Owen said. “All of us in the group were looking at each other and thinking how great it sounded to play with a live symphony orchestra, and all these songs that we heard for decades on the records, but never heard live.” For El Paso’s show, songwriter-filmmaker Tyson Kelly will play Lennon. A frontman for the LA band King Washington, Kelly also happens to be the son of songwriting Hall of Famer Tom Kelly. He joined The Beatles tribute after garnering attention for his Lennon impersonations. The group will also perform some equally cherished solo work, such as Paul McCartney’s “Maybe I’m Amazed” and Lennon’s “Imagine.” Czech conductor and EPSO music director Bohuslav Rattay has something to say to diehard Beatles fans who prefer keeping their Beatles fix to the recordings rather than a tribute show. “Sure they can do that, but that’s a lifeless experience,” Rattay said. “In a live performance, you actually feel the energy that’s actually going on between the audience and the musicians. I think that’s what people can really appreciate and experience.” El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Albuquerque Isotopes. For details see Wed., Aug. 16.

FRI. AUG. 18 ‘The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)’ A run through the Bard’s classics with elements of slapstick, hip-hop and side-splitting antics. Runs until Sunday, Aug. 20. Glasbox, 210 Poplar, 7:30 p.m., $10 adults, $8 full-time students, senior citizens & active military, 65+, shakespeareontherocks.com, 915474-4275. Alfresco Fridays: Twisted Hams Weekly outdoor concert series. This week is classic rock covers. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 6 p.m., free, alfrescofridays.com. ‘A Celebration of Madonna’ VJ Joe Dorgan plays some records. Cake and giveaways, too. Age 21+ Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 9 p.m., free, trickyfalls.com. ‘Headset: A View from the Light Booth’ Comedy about a theater light booth (i.e. control room) when a play goes wrong. Event runs Aug. 18-Sept. 3, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., 7 p.m. on Aug. 31. Blackbox Theatre, 430 N. Main St., 8 p.m., $15, $12 student/senior, $10 Thurs., 575-5231223, no-strings.org. Bixel Boys EDM music. Age 21+ Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango St., 9 p.m., free w/RSVP, $10 gen admish, eventbrite.com.

‘Noises Off’ Comic play about a group of actors performing “Nothing’s On.” Event runs Aug. 11-27, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Las Cruces Community Theater, 313 N. Main St., 8 p.m., $15 adult, $12 student/ senior/military, $11 groups of 10+, $10 ages under 12, 575-532-1200, lcctnm.org. Movies in the Canyon: ‘Pete’s Dragon’ Weekly Summer movie series. Films run Fri. and Sat. from Aug. 18-Sept. 30. Tonight is the liveaction adaptation of the 1977 Disney musical about an orphan boy who makes friends with a dragon. El Paso Live weather hotline: 915-534-0674 McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8:15 p.m., free, 915-534-0600, moviesinthecanyon.com. New Era Wrestling Luchadore-style wrestling. Main event is N.E.W. Light Heavyweight Championship match between Bones and Dastan, an all out slobberknocker. Food trucks shall be sling-slinging the grub, too.Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the bell rings at 8 p.m. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 8:30 p.m., $10 adult, $5 kids, 915-356-5113, facebook. com/neweraep. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Albuquerque Isotopes. For details see Wed., Aug. 16., 915533-BASE. Paint & Pour Social painting class with a twist of hooch. This month’s theme is watercolor rose. Age 21+ Mickelsen Community Library, 2 Sheridan Rd., 6-8 p.m., $20 (includes supplies and a glass of wine), 915-568-1902.

Photo provided by El Paso Symphony Orchestra

WHAT’S UP

Classical Mystery Tour feat. El Paso Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m. Plaza Theatre, 125 Pioneer Plaza $30-$75 plus fees Tickets: Plaza Theatre Box Office, all Ticketmaster outlets, TicketMaster.com or 800-745-3000 More info at ElPasoLive.com or 915-532-3776 Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. Event runs Aug. 18-24, 7:30 p.m. Additional screenings: 1:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m., $7, $6 matinee/senior/military/ student, $5 Wed., mesillavalleyfilm. org. Our Lady of the Valley Bazaar Activities and jams and border eats. Our Lady of the Light Catholic Church, 4500 Delta, 5 p.m.-12 a.m., 915-383-8683. ‘77 Minutes’ In 1984, a man walks into a McDonalds in San Diego and shoots forty people, killing 21 in the worst mass shooting in USA history at the time. Explores the tragedy and why it took police 77 minutes to take down the shooter. Filmmaker Charlie Minn will answer questions on opening weekend. For details, see Wed., Aug. 16. Double Clutchers Rockabilly music performance. The Original American Steakhouse, 7600 Alabama St., 8-11 p.m., free. Movie Screening: ‘Field of Dreams’ Music, food trucks, dance groups and the film about a dude who listens to a ghost and builds a baseball field. El Paso County Sportspark, 1780 N. Zaragoza Rd., 6:30 p.m.-10 p.m., free, 915-764-3580, facebook.com/ parksaftersunset.

SAT. AUG. 19 The 40th Anniversary of Elvis Presley’s passing Music performance/ celebration. Special Edition, 3333 N Yarbrough Dr. #D, 12 a.m.-11:59 p.m., free, 915-595-0558. ‘The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)’ A run through the Bard’s classics with elements of slapstick, hip-hop and side-splitting antics. For details, see Fri., Aug. 18 entry. Crafts for Kids: Look to the Stars An eclipse celebration and preparation. Crafts are free, museum admission ain’t. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 10 a.m.-1 p.m., free-$5. Vista College Car Show Various motorchariots on display. Music, food, drinks, and kids’ activities. Vista College, 610 Montana Ave., 10 a.m-3:30 PM, free spectators, 915-208-2293. ‘Headset: A View from the Light Booth’ Comedy about a theater light booth (i.e. control room) when a play goes wrong. For details see Fri., Aug. 18., 575-523-1223. Classic Mystery Tour: A Tribute to The Beatles World famous Beatles tribute band shake, shake, shakes with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra. Plaza Theater, 125 Pioneer Plaza, 8 p.m., $30-$75, 915-532-3776, ElPasoLive. org. ‘Noises Off’ Comic play about a group of actors performing “Nothing’s On.” For details see Fri., Aug. 18., 575-532-1200.


CALENDAR AUGUST 16-23, 2017 Victorian Sci-Fi Book & Tea Club Discuss science fiction from the 1800s whilst stuffing the gullet full of pastry. August’s book is “The Poison Belt” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Find the book on their Facebook page. Costumes encouraged. Magoffin Home State Historic Site, 1120 Magoffin Ave., 2-3 p.m, $5, 915-533-5147, visitmagoffinhome.com. John Wesley Hardin’s Demise Reenactment of the death of Hardin. Lil’ ghost tour, too. Old West costumes encouraged. Concordia Cemetery, 3700 Yandell Dr., 6 p.m., $5, $2 military/student/senior, free ages 11 and under, concordiacemetery.org. SalsaFest 2017 Salsa dancing. Salsa music by Team Havana and Azucar. Food trucks. Vendors. Beer Garden. Plaza de Las Cruces, 100 N. Main St., 7 p.m., 575-525-1955, facebook. com/SalsafestLasCruces. SXN Showcase: Great Dane Outdoor concert with DJ headliner. Openers: Frythm, Aaron Brockovich, Amy G. Dala, Mvnners, Ledezma, Glass Mask, ouitches and Low Doses. Age 18+ Prickly Elder, 916 N. Mesa St., 8 p.m. Sunset Film Society: ‘The Incredibles’ Computer-animated flick about a family of superheroes in a world of outlawed superheroes. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 2 p.m., free, sunsetfilmsociety.org. Lecture: ‘Borderland Chinese: Their Arrival, Contributions and Heritage in the El Paso Region’ Anthropologist Anna Fahy talks about what originally brought the Chinese to the El Paso region. El Paso Archaeological Society, 4301 Transmountain Rd., 2 p.m., free, epas.com. Mayhem Toyz and Comics Three Year Anniversary Cupcakes. Candy bags for ages 12 and under. Comic book and toy raffles. Artwork for sale by SirDigital Madrid. Special guest: local comic artist Jacob Marmolejo, Mayhem Toyz and Comics, 2200 N. Lee Trevino Dr., Ste. B3B, 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m., free. Movies in the Canyon: ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ Weekly Summer movie series. Films run Fri. and Sat. from Aug. 18-Sept. 30. Set seventy years before the return of He-Who-MustNot-Be-Named, British wizard Newt Scamander stops in New York City on his way to Arizona. It’s good under the hood, but then magic creatures held inside his suitcase escape, which isn’t a euphemism. El Paso Live weather hotline: 915-534-0674. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8:15 p.m., free, 915-534-0600, moviesinthecanyon.com. The Film Salon: ‘Summer of Seijun’ Series Tonight’s flick is “Branded to Kill,” directed by Seijun Suzuki. An assassin botches a job and becomes a target. Sniff this rice, buddy. Alamo Drafthouse, 250 E. Montecillo Blvd., 7 p.m.-, $3, filmsalon.org. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. For details see Fri., Aug. 18.

El Paso Psychic Fair Aura Photos, handmade New Age crystal & gemstone jewelry, Feng Shui products, and readings by 12 or more professional psychic readers and mediums from across Texas and New Mexico. Readings offered in English and Spanish. Event runs Aug. 19-20, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Hawthorn Inn , 1700 Airway Blvd., 11 a.m.-7 p.m., $5, free active duty military, 915-345-6245, ElPasoPsychicFair.com. Acid Pie Album Release Party Local rock trio celebrates their third album “Watergun.” The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9-11:59 p.m., $5 21+, $8 18+, 915-346-4649, , facebook.com/ acidpieband. Q-Rotica Ball 2017 Stripping. Kissing contest with Buzz Adams. Professional dominatrix, hook suspension and aerial bondage demo. Special guest is pornstar Richelle Ryan. Red Parrot, 14401 Gateway Blvd. West, 8 p.m., $20-$500, eventbrite.com. Touch-A-Truck Trucks and large vehicles for getting into or on or played around. A day for the kids. Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, 1 Ardovino Dr., 7:30 a.m.-12 p.m., free, ardovinos.com.

SUN. AUG. 20 ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’ Banked track roller derby double header. Las Diablas vs. Chuco Town Chulas. Las Catrinas vs Sexecutioners. Halftime music by Los Chucanos. Real tickets at The Pershing Inn, Golden Goose, Zombie Skate Shop and Label Exchange. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 5-9 p.m., $7 adv., $10 door, $7 military, free ages under 10, suncityrollergirls.com. ‘The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)’ A run through the Bard’s classics with elements of slapstick, hip-hop and side-splitting antics. For details, see Fri., Aug. 18 entry. ‘Headset: A View from the Light Booth’ Comedy about a theater light booth (i.e. control room) when a play goes wrong. For details see Fri., Aug. 18. UTEP Soccer The Miners excavate Abilene Christian Women’s Soccer. University Field, Sun Bowl Dr. and Glory Rd., 1 p.m., $5, $3 age 3-12, 915747-6150, utepathletics.com. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. For details see Fri., Aug. 18.

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM Sunset Film Society: ‘The Godfather II’ After a failed assassination of his father, Michael Corleone gets involved with his father’s business. What’s the secret to that sauce? Blood. Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, 1 Ardovino Dr., 4 p.m., $34 (includes Italian buffet), sunsetfilmsociety.org.

MON. AUG. 21 Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. For details see Fri., Aug. 18. Marduk Black metal music performance. Openers: Incantation, Abysmal Dawn, Beyond Terror, Genocide ov Bucon, Coexisted. Doors at 6 p.m. Find real tickets at 7th Layer, All That Music, and Eloise. Online at ticketfly.com. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 6:30 p.m., $20 adv., $25 door.

TUES. AUG. 22 Board Game Night Board and tabletop games. Bring your own. There are board games onsite, too. Game Vault, 9828 Montana Ave., 6-10 p.m., gamevaultelpaso.com. Greg Howe Guitarist performs with his trio Stu Hamm and Gianluca Palmieri. Openers are Bernie Mora and Tangent. All ages. Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7 p.m., $20. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. For details see Fri., Aug. 18. Citizenship Classes Information to pass the United States citizen test. All El Paso Libraries, 5 p.m., free, 915212-READ, elpasolibrary.org.

WED. AUG. 23 State Line Music Series: Bri Bagwell Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, countyline.com/StateLineMusic. html. Meditation on Twin Hearts Cost: free Meditation to open the heart and crown chakra. Boom, chakra, chakra.

Unity Church, 1420 Alabama St., United States of America, 7 p.m., facebook.com/lightelpaso. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘My Cousin Rachel’ A remake of a 1952 movie based on a British novel by Daphne du Maurier. A young Englishman’s cousin dies and he thinks his cousin’s wife killed him, but after he meets her, he starts to fall for her. For details see Fri., Aug. 18. Mr. Showtime – David Scott Standup comedy. Event runs Aug. 9-13, 7:30 p.m., additional late shows Fri.-Sat. at 9:30 p.m. Ages 17+ El Paso Comic Strip, 1201 Airway Blvd., 7:30 p.m., $6-$12, 915-779-5233, laff2nite.com.

EXHIBITS Mesilla Valley Fine Arts August Exhibit Dual exhibit. Photographs by Bob Zolto. Paintings by Frank Peacock. Mesilla Valley Fine Arts Gallery, 2470-A Calle de Guadalupe, 10 a.m.-5p.m., 575-522-2933, mesillavalleyfinearts.com. Ends 8/16/17. The Red That Colored the World This art exhibit explores the use of the cochineal bug, used to create a red pigment, throughout history and places and art styles. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 12-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300,. elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 8/20/17. ‘Nature’ The New Mexico Watercolor Society’s Southern Chapter’s new exhibit. Southwest Environmental Center’s Cottonwood Gallery, 275 N. Main St., 9 a.m.-6 p.m., free, 575522-5552, Ends 8/31/17. ‘The Life of J’ New paintings from local Jorge Alfonso Polanco Aguirre. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-543-6747, internationalmuseumofart.net. Ends 8/31/17. Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo: Una sonrisa a mitad del camino Photograph exhibition that displays an extensive part of the daily life of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera through the lens of Guillermo Kahlo, Peter Jules, Guillermo Zamora, Nickolas Murray, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo and Juan Guzman among others. Chamizal National Memorial , 800 S. San Marcial St, 6:30-8:30 p.m., free, 915-533-4082, facebook. com/consulmexepa. Ends 9/7/17. An American Animator, Don Bluth Celebration of the 10th annual Plaza

13 Classic Film Festival. An El Paso native animator known for “Anastasia” and “All Dogs Go To Heaven.” Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 9 a.m.-9p.m., free, 915-212-0300, elpasomuseumofart. org. Ends 9/7/17. ‘American Plains Artists’ The 32nd annual juried exhibit and sale features 104 two-and three-dimensional realistic and representational artworks in traditional media that depicts the American Great Plains region. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 12-5 p.m, nmfarmandranchmuseum.org. Ends 11/5/17. Fauna & Flora of New Mexico 32 photographs of a variety of birds in their natural habitat. Pictures are by the Las Cruces photographer Nirmal Khandan. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 12-5 p.m., $2-$5, 575-522-4100, nmfarmandranchmuseum.org. Ends 12/3/17. Suzi Davidoff: Simplified World Explores human-wrought changes in the ecosystem. Drawings on found maps and globes with accompanying hand-drawn animation. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-747-6151, rubin.utep.edu. Ends 12/15/17.

MUSEUMS El Paso Museum of Art Permanent collections, special exhibits, art classes, film series, lectures, concerts, storytelling sessions and educational programs. 1 Arts Festival Plz, Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m-5 p.m.; Thur., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun., 12 p.m.-5 p.m, free, 915-532-1707 or elpasoartmuseum.org. Dream Chasers Club Local art exhibits. 200 S. Santa Fe St., 915-342-6357 or DCCDreamChasersClub.com. El Paso Museum of History The past displayed in permanent and temporary exhibitions. 510 N. Santa Fe Street, Tues-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 12-5 p.m., Thurs. 9 a.m.-9 p.m, closed Mondays and holidays, 915-351-3588, or www.elpasotexas.gov/history. Al Borrego Studio & Gallery Original works, prints and gifts by Al Borrego. 1501C Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915-851-0093, www. alborrego.com.

Bert Saldana Art Gallery Original Southwestern oil paintings and prints by Bert Saldana. 1501 Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915479-2926, bert_saldana@yahoo.com or www.bertsaldanafineart.com. Branigan Cultural Center Permanent local history exhibit and changing cultural exhibits, as well as educational programs, classes, and other special events. 501 N. Main St., Las Cruces, NM, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., 575-541-2154 or lascruces.org/museums. Centennial Museum Focusing on the natural history and the indigenous, colonial, pre-urban and folk cultures of the border regions of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico. University at Wiggins, UTEP, Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.4:30 p.m., free, 915-747-5565 or museum@utep.edu. Centro Municipal de las Artes Museum offers poetry readings, art exhibitions, dance performances and art classes. 16 de Septiembre, Mariscal 105, Cd. Juarez, MX, free, every Sunday 11 a.m.-1 p.m., for more info (01152656) 617-2828. Crossland Gallery & Art Junction Home of the El Paso Art Association. 500 W. Paisano, Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free, 915534-7377 or elpasoartassociation. com. El Paso Holocaust Museum and Study Center The museum was established to help educate the public about the Nazi Holocaust during WWII. 715 N. Oregon, Tues.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. and Sun. 1-5 p.m., and by appointment, 915-351-0048. El Paso Museum of Archaeology Dioramas and displays of ancient times. 4301 Transmountain Rd, Tue.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun. and Mon., 915-755-4332. McCall Neighborhood Center Contains a museum, gift shop and photographic collection on local and national Black History, and archives. 3231 E. Wyoming, Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.3 p.m., weekends by appointment, free, all ages, 915-566-2407. Maria Branch Gallery Original oil paintings and art lessons. 500 W. Paisano Dr., 915-525-2731 or www. mariabranch.com.

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KISS-FM ‘Summer of Love’ Brunch Series Wine, brunch and a movie screening. Today’s movie: “Steel Magnolias.” Alamo Drafthouse, 250 E. Montecillo Blvd., 11:00 a.m., drafthouse.com. ‘Noises Off’ Comic play about a group of actors performing “Nothing’s On.” For details see Fri., Aug. 18., 575-532-1200. 12th Annual Tour de Tolerance 100K and 50K bike ride. 5K run, too. Discount on registration before Aug. 12. Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino, 1200 Futurity Dr., 7:45 a.m., $15-$40 .elpasoholocaustmuseum.org.

By Gustavo Arellano comment: @whatsupweekly


14

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AUGUST 16-23, 2017

Q-ROTICA SHINES A SEX-POSITIVE LIGHT ON KINK COMMUNITY By Denise Nelson-Prieto comment: @whatsupweekly

This Saturday, Aug. 19 will mark the return of El Paso’s hottest adult party, Q-Rotica, the city’s premiere erotic fetish ball that heats up The Red Parrot. The evening will be a sizzling showcase of some of the kink community’s talented visionaries, including a professional dominatrix, bondage expert, singing group and bondage aerialist. “We’re providing the stage entertainment that surpasses the vanilla crowd,” said Sabine Green, creative director at Nequim Studio. “We’ve spent the last four years creating a safe space through Nequim studios for all kinds of counter culture groups – the BDSM and kink community, the LGBTQ community – so this event is a natural part of that.” (For those who are little green to the kink lexicon, BDSM stands for bondage, discipline, dominance and submission/sadomasochism.) Saturday’s demonstrations and shows are meant to give a glimpse into the world of BDSM and kink, advocating for people who are not only already in the lifestyle, but for those who are simply curious and looking for more items to add to their naughty menu. “I think – and I could be wrong – we’re the only ones in El Paso who have pushed adult sex education in a safe environment

and because of that, and through the workshops and classes we’ve given here, we’ve created a huge network that has given us access to a lot of people who would normally not come out of the closet,” said owner and principal photographer of Nequim, Frank Villasana. “Because they trust us and have grown to respect us, they’re willing to collaborate and do an event like this.” Q-Rotica is also a pre-cursor to Taboo II, Nequim’s birthday celebration on Nov. 4th, which will feature BDSM, fetish and kink performers. For Darius Belcher, owner of The Red Parrot, hosting Q-Rotica is a no-brainer, and part of his vision of bringing the hottest adult entertainment to the city. “What we can offer for this event is stability and reputation,” he said. “The Red Parrot has been around for 23 years and we’re ranked as one of the country’s top clubs.” Belcher is not only providing the space for the event, but some of his dancers, any of whom he said he’d “stack against any club in the country.” The evening’s featured dancer will be adult film star Richelle Ryan, who once held the title “Adult Movie Feature Entertainer of the Year.” The evening’s lineup also includes a professional Dominatrix show featuring Mistress Ruby and her submissive, John Crowe. She’s been spanking, whipping and

humiliating for seven years and specializes rounding off what’s sure to be a night that in all manners of fetish, training and dom- will leave attendees salaciously inspired. ination. “My show will reflect the dynamic of what happens behind closed doors,” she said of her show. The R&B/soul ensemble Somethin 4 The Fellas, bills itself as a “movement for Bondage aerialists liberated women.” The quintet of luswill perform gravity-defying cious ladies will thrill the crowd with feats while suspended from their tantalizing elegance, class and silk straps and the lyra, an aerial ring, during Q-Rotica. talent. Photo courtesy of Nequim Pinup DK Lthrmn has more than 20 and Boudoir Photography years of experience in Shibari, the ancient Japanese art of knot tying. He will be on-hand all night giving demonstrations to the bold, adventurous and curious. Bondage aerialist Karolyn Nevarez and some of her crew will perform titillating, gravity-defying feats while suspended from silk straps and the lyra, an aerial ring. Q-Rotica will also feature an Exploratorium, a designated area in the back of the club that is a veritable garden of earthly delights featuring Hell Paso authentic custom bondage gear, Adult Video Warehouse, WHAT’S UP and a photo booth. All of the Taboo performers will be available for photos in the Q-Rotica Presented by KLAQ, The Red Parrot and Exploratorium. Nequim Pinup and Boudoir Photography Studio KLAQ’s Buzz Adams will host different Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.—2 a.m. stimulating events like a kissing contest and The Red Parrot, 14401 Gateway West the Price Is Right to tease the audience – $20-$500, Tickets at EventBrite.com

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